WorldWideScience

Sample records for bio energy aeolian

  1. Study of potentials bio energy, aeolian, miniature hydraulic and solar in Mexico (Annexe 9 in 'A vision of year 2030 on the use of the renewable energies in Mexico'); Estudio de los potenciales bioenergetico, eolico, minihidraulico y solar en Mexico (Anexo 9 en 'Una vision al 2030 de la utilizacion de las energias renovables en Mexico')

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldana Flores, Ricardo; Miranda Miranda, Ubaldo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-08-15

    In this report we can observe maps and studies made about the evaluation of the bio energy potential of co-generation of electricity in the sugar industry and the sweepings, of the wind power potential in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Mexican Republic, of the miniature hydraulic potential and the hydro energy resources whereupon it counts country and, of the solar potential in which the OLADE presents/displays for Mexico the monthly maps of solar radiation maximum direct total and in Wm{sup 2}. [Spanish] En este reporte podemos observar mapas y estudios realizados acerca de la evaluacion del potencial bioenergetico de cogeneracion de electricidad en la industria azucarera y la basura, del potencial eoloenergetico en America Latina, el Caribe y la Republica Mexicana, del potencial minihidraulico y los recursos hidroenergeticos con que cuenta el pais y, del potencial solar en el cual la OLADE presenta para Mexico los mapas mensuales de radiacion solar maxima total y directa en W/m{sup 2}.

  2. The Influence of Political Decisions upon the Evolution of Renewable Energy in Romania. Case Study: Aeolian Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASILE POPA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted the fact that the foreseeable effects of the climate changes will have a major impact on the environment, and the human activities, especially fossil fuel combustion, represents the main cause of global warming. Both climate changes and the raise of the world consumption of energy and the perspective of diminishing the mineral energy resources turn the renewable energy into the main viable alternative. Between the renewable resources, the wind (Aeolian energy has a great potential. In this context, in the last few decades, as a result of the political support towards the renewable energy, the global production of wind energy has met considerable development. In Romania, the insertion of the promotion of electric energy produced by the renewable energy sources system has gathered plenty investments, leading to spectacular risings. The evolution in this domain has though been mostly influenced by the governmental policies. The repetitive changes of legislation led to an uncertain future for the Aeolian energy in Romania, on short term to say the least.

  3. The using of aeolian energy in air circulators; A utilizacao da energia eolica em circuladores de ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao Filho, Telesforo Reis de

    2003-07-01

    The present work is a theoretical research on how to take advantage of the wind kinetic energy using a rotor type Savonius, doing the conversion in mechanical energy, through the fan utilization aiming a thermal comfort and beginning with an introduction on the aeolian energy, its utilization and objectives. Several local types and behavior influenced by the air mass mechanics are shown. A statistic of these air masses and a brief study of the aeolian turbines, its characteristics and design, advantages and disadvantages are presented. An experimental analysis in Sao Luis region were done, using the wind frequency with the objective of obtaining a good revenue. The characterization of the main types of rotors used nowadays are presented, too. (author)

  4. SETIS Magazine: BioEnergy

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, David

    2014-01-01

    The SETIS magazine aims at delivering timely information and analysis on the state of play of energy technologies, related research and innovation efforts in support of the implementation of the European Strategic Energy Technology Plan. The editorial for the Bioenergy issue is provided by European Biomass Association President Gustav Melin. This issue also hosts interviews by: Juan Carrasco - European Energy Research Alliance (EERA) Bioenergy Joint Programme Coordinator Christia...

  5. Bioenergy Status Document 2012; Statusdocument Bio-energie 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, M.; Schepers, B.; Van Grinsven, A.; Bergsma, G.; Croezen, H. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    In addition to a review and characterisation of the current situation, the report contains an update on government policies on bio-energy and a review of the sources and sustainability of the biomass used in the Netherlands [Dutch] Het statusdocument bio-energie 2012 geeft de huidige status weer van bio-energie in Nederland, inclusief trends en verwachtingen voor de toekomst. Het doel van dit document is inzicht verstrekken in de ontwikkelingen van bio-energie, voor overheden en marktpartijen.

  6. Bio-energy. Innovators talking; Bio-energie. Innovators aan het woord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Qualitative studies have been conducted of the results of completed projects focused on energy innovation, spread over the seven themes of the top sector Energy: Energy saving in industry, Energy conservation in the built environment, Gas, Bio-energy, Smart grids, Offshore Wind, Solar PV. This provides insight into the follow-up activities and lessons of some EOS (Energy Research Subsidy) completed projects with the aim to inspire, connect and strengthen the TKIs (Topconsortia for Knowledge and Innovation) and individual companies and researchers working on energy innovation. This report concerns the research on bio-energy [Dutch] Er is een kwalitatief onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de resultaten van afgeronde projecten gericht op energie-innovatie, verdeeld over de zeven thema's van de topsector Energie: Energiebesparing in de industrie; Energiebesparing in de gebouwde omgeving; Gas; Bio-energie; Smart grids; Wind op zee; Zon-pv. Daarmee wordt inzicht gegeven in de vervolgactiviteiten en lessen van een aantal afgesloten EOS-projecten (Energie Onderzoek Subsidie) met het oog op het inspireren, verbinden en versterken van de TKI's (Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie) en individuele bedrijven en onderzoekers die werken aan energie-innovatie. Dit rapport betreft het onderzoek naar bio-energie.

  7. Bio energy in Norway; Bioenergi i Noreg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamnaberg, Haavard; Sidelnikova, Maria

    2011-07-01

    The main conclusion in this report is that it is possible to make available about 14 TWh bio energy in Norway than what is used today to a charge that is located less than ca. 30 oere / kWh. Almost all this potential come from the forest and requires an increase in output up to the net sustained yield. Further 5 TWh may be available in the form of biogas at a cost that is both higher and have greater uncertainty than the fixed bio energy. It is set up a cost curve based on this work, which is quoted here. This reflects only the technical costs, and does not regard wages, commissions, taxes or fees. The value of alternative uses of biomass are not considered. The cost curve must therefore not be mixed with a supply curve. (eb)

  8. Bio-energy status document 2012; Statusdocument bio-energie 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, M.; Schepers, B.L.; Van Grinsven, A.H.; Bergsma, G.C.; Croezen, H.C.

    2013-05-15

    In 2012 bio-energy contributed over 71 PJ to the Dutch energy supply, a rise of almost 2 PJ over 2011. This means that 75% of the renewable energy consumed in the Netherlands is now derived from biomass. The growth is due mainly to the increase in the mandatory biotransport fuel percentage from 4.25% to 4.5%. The use of energy from 'other biomass combustion' (incl. paper sludge, green waste and chicken excrement) recovered to the level of 2010, following a marked drop in 2011 due to plant maintenance, termination of the MEP ('Environmental Quality of Power Generation') subsidy scheme and high biomass prices. At large power stations there was a considerable decrease in co-incineration of biomass because of incidents (a fire at the Nijmegen coal-fired plant) and a maintenance backlog (at the Amer power station). These are some of the results reported in the 'Bio-energy status document 2012', prepared by CE Delft for NL Agency. In addition to a review and characterisation of the current situation, the report contains an update on government policies on bio-energy and a review of the sources and sustainability of the biomass used in the Netherlands [Dutch] De bijdrage van bio-energie aan de Nederlandse energievoorziening bedroeg in 2012 ruim 71 PJ, een stijging van bijna 2 PJ ten opzichte van 2011. Daarmee is 75% van het verbruik van hernieuwbare energie in Nederland afkomstig van bio-energie. De stijging wordt vooral veroorzaakt door de oplopende bijmengplicht van biotransportbrandstoffen van 4,25% naar 4,5%. Verbruik van energie uit 'overige biomassaverbranding' (o.a. papierslib, groenafval en kippenmest) herstelde zicht tot het niveau van 2010, na een forse daling in 2011 door onderhoud aan installaties, afloop van MEP-subsidies en hoge prijzen van biomassa. Het bij- en meestoken van biomassa in grote elektriciteitscentrales daalde juist aanzienlijk door calamiteiten en uitloop van onderhoud (brand kolencentrale bij Nijmegen

  9. Evaluation of bio-energy potential using world energy models; Sekai energy model ni yoru bio energy no potential hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, J.; Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    Bio-energy potential is evaluated using world energy models. The world energy model is a dynamic model by which the total cost of energy systems between 1995 and 2055 can be minimized on the basis of the optimization type world energy demand and supply model. For the given utilization costs of transportation, recovery and planting, the utilization of bio-energy is promoted even under the cost minimization condition. However, the utilization amount varies in a wide range by changing the utilization costs. Among conversion technologies of bio-energy, it is biomass liquefaction that provides the largest utilization amount. Thermal demand, direct combustion for power generation, and biomass gasification follow to the above. Biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) is to be used up to 2020. It is not to be used after 2030, due to the complete shift to the biomass liquefaction. For a model including the utilization of fast breeder after 2030, the utilization amount of bio-energy is not to change. Competition with food and land utilization is to be investigated. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF AEOLIAN ENERGY CONVERSION OPTIMISATION DE LA CONVERSION DE L’ENERGIE EOLIENNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Soufi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of renewable energy increases, because people are increasingly concerned with environmental issues. Among renewable, wind power is now widely used. Their study showed that a value of wind speed, there is a maximum mechanical power supplied by the turbine. So, power is supplied are particularly changes with maximum speed.However, the objective of this paper is to present an algorithm for optimal conversion of wind energy based on a criterion optimization that must maintain specific speed of the turbine at optimum speed which corresponds to the maximum power provided by the steady wind turbine. To this end, the object is to preserve the position of any static operating point on the characteristic of optimal.To validate the model and algorithm for optimal conversion of wind energy, a series of numerical simulations carried out using the software MatLab Simulink will be presented is discussed.

  11. PROGRESS IN QUATERNARY AEOLIAN ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Rui-jie; CHEN Yuan; HASI Eerdun; YUE Xing-ling

    2005-01-01

    Quaternary aeolian environment researches were mainly conducted by analyzing the information carri-ers, extracting valuable evidences about aeolian environment changes, so to presume and reconstruct paleoenviron-ments. This paper formulated progress in Quaternary aeolian environment research using dune-morphological records,sedimentological records and bio-fossils records, as well as advances about chronology; presented that people shouldpay more attention to further synthetic study of multi-types of records including dune morphology, size, formationtime, sediment supply, and their relations with wind regime in future, especially the research on dating method.

  12. BioEnergy Feasibility in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The BioEnergy Atlas for South Africa is the result of a project funded by the South African Department of Science and Technology, and executed by SAEON/ NRF with the assistance of a number of collaborators in academia, research institutions, and government. Now nearing completion, the Atlas provides an important input to policy and decision support in the country, significantly strengthens the availability of information resources on the topic, and provides a platform whereby current and future contributions on the subject can be managed, preserved, and disseminated. Bioenergy assessments have been characterized in the past by poor availability and quality of data, an over-emphasis on potentials and availability studies instead of feasibility assessment, and lack of comprehensive evaluation in competition with alternatives - both in respect of competing bioenergy resources and other renewable and non-renewable options. The BioEnergy Atlas in its current edition addresses some of these deficiencies, and identifies specific areas of interest where future research and effort can be directed. One can qualify the potentials and feasible options for BioEnergy exploitation in South Africa as follows: (1) Availability is not a fixed quantum. Availability of biomass and resulting energy products are sensitive to both the exclusionary measures one applies (food security, environmental, social and economic impacts) and the price at which final products will be competitive. (2) Availability is low. Even without allowing for feasibility and final product costs, the availability of biomass is low: biomass productivity in South Africa is not high by global standards due to rainfall constraints, and most arable land is used productively for food and agribusiness-related activities. This constrains the feasibility of purposely cultivated bioenergy crops. (3) Waste streams are important. There are significant waste streams from domestic solid waste and sewage, some agricultural

  13. Analysis of Norwegian bio energy statistics. Quality improvement proposals; Analyse av norsk bioenergistatistikk. Forslag til kvalitetsheving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This report is an assessment of the current model and presentation form of bio energy statistics. It appears proposed revision and enhancement of both collection and data representation. In the context of market development both in general for energy and particularly for bio energy and government targets, a good bio energy statistics form the basis to follow up the objectives and means.(eb)

  14. Richland Community College BioEnergy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Douglas C. [Richland Community College, Decatur, IL (United States)

    2012-09-25

    The purpose of this project was to focus on education and community outreach. As such, it reflected anticipated growth in the renewable/alternative energy industry creating a vast need for trained industry professionals, engineers, operations managers, and technicians to operate state-of-the art production facilities. This project's scope leveraged Richland's initial entry in the renewable energy education, which included Associate of Applied Science degrees and certificates in biofuels and bioprocessing. This facilitated establishing a more comprehensive sustainability and renewable energy programs including experiential learning laboratory components needed to support new renewable energy education degree and certificate specialties, as well as community outreach. Renewable energy technologies addressed included: a) biodiesel, c) biomass, d) wind, e) geothermal, and f) solar. The objective is to provide increasingly innovative hands on experiential learning and knowledge transfer opportunities.

  15. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  16. Zhongrun,Heading for Advanced Bio-Energy Technology%Zhongrun, Heading for Advanced Bio-Energy Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Huaibei Zhongrun Bio-energy Technology Development Co.,Ltd.is a high-tech Sino-US joint venture,also a participator of the 12th CHITEC.Its majority shareholder is Anhui Huaibei Mining Group and it is co-sponsored by Anhui Guohua Group and US Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.

  17. Bioenergy Status Document 2011; Statusdocument Bio-energie 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, M.; Schepers, B.; Van Grinsven, A.; Bergsma, G.

    2011-03-15

    The Dutch status document on bio-energy has been updated with data for the year 2011. This document provides an overview of the amount of energy derived from biomass, a description of the current bio-energy policy framework and a discussion of the extent to which the Netherlands is on track for securing European renewable energy targets. The status document shows there has been a slight increase in the share of bio-energy in overall energy consumption as well as in the total amount of renewable energy generated (which now stands at a little over 4% of gross final consumption). The question, however, is whether this growth is sufficient to meet the European target of 14% renewables in 2020. The limited growth is due partly to the decrease in the amount of energy generated in the category 'other incineration'. In addition, there was a decline in the physical delivery of transport biofuels because certain types of fuel can be 'double-counted' in the records, although they do not contribute to the 14% target. This document provides an overview of the amount of energy derived from biomass, a description of the current bio-energy policy framework and a discussion of the extent to which the Netherlands is on track for securing European renewable energy targets [Dutch] Het statusdocument bio-energie 2011 geeft de huidige status weer van bioenergie in Nederland, inclusief trends en verwachtingen voor de toekomst. Het doel van dit document is inzicht verstrekken aan overheden en marktpartijen in de ontwikkelingen van bio-energie. De kabinetsdoelstellingen voor hernieuwbare energie zijn conform de doelstellingen uit de richtlijn voor hernieuwbare energie (2009/28/EG), die is vastgesteld door de EC. In 2020 moet 14% van het nationale bruto finaal eindgebruik afkomstig zijn van hernieuwbare bronnen, de Nederlandse overheid schat dat dat overeenkomt met 300 PJ. Naar schatting is in 2011 ongeveer 88 PJ aan hernieuwbare energie geproduceerd, ongeveer evenveel

  18. The Role of Bio-productivity on Bio-energy Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. J. Janssens

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The principal photosynthetic pathways convert solar energy differently depending on the environmental conditions and the plant morphotype. Partitioning of energy storage within crops will vary according to environmental and seasonal conditions as well. Highest energy concentration is found in terpens like latex and, to a lesser extent, in lipids. Ideally, we want plant ingredients with high energy content easily amenable to ready-to-use bio-fuel. Generally, these crops are adapted to drier areas and tend to save on eco-volume space. Competition with food crops could be avoided by fetching energy from cheap agricultural by-products or waste products such as bagasse in the sugar cane. This would in fact mean that reducing power of agricultural residues should be extracted from the biomass through non-photosynthetic processes like animal ingestion or industrial bio-fermentation. Conversion and transformation efficiencies in the production chain are illustrated for some relevant crops in the light of the maximum power theorem.

  19. Energy life cycle assessment of rice straw bio-energy derived from potential gasification technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Ci-Syuan; Shaw, Dai-Gee; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Ma, Hsiao-Kan

    2011-06-01

    To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain and be capable of being produced in large quantities without reducing food supplies. Amounts of agricultural waste are produced and require treatment, with rice straw contributing the greatest source of such potential bio-fuel in Taiwan. Through life-cycle accounting, several energy indicators and four potential gasification technologies (PGT) were evaluated. The input energy steps for the energy life cycle assessment (ELCA) include collection, generator, torrefaction, crushing, briquetting, transportation, energy production, condensation, air pollution control and distribution of biofuels to the point of end use. Every PGT has a positive energy benefit. The input of energy required for the transportation and pre-treatment are major steps in the ELCA. On-site briquetting of refused-derived fuel (RDF) provides an alternative means of reducing transportation energy requirements. Bio-energy sources, such as waste rice straw, provide an ideal material for the bio-fuel plant.

  20. National Bio-fuel Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jezierski, Kelly [NextEnergy Center, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-12-27

    The National Biofuel Energy Laboratory or NBEL was a consortia consisting of non-profits, universities, industry, and OEM’s. NextEnergy Center (NEC) in Detroit, Michigan was the prime with Wayne State University as the primary subcontractor. Other partners included: Art Van Furniture; Biodiesel Industries Inc. (BDI); Bosch; Clean Emission Fluids (CEF); Delphi; Oakland University; U.S. TARDEC (The Army); and later Cummins Bridgeway. The program was awarded to NextEnergy by U.S. DOE-NREL on July 1, 2005. The period of performance was about five (5) years, ending June 30, 2010. This program was executed in two phases: 1.Phase I focused on bench-scale R&D and performance-property-relationships. 2.Phase II expanded those efforts into further engine testing, emissions testing, and on-road fleet testing of biodiesel using additional types of feedstock (i.e., corn, and choice white grease based). NextEnergy – a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Detroit was originally awarded a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy for Phase I of the NBEL program. A few years later, NextEnergy and its partners received an additional $1.9MM in DOE funding to complete Phase II. The NBEL funding was completely exhausted by the program end date of June 30, 2010 and the cost share commitment of 20% minimum has been exceeded nearly two times over. As a result of the work performed by the NBEL consortia, the following successes were realized: 1.Over one hundred publications and presentations have been delivered by the NBEL consortia, including but not limited to: R&D efforts on algae-based biodiesel, novel heterogeneous catalysis, biodiesel properties from a vast array of feedstock blends, cold flow properties, engine testing results (several Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] papers have been published on this research), emissions testing results, and market quality survey results. 2.One new spinoff company (NextCAT) was formed by two WSU Chemical Engineering professors

  1. Market survey Slovakia. Bio-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-01-15

    The study presents an overview of Slovakian bioenergy market, its current state and future prospects in terms of size and potentials. In the opening, the basic structure of Slovakian energy sources is presented from IEA energy statistics, then a list of programmes and valid legislation relating to RES follow. Figures from several sources show possible potential accomplishable in biomass utilisation in Slovakia. Some most promising areas containing interesting amounts of unutilised biomass are quoted. Chapter 4 contains overview of programmes supporting the use of RES, examples of already realised projects and some planned projects. In Chapter 5 there is a list of main stakeholders in the bioenergy sector, description of legal requirements and procedures necessary for starting a business in Slovakia and some ways how to promote bioenergy business in Slovakia. As the most promising opportunities identified in Slovakia we can consider projects of biomass utilisation in the form of installation of boilers and creation of distribution channels enabling steady supply of biomass for competitive prices. A lot of waste and other residues from woodworking industries or forestry is available for this purpose. Dutch companies should make maximum use of their technological know-how and try to offer equipment for biomass utilisation. Biogas is produced only on a very limited scale. The reason for that lies in relatively high initial costs that cannot be covered from farming companies and low rentability of realised projects. Still, projects solving disposal of agricultural waste on the one hand and energy production on the other are worth paying attention to. Success stories from the Netherlands could serve as a source of inspiration but doing of thoroughgoing analysis preceding investment itself is of necessity in order to cope with hidden risks and uncertainties. In any case, Dutch companies can offer technological equipment to Slovakian buyers without risks connected with

  2. Market survey Slovak Republic. Bio-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-01-15

    The study presents an overview of Slovakian bioenergy market, its current state and future prospects in terms of size and potentials. In the opening, the basic structure of Slovakian energy sources is presented from IEA energy statistics, then a list of programmes and valid legislation relating to RES follow. Figures from several sources show possible potential accomplishable in biomass utilisation in Slovakia. Some most promising areas containing interesting amounts of unutilised biomass are quoted. Chapter 4 contains overview of programmes supporting the use of RES, examples of already realised projects and some planned projects. In Chapter 5 there is a list of main stakeholders in the bioenergy sector, description of legal requirements and procedures necessary for starting a business in Slovakia and some ways how to promote bioenergy business in Slovakia. As the most promising opportunities identified in Slovakia we can consider projects of biomass utilisation in the form of installation of boilers and creation of distribution channels enabling steady supply of biomass for competitive prices. A lot of waste and other residues from woodworking industries or forestry is available for this purpose. Dutch companies should make maximum use of their technological know-how and try to offer equipment for biomass utilisation. Biogas is produced only on a very limited scale. The reason for that lies in relatively high initial costs that cannot be covered from farming companies and low rentability of realised projects. Still, projects solving disposal of agricultural waste on the one hand and energy production on the other are worth paying attention to. Success stories from the Netherlands could serve as a source of inspiration but doing of thoroughgoing analysis preceding investment itself is of necessity in order to cope with hidden risks and uncertainties. In any case, Dutch companies can offer technological equipment to Slovakian buyers without risks connected with

  3. MSU-Northern Bio-Energy Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegel, Greg [Montana State Univ. Northern, Havre, MT (United States); Windy Boy, Jessica [Montana State Univ. Northern, Havre, MT (United States). Bio-Energy Center of Excellence; Maglinao, Randy Latayan [Montana State Univ. Northern, Havre, MT (United States). Bio-Energy Center of Excellence; Abedin, Md. Joynal [Montana State Univ. Northern, Havre, MT (United States). Bio-Energy Center of Excellence

    2017-03-02

    The goal of this project was to establish the Bio-Energy Center (the Center) of Montana State University Northern (MSUN) as a Regional Research Center of Excellence in research, product development, and commercialization of non-food biomass for the bio-energy industry. A three-step approach, namely, (1) enhance the Center’s research and testing capabilities, (2) develop advanced biofuels from locally grown agricultural crops, and (3) educate the community through outreach programs for public understanding and acceptance of new technologies was identified to achieve this goal. The research activities aimed to address the obstacles concerning the production of biofuels and other bio-based fuel additives considering feedstock quality, conversion process, economic viability, and public awareness. First and foremost in enhancing the capabilities of the Center is the improvement of its laboratories and other physical facilities for investigating new biomass conversion technologies and the development of its manpower complement with expertise in chemistry, engineering, biology, and energy. MSUN renovated its Auto Diagnostics building and updated its mechanical and electrical systems necessary to house the state-of-the-art 525kW (704 hp) A/C Dynamometer. The newly renovated building was designated as the Advanced Fuels Building. Two laboratories, namely Biomass Conversion lab and Wet Chemistry lab were also added to the Center’s facilities. The Biomass Conversion lab was for research on the production of advanced biofuels including bio-jet fuel and bio-based fuel additives while the Wet Chemistry lab was used to conduct catalyst research. Necessary equipment and machines, such as gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, were purchased and installed to help in research and testing. With the enhanced capabilities of the Center, research and testing activities were very much facilitated and more precise. New biofuels derived from Camelina sativa (camelina), a locally

  4. Bio-fuels: energies between decline and revival; Les biocombustibles: des energies entre declin et renouveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, A.

    1999-12-01

    The development of bio-fuels is highly dependent of the variations of the prices of major energies, of the agriculture prices and of the situation of the environmental concerns. Thus at the crossroad of various sectors of activity one can question the relevance of the use of bio-fuels, today marginalized. Their development is always taken into consideration during crisis periods (agriculture, energy and pollution). However, once the crisis is gone, it remains the question of the economical viability and sustainability of the infatuation for these non-conventional energies. This paper presents some modalities of valorization of bio-fuels in France and in foreign countries: 1 - the renewable energy sources in France and in the European Union; 2 - the development of bio-fuels at the service of foresters and agriculturists: present day situation and perspectives of wood fuel in France (individual and collective uses), perspectives of biomass energy after the common agricultural policy reform, the objectives of the European Union; 3 - the energy valorization of biomass at the service of environment: forestry exploitation (land planning, pollution abatement), management of public dumps and water processing plants (incineration of household wastes, biogas generation); 4 - the bio-fuels competitiveness. (J.S.)

  5. Energy harvesting for human wearable and implantable bio-sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcheson, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    There are clear trade-offs between functionality, battery lifetime and battery volume for wearable and implantable wireless-biosensors which energy harvesting devices may be able to overcome. Reliable energy harvesting has now become a reality for machine condition monitoring and is finding applications in chemical process plants, refineries and water treatment works. However, practical miniature devices that can harvest sufficient energy from the human body to power a wireless bio-sensor are still in their infancy. This paper reviews the options for human energy harvesting in order to determine power availability for harvester-powered body sensor networks. The main competing technologies for energy harvesting from the human body are inertial kinetic energy harvesting devices and thermoelectric devices. These devices are advantageous to some other types as they can be hermetically sealed. In this paper the fundamental limit to the power output of these devices is compared as a function of generator volume when attached to a human whilst walking and running. It is shown that the kinetic energy devices have the highest fundamental power limits in both cases. However, when a comparison is made between the devices using device effectivenesses figures from previously demonstrated prototypes presented in the literature, the thermal device is competitive with the kinetic energy harvesting device when the subject is running and achieves the highest power density when the subject is walking.

  6. Fossil energy savings potential of sugar cane bio-energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thu Lan T; Hermansen, John Erik; Sagisaka, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    One important rationale for bio-energy systems is their potential to save fossil energy. Converting a conventional sugar mill into a bio-energy process plant would contribute to fossil energy savings via the extraction of renewable electricity and ethanol substituting for fossil electricity...... and gasoline, respectively. This paper takes a closer look at the Thai sugar industry and examines two practical approaches that will enhance fossil energy savings. The first one addresses an efficient extraction of energy in the form of electricity from the excess bagasse and cane trash. The second while...... proposing to convert molasses or sugar cane to ethanol stresses the use of bagasse as well as distillery spent wash to replace coal in meeting ethanol plants' energy needs. The savings potential achieved with extracting ethanol from surplus sugar versus current practice in sugar industry in Thailand amounts...

  7. Bio-Inspired Optimization of Sustainable Energy Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy development always involves complex optimization problems of design, planning, and control, which are often computationally difficult for conventional optimization methods. Fortunately, the continuous advances in artificial intelligence have resulted in an increasing number of heuristic optimization methods for effectively handling those complicated problems. Particularly, algorithms that are inspired by the principles of natural biological evolution and/or collective behavior of social colonies have shown a promising performance and are becoming more and more popular nowadays. In this paper we summarize the recent advances in bio-inspired optimization methods, including artificial neural networks, evolutionary algorithms, swarm intelligence, and their hybridizations, which are applied to the field of sustainable energy development. Literature reviewed in this paper shows the current state of the art and discusses the potential future research trends.

  8. Nutrient flows in small-scale bio-energy use in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, L.T.C.; Wösten, J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the opportunities for the retention and return of nutrients in local bio-energy production using energy crops (oil palm, jatropha and cassava), fuel wood, manure, rice husks and a common pest plant (water hyacinth). For all bio-energy systems some return of nutrients is possible,

  9. MSU-Northern Bio-Energy Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegel, Greg [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Alcorn-Windy Boy, Jessica [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Abedin, Md. Joynal [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Maglinao, Randy [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2014-09-30

    MSU-Northern established the Bio-Energy Center (the Center) into a Regional Research Center of Excellence to address the obstacles concerning biofuels, feedstock, quality, conversion process, economic viability and public awareness. The Center built its laboratories and expertise in order to research and support product development and commercialization for the bio-energy industry in our region. The Center wanted to support the regional agricultural based economy by researching biofuels based on feedstock’s that can be grown in our region in an environmentally responsible manner. We were also interested in any technology that will improve the emissions and fuel economy performance of heavy duty diesel engines. The Center had a three step approach to accomplish these goals: 1. Enhance the Center’s research and testing capabilities 2. Develop advanced biofuels from locally grown agricultural crops. 3. Educate and outreach for public understanding and acceptance of new technology. The Center was very successful in completing the tasks as outlined in the project plan. Key successes include discovering and patenting a new chemical conversion process for converting camelina oil to jet fuel, as well as promise in developing a heterogeneous Grubs catalyst to support the new chemical conversion process. The Center also successfully fragmented and deoxygenated naturally occurring lignin with a Ni-NHC catalyst, showing promise for further exploration of using lignin for fuels and fuel additives. This would create another value-added product for lignin that can be sourced from beetle kill trees or waste products from cellulose ethanol fuel facilities.

  10. The global technical potential of bio-energy in 2050 considering sustainability constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, Helmut; Beringer, Tim; Bhattacharya, Sribas C; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Hoogwijk, Monique

    2010-12-01

    Bio-energy, that is, energy produced from organic non-fossil material of biological origin, is promoted as a substitute for non-renewable (e.g., fossil) energy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and dependency on energy imports. At present, global bio-energy use amounts to approximately 50 EJ/yr, about 10% of humanity's primary energy supply. We here review recent literature on the amount of bio-energy that could be supplied globally in 2050, given current expectations on technology, food demand and environmental targets ('technical potential'). Recent studies span a large range of global bio-energy potentials from ≈30 to over 1000 EJ/yr. In our opinion, the high end of the range is implausible because of (1) overestimation of the area available for bio-energy crops due to insufficient consideration of constraints (e.g., area for food, feed or nature conservation) and (2) too high yield expectations resulting from extrapolation of plot-based studies to large, less productive areas. According to this review, the global technical primary bio-energy potential in 2050 is in the range of 160-270 EJ/yr if sustainability criteria are considered. The potential of bio-energy crops is at the lower end of previously published ranges, while residues from food production and forestry could provide significant amounts of energy based on an integrated optimization ('cascade utilization') of biomass flows.

  11. Bio-based targeted chemical engineering education : Role and impact of bio-based energy and resourcedevelopment projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardoa, N.M.; Venselaar, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Avans University of Applied Sciences is redrafting its courses and curricula in view of sustainability. For chemical engineering in particular that implies a focus on 'green' and bio-based processes, products and energy. Avans is situated in the Southwest region of the Netherlands and specifically i

  12. Contemporary research in aeolian geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, B. O.

    2009-04-01

    The first International Conference on Aeolian Geomorphology (ICAR) was held in 1986, and every four years since then, aeolian geomorphologists from around the world have assembled to discuss their research and to showcase recent advancements in understanding and modeling of aeolian processes. A content analysis of the "Bibliography of Aeolian Research" [Stout, J.E., Warren, A., Gill, T.E., 2009. Publication trends in aeolian research: An analysis of the Bibliography of Aeolian Research. Geomorphology 105, 6-17 (this volume)] shows that the number of publications on aeolian topics has increased exponentially from the mid-20th Century with approximately 50 publications per year to about 500 publications per year when the first ICAR was held, to almost 1000 publications per year currently. Areas of focus have shifted historically from initial concerns with aeolian erosion and dust events as isolated phenomenon of localized curiosity or only regional importance, to comprehensive physically-based investigations and modeling of the mechanics of aeolian transport. Recently, more applied studies have been motivated by the recognition of the importance of aeolian processes to dust emissions into the atmosphere (with relevance for human health and for meteorological conditions and climate change) and within regional management contexts (especially on coasts where impending sea-level rise is of great concern and in arid and semi-arid environments given the dependence of sediment surface stability and remobilization on meteorological and ecological conditions). Aeolian geomorphology is a rapidly growing sub-discipline of Geomorphology that offers rich opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborations with colleagues from the Atmospheric Sciences, Climatology, Sedimentology, Quaternary Geology, Fluid Mechanics, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Physical Geography, Ecology, and Agricultural Sciences, as well as our counterparts in fluvial, coastal, and arid

  13. Urban Wood-Based Bio-Energy Systems in Seattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stan Gent, Seattle Steam Company

    2010-10-25

    Seattle Steam Company provides thermal energy service (steam) to the majority of buildings and facilities in downtown Seattle, including major hospitals (Swedish and Virginia Mason) and The Northwest (Level I) Regional Trauma Center. Seattle Steam has been heating downtown businesses for 117 years, with an average length of service to its customers of 40 years. In 2008 and 2009 Seattle Steam developed a biomass-fueled renewable energy (bio-energy) system to replace one of its gas-fired boilers that will reduce greenhouse gases, pollutants and the amount of waste sent to landfills. This work in this sub-project included several distinct tasks associated with the biomass project development as follows: a. Engineering and Architecture: Engineering focused on development of system control strategies, development of manuals for start up and commissioning. b. Training: The project developer will train its current operating staff to operate equipment and facilities. c. Flue Gas Clean-Up Equipment Concept Design: The concept development of acid gas emissions control system strategies associated with the supply wood to the project. d. Fuel Supply Management Plan: Development of plans and specifications for the supply of wood. It will include potential fuel sampling analysis and development of contracts for delivery and management of fuel suppliers and handlers. e. Integrated Fuel Management System Development: Seattle Steam requires a biomass Fuel Management System to track and manage the delivery, testing, processing and invoicing of delivered fuel. This application will be web-based and accessed from a password-protected URL, restricting data access and privileges by user-level.

  14. Fossil energy savings potential of sugar cane bio-energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thu Lan T. [Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Tjele (Denmark); The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Hermansen, John E. [Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Tjele (Denmark); Sagisaka, Masayuki [Institute of Science for Safety and Sustainability, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    One important rationale for bio-energy systems is their potential to save fossil energy. Converting a conventional sugar mill into a bio-energy process plant would contribute to fossil energy savings via the extraction of renewable electricity and ethanol substituting for fossil electricity and gasoline, respectively. This paper takes a closer look at the Thai sugar industry and examines two practical approaches that will enhance fossil energy savings. The first one addresses an efficient extraction of energy in the form of electricity from the excess bagasse and cane trash. The second while proposing to convert molasses or sugar cane to ethanol stresses the use of bagasse as well as distillery spent wash to replace coal in meeting ethanol plants' energy needs. The savings potential achieved with extracting ethanol from surplus sugar versus current practice in sugar industry in Thailand amounts to 15 million barrels of oil a year. Whether the saving benefits could be fully realized, however, depends on how well the potential land use change resulting from an expansion of ethanol production is managed. The results presented serve as a useful guidance to formulate strategies that enable optimum utilization of biomass as an energy source. (author)

  15. Bio-energy in China. Content analysis of news articles on Chinese professional internet platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Mei [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, College of Forestry (China); Tahvanainen, Liisa; Pelkonen, Paavo [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Ahponen, Pirkkoliisa [Faculty of Social Sciences and Regional Studies, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study is to discuss how information about the development and use of bio-energy is forwarded and disseminated to general public via the Internet in China. Furthermore, this study also explores in what manner the information of renewable energy policies is presented. A research method used in this study is an application of content analysis. Altogether 19 energy-related web platforms were found by searching keywords, such as 'energy net' or 'renewable energy net' or 'bio-energy net' on www.Google.cn. A thorough analysis was conducted by focusing on one of them: www.china5e.com. The news articles on www.china5e.com were examined according to whether the use of bio-energy was articulated positively or negatively in the contents of articles. It was also considered whether the articles were imported from abroad. The results of this study indicated that in China there is a tendency on the Internet to disseminate primarily the positive information about bio-energy with a great emphasis on its benefits. In addition, the study shows that when analyzing the content of the news articles, biogas and liquid bio-fuels will be the main bio-energy development trends in China in the near future. (author)

  16. Bio-energy in China: Content analysis of news articles on Chinese professional internet platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Mei [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, College of Forestry (China)], E-mail: qu@cc.joensuu.fi; Tahvanainen, Liisa [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Ahponen, Pirkkoliisa [Faculty of Social Sciences and Regional Studies, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Pelkonen, Paavo [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study is to discuss how information about the development and use of bio-energy is forwarded and disseminated to general public via the Internet in China. Furthermore, this study also explores in what manner the information of renewable energy policies is presented. A research method used in this study is an application of content analysis. Altogether 19 energy-related web platforms were found by searching keywords, such as 'energy net' or 'renewable energy net' or 'bio-energy net' on (www.Google.cn). A thorough analysis was conducted by focusing on one of them: (www.china5e.com). The news articles on (www.china5e.com) were examined according to whether the use of bio-energy was articulated positively or negatively in the contents of articles. It was also considered whether the articles were imported from abroad. The results of this study indicated that in China there is a tendency on the Internet to disseminate primarily the positive information about bio-energy with a great emphasis on its benefits. In addition, the study shows that when analyzing the content of the news articles, biogas and liquid bio-fuels will be the main bio-energy development trends in China in the near future.

  17. System analysis of a bio-energy plantation: full greenhouse gas balance and energy accounting (POPFULL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I.; Berhongaray, G.; Broeckx, L.; De Groote, T.; ElKasmioui, O.; Fichot, R.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Verlinden, M.; Zona, D.

    2011-12-01

    In recent year the environmental impact of fossil fuels and their reduced availability are leading to an increasing interest in renewable energy sources, among them bio-energy. However, the cost/benefit in establishing, managing, and using these plantations for energy production should be quantified together with their environmental impact. In this project we are performing a full life cycle analysis (LCA) balance of the most important greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, H2O and O3), together with full energy accounting of a short-rotation coppice (SRC) plantation with fast-growing trees. We established the plantation two years ago and we have been monitoring net fluxes of CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3, in combination with biomass pools (incl. soil) and fluxes, and volatile organic carbon (VOCs). This poplar plantation will be monitored for another two years then harvested and transformed into bio-energy. For the energy accounting we are performing a life cycle analysis and energy efficiency assessments over the entire cycle of the plantation until the production of electricity and heat. Here we present an overview of the results from the first two years from the plantation establishment, and some of the projections based on these first results.

  18. Complementary systems of aeolian and hydraulic energy in Brazil; Sistemas complementares de energia eolica e hidraulica no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Dario Jackson; Sugai, Martha Regina von Borstel [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: dario@copel.com; martha.sugai@copel.com; Amarante, Odilon A. Camargo do [Camargo Schubert Engenheiros Associados Ltda., Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: ventar@terra.com.br; Rocha, Nelson de Andrade [Promon Engenharia Ltda, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nelson.rocha@promon.com.br; Bittencourt, Rogerio Motta [Companhia Hidro Eletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: rogeriob@chesf.gov.br

    2005-10-15

    One important historical challenge to the operation planning of the Brazilian interconnected electrical system has been the seasonal stabilization of the energy supply, due to the stochastic nature of hydro resources. Most of the significant Brazilian hydro power stations rely on the hydrological regimes of the Southeast, which have a remarkable tendency for seasonal fluctuations of significant amplitude. In the last decades, wind power generation has proven its suitability to the Gigawatt scale, necessary to an effective contribution to electric systems. This paper demonstrates, from existing data, the wind / hydro seasonal complementarity in the relevant areas of Brazil, and discusses its possible effect on the feasibility of seasonal stabilization of the energy supply in the Brazilian interconnected grid, taking advantage of the country's large natural resources available. Case studies for the southern/southeastern and the northeastern regions of Brazil are presented. (author)

  19. Techno-economic assessment of micro-algae as feedstock for renewable bio-energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, J.G.G.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper determines the energy consumption ratio and overall bio-energy production costs of microalgae cultivation, harvesting and conversion to secondary energy carriers, thus helping to clarify future perspectives of micro-algae production for energy purposes. A limitation growth model is develo

  20. Prospect of Chinese Bio-energy Grasses to Produce Fuel Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q.Z.; Xu, L.J. (Grassland Research Inst. of Chinese Academy of Agriculture Science, Hohhot 010010 (China)). E-mail:sunqz@126.com; Yu, Z. (College of Animal Science and Technology, Agricultural Univ., Beijing 100094 (China))

    2008-10-15

    The current energy shortage is seriously restricting the economic development of countries around the world. To seek bio-energy resources to replace liquid fossil fuels is inevitable. In China, energy grasses, Medicago sativa, Panicum virgatum, Astragalus adsurgens, Sorghum sudanense, Caragana Korshinskii and Lespedeza hedysaroides play more important role in development and utilization of fuel ethanol, and have a board application prospect

  1. Functional genomics of bio-energy plants and related patent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-04-01

    With dwindling fossil oil resources and increased economic growth of many developing countries due to globalization, energy driven from an alternative source such as bio-energy in a sustainable fashion is the need of the hour. However, production of energy from biological source is relatively expensive due to low starch and sugar contents of bioenergy plants leading to lower oil yield and reduced quality along with lower conversion efficiency of feedstock. In this context genetic improvement of bio-energy plants offers a viable solution. In this manuscript, we reviewed the current status of functional genomics studies and related patent activities in bio-energy plants. Currently, genomes of considerable bio-energy plants have been sequenced or are in progress and also large amount of expression sequence tags (EST) or cDNA sequences are available from them. These studies provide fundamental data for more reliable genome annotation and as a result, several genomes have been annotated in a genome-wide level. In addition to this effort, various mutagenesis tools have also been employed to develop mutant populations for characterization of genes that are involved in bioenergy quantitative traits. With the progress made on functional genomics of important bio-energy plants, more patents were filed with a significant number of them focusing on genes and DNA sequences which may involve in improvement of bio-energy traits including higher yield and quality of starch, sugar and oil. We also believe that these studies will lead to the generation of genetically altered plants with improved tolerance to various abiotic and biotic stresses.

  2. The greenhouse gas and energy balance of different treatment concepts for bio-waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortner, Maria E; Müller, Wolfgang; Bockreis, Anke

    2013-10-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) and energy performance of bio-waste treatment plants been investigated for three characteristic bio-waste treatment concepts: composting; biological drying for the production of biomass fuel fractions; and anaerobic digestion. Compared with other studies about the environmental impacts of bio-waste management, this study focused on the direct comparison of the latest process concepts and state-of-the-art emission control measures. To enable a comparison, the mass balance and products were modelled for all process concepts assuming the same bio-waste amounts and properties. In addition, the value of compost as a soil improver was included in the evaluation, using straw as a reference system. This aspect has rarely been accounted for in other studies. The study is based on data from operational facilities combined with literature data. The results show that all three concepts contribute to a reduction of GHG emissions and show a positive balance for cumulated energy demand. However, in contrast to other studies, the advantage of anaerobic digestion compared with composting is smaller as a result of accounting for the soil improving properties of compost. Still, anaerobic digestion is the environmentally superior solution. The results are intended to inform decision makers about the relevant aspects of bio-waste treatment regarding the environmental impacts of different bio-waste management strategies.

  3. 2010 World bio-energy conference; Compte-rendu de la conference internationale sur les bioenergies 25-27 mai a Joenkoeping en Suede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    After having evoked the bio-energy price awarded to a Brazilian for his works on the use of eucalyptus as energy source, this report proposes a synthesis of the highlights of the conference: discussions about sustainability, bio-energies as an opportunity for developing countries, the success of bio-energies in Sweden, and more particularly some technological advances in the field of biofuels: a bio-LPG by Biofuel-solution AB, catalysis, bio-diesel from different products in a Swedish farm, a second generation ethanol by the Danish company Inbicon, a large scale methanization in Goteborg, a bio-refinery concept in Sweden, bio-gases

  4. Analysis of the economic-financial viability of the aeolian energy faced to the new context of the power sector; Analise da viabilidade economico-financeira da energia eolica diante do novo contexto do setor eletrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Virginia Brasil [Companhia Hidro-Eletrica de Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: virginia@chesf.gov.br; Oliveira, Marcos Roberto Gois de [Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: mrgois@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    This paper analyses the economical-financial viability of a hypothetic aeolian project at the Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil. Brazil presents a great aeolian potential, particularly at the Northeastern region, where various aeolian enterprises had been implanted due to favorable conditions of the wind in that region. However, for the increasing the aeolian generation it is necessary that studies have to be done concerning to the technical viability and, specially the economical-financial viability, because the investors need reliable subsides for the decision making.

  5. BioMeeT. Planning of biomass based methanol energy combine - Trollhaettan region. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandberg, Aake; Hjortsberg, Hans; Saevbark, Bengt [Ecotraffic R and D AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekbom, Tomas; Hjerpe, Carl-Johan; Landaelv, Ingvar [Nykomb Synergetics AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    The conversion of biomass in an energy combine based on primary gasification yields a gas that can be used as fuels gas, for synthesis of motor fuels (methanol or other) or for electric power production. The study gives examples of alternative product mixes. The conclusions of the study are: (1) Potential of new, not yet utilised biomass is available, and new areas of applications, where oil is presently used, are needed to develop the potential. Motor fuel production (methanol, DME) is a presumption in the BioMeeT-study. (2) Yield figures in the energy combine are comparable to those of now used bio-systems for power and co-generation. (3) Which one of the cases in the BioMeeT-project is the most favourable cannot be decided on a plant-to-plant basis alone but the entire system for supply energy carriers in the region has to be considered, as the all plants within the system may change. This would require further investigations. Moreover, the results will be different in various regions in Sweden and Europe due to the markets for all energy carriers. (4) At today's conditions in the Trollhaettan region it must be stated that there is only room for dedicated bio-methanol/DME production (provided such a market will come) with moderate addition to the district heating system as in the BAL-project. (5) In the longer term the future supply of all energy carriers, including new electric power and new bio-fuels, has to be considered for new plants and at renewals. In such a case an energy combine as in the BioMeeT-project may be a central conversion plant with gas deliveries to satellites such as local co-generation, district heat and industries in a regional system within a 50 - 100 km radius. This should be included in regional planning for the future. (6) Estimated investment costs per kW feedstock input is higher for the energy combine compared to present technologies (mature technologies for power and heat) but have to be judged for all plants taken together in

  6. Transforming Canada's forestry sector - Bio-energy and bio-products: Good for the planet, job creation and bottom line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobden, C. (Forest Products Assosiation of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)), e-mail: catherine.cobden@FPAC.ca

    2010-07-01

    The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) and CIBC World Markets have recently completed a new study with the goal of overhauling Canada's dominant pulp and paper industry for a new millennium. The FPAC report identified a number of emerging bio-industries that use wood fibre. A wide array of bio-energy, bio-fuels and bio-chemicals can be made using wood to create more environmentally friendly and cost-effective alternatives to those produced using fossil fuels. The study highlighted viable opportunities for the forestry sector to return to profitability - with the right investments in the right areas. Although some paper segments face very challenging economics without transformation, many segments in this sector show significant financial potential under a bio-refinery scenario. In addition to pulp and paper, this sector can become a major player in energy production and the bio-chemical industry. The ability to produce energy, fuel and chemicals from green hydrocarbons, along with forests' capacity to sequester carbon from the atmosphere, will change the nature of the game for Canada's forest products sector. Presenters will review the opportunities available for the environment, forestry workers, communities and the economy at large. (orig.)

  7. Complex systems in aeolian geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2007-11-01

    Aeolian geomorphology provides a rich ground for investigating Earth surface processes and landforms as complex systems. Sand transport by wind is a classic dissipative process with non-linear dynamics, while dune field evolution is a prototypical self-organisation phenomenon. Both of these broad areas of aeolian geomorphology are discussed and analysed in the context of complexity and a systems approach. A feedback loop analysis of the aeolian boundary-layer-flow/sediment-transport/bedform interactions, based on contemporary physical models, reveals that the system is fundamentally unstable (or at most meta-stable) and likely to exhibit chaotic behaviour. Recent field-experimental research on aeolian streamers and spatio-temporal transport patterns, however, indicates that sand transport by wind may be wholly controlled by a self-similar turbulence cascade in the boundary layer flow, and that key aspects of transport event time-series can be fully reproduced from a combination of (self-organised) 1/ f forcing, motion threshold, and saltation inertia. The evolution of various types of bare-sand dunes and dune field patterns have been simulated successfully with self-organising cellular automata that incorporate only simplified physically-based interactions (rules). Because of their undefined physical scale, however, it not clear whether they in fact simulate ripples (bedforms) or dunes (landforms), raising fundamental cross-cutting questions regarding the difference between aeolian dunes, impact ripples, and subaqueous (current) ripples and dunes. An extended cellular automaton (CA) model, currently under development, incorporates the effects of vegetation in the aeolian environment and is capable of simulating the development of nebkhas, blow-outs, and parabolic coastal dunes. Preliminary results indicate the potential for establishing phase diagrams and attractor trajectories for vegetated aeolian dunescapes. Progress is limited, however, by a serious lack of

  8. Bio-Inspired Energy-Aware Protocol Design for Cooperative Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrucci, Gian Paolo; Anggraeni, Puri Novelti; Wardana, Satya Ardhy;

    2011-01-01

    In this work, bio-inspired cooperation rules are applied to wireless communication networks. The main goal is to derive cooperative behaviour rules to improve the energy consumption of each mobile device. A medium access control (MAC) protocol particularly designed for peer-to-peer communication ...

  9. Ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae affects the energy-efficient harvesting by bio-flocculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salim, S.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae in bio-flocculation was studied with emphasis on the recovery, sedimentation rate and energy demand for harvesting the target microalgae. When the autoflocculating microalgae Ettlia texensis, Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Scenedesmus o

  10. Energy conservation and use of renewable energies in the bio-industries 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, F.

    1982-01-01

    The proceedings are presented of the Second International Seminar on Energy Conservation and the Use of Renewable Energies in the Bio-industries. Of 106 papers presented, the following 5 are of particular forestry interest: Brewbaker, J.L.; MacDicken, K.; Beldt, R. van den. Tropical nitrogen-fixing fuelwood trees. 108-119 (Refs. 15). Farnham, R.S.; Garton, S.; Louis, K.A.; Read, P.E. Propagating and establishing bioenergy plantations. 274-283 (Refs. 14). Salix and Alnus spp. in the marginal wetlands of northern Minnesota, USA. Kio, P.R.O. Factors and policies affecting forest resources use and conservation in Africa. 425-432 (Refs. 9), including discussion of the causes and consequences of deforestation. Plumptre, R.A.; Sandells, A. Construction, performance and economics of simple solar timber drying kilns. 577-586 (Refs. 11). Yermanos, D.M. Jojoba - outlook for maximizing oil production. 738-748 (Refs. 1). It describes experiments on seed and oil yields of Simmondsia chinensis in California.

  11. The scientometric biography of a leading scientist working on the field of bio-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konur, Ozcan [Sirnak University Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Turkey)], email: okonur@hotmail.com

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a scientometric biography of a Turkish scientist, Prof. Dr. Ayhan Demirbas, who is a leading figure in the field of bio-energy. It describes the method and importance of doing such biographies and suggests that there are too few of them, this one being the first in this specific area. It provides insight into the individual, his work, his research and links in his field of studies and research. Prof. Dr. Demirbas has spent almost three decades in research, particularly in the field of bio-energy. He has researched and taught in the field of renewable energies including biodiesels, biofuels, biomass pyrolysis, liquefaction and gasification, biogas, bioalcohols, and biohydrogen. He has also studied a great variety of subjects, such as the development of pulp from plants, chemical and engineering thermodynamics, chemical and energy education, global climate change, drinking water and cereal analyses. He has published 454 articles as of 2011.

  12. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  13. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  14. Computer simulation of aeolian bedforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗天德; 慕青松; 武生智

    2001-01-01

    A discrete model is set up using the cellular automaton method and applied to simulate the formation and evolution of aeolian bedforms. The calculated bedforms resemble the actual shape of natural sand ripples and dunes.This reveals that the sand movement is a typical nonlinear dynamical process, and that the nesting configuration of sand ripples, dunes and draas are a self-organized system with a fractal characteristic, and evotves simultaneously at various scales in the sand-airflow.

  15. Energy Balance of Bio-ethanol - A Review; Energibalans foer bioetanol - en kunskapsoeversikt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Paal

    2006-03-15

    This review presents a synthesis of various Swedish and international studies on the bio-ethanol energy balance, and an analysis of how and why their results differ. Other methods, such as exergy- and emergy analysis, are discussed and compared with the energy analysis method. Finally, potential improvements of the energy efficiency in bio-ethanol production are discussed. The energy balance is here expressed as the ratio of the energy content of the fuel to the primary energy input for the entire production cycle of the fuel. The energy balance of ethanol from cereals is, on average, 1.6, and varies between 0.7 and 2.8. Corresponding average figures for ethanol from corn, sugar beets and lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. energy forest) are 1.4, 1.8 and 3.2, respectively. There are several reasons why the energy balances differ between the different studies, even where the feedstock is identical. The sources of differences can be divided between those related to differences in local and geographical conditions, and those related to differences in the methodological approach applied. Depending on the definition of the system that is studied (systems boundaries), and how the energy input is divided between the ethanol and the by-products generated in the process (allocation methods), the energy balance may differ by a factor of 5. Thus, it is impossible to make reliable and fair comparisons between different studies unless all assumptions are clearly presented and defined. Results from exergy- and emergy analysis of bio-ethanol often show significantly different results from those presented in energy analyses. It is, however, not useful to compare these different results since the various methods have different focuses and are answering different questions. The energy balance of cereal-based ethanol can be improved by more efficient cultivation methods, but mainly by improved conversion processes. One possibility is by using bio-refineries where not only ethanol but also

  16. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  17. Quantum design of photosynthesis for bio-inspired solar-energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Elisabet; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2017-03-15

    Photosynthesis is the natural process that converts solar photons into energy-rich products that are needed to drive the biochemistry of life. Two ultrafast processes form the basis of photosynthesis: excitation energy transfer and charge separation. Under optimal conditions, every photon that is absorbed is used by the photosynthetic organism. Fundamental quantum mechanics phenomena, including delocalization, underlie the speed, efficiency and directionality of the charge-separation process. At least four design principles are active in natural photosynthesis, and these can be applied practically to stimulate the development of bio-inspired, human-made energy conversion systems.

  18. Quantum design of photosynthesis for bio-inspired solar-energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Elisabet; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2017-03-01

    Photosynthesis is the natural process that converts solar photons into energy-rich products that are needed to drive the biochemistry of life. Two ultrafast processes form the basis of photosynthesis: excitation energy transfer and charge separation. Under optimal conditions, every photon that is absorbed is used by the photosynthetic organism. Fundamental quantum mechanics phenomena, including delocalization, underlie the speed, efficiency and directionality of the charge-separation process. At least four design principles are active in natural photosynthesis, and these can be applied practically to stimulate the development of bio-inspired, human-made energy conversion systems.

  19. Rapid and facile ratiometric detection of an anthrax biomarker by regulating energy transfer process in bio-metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihe; Li, Bin; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Liming; Zheng, Youxuan

    2016-11-15

    A ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on luminescent bio-metal-organic framework was prepared by exchanging both Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) cations into anionic bio-MOF-1. Due to a highly efficient energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) (>89%), emission color of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 was orange-red even though Tb(3+) was the dominant content in this Tb/Eu co-doping material. More interestingly, this energy transfer process could be modulated by dipicolinic acid (DPA), an unique biomarker for bacillus spores. With DPA addition, corresponding DPA-to-Tb(3+) energy transfer was gradually enhanced while the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) was significantly weakened. By regulating the energy transfer process in Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1, visual colorimetric sensing of DPA in porous MOF was realized for the first time. Detection limit of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 for DPA was 34nM, which was much lower than an infectious dosage of Bacillus anthracis spores (60μM) for human being. Besides, Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 showed a remarkable selectivity over other aromatic ligands and amino acids. More importantly, this porous ratiometric sensor worked equally well in human serum. These particularly attractive features of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 made the direct, rapid and naked-eye detection of DPA for practical application possible.

  20. Bio-energy Alliance High-Tonnage Bio-energy Crop Production and Conversion into Conventional Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capareda, Sergio [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hall, Kenneth R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Holtzapple, Mark [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Searcy, Royce [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering; Thompson, Wayne H. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Baltensperger, David [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Myatt, Robert [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Blumenthal, Jurg [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences

    2012-11-30

    Maintaining a predictable and sustainable supply of feedstock for bioenergy conversion is a major goal to facilitate the efficient transition to cellulosic biofuels. Our work provides insight into the complex interactions among agronomic, edaphic, and climatic factors that affect the sustainability of bioenergy crop yields. Our results provide science-based agronomic response measures that document how to better manage bioenergy sorghum production from planting to harvest. We show that harvest aids provide no significant benefit as a means to decrease harvest moisture or improve bioenergy yields. Our efforts to identify optimal seeding rates under varied edaphic and climatological conditions reinforce previous findings that sorghum is a resilient plant that can efficiently adapt to changing population pressures by decreasing or increasing the numbers of additional shoots or tillers – where optimal seeding rates for high biomass photoperiod sensitive sorghum is 60,000 to 70,000 seeds per acre and 100,000 to 120,000 seeds per acre for sweet varieties. Our varietal adaptability trials revealed that high biomass photoperiod sensitive energy sorghum consistently outperforms conventional photoperiod insensitive sweet sorghum and high biomass forage sorghum as the preferred bioenergy sorghum type, with combined theoretical yields of both cellulosic and fermentable water-soluble sugars producing an average yield of 1,035 gallons of EtOH per acre. Our nitrogen trials reveal that sweet sorghums produce ample amounts of water-soluble sugars with minimal increases in nitrogen inputs, and that excess nitrogen can affect minor increases in biomass yields and cellulosic sugars but decrease bioenergy quality by decreasing water-soluble sugar concentrations and increasing ash content, specifically when plant tissue nitrogen concentrations exceed 0.6 %, dry weight basis. Finally, through our growth and re-growth trials, we show that single-cut high biomass sorghum bioenergy yields

  1. Analysis of the market for bio energy - locally and internationally. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-15

    This report aims to describe the market potential for biogas and biomass heat and power applications, and to assess the opportunities and barriers for development of such biomass markets locally and internationally. The project has been commissioned by ENERCOAST whose overall aim is to create a market for bio energy in the North Sea area. The project uses Denmark, Central Denmark Region, and three Danish municipalities (Randers, Norddjurs, and Syddjurs) to illustrate the challenges related to developing a more substantial market for bio energy trade. A parallel study also commissioned by ENERCOAST and carried out by Ea Energy Analyses assessed the sustainability of relevant biomass supply chains related to the resource accessibility in the three municipalities. The primary focus was on biogas, straw, wood residues, and energy crops for combined heat and power production and the results were presented in a report released in July of 2010 entitled 'SSCM Analysis of the Bioenergy Resources in Randers, Norddjurs and Syddjurs' (Ea Energy Analyses, 2010). The data basis for both studies is very similar, and as such the current report incorporates and builds upon many of the SSCM reports findings. The present report describes the market structures and price developments of the aforementioned biomass resources. The market structures and trade conditions are described on a local (the 3 municipalities), national (Denmark) and regional/international (European/global) level. (LN)

  2. Bio-Refineries Bioprocess Technologies for Waste-Water Treatment, Energy and Product Valorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Cowan, A.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also, potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world, and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food, fiber, and other biology-based products, including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific-attribute raw materials for differentiated markets, we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio-refineries be seen as part of a `new' agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste-water treatment, water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal, sustainable energy production, and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings, and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio-oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar-driven microalgae bio-refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy, fuels, and other useful materials (valorisation), with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

  3. Market development problems for sustainable bio-energy systems in Sweden. (The BIOMARK project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helby, Peter (ed.); Boerjesson, Paal; Hansen, Anders Christian; Roos, Anders; Rosenqvist, Haakan; Takeuchi, Linn

    2003-03-01

    The report consists of three case studies relating to Swedish bio-energy markets. The first is concerned with a general analysis of costs and benefits of transition to biomass-based electricity in Sweden. The analysis indicates that many price relations in Sweden do not support the transition to bio-energy. Future prospects for biomass conversion technologies versus natural gas based technologies may not be in favour of bio-energy with the existing fuel prices. Additionally, there is no effective utilisation of the large economic benefits that could be gained by coordinating the bio-energy fuel chain with the management of other material flows such as the nutrient flows in the water cycle. In government policies, the supply of biomass does not seem to receive the same attention as the conversion technologies. Potentially, this could lead to a shortage of biomass feedstock when the conversion technology part of the programmes succeeds. The second study is about market development for energy crops, specifically Salix. The analysis shows that real-life development is far behind prognoses and scenarios, confirming worries about future supplies of biomass. While Salix is associated with significant positive externalities and provides a large potential for co-benefits, the institutional setting is not favourable for the exploitation of these advantages. A particular problem is the high risk farmers face when planting Salix, as future demand is uncertain and prices difficult to predict. A better distribution of risk among the market actors, particularly between farmers and district heating companies, might be the best strategy for renewed growth in this sector. The third study is concerned with the wood pellets market, which experienced a supply crisis in the winter 2001/02, as producers were unable to satisfy demand or did so only at highly elevated prices. The analysis points to weakness in market governance, especially insufficient information flows between actors

  4. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui; Zhong, Lisheng

    2016-07-25

    The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole-dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge-Kutta method and Pang's soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs) depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the corresponding theory are

  5. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Pang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole–dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge–Kutta method and Pang’s soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the

  6. Stabilization of the Soliton Transported Bio-energy in Protein Molecules in the Improved Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-Feng; LUO Yu-Hui

    2004-01-01

    We study the stabilization of the soliton transported bio-energy by the dynamic equations in the improved Davydov theory from four aspects containing the feature of free motion and states of the soliton at the long-time motion and at biological temperature 300 K and behaviors of collision of the solitons by Runge-Kutta method and physical parameter values appropriate to the α-helix protein molecules. We prove that the new solitons can move without dispersion at a constant speed retaining its shape and energy in free and long-time motions and can go through each other without scattering. If considering further influence of the temperature effect of heat bath on the soliton, it is still thermally stable at biological temperature 300 K and in a time as long as 300 ps and amino acid spacings as large as 400, which shows that the lifetime of the new soliton is at least 300 ps, which is consistent with analytic result obtained by quantum perturbation theory. These results exhibit that the new soliton is a possible carrier of bio-energy transport and the improved model is possibly a candidate for the mechanism of this transport.

  7. A study of the development of bio-energy resources and the status of eco-society in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xia; Huang, Yongmei; Gong, Jirui [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Xinshi [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Institute of Botany, CAS, Beijing 100093 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Industrialization of bio-energy relies on the supply of resources on a large scale. The theoretical biomass resources could reach 2.61-3.51 billion tce (tons of coal equivalent)/a in China, while the available feedstock is about 440-640 million tce/a, however, among this only 1.5-2.5% has been transferred into energy at present. Marginal land utilization has great prospects of supplying bio-energy resources in China, with co-benefits, such as carbon sequestration, water/soil conservation, and wind erosion protection. There is a large area of marginal land in China, especially in northern China, including about 263 million ha of desertification land, 173 million ha of sand-land, and 17 million ha of salinizatin land. The plant species suitable to be grown in marginal lands, including some species in Salix, Hippophae, Tamarix, Caragana, and Prunus is also abundant Biomass feedstock in marginal lands would be 100 million tce/a in 2020, and 200 million tce/a in 2050. As a result, a win-win situation of eco-society and bio-energy development could be realized, with an expected 4-5% reduction of total CO{sub 2} emission in China in 2020-2050. Although much progress has been made in the field of bio-energy research in China, yet significant efforts should be taken in the future to fulfill large-scale industrialization of bio-energy. (author)

  8. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  9. Robotic Measurement of Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S.; Duperret, J. M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Lancaster, N.; Nikolich, G.; Shipley, T. F.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Zobeck, T. M.; Koditschek, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional measurements of sand transport and dust emission in complex natural settings presently lack spatiotemporal resolution adequate to inform models relevant for land management, climate policy, and the basic science of geomorphology. Deployments of wind, sand and dust sensors sophisticated enough to begin unpacking the complex relations among wind turbulence, surface roughness, sand flux and dust emission remain largely stationary. Aerial observations from satellites, planes and even UAVs help fill in, but none of these modalities offer the hope of "capturing the action" by being at the right place at the right time relative to the highly localized nature of sediment transport during wind storms. We have been developing a legged robot capable of rapidly traversing desert terrain, and are now adapting it to serve as a platform for scientific instrumentation. We aim to field a semi-autonomous, reactive mobile sensory package suited to the needs of aeolian science that can address the limitations of existing alternatives. This presentation reports on early trials in the Jornada LTER and White Sands National Monument aimed at gathering measurements of airflow and rates of sand transport on a dune face, assessing the role of roughness elements such as vegetation in modifying the wind shear stresses incident on the surface, and estimating erosion susceptibility in a natural arid soil. We will solicit ideas from the audience about other potentially interesting and viable measurement targets. Future close collaboration between aeolian, cognitive and robotics scientists such as we hope to promote through this presentation may yield machines with scientifically relevant sensory suites possessing sufficient autonomy to operate in-situ at the most intense episodes of wind and sediment movement under conditions far too uncomfortable and hazardous for human presence.

  10. Ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae affects the energy-efficient harvesting by bio-flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, S; Vermuë, M H; Wijffels, R H

    2012-08-01

    The effect of ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae in bio-flocculation was studied with emphasis on the recovery, sedimentation rate and energy demand for harvesting the target microalgae. When the autoflocculating microalgae Ettlia texensis, Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Scenedesmus obliquus were added to Chlorella vulgaris at a ratio of 0.25, the recovery of C. vulgaris increased from 25% to, respectively, 40%, 36% and 31%. The sedimentation rate increased as well. Addition of Tetraselmis suecica to Neochloris oleoabundans at a ratio of 0.25 increased the recovery from 40% to 50%. Application of bio-flocculation at a ratio of 0.25, followed by centrifugation reduces the energy demand for harvesting of the target microalgae from 13.8 MJ kgDW(-1) if only centrifugation is used to 1.83, 1.81, 1.53 and 1.34 MJ kgDW(-1), respectively, using T. suecica, E. texensis, A. falcatus and S. obliquus and 3h sedimentation before centrifugation.

  11. 76 FR 42154 - BioMETRX, Inc., Biopure Corp. (n/k/a PBBPC, Inc.), Distributed Energy Systems Corp., Fortified...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION BioMETRX, Inc., Biopure Corp. (n/k/a PBBPC, Inc.), Distributed Energy Systems Corp., Fortified... accurate information concerning the securities of Distributed Energy Systems Corp. because it has not...

  12. Canola energy balance for bio diesel production; Balanco energetico da cultura da canola para a producao de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzoni, Decio Luiz; Avila, Marcio Turra de [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (Embrapa-Soja), Londrina, PR (Brazil)], Emails: gazzonid@cnpso.embrapa.br, marcio@cnpso.embrapa.br; Borges, Jose Luiz Bernardo [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)], Emails: borges@cnpso.embrapa.br; Felici, Paulo Henrique Nardon [Bunge Alimentos S.A., Orindiuva, SP (Brazil). Div. de Acucar e Etanol], Email: paulo.felici@bunge.com

    2009-10-15

    Energy balance is the best parameter to define technical viability and sustainability of an agroenergy programme, by establishing the relationship between bio fuel and co-products of a given feedstock energy output and the quantity of energy inputs during the production process, including the agricultural and industrial stages. In this study, the amount of energy necessary to produce bio diesel from canola (Brassica napus L.) was calculated as well as the energy contents of canola oil and cake. We took into account the activities requesting energy expenditure in the cultivation, transport and canola processing. Considering meal utilization, it was concluded that for each input energy unit for canola, 2.9 energy units are produced, and considering only oil production this relationship decrease to 1:1.4. (author)

  13. Bionics and Structural Biology: A Novel Approach for Bio-energy Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Karthikeyan; R. Krishnan; S. Adline Princy

    2008-01-01

    Cellular metabolism is a very complex process. The biochemical pathways are fundamental structures of biology. These pathways possess a number of regeneration steps which facilitate energy shuttling on a massive scale. This facilitates the biochemical pathways to sustain the energy currency of the cells. This concept has been mimicked using electronic circuit components and it has been used to increase the efficiency of bio-energy generation. Six of the carbohydrate biochemical pathways have been chosen in which glycolysis is the principle pathway. All the six pathways are interrelated and coordinated in a complex manner. Mimic circuits have been designed for all the six biochemical pathways. The components of the metabolic pathways such as enzymes, cofactors etc., are substituted by appropriate electronic circuit components. Enzymes arc related to the gain of transistors by the bond dissociation energies of enzyme-substrate molecules under consideration. Cofactors and coen-zymes are represented by switches and capacitors respectively. Resistors are used for proper orientation of the circuits. The energy obtained from the current methods employed for the decomposition of organic matter is used to trigger the mimic circuits. A similar energy shuttle is observed in the mimic circuits and the percentage rise for each cycle of circuit functioning is found to be 78.90. The theoretical calculations have been made using a sample of domestic waste weighing 1.182 kg. The calculations arrived at finally speak of the efficiency of the novel methodology employed.

  14. Water electrolysis from the sources of aeolian and photovoltaic energies; Eletrolise da agua a partir de fontes de energia eolica e fotovoltaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ennio Peres da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Hidrogenio

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an overview on the water electrolysis from aeolic and photovoltaic energies sources, considering the following aspects: hydrogen technology; water electrolysis; water dissociators; 3000 A unipolar dissociators; 4000 A unipolar dissociators; bipolar dissociators; generation systems connected to the network; generation systems disconnected from the network; costs of the hydrogen.

  15. Determining the potential of inedible weed biomass for bio-energy and ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripong Premjet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of indigenous weeds in six provinces located in the low northern part of Thailand were undertaken to determine the potential of weed biomass for bio-energy and bio-ethanol. The results reveal that most of the weed samples had low moisture contents and high lower heating values (LHVs. The LHVs at the highest level, ranging from 17.7 to 18.9 Mg/kg, and at the second highest level, ranging from 16.4 to 17.6 Mg/kg, were obtained from 11 and 31 weed species, respectively. It was found that most of the collected weed samples contained high cellulose and low lignin contents. Additionally, an estimate of the theoretical ethanol yields based on the amount of cellulose and hemicellulose in each weed species indicated that a high ethanol yield resulted from weed biomasses with high cellulose and hemicellulose contents. Among the collected weed species, the highest level of ethanol yield, ranging from 478.9 to 548.5 L/ton (substrate, was achieved from 11 weed species. It was demonstrated that most of the collected weed species tested have the potential for thermal conversion and can be used as substrates for ethanol production.

  16. Environmental consequences of processing manure to produce mineral fertilizer and bio-energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, J W; Groenestein, C M; De Boer, I J M

    2012-07-15

    Liquid animal manure and its management contributes to environmental problems such as, global warming, acidification, and eutrophication. To address these environmental issues and their related costs manure processing technologies were developed. The objective here was to assess the environmental consequences of a new manure processing technology that separates manure into a solid and liquid fraction and de-waters the liquid fraction by means of reverse osmosis. This results in a liquid mineral concentrate used as mineral nitrogen and potassium fertilizer and a solid fraction used for bio-energy production or as phosphorus fertilizer. Five environmental impact categories were quantified using life cycle assessment: climate change (CC), terrestrial acidification (TA), marine eutrophication (ME), particulate matter formation (PMF), and fossil fuel depletion (FFD). For pig as well as dairy cattle manure, we compared a scenario with the processing method and a scenario with additional anaerobic digestion of the solid fraction to a reference situation applying only liquid manure. Comparisons were based on a functional unit of 1 ton liquid manure. System boundaries were set from the manure storage under the animal house to the field application of all end products. Scenarios with only manure processing increased the environmental impact for most impact categories compared to the reference: ME did not change, whereas, TA and PMF increased up to 44% as a result of NH3 and NO(x) emissions from processing and storage of solid fraction. Including digestion reduced CC by 117% for pig manure and 104% for dairy cattle manure, mainly because of substituted electricity and avoided N2O emission from storage of solid fraction. FFD decreased by 59% for pig manure and increased 19% for dairy cattle manure. TA and PMF remained higher compared to the reference. Sensitivity analysis showed that CH4 emission from manure storage, NH3 emission from processing, and the replaced nitrogen

  17. Numerical analysis on aeolian vibration of transmission lines with Stockbridge dampers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; KONG De-yi; LONG Xiao-hong; FANG Qin-han

    2008-01-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and mode superposition method instead of the energy balance method to compute transmission line aeolian vibrations induced by the Karman vortex. Firstly, we obtained the wind power inputs using CFD theory. The result is effective for aeolian vibration analyses compared with the power which were measured in wind tunnel tests. Then a new aeolian excitation was derived using the wind power equivalent principle, and the aeolian vibration distribution along transmission lines and the wind power input obtained by CFD can be account. Secondly, we formulated the motion equation of a conductor-damper system and derived a semi-analytial solution using the mode superposition method. The Stockbridge-type dampers attached were simplified to the forces transmitted by the clamps. Finally, the semi-analytical solution can be solved by iterative methods. Taking a 1 000 kV Ultra High Voltage transmission line as an example, we analyzed the line with and without dampers by the semi-analytical solution. Compared with the results which were computed by the energy balance method, the semi-analytical solution is precise enogh for aeolian vibration analyses. Besides, we also analyzed the influence of damper position and quantity.

  18. LDHs as electrode materials for electrochemical detection and energy storage: supercapacitor, battery and (bio)-sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousty, Christine; Leroux, Fabrice

    2012-11-01

    From an exhaustive overview based on applicative academic literature and patent domain, the relevance of Layered Double Hydroxide (LDHs) as electrode materials for electrochemical detection of organic molecules having environmental or health impact and energy storage is evaluated. Specifically the focus is driven on their application as supercapacitor, alkaline or lithium battery and (bio)-sensor. Inherent to the high versatility of their chemical composition, charge density, anion exchange capability, LDH-based materials are extensively studied and their performances for such applications are reported. Indeed the analytical characteristics (sensitivity and detection limit) of LDH-based electrodes are scrutinized, and their specific capacity or capacitance as electrode battery or supercapacitor materials, are detailed.

  19. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  20. Bio-energy retains its mitigation potential under elevated CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Liberloo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: If biofuels are to be a viable substitute for fossil fuels, it is essential that they retain their potential to mitigate climate change under future atmospheric conditions. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] stimulates plant biomass production; however, the beneficial effects of increased production may be offset by higher energy costs in crop management. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: We maintained full size poplar short rotation coppice (SRC systems under both current ambient and future elevated [CO2] (550 ppm and estimated their net energy and greenhouse gas balance. We show that a poplar SRC system is energy efficient and produces more energy than required for coppice management. Even more, elevated [CO2] will increase the net energy production and greenhouse gas balance of a SRC system with 18%. Managing the trees in shorter rotation cycles (i.e., 2 year cycles instead of 3 year cycles will further enhance the benefits from elevated [CO2] on both the net energy and greenhouse gas balance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Adapting coppice management to the future atmospheric [CO2] is necessary to fully benefit from the climate mitigation potential of bio-energy systems. Further, a future increase in potential biomass production due to elevated [CO2] outweighs the increased production costs resulting in a northward extension of the area where SRC is greenhouse gas neutral. Currently, the main part of the European terrestrial carbon sink is found in forest biomass and attributed to harvesting less than the annual growth in wood. Because SRC is intensively managed, with a higher turnover in wood production than conventional forest, northward expansion of SRC is likely to erode the European terrestrial carbon sink.

  1. Mathematical algorithm to transform digital biomass distribution maps into linear programming networks in order to optimize bio-energy delivery chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velazquez-Marti, B.; Annevelink, E.

    2008-01-01

    Many linear programming models have been developed to model the logistics of bio-energy chains. These models help to determine the best set-up of bio-energy chains. Most of them use network structures built up from nodes with one or more depots, and arcs connecting these depots. Each depot is source

  2. Mathematical algorithm to relate digital maps of distribution of biomass with algorithms of linear programming to optimize bio-energy delivery chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velazquez-Marti, B.; Annevelink, E.

    2008-01-01

    Many linear programming models have been developed to model the logistics of bio-energy chains. These models help to determine the best set-up of bio-energy chains. Most of them use network structures built up from nodes with one or more depots, and arcs connecting these depots. Each depot is source

  3. Applying distance-to-target weighing methodology to evaluate the environmental performance of bio-based energy, fuels, and materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Patel, M.K.; Heilmeier, H.; Bringezu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enhanced use of biomass for the production of energy, fuels, and materials is one of the key strategies towards sustainable production and consumption. Various life cycle assessment (LCA) studies demonstrate the great potential of bio-based products to reduce both the consumption of non-renewabl

  4. Applying distance-to-target weighing methodology to evaluate the environmental performance of bio-based energy, fuels, and materials

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, M.; Patel, M.K.; H. Heilmeier; Bringezu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enhanced use of biomass for the production of energy, fuels, and materials is one of the key strategies towards sustainable production and consumption. Various life cycle assessment (LCA) studies demonstrate the great potential of bio-based products to reduce both the consumption of non-renewable energy resources and greenhouse gas emissions. However, the production of biomass requires agricultural land and is often associated with adverse environmental effects such as eutrophication of s...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of goat manure: bio-conversion of energy and bio fertilizer; Digestao anaerobica de dejetos de caprinos: conversor biologico de energia e biofertilizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canafistula, Francisco Jose Firmino; Carvalho, Paulo Cesar Marques de; Teixeira, Adunias dos Santos [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Eletrica], Emails: firmino@ufc.br, carvalho@dee.ufc.br, adunias@ufc.com

    2009-07-01

    This research aims at analyzing biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of goat excrements related to energy generation, in addition to analyzing the bio-fertilizer as a byproduct of the process. Therefore, new products are generated from semi-intensive and extensive of goats, increasing its economical and environmental viability of the activity. The biogas was applied as the fuel for an Otto cycle internal combustion engine of 5.5 HP used to drive a hydraulic pump that supplied water to an area of one hectare of pasture. In addition, the spreadsheet GDER was applied to compute the kWh cost of the following electricity sources: biogas from goat excrement, diesel, electrical grid, wind and solar. It was found tat the biogas can substitute 30% of the daily energy requirements, and one can state that 1 m{sup 3} of biogas is equivalent to 740 mL of gasoline. (author)

  6. Bio energy in regions. An advisor - based on the results of the competition bio energy regions; Bioenergie in Regionen. Ein Ratgeber - basierend auf den Ergebnissen des Wettbewerbs Bioenergie-Regionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Dirk [nova-Institut GmbH - Chemiepark Knapsack, Huerth (Germany); Elbe, Sebastian; Elbe, Judith [SPRINT GbR, Darmstadt (Germany); Bohnet, Sebastian; Haak, Falko; Thraen, Daniela [Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gemeinnuetzige GmbH (DBFZ), Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    25 quite different regions in Germany are the godparents for this brochure. The spectrum includes the wind power region North Friesland in Northern Germany, the Achen Valley on the edge of the Alps in Southern Germany, the low mountain ranges of the Eifel in Western Germany and the Saxon Switzerland in East Germany. All regions contribute to the climate protection, increase of the regional value creation, job creation as well as regional alternatives of energy. The brochure under consideration describes the experiences of these 25 bio energy regions and makes these experiences available to other regions and actors. It is all about practically relevant instructions and opportunities for action in order to mobilize and utilize bio energy in regions.

  7. Agro-industrial lignocellulosic biomass a key to unlock the future bio-energy: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Anwar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available From the last several years, in serious consideration of the worldwide economic and environmental pollution issues there has been increasing research interest in the value of bio-sourced lignocellulosic biomass. Agro-industrial biomass comprised on lignocellulosic waste is an inexpensive, renewable, abundant and provides a unique natural resource for large-scale and cost-effective bio-energy collection. To expand the range of natural bio-resources the rapidly evolving tools of biotechnology can lower the conversion costs and also enhance target yield of the product of interest. In this background green biotechnology presents a promising approach to convert most of the solid agricultural wastes particularly lignocellulosic materials into liquid bio based energy-fuels. In fact, major advances have already been achieved to competitively position cellulosic ethanol with corn ethanol. The present summarized review work begins with an overview on the physico-chemical features and composition of agro-industrial biomass. The information is also given on the multi-step processing technologies of agro-industrial biomass to fuel ethanol followed by a brief summary of future considerations.

  8. Sustainable Systems Analysis of Production and Transportation Scenarios for Conventional and Bio-based Energy Commodities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, E. M.; Golden, J. S.; Nowacek, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    International commerce places unique pressures on the sustainability of water resources and marine environments. System impacts include noise, emissions, and chemical and biological pollutants like introduction of invasive species into key ecosystems. At the same time, maritime trade also enables the sustainability ambition of intragenerational equity in the economy through the global circulation of commodities and manufactured goods, including agricultural, energy and mining resources (UN Trade and Development Board 2013). This paper presents a framework to guide the analysis of the multiple dimensions of the sustainable commerce-ocean nexus. As a demonstration case, we explore the social, economic and environmental aspects of the nexus framework using scenarios for the production and transportation of conventional and bio-based energy commodities. Using coupled LCA and GIS methodologies, we are able to orient the findings spatially for additional insight. Previous work on the sustainable use of marine resources has focused on distinct aspects of the maritime environment. The framework presented here, integrates the anthropogenic use, governance and impacts on the marine and coastal environments with the natural components of the system. A similar framework has been highly effective in progressing the study of land-change science (Turner et al 2007), however modification is required for the unique context of the marine environment. This framework will enable better research integration and planning for sustainability objectives including mitigation and adaptation to climate change, sea level rise, reduced dependence on fossil fuels, protection of critical marine habitat and species, and better management of the ocean as an emerging resource base for the production and transport of commodities and energy across the globe. The framework can also be adapted for vulnerability analysis, resilience studies and to evaluate the trends in production, consumption and

  9. Theory of bio-energy transport in protein molecules and its experimental evidences as well as applications (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-feng

    2007-01-01

    A new theory of bio-energy transport along pro-tein molecules, where energy is released by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), has recently been proposed for some physical and biological reasons. In this theory, Davydov's Hamiltonian and wave function of the systems are simultaneously improved and extended. A new interac-tion has been added into the original Hamiltonian. The original wave function of the excitation state of single parti-cles has been replaced by a new wave function of the two-quanta quasi-coherent state. In such a case, bio-energy is carried and transported by the new soliton along protein molecular chains. The soliton is formed through the self-trapping of two excitons interacting with amino acid resi-dues. The exciton is generated by the vibration of amide-Ⅰ (C=O stretching) arising from the energy of the hydrolysis of ATP. The properties of the soliton are extensively studied by analytical methods and its lifetime for a wide range of parameter values relevant to protein molecules is calculated using the nonlinear quantum perturbation theory. The life-time of the new soliton at the biological temperature of 300 K is large enough and belongs to the order of 10-10 s or τ/τ 0 ≥700. The different properties of the new soliton are fur-ther studied. The results show that the new soliton in the new model is a better carrier of bio-energy transport and it can play an important role in biological processes. This model is a candidate of the bio-energy transport mechanism in protein molecules.

  10. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  11. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  12. On the mathematical modeling of aeolian saltation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet; Sørensen, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The development of a mathematical model for aeolian saltation is a promising way of obtaining further progress in the field of wind-blown sand. Interesting quantities can be calculated from a model defined in general terms, and a specific model is defined and compared to previously published data...

  13. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

    2008-01-18

    activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to

  14. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  15. Rational design equations for the Aeolian vibration of overhead power lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, M.L.; Chopra, N. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Aeolian vibration must be considered when designing overhead power transmission lines because of its potential risk of causing fatigue failure to the conductor, hardware, and tower members. Aeolian vibration is caused by the alternate shedding of Karman vortices from the top and bottom of the line's conductor when the conductor is exposed to a side wind. This paper presented a novel approach to analytically predict the vortex-induced vibration (i.e. Aeolian vibration) of an overhead power line's single conductor due to wind. The paper described the derivation of an analytical solution to the basic problem of the Aeolian vibration of a conductor span with equivalent supports on both ends by using the energy balance principle as well as the semi-empirical equations for the wind power input and the self damping of a conductor. The paper noted that a wind's turbulence effect may also be taken into account by using a previously found analytical solution. Simple, pragmatic design equations were established for undamped conductor spans by curve-fitting the numerical data from analytical solutions. It was concluded that the complicated problem of Aeolian vibration of a single conductor without damper or with multiple dampers could be easily solved by using the analytical solutions developed in this paper and that simple, yet rational design equations have been established for the Aeolian vibration of undamped conductor spans to bridge the gap between the apparently complicated theory and the often overly simplified actual design practice. 13 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  16. Aeolian Processes at Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, W. A.; Fike, D. A.; Greeley, R.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Malin, M. C.; Soderblom, L.; Squyres, S.; Sullivan, R.; Thompson, S.

    2004-12-01

    The Opportunity Rover has observed a variety of aeolian features at Meridiani Planum. These features imply wind-related processes that operate on a range of time-scales, so that at least a relative time-scale of formation and modification can be assigned to many. (a) Features forming and changing in the shortest time include probable impact ripples (cm-scale) that occur in dark basalt sand on the floors of local depressions throughout the plains. Also in this category are deposits of bright airfall dust (in the form of streaks) that are not removed downwind of topographic features such as crater rims. Analysis of MOC imagery indicates that streaks change orientation after intense dust storms. The similar orientations of impact ripples and bright streaks are thought to indicate the prevailing direction of the most-recent vigorous wind regime. (b) Forming and changing on a longer, intermediate time-scale (and hence older) are deflationary ripples armored with well-sorted mm-sized hematitic grains that likely propagate by creep (i.e., pushed by the impacts of smaller saltating grains). The removal of dust from the plains during storms implies saltation of sand ( ˜ 100 μ m) which indicates shear velocities approaching what is required to roll the ˜ 1 mm hematitic grains. The ``plains ripples'' rarely occupy local depressions and cover the plains at Meridiani Planum ( ˜ 1 cm tall, ˜ 10 cm wide, up to ˜ 1 m long). Plains ripples indicate two prominent orientations: the orientation of individual bedforms as well as that of en-echelon ripple trains. As deflationary structures that form by the winnowing of small grains, these features require relatively long periods to form. The presence of multiple orientations indicates that, once formed, multiple episodes of vigorous winds may be required to change markedly the orientations of these features. (c) Requiring probably the longest formation times are tails of protected rock downwind of hematite spherules embedded in

  17. Preparation of the soil for the energy policy turnaround. With bio-energy for more climate protection and sustainability. Collection of essays with contributions from science, practice and policy; Den Boden bereiten fuer die Energiewende. Mit Bioenergie fuer mehr Klimaschutz und Nachhaltigkeit. Aufsatzsammlung mit Beitraegen aus Wissenschaft, Praxis und Politik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    In order to create acceptance by understanding and in order to support the energy policy turnaround, the Agency for Renewable Energies (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) supplies several contributions to the following topics: (1) Bio-energy and the energy policy turnaround; (2) Sustainability by means of bio-energy, but how?; (3) How can energy crops modify the region?; (4) Bio-Energy and the landscape of the future; (5) Isles with green energy: Bio-Energy for decentralized solutions; (6) Bio-energy and organic agriculture; (7) Forest and field in the climate protection.

  18. Influence of structure disorders and temperaturesof systems on the bio-energy transport in proteinmolecules (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-feng PANG

    2008-01-01

    The influence of molecular structure disor-ders and physiological temperature on the states and properties of solitons as transporters of bio-energy are numerically studied through the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and a new theory based on my paper [Front. Phys. China, 2007, 2(4): 469]. The structure dis-orders include fluctuations in the characteristic parame-ters of the spring constant, dipole-dipole interaction con-stant and exciton-phonon coupling constant, as well as the chain-chain interaction coefficient among the three channels and ground state energy resulting from the dis-order distributions of masses of amino acid residues and impurities. In this paper, we investigate the behav-iors and states of solitons in a single protein molecu-lar chain, and in α-Helix protein molecules with three channels. In the former we prove first that the new soli-tons can move without dispersion, retaining its shape, velocity and energy in a uniform and periodic protein molecule. In this case of structure disorder, the fluctu-ations of the spring constant, dipole-dipole interaction constant and exciton-phonon coupling constant, as well as the ground state energy and the disorder distribu-tions of masses of amino acid residues of the proteins influence the states and properties of motion of solitons. However, they are still quite stable and are very robust against these structure disorders, even in the presence of larger disorders in the sequence of masses, spring con-stants and coupling constants. Still, the solitons may disperse or be destroyed when the disorder distribution of the masses and fluctuations of structure parameters are quite great. If the effect of thermal perturbation of the environment on the soliton in nonuniform proteins is considered again, it is still thermally stable at the biolog-ical temperature of 300 K, and at the longer time period of 300 ps and larger spacing of 400 amino acids. The new soliton is also thermally stable in the case of motion

  19. A Conversation with Blake Simmons, Vice President, Deconstruction Division, and Jon Magnuson, Director, Fungal Biotechnology Group, Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2013-05-03

    An interview of myself and Blake Simmons conducted by Vicki Glaser, Executive Editor of Industrial Biotechnology. The subject of the interview was the relatively new PNNL led Fungal Biotechnology Group within the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI).

  20. Potential improvement to a citric wastewater treatment plant using bio-hydrogen and a hybrid energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiaohua; Yang, Haijun; Berthold, Sascha; Doetsch, Christian; Shen, Jianquan

    Treatment of highly concentrated organic wastewater is characterized as cost-consuming. The conventional technology uses the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic process (A 2/O), which does not produce hydrogen. There is potential for energy saving using hydrogen utilization associated with wastewater treatment because hydrogen can be produced from organic wastewater using anaerobic fermentation. A 50 m 3 pilot bio-reactor for hydrogen production was constructed in Shandong Province, China in 2006 but to date the hydrogen produced has not been utilized. In this work, a technical-economic model based on hydrogen utilization is presented and analyzed to estimate the potential improvement to a citric wastewater plant. The model assesses the size, capital cost, annual cost, system efficiency and electricity cost under different configurations. In a stand-alone situation, the power production from hydrogen is not sufficient for the required load, thus a photovoltaic array (PV) is employed as the power supply. The simulated results show that the combination of solar and bio-hydrogen has a much higher cost compared with the A 2/O process. When the grid is connected, the system cost achieved is 0.238 US t -1 wastewater, which is lower than 0.257 US t -1 by the A 2/O process. The results reveal that a simulated improvement by using bio-hydrogen and a FC system is effective and feasible for the citric wastewater plant, even when compared to the current cost of the A 2/O process. In addition, lead acid and vanadium flow batteries were compared for energy storage service. The results show that a vanadium battery has lower cost and higher efficiency due to its long lifespan and energy efficiency. Additionally, the cost distribution of components shows that the PV dominates the cost in the stand-alone situation, while the bio-reactor is the main cost component in the parallel grid.

  1. Second-generation bio-ethanol (SGB) from Malaysian palm empty fruit bunch: energy and exergy analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Teng; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-07-01

    Recently, second-generation bio-ethanol (SGB), which utilizes readily available lignocellulosic biomass has received much interest as another potential source of liquid biofuel comparable to biodiesel. Thus the aim of this paper is to determine the exergy efficiency and to compare the effectiveness of SGB and palm methyl ester (PME) processes. It was found that the production of bio-ethanol is more thermodynamically sustainable than that of biodiesel as the net exergy value (NExV) of SGB is 10% higher than that of PME. Contrarily, the former has a net energy value (NEV) which is 9% lower than the latter. Despite this, SGB is still strongly recommended as a potential biofuel because SGB production can help mitigate several detrimental impacts on the environment.

  2. Laboratory investigations on continuous bio-methanization of energy crops as mono-substrate without supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Burak [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW Hamburg), Lifetec Process Engineering, Lohbruegger Kirchstrasse 65, 21033 Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany); Bogazici University, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bebek, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    Continuous bio-methanization of an energy crop, namely the beet silage, was investigated in this laboratory-scale work as mono-substrate, using a mesophilic biogas digester controlled by a fuzzy logic control (FLC) technique and without using any supplementing or buffering agent, despite the low pH of the substrate around 3.80. The temperature, pH, redox potential (ORP), daily biogas production and composition of digester biogas were continuously measured online. During the operation, the hydraulic retention time (HRT) varied between 24.8 and 9 days, as the organic loading rate (OLR) ranged from 2.6 to 4.7 g L{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The average pH, specific gas production rate (spec. GPR) and volumetric gas production rate (vol. GPR) were determined to be 7.12, 0.31 L g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} and 1.084 L L{sup -1} d{sup -1}, respectively. The average methane (CH{sub 4}) content of digester biogas was about 56%. The FLC technique, which was developed at HAW Hamburg for anaerobic conversion of acidic energy crops to methane, determined the daily feeding volume ({proportional_to} OLR/HRT) for the biogas digester, depending on the feedback from online pH and methane measurements, and on the calculation of the spec. GPR. The spec. GPR was calculated by the corrected daily biogas production. Through online monitoring of pH, biogas production rate and composition, and by use of the FLC technique, the acidic beet silage could continuously be converted to biogas, without using manure or any other kind of buffering or supplementing agent(s). The lab-scale anaerobic biogas digester performed stable and safe, without encountering any problems of instability, as indicated by an adequate amount of buffering capacity, a VFA content below 0.5 g L{sup -1} and a neutral pH range throughout the study. (author)

  3. Introducing a New International Society of Aeolian Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Lee, J.; Lancaster, N.; Bullard, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Aeolian research is a long-standing and rapidly growing area of geological study where scientists of many disciplines meet to investigate the effects of wind on the surface of the Earth and other planetary bodies such as Mars and Titan. Fields of study in aeolian research cover a broad spectrum ranging from developing a basic scientific understanding of the fundamental physical processes of grain motion to the effects of soil erosion on landscape health and environmental sustainability. Aeolian research also includes studies of the effects of aeolian particles on global climate, air quality, and human health, coastal sand transport processes, land degradation, dune migration, the formation of sand seas, and much more. A growing number of international conferences have been organized to focus specifically on aeolian phenomena and a vast number of scholarly publications have been produced to support the science. One popular bibliography includes over 30,000 citations and hundreds of peer-reviewed papers are published each year. Until very recently, no scientific society specifically dealing with aeolian research has been available. The new International Society of Aeolian Research (ISAR) that has been organized to bring together aeolian scientists from around the world. The new society was created to promote contacts among researchers in aeolian processes and related subjects for discussion and comparison of research, to initiate conferences (such as the International Conference on Aeolian Research), to organize excursions, and support the publication of a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The International Society of Aeolian Research sponsors the new Elsevier journal Aeolian Research in support of these activities. This paper will provide further details about the new society and the journal. Please see www.aeolianresearch.org for details.

  4. Aesthetic value of aeolian geomorphosites in the Kumtagh Desert, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinFeng Wu; Xin Wang; Feng Guo; Lei Li

    2014-01-01

    Tourism development of aeolian geomorphosites in the Kumtagh Desert is beneficial to both harmonious development of human-nature relationship and the sustainable development of the tourist industry in the Kumtagh Desert and its sur-rounding area. This paper adopts some research methods including field observation, expert assessment, and systematic investigation to analyze and evaluate the aesthetic value of aeolian geomorphosites in the Kumtagh Desert from three aspects of"Beauty of Morphology","Beauty of Color"and"Beauty of Forms". This research is a creative work in the field of aeolian geomorphosites combining the method of aeolian geomorphology and tourism geography.

  5. Bio-oil from cassava peel: a potential renewable energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Ong Lu; Kurniawan, Alfin; Lin, Chun Xiang; Ju, Yi-Hsu; Ismadji, Suryadi

    2013-10-01

    In this work, liquid biofuel (bio-oil) was produced by pyrolizing cassava peel. The experiments were conducted isothermally in a fixed-bed tubular reactor at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600°C with a heating rate of 20°C/min. The chemical compositions of bio-oil were analyzed by a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. For the optimization of liquid product, temperature was plotted to be the most decisive factor. The maximum yield of bio-oil ca. 51.2% was obtained at 525°C and the biofuel has a gross calorific value of 27.43 MJ/kg. The kinetic-based mechanistic model fitted well with experimental yield of pyrolysis products with the mean squared error (MSE) of 13.37 (R(2)=0.96) for solid (char), 16.24 (R(2)=0.95) for liquid (bio-oil), and 0.49 (R(2)=0.99) for gas.

  6. A Bio-Inspired, Heavy-Metal-Free, Dual-Electrolyte Liquid Battery towards Sustainable Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2016-04-04

    Wide-scale exploitation of renewable energy requires low-cost efficient energy storage devices. The use of metal-free, inexpensive redox-active organic materials represents a promising direction for environmental-friendly, cost-effective sustainable energy storage. To this end, a liquid battery is designed using hydroquinone (H2BQ) aqueous solution as catholyte and graphite in aprotic electrolyte as anode. The working potential can reach 3.4 V, with specific capacity of 395 mA h g(-1) and stable capacity retention about 99.7% per cycle. Such high potential and capacity is achieved using only C, H and O atoms as building blocks for redox species, and the replacement of Li metal with graphite anode can circumvent potential safety issues. As H2BQ can be extracted from biomass directly and its redox reaction mimics the bio-electrochemical process of quinones in nature, using such a bio-inspired organic compound in batteries enables access to greener and more sustainable energy-storage technology.

  7. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose fibers

  8. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: an innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, M; Rada, E C; Antolini, D

    2011-01-01

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N(2)O, NH(3) and H(2)S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  9. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals using catalysts with different concentrations of acid sites. It shows that greater separation of acid sites makes catalysts more efficient at producing hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. The conversion of biomass into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant attention because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Biomass is a renewable resource, which is abundant worldwide and can potentially be exploited to produce transportation fuels that are less damaging to the environment. This renewable resource consists of cellulose (40–50%), hemicellulose (25–35%), and lignin (16–33%) biopolymers in addition to smaller quantities of inorganic materials such as silica and alkali and alkaline earth metals (calcium and potassium). Fast pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical technology for converting biomass into precursors for hydrocarbon fuels because it produces up to 75 wt% bio-oil,1 which can be upgraded to feedstocks and/or blendstocks for further refining to finished fuels. Bio-oil that has not been upgraded has limited applications because of the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups, derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which gives rise to high acidity, high viscosity, low heating value, immiscibility with hydrocarbons and aging during storage. Ex situ catalytic vapor phase upgrading is a promising approach for improving the properties of bio-oil. The goal of this process is to reject oxygen and produce a bio-oil with improved properties for subsequent downstream conversion to hydrocarbons.

  10. Archaen to Recent aeolian sand systems and their sedimentary record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; Clemmensen, Lars B; Lancaster, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The sedimentary record of aeolian sand systems extends from the Archean to the Quaternary, yet current understanding of aeolian sedimentary processes and product remains limited. Most preserved aeolian successions represent inland sand-sea or dunefield (erg) deposits, whereas coastal systems...... are primarily known from the Cenozoic. The complexity of aeolian sedimentary processes and facies variability are under-represented and excessively simplified in current facies models, which are not sufficiently refined to reliably account for the complexity inherent in bedform morphology and migratory...... behaviour, and therefore cannot be used to consistently account for and predict the nature of the preserved sedimentary record in terms of formative processes. Archean and Neoproterozoic aeolian successions remain poorly constrained. Palaeozoic ergs developed and accumulated in relation...

  11. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-08

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm(-1); 96 dB cm(-1)). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  12. Kinetics of coffee industrial residue pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model and components separation of bio-oil by sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanwei; Ren, Jie; Ye, Ziwei; Xu, Qizhi; Liu, Jingyong; Sun, Shuiyu

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the kinetics of coffee industrial residue (CIR) pyrolysis, the effect of pyrolysis factors on yield of bio-oil component and components separation of bio-oil. The kinetics of CIR pyrolysis was analyzed using distributed activation energy model (DAEM), based on the experiments in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and it indicated that the average of activation energy (E) is 187.86kJ·mol(-1). The bio-oils were prepared from CIR pyrolysis in vacuum tube furnace, and its components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among pyrolysis factors, pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor on components yield of bio-oil, directly concerned with the volatilization and yield of components (palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, octadecanoic acid and caffeine). Furthermore, a new method (sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis) was put forward and applied to the components separation of bio-oil. Based on experiments, a solution of components separation of bio-oil was come out.

  13. Towards an integrated system for bio-energy: hydrogen production by Escherichia coli and use of palladium-coated waste cells for electricity generation in a fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, R L; Redwood, M D; Yong, P; Caldelari, I; Sargent, F; Macaskie, L E

    2010-12-01

    Escherichia coli strains MC4100 (parent) and a mutant strain derived from this (IC007) were evaluated for their ability to produce H(2) and organic acids (OAs) via fermentation. Following growth, each strain was coated with Pd(0) via bioreduction of Pd(II). Dried, sintered Pd-biomaterials ('Bio-Pd') were tested as anodes in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell for their ability to generate electricity from H(2). Both strains produced hydrogen and OAs but 'palladised' cells of strain IC007 (Bio-Pd(IC007)) produced ~threefold more power as compared to Bio-Pd(MC4100) (56 and 18 mW respectively). The power output used, for comparison, commercial Pd(0) powder and Bio-Pd made from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, was ~100 mW. The implications of these findings for an integrated energy generating process are discussed.

  14. Evaluating the bio-energy potential of groundnut shell and sugarcane bagasse waste composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde Ajani Oyelaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An assessment has been carried out on bio-coal briquettes from coal with sugarcane bagasse and coal with groundnut shell. Proximate analyses and elemental compositions of the coal and biomasses were determined. Different samples of briquettes were produced by blending varying composition of the coal with the biomasses in the ratio of 100:0; 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60 and 0: 100, using calcium carbonate as a desulfurizing agent and cassava starch as a binder. A manual hydraulically operated briquetting machine was used with the pressure kept at 5MPa. The results of the properties evaluated shows that biomass increases the burning efficiency of briquettes with increase in the biomass material, increasing combustion rate, faster ignition, producing lesser ash and fewer pollutants. Results obtained shows that the calorific value of briquettes produced from coal-groundnut shells and coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 16.94 - 20.81 and 17.31 – 21.03 MJ/kg respectively. The ignition time ranges from 6.9 – 12.5 minutes for coal-groundnut shells briquettes while that of coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 6.5 – 11.1 minutes. The bio-coal blends with sugarcane bagasse were better than that of groundnut shells. However, both sugarcane bagasse and groundnut shells produce bio-coal briquettes that are very efficient, providing sufficient heat as at the time necessary, generating less smoke and gases (e.g sulphur that are harmful to environment, and generating less ash, as these have adverse effect during cooking.

  15. The Autonomous House: A Bio-Hydrogen Based Energy Self-Sufficient Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-jen Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the greenhouse effect and global energy crisis, finding sources of clean, alternative energy and developing everyday life applications have become urgent tasks. This study proposes the development of an "autonomous house" emphasizing the use of modern green energy technology to reduce environmental load, achieve energy autonomy and use energy intelligently in order to create a sustainable, comfortable living environment. The houses' two attributes are: (1 a self-sufficient energy cycle and (2 autonomous energy control to maintain environmental comfort. The autonomous house thus combines energy-conserving, carbon emission-reducing passive design with active elements needed to maintain a comfortable environment.

  16. The autonomous house: a bio-hydrogen based energy self-sufficient approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Yuan; Chu, Chen-Yeon; Cheng, Ming-Jen; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2009-04-01

    In the wake of the greenhouse effect and global energy crisis, finding sources of clean, alternative energy and developing everyday life applications have become urgent tasks. This study proposes the development of an "autonomous house" emphasizing the use of modern green energy technology to reduce environmental load, achieve energy autonomy and use energy intelligently in order to create a sustainable, comfortable living environment. The houses' two attributes are: (1) a self-sufficient energy cycle and (2) autonomous energy control to maintain environmental comfort. The autonomous house thus combines energy-conserving, carbon emission-reducing passive design with active elements needed to maintain a comfortable environment.

  17. Properties of Soliton-Transported Bio-energy in α-Helix Protein Molecules with Three Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We study numerically the propagating properties of soliton-transported bio-energy excited in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels in the cases of the short-time and long-time motions and its features of collision at temperature T = 0 and biological temperature T = 300 K by the dynamic equations in the improved Davydov theory and fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, respectively. From these simulation experiments we see that the new solitons in the improved model can move without dispersion at a constant speed retaining its shape and energy in the cases of motion of both short-time or T = 0 and long time or T = 300 K and can go through each other without scattering in their collisions. In these cases its lifetime is, at least, 120 ps at 300 K, in which the soliton can travel over about 700 amino acid residues. This result is consistent with analytic result obtained by quantum perturbed theory in this model. In the meanwhile, the influences of structure disorder of α-helix protein molecules, including the inhomogeneous distribution of amino acids with different masses and fluctuations of spring constant, dipole-dipole interaction, exciton-phonon coupling constant and diagonal disorder, on the solitons are also studied by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the soliton still is very robust against the structure disorders and thermal perturbation of proteins at biological temperature 300 K. Therefore we can conclude that the new soliton in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels is a possible carrier of bio-energy transport and the improved model is possibly a candidate for the mechanism of this transport.

  18. Impact of biological treatments of bio-waste for nutrients, energy and bio-methane recovery in a life cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Contini, Stefano; Morettini, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Composting of the source-segregated organic fraction of municipal solid waste was compared in a life cycle perspective with conventional anaerobic digestion (AD), aimed at electricity substitution, and with AD aimed at biogas upgrading into bio-methane. Three different uses of the bio-methane were considered: injection in the natural gas grid for civil heating needs; use as fuel for high efficiency co-generation; use as fuel for vehicles. Scenarios with biogas upgrading showed quite similar impact values, generally higher than those of composting and conventional AD, for which there was a lower impact. A decisive contribution to the higher impact of the scenarios with bio-methane production was by the process for biogas upgrading. In any case the substitution of natural gas with bio-methane resulted in higher avoided impacts compared to electricity substitution by conventional AD. The uncertainty analysis confirmed the positive values for eutrophication, acidification and particulate matter. Large uncertainty was determined for global warming and photochemical ozone formation.

  19. Estimating Energy- and Eco-Balances for Continuous Bio-Ethanol Production Using a Blenke Cascade System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Kohlus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy and environmental effects of wheat-based fuel, produced continuously by a Blenke cascade system, were assessed. Two scenarios: (1 no-co-products utilization scenario; and (2 co-products utilization scenario, were compared. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA model was used for analysis. The scope covered a cradle-to-gate inventory. The results from energy analysis showed, that wheat-based ethanol has a positive average net energy value (NEV, NEV = 3.35 MJ/kg ethanol with an average net energy ratio (NER, NER = 1.14 MJ/MJ fossils for scenario 1, while for scenario 2, NEV = 20 MJ/kg ethanol with NER = 3.94 MJ/MJ fossils. The environmental performance analysis indicated that in scenario 1, the strongest contribution to environmental impacts was from the ethanol conversion stage; whereas in scenario 2, it was from wheat production stage. The use of a continuous fermentation system based on Blenke cascade is a promising technology that increases wheat based bio-ethanol’s energy benefits. In addition, the calculated parameters show the potential to significantly reduce emissions level.

  20. Momentum profile of aeolian saltation cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The momentum profile of an aeolian saltation cloud is poorly understood. In this paper, height profiles for saltation momentum are reconstructed for three particle-size populations at four wind velocities based on profiles for mean particle velocity and relative particle concentration of saltation cloud obtained using particle image velocimetry in a wind tunnel. The results suggest that the saltation momentum profiles are characterized by peak curves with a maximum at some height above the surface. The height of this maximum increases with increasing wind velocity, but decreases with increasing particle size. It is linearly correlated with average saltation height and is comparable with the results of numerical simulations in a previous study. Our results confirm that Bagnold’s kink is an important feature of wind velocity profiles modified by the presence of saltating particles and that the height of the kink is closely related to the average trajectories of the saltating particles.

  1. Bio-Energy Connectivity And Ecosystem Services. An Assessment by Pandora 3.0 Model for Land Use Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pelorosso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Landscape connectivity is one of the major issues related to biodiversity conservation and to the delivery of Ecosystem Services (ES. Several models were developed to assess landscape connectivity but lack of data and mismatching scale of analysis often represent insurmountable constraints for the correct evaluation and integration of ecological connectivity into plans and assessment procedures. In this paper a procedure for ES assessment related with Habitat and Bio-Energy Landscape Connectivity (BELC is proposed. The method is based on the connectivity measure furnished by the last version of PANDORA model and uses a modified formulation of current ES evaluation. The implementation of the model in a real case has highlighted its potential multi-scale workability. The spatial approach of the model aims at furnishing a further tool for the spread of ES and landscape ecology concepts into procedures of assessment (e.g. EIA, SEA and land use planning at different administrative scales.

  2. Optimization of inoculum to substrate ratio for bio-energy generation in co-digestion of tannery solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sri Bala Kameswari, K.; Chitra Kalyanaraman,; Porselvam, S. [Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Environmental Technology Division, Chennai (India); Thanasekaran, K. [Anna University, Centre for Environmental Studies, Chennai (India)

    2012-04-15

    The inoculum to substrate (I/S) ratio is an important factor which influences the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, the effect of different I/S ratios on the performance of co-digestion of fleshings along with mixture of sludge generated during treatment of tannery wastewater was investigated. The parameters studied were biogas generation, volatile solids reduction, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, and the stability of the digestion process based on VFA to alkalinity ratio was evaluated for various I/S ratios. Economical significance of I/S ratio as related to the volume of the anaerobic digester and the potential benefit of bio-energy generated are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  3. Multi-Technique Study of a Martian Aeolian Sand Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K.; Marshall, J.; Evans, N. D.; Luttge, A.

    2001-01-01

    Potential scientific returns from technological advances in various forms of microscopy and benchmarking of currently available in-situ measurements using an aeolian red dune sand from the central Australian desert. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Assessment of bio-energy potential in tea industries of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tea production is an energy intensive agro-processing trade. Since high demand of energy and increased in fuel prices, tea waste can be utilized to supplement part of energy required in tea processing. This study was conducted in tea estates of Assam (North Lakhimpur, Sonitpur, and Silchar, India. The total energy consumption in tea manufacturing was found to be 4.2-8.5 kWh/kg of made tea. Thus, total energy consumption (5 kWh/kg of tea for manufacturing of 1197 million kg of tea from 564 thousand hectare tea plantation in India (during 2014-2015 was 5.985×109 kWh. The total obtainable energy from tea waste was estimated and the conversion efficiency of calorific value to electrical energy was assumed to be 10%, which is the least value of conversion efficiency. Energy potential in processing and garden waste was found to be 11.999×107 kWh and 3.492×1010kWh, respectively, and corresponding electrical energy was estimated to be 1.1999×107 kWh and 3.492×109 kWh, respectively. Thus, comparing the energy that could be generated from wastes in tea estate and that required in tea manufacturing, it can be concluded that the huge amount of energy could be saved with the utilization of tea waste.

  5. Accounting for the constrained availability of land: a comparison of bio-based ethanol, polyethylene, and PLA with regard to non-renewable energy use and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Conijn, J.G.; Corre, W.J.; Pate, E.

    2012-01-01

    In a bio-based economy, chemicals, materials, biofuels, and other forms of energy will be produced from biomass. Pressure on agricultural land will thus increase, calling for highly efficient solutions in terms of land use, with minimal environmental impacts. In order to gain better insight into the

  6. Comparing environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy – A life cycle perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.W.; Vinken, T.M.W.J.; Hamelin, L.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co-substrates for anaer

  7. Comparing environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy – A life cycle perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vries, J.W.; Vinken, T.M.W.J; Hamelin, Lorie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co-substrates for an......The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co......-substrates for anaerobic digestion. Environmental impact categories considered were climate change, terrestrial acidification, marine and freshwater eutrophication, particulate matter formation, land use, and fossil fuel depletion. Six scenarios were evaluated: mono-digestion of manure, co-digestion with: maize silage......, maize silage and glycerin, beet tails, wheat yeast concentrate (WYC), and roadside grass. Mono-digestion reduced most impacts, but represented a limited source for bio-energy. Co-digestion with maize silage, beet tails, and WYC (competing with animal feed), and glycerin increased bio-energy production...

  8. Production of bio-energy from low-value biomass by bioconversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Tianwei

    2014-01-01

    Since 1993,China has become a net importer of energy from a net exporter. The total energy con-sumption has been greater than the total supply,and the external dependence of the energy demand increases rapidly. China’s crude oil import volume and imports amount reached 253.78 million tons and 196.664 billion US dollars in 2011,with a growth rate of 6%and 45.3%,respectively,year-on-year. The significant increase in demand for oil and the caused structural contradictions are increasingly becoming the greatest challenge for China’s energy security. The energy crisis has not only touched everyone’s nerves,but also sparked a strong desire to find alternative energy.

  9. Production of bio-energy from low-value biomass by bioconversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Tianwei

    2014-01-01

    Since 1993, China has become a net importer of energy from a net exporter. The total energy con- sumption has been greater than the total supply, and the external dependence of the energy demand increases rapidly. China' s crude oil import volume and imports amount reached 253.78 million tons and 196.664 billion US dollars in 2011, with a growth rate of 6 % and 45.3 %, respectively, year-on-year. The significant increase in demand for oil and the caused structural contradictions are increasingly becoming the greatest challenge for China' s energy security. The energy crisis has not only touched everyone' s nerves, but also sparked a strong desire to find alternative energy.

  10. Photobiological hydrogen production and artificial photosynthesis for clean energy: from bio to nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, K; Najafpour, M M; Voloshin, R A; Balaghi, S E; Tyystjärvi, E; Timilsina, R; Eaton-Rye, J J; Tomo, T; Nam, H G; Nishihara, H; Ramakrishna, S; Shen, J-R; Allakhverdiev, S I

    2015-12-01

    Global energy demand is increasing rapidly and due to intensive consumption of different forms of fuels, there are increasing concerns over the reduction in readily available conventional energy resources. Because of the deleterious atmospheric effects of fossil fuels and the uncertainties of future energy supplies, there is a surge of interest to find environmentally friendly alternative energy sources. Hydrogen (H2) has attracted worldwide attention as a secondary energy carrier, since it is the lightest carbon-neutral fuel rich in energy per unit mass and easy to store. Several methods and technologies have been developed for H2 production, but none of them are able to replace the traditional combustion fuel used in automobiles so far. Extensively modified and renovated methods and technologies are required to introduce H2 as an alternative efficient, clean, and cost-effective future fuel. Among several emerging renewable energy technologies, photobiological H2 production by oxygenic photosynthetic microbes such as green algae and cyanobacteria or by artificial photosynthesis has attracted significant interest. In this short review, we summarize the recent progress and challenges in H2-based energy production by means of biological and artificial photosynthesis routes.

  11. A two-stage bio hydrogen process for energy generation from municipal solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo-Benitez, J. a.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    Energy supply and disposal of solid wastes are two big challenges that great cities face at the present time. Several experts have shown that hydrogen is the fuel of the future, due to their high energy content (three times more than that of the gasoline) and its clean combustion. (Author)

  12. Research Extension and Education Programs on Bio-based Energy Technologies and Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Sam [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Womac, Al [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station

    2010-03-02

    The overall objectives of this project were to provide enhanced educational resources for the general public, educational and development opportunities for University faculty in the Southeast region, and enhance research knowledge concerning biomass preprocessing and deconstruction. All of these efforts combine to create a research and education program that enhances the biomass-based industries of the United States. This work was broken into five primary objective areas: • Task A - Technical research in the area of biomass preprocessing, analysis, and evaluation. • Tasks B&C - Technical research in the areas of Fluidized Beds for the Chemical Modification of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Biomass Deconstruction and Evaluation. • Task D - Analyses for the non-scientific community to provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of biomass supply, demand, technologies, markets and policies; identify a set of feasible alternative paths for biomass industry development and quantify the impacts associated with alternative path. • Task E - Efforts to build research capacity and develop partnerships through faculty fellowships with DOE national labs The research and education programs conducted through this grant have led to three primary results. They include: • A better knowledge base related to and understanding of biomass deconstruction, through both mechanical size reduction and chemical processing • A better source of information related to biomass, bioenergy, and bioproducts for researchers and general public users through the BioWeb system. • Stronger research ties between land-grant universities and DOE National Labs through the faculty fellowship program. In addition to the scientific knowledge and resources developed, funding through this program produced a minimum of eleven (11) scientific publications and contributed to the research behind at least one patent.

  13. Meso-scale aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes: The nature of aeolian transport events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Davidson-Arnott, Robin

    2011-03-01

    Observations of aeolian transport in coastal areas have focused on short-term experiments because of limitations imposed by instrumentation. This paper uses a case study at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, Canada, to analyze how sediment transport takes place at the beach over periods of weeks to months. A monitoring station provided hourly time series of vegetation cover, shoreline position, fetch distances, surficial moisture content, presence of ice and snow, wind speed and direction and transport processes over nine months. Analysis shows that high wind speeds may not generate any net transport into the dunes because of the limitations imposed by snow/ice cover, moisture, and short fetch distances. Despite extreme winds during intense storms, such events often lead to wave scarping rather than aeolian sediment input to the foredunes. When sediment was transported on the beach, the magnitude was regulated by a combination of factors including: angle of wind approach, fetch distance, moisture content, and duration of the wind event. In particular, angle of wind approach (and therefore fetch distance) may demote a high magnitude wind event with strong transport potential to one with no transport at all, which poses challenges for predicting the effects of individual storms over the course of several months. A significant proportion of sediment delivery to the foredunes was associated with wind events of low to medium magnitude. It is suggested here that large magnitude wind events have low probabilities of resulting in transport towards the foredune because factors such as wave inundation play an increasing role in preventing sediment movement across the beach. This has implications for modelling and management, and highlights differences between the magnitude and frequency of aeolian transport events in the coastal environment compared to those in deserts and to fluvial sediment transport.

  14. Producing bio-based bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology saves energy and combats climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B G; Blok, K; Patel, M K

    2007-11-15

    The production of bulk chemicals from biomass can make a significant contribution to solving two of the most urgent environmental problems: climate change and depletion of fossil energy. We analyzed current and future technology routes leading to 15 bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology and calculated their CO2 emissions and fossil energy use. Savings of more than 100% in non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions are already possible with current state of the art biotechnology. Substantial further savings are possible for the future by improved fermentation and downstream processing. Worldwide CO2 savings in the range of 500-1000 million tons per year are possible using future technology. Industrial biotechnology hence offers excellent opportunities for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and decreasing dependence on fossil energy sources and therefore has the potential to make inroads into the existing chemical industry.

  15. Anaerobic digestion as a key technology in bio-energy production: Current achievements and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Dewil, Raf; Appels, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been applied for many decades for the treatment of organic wastes like manure, wastewater sludge and crop residues. Whereas these streams were considered as a nuisance in the past, nowadays, emphasis lies on resource recovery. These wastes are, indeed, providing an important source of renewable energy. Therefore, there is a renewed interest in anaerobic digestion as a technology for sustainable renewable energy production. Also, anaerobic digestion plays a central role...

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions after sewage sludge and inorganic N-fertilization of a willow bio-energy plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemedtsson, Leif; Hedenrud, Anna; Rychlik, Sophie; Weslien, Per; Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Achberger, Christine; Lindroth, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The use of sewage sludge as fertilizer after harvest or inorganic N-fertilization of bio-energy plantations can give rise to high emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Plantations of e.g. willow (Salix) are today grown and used for bioenergy purposes. They could serve as carbon and nitrogen sinks, lowering greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate a change in climate. However, since N2O is such a powerful greenhouse gas it can have a large impact on the total emission of greenhouse gases from a bio-energy plantation. The magnitude of N2O emissions after fertilization is therefore important to investigate. This study concerns N2O emissions from a conventionally grown bio-energy plantation of Salix. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of sewage sludge after harvest as well as inorganic N-fertilization in a growing plantation, and its effect on emissions of N2O from the soil ecosystem. The field site is a Salix plantation in south-western Sweden, a representative site in management practices and abiotic conditions. The site was divided into two areas, a larger field and smaller plots. The field was applied with sewage sludge after harvest 2013. Emissions of N2O were measured using the micrometeorological Eddy covariance technique, with a Quantum Cascade laser (Aerodyne). The fluxes of CO2 and H2O were measured using a LI-7200(Li-cor) instrument. The flux was calculated using the EddyPro software. On the plots, N2O emissions from inorganic N-fertilization (2013) were monitored using automatic chambers (height 1.05 m, volume 0.2625 m3) and a trace gas analyzer (TGA100, Campbell Scientific, USA) during approximately one (1) year. The N2O emissions from the plots (inorganic fertilizer) and field (sewage sludge) were compared with non-fertilized plots (controls) using the automatic chambers for both comparisons. The N2O emissions from the control plot for the inorganic fertilizer had an emission over the growing season that was 0.33 kg N2O

  17. Aeolian desertification and its control in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aeolian desertification is a kind of land degradation through wind erosion resulted from the excessive human activities in arid, semiarid and part of sub-humid regions in Northern China. To compare the results of remote sensing data in the late 1950s, 1975, 1987, 2000 and 2010, we can summarize that the expansion of aeolian desertified land in Northern China has been accelerated for 5 decades, as its annual expanded rate was 1,560 km2 during the late 1950s and 1975, 2,100 km2 between 1975 and 1988, 3,600 km2 from 1988 to 2000, and -1,375 km2 from 2000 to 2010. The desertified land kept expanding before 2000 and began to get rehabilitated since 2000. The impact of human activity on the aeolian desertification process is much more active than that from natural process which mainly incarnates on land use change (from rangeland to farmland and increased land use intensity (over-cultivation, over-grassing, and over-fuelwood collection. The natural vegetation cover destroyed by the human activities has accelerated the development of aeolian desertification. China has made great progresses in understanding and combating aeolian desertification through decades of effort and there were many projects carried out for the prevention and control purpose. The National Project of Grain for Green Program is the most important one with 1060 counties of 22 provinces involved. The objective is to withdraw 3.67 million ha of dry land farming and degraded steppe, and 5.13 million ha of aeolian desertified land suited to reforestation and re-vegetation will be rehabilitated. There are about 8 million ha of lands suffering from aeolian desertification will be brought under control in the next ten years and 26.67 million ha of windbreaks will be planted. The total investment from the central government is estimated to be 75 billion RMB (11 billion USD.

  18. The Energy Challenge for Pacific Island Countries: Sustainable Development and Energy Security through Bio-fuel Substitution for Remote Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, M.J.

    2006-10-15

    Pacific Island Countries (PICs) face a number of development challenges as a result of their small size and geographically-remote locations. One of the most prominent is access to affordable energy supplies. The high cost of petroleum products affects all sectors, impacting islanders' day to day life and undermining achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Measures are needed that can support energy security and fair pricing in PICs, through improved regulatory frameworks and the substitution of local energy resources for imported fuels wherever possible. At the macro level, regional bulk procurement contracts offer one option to address the challenge of expensive imported petroleum products. At the micro level, biofuel substitution may offer another opportunity. Coconut biodiesel, produced from locally-harvested coconuts, may enable these remote island populations to develop their own sustainable energy supplies, and provide sustainable livelihoods for their people.

  19. Producing Bio-Based Bulk Chemicals Using Industrial Biotechnology Saves Energy and Combats Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, B.G.; Blok, K.; Patel, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    The production of bulk chemicals from biomass can make a significant contribution to solving two of the most urgent environmental problems: climate change and depletion of fossil energy. We analyzed current and future technology routes leading to 15 bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology and

  20. Bio-Wastes as an Alternative Household Cooking Energy Source in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudina Terefe Tucho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Up to the present day, wood has been used to supply the needs for cooking in rural Africa. Due to the ongoing deforestation, households need to change to other energy sources. To cover this need, a large amount of people are using residues from agriculture (straw, manure instead. However, both straw and manure also have a function in agriculture for soil improvement. Using all the straw and manure will seriously affect the food production. In this paper we first determine the amount of energy that households need for cooking (about 7 GJ per year. Then we estimate the amount of residues that can be obtained from the agricultural system and the amount of energy for cooking that can be derived from this amount when different conversion techniques are used. The amount of residues needed is strongly affected by the technology used. The traditional three stone fires require at least two times as much resource than the more advanced technologies. Up to 4 ha of land or 15 cows are needed to provide enough straw and manure to cook on the traditional three stone fires. When more efficient techniques are used (briquetting, biogas this can be reduced to 2 ha and six cows. Due to large variation in resource availability between households, about 80% of the households own less than 2 ha and 70% holds less than four cows. This means that even when modern, energy efficient techniques are used the largest share of the population is not able to generate enough energy for cooking from their own land and/or cattle. Most rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa may share similar resource holding characteristics for which the results from the current findings on Ethiopia can be relevant.

  1. A bio-inspired study on tidal energy extraction with flexible flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendi; Xiao, Qing; Cheng, Fai

    2013-09-01

    Previous research on the flexible structure of flapping wings has shown an improved propulsion performance in comparison to rigid wings. However, not much is known about this function in terms of power efficiency modification for flapping wing energy devices. In order to study the role of the flexible wing deformation in the hydrodynamics of flapping wing energy devices, we computationally model the two-dimensional flexible single and twin flapping wings in operation under the energy extraction conditions with a large Reynolds number of 106. The flexible motion for the present study is predetermined based on a priori structural result which is different from a passive flexibility solution. Four different models are investigated with additional potential local distortions near the leading and trailing edges. Our simulation results show that the flexible structure of a wing is beneficial to enhance power efficiency by increasing the peaks of lift force over a flapping cycle, and tuning the phase shift between force and velocity to a favourable trend. Moreover, the impact of wing flexibility on efficiency is more profound at a low nominal effective angle of attack (AoA). At a typical flapping frequency f * = 0.15 and nominal effective AoA of 10°, a flexible integrated wing generates 7.68% higher efficiency than a rigid wing. An even higher increase, around six times that of a rigid wing, is achievable if the nominal effective AoA is reduced to zero degrees at feathering condition. This is very attractive for a semi-actuated flapping energy system, where energy input is needed to activate the pitching motion. The results from our dual-wing study found that a parallel twin-wing device can produce more power compared to a single wing due to the strong flow interaction between the two wings.

  2. Energy Efficient Security Architecture for Wireless BioMedical Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mukesh, Rajeswari; Bharathi, V Subbiah

    2009-01-01

    Latest developments in VLSI, wireless communications, and biomedical sensing devices allow very small, lightweight, low power, intelligent sensing devices called biosensors. A set of these devices can be integrated into a Wireless Biomedical Sensor Network (WBSN), a new breakthrough technology used in telemedicine for monitoring the physiological condition of an individual. The biosensor nodes in WBSN has got resource limitations in terms of battery lifetime, CPU processing capability, and memory capacity. Replacement or recharging of batteries on thousands of biosensor nodes is quiet difficult or too costly. So, a key challenge in wireless biomedical sensor networks is the reduction of energy and memory consumption. Considering, the sensitivity of information in WBSN, we must provide security and patient privacy, as it is an important issue in the design of such systems. Hence this paper proposes an energy efficient security protocol for WBSN where security is provided to the physiological data, which is bei...

  3. Energy Efficient Security Architecture for Wireless Bio-Medical Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Mukesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Latest developments in VLSI, wireless communications, and biomedical sensing devices allow very small, lightweight, low power, intelligent sensing devices called biosensors. A set of these devices can be integrated into a Wireless Biomedical Sensor Network (WBSN, a new breakthrough technology used in telemedicine for monitoring the physiological condition of an individual. The biosensor nodes in WBSN has got resource limitations in terms of battery lifetime, CPU processing capability, and memory capacity.Replacement or recharging of batteries on thousands of biosensor nodes is quiet difficult or too costly. So, a key challenge in wireless biomedical sensor networks is the reduction of energy and memory consumption. Considering, the sensitivity of information in WBSN, we must provide security and patient privacy, as it is an important issue in the design of such systems. Hence this paper proposes an energy efficient security protocol for WBSN where security is provided to the physiological data, which is being transmitted from the sensor node to the sink device. This is achieved by authenticating the data using patients biometric , encrypting the data using Quasi Group cryptography after compressing the image data using an energy efficient number theory based technique.

  4. Bio serves nano: biological light-harvesting complex as energy donor for semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werwie, Mara; Xu, Xiangxing; Haase, Mathias; Basché, Thomas; Paulsen, Harald

    2012-04-03

    Light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants is attached to type-II core-shell CdTe/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) exhibiting an absorption band at 710 nm and carrying a dihydrolipoic acid coating for water solubility. LHCII stays functional upon binding to the QD surface and enhances the light utilization of the QDs significantly, similar to its light-harvesting function in photosynthesis. Electronic excitation energy transfer of about 50% efficiency is shown by donor (LHCII) fluorescence quenching as well as sensitized acceptor (QD) emission and corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The energy transfer efficiency is commensurable with the expected efficiency calculated according to Förster theory on the basis of the estimated donor-acceptor separation. Light harvesting is particularly efficient in the red spectral domain where QD absorption is relatively low. Excitation over the entire visible spectrum is further improved by complementing the biological pigments in LHCII with a dye attached to the apoprotein; the dye has been chosen to absorb in the "green gap" of the LHCII absorption spectrum and transfers its excitation energy ultimately to QD. This is the first report of a biological light-harvesting complex serving an inorganic semiconductor nanocrystal. Due to the charge separation between the core and the shell in type-II QDs the presented LHCII-QD hybrid complexes are potentially interesting for sensitized charge-transfer and photovoltaic applications.

  5. BioEnergy transport systems. Life cycle assessment of selected bioenergy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Goeran

    1999-07-01

    Biomass for energy conversion is usually considered as a local resource. With appropriate logistic systems, access to biomass can be improved over a large geographical area. In this study, life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used as method to investigate the environmental impacts of selected bioenergy transport chains. As a case study, chains starting in Sweden and ending in Holland have been investigated. Biomass originates from tree sections or forest residues, the latter upgraded to bales or pellets. The study is concentrated on production of electricity, hot cooling water is considered as a loss. Electricity is, as the main case, produced from solid biomass in the importing country. Electricity can also be produced in the country of origin and exported via the trans-national grid as transportation media. As an alternative, a comparison is made with a coal cycle. The results show that contribution of emissions from long-range transportation is of minor importance. The use of fuels and electricity for operating machines and transportation carriers requires a net energy input in bioenergy systems which amounts to typically 7-9% of delivered electrical energy from the system. Emissions of key substances such as NO{sub x}, CO, S, hydrocarbons, and particles are low. Emissions of CO{sub 2} from biocombustion are considered to be zero since there is approximately no net contribution of carbon to the biosphere in an energy system based on biomass. A method to quantify non-renewability is presented. For coal, the non-renewability factor is calculated to be 110%. For most of the cases with bioenergy, the non-renewability factor is calculated to be between 6 and 11%. Reclamation of biomass results in certain losses of nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus and base cations such as K, Ca and Mg. These are balanced by weathering, vitalisation or ash recirculation procedures. Withdrawal of N from the ecological system is approximately 10 times the load from the technical

  6. Bio Energy and Poverty in Kenya: Attitude, Actors and Activities. Working Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gathui, Tameezan wa; Ngugi, Wairimu [Practical Action Consulting in Eastern Africa, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-05-15

    This report, presents the findings of socio-economic baseline surveys carried out in the Eastern Africa office of Practical Action Consulting in Kenya in 2008. The report was part of a broader baseline study carried out across the respective PISCES countries to help provide a better understanding of the current issues relating to bioenergy use, access and delivery at the community level. The discussions looked at the key interrelated issues of food, water and energy security in relation to bioenergy at the household level.

  7. Aeolian Slipface Processes on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Carin; Jackson, Derek; Bourke, Mary; Cooper, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The surface of Mars is dominated by aeolian features and many locations show ripple and dune migration over the past decade with some sediment fluxes comparable to terrestrial dunes. One of the leading goals in investigating aeolian processes on Mars is to explore the boundary conditions of sediment transport, accumulation, and dune mor-phology in relation to wind regime as well as to quantify migration rates and sediment flux. We combine terrestrial field observations, 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and remote sensing data to investigate com-plex, small scale wind patterns and grainflow processes on terrestrial and martian dunes. We aim to constrain grain flow magnitudes and frequencies that occur on slipface slopes of dunes in order to improve estimates of martian dune field migration and sediment flux related to wind velocity and flow patterns. A series of ground-based, high resolution laser scans have been collected in the Maspalomas dune field in Gran Canaria, Spain to investigate grainflow frequency, morphology and slipface advancement. Analysis of these laser scans and simultaneous video recordings have revealed a variety of slipface activity. We identify 6 different grain-flow morphologies including, hourglass shape (classic alcove formation with deposit fan below), superficial flow (thin lenses), narrow trough (vertical lines cm in width), sheet, column (vertical alcove walls), and complex (combi-nation of morphologies triggered simultaneously in the same location). Hourglass grainflow morphologies were the most common and occurred regularly. The superficial and narrow trough morphologies were the second most com-mon and frequently occurred in between large grain flows. Sheet grainflows were rare and unpredictable. These flows involved large portions of the slipface (metres across) and mobilized a substantial amount of sediment in one event. We have compared these grainflow morphologies from Maspalomas to those in martian dune fields and

  8. Energy performance of an integrated bio-and-thermal hybrid system for lignocellulosic biomass waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyi; Zhang, Jingxin; Tong, Yen Wah; Yang, Wenming; Dai, Yanjun; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2017-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass waste, a heterogeneous complex of biodegradables and non-biodegradables, accounts for large proportion of municipal solid waste. Due to limitation of single-stage treatment, a two-stage hybrid AD-gasification system was proposed in this work, in which AD acted as pre-treatment to convert biodegradables into biogas followed by gasification converting solid residue into syngas. Energy performance of single and two-stage systems treating 3 typical lignocellulosic wastes was studied using both experimental and numerical methods. In comparison with conventional single-stage gasification treatment, this hybrid system could significantly improve the quality of produced gas for all selected biomass wastes and show its potential in enhancing total gas energy production by a maximum value of 27% for brewer's spent grain treatment at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 3gVS/L/day. The maximum overall efficiency of the hybrid system for horticultural waste treatment was 75.2% at OLR of 11.3gVS/L/day, 5.5% higher than conventional single-stage system.

  9. Phytotechnological purification of water and bio energy utilization of plant biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stom, D. I.; Gruznych, O. V.; Zhdanova, G. O.; Timofeeva, S. S.; Kashevsky, A. V.; Saksonov, M. N.; Balayan, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of using the phytomass of aquatic plants as the substrate in the microbial fuel cells and selection of microorganisms suitable for the generation of electricity on this substrate. The conversion of chemical energy of phytomass of aquatic plants to the electrical energy was carried out in a microbial fuel cells by biochemical transformation. As biological agents in the generation of electricity in the microbial fuel cells was used commercial microbial drugs “Doctor Robic 109K” and “Vostok-EM-1”. The results of evaluation of the characteristics of electrogenic (amperage, voltage) and the dynamics of the growth of microorganisms in the microbial fuel cells presents in the experimental part. As a source of electrogenic microorganisms is possible to use drugs “Dr. Robic 109K” and “Vostok-EM-1” was established. The possibility of utilization of excess phytomass of aquatic plants, formed during the implementation of phytotechnological purification of water, in microbial fuel cells, was demonstrated. The principal possibility of creating hybrid phytotechnology (plant-microbe cells), allowing to obtain electricity as a product, which can be used to ensure the operation of the pump equipment and the creation of a full cycle of resource-saving technologies for water treatment, was reviewed.

  10. Bio-methanization of energy crops through mono-digestion for continuous production of renewable biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Burak [Lifetec Process Engineering, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Lohbruegger Kirchstrasse 65, 21033 Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany); Bogazici University, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bebek 34342, Istanbul (Turkey); Scherer, Paul [Lifetec Process Engineering, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Lohbruegger Kirchstrasse 65, 21033 Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this laboratory-scale study was to investigate the long-term anaerobic fermentation of an extremely sour substrate, an energy crop, for continuous production of methane (CH{sub 4}) as a source of renewable energy. The sugar beet silage was used as the mono-substrate, which had a low pH of around 3.3-3.4, without the addition of manure. The mesophilic biogas digester was operated in a hydraulic retention time (HRT) range between 15 and 9.5 days, and an organic loading rate (OLR) range of between 6.33 and 10 g VS l{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The highest specific gas production rate (spec. GPR) and CH{sub 4} content were 0.67 l g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} and 74%, respectively, obtained at an HRT of 9.5 days and OLR of 6.35 g VS l{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The digester worked within the neutral pH range as well. Since this substrate lacked the availability of macro and micro nutrients, and the buffering capacity as well, external supplementation was definitely required to provide a stable and efficient operation, as provided using NH{sub 4}Cl and KHCO{sub 3} in this case. The findings of this ongoing long-term fermentation of an extremely acidic biomass substrate without manure addition have reflected crucial information about how to appropriately maintain the operational and particularly the environmental parameters in an agricultural biogas plant. (author)

  11. Bio-hybrid integrated system for wide-spectrum solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathleen; Erdman, Matthew; Quintana, Hope; Shelnutt, John; Nogan, John; Swartzentruber, B.; Martinez, Julio; Lavrova, Olga; Busani, Tito

    2014-03-01

    An integrated hybrid photovoltaic-thermoelectric system has been developed using multiple layers of organic photosensitizers on inorganic semiconductors in order to efficiently convert UV-visible and IR energy into electricity. The hot anode of n-type ZnO nanowires was fabricated using a thermal process on pre-seeded layer and results to be crystalline with a transmittance up to 92 % and a bandgap of 3.32 eV. The visible-UV light-active organic layer was deposited between the anode and cathode at room temperature using a layer-by-layer deposition onto ITO and ZnO and Bi2Te3 nanowires from aqueous solution. The organic layer, a cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solid is composed of oppositely charged porphyrin metal (Zn(II) and Sn(IV)(OH-)2) derivatives that are separately water soluble, but when combined form a virtually insoluble solid. The electron donor/acceptor properties (energy levels, band gaps) of the solid can be controlled by the choice of metals and the nature of the peripheral substituent groups of the porphyrin ring. The highly thermoelectric structure, which acts as a cold cathode, is composed of p-type Bi2Te3 nanowires with a thermoelectric efficiency (ZT) between ~0.7 to 1, values that are twice that expected for bulk Bi2Te3. Efficiency of the integrated device, was found to be 35 at 0.2 suns illumination and thermoelectric properties are enhanced by the charge transfer between the CBI and the Bi2Te3 is presented in terms of photo- and thermogenerated current and advantages of the low cost fabrication process is discussed.

  12. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  13. Bio-nanohybrids of quantum dots and photoproteins facilitating strong nonradiative energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Mutlugun, Evren; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Sharma, Vijay K; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-08-01

    Utilization of light is crucial for the life cycle of many organisms. Also, many organisms can create light by utilizing chemical energy emerged from biochemical reactions. Being the most important structural units of the organisms, proteins play a vital role in the formation of light in the form of bioluminescence. Such photoproteins have been isolated and identified for a long time; the exact mechanism of their bioluminescence is well established. Here we show a biomimetic approach to build a photoprotein based excitonic nanoassembly model system using colloidal quantum dots (QDs) for a new bioluminescent couple to be utilized in biotechnological and photonic applications. We concentrated on the formation mechanism of nanohybrids using a kinetic and thermodynamic approach. Finally we propose a biosensing scheme with an ON/OFF switch using the QD-GFP hybrid. The QD-GFP hybrid system promises strong exciton-exciton coupling between the protein and the quantum dot at a high efficiency level, possessing enhanced capabilities of light harvesting, which may bring new technological opportunities to mimic biophotonic events.

  14. Four-fold symmetry of resistivity and flux pinning energy in Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. F.; Tao, J.; Xu, X. B.; Qiu, L.; Yang, S. G.; Wang, Z. H.

    2017-01-01

    Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal with T c ˜ 26.4 K has been prepared by the molten salt electrochemical method. We observed a four-fold symmetry in the angular dependence of ab-plane resistance R (θ) at H = 0.5 T and T = 25.5 K for the first time. The data can be scaled by R = [R 1sin2(θ + 45°) + R 2cos2(θ + 45°) - R(90°)]|sin2θ| + R(90°). Although dip structure appears in R(θ) when the angles between the magnetic field direction and c-axis are 0°, 90°, 180° and 270°, respectively, the maximal position of resistance tilted away θ = 45° and θ = 135°, namely the angle difference between two peaks is 79° or 101°. This result indicates the superconducting Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal is probably an orthorhombic structure with distorted Bi-O octahedron. We consider that the angular dependence of resistivity comes from the superconducting energy gap with {{{d}}{x}}2{{}-{y}}2 pairing symmetry. The flux pinning energy for θ = 90° is higher than that for θ = 135° proves the existence of the anisotropic vortex pinning effect. The field dependence of flux pinning energy displays a power law, U ∝ H -α . The irreversibility line was also discussed.

  15. Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatcher, Patrick [Old Dominion University

    2012-03-29

    . The positive economics of this process are influenced by the following: 1. the weight percent of dry algae in suspension that can be fed into the evaporator, 2. the alga species’ ability to produce a higher yield of biodiesel, 3. the isolation of valuable methoxylated by-products, 4. recycling and regeneration of methanol and TMAH, and 5. the market value of biodiesel, commercial agricultural fertilizer, and the three methoxylated by-products. The negative economics of the process are the following: 1. the cost of producing dried, ground algae, 2. the capital cost of the equipment required for feedstock mixing, reaction, separation and recovery of products, and reactant recycling, and 3. the electrical cost and other utilities. In this report, the economic factors and results are assembled to predict the commercialization cost and its viability. This direct conversion process and equipment discussed herein can be adapted for various feedstocks including: other algal species, vegetable oil, jatropha oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and other TAG containing raw materials as a renewable energy resource.

  16. The Origin of Transverse Aeolian Ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.

    2015-12-01

    Transverse aeolian ridges, or TARs, are found throughout the tropics of Mars and typically appear as rows of bright ripples that are several meters tall and spaced semi-regularly several tens of meters apart. The origin of these features remained mysterious for decades after their discovery in Viking and Mars Global Surveyor images. A new hypothesis (Geissler, 2014, 10.1002-2014JE004633) suggests that TARs might be deposits left behind by dusty turbidity currents in the Martian atmosphere. The hypothesis assumes that the micron-sized dust particles are transported in suspension in turbulent flows, driven both by the winds and by gravity. The dust is concentrated near the surface, much like turbidity currents on Earth. Because of the difference in density, however, the dust clouds behave as a fluid distinct from the clear sky above. In particular, waves can appear at the surface of the dense "fluid" when the flows encounter topographic obstacles along their paths. Such gravity waves travel at speeds that are determined by gravity and the thickness of the flow, much like waves in shallow water on Earth. When the wave propagation speed matches the speed of the flow, stationary waves are produced that persist in fixed locations. The bedforms deposited by such stationary waves are called "antidunes" (Gilbert, 1914, USGS Prof. Paper 86) because, unlike dunes, they can migrate upstream in a supercritical flow. Antidunes are commonly seen in shallow, high energy fluvial deposits on Earth. They are usually destroyed as quickly as they form, and are rarely preserved. The Martian TARs survive because the dust is sticky; TARs are deposited by currents that are much slower than the wind speeds needed to lift the dust again. Subaerial antidunes are much rarer on Earth and less well studied, and so the giant subaerial stationary antidunes of Mars, if that is what the TARs turn out to be, may teach us much about a geological process that is poorly known on our planet.

  17. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  18. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2017-01-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  19. Aeolian Sediment Transport Pathways and Aerodynamics at Troughs on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Mary C.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between wind regimes and topography can give rise to complex suites of aeolian landforms. This paper considers aeolian sediment associated wit11 troughs on Mars and identifies a wider range of deposit types than has previously been documented. These include wind streaks, falling dunes, "lateral" dunes, barchan dunes, linear dunes, transverse ridges, sand ramps, climbing dunes, sand streamers, and sand patches. The sediment incorporated into these deposits is supplied by wind streaks and ambient Planitia sources as well as originating within the trough itself, notably from the trough walls and floor. There is also transmission of sediment between dneTsh. e flow dynamics which account for the distribution of aeolian sediment have been modeled using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. The model predicts flow separation on the upwind side of the trough followed by reattachment and acceleration at the downwind margin. The inferred patterns of sediment transport compare well with the distribution of aeolian forms. Model data indicate an increase of wind velocity by approx. 30 % at the downwind trough margin. This suggests that the threshold wind speed necessary for sand mobilization on Mars will be more freqentmlye t in these inclined locations.

  20. Aeolian sediment flux derived from a natural sand trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van der A.J.; Wijnberg, K.M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, a mega-nourishment (the ‘Sand Motor’) was constructed along the Dutch Coast. Since it is a pilot project, its evolution is closely monitored. This paper presents first results on the temporal variation in aeolian sediment transport across the nourishment, based on (a) the rate of infill ove

  1. Analysis of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions of the life cycle of bio-hydrogen applied to the Portuguese road transportation sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Baptista, Patricia; Silva, Carla [IDMEC (Portugal). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this work the main objective is to analyze energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions of biohydrogen for use in the transportation sector in Portugal. A life cycle assessment will be performed in order to evaluate bio-hydrogen pathways, having biodiesel and conventional fossil diesel as reference. The pathways were production of feedstock, pre-treatment, treatment, compression, distribution and applications. For the well-to-tank analysis the SimaPro 7.1 software and excel tools are used. This study includes not only a well-to-tank analysis but also a tank-to-wheel analysis (using ADVISOR software) estimating hydrogen consumption and electricity consumption of a fuel cell hybrid and a plug-in hybrid. Several bio-hydrogen feedstocks to produce hydrogen through fermentation processes will be considered: potato peels. (orig.)

  2. Spatial differences of aeolian desertification responses to climate in arid Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Hua, Ting; Lang, Lili; Ma, Wenyong

    2017-01-01

    Most areas of arid Asia are covered by aeolian dunes, sand sheets, gravels, and desert steppes, and may jeopardize nearly 350 million people if climate change increases aeolian desertification. Although the aeolian desertification is mainly triggered by climate changes are extensively acknowledged, the responses of aeolian desertification to various climate scenarios are poorly understood. Based on the tight combinations of dune activity index (DAI) trends and of aeolian desertification, here the spatial differences of aeolian desertification responses on various climate scenarios were reported. The analyzed results show that the variations in temperature, precipitation and wind regime have no significant contributions on aeolian desertification in the extremely arid Asia. From the early to blooming periods of vegetation growth, although temperature rise may benefit vegetation growths in some high latitudes and altitudes, the temperature rise may increase aeolian desertification in most arid Asia regions such as Mongolia, West and Central Asia. In arid Asia, although precipitation increases may benefit the rehabilitation, decreases in precipitation is not the key role on aeolian desertification occurrences in extremely arid regions. From the early to blooming periods of vegetation growths, spatial trends of the sensitivity of aeolian desertification to wind regime varied. Generally, at the regional scales there are relative high sensitivities for aeolian desertification to climate changes in the eastern and western regions of arid Asia, and the climate changes may not play important roles on aeolian desertification occurrence in the central regions. The spatial differences of aeolian desertification responses to climate changes indicate various strategies for aeolian desertification combating are needed in different regions of arid Asia.

  3. Character and provenance of aeolian sediments in northeast Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Janet E.; Nichol, Douglas W.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian activity is not generally associated with the humid tropics, and although reports of loess-like soils in various locations in southeast Asia exist, these mainly lack the detailed analysis to set them in meaningful spatial or historical context. This paper examines the red and yellow sandy sediments of the Khorat Plateau in northeast Thailand which have been variously referred to as 'cover sands', 'loessial soils' or 'loess'. The sediments are referred to as having alluvial, biological as well as aeolian origin, and a date of 9-35 ka is reported. The study compares the Khorat sediments physically and geochemically with loess and aeolian sediments from other regions, as well as with other sites in southeast Asia which are reported here. The moderate degree of particle sorting and unimodal sizes of the sediments along with a sub-spherical sub-rounded form, supports previous diagnoses of an aeolian origin. Geochemical analysis of the Khorat sediments indicates severe depletion in both mobile and immobile elements, which are even more depleted than other southeast Asian loessic soils examined. This depletion, along with the only moderate particle sorting, suggests the source of the sediments to be the local weathered sandstones outcropping around the edge of the Khorat Plateau. The dissimilarity of the Khorat sediments from Upper Continental Crust (UCC) elemental values supports this, as homogenisation would occur if diverse source areas were involved. The study suggests that aeolian sediments of humid tropical regions warrant more attention as climate proxy markers, due to the dissimilarity between the present climate and conditions required for their formation.

  4. Turbulent Flow and Sand Dune Dynamics: Identifying Controls on Aeolian Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. M.; Wiggs, G.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment transport models are founded on cubic power relationships between the transport rate and time averaged flow parameters. These models have achieved limited success and recent aeolian and fluvial research has focused on the modelling and measurement of sediment transport by temporally varying flow conditions. Studies have recognised turbulence as a driving force in sediment transport and have highlighted the importance of coherent flow structures in sediment transport systems. However, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, research in the fluvial environment has identified the significance of turbulent structures for bedform morphology and spacing. However, equivalent research in the aeolian domain is absent. This paper reports the findings of research carried out to characterise the importance of turbulent flow parameters in aeolian sediment transport and determine how turbulent energy and turbulent structures change in response to dune morphology. The relative importance of mean and turbulent wind parameters on aeolian sediment flux was examined in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Measurements of wind velocity (using sonic anemometers) and sand transport (using grain impact sensors) at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz were made across a flat surface and along transects on a 9 m high barchan dune. Mean wind parameters and mass sand flux were measured using cup anemometers and wedge-shaped sand traps respectively. Vertical profile data from the sonic anemometers were used to compute turbulence and turbulent stress (Reynolds stress; instantaneous horizontal and vertical fluctuations; coherent flow structures) and their relationship with respect to sand transport and evolving dune morphology. On the flat surface time-averaged parameters generally fail to characterise sand transport dynamics, particularly as the averaging interval is reduced. However, horizontal wind speed correlates well with sand transport even with short averaging times. Quadrant

  5. Towards a phoenix phase in aeolian research: shifting geophysical perspectives from fluvial dominance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Breshears, David D [UNIV OF ARIZONA

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian processes are a fundamental driver of earth surface dynamics, yet the importance of aeolian processes in a broader geosciences context may be overshadowed by an unbalanced emphasis on fluvial processes. Here we wish to highlight that aeolian and fluvial processes need to be considered in concert relative to total erosion and to potential interactions, that relative dominance and sensitivity to disturbance vary with mean annual precipitation, and that there are important scale-dependencies associated with aeolian-fluvial interactions. We build on previous literature to present relevant conceptual syntheses highlighting these issues. We then highlight the relative investments that have been made in aeolian research on dust emission and management relative to that in fluvial research on sediment production. Literature searches highlight that aeolian processes are greatly understudied relative to fluvial processes when considering total erosion in different environmental settings. Notably, within the USA, aeolian research was triggered by the Dust Bowl catastrophe of the 1930s, but the resultant research agencies have shifted to almost completely focusing on fluvial processes, based on number of remaining research stations and on monetary investments in control measures. However, numerous research issues associated with intensification of land use and climate change impacts require a rapid ramping up in aeolian research that improves information about aeolian processes relative to fluvial processes, which could herald a post-Dust Bowl Phoenix phase in which aeolian processes are recognized as broadly critical to geo- and environmental sciences.

  6. Aeolian Coastal Landscapes in changes (a study from Tahkuna, Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The openness of the coast to the winds and storm waves has an important part in changing aeolian coastal landscapes as well as anthropogenic factor. The aeolian coastal landscapes are probably the most dynamic areas. Occurrence of aeolian coastal landscapes in Estonia is limited. They consist of sandy beaches, sandy beach ridges and dunes. The coastal ecosystems are strongly affected by their topography, based on the character of deposits and moisture conditions. The majority of their ecosystems are quite close to the specific natural habitat. These ecosystems are represented in the list of the European Union Habitats (Natura 2000). In recent decades human influence has changed the landscape over time in different activities (recreation, trampling, off-road driving) and their intensities, which has led to destruction or degradation of various habitats. Previously coastal landscapes were used for forestry and pasture. Nowadays one of the most serious threats to open landscape is afforestation. This study examines the relationships between landscape components during last decades. Trying to find out how much aeolian coastal landscapes are influenced by natural processes or human activities. The results are based on cartographic analysis, fieldwork data. The method of landscape complex profile was used. The profiles show a cross-sections of landforms and interrelationships between landscape components, most frequently describing the relations between soils and vegetation. In each sample point the mechanical composition of sediments, vegetation cover and soil is determined. Results show that changes in landscapes are induced by their own development as well as changes in environmental factors and human activities. Larger changes are due to increase of coastal processes activity. These processes can be observed in sandy beaches, which are easily transformed by waves. Higher sea levels during storm surges are reaching older beach formation, causing erosion and creating

  7. Contemporary proglacial aeolian sediment transport in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, J. E.; Austin, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Glacial erosion processes produce significance quantities of fine sediments that are washed out from beneath glaciers by meltwater. When deposited on the glacier floodplain they dessicate and strong ice-driven winds can entrain and transport them across the landscape resulting in the formation of sand dunes and loess, and adding very fine particles (dust) to the atmosphere. Recent studies suggest that locally-generated dust can play an important role in regulating albedo and the melting rate of glaciers. Very few field process studies have examined the relationship between sediment-delivery to the proglacial floodplain by meltwater and the subsequent aeolian erosion and deposition of these fine sediments. This research reports the use of semi-isokinetic directional sediment samplers to make an initial assessment of the rates of transport of dust and sand in Sandflugtdalen, a valley adjacent to the West Greenland ice sheet. Vertical arrays (z(m) = 0.18, 0.43, 0.85, 1.4) of samplers were deployed in a down valley transect over a distance of 4 km. Trapped sediments were retrieved after intervals of 1 week and 9 weeks. The mass of sediment collected in the traps varied from 0.002-3.62 g cm2 wk-1. As expected, near surface traps collected more, and coarser, sediment than those deployed at 1.4 m height but the decrease in mass of sediment with height was highly variable. The array closest to the glacier trapped the greatest quantity of suspended sediment and the density of suspended sediment decreased with distance down valley. The flux of aeolian sediment comprises clays, silts and sand-sized particles. Areas of aeolian entrainment, transport and deposition are closely linked to the development and distribution of sediments on the proglacial floodplain which varies considerably in terms of surface roughness. At the east end of the valley, close to the ice sheet, aeolian sediment flux is controlled by sediment supply and topography rather than wind speed. Further down

  8. Holocene aeolian sediments on the NE Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, G.; Lehmkuhl, F.; Hilgers, A.; Zhao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The semiarid climate of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau supports the formation of different types of aeolian sediments and landforms during the Holocene. Aeolians silts and sands in the catchment of the Donggi Cona in an elevation above 4000m to 4800 m asl reflect variable climate conditions during that time as well as different sediment sources. Based on 51 OSL datings and catchment wide geomorphological mapping a complex pattern of long and short distance sediment transport has been reconstructed. Only few aeolian archives are preserved from the late Pleistocene in this mountain environment indicating cold and dry climate conditions which prevented a continuous accumulation. During the early Holocene a phase of increased aeolian sedimentation of sand at the slopes of the mountains has been reconstructed. The sand originated from a large alluvial fan which was highly active during the Pleistocene. In addition, a thin loess cover is preserved at a few sites in the neighboring mountains ranges. The sedimentation of the loess started around 2000 years later than the sedimentation of the sand at the foot slope. Both archives are related to an increase in precipitation at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau which was related to a strengthening of the Asian Monsoon during that time. The wetter climate conditions favored the development of a vegetation cover which leads to the trapping and fixation of the aeolian sediments. However, with a further strengthening of the Monsoon systems these archives subsequently eroded due to higher run off and accumulated as colluvial and fluvial deposits in the basins. These phase lasted until 6 ka. A second aeolian period started at around 3 ka with the formation new dunes in the basins. This period can be associated with dry and cold climate of the late Holocene supporting the reactivation of the sand in the area. This might be further enhanced by an increased human impact by grazing during the late Holocene and resulting

  9. Bio-energy utilizes surplusses at the agricultural commodity markets. Large potentials of the biomass; Bioenergie verwertet Ueberschuesse an den Agrarmaerkten. Grosse Potenziale der Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-19

    At the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere, the situation in agricultural markets relaxes visibly. After the year 2012 was characterized by periods of drought in the United States and some Eastern European countries, in recent months good harvests in major producing countries in the southern hemisphere have provided that the stocks of major agricultural commodities are grown again. Thus, enough resources are still available for the supply of food and energy. There still exists land potential in Europe and on other continents for the use of bio-energy. In addition to new power plant crops, known arable crop cultures contribute to the exploration of such a potential: An example of this is the sugar beet. The view on the global supply balance in agricultural goods inter alia the major staple food rice shows that there exist large surpluses on the food markets. However, these surpluses do not benefit the hungry persons in the world. Hunger is a problem of distribution which is not associated with the growth of bio-energy.

  10. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  11. Formation of aeolian dunes on Anholt, Denmark since AD 1560

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Bjørnsen, Mette; Murray, Andrew;

    2007-01-01

    Sand dunes on the island of Anholt (Denmark) in the middle of Kattegat form a relatively barren, temperate climate Aeolian system, locally termed the "Desert". The dunes have developed on top of a raised beach ridge system under the influence of dominant winds from westerly directions....... They are relatively coarse-grained with an average mean grain size of 480 µm. The last phase of aeolian activity and dune formation on Anholt started after AD 1560, when the local pine forest was removed. Historical sources report intense sand mobilization in the 17th century, and new optically stimulated...... luminescence (OSL) dates indicate that dune formation continued until the end of the 19th century. This period of sand drift and dune formation took place during the later part of the Little Ice Age, which is characterized by increased (summer) storminess in large parts of NW Europe. Dune stabilization...

  12. Human Causes of Aeolian Desertification in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian desertification has rapidly developed in the past 50 years in Northern China,covered an area of 0.386 million km2 by 2000,affected nearly 170 million population,and caused the direct and indirect economic loss of about $6.75(U.S.dollar) billion per year.Here we present several lines of evidence to demonstrate that human activities guided by policy shifts have been a major force to drive aeolian desertification via changes in land-use patterns and intensity.It is suggested that the desertification can be curbed or even reversed by adopting prevention and control measures with ecologically sound land-use practices in China.

  13. Soil Response to Aeolian Disturbance in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, R. C.; Culler, L. E.; Chipman, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic soils are a critical ecological resource, yet are increasingly vulnerable to global change. In the Kangerlussuaq region of West Greenland, aeolian disturbance is the greatest threat to soil stability, with strong katabatic winds eroding vegetation and soil down to the underlying glacial till or bedrock. Little is known about what controls the distribution and rate of the aeolian erosion, which initially results in a state change from tundra to a deflated and nearly unvegetated ground. It is unclear if vegetation can eventually reestablish after erosion occurs, potentially aided by the biological soil crust (BSC) that develops within the eroded areas, or if this soil loss is an irreversible change in vegetation and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Our analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that across the entire study region, deflated ground covers 22% of the terrestrial landscape. Aeolian erosion occurs more frequently closer to the Greenland Ice Sheet and on S-facing slopes. Using lichenometry, we estimate that erosional fronts move across the landscape at rates of 2.5 cm yr-1, leaving unproductive ground in their wake. The onset of widespread aeolian erosion occurred roughly 700-1000 years ago, pointing toward regional cooling and aridity as the drivers behind erosion. Finally, we consider whether the BSCs can improve soil quality enough to allow for full vegetation regrowth. Preliminary results show that while the BSCs fix atmospheric N and increase C storage, the rate of soil quality recovery is extremely slow. Understanding the thresholds between vegetated tundra and eroded ground is critical for predicting how the Kangerlussuaq landscape will respond to anticipated changes in climate and ice sheet dynamics.

  14. Quantifying the provenance of aeolian sediments using multiple composite fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benli; Niu, Qinghe; Qu, Jianjun; Zu, Ruiping

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new fingerprinting method that uses multiple composite fingerprints for studies of aeolian sediment provenance. We used this method to quantify the provenance of sediments on both sides of the Qinghai-Tibetan Railway (QTR) in the Cuona Lake section of the Tibetan Plateau (TP), in an environment characterized by aeolian and fluvial interactions. The method involves repeatedly solving a linear mixing model based on mass conservation; the model is not limited to spatial scale or transport types and uses all the tracer groups that passed the range check, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and a strict analytical solution screening. The proportional estimates that result from using different composite fingerprints are highly variable; however, the average of these fingerprints has a greater accuracy and certainty than any single fingerprint. The results show that sand from the lake beach, hilly surface, and gullies contribute, respectively, 48%, 31% and 21% to the western railway sediments and 43%, 33% and 24% to the eastern railway sediments. The difference between contributions from various sources on either side of the railway, which may increase in the future, was clearly related to variations in local transport characteristics, a conclusion that is supported by grain size analysis. The construction of the QTR changed the local cycling of materials, and the difference in provenance between the sediments that are separated by the railway reflects the changed sedimentary conditions on either side of the railway. The effectiveness of this method suggests that it will be useful in other studies of aeolian sediments.

  15. Aeolian Sediment Transport Integration in General Stratigraphic Forward Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Salles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of numerical models have been developed to simulate the physical processes involved in saltation, and, recently to investigate the interaction between soil vegetation cover and aeolian transport. These models are generally constrained to saltation of monodisperse particles while natural saltation occurs over mixed soils. We present a three-dimensional numerical model of steady-state saltation that can simulate aeolian erosion, transport and deposition for unvegetated mixed soils. Our model simulates the motion of saltating particles using a cellular automata algorithm. A simple set of rules is used and takes into account an erosion formula, a transport model, a wind exposition function, and an avalanching process. The model is coupled to the stratigraphic forward model Sedsim that accounts for a larger number of geological processes. The numerical model predicts a wide range of typical dune shapes, which have qualitative correspondence to real systems. The model reproduces the internal structure and composition of the resulting aeolian deposits. It shows the complex formation of dune systems with cross-bedding strata development, bounding surfaces overlaid by fine sediment and inverse grading deposits. We aim to use it to simulate the complex interactions between different sediment transport processes and their resulting geological morphologies.

  16. A new aeolian generator for Mexico; Un nuevo generador eolico para Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronin, Boris; Gomez Reyna, Jose Antonio; Zerquera Izquierdo, Mariano David; Cardenas Grajales, Juan Jose; Zamora Quintana, Laura Angelica [Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The use of wind kinetic energy to produce electrical energy is one of the most powerful alternatives for the human being, to avoid the risk of being in the threshold of the age of stone. In the present work, different types from aero generators are analyzed and a new generator developed by one of the authors of this article is presented. Its high efficiency is presented in comparison with the helical generators that at the moment are dominant in the construction of Aeolian mills. Perspectives of exploitation of the kinetic energy of the wind in Mexico are analyzed. A resolution model of the problem of obtaining constant parameters of electrical output, to conditions of variable mechanical parameters of entrance is shown. An example is shown of the construction of Aeolian parks that can cover all the needs of electrical energy in Mexico. [Spanish] El uso de la energia cinetica del viento para la obtencion de la energia electrica, es una de las alternativas mas poderosas para el ser humano, para evitar el riesgo de estar al umbral de la edad de piedra. En el trabajo presente, se analizan diferentes tipos de aerogeneradores y se presenta un nuevo generador desarrollado por uno de los autores de este articulo. Se muestra su alta eficiencia en comparacion con los generadores helicoidales que actualmente son dominantes en la construccion de molinos eolicos. Se analizan perspectivas de aprovechamiento de la energia cinetica del viento en Mexico. Se muestra un modelo de resolucion del problema de la obtencion de parametros de salida electricos constantes, a condiciones de los parametros mecanicos de entrada variables. Se muestra un ejemplo de la construccion de parques eolicos que pueden cubrir todas las necesidades de energia electrica en Mexico.

  17. Bio-, recycling- and waste fuels. How does the transition to renewable energy-sources affect the Swedish power and heat preparedness; Bio-, retur- och avfallsbraenslen. Hur oevergaangen till foernybara energikaellor paaverkar Sveriges el- och vaermeberedskap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    The total energy supply in Sweden amounted to 600 TWh in 2000. Close to 100 TWh of these were Bio-, recycling- and waste-fuels (BRW), which means that the use of these fuels has tripled during the last decade. BRW stand for half the energy supply to district heating in Sweden. A large number of heat and power plants built for fossil fuels have been converted to BRW, and several new plants designed for biofuels have been taken into operation. Upgraded biofuels (briquets, pellets and powders) have substituted fuel oil in households and small heating networks. These developments make it important to study issues about safety of supply and emergency planning. In difference to fossil fuels there is no obligation to set up emergency stocks of BRW in Sweden. In combination with an increased dependence on logistics this means that the preparedness in short time emergency situations has deteriorated. For short periods, fuel oil and coal can however be used as replacement fuels. The increased know-how on producing, handling, transport and combustion of BRW is, on the other hand, a great asset for Sweden both in normal and emergency situations.

  18. Amelioration of drought-induced negative responses by elevated CO2 in field grown short rotation coppice mulberry (Morus spp.), a potential bio-energy tree crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Kanubothula Sitarami; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2017-02-25

    Present study describes the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry, a potential bio-energy tree, grown under interactive environment of elevated CO2 (E) and water stress (WS). Growth in E stimulated photosynthetic performance in well-watered (WW) as well as during WS with significant increases in light-saturated photosynthetic rates (A Sat), water use efficiency (WUEi), intercellular [CO2], and photosystem-II efficiency (F V/F M and ∆F/F M') with concomitant reduction in stomatal conductance (g s) and transpiration (E) compared to ambient CO2 (A) grown plants. Reduced levels of proline, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and higher contents of antioxidants including ascorbic acid and total phenolics in WW and WS in E plants clearly demonstrated lesser oxidative damage. Further, A plants showed higher transcript abundance and antioxidant enzyme activities under WW as well as during initial stages of WS (15 days). However, with increasing drought imposition (30 days), A plants showed down regulation of antioxidant systems compared to their respective E plants. These results clearly demonstrated that future increased atmospheric CO2 enhances the photosynthetic potential and also mitigate the drought-induced oxidative stress in SRC mulberry. In conclusion, mulberry is a potential bio-energy tree crop which is best suitable for short rotation coppice forestry-based mitigation of increased [CO2] levels even under intermittent drought conditions, projected to prevail in the fast-changing global climate.

  19. Holocene palaeosols and aeolian activities in the Umimmalissuaq valley, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Michael; Thiel, Christine; Kühn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aeolian sand sheets and active dunefields preserve an ancient Holocene land surface represented by palaeosols that occur around the present ice margin in the Kangerlussuaq area, West Greenland. To determine the relation between Holocene aeolian activities and periods of soil formation, both subst....... This period was characterised by low but constant aeolian activity. Since aeolian activity intensified after around 300 cal. yr b2k and is still resulting in active dunefields with coarse and medium sand accumulation, the ice margin must have reached its present position at that time....

  20. Atmospheric significance of aeolian salts in the sandy deserts of northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-Q. Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Large sandy deserts in the middle latitudes of northwestern China were investigated for soluble salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore the environmental significance of "aeolian salts". Results revealed that aeolian salt variations have a clear relationship with the changing meridional and zonal gradients of the desert locations and the aeolian differentiation effect, but are weakly linked to local geological conditions. It suggests that the natural system of aeolian salts is hydrologically open and the chemistry of the parent brines are different from that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Atmospheric depositions of water-soluble chemical species are an important process/source contributing to aeolian salt. Sequential variations of soluble salts in sedimentary profiles interbedded with aeolian and non-aeolian deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications in the hinterland areas of these deserts were further evaluated, based on the constraints of OSL dating and radiocarbon dating data. The results indicate that the inorganic salts may be a latent geoproxy in revealing regional palaeoclimatic changes in desert areas for the sediments deposited under onefold depositional environment, but the interpretation should be more careful for the sediments deposited under diverse depositional conditions. This study presents the evidence of atmospheric origin of aeolian salt in sandy deserts, with limited climatic significance in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

  1. Aeolian particle transport inferred using a ~150-year sediment record from Sayram Lake, arid northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Ma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied sediment cores from Sayram Lake in the Tianshan Mountains of northwest China to evaluate variations in aeolian transport processes over the past ~150 years. Using an end-member modeling algorithm of particle size data, we interpreted end members with a strong bimodal distribution as having been transported by aeolian processes, whereas other end members were interpreted to have been transported by fluvial processes. The aeolian fraction accounted for an average of 27% of the terrigenous components in the core. We used the ratio of aeolian to fluvial content in the Sayram Lake sediments as an index of past intensity of aeolian transport in the Tianshan Mountains. During the interval 1910-1930, the index was high, reflecting the fact that dry climate provided optimal conditions for aeolian dust transport. From 1930-1980, the intensity of aeolian transport was weak. From the 1980s to the 2000s, aeolian transport to Sayram Lake increased. Although climate in northwest China became more humid in the mid-1980s, human activity had by that time altered the impact of climate on the landscape, leading to enhanced surface erosion, which provided more transportable material for dust storms. Comparison of the Lake Sayram sediment record with sediment records from other lakes in the region indicates synchronous intervals of enhanced aeolian transport from 1910 to 1930 and 1980 to 2000.

  2. Mega-ripples in Iran: A new analog for transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    A new terrestrial analog site for transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) is described in this study. The Lut desert of Iran hosts large ripple-like aeolian bedforms, with the same horizontal length scales and patterns of TARs on Mars. Different classes of TARs and different types of other aeolian features such as sand dunes, zibars, dust devil tracks and yardangs can be found in this area, which signify an active aeolian region. This area represents a unique site to study the formation and evolution of these enigmatic features, with potential relevance toward a better understanding of TARs on Mars.

  3. Bio-Inspired Fluoro-polydopamine Meets Barium Titanate Nanowires: A Perfect Combination to Enhance Energy Storage Capability of Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanyao; Huang, Xingyi; Jiang, Pingkai

    2017-03-01

    Rapid evolution of energy storage devices expedites the development of high-energy-density materials with excellent flexibility and easy processing. The search for such materials has triggered the development of high-dielectric-constant (high-k) polymer nanocomposites. However, the enhancement of k usually suffers from sharp reduction of breakdown strength, which is detrimental to substantial increase of energy storage capability. Herein, the combination of bio-inspired fluoro-polydopamine functionalized BaTiO3 nanowires (NWs) and a fluoropolymer matrix offers a new thought to prepare polymer nanocomposites. The elaborate functionalization of BaTiO3 NWs with fluoro-polydopamine has guaranteed both the increase of k and the maintenance of breakdown strength, resulting in significantly enhanced energy storage capability. The nanocomposite with 5 vol % functionalized BaTiO3 NWs discharges an ultrahigh energy density of 12.87 J cm(-3) at a relatively low electric field of 480 MV m(-1), more than three and a half times that of biaxial-oriented polypropylene (BOPP, 3.56 J cm(-3) at 600 MV m(-1)). This superior energy storage capability seems to rival or exceed some reported advanced nanoceramics-based materials at 500 MV m(-1). This new strategy permits insights into the construction of polymer nanocomposites with high energy storage capability.

  4. Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis for Bio-Liquid Jet Fuel from Open Pond-Based Micro-Algae under China Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A life-cycle analysis (LCA of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and energy use was performed to study bio-jet fuel (BJF production from micro-algae grown in open ponds under Chinese conditions using the Tsinghua University LCA Model (TLCAM. Attention was paid to energy recovery through biogas production and cogeneration of heat and power (CHP from the residual biomass after oil extraction, including fugitive methane (CH4 emissions during the production of biogas and nitrous oxide (N2O emissions during the use of digestate (solid residue from anaerobic digestion as agricultural fertilizer. Analyses were performed based on examination of process parameters, mass balance conditions, material requirement, energy consumptions and the realities of energy supply and transport in China (i.e., electricity generation and heat supply primarily based on coal, multiple transport modes. Our LCA result of the BJF pathway showed that, compared with the traditional petrochemical pathway, this new pathway will increase the overall fossil energy use and carbon emission by 39% and 70%, respectively, while decrease petroleum consumption by about 84%, based on the same units of energy service. Moreover, the energy conservation and emission reduction benefit of this new pathway may be accomplished by two sets of approaches: wider adoption of low-carbon process fuels and optimization of algae cultivation and harvest, and oil extraction processes.

  5. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  6. Monte Carlo path sampling approach to modeling aeolian sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, E. J.; Mitasova, H.; Mitas, L.

    2011-12-01

    Coastal communities and vital infrastructure are subject to coastal hazards including storm surge and hurricanes. Coastal dunes offer protection by acting as natural barriers from waves and storm surge. During storms, these landforms and their protective function can erode; however, they can also erode even in the absence of storms due to daily wind and waves. Costly and often controversial beach nourishment and coastal construction projects are common erosion mitigation practices. With a more complete understanding of coastal morphology, the efficacy and consequences of anthropogenic activities could be better predicted. Currently, the research on coastal landscape evolution is focused on waves and storm surge, while only limited effort is devoted to understanding aeolian forces. Aeolian transport occurs when the wind supplies a shear stress that exceeds a critical value, consequently ejecting sand grains into the air. If the grains are too heavy to be suspended, they fall back to the grain bed where the collision ejects more grains. This is called saltation and is the salient process by which sand mass is transported. The shear stress required to dislodge grains is related to turbulent air speed. Subsequently, as sand mass is injected into the air, the wind loses speed along with its ability to eject more grains. In this way, the flux of saltating grains is itself influenced by the flux of saltating grains and aeolian transport becomes nonlinear. Aeolian sediment transport is difficult to study experimentally for reasons arising from the orders of magnitude difference between grain size and dune size. It is difficult to study theoretically because aeolian transport is highly nonlinear especially over complex landscapes. Current computational approaches have limitations as well; single grain models are mathematically simple but are computationally intractable even with modern computing power whereas cellular automota-based approaches are computationally efficient

  7. Bio-energies. The domestic use of wood fuel: the weight of discretion. The urban and industrial wood heating, a growth value. Biomass - electricity - heat, towards a new concept. Bio-gas, a fermenting stake. Bio-components for fuels, foresight and quality. Biomolecules: towards a chemistry of substitution. Wood materials: a concentrate of environment; Les bioenergies. L'usage domestique du bois energie: le poids de la discretion. Le chauffage urbain et industriel au bois, une valeur de croissance. Biomasse - electricite - chaleur, vers un nouveau concept. Le biogaz, un enjeu qui fermente. Biocomposants pour carburants, prevoyance et qualite. Les biomolecules: vers une chimie de substitution. Le bois materiau: un concentre d'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This dossier presents a status of todays situation of the use of bio-energies in France and of its perspectives of development at the year 2006 vista. Seven aspects of bio-energies are considered: wood fuel, district and industrial heating, biomass production and gasification processes, biogas (methane) production from municipal waste tips, bio-fuels and bio-additives (bio-ethanol, ETBE, colza derived oils, vegetal oil methyl esters), bio-molecules production and valorization as substitutes to petroleum products (lubricants, wetting agents, solvents, polymers, coatings), development of wood materials (environmental advantages: CO{sub 2} immobilization, lower energy needs during fabrication, possible energy valorization at end life). (J.S.)

  8. Energy and greenhouse gas assessment of European glucose production from corn – a multiple allocation approach for a key ingredient of the bio-based economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiropoulos, I.; Cok, B.; Patel, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Bio-based products are considered to be a sustainable alternative to conventional fossil fuel-based materials. This paper studies the production of glucose from corn starch, an important feedstock for a wide range of bio-based products (e.g. ethanol, bio-based monomers), in a European corn wet mill

  9. The Icelandic volcanic aeolian environment: Processes and impacts - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnalds, Olafur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2016-03-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth or 22,000 km2. The sand has been mostly produced by glacio-fluvial processes, leaving behind fine-grained unstable sediments which are later re-distributed by repeated aeolian events. Volcanic eruptions add to this pool of unstable sediments, often from subglacial eruptions. Icelandic desert surfaces are divided into sand fields, sandy lavas and sandy lag gravel, each with separate aeolian surface characteristics such as threshold velocities. Storms are frequent due to Iceland's location on the North Atlantic Storm track. Dry winds occur on the leeward sides of mountains and glaciers, in spite of the high moisture content of the Atlantic cyclones. Surface winds often move hundreds to more than 1000 kg m-1 per annum, and more than 10,000 kg m-1 have been measured in a single storm. Desertification occurs when aeolian processes push sand fronts and have thus destroyed many previously fully vegetated ecosystems since the time of the settlement of Iceland in the late ninth century. There are about 135 dust events per annum, ranging from minor storms to >300,000 t of dust emitted in single storms. Dust production is on the order of 30-40 million tons annually, some traveling over 1000 km and deposited on land and sea. Dust deposited on deserts tends to be re-suspended during subsequent storms. High PM10 concentrations occur during major dust storms. They are more frequent in the wake of volcanic eruptions, such as after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption. Airborne dust affects human health, with negative effects enhanced by the tubular morphology of the grains, and the basaltic composition with its high metal content. Dust deposition on snow and glaciers intensifies melting. Moreover, the dust production probably also influences atmospheric conditions and parameters that affect climate change.

  10. A comprehensive method for aeolian particle granulometry and micromorphology analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, E; Dody, A; Weiner, D; Barkai, D; Offer, Z Y

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to use a new approach to investigate aeolian particle granulometry and micromorphology. Taking total aeolian deposition into account, we used parameters such as, particle area, perimeter, shape analysis for particle roughness (area/perimeter) and elongation (long/short axis). These parameters were analyzed on temporal and spatial scales at four study sites in the eastern Negev Desert, Israel. The total collection of particles was sorted into three size groups based on particle area to facilitate comparison. The classic definition of particle size (equating particle length with particle diameter) produced relatively small variations among the three size classes (25-38.6%). Our proposed comprehensive method demonstrated significant variation among the three size classes (13.9-60.8%), e.g. the classic method placed 36.4% of the particles in size class two while the new method placed 60.8% of the particles in this size class; the differences were even more significant regarding size class 3 (38.6% vs. 13.9%, respectively). The classic method did not facilitate investigation of particle roughness and elongation. With this new approach, it was possible to clearly define the particles by size class, based on these characteristics. With roughness, the variation among size classes 2 and 3 was about 27%. With elongation, the variation among size classes two and three was about 21%. Applying similar investigation method to study the aeolian particle granulometry and micromorphology can better facilitate more detailed calculation of particle size distribution, roughness and elongation.

  11. Responses of aeolian desertification to a range of climate scenarios in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Hua, Ting; Ma, Wenyong

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian desertification plays an important role in earth-system processes and ecosystems, and has the potential to greatly impact global food production. The occurrence of aeolian desertification has traditionally been attributed to increases in wind speed and temperature and decreases in rainfall. In this study, by integrating the aeolian desertification monitoring data and climate and vegetation indices, we found that although aeolian desertification is influenced by complex climate patterns and human activities, increases in rainfall and temperature and decreases in wind speed may not be the key factors of aeolian desertification controls in some regions of China. Our results show that, even when modern technical approaches are used, different approaches to desertification need to be applied to account for regional differences. These results have important implications for future policy decisions on how best to combat desertification.

  12. Surface morphology and surface energy of anode materials influence power outputs in a multi-channel mediatorless bio-photovoltaic (BPV) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Paolo; Zarrouati, Marie; Thorne, Rebecca J; Schneider, Kenneth; Rowden, Stephen J L; Ali, Akin; Yunus, Kamran; Cameron, Petra J; Fisher, Adrian C; Ian Wilson, D; Howe, Christopher J; McCormick, Alistair J

    2012-09-21

    Bio-photovoltaic cells (BPVs) are a new photo-bio-electrochemical technology for harnessing solar energy using the photosynthetic activity of autotrophic organisms. Currently power outputs from BPVs are generally low and suffer from low efficiencies. However, a better understanding of the electrochemical interactions between the microbes and conductive materials will be likely to lead to increased power yields. In the current study, the fresh-water, filamentous cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena limnetica (also known as Oscillatoria limnetica) was investigated for exoelectrogenic activity. Biofilms of P. limnetica showed a significant photo response during light-dark cycling in BPVs under mediatorless conditions. A multi-channel BPV device was developed to compare quantitatively the performance of photosynthetic biofilms of this species using a variety of different anodic conductive materials: indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (ITO), stainless steel (SS), glass coated with a conductive polymer (PANI), and carbon paper (CP). Although biofilm growth rates were generally comparable on all materials tested, the amplitude of the photo response and achievable maximum power outputs were significantly different. ITO and SS demonstrated the largest photo responses, whereas CP showed the lowest power outputs under both light and dark conditions. Furthermore, differences in the ratios of light : dark power outputs indicated that the electrochemical interactions between photosynthetic microbes and the anode may differ under light and dark conditions depending on the anodic material used. Comparisons between BPV performances and material characteristics revealed that surface roughness and surface energy, particularly the ratio of non-polar to polar interactions (the CQ ratio), may be more important than available surface area in determining biocompatibility and maximum power outputs in microbial electrochemical systems. Notably, CP was readily outperformed by all

  13. Innovations and economic success in Finnish equine and bio-energy enterprises; Innovaatiotoiminta ja taloudellinen menestyminen hevosalan ja bioenergia-alan pienyrityksissae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiilikainen, S.

    2009-07-01

    Cluster of industries is the critical mass of industries, which are located into certain geographical areas. In cluster supporting and related industries are linked through vertical and a horizontal relationship. Rural clusters are based on local traditions, resources and knowledge. The key advantage of cluster of industries is the fact that innovations are often created in them. The purpose of this study is to find out how creation of innovations can be improved in rural cluster of industries. The subject of this study is the link between innovations and the financial success of enterprises. The research questions are formulated as: What kinds of innovations take place in equine and bio-energy enterprises? How different factors affect to innovations made in these enterprises? How does competitiveness, the economic success of enterprises relate these innovations? Theoretical background of the study lies on the Schumpeter's' theory of entrepreneurship and innovations are defined broadly as doing new things or doing things already done on a new way. Data were collected by postal survey in August 2008 (n =165), the respondents were equine entrepreneurs from Uusimaa region and bio-energy entrepreneurs in Pohjois-Pohjanmaa region. Data were analysed using multivariate analyses. The study results reveal that, most of the innovations related to services or pricing the services. It was fairly uncommon to develop new business models, which was worrying, because many of the enterprises had enlarged or invested heavily on the capacity. The economic success did relate to innovations; those enterprises who performed poorly had not introduced any innovations or improvements during past three years, whist enterprises with good or average performance had introduced innovations or improvements. (orig.)

  14. Gully annealing by aeolian sediment: field and remote-sensing investigation of aeolian-hillslope-fluvial interactions, Colorado River corridor, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Draut, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This study of gully annealing by aeolian sediment, spanning 95 km along the Colorado River corridor in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA, employed field and remote sensing observations, including digital topographic modelling. Results indicate that aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion. Gullies are less prevalent in areas where surficial sediment undergoes active aeolian transport, and have a greater tendency to terminate in active aeolian sand. Although not common, examples exist in the record of historical imagery of gullies that underwent infilling by aeolian sediment in past decades and evidently were effectively annealed. We thus provide new evidence for a potentially important interaction of aeolian–hillslope–fluvial processes, which could affect dryland regions substantially in ways not widely recognized. Moreover, because the biologic soil crust plays an important role in determining aeolian sand activity, and so in turn the extent of gully development, this study highlights a critical role of geomorphic–ecologic interactions in determining arid-landscape evolution.

  15. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. Final year report. R and D on the bio-fuel production by high functional bio-reactor; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Kokino bio reactor ni yoru bio nenryo seisan ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (saishu nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A system was developed for producing automobile fuel from the recycled paper and waste cooking oil using high functional intelligent yeast. Element technology is the functional yeast creation technology and the online intelligent control technology of the process into which the fixed bio-reactor was inserted. Studies were made on the following: 1) creation of high activity lipase production/ethanol production yeasts; 2) bio-fuel production by intelligent bio-reactor; 3) process optimization control technology by fuzzy control; 4) stabilization of bio-fuel production yeast; 5) comprehensive investigational study. In FY 2000, the results were obtained as written below: development of the stable lipase coming from rhizopus japonicus, fixed bacterium using rhizopus oryzae fungus body which can be used more than ten times, direct ethanol fermentation from starch by developing the multi-copy glucoamylase manifestation yeast, operation of a 20L capacity bench plant, etc. (NEDO)

  16. A linear dune dam - a unique late Pleistocene aeolian-fluvial archive bordering the northwestern Negev Desert dunefield, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Bookman, Revital; Friesem, David; Vardi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between aeolian and fluvial processes, known as aeolian-fluvial (A-F) interactions, play a fundamental role in shaping the surface of the Earth especially in arid zones. The blocking of wadis by dunes (dune-damming) is an A-F interaction that is perceived to be an archive of periods of aeolian 'superiority' on fluvial transport power and has had a strong impact on arid landscapes and prehistoric man since the late Quaternary. The southern fringes of the northwestern Negev dunefield are lined with discontinuous surfaces of light-colored, playa-like, low-energy, fine-grained fluvial deposits (LFFDs). Abundant Epipalaeolithic camp sites mainly border the LFFDs. The LFFDs are understood to be reworked loess-like sediment deposited in short-lived shallow water bodies during the late Pleistocene. These developed adjacently upstream of hypothesized dune dams of wadis that drain the Negev highlands. However, no dune dam structures by the LFFDs have been explicitly identified or analyzed. This paper presents for the first time the morphology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of a hypothesized dune dam. The studied linear-like dune dam structure extends west-east for several hundred meters, has an asymmetric cross-section and is comprised of two segments. In the west, the structure is 3-5 m high, 80 m wide, with a steep southern slope, and is covered by pebbles. Here, its morphology and orientation resembles the prevailing vegetated linear dunes (VLDs) of the adjacent dunefield though its slope angles differ from VLDs. To the south of the structure extends a thick LFFD sequence. In the east the structure flattens and is covered by nebkhas with its southern edge overlapped by LFFD units. The structures' stratigraphy is found to be comprised of a thick LFFD base, overlaid by aeolian and fluvially reworked sand, a thin middle LFFD unit, and a crest comprised of LFFDs, fluvial sand and pebbles. Carbonate contents and particle size distributions of the sediments easily

  17. Element geochemical analysis of the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment in desert stream flash floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  18. Element Geochemical Analysis of the Contribution of Aeolian Sand to Suspended Sediment in Desert Stream Flash Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  19. Aeolian processes and landforms in the sub-Antarctic: preliminary observations from Marion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Hedding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sub-Antarctic Marion Island has a hyperoceanic climate, with cold and wet conditions and consistently strong wind velocities throughout the year. Recent observations recognized the increasing role of aeolian processes as a geomorphic agent, and this paper presents the first data for transport by aeolian processes on a sub-Antarctic island. Data were collected through an intensive and high-resolution measurement campaign at three study sites using Big Spring Number Eight sediment traps and surface sediment samplers in conjunction with an array of climatic and soil logger sensors. Observed aeolian landforms are megaripples, and the data suggest that aeolian processes are also modifying solifluction landforms. The sediment traps and sediment samplers collected wind-blown scoria at all three study sites, and the annual (horizontal aeolian sediment flux extrapolated from this preliminary data is estimated at 0.36–3.85 kg cm−2 y−1. Importantly, plant material of various species was trapped during the study that suggests the efficiency of wind for the dispersal of plants in this sub-Antarctic environment may be underestimated. This paper advocates long-term monitoring of aeolian processes and that the link between aeolian processes and synoptic climate must be established. Furthermore, wind as a means to disperse genetic material on Marion Island should be investigated.

  20. Estimating Energy- and Eco-Balances for Continuous Bio-Ethanol Production Using a Blenke Cascade System

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Energy and environmental effects of wheat-based fuel, produced continuously by a Blenke cascade system, were assessed. Two scenarios: (1) no-co-products utilization scenario; and (2) co-products utilization scenario, were compared. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) model was used for analysis. The scope covered a cradle-to-gate inventory. The results from energy analysis showed, that wheat-based ethanol has a positive average net energy value (NEV), NEV = 3.35 MJ/kg ethanol with an average net en...

  1. Bio-energy. An overview study of environmental aspects of techniques for biomass based generated energy; Bio-energiecentrales. Inventariserend onderzoek naar milieu-aspecten bij diverse energieopwekkingtechnieken met behulp van biomassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, P.P.; De Groot, G.M.

    2010-11-15

    The RIVM conducted a short overview study of techniques applied in the Netherlands to produce biomass based fuel or biomass based generated energy. The study focuses on scale and potential emissions for different branches. Relevant laws are included in the study as well. The overview is made on behalf of the VROM-inspectorate and is meant as an overview of current developments regarding biomass based generated energy. The scope of this study was set in consultation with the VROM-Inspectorate. Most attention was given to combustion on small and average scale, gassing and pyrolysis. These techniques need different temperatures and doses of oxygen and result in different products, e.g. oil, coal and gas. The term fermentation in this study is mainly used for the fermentation of dung. If an additional organic product is added the term co-fermentation is used. [Dutch] Het RIVM heeft een overzicht gemaakt van technieken die in Nederland worden gebruikt om biobrandstoffen te produceren of energie op te wekken met behulp van biobrandstoffen. De aandacht gaat uit naar de schaal waarop dit plaatsvindt en de emissies van deze bedrijven die bij de desbetreffende technieken kunnen vrijkomen. Daarnaast is de relevante wet- en regelgeving in kaart gebracht. Het overzicht is gemaakt op verzoek van de VROM-Inspectie, die hiermee zicht wil krijgen op de huidige ontwikkelingen waarbij biomassa wordt gebruikt om energie op te wekken. In overleg met de VROM-Inspectie is het onderzoek verder afgebakend. De meeste aandacht gaat uit naar verbrandingsinstallaties op kleine of middelgrote schaal, vergassinginstallaties, pyrolyse-installaties en (co)-vergistinginstallaties. Pyrolyse, vergassing en verbranding zijn technieken waarbij verschillende temperaturen en hoeveelheden zuurstof tot verschillende producten leiden. Deze producten zijn bijvoorbeeld olie, kolen en gas. Bij vergisting wordt in dit onderzoek vooral de productie van biogas uit mest bedoeld. Er is sprake van co-vergisting als

  2. Armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain-size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  3. Dune-like dynamic of Martian Aeolian large ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Yizhaq, H.; Esposito, F.

    2016-08-01

    Martian dunes are sculpted by meter-scale bed forms, which have been interpreted as wind ripples based on orbital data. Because aeolian ripples tend to orient and migrate transversely to the last sand-moving wind, they have been widely used as wind vanes on Earth and Mars. In this report we show that Martian large ripples are dynamically different from Earth's ripples. By remotely monitoring their evolution within the Mars Science Laboratory landing site, we show that these bed forms evolve longitudinally with minimal lateral migration in a time-span of ~ six terrestrial years. Our observations suggest that the large Martian ripples can record more than one wind direction and that in certain cases they are more similar to linear dunes from a dynamic point of view. Consequently, the assumption of the transverse nature of the large Martian ripples must be used with caution when using these features to derive wind directions.

  4. The nature and formation of aeolian mineral dust material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Ian; O'hara-Dhand, Ken; McLaren, Sue

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust affects climate and records past climates. It has become a much studied material but there has been a certain lack of emphasis on the actual nature of the dust, and an even greater neglect of actual production mechanisms for dust particles. Huge amounts of dust may be raised from the Bodele depression and other parts of North Africa, and much of it may be carried across the North Atlantic to aid in soil formation in Brazil. But what does it consist of? We know that much of the Bodele dust is diatoms from old Lake Chad, but what of the lithological inorganic mineral content? A very crude division of aeolian dust into large dust(say around 20-50um) and small dust (2-5um)has been proposed. Much of the study of loess has been confused by the failure to make this distinction, and similar problems may arise in the study of the finer fractions of aeolian dust. Much aeolian material is clay-mineral based- formed from clay mineral aggregates(CMA), from lake bottom sediments. This can form large dust particles, as in parna in Australia, but also contributes largely to small long travel aerosolic dust. Another major contributor is the quartz fragment. The large dust for classic loess deposits is mostly quartz silt- and there is considerable discussion about the controls that affect quartz silt. There are some interesting modalities in the world of quartz particle sedimentology which need to be examined. Quartz sand (say 200-500um) is the key initiating material and the formation processes for quartz sand have a down-the-line effect on the formation of smaller particles. The central observation is the action of two processes- a eutectic-like reaction in the proto-rock granite which defines the essential nature of sand particles, and the high-low displacive crystallographic transformation which introduces tensile stresses into the quartz particle systems. The limited range of eutectic particle size means a limited range of tensile stresses. A neat combination of

  5. Succinic acid production derived from carbohydrates: An energy and greenhouse gas assessment of a platform chemical toward a bio-based economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok, B.; Tsiropoulos, I.; Roes, A.L.; Patel, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based succinic acid has the potential to become a platform chemical, i.e. a key building block for deriving both commodity and high-value chemicals, which makes it an attractive compound in a bio-based economy. A few companies and industrial consortia have begun to develop its industrial product

  6. Interactive association between biopolymers and biofunctions in carinata seeds as energy feedstock and their coproducts (carinata meal) from biofuel and bio-oil processing before and after biodegradation: current advanced molecular spectroscopic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Xin, Hangshu; Ban, Yajing; Zhang, Xuewei

    2014-05-07

    Recent advances in biofuel and bio-oil processing technology require huge supplies of energy feedstocks for processing. Very recently, new carinata seeds have been developed as energy feedstocks for biofuel and bio-oil production. The processing results in a large amount of coproducts, which are carinata meal. To date, there is no systematic study on interactive association between biopolymers and biofunctions in carinata seed as energy feedstocks for biofuel and bioethanol processing and their processing coproducts (carinata meal). Molecular spectroscopy with synchrotron and globar sources is a rapid and noninvasive analytical technique and is able to investigate molecular structure conformation in relation to biopolymer functions and bioavailability. However, to date, these techniques are seldom used in biofuel and bioethanol processing in other research laboratories. This paper aims to provide research progress and updates with molecular spectroscopy on the energy feedstock (carinata seed) and coproducts (carinata meal) from biofuel and bioethanol processing and show how to use these molecular techniques to study the interactive association between biopolymers and biofunctions in the energy feedstocks and their coproducts (carinata meal) from biofuel and bio-oil processing before and after biodegradation.

  7. Environmental and energy system analysis of bio-methane production pathways : A comparison between feedstocks and process optimizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierie, F.; van Someren, C. E. J.; Benders, R. M. J.; Bekkering, J.; van Gemert, W. J. Th; Moll, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    The energy efficiency and sustainability of an anaerobic green gas production pathway was evaluated, taking into account five biomass feedstocks, optimization of the green gas production pathway, replacement of current waste management pathways by mitigation, and transport of the feedstocks. Sustain

  8. Aeolian deposition of Arabia and Somalia sediments on the southwestern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.

    peninsular India through fluvial discharge. Since formation of palygorskite calls for an arid and hot climate and saline conditions, occurrence of this clay mineral in the sediments of the study area documents aeolian sediment contribution from Arabia...

  9. Formation mechanism and development pattern of aeolian sand landform in Yarlung Zangbo River valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 董光荣; 申建友; 杨萍; 刘贤万; 王跃; 靳鹤龄; 王强

    1999-01-01

    Aeolian sand landforms in the Yarlung Zangbo River valley can be divided into 4 classes and 21 types. The river valley has favourable environment conditions for the development of aeolian sand landforms. Simulation of MM4 mid-scale climate model showed that the near-surface flow field and wind vector field during the winter half year in the fiver valley are generally favourable for the aeolian sand deposition and as a whole they also affect the distribution zones and sites of aeolian sand landforms. Sand dunes and sand dune groups in the fiver valley developed mainly in three ways, namely windward retarding deposition, leeward back flow deposition and bend circumfluence deposition. Through alternating positive-reverse processes of sand dune formation under wind actions and sand dune vanishing under water actions, sand dunes developed from primary zone through main-body zone then to vanishing zone where climbing dunes and falling dunes are declining and are even disappearing.

  10. Preface to the Eighth International Conference on Aeolian Research - ICAR 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhibao; Huang, Ning

    2015-12-01

    The papers in this special issue of Aeolian Research arise from the Eighth International Conference on Aeolian Research (ICAR8), held on July 21-25, 2014 at Lanzhou University, China. The conference was sponsored by the International Society for Aeolian Research, convened by Zhibao Dong and Ning Huang, and supported by several institutions from China. The conference was well attended by 284 participants from 20 nations. 138 oral presentations, 142 posters and 296 abstracts were organized into six sessions. The 13 papers that appear in this special issue are drawn from the post-conference submissions, which were successfully reviewed by peers, revised and accepted. Those papers that have not completed review will become regular submissions to Aeolian Research and published (if accepted) when they pass review process.

  11. Hydrological indications of aeolian salts in mid-latitude deserts of northwestern China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bing-Qi Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Large sandy deserts in middle latitude of northwestern China were studied on salt variations in modernand ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore their hydrological indications at the present and past.Globally, sulphate is rich in arid to semi-arid deserts, including the aeolian loess sediments in China andsoils in low-latitude deserts, but is less common in the aeolian sediments from the mid-latitude desertsin this study. The compositional differences between aeolian salts and local natural waters is evident,indicating the chemistry of aeolian salts and the associated parent brines may be significantly differentthan that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. The formation of aeolian salts in the studieddeserts is strongly controlled by earth surface processes in a large scale but not in a local scale. Verticalchanges in facies and salinities are abrupt in the studied palaeo-aeolian sediment samples, which wereinterbedded by lacustrine/fluvial sediments with OSL and ^{14}C ages ranging between 40 and 2 ka BP,reflecting rapid high-amplitude changes in hydrological settings during late Pleistocene to later Holocenein these ancient playa systems. A great difference in salt composition between aeolian and lacustrinesediments suggests that the inorganic salt is a latent geoproxy in revealing local hydrological variationsand climate change in the desert areas. But the environmental indications could be amphibolous for thesedimentary sequences with dual/multiple depositional end-members; under this situation an increase insequence salinity does not always represent an enhanced environmental aridity. Ancient playas are aridor humid at the same time based on several sporadic records is not a valid approach to correlation of saltdeposits in adjacent saline playa basin in the studied areas. Effects of earth surface processes includingerosion, deposition and other processes on sediment properties will bias the hydrological implications ofsediment salinity.

  12. Hydrological indications of aeolian salts in mid-latitude deserts of northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Large sandy deserts in middle latitude of northwestern China were studied on salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore their hydrological indications at the present and past. Globally, sulphate is rich in arid to semi-arid deserts, including the aeolian loess sediments in China and soils in low-latitude deserts, but is less common in the aeolian sediments from the mid-latitude deserts in this study. The compositional differences between aeolian salts and local natural waters is evident, indicating the chemistry of aeolian salts and the associated parent brines may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. The formation of aeolian salts in the studied deserts is strongly controlled by earth surface processes in a large scale but not in a local scale. Vertical changes in facies and salinities are abrupt in the studied palaeo-aeolian sediment samples, which were interbedded by lacustrine/fluvial sediments with OSL and 14C ages ranging between 40 and 2 ka BP, reflecting rapid high-amplitude changes in hydrological settings during late Pleistocene to later Holocene in these ancient playa systems. A great difference in salt composition between aeolian and lacustrine sediments suggests that the inorganic salt is a latent geoproxy in revealing local hydrological variations and climate change in the desert areas. But the environmental indications could be amphibolous for the sedimentary sequences with dual/multiple depositional end-members; under this situation an increase in sequence salinity does not always represent an enhanced environmental aridity. Ancient playas are arid or humid at the same time based on several sporadic records is not a valid approach to correlation of salt deposits in adjacent saline playa basin in the studied areas. Effects of earth surface processes including erosion, deposition and other processes on sediment properties will bias the hydrological implications of sediment

  13. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited

  14. Microbial anaerobic digestion (bio-digesters) as an approach to the decontamination of animal wastes in pollution control and the generation of renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E; Mamphweli, Sampson N; Meyer, Edson L; Okoh, Anthony I; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2013-09-17

    With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester) via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas) and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications.

  15. Microwave energy-assisted formation of bioactive CaO–MgO–SiO$_2$ ternary glass from bio-wastes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ENOBONG R ESSIEN; VIOLETTE N ATASIE; ESTHER U UDOBANG

    2016-08-01

    Regeneration technique is extensively being sought after as a means of achieving bone repair without adverse immunological response. Silicate-based bioactive glasses containing Mg are gaining increasing attention for their biocompatibility. The current work has been focused on designing a facile and economic route using bio-wastes for synthesizing bioactive glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO$_2$ system. Rice husk ash (RHA) obtained from burning ricehusk was used as silica source, while Ca was extracted from eggshells for preparing the glass through a modified sol–gel approach. The gel formed was irradiated in microwave before sintering at 950$^{\\circ}$C for 3 h. Thereafter, bioactivity test was conducted on the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) at physiological conditions for a maximum of 14 days. Characterization of samples were performed before and after immersion in SBF to evaluate thecomposition, morphology and phases present in the glass using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Apatite formation was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.Results obtained showed the presence of diopside, wollastonite and pseudo-wollastonite as major bioactive phases. Hydroxyapatite formed on the material within 3 days in SBF, indicating good bioactivity.

  16. Microbial Anaerobic Digestion (Bio-Digesters as an Approach to the Decontamination of Animal Wastes in Pollution Control and the Generation of Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden Makaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications.

  17. Bio-ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , however, shown that by following this path, we will lose more than we gain on both CO2 emission and fossil fuel dependency. Being renewable, CO2 neutral and storable, biomass is a priority resource for fossil fuel substitution in general. Investigations of the magnitude of biomass that is or can be made...... available for energy purposes - be it from waste, agricultural residues or energy crops - show, however, that biomass is very limited compared to the potential use of it. Even in the most optimistic near term scenarios (30 years ahead), the total physically available biomass can at maximum substitute around......, but they do not improve the energy balance enough for bio-ethanol to compete with alternative uses of the biomass. When using biomass to substitute fossil fuels in heat & power production, a close to 100% substitution efficiency is achieved. The best alternative for CO2 reduction and oil saving is, therefore...

  18. Terrestrial sensitivity to abrupt cooling recorded by aeolian activity in northwest Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M.C.; Fisher, T.G.; Goble, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence dated sand dunes and Pleistocene beach ridges in northwest Ohio are used to reconstruct landscape modification more than 5000. yr after deglaciation. Four of the OSL ages (13.3-11.1. ka) cluster around the Younger Dryas cold event, five ages (10.8-8.2. ka) cluster around the Preboreal, one young age (0.9-0.7. ka) records more recent aeolian activity, and one age of 15.1-13.1. ka dates a barrier spit in Lake Warren. In northwest Ohio, both landscape instability recorded by aeolian activity and a vegetation response recorded by pollen are coeval with the Younger Dryas. However, the climate conditions during the Preboreal resulting in aeolian activity are not recorded in the available pollen records. From this, we conclude that aeolian dunes and surfaces susceptible to deflation are sensitive to cooler, drier episodes of climate and can complement pollen data. Younger Dryas and Preboreal aged aeolian activity in northwestern Ohio coincides with aeolian records elsewhere in the Great Lakes region east of the prairie-forest ecotone. ?? 2011 University of Washington.

  19. Palaeoclimatic considerations of talus flatirons and aeolian deposits in Northern Fuerteventura volcanic island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Elorza, Mateo; Lucha, Pedro; Gracia, F.-Javier; Desir, Gloria; Marín, Cinta; Petit-Maire, Nicole

    2013-09-01

    Fuerteventura volcanic island has been subject to considerable aeolian activity since the Late Pleistocene. The aeolian record includes inactive aeolian deposits with interbedded entisols, whose age by OSL dating ranges between 46 and 26 ky BP. The Corralejo active dune field, where sand sheets, nebkhas, coppice dunes, blowouts, barchans and transverse dunes have been described, constitutes a more recent Aeolian deposit. Here the age is about 14 ky BP. On Fuerteventura Island aeolian dust has been deposited on valleys and slopes. This last type of accumulation has been affected by gully incision, producing talus flatirons. Samples taken on the apex of these palaeo-slopes indicate an OSL age of 30 and 50 ky BP. A palaeoclimatic succession has been interpreted during which a prevailing arid period took place in OIS 4, with the accumulation of aeolian dust. A humid period occurred in OIS 2, during which slopes were dissected and formed talus flatirons. An arid period about 14 ky BP gave rise to the Corralejo dune field, which has continued until present with slight climatic oscillations.

  20. Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Materials as an Energy Storage Medium in Building Envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Abhari, Mr. Ramin [Renewable Energy Group, Inc.; Shukla, Dr. Nitin [Fraunhofer USA, Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston; Kosny, Dr. Jan [Fraunhofer USA, Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of phase change material (PCM) in building envelope systems. Several studies have reported the energy saving potential of PCM in building envelopes. However, wide application of PCMs in building applications has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel paraffin product made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application, with the ultimate goal of commercializing a low-cost PCM platform. The low-cost PCM pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation, installed in external walls and field-tested under natural weatherization conditions for a period of several months. In addition, several PCM samples and PCM-cellulose samples were prepared under controlled conditions for laboratory-scale testing. The laboratory tests were performed to determine the phase change properties of PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation both at microscopic and macroscopic levels. This article presents the data and analysis from the exterior test wall and the laboratory-scale test data. PCM behavior is influenced by the weather and interior conditions, PCM phase change temperature and PCM distribution within the wall cavity, among other factors. Under optimal conditions, the field data showed up to 20% reduction in weekly heat transfer through an external wall due to the PCM compared to cellulose-only insulation.

  1. Fuelling a BioMess. Why Burning Trees for Energy Will Harm People,the Climate and Forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainville, N.

    2011-10-15

    The global bioenergy boom is driven by a surge of interest in biological materials - or biomass - to produce heat, electricity and fuels. In a world of declining fossil fuel deposits and rising fuel prices, industries and governments are hastily switching back to an ancient source of energy: trees. In Canada, forest bioenergy once referred to a sensible, small-scale and local solution to produce heat and power by using mill and pulp residues at the plant. This is no longer the case. Now, the sector is rapidly developing into large-scale, industrial use of natural forests for energy. This is due to new government biomass extraction policies and subsidies. Without public hearings, exhaustive science or adequate environmental standards in place, provincial governments have allocated large volumes of biomass from publicly owned forests to be burnt, thereby radically changing the way forests are used in Canada. This is turning to ash sustainable job opportunities, threatening the greening of the forest sector and the value-added product trend that has been emerging in recent years. The premise on which the forest bioenergy industry is based - i.e. that woody biomass is infinitely available and that burning it is clean and carbon neutral - does not stand up to scientific scrutiny and needs to be revisited. Exploiting forests for energy increases carbon emissions and contributes to climate change for decades, even centuries, before proving to be better than fossil fuels. The Canadian government has failed to report those emissions. Accounting properly for the climate footprint of forest bioenergy is crucial if governments really want to tackle climate change and meet greenhouse gas reduction targets by 2020 and 2050. Large-scale combustion of wood is also a health hazard due to significant toxic emissions of fine particulates, carbon monoxide and heavy metals. Because enormous amounts of forest biomass are needed to produce small amounts of energy, drastic ecological

  2. Possible indicators for bio-mass burning in a small Swedish city as studied by energy dispersive fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selin Lindgren, Eva; Henriksson, Dag; Lundin, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Biomass is increasingly used in energy plants of different size and sophistication in Sweden. Biomass is also available in Sweden owing to its large forest-covered areas. Incineration of biomass in an environmentally friendly manner is one of the key issues in Swedish policy for sustainable...... development. Hence there is ongoing research on the effects of biomass burning on the air quality in Swedish cities. The relative contributions of anthropogenic sources to pollution in the urban environment are usually difficult to evaluate owing to the complexity of the ambient aerosol. In order...... of biomass burning to particulate air pollution. In order to identify typical indicators for biomass burning, principle component analysis was performed on data on elemental contents and black carbon. Analysis suggests that the K/Zn ratio will be useful as an indicator for biomass incineration....

  3. Oil alternative strategies and mid-long term development goals of bio-energy%石油替代战略与生物质能源中长期发展目标

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李十中

    2011-01-01

    The guarantee feedstock resources for developing bio-energy in China were introduced in this paper, including land resources, forest resources, straw resource, agricultural residual and organic waste. The significance and developing prospect of biomass energy were presented from a strategic perspective. Main bio-energy products and biomass conversion techniques were reviewed, such as fuel ethanol, biodiesel, biogas and bio-pelletes etc. The goals of developing bio-energy at different stages in our nation from now to 2050 were introduced, and some feasible advices were given from the views of policy, technology and environmental protection.%以我国发展生物质能源的资源保障为基础,包括土地资源、林地资源、秸秆资源、农林剩余物,以及有机废弃物资源等,分析了我国生物质资源的地位作用和发展前景,综述了燃料乙醇、生物柴油、沼气等主要生物能源产品及其转化技术,介绍了我国对各种生物质能源产品从目前到2050年分阶段的发展目标,并且从政策、技术、环保等多个角度,提出了一些发展生物质能源的建议.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Bio-Energy Therapies on Cancer Growth——An overview of recent laboratory studies in the U.S. And its implications in cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin W. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Bioenergy therapies (such as Qigong, Reiki, Yoga, Pranic healing, and Therapeutic touch) have reported benefits for cancer patients, but few randomized control trials were done to verify their efficacy. It is believed that laboratory study of inhibitory effects of bio-energy therapies on cancer growth may lead to an understanding of the true efficacy of bio-energy and create a foundation for future clinical trials. Methods: Typical in-vitro study involved randomly dividing lab-prepared cancer cells into different groups with one being treated by bio-energy therapy and one or more as control groups. Sometimes, controls were treated by a sham healer. Typical in vivo study involved injecting or implanting cancerous cells into mice, then randomly dividing them into various groups. The control could be either non-treatment or sham treatment; the outcomes include tumor size or survival time. Results: Most studies demonstrated some inhibitory effects of bioenergy therapies on the growth of cancer cells in comparison with control. The in vivo studies reported that the bio-energy treated group had significantly slower tumor growth or longer survival lives than those in the control. One study reported survival with a normal life cycle instead of dying in 3 weeks, and cancer-infected mice developed immune response to the same breast cancer. However, researchers are confronted with methodological challenges in choosing appropriate controis, minimizing contamination, and replicating study outcomes. Conclusion: Encouraging evidence suggests hioenergy may have inhibitory effects on cancer growth, or prolong the life of cancer-infected animals, although improvement is needed in research design and replication of the findings. Bioenergy for cancer treatment is an area that is often neglected by mainstream medicine and research,and it should be seriously examined and considered as an important supplement to conventional cancer treatment.

  5. Granulometric profiling of aeolian dust deposits by automated image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Determination of granulometric parameters is of growing interest in the Earth sciences. Particle size data of sedimentary deposits provide insights into the physicochemical environment of transport, accumulation and post-depositional alterations of sedimentary particles, and are important proxies applied in paleoclimatic reconstructions. It is especially true for aeolian dust deposits with a fairly narrow grain size range as a consequence of the extremely selective nature of wind sediment transport. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. As terrestrial wind-blown deposits are among the most important archives of past environmental changes, proper explanation of the proxy data is a mandatory issue. Automated imaging provides a unique technique to gather direct information on granulometric characteristics of sedimentary particles. Granulometric data obtained from automatic image analysis of Malvern Morphologi G3-ID is a rarely applied new technique for particle size and shape analyses in sedimentary geology. Size and shape data of several hundred thousand (or even million) individual particles were automatically recorded in this study from 15 loess and paleosoil samples from the captured high-resolution images. Several size (e.g. circle-equivalent diameter, major axis, length, width, area) and shape parameters (e.g. elongation, circularity, convexity) were calculated by the instrument software. At the same time, the mean light intensity after transmission through each particle is automatically collected by the system as a proxy of optical properties of the material. Intensity values are dependent on chemical composition and/or thickness of the particles. The results of the automated imaging were compared to particle size data determined by three different laser diffraction instruments

  6. Use of Natural-Fiber Bio-Composites in Construction versus Traditional Solutions: Operational and Embodied Energy Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Galan-Marin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades natural polymers have become more and more frequent to replace traditional inorganic stabilizers in building materials. The purpose of this research is to establish a comparison between the most conventional building material solutions for load-bearing walls and a type of biomaterial. This comparison will focus on load-bearing walls as used in a widespread type of twentieth century dwelling construction in Europe and still used in developing countries nowadays. To carry out this analysis, the structural and thermal insulation characteristics of different construction solutions are balanced. The tool used for this evaluation is the life cycle assessment throughout the whole lifespan of these buildings. This research aims to examine the environmental performance of each material assessed: fired clay brick masonry walls (BW, concrete block masonry walls (CW, and stabilized soil block masonry walls (SW stabilized with natural fibers and alginates. These conventional and new materials are evaluated from the point of view of both operational and embodied energy.

  7. Evaluation of Emissions Bio diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Dorronsoro Arenal, J. L.; Rojas Garcia, E.; Perez Pastor, R.; Garcia Alonso, S.

    2007-09-27

    The generation of energy from vegetal products is one of the possibilities to our reach in order to reduce the atmospheric pollution. Particularly, the use of bio diesel in internal combustion engines can be one of the best options. The finest particles emitted by the combustion engines are easily breathable and on them different substances can be absorbed presumably toxic, between which it is possible to emphasize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), by its demonstrated carcinogen character. In this work, it is studied on the one hand, the characteristics that can present the aerosol of emission in a diesel engine with a maximum power of 97 kW, working without load to 600 rpm, using as combustible mixtures of bio diesel and diesel in different proportions. On the other hand, the evolution that takes place in the concentration of PAHs in emission particles, according to the percentage of bio diesel used in the combustible mixture. (Author) 9 refs.

  8. Applying Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory to simulate growth and bio-energetics of blue mussels under low seston conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, R.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Bacher, C.; Strohmeier, T.

    2009-08-01

    A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for simulation of growth and bioenergetics of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) has been tested in three low seston sites in southern Norway. The observations comprise four datasets from laboratory experiments (physiological and biometrical mussel data) and three datasets from in situ growth experiments (biometrical mussel data). Additional in situ data from commercial farms in southern Norway were used for estimation of biometrical relationships in the mussels. Three DEB parameters (shape coefficient, half saturation coefficient, and somatic maintenance rate coefficient) were estimated from experimental data, and the estimated parameters were complemented with parameter values from literature to establish a basic parameter set. Model simulations based on the basic parameter set and site specific environmental forcing matched fairly well with observations, but the model was not successful in simulating growth at the extreme low seston regimes in the laboratory experiments in which the long period of negative growth caused negative reproductive mass. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model was moderately sensitive to changes in the parameter and initial conditions. The results show the robust properties of the DEB model as it manages to simulate mussel growth in several independent datasets from a common basic parameter set. However, the results also demonstrate limitations of Chl a as a food proxy for blue mussels and limitations of the DEB model to simulate long term starvation. Future work should aim at establishing better food proxies and improving the model formulations of the processes involved in food ingestion and assimilation. The current DEB model should also be elaborated to allow shrinking in the structural tissue in order to produce more realistic growth simulations during long periods of starvation.

  9. Spatiotemporal Structure of Aeolian Particle Transport on Flat Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Niiya, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We conduct numerical simulations based on a model of blowing snow to reveal the long-term properties and equilibrium state of aeolian particle transport from $10^{-5} \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{m}$ to $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{m}$ above the flat surface. The numerical results are s follows. (i) Time-series data of particle transport are divided into development, relaxation, and equilibrium phases, which are formed by rapid wind response below $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{cm}$ and gradual wind response above $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{cm}$. (ii) The particle transport rate at equilibrium is expressed as a power function of friction velocity, and the index of 2.35 implies that most particles are transported by saltation. (iii) The friction velocity below $100 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm{m}$ remains roughly constant and lower than the fluid threshold at equilibrium. (iv) The mean particle speed above $300 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm{m}$ is less than the wind speed, whereas that below $300 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm...

  10. The birth and death of transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) are small bright windblown deposits found throughout the Martian tropics that stand a few meters tall and are spaced a few tens of meters apart. The origin of these features remains mysterious more than 20 years after their discovery on Mars. This paper presents a new hypothesis, that some of the TARs could be indurated dust deposits emplaced millions of years ago during periods of higher axial obliquity. It suggests that these TARs are primary depositional bed forms that accumulated in place from dust carried by the winds in suspension, perhaps in a manner comparable to antidunes on Earth, and were subsequently indurated and eroded to their current states by eons of sandblasting. It points out examples of modern dust drifts and dune-like features that appear to have been recently formed by dust accumulating directly onto the surface from atmospheric suspension. It shows how these pristine dust deposits could evolve to explain the range of morphologies of the TARs. Finally, it explains how the known properties of many TARs are consistent with this hypothesis, including their composition, thermal behavior, and distribution.

  11. A morphometric model of the Aeolian Islands (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, M.; Favalli, M.; Mazzarini, F.; Mori, A.; Sinapi, M. T. Pareschi   L.

    2003-07-01

    A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Aeolian Islands (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) is presented, with a 5 m horizontal resolution, derived from photograms at a relative medium scale of 1:35000, collected during an aerophotogrammetric flight in 1994-5. The sea data come from a hydrographic survey (1996-1997) of the seabed topography, carried out in accordance with present international standards. The sounding density of the bathymetric survey varies: it is more accurate near the coasts and in areas of structural interest. Previous bathymetric surveys, when available, were limited to small areas. The present DEM is enclosed in a rectangle with limits of longitude 14°16'32”- 15°22'51”E and latitude 38°20'55”- 38°53'50”N. The DEM of the islands and of the seabed, merged together, is presented here for the first time. The shadowed raster images of the DEM clearly outline the structural and volcanological features of the archipelago.

  12. The fairy tale of bio-ethanol. Het sprookje van de bio-ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beverloo, W.A. (Vakgroep Levensmiddelentechnologie, Landbouwuniversiteit Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1992-03-01

    Agricultural products can be converted into bio-ethanol. Proponents of the bio-ethanol production however use inaccurate arguments with regard to the comparison of the prices per liter for bio-ethanol and petrol instead of using the net heating value of the fuels. Also their basic assumptions concerning the energy efficiency or the energy balances or the carbon dioxide emissions are incorrect. The production of biomass for energy does not serve any other societal interest than subsidized employment for agricultural farmers. 4 tabs., 9 refs.

  13. Aeolian and fluvial processes in dryland regions: the need for integrated studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Field, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Aeolian and fluvial processes play a fundamental role in dryland regions of the world and have important environmental and ecological consequences from local to global scales. Although both processes operate over similar spatial and temporal scales and are likely strongly coupled in many dryland systems, aeolian and fluvial processes have traditionally been studied separately, making it difficult to assess their relative importance in drylands, as well as their potential for synergistic interaction. Land degradation by accelerated wind and water erosion is a major problem throughout the world's drylands, and although recent studies suggest that these processes likely interact across broad spatial and temporal scales to amplify the transport of soil resources from and within drylands, many researchers and land managers continue to view them as separate and unrelated processes. Here, we illustrate how aeolian and fluvial sediment transport is coupled at multiple spatial and temporal scales and highlight the need for these interrelated processes to be studied from a more integrated perspective that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Special attention is given to how the growing threat of climate change and land-use disturbance will influence linkages between aeolian and fluvial processes in the future. We also present emerging directions for interdisciplinary needs within the aeolian and fluvial research communities that call for better integration across a broad range of traditional disciplines such as ecology, biogeochemistry, agronomy, and soil conservation.

  14. Observations of several characteristics of aeolian sand movement in the Taklimakan Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Zhiwen; DONG; Zhibao; WANG; Tao; CHEN; Guangting; YAN

    2004-01-01

    With both sides of the Taklimakan Desert highway line as the study area, three typical aeolian sand landforms, i.e. complex dune ridge, barchan dune and flat sand land, were selected as sand beds for the observation, analysis and research of the characteristics of aeolian sand movement such as aeolian sand stream structure, sand transport intensity, etc. in the Taklimakan Desert. The results show that there is a linear relation between the height and the log of sand transport rate over transverse dune chain, longitudinal dune ridge and flat sand land, i.e. the sand transport percentage decreases exponentially with increasing height. Sand transport rate within the 10 cm height above the bed surface accounts for 80%-95% of the total sand transport rate of the observed height (40 cm), while the sand transport rate in 20 cm occupies 98% of the total amount. Sand transport rate (g·cm-1·min-1) differs greatly with respect to different landform types and different topographic positions. Based on the investigation and analysis on aeolian sand landform origin, morphological type and distribution feature, the two typical landform assemblages, complex transverse dune chain-alluvial plain and huge longitudinal dune ridge-interridge lowland in the Taklimakan Desert were divided into several characteristic zones of aeolian sand movement states. From this one can qualitatively judge the types and severities of sand disasters at various topographic positions in the engineering installation region and further put forward concrete schemes and measures to control sand damages.

  15. The Biogas from bio-energy electrical power plant of Nuevo Leon; Central electrica de biogas de bioenergia de Nuevo Leon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvizu F, Jose L [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Saldana M, Jaime L [Sistemas de Energia Internacional S.A. de C.V. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The biogas from bio-energy electrical power plant of Nuevo Leon represents, in all the national territory, the first experience on the advantage of biogas emitted by the sanitary landfills for the generation of electrical energy. Therefore, one of the specific objectives of this paper is the one of diffusion and reproduction of the same one in other cities of Mexico and Latin America. The project is framed within the world-wide policies on the control of emissions for the reduction of the greenhouse effect gases (GEG) and its impact in the global climatic change. The gas emitted by the trash sanitary landfills, commonly known as biogas, is a gas mixture derived from the decomposition of the organic matter of the municipal trash by microorganisms in anaerobic conditions. Biogas generated in the sanitary landfills has a methane content of 55% and a 35% of carbon dioxide. The balance 10% is made up of water steam, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen sulfur and other gases in minimum amounts. [Spanish] La Central Electrica de Biogas de Bioenergia de Nuevo Leon representa, en todo el territorio nacional, la primera experiencia sobre el aprovechamiento del biogas emitido por los rellenos sanitarios para la generacion de energia electrica. Por esta razon, uno de los objetivos especificos de este trabajo es la de difusion y reproduccion del mismo en otras ciudades de Mexico y Latinoamerica. El proyecto esta enmarcado dentro de las politicas mundiales sobre el control de emisiones para la reduccion de los gases de efecto invernadero (GEI) y su impacto en el cambio climatico global. El gas emitido por la basura dispuesta en los rellenos sanitarios, comunmente conocido como biogas, es una mezcla de gases derivado de la descompensacion de la materia organica de la basura municipal por microorganismos en condiciones anaerobias. El biogas generado en los rellenos sanitarios tiene un contenido de metano del 55% y un 35% de bioxido de carbono. El 10% restante se compone de vapor

  16. Physiochemical, energy characteristics and performance of coconut fiber in the sorption of diesel and bio diesel oils; Caracteristicas fisico-quimicas, energetica e desempenho da fibra de coco na sorcao de oleos diesel e biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Adriana Ferla de [Pos-Graduacao em Agronomia - Energia na Agricultura, Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista - FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Biocombustiveis, Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR, Palotina, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: adrianaferla@ufpr.br; Leao, Alcides Lopes [Dept. de Recursos Naturais, Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista - FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: alcidesleao@fca.unesp.br; Caraschi, Jose Claudio [Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP, Itapeva, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carachi@itapeva.unesp.br; Oliveira, Luciano Caetano de [Curso de Agronomia, Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR, Palotina, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: lucianocaetano@ufpr.br; Goncalves, Jose Evaristo [Pos-Graduacao em Agronomia - Energia na Agricultura, Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista - FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: evaristto@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    Accidents involving oil spills and its derivatives on the soil and in hydric bodies are common and worrying once they endanger the quality of the ecosystem. An economical and efficient way of combating oil spills is the use of the sorption method using sorbent materials. There is a range of sorbent materials, however, the natural ones like biomass and vegetable fibers demonstrate interest due to the low cost and good sorbent capacity. There are works concerning the sorption of crude oil, however for diesel and bio diesel, which had their production increased, there is a little or even nothing exists in the literature. The aim of this work was to investigate the sorption capacity of coconut fiber (Cocos nucifera) confronting to the fuels, diesel and biodiesel and to compare them with the peat commercially used. The bio sorbents were also submitted to the physiochemical and energy characterization. Most of the tests were performed on the granulometric size range of {<=}180 {mu}m 180-425 {mu}m; 425-850 {mu}m e 850-3350 {mu}m. The coir fiber presented capacity of diesel and bio diesel sorption similar to the commercial sorbent made of peat. The determination of the calorific power of the bio sorbents shows that they can be used for energy generation before and after they are used as sorbents. This way, those materials can be used after studies of economical viability in this sector and still to increase the economy of the areas where they are abundant. (author)

  17. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    We review selected experimental saltation studies performed in laboratory wind tunnels and collision experiments performed in (splash-) laboratory facilities that allow detailed observations between impinging particles on a stationary bed. We also discuss progress in understanding aeolian transport in nonterrestrial environments. Saltation studies in terrestrial wind tunnels can be divided into two groups. The first group comprises studies using a short test bed, typically 1-4 m long, and focuses on the transitional behavior near the upwind roughness discontinuity where saltation starts. The other group focuses on studies using long test beds - typically 6 m or more - where the saturated saltation takes place under equilibrium conditions between wind flow and the underlying rough bed. Splash studies using upscaled model experiments allow collision simulations with large spherical particles to be recorded with a high speed video camera. The findings indicate that the number of ejected particles per impact scales linearly with the impact velocity of the saltating particles. Studies of saturated saltation in several facilities using predominantly Particle Tracking Velocimetry or Laser Doppler Velocimetry indicate that the velocity of the (few) particles having high trajectories increases with increasing friction velocity. However, the speed of the majority of particles that do not reach much higher than Bagnold's focal point is virtually independent of Shields parameter - at least for low or intermediate u*-values. In this case mass flux depends on friction velocity squared and not cubed as originally suggested by Bagnold. Over short beds particle velocity shows stronger dependence on friction velocity and profiles of particle velocity deviate from those obtained over long beds. Measurements using horizontally segmented traps give average saltation jump-lengths near 60-70 mm and appear to be only weakly dependent on friction velocity, which is in agreement with some

  18. Aeolian Dust and Forest Fire Smoke in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2006-12-01

    Particles of aeolian dust and forest fire smoke are now regularly detected in urban air. Although dusts are common on the Asian Pacific Rim and forest fire smoke characteristic of South East Asia they also frequently detected elsewhere. In the past dust was treated as though it was fairly inert and reactions on the surface limited to the neutralizing ability of alkaline minerals. More recent work shows that that dust has a complex organic chemistry. Observations in China found fatty acids from urban areas (oleic acid and linoleic acid from cooking) on dust derived aerosols. The fatty acids and PAHs decreased sharply after dust storms, suggesting a role for dust in removal processes. When silica particles absorb unsaturated compounds they can react with ozone and release compounds such as formaldehyde. Particles from forest fires have a similarly complex chemistry and the acid-alkaline balance may vary depend on the balance of removal rates of alkaline materials (ammonia, potassium carbonate) and inorganic and organic acids. Airborne dust and forest fire soot can contain humic like substances (HULIS) either as primary material or as secondary oxidation products of the surface of soot. This paper will report on the role polluted air masses in the generation humic materials, particularly those that are surface active. These materials of high molecular weight oxygen rich organic compounds, which exhibit a range of properties of importance in aerosols: they can form complexes with metal ions and thus enhance their solubility, photosensitize the oxidation of organic compounds and lower the surface tension of aqueous aerosols. HULIS can be oxidized to form a range of simpler acids such as formic, acetic and oxalic acid. Dust and forest fire smoke particles have a different composition and size range to that of typical urban combustion particles, so it is likely that the health impacts will be different, yet current regulation often does not recognize any significant

  19. Erupted cumulate fragments in rhyolites from Lipari (Aeolian Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Francesca; Ellis, Ben S.; Bachmann, Olivier; Lucchi, Federico; Tranne, Claudio A.; Agostini, Samuele; Dallai, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Over the last ~267 ky, the island of Lipari has erupted magmas ranging in compositions from basaltic andesites to rhyolites, with a notable compositional gap in the dacite field. Bulk geochemical and isotopic compositions of the volcanic succession, in conjunction with major and trace elemental compositions of minerals, indicate that the rhyolites were dominantly generated via crystal fractionation processes, with subordinate assimilation. Radiogenic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) and stable (O) isotopes independently suggest ≤30 % of crustal contamination with the majority of it occurring in mafic compositions, likely relatively deep in the system. Within the rhyolites, crystal-rich, K2O-rich enclaves are common. In contrast to previous interpretations, we suggest that these enclaves represent partial melting, remobilization and eruption of cumulate fragments left-over from rhyolite melt extraction. Cumulate melting and remobilization is supported by the presence of (1) resorbed, low-temperature minerals (biotite and sanidine), providing the potassic signature to these clasts, (2) reacted Fo-rich olivine, marking the presence of mafic recharge, (3) An38-21 plagioclase, filling the gap in feldspar composition between the andesites and the rhyolites and (4) strong enrichment in Sr and Ba in plagioclase and sanidine, suggesting crystallization from a locally enriched melt. Based on Sr-melt partitioning, the high-Sr plagioclase would require ~2300 ppm Sr in the melt, a value far in excess of Sr contents in Lipari and Vulcano magmas (50-1532 ppm) but consistent with melting of a feldspar-rich cumulate. Due to the presence of similar crystal-rich enclaves within the rhyolites from Vulcano, we propose that the eruption of remobilized cumulates associated with high-SiO2 rhyolites may be a common process at the Aeolian volcanoes, as already attested for a variety of volcanic systems around the world.

  20. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Aeolian system dynamics derived from thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Stephen Paul

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing and field-based observations were used to study aeolian systems, specifically sand transport pathways, dust emission sources and Saharan atmospheric dust. A method was developed for generating seamless and radiometrically accurate mosaics of thermal infrared data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. Using a combination of high resolution thermal emission spectroscopy results of sand samples and mosaic satellite data, surface emissivity was derived to map surface composition, which led to improvement in the understanding of sand accumulation in the Gran Desierto of northern Sonora, Mexico. These methods were also used to map sand transport pathways in the Sahara Desert, where the interaction between sand saltation and dust emission sources was explored. The characteristics and dynamics of dust sources were studied at White Sands, NM and in the Sahara Desert. At White Sands, an application was developed for studying the response of dust sources to surface soil moisture based on the relationship between soil moisture, apparent thermal inertia and the erosion potential of dust sources. The dynamics of dust sources and the interaction with sand transport pathways were also studied, focusing on the Bodele Depression of Chad and large dust sources in Mali and Mauritania. A dust detection algorithm was developed using ASTER data, and the spectral emissivity of observed atmospheric dust was related to the dust source area in the Sahara. At the Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) in Tenerife, Spain where direct measurement of the Saharan Air Layer could be made, the cycle of dust events occurring in July 2009 were examined. From the observation tower at the IZO, measurements of emitted longwave atmospheric radiance in the TIR wavelength region were made using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) handheld camera. The use of the FLIR to study atmospheric dust from the Saharan is a

  2. Sedimentary cycles in a Mesoproterozoic aeolian erg-margin succession: Mangabeira Formation, Espinhaço Supergroup, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bállico, M. B.; Scherer, C. M. S.; Mountney, N. P.; Souza, E. G.; Reis, A. D.; Raja Gabaglia, G. P.; Magalhães, A. J. C.

    2017-03-01

    Aeolian systems were abundant and widespread in the early Proterozoic, post-2.2 Ga. However, the majority of aeolian successions of such great age are intensely deformed and are preserved only in a fragmentary state meaning that, hitherto, few attempts have been made to apply a sequence stratigraphic approach to determine mechanisms of aeolian construction, accumulation and preservation in such systems. The Mangabeira Formation is a well preserved Mesoproterozoic erg successions covering part of the São Francisco Craton, northeastern Brazil. The lower unit of the Mangabeira Formation ( 500 m thick) comprises aeolian deposits of dune, interdune, and sand-sheet origin, as well as some of waterlain origin. These deposits are organized into vertically stacked depositional cycles, each 6 to 20 m thick, and characterized by aeolian sandsheet and waterlain deposits succeeded by aeolian dune and interdune deposits indicative of a drying-upward trend. Aeolian cross-strata exhibit a mean dip direction to the north. Each of these cycles likely arose in response to climatic oscillation from relatively humid to arid conditions, possibly related to orbital forcing. The lower unit of the Mangabeira Formation comprises up to 14 erg sequences. The accumulation and preservation of each was determined by the relative rate of water-table rise and the availability of sand for aeolian transport, both of which changed through time, resulting in the preservation of a succession of repeated drying-upward cycles.

  3. Late-glacial to Holocene aeolian deposition in northeastern Europe - The timing of sedimentation at the Iisaku site (NE Estonia)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalinska-Nartisa, Edyta; Nartiss, Maris; Thiel, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    The Late-glacial and Holocene aeolian inland dune complex at Iisaku (NE Estonia) has been investigated using an accurate and detailed compilation of the sedimentary properties and chronological framework. The quartz grains forming the dunes are very variable, reflecting aeolian, weathering, and p...

  4. High-frequency field observations of aeolian saltation interactions with turbulent boundary layer winds

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The wind-blown transport of sand is driven by turbulent winds that fluctuate over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Increasingly sophisticated models and wind tunnel experiments have attempted to capture these dynamics of aeolian saltation, yet model predictions often diverge substantially from field observations. To help fill this knowledge gap, we collected comprehensive high-frequency field measurements to characterize the dynamics of aeolian saltation under natural conditions. Here, we provide detailed description of our field deployments, including information about sites, instruments, and data processing methods. We then demonstrate how our field measurements can help to improve understanding of the mechanics of aeolian processes. We also describe the limitations of our measurement techniques and the needs for future work.

  5. Influence of grain size, shape and compaction on georadar waves: example of an Aeolian dune

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05577.x

    2012-01-01

    Many Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles acquired in dry aeolian environment have shown good reflectivity inside present-day dunes. We show that the origin of this reflectivity is related to changes in grain size distribution, packing and/or grain shape in a sandy material. We integrate these three parameters into analytical models for bulk permittivity in order to predict the reflections and the velocity of GPR waves. We consider two GPR cross-sections acquired over Aeolian dunes in the Chadian desert. The 2D migration of GPR data suggests that dunes contain different kinds of bounding surfaces. We discuss and model three kinds of reflections using reasonable geological hypothesis about Aeolian sedimentation processes. The propagation and the reflection of radar waves are calculated using the 1D wavelet modelling method in spectral domain. The results of the forward modelling are in good accordance with real observed data.

  6. 10 years of aeolian geomorphology at the EGU: past achievements and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Andreas C. W.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Claudin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    On this tenth anniversary of the Aeolian Processes & Landforms session at the EGU the original conveners review and reflect on the recent achievements and expansion in aeolian geomorphological research, focussing on advances in our understanding of sand transport processes, dune development and dynamics, and the mechanisms and scalings involved. This talk will highlight the variety and impact of the dramatic increase in the extent and interest of research on aeolian processes and landforms in the last ten years, including the increasingly strong community presence at international meetings, the diversity and extent of collaborations across subject boundaries, and the application of new measurement technologies and mathematical approaches. We conclude with a forward-looking prospectus of exciting future challenges and open research questions.

  7. A REVIEW OF ASSESSMENTS CONDUCTED ON BIO-ETHANOL AS A TRANSPORTATION FUEL FROM A NET ENERGY, GREENHOUSE GAS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interest in producing ethanol from bio-mass in an attempt to make transportation ecologically sustainable continues to grow. In recent years, a large number of assessments have been conducted to assess the environmental merit of biofuels. Two detailed reviews that looked at the s...

  8. Semiarid landscapes response to Aeolian processes during Holocene in Baikal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan'ko, Lidia; Opekunova, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Arid and semiarid landscapes play a significant role in global climate, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. Regional analysis of the past aeolian processes is essential for improve our understanding of how various landscape and ecosystems responded to climate change in the past. Our investigation presents details on sand dunes and on loess-like sediments. The study areas are situated in the northern part of Baikal Region (Eastern Siberia). In its depressions, the so-called Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley surrounded mountain ranges local dunefieds and loess-like sediments have developed. Present climate in the study areas is continental, characterized by low precipitation(mean annual 250-450 mm) and wide annual range of temperature. Field investigations indicate that the Holocene deposits of the Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley are sealed the pedo-sedimentary interface. The analytical results suggest that one's represents a changeover from intensified soil formation to accelerated aeolian dust accumulation. The original content of calcium carbonate and gypsum at the base of some sections of loess-like sediments indicates the aeolian origin of these sediments. In whole, the soil horizons are a proof for humid phases. The change was forced by climatic aridity. Absolute dating of the organogenic components of soils (14C) indicate the age positions of the arid and humid climate phases. Our results indicate not only 1-4 long-time episodes of aeolian dust accumulation during the Holocene, but shot-time aeolian accumulation episodes, that were specific for Late Holocene. For example, in the Tunkinskaya Valley the Late Holocene soil formation replaced by aeolian deposit at 1700 - 1900, 800 and 200-250 years ago, in the Barguzinskaya Valley - about 3100 - 2900, 2300 and 600 years ago. It can be concluded that a periodical formation of the aeolian deposits in the semiarid landscapes during Holocene can be postulated. Aeolian and loess-like sediments of the

  9. Active aeolian processes on Mars: A regional study in Arabia and Meridiani Terrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D.A.; Fenton, L.K.; Geissler, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence of widespread aeolian activity in the Arabia Terra/Meridiani region (Mars), where different kinds of aeolian modifications have been detected and classified. Passing from the regional to the local scale, we describe one particular dune field in Meridiani Planum, where two ripple populations are distinguished by means of different migration rates. Moreover, a consistent change in the ripple pattern is accompanied by significant dune advancement (between 0.4-1 meter in one Martian year) that is locally triggered by large avalanche features. This suggests that dune advancement may be common throughout the Martian tropics. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  11. Identifying sources of aeolian mineral dust: Present and past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R; Prospero, Joseph M; Baddock, Matthew C; Gill, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian mineral dust is an important component of the Earth’s environmental systems, playing roles in the planetary radiation balance, as a source of fertilizer for biota in both terrestrial and marine realms and as an archive for understanding atmospheric circulation and paleoclimate in the geologic past. Crucial to understanding all of these roles of dust is the identification of dust sources. Here we review the methods used to identify dust sources active at present and in the past. Contemporary dust sources, produced by both glaciogenic and non-glaciogenic processes, can be readily identified by the use of Earth-orbiting satellites. These data show that present dust sources are concentrated in a global dust belt that encompasses large topographic basins in low-latitude arid and semiarid regions. Geomorphic studies indicate that specific point sources for dust in this zone include dry or ephemeral lakes, intermittent stream courses, dune fields, and some bedrock surfaces. Back-trajectory analyses are also used to identify dust sources, through modeling of wind fields and the movement of air parcels over periods of several days. Identification of dust sources from the past requires novel approaches that are part of the geologic toolbox of provenance studies. Identification of most dust sources of the past requires the use of physical, mineralogical, geochemical, and isotopic analyses of dust deposits. Physical properties include systematic spatial changes in dust deposit thickness and particle size away from a source. Mineralogy and geochemistry can pinpoint dust sources by clay mineral ratios and Sc-Th-La abundances, respectively. The most commonly used isotopic methods utilize isotopes of Nd, Sr, and Pb and have been applied extensively in dust archives of deep-sea cores, ice cores, and loess. All these methods have shown that dust sources have changed over time, with far more abundant dust supplies existing during glacial periods. Greater dust supplies in

  12. Perspective View, Mt. Etna, Italy & the Aeolian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Italy's Mount Etna and the Aeolian Islands are the focus of this perspective view made from an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Emission Radiometer (ASTER) image from NASA's Terra spacecraft overlaid on Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) topography. The image is looking south with the islands of Lipari and Vulcano in the foreground and Etna with its dark lava flows on the skyline. Vulcano also hosts an active volcano, the cone of which is prominent. In late October 2002, Etna erupted again, sending lava flows down the north and south sides of the volcano. The north flows are near the center of this view, but the ASTER image is from before the eruption.In addition to the terrestrial applications of these data for understanding active volcanoes and hazards associated with them such as lava flows and explosive eruptions, geologists studying Mars find these data useful as an analog to martian landforms and geologic processes. In late September 2002, a field conference with the theme of Terrestrial Analogs to Mars focused on Mount Etna allowing Mars geologists to see in person the types of features they can only sample remotely.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D

  13. Combustion characteristics and kinetics of bio-oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia ZHANG; Zhaoping ZHONG; Yaji HUANG

    2009-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of bio-oils derived from rice husk and corn were studied by thermogravimetry analysis. According to the thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) curves of bio-oils in air and nitrogen atmosphere, we analyzed the combustion characteristics of different kinds of bio-oils in different atmospheres and worked out the combustion kinetics parameters of the bio-oil, providing reliable base data for the burning of bio-oil. The thermogravimetry indicated that the combustion process of bio-oil was divided into three stages. At the same time, the combustion process can be described by different order reaction models, and with the method of Coats-Redfern, the activation energy and frequency factor of different kinds of bio-oils were obtained.

  14. Effects of biomass particle size on yield and composition of pyrolysis bio-oil derived from Chinese tallow tree (Triadica Sebifera L. and energy cane (Saccharum complex in an inductively heated reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the face of fluctuating petroleum costs and a growing demand for energy, the need for an alternative and sustainable energy source has increased. A viable solution for this problem can be attained by using thermochemical conversion, pyrolysis, of existing biomass sources for the production of liquid fuels. This study focuses on the effect that biomass particle size has on the conversion of biomass into liquid pyrolysis oil. Energy cane and Chinese tallow tree biomass were pyrolyzed at 550 ℃. The particle size ranges studied were < 0.5, 0.5 to 1.4, 1.4 to 2.4 and, 2.4 to 4.4 mm. The results indicate that the range from 0.5-1.4 mm is a better range for optimizing bio-oil production while keeping water content low.

  15. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  16. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  17. Influence of aeolian activities on the distribution of microbial abundance in glacier ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are continuously blown onto the glacier snow, and thus the glacial depth profiles provide excellent archives of microbial communities and climatic and environmental changes. However, it is uncertain about how aeolian processes that cause climatic changes control the distribution of microorganisms in the glacier ice. In the present study, microbial density, stable isotopic ratios, 18O / 16O in the precipitation, and mineral particle concentrations along the glacial depth profiles were collected from ice cores from the Muztag Ata glacier and the Dunde ice cap. The ice core data showed that microbial abundance was often, but not always associated with high concentrations of particles. Results also revealed clear seasonal patterning with high microbial abundance occurring in both the cooling autumn and warming spring-summer seasons. Microbial comparisons among the neighbouring glaciers display a heterogeneous spatial pattern, with the highest microbial cell density in the glaciers lying adjacent to the central Asian deserts and lowest microbial density in the southwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. In conclusion, microbial data of the glaciers indicates the aeolian deposits of microorganisms in the glacier ice and that the spatial patterns of microorgansisms are related to differences in sources of microbial flux and intensity of aeolian activities in the current regions. The results strongly support our hypothesis of aeolian activities being the main agents controlling microbial load in the glacier ice.

  18. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and em

  19. Aeolian transport in the field: A comparison of the effects of different surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhibao; Lv, Ping; Zhang, Zhengcai; Qian, Guangqiang; Luo, Wanyin

    2012-05-01

    Aeolian transport represents the result of wind-surface interactions, and therefore depends strongly on variations in the characteristics of the sediment surface. We conducted field observations of aeolian transport of typical dune sand in three 80 m × 80 m plots with different surface treatments: gravel-covered sand, enclosed shifting sand, and open (unprotected) shifting sand. The study was performed at the Shapotou Aeolian Experiment Site in the southeastern part of China's Tengger Desert to compare the effects of these different surface treatments on aeolian transport. To do so, we analyzed the flux density profiles and transport rates above each surface. The flux density profiles for all three treatments followed the exponential decay law that was proposed by most previous researchers to describe the saltation flux density profiles. Coefficients of the exponential decay function were defined as a function of the surface and the wind velocity. The enclosed and open plots with shifting sand had similar flux density profiles, but the flux density above gravel-covered plots showed that transport decayed more slowly with increasing height, producing flux density profiles with a higher average saltation height. The transport rate above the three treatment plots tended to increase proportionally with the cube of the mean wind velocity and with the maximum wind velocity during the observation period, but was more strongly correlated with the square of drift potential. Transport rates above the plot with open shifting sand were greater than those above the plots with enclosed shifting sand and the gravel-covered plot.

  20. A process-based model for aeolian sediment transport and spatiotemporal varying sediment availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonhout, Bas M.; Vries, Sierd de

    2016-08-01

    Aeolian sediment transport is influenced by a variety of bed surface properties, like moisture, shells, vegetation, and nonerodible elements. The bed surface properties influence aeolian sediment transport by changing the sediment transport capacity and/or the sediment availability. The effect of bed surface properties on the transport capacity and sediment availability is typically incorporated through the velocity threshold. This approach appears to be a critical limitation in existing aeolian sediment transport models for simulation of real-world cases with spatiotemporal variations in bed surface properties. This paper presents a new model approach for multifraction aeolian sediment transport in which sediment availability is simulated rather than parameterized through the velocity threshold. The model can cope with arbitrary spatiotemporal configurations of bed surface properties that either limit or enhance the sediment availability or sediment transport capacity. The performance of the model is illustrated using four prototype cases, the simulation of two wind tunnel experiments from literature and a sensitivity analysis of newly introduced parameters.

  1. A review of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling over aeolian landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2016-09-01

    Aeolian landforms occur on all earths' continents as well as on Mars, Titan and Venus and are typically formed where sediment is eroded and/or deposited by near surface wind flow. As wind flow approaches an aeolian landform, secondary flow patterns are created that cause wind to deviate in both speed and direction, producing complex patterns of sediment erosion, deposition and transportation. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of wind flow has become a common tool to predict and understand secondary wind flow and resulting sediment transport. Its use has progressed from simulating wind flow over simple two dimensional dune shapes, to calculating a multitude of flow parameters over a range of increasingly complex landforms. Analysis of 25 peer reviewed journal articles, found that CFD has been crucial to providing additional insight to flow dynamics on the stoss slope of dunes, the structure and nature of wind flow separation in the lee of landforms and information on localised wind flow variations in large-scale dune fields. The findings of this assay demonstrate that further research is required regarding the parameterisation and modelling of surface roughness, the incorporation of accurate sediment transport to wind flow models, and the prediction of topographic surface changes. CFD is anticipated to be increasingly utilised in aeolian geomorphology and this work aims to be a starting point for aeolian geomorphologists wishing to better understand and review the utilisation of the technique to date.

  2. Effect of rock fragment embedding on the aeolian deposition of dust on stone-covered surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many stone-covered surfaces on Earth are subject to aeolian deposition of atmospheric dust. This study investigates how the deposition of dust is affected when rock fragments become gradually more embedded in the ground or, inversely, become more concentrated on the surface. Experiments were execute

  3. A tribute to Michael R. Raupach for contributions to aeolian fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the early work of Bagnold in the 1940s, aeolian research has grown to become a major integral part of earth-system studies. Many individuals have contributed to this development, and Dr. Michael R. Raupach (MR2, 1950 – 2015) was one of the most outstanding. MR2 worked for about a decade (1985 ...

  4. Harvesting of microalgae by bio-flocculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salim, S.; Bosma, R.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The high-energy input for harvesting biomass makes current commercial microalgal biodiesel production economically unfeasible. A novel harvesting method is presented as a cost and energy efficient alternative: the bio-flocculation by using one flocculating microalga to concentrate the non-flocculati

  5. MULTIFUNCTIONAL NANO-BIO MATERIALS WITHIN CELLULAR MACHINERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkova, E A; Ulasov, I V; Kim, D-H; Dimitrijevic, N M; Novosad, V; Bader, S D; Lesniak, M S; Rajh, T

    2011-08-01

    Functional nanoscale materials that possess specific physical or chemical properties can leverage energy transduction in vivo. Once these materials integrate with biomolecules they combine physical properties of inorganic material and the biorecognition capabilities of bio-organic moieties. Such nano-bio hybrids can be interfaced with living cells, the elementary functional units of life. These nano-bio systems are capable of bio-manipulation or actuation via altering intracellular biochemical pathways. Thus, nano-bio conjugates are appealing for a wide range of applications from the life sciences and nanomedicine to catalysis and clean energy production. Here we highlight recent progress in our efforts to develop smart nano-bio hybrid materials, and to study their performance within cellular machinery under application of external stimuli, such as light or magnetic fields.

  6. Observations of an aeolian landscape: From surface to orbit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary

    2016-12-01

    Landscapes derived solely from aeolian processes are rare on Earth because of the dominance of subaqueous processes. In contrast, aeolian-derived landscapes should typify Mars because of the absence of liquid water, the long exposure times of surfaces, and the presence of wind as the default geomorphic agent. Using the full range of available orbital and Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity images, wind-formed features in Gale Crater were cataloged and analyzed in order to characterize the aeolian landscape and to derive the evolution of the crater wind regime over time. Inferred wind directions show a dominance of regional northerly winds over geologic time-scales, but a dominance of topography-driven katabatic winds in modern times. Landscapes in Gale Crater show a preponderance of aeolian features at all spatial scales. Interpreted processes forming these features include first-cycle aeolian abrasion of bedrock, pervasive deflation, organization of available sand into bedforms, abundant cratering, and gravity-driven wasting, all of which occur over a background of slow physical weathering. The observed landscapes are proposed to represent a spectrum of progressive surface denudation from fractured bedrock, to retreating bedrock-capped mesas, to remnant hills capped by bedrock rubble, to desert pavement plains. This model of landscape evolution provides the mechanism by which northerly winds acting over ∼3 Ga excavated tens of thousands of cubic kilometers of material from the once sediment-filled crater, thus carving the intra-crater moat and exhuming Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons). The current crater surface is relatively sand-starved, indicating that potential sediment deflation from the crater is greater than sediment production, and that most exhumation of Mount Sharp occurred in the ancient geologic past.

  7. Aeolian process effects on vegetation communities in an arid grassland ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Lorelei J; Epstein, Howard E; Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S

    2012-04-01

    Many arid grassland communities are changing from grass dominance to shrub dominance, but the mechanisms involved in this conversion process are not completely understood. Aeolian processes likely contribute to this conversion from grassland to shrubland. The purpose of this research is to provide information regarding how vegetation changes occur in an arid grassland as a result of aeolian sediment transport. The experimental design included three treatment blocks, each with a 25 × 50 m area where all grasses, semi-shrubs, and perennial forbs were hand removed, a 25 × 50 m control area with no manipulation of vegetation cover, and two 10 × 25 m plots immediately downwind of the grass-removal and control areas in the prevailing wind direction, 19° north of east, for measuring vegetation cover. Aeolian sediment flux, soil nutrients, and soil seed bank were monitored on each treatment area and downwind plot. Grass and shrub cover were measured on each grass-removal, control, and downwind plot along continuous line transects as well as on 5 × 10 m subplots within each downwind area over four years following grass removal. On grass-removal areas, sediment flux increased significantly, soil nutrients and seed bank were depleted, and Prosopis glandulosa shrub cover increased compared to controls. Additionally, differential changes for grass and shrub cover were observed for plots downwind of vegetation-removal and control areas. Grass cover on plots downwind of vegetation-removal areas decreased over time (2004-2007) despite above average rainfall throughout the period of observation, while grass cover increased downwind of control areas; P. glandulosa cover increased on plots downwind of vegetation-removal areas, while decreasing on plots downwind of control areas. The relationships between vegetation changes and aeolian sediment flux were significant and were best described by a logarithmic function, with decreases in grass cover and increases in shrub cover

  8. Energy analysis in a swine production system with use of manure as bio fertilizer in pasture; Analise energetica em sistema de producao de suinos com aproveitamento dos dejetos como biofertilizante em pastagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Cassio V. [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM), Diamantina, MG (Brazil)], email: agro.cassio@hotmail.com; Campos, Alessandro T. [Universidade Federal de Lavras (DEG/UFLA), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia], email: campos@deg.ufla.br; Bueno, Osmar C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCA/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas; Silva, Enilson B. [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM), Diamantina, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Agronomia

    2009-07-01

    This work objective was to esteem the amount of energy employed in a complete cycle swine production and the energy balance of the system with utilization of the generated manure as bio fertilizer in pasture area, by using five cycles' average data, in a commercial farm in Diamantina municipal district - MG Brazil. The energy coefficient of each involved component was quantified in the productive process of finished swine, residues treatment and Brachiaria decumbens pasture production, in the form of ration, human labor, electric power, machines and equipment, fuel and lubricants, buildings, finished swine production and Brachiaria decumbens production. The average quantity of energy to produce 1 kg of alive swine was of 53.35 MJ. Of total employed energy in the system 76.03% (1,067,106.07 MJ) refers to the inputs and 23.97% (331,400 MJ) refers to the outputs, resulting in an energy efficiency coefficient of 0.31. The energy converted in swine for abate corresponded to 55.58% (184,200 MJ) of the outputs, while the pasture of Brachiaria decumbens reached a value of 44.42% (147,200 MJ). (author)

  9. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  10. Towards Ideal NOx and CO2 Emission Control Technology for Bio-Oils Combustion Energy System Using a Plasma-Chemical Hybrid Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, M.; Fujishima, H.; Yamato, Y.; Kuroki, T.; Tanaka, A.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-03-01

    A pilot-scale low-emission boiler system consisting of a bio-fuel boiler and plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system is investigated. This system can achieve carbon neutrality because the bio-fuel boiler uses waste vegetable oil as one of the fuels. The plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system has two processes: NO oxidation by ozone produced from plasma ozonizers and NO2 removal using a Na2SO3 chemical scrubber. Test demonstrations of the system are carried out for mixed oils (mixture of A-heavy oil and waste vegetable oil). Stable combustion is achieved for the mixed oil (20 - 50% waste vegetable oil). Properties of flue gas—e.g., O2, CO2 and NOx—when firing mixed oils are nearly the same as those when firing heavy oil for an average flue gas flow rate of 1000 Nm3/h. NOx concentrations at the boiler outlet are 90 - 95 ppm. Furthermore, during a 300-min continuous operation when firing 20% mixed oil, NOx removal efficiency of more than 90% (less than 10 ppm NOx emission) is confirmed. In addition, the CO2 reduction when heavy oil is replaced with waste vegetable oil is estimated. The system comparison is described between the plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal and the conventional technology.

  11. 从中国玉米生物乙醇发展分析生物能源对粮食安全的影响%Does Development of Bio-energy Really Affect the “food”?——Based on the Development of Chinese Corn Bio-ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玲霞; 黄朝禧; 彭开丽

    2011-01-01

    Taking bio-ethanol from corn as an example, this paper quantitatively analyzes relationship between "biological energy" and "food" with the means of scenario analysis. The results show that the development of corn bio-ethanol plays an impact on the demand for corn. If do a more realistic predictions to the other industrial use and rations of grain, the supply and demand conditions will be relieved to some degree. So the development of com bio-ethanol will not impact the "food" problem significantly. But considering stocks and exports, the relations are rather strained between supply and demand of corn. Food energy' s development is an ordeal of technology and strategy, actively guide technological innovation, and to ensure the most basic food needs is the good way for the future.%本文以玉米生物乙醇为例,采用情景分析法定量分析“生物能源”与“吃饭”的关系.研究表明:(1)设定2020年生物乙醇的产量为1000万吨、1500万吨和2300万吨,玉米生物乙醇占生物乙醇的60%、40%和20%,则9个子情景所需玉米量最多3864万吨,最少560万吨;(2)结合其他玉米需求分析其供需关系,发现9个子情景均未达均衡,最大和最小缺口分别为4249万吨和945万吨,说明玉米生物乙醇的发展对玉米需求造成了影响.如对口粮和其他工业用粮进行更切合实际的预测,则供求情况会有所缓解,所以玉米生物乙醇的发展不会对“吃饭”问题造成太大影响.但若考虑库存和出口则会显得供求紧张.发展粮食能源是一场技术与战略的考验,积极引导技术创新,并保证最基本的粮食需求是未来的出路.

  12. Climate evolution during the Pleniglacial and Late Glacial as recorded in quartz grain morphoscopy of fluvial to aeolian successions of the European Sand Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woronko Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present results of research into fluvial to aeolian successions at four sites in the foreland of the Last Glacial Maximum, i.e., the central part of the “European Sand Belt”. These sites include dune fields on higher-lying river terraces and alluvial fans. Sediments were subjected to detailed lithofacies analyses and sampling for morphoscopic assessment of quartz grains. Based on these results, three units were identified in the sedimentary succession: fluvial, fluvio-aeolian and aeolian. Material with traces of aeolian origin predominate in these sediments and this enabled conclusions on the activity of aeolian processes during the Pleniglacial and Late Glacial, and the source of sediment supply to be drawn. Aeolian processes played a major role in the deposition of the lower portions of the fluvial and fluvio-aeolian units. Aeolian material in the fluvial unit stems from aeolian accumulation of fluvial sediments within the valley as well as particles transported by wind from beyond the valley. The fluvio-aeolian unit is composed mainly of fluvial sediments that were subject to multiple redeposition, and long-term, intensive processing in an aeolian environment. In spite of the asynchronous onset of deposition of the fluvio-aeolian unit, it is characterised by the greatest homogeneity of structural and textural characteristics. Although the aeolian unit was laid down simultaneously, it is typified by the widest range of variation in quartz morphoscopic traits. It reflects local factors, mainly the origin of the source material, rather than climate. The duration of dune-formation processes was too short to be reflected in the morphoscopy of quartz grains.

  13. Variation and Distribution of Sediments in a Mixed Glacifluvial-Aeolian System in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. J.; Bullard, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    There is a clear association between the distribution of wind-blown sediments and the former extent of ice sheets and glaciers. Glacial erosion processes produce significant quantities of fine sediments that are washed out from beneath glaciers by meltwater. Once deposited and desiccated, aeolian processes may transport them across the landscape resulting in the formation of sand dunes and loess, and adding dust to the atmosphere. This research reports the use of digital imaging and laser sizing to obtain the grain size distribution and textural attributes of sand and dust in Sandflugtdalen, a valley adjacent to the West Greenland ice sheet. An initial assessment of the rates of sand and dust transport, made using semi-isokinetic directional sediment samplers, indicate that the flux of aeolian sediment comprises clays, silts and sand-sized particles. Digital imaging of the surficial sediment deposits provides a rapid means of sampling the large, spatially and temporally variable, proglacial valley. Sediments were initially photographed during June 2007 and then resampled after a 9-week interval. The grain size distribution and surface texture were computed using a calibrated autocorrelation method. It is estimated that individual particles may be resolved down to a size of 0.045 mm. The regions of aeolian entrainment, transport and deposition are directly linked to the development and distribution of sediments on the proglacial floodplain, which varies considerably in terms of surface roughness. On the floodplain close to the ice sheet, aeolian flux is controlled by sediment supply and lag formation and the total surface roughness is determined by the combination of grain-scale roughness and topography. Further down valley, recycling of sediments by aeolian and fluvial activity is significant and wind speed becomes an important controlling factor. Within the dunefields, surface roughness is principally determined by topography and vegetation. Close to the ice sheet

  14. Bios data analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabelli, H; Sugerman, A; Kovacevic, L; Kauffman, L; Carlson-Sabelli, L; Patel, M; Konecki, J

    2005-10-01

    The Bios Data Analyzer (BDA) is a set of computer programs (CD-ROM, in Sabelli et al., Bios. A Study of Creation, 2005) for new time series analyses that detects and measures creative phenomena, namely diversification, novelty, complexes, nonrandom complexity. We define a process as creative when its time series displays these properties. They are found in heartbeat interval series, the exemplar of bios .just as turbulence is the exemplar of chaos, in many other empirical series (galactic distributions, meteorological, economic and physiological series), in biotic series generated mathematically by the bipolar feedback, and in stochastic noise, but not in chaotic attractors. Differencing, consecutive recurrence and partial autocorrelation indicate nonrandom causation, thereby distinguishing chaos and bios from random and random walk. Embedding plots distinguish causal creative processes (e.g. bios) that include both simple and complex components of variation from stochastic processes (e.g. Brownian noise) that include only complex components, and from chaotic processes that decay from order to randomness as the number of dimensions is increased. Varying bin and dimensionality show that entropy measures symmetry and variety, and that complexity is associated with asymmetry. Trigonometric transformations measure coexisting opposites in time series and demonstrate bipolar, partial, and uncorrelated opposites in empirical processes and bios, supporting the hypothesis that bios is generated by bipolar feedback, a concept which is at variance with standard concepts of polar and complementary opposites.

  15. ON THE UNDERSTANDING OF AEOLIAN SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY: AN EXAMPLE FROM MIOCENE-PLIOCENE DEPOSITS IN PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ZAVALA

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Upper Tertiary aeolian strata (Río Negro Formation outcrop in extensive sea cliffs at the Northeast of Patagonia. These outcrops show deposits corresponding to a complete suite of aeolian and aeolian related sub-environments, and also provide excellent exposures to analyse the sedimentology and internal architecture from a sequence stratigraphic point of view. Field studies, supplemented withline-drawings of oblique photographs, allowed the recognition of seven aeolian depositional sequences within the succession, each one bounded by regional super surfaces (or deflation surfaces. Internally these aeolian sequences display a cyclic recurrence in facies, that yields a tentative genetic model for their evolution. As documented from field examples, each basic aeolian depositional sequence was deposited during a single aggradational period, and is bounded by unconformities related to degradational periods. Degradational periods are regional deflationary events, that resulted in deep-scoured to flat surfaces, characterised by erosion / non deposition in which the only recognised accumulation is isolated and large angular blocks of fine-grained aggregates, interpreted as residual remnants of deposits of the previous sequence. Aggradational periods are characterised by a near- continuous accumulations responsible for the sequence building. Differences in the aeolian sediment budget to the area and the rising rate of water table control the related facies types, and allow to discriminateearly and late aggradational sub-periods. Early aggradational sub-periods form under conditions of relatively fast rising water tables associated with moderate aeolian sediment budget, thus resulting in the development of extended wet interduneslaterally associated with aeolian dunes and dry interdunes. During late aggradational sub-periods, the depositional surface outdistanced the water table, and aeolian dunes and dry interdunes tend to predominate. This sub

  16. Public Perception of Bio fuels; Percepcion Publica de los Biocombustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Priolo, V.

    2011-11-10

    The deployment of bio fuels has generated a significant controversy in the energy, agricultural and environmental fields. Governments and promoters around the world have advocated for developing bio fuels based on their potential contribution to emissions reduction and energy security. But opposition to bio fuels has growth in the last years. Environmental NGO's and other stake holders have called for a review of the environmental and social sustainability of energy crops. This controversy has characterized the public debate around bio fuels. In this context, and given the need to improve public involvement in energy technologies, this article reports an investigation of Spanish citizens' perceptions about bio fuels. The study investigated the perceptions of informed citizens and the reasoning basis underlying beliefs and attitudes. The study finds an initial positive association of bio fuels to a clean and natural fuel that is mitigated by participants' concerns on the practical usage of bio fuels and the social and environmental impacts. Study participants' reactions show the need to differentiate among the diverse groups of publics holding differing views and a different reaction to information on the benefits and costs of bio fuels. (Author) 9 refs.

  17. Energy sustainability through green energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Atul

    2015-01-01

    This book shares the latest developments and advances in materials and processes involved in the energy generation, transmission, distribution and storage. Chapters are written by researchers in the energy and materials field. Topics include, but are not limited to, energy from biomass, bio-gas and bio-fuels; solar, wind, geothermal, hydro power, wave energy; energy-transmission, distribution and storage; energy-efficient lighting buildings; energy sustainability; hydrogen and fuel cells; energy policy for new and renewable energy technologies and education for sustainable energy development

  18. Dynamic simulation of a pumping system using the wind power and determination of the aeolian resources; Simulacion dinamica de un sistema de bombeo utilizando la potencia del viento y determinacion de recursos eolicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco Lozano, Miguel

    2002-05-15

    The present investigation project pretends toward analyze the possibility of pumping water using Aeolian energy from the Soto la Marina River to the Contadero Lagoon, through an eight kilometers channel. In order to obtain this objective it is necessary to analyze diverse configurations for Aeolian energy converters as well as to determine the Aeolian potential of the site. An isolated Aeolian energy pumping system will be analyzed, that is to say, without interconnection with the electric power network and another interconnected with this network. In addition, with the installation of meteorological monitoring stations a partial evaluation of the Aeolian resource in the zone will be made. This research project was born as a result of an invitation of the Dr. Eric Gustafson, President of Conservation Mexico A.C. and of Ing. Virgilio Garza, President of the Vigia Group, to participate in a project called Laguna Flamingo. Such project deals with the restoration of a habitat of aquatic birds in the Contadero Lagoon, property of Ing. Virgilio Garza in Soto la Marina, Tamaulipas, Mexico. [Spanish] El presente proyecto de investigacion pretende analizar la posibilidad de bombear agua utilizando energia eolica desde el rio Soto La Marina hasta la laguna Contadero, a traves de un canal de 8 km. Para lograr este objetivo es necesario analizar diversas configuraciones de convertidores de energia eolica asi como determinar el potencial eolico del sitio. Se analizara un sistema de bombeo con energia eolica operando aislado, es decir, sin interconexion con la red electrica y otro interconectado con dicha red. Ademas, con la instalacion de estaciones de monitoreo meteorologico se realizara una evaluacion parcial del recurso eolico en la zona. Este proyecto de investigacion nacio a raiz de una invitacion del Dr. Eric Gustafson, Presidente de Conservacion Mexico A.C. y del Ing. Virgilio Garza, Presidente del grupo Vigia, para participar en un proyecto llamado Laguna Flamingo. Tal

  19. Bio-fuels for the gas turbine: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Medi-Caps Institute of Technology and Management, Pigdamber, Rau, Indore (M.P.) (India); Rehman, A.; Sarviya, R.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MANIT, Bhopal (M.P.) (India)

    2010-12-15

    Due to depletion of fossil fuel, bio-fuels have generated a significant interest as an alternative fuel for the future. The use of bio-fuels to fuel gas turbine seems a viable solution for the problems of decreasing fossil-fuel reserves and environmental concerns. Bio-fuels are alternative fuels, made from renewable sources and having environmental benefit. In recent years, the desire for energy independence, foreseen depletion of nonrenewable fuel resources, fluctuating petroleum fuel costs, the necessity of stimulating agriculture based economy, and the reality of climate change have created an interest in the development of bio-fuels. The application of bio-fuels in automobiles and heating applications is increasing day by day. Therefore the use of these fuels in gas turbines would extend this application to aviation field. The impact of costly petroleum-based aviation fuel on the environment is harmful. So the development of alternative fuels in aviation is important and useful. The use of liquid and gaseous fuels from biomass will help to fulfill the Kyoto targets concerning global warming emissions. In addition, to reduce exhaust emission waste gases and syngas, etc., could be used as a potential gas turbine fuel. The term bio-fuel is referred to alternative fuel which is produced from biomass. Such fuels include bio-diesel, bio-ethanol, bio-methanol, pyrolysis oil, biogas, synthetic gas (dimethyl ether), hydrogen, etc. The bio-ethanol and bio-methanol are petrol additive/substitute. Bio-diesel is an environment friendly alternative liquid fuel for the diesel/aviation fuel. The gas turbine develops steady flame during its combustion; this feature gives a flexibility to use alternative fuels. Therefore so the use of different bio-fuels in gas turbine has been investigated by a good number of researchers. The suitability and modifications in the existing systems are also recommended. (author)

  20. Bio-inspired vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  1. Saltation-threshold model can explain aeolian features on low-air-density planetary bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the minimal fluid speeds at which sediment transport can be sustained is crucial for understanding whether underwater landscapes exposed to water streams and wind-blown loose planetary surfaces can be altered. It also tells us whether surface features, such as ripples and dunes, can evolve. Here, guided by state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we propose an analytical model predicting the minimal fluid speeds required to sustain sediment transport in a Newtonian fluid. The model results are consistent with measurements and estimates of the transport threshold in water and Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. Furthermore, it predicts reasonable wind speeds to sustain aeolian sediment transport ("saltation") on the low-air-density planetary bodies Triton, Pluto, and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (comet). This offers an explanation for possible aeolian surface features photographed on these bodies during space missions.

  2. Developing a SAR TT-OSL protocol for volcanically-heated aeolian quartz from Datong (China)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank;

    2012-01-01

    The thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) responses of chemically-purified fine-grained quartz from a lava-baked aeolian sediment from Datong (China) are presented. Our main focus is to examine the suitability of the test dose TT-OSL and OSL response to monitor sensitiv......The thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) responses of chemically-purified fine-grained quartz from a lava-baked aeolian sediment from Datong (China) are presented. Our main focus is to examine the suitability of the test dose TT-OSL and OSL response to monitor...... sensitivity changes during SAR measurements. It is found that, in contrast to the test dose OSL, the TT-OSL response to a test dose can successfully monitor sensitivity changes, and a high-temperature blue-light bleach (600s at 260°C) in the middle of each SAR cycle is necessary to minimize interference...

  3. BioProject

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The BioProject database provides an organizational framework to access information about research projects with links to data that have been or will be deposited...

  4. BioSentinel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — BioSentinel technology will provide critical information about how living systems, from humans down to cells, adapt, respond and survive in deep space, beyond LEO...

  5. BioSystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NCBI BioSystems Database provides integrated access to biological systems and their component genes, proteins, and small molecules, as well as literature...

  6. 'Bio-energy Schaffhausen': biogas, proteins and fibres, all three from grass; Bioenergie Schaffhausen. Biogas, Protein und Fasern aus Gras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmer, F.; Mueller, P.H.

    2002-07-01

    Bioenergie Schaffhausen Ltd., Switzerland, has commissioned the first industrial bio-refinery for processing grass. This unique grass refinery process provides a new industrial utilisation of grass. The products are green power and technical fibres for heat and sound insulation. The green electricity and green gas are made and sold by Etawatt Ltd. and Schaffhausen City Works, the green heat is used internally as process heat. All plant components are utilised for generation of value-added products, which makes the plant economically profitable even at a relatively small scale. The fully continuous and automated plant includes raw material reception, pre-treatment, fractionation, separation, and drying of fibres; separation of protein; juice treatment and conversion to biogas in a so-called UASB reactor; gas cleaning and conversion to electricity and process heat in a combined heat and power plant. The design capacity of the plant is 20,000 t fresh grass or 5,000 t dry substance input per year in two shifts. The plant supplier is '2B Biorefineries' (www.2bio.ch). The start up was in October 2001. Over 500 tons of grass have been processed. The grass refinery has produced so far 78,000 m{sup 3} biogas, 150,000 kWh green electricity and 250,000 kWh green heat. Further, 80 tons of insulation fibres have been produced and sold in the market under the brand name '2B Gratec'. Over 30 buildings have been insulated. The washer and drier have not reached production capacity. The drying is a critical process for fibre quality. The drier is being modified and a new washer is being installed. It is planned to run at design capacity from May 2003. (author)

  7. Aeolian nutrient fluxes following wildfire in sagebrush steppe: implications for soil carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, N. J.; Germino, M. J.; Sankey, J. B.; Ingram, L. J.; Glenn, N. F.

    2011-12-01

    Pulses of aeolian transport following fire can profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. Our objective was to determine horizontal nutrient fluxes occurring in the saltation zone during an episodic pulse of aeolian transport that occurred following a wildfire in a semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystem in southern Idaho, USA. We also examined how temporal trends in nutrient fluxes were affected by changes in particle sizes of eroded mass as well as nutrient concentrations associated with different particle size classes. In the burned area, total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes were as high as 235 g C m-1 d-1 and 19 g N m-1 d-1 during the first few months following fire, whereas C and N fluxes were negligible in an adjacent unburned area throughout the study. Temporal variation in C and N fluxes following fire was largely attributable to the redistribution of saltation-sized particles. Total N and organic C concentrations in the soil surface were significantly lower in the burned relative to the unburned area one year after fire. Our results show how an episodic pulse of aeolian transport following fire can affect the spatial distribution of soil C and N, which, in turn, can have important implications for soil C storage. These findings demonstrate how an ecological disturbance can exacerbate a geomorphic process and highlight the need for further research to better understand the role aeolian transport plays in the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in recently burned landscapes.

  8. Engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Thomas F

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The underlying goal of synthetic biology is to make the process of engineering biological systems easier. Recent work has focused on defining and developing standard biological parts. The technical standard that has gained the most traction in the synthetic biology community is the BioBrick standard for physical composition of genetic parts. Parts that conform to the BioBrick assembly standard are BioBrick standard biological parts. To date, over 2,000 BioBrick parts have been contributed to, and are available from, the Registry of Standard Biological Parts. Results Here we extended the same advantages of BioBrick standard biological parts to the plasmid-based vectors that are used to provide and propagate BioBrick parts. We developed a process for engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts. We designed a new set of BioBrick parts that encode many useful vector functions. We combined the new parts to make a BioBrick base vector that facilitates BioBrick vector construction. We demonstrated the utility of the process by constructing seven new BioBrick vectors. We also successfully used the resulting vectors to assemble and propagate other BioBrick standard biological parts. Conclusion We extended the principles of part reuse and standardization to BioBrick vectors. As a result, myriad new BioBrick vectors can be readily produced from all existing and newly designed BioBrick parts. We invite the synthetic biology community to (1 use the process to make and share new BioBrick vectors; (2 expand the current collection of BioBrick vector parts; and (3 characterize and improve the available collection of BioBrick vector parts.

  9. BioArchitecture

    OpenAIRE

    Gunning, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Volume 1 has defined the scope of BioArchitecture. From the outset we have strived to ensure that BioArchitecture is not limited to the three major polymer systems of the cytoplasm. I am happy to say that a cursory glance at the contents of volume 1 makes it clear that we are interested in all aspects of bioarchitecture from molecules to polymers to cells to tissue to the organism.

  10. Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Philip; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

    2012-07-01

    As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

  11. Aeolian sediment transport and landforms in managed coastal systems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nancy L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.

    2011-11-01

    Humans modify beaches and dunes and aeolian transport potential by building structures, walking or driving, extracting resources, accommodating recreation, increasing levels of protection, removing storm deposits, or restoring landforms and habitats. The effects of human adjustments are reviewed here in terms of cross-shore zones because humans tend to compartmentalize landforms and habitats through their actions and regulations. Common human modifications in the beach zone include nourishing beaches, constructing shore protection structures and raking to remove litter. Modifications affecting the dune zone include altering the location, size and stability of dunes using sand-trapping fences, vegetation plantings and bulldozers or replacing dunes with shore-parallel structures. Modifications affecting the landward zone include buildings, roads, and parking lots. Landform and habitat resilience requires levels of dynamism and geomorphic complexity not often found in managed systems. Preserving or enhancing dynamism and complexity requires emphasis on innovative designs rooted in geomorphological and aeolian research. Future studies are suggested for: (1) quantifying the effect of small and large scale beach nourishment designs and sediment characteristics on dune initiation, development, and evolution; (2) quantifying the extent to which size and spacing of human structures and landform alterations inhibit sediment transfers alongshore or onshore; (3) identifying the advantages or disadvantages of "niche" dunes formed by structures; (4) providing quantitative data on the effects of raking or driving on the beach; (5) identifying the role of aeolian landforms on private properties; and (6) identifying alternative ways of employing sand fences and vegetation plantings to increase topographic and habitat diversity.

  12. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  13. Braidplain, floodplain and playa lake, alluvial-fan, aeolian and palaeosol facies composing a diversified lithogenetical sequence in the permian and triassic of South Devon (England)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    The Permian and Triassic of South Devon (England) are a continental red bed sequence of very diversified lithogenetical composition. Within the thick series, the distribution of the main depositional environments being fluvial braidplain, fluvial floodplain and playa lake, alluvial fan, aeolian dune and calcrete palaeosol changes repeatedly in both horizontal and vertical direction. Significant sedimentary milieus such as aeolian dunes and calcrete palaeosols occur repeatedly within the succession, but are also lacking in several parts of the sequence. Fluvial braidplain deposits comprise conglomerates, sandstones, intraformational reworking horizons and mudstones and originate in channels and overbank plains of a braided river system. Conglomerates and sandstones are formed by migration of bars and spreading out of sheets during infilling of streams and aggradation of flats. Gravel is often enriched as lag pockets or veneers within steeper scour holes and kolk pots or on the plane floor of the watercourse. Finer-grained sandstones and mudstones are laid down by suspension settling in stagnant water bodies such as small lakes in the overbank area and residual pools in interbar depressions during low-stage or waning-flow in active channels or in abandoned streams. Spectacular bioturbation features in some sandstones with both horizontal tubes and vertical burrows testify to the colonization of the sediments at the bottom of the rivers with declining discharge and transport capacity. Intraformational reworking horizons with ghost-like remnants of degraded sandstones, mudstones and pedogenic carbonates document partially severe condensation of the sequence by removal of some facies elements from the depositional record. The occasionally occurring gravel-bearing mudstones or silty-clayey sandstones represent products of high-energy water surges overspilling the channel banks and transporting sandy and gravelly bed-load in limited amounts beyond the levee wall. The

  14. Simulation of aeolian sand saltation with rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Cong; Pan, Xiying

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model based on the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocity and angular velocity of sand grains to describe a sand saltation process in which both wind field-sand grain coupling and the Magnus force experienced by saltating sand grains have been incorporated. The computation results showed that the Magnus force had significant effects on sand grain saltation. In particular, when the Magnus force was incorporated, the calculated sand transport fluxes and sand transport rate per unit width were closer to the experimental value than when this force was excluded. The sand transport flux is enhanced because the Magnus force owing to particle rotation causes the particles to have higher and longer trajectories, so the particles can get more speed and energy from the wind, which leads to a larger sand transport flux. In addition, it was found that when taking the Magnus force into account, the probability density of the impact velocity and angular velocity of saltating sand grains followed an exponential distribution and a unimodal asymmetric distribution, respectively. Moreover, the sand energy flux increased with the height above the sand surface until the energy flux reached its maximum and then decreased. Furthermore, the energy flux near the ground surface decreased as the grain diameter increased, but beyond a specific height the energy flux increased with the grain diameter. Finally, for the same sand grain diameter, the energy flux increased with the friction velocity.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of formation of three-dimensional aeolian sand ripples in a turbulent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the method of large-eddy simulation,the equation of spherule motion and the method of immersed boundary condition,numerical simulations of three-dimen-sional turbulent aeolian motion and the formation of sand ripples under three-di-mensional turbulent wind and the mutual actions of saltation and creeping motion were carried out. The resulting sand ripples have the form that is flat on the upwind side and steep on the leeward,which is identical to the sand ripples in nature. We also realized the self-restoration process of three-dimensional sand ripples,which shows the correctness of the method of numerical simulation and the models of saltation and creeping. Finally,We analyzed the influence of sand ripples on the three-dimensional turbulent wind field,and found that due to the appearance and development of sand ripples,in the normal direction of ground there exists stronger energy exchange,and moreover,there is close correspondence between the forms of sand ripples and the vorticity close to the ground surface.

  16. Tracking aeolian transport patterns across a mega-nourishment using video imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnberg, Kathelijne; van der Weerd, Lianne; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    Coastal dune areas protect the hinterland from flooding. In order to maintain the safety level provided by the dunes, it may be necessary to artificially supply the beach-dune system with sand. How to best design these shore nourishments, amongst others with respect to optimal dune growth on the long-term (decadal scale), is not yet clear. One reason for this is that current models for aeolian transport on beaches appear to have limited predictive capabilities regarding annual onshore sediment supply. These limited capabilities may be attributed to the lack of appropriate input data, for instance on moisture content of the beach surface, or shortcomings in process understanding. However, it may also be argued that for the long-term prediction of onshore aeolian sand supply from the beach to the dunes, we may need to develop some aggregated-scale transport equations, because the detailed input data required for the application of process-scale transport equations may never be available in reality. A first step towards the development of such new concepts for aggregated-scale transport equations is to increase phenomenological insight into the characteristics and number of aeolian transport events that account for the annual volume changes of the foredunes. This requires high-frequency, long-term data sets to capture the only intermittently occurring aeolian transport events. Automated video image collection seems a promising way to collect such data. In the present study we describe the movement (direction and speed) of sand patches and aeolian bed forms across a nourished site, using video imagery, to characterize aeolian transport pathways and their variability in time. The study site is a mega-nourishment (21 Mm3 of sand) that was recently constructed at the Dutch coast. This mega-nourishment, also referred to as the Sand Motor, is a pilot project that may potentially replace current practice of more frequently applying small scale nourishments. The mega

  17. BioFET-SIM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hediger, M. R.; Martinez, K. L.; Nygård, J.

    2013-01-01

    signals through its web-based interface www.biofetsim.org. The model also allows for predictions of the effects of changes in the experimental setup on the sensor signal. After an introduction to nanowire-based FET biosensors, this chapter reviews the theoretical basis of BioFET-SIM models describing both...... single and multiple charges on the analyte. Afterwards the usage of the interface and its relative command line version is briefly shown. Finally, possible applications of the BioFET-SIM model are presented. Among the possible uses of the interface, the effects on the predicted signal of pH, buffer ionic...... strength, analyte concentration, and analyte relative orientation on nanowire surface are illustrated. Wherever possible, a comparison to experimental data available in literature is given, displaying the potential of BioFETSIM for interpreting experimental results....

  18. Engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts

    OpenAIRE

    Knight Thomas F; Endy Drew; Shetty Reshma P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The underlying goal of synthetic biology is to make the process of engineering biological systems easier. Recent work has focused on defining and developing standard biological parts. The technical standard that has gained the most traction in the synthetic biology community is the BioBrick standard for physical composition of genetic parts. Parts that conform to the BioBrick assembly standard are BioBrick standard biological parts. To date, over 2,000 BioBrick parts have ...

  19. Facies architecture and stratigraphic evolution of aeolian dune and interdune deposits, Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Fábio Herbert; Scherer, Claiton Marlon dos Santos; Kuchle, Juliano

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), located in the Tucano Central Basin, northeast region of Brazil, is characterized by a sandstone succession of aeolian origin that comprises the preserved deposits of dunes and interdunes. Grainflow and translatent wind-ripple strata, and frequent presence of reactivation surface, compose the cross-bedding of crescent aeolian dune deposits. The aeolian cross-strata show a mean dip toward the ENE. In places, interlayered with dune cross-beds, occur interdune units composed of facies indicative of dry, damp and wet condition of the substrate, suggesting spatial and/or temporal variations in the moisture content of the interdune accumulation surface. The presence of NNW current ripple cross-lamination in wet interdune areas indicates streamflows confined to interdune corridors and oriented perpendicular to aeolian transport direction. Lenses of damp and wet interdune strata exhibit mainly interdigitated and transitional relationships with the toe-sets of overlying aeolian dune units in sections parallel to aeolian transport, indicating that dune migration was contemporaneous with accumulation in adjacent interdunes. Lateral variations in the preserved thickness of the interdune units and the associated rare occurrence of abrupt and erosive contacts between interdune and overlying dune sets, suggest temporal variations in the angle of dune and interdune climb that may be related to high-frequency changes in water table position. Four stratigraphic intervals in the Caldeirão Member can be identified, two intervals showing cross-bedding of aeolian dunes without wet interdune areas and two intervals exhibiting aeolian dunes separated by wet interdune areas, marking the transition between dry aeolian systems (Intervals I and III) and wet aeolian systems (Intervals II and IV). The temporal alternations between dry and wet aeolian systems reflect changes in the availability of dry sand and/or the rate in the water

  20. Multi-decadal periods of enhanced aeolian activity on the north-eastern Tibet Plateau during the last 2ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Georg

    2016-10-01

    The north-eastern Tibetan Plateau is regarded as key area for the understanding of the Holocene paleoclimate in central Asia. During the last decade a special emphasis has been placed on multi-decadal to millennial scale climate fluctuations, especially in the context of the recent climate change. However, most reconstructions are based on lake sediments, tree rings and speleothems whereas only little information from terrestrial archives is included. This study presents multi-decadal scale climate fluctuations based on optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from aeolian sediments from three catchment areas. Six phases of enhanced aeolian accumulation during the last 2000 years, each lasting around 80-200 years were identified. The first three phases (1630-1725 CE, 1450-1530 CE and 1250-1350 CE) occurred during the Little Ice Age; the other three (750-950 CE, 390-540 CE, 50-225 CE) during the so-called dark ages cooling. Aeolian processes were strongly reduced during the medieval climate anomaly. A comparison with other proxy records indicates that the formation of aeolian archives on the north-eastern Tibetan Plateau during the late Holocene is facilitated by cool and dry climate conditions during times of weaker Asian Summer Monsoon and probably enhanced westerlies. The results show that short term climate fluctuations can be reconstructed from non-continuous and heterogeneous terrestrial archives in a semi-arid environment, provided a sufficient number of OSL ages from aeolian sediments is available.

  1. Bio fuel is damaging to the environment; Biobrensel er skadelig for miljoeet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valestrand, Morten

    2008-07-01

    In the renewable energy debate, allegations flourish between policy makers, the research community and the industry. Bio energy is harmful to the environment, the European Commission cheats, and the petroleum industry spreads false propaganda, are some of the allegations. A brief summary of the current debate concerning bio energy is presented

  2. Bio energy production in birch and hybrid aspen after addition of residue based fertilizers - establishment of fertilization trials; Bioenergiproduktion hos bjoerk och hybridasp vid tillfoersel av restproduktbaserade goedselmedel - etablering av goedslingsfoersoek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar (EkoBalans Fenix AB, Malmoe (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Sewage sludge and wood ashes could be used as fertilizers in order to increase forest tree production. In southern Sweden forest growth normally increases with approximately 10 % after ash recycling due to increased N and/or P availability. P is added with the ashes and the pH-increasing effect of the wood ash can lead to increased N net mineralization. Other positive effects of wood ash recycling are improved nutrient sustainability and less acid run-off water. Possible negative effects are heavy metal accumulation, if the content of one or more heavy metals of the recycled ash exceeds the heavy metal content of the harvested biomass, and nitrate leaching if the vegetation cannot take up nitrified N. It is important to evaluate the sustainability of fertilization systems based on residues such as sludge and wood ash. Wood ash does not contain N and the P concentration often is too low for the ashes to function as an NP fertilizer. Thus N and sometimes P must be added. Sludge is an interesting alternative. The main purpose of the project is to study sustainable production of forest bio energy in intensively cultivated birch and hybrid aspen stands. Another purpose is to establish experiments that can be used for long term studies and as demonstration objects. In the first few years the goal is to study the short term effects of residue based fertilization compared to conventional NPK fertilization on tree nutrient uptake, nutrient leaching, sustainability and economy. In the long term the goal is to design appropriate fertilization strategies in a residue based fertilization system for the intensive cultivation of birch and hybrid aspen without negative side effects such as large scale nutrient leaching. Four field experiments were established in 2008 and one additional experiment in hybrid aspen will be established in the spring of 2009. Elevated bud N and P concentrations after fertilization with both Ashes+N and NPK means good possibilities for future growth

  3. Bio-climatic building of the cross-border experimental park of renewable energies of Badajoz; Edificio bioclimatico del parque experimental transfronterizo de energias renovables de Badajoz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancola, E.; Soutullo, S.; Monreal, M.; Ferrer, J. A.; Heras, M. R.

    2008-07-01

    Within the program of the E. U. of transfrontier cooperation INTERREG, it is being built a new Experimental Transfrontier Park of Renewable Energy (PETER) in the University of Extremadura (Badajoz) in Spain and in the University of Evora in Portugal. The building, which is located in Badajoz, will house laboratories for companies in the area of renewable energies. This building has been designed under parameters of energy efficiency since its design phase, applying concepts of environmental design and evaluation and providing support for the project design by means of simulation tools. (Author)

  4. Bio-based chemicals - green, but also sustainable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ögmundarson, Ólafur; Herrgard, Markus; Förster, Jochen;

    For almost two decades, the chemical industry has put great effort into developing bio-chemicals,among others to fight global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions, one of the biggest threats that are faced by our society today. To facilitate a growing and versatile bio-based chemical...... production, the US Department of Energy proposed in 2004 a list of 12 building block chemicals which can either be converged through biological or chemical conversions. Moving toward more bio-based chemicals, the chemical industry does not only claim to reduce climate change impacts, but also...... that they are increasing overall sustainability in chemical production. Whether such claims are justifiable is unclear. When sustainability of bio-based polymer production is assessed, various environmental trade-offs occur that need to be considered. It is not enough to claim that a bio-chemical is sustainable...

  5. Numerical study of turbulent flow over complex aeolian dune fields: the White Sands National Monument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of fully developed turbulent flows responding to aeolian dune fields are studied using large-eddy simulation with an immersed boundary method. An aspect of particular importance in these flows is the downwind migration of coherent motions associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities that originate at the dune crests. These instabilities are responsible for enhanced downward transport of high-momentum fluid via the so-called turbulent sweep mechanism. However, the presence of such structures and their role in determining the bulk characteristics of fully developed dune field sublayer aerodynamics have received relatively limited attention. Moreover, many existing studies address mostly symmetric or mildly asymmetric dune forms. The White Sands National Monument is a field of aeolian gypsum sand dunes located in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. Aeolian processes at the site result in a complex, anisotropic dune field. In the dune field sublayer, the flow statistics resemble a mixing layer: At approximately the dune crest height, vertical profiles of streamwise velocity exhibit an inflection and turbulent Reynolds stresses are maximum; below this, the streamwise and vertical velocity fluctuations are positively and negatively skewed, respectively. We evaluate the spatial structure of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities present in the dune field sublayer (shear length L(s) and vortex spacing Λ(x)) and show that Λ(x)=m(dune)L(s), where m(dune)≈7.2 in the different sections considered (for turbulent mixing layers, 7

  6. Feedbacks between aeolian processes and ecosystem change in a degraded desert grassland in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junran

    2015-04-01

    The desert grassland in the southwestern US has undergone dramatic vegetation changes with many areas of grassland becoming shrublands in the last 150 years. A principle manifestation of such a land degradation is the wide distribution of fertile islands in once-homogenous landscapes, which changed soil resource redistributions through the movement of resources from plant interspaces to the area beneath plant canopies. A great deal of work has examined the role of water in nutrient reduction and enforcement of islands of fertility in the semiarid landscapes. However, little is known on the role of wind in the removal or redistribution of soil resources, and further the feedbacks between wind and ecosystem change in this area. In spring 2004, a vegetation removal experiment was established in the northern Chihuahuan Desert, southern New Mexico, where vegetation cover on the experimental plots were manually reduced to various levels to study the entire suite of aeolian processes, including erosion, transport, and deposition in creating and enforcing patchy distribution of vegetation. This experiment has been continually maintained for more than ten years, with the sampling and observation of vegetation cover, soil nutrients, sediment flux, topography, and plant physiology. The experimental results highlighted that the aeolian processes in the Chihuahuan Desert are able to change soil properties and community composition in as short as 3 three years. Further, the removal of grasses by 75% may trigger a very substantial increase of wind erosion and the removal of grass by 50% could cause significant amount of C and N loss due to wind erosion. Last but not least, the change of the spatial distribution of soil C and the micro-topography both point to the fact that aeolian processes contribute substantially to the dynamics of fertile islands in this desert grassland.

  7. Land degradation in drylands: Interactions among hydrologic-aeolian erosion and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sujith; Breshears, David D.; Huxman, Travis E.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Land degradation in drylands is one of the major environmental issues of the 21st century particularly due to its impact on world food security and environmental quality. Climate change, shifts in vegetation composition, accelerated soil erosion processes, and disturbances have rendered these landscapes susceptible to rapid degradation that has important feedbacks on regional climate and desertification. Even though the role of hydrologic-aeolian erosion and vegetation dynamic processes in accelerating land degradation is well recognized, most studies have concentrated only on the role of one or two of these components, and not on the interactions among all three. Drawing on relevant published studies, here we review recent contributions to the study of biotic and abiotic drivers of dryland degradation and we propose a more holistic perspective of the interactions between wind and water erosion processes in dryland systems, how these processes affect vegetation patterns and how vegetation patterns, in turn, affect these processes. Notably, changing climate and land use have resulted in rapid vegetation shifts, which alter the rates and patterns of soil erosion in dryland systems. With the predicted increase in aridity and an increase in the frequency of droughts in drylands around the world, there could be an increasing dominance of abiotic controls of land degradation, in particular hydrologic and aeolian soil erosion processes. Further, changes in climate may alter the relative importance of wind versus water erosion in dryland ecosystems. Therefore acquiring a more holistic perspective of the interactions among hydrologic-aeolian erosion and vegetation dynamic processes is fundamental to quantifying and modeling land degradation processes in drylands in changing climate, disturbance regimes and management scenarios.

  8. Aeolian sands and buried soils in the Mecklenburg Lake District, NE Germany: Holocene land-use history and pedo-geomorphic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Mathias; Fülling, Alexander; Kaiser, Knut; Ulrich, Jens

    2014-04-01

    The present study is a pedo-geomorphic approach to reconstructing Holocene aeolian sand dynamics in the Mecklenburg Lake District (NE Germany). Stratigraphical, sedimentological and soil research supplemented by morphogenetic interpretations of the genesis of dunes and aeolian sands are discussed. A complex Late Holocene aeolian stratigraphy within a drift sand area was developed at the shore of Lake Müritz. The results were confirmed using palynological records, archaeological data and regional history. Accelerated aeolian activity was triggered by the intensification of settlement and land-use activities during the 13th and in the 15th to 16th century AD. After a period of stability beginning with population decline during the ‘Thirty Years War' and continuing through the 18th century, a final aeolian phase due to the establishment of glassworks was identified during the 19th century AD. We assume a direct link between Holocene aeolian dynamics and human activities. Prehistoric Holocene drift sands on terrestrial sites have not been documented in the Mecklenburg Lake District so far. This might be explained either by erosion and incorporation of older aeolian sediments during younger aeolian phases and/or a lower regional land-use intensity in older periods of the Holocene. The investigated drift sands are stratigraphically and sedimentologically characterised by a high degree of heterogeneity, reflecting the spatial and temporal variability of Holocene human impact.

  9. BioMEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Gerald A

    2007-01-01

    Explosive growth in the field of Microsystem Technology has introduced a variety of promising products in major disciplines from microelectronics to life sciences. 'Biomes' is a discipline which focuses on microsystems for living systems. This work presents the exciting field of bio-microsystems.

  10. Bio-Culturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The article argues on the basis of analyses of successful films for children that not only cultural determinants but also innate determinats are important, and that film studies should combine cultural studies with cognitive theory, evolutionary theory and neuroscience, an approach that is called...... Bio-culturalism....

  11. Bio-technologies; Biotechnologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawitz, X. [Systems Bio Industries, 92 - Boulogne Billancourt (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies which describes the measures taken by Systems Bio-Industries company to adapt its central heating plants, turbines, engines and dryers to the new French 2910 by-law about thermal efficiency and environmental impact of heating plants. The project of development of a cogeneration system in the Angouleme site is briefly described. (J.S.)

  12. Seismicity Pattern Changes before the M = 4.8 Aeolian Archipelago (Italy) Earthquake of August 16, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seismicity patterns associated with an M = 4.8 earthquake recorded in the Aeolian Archipelago on 16, August, 2010, by means of the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. This earthquake triggered landslides at Lipari; a rock fall on the flanks of the Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina islands, and some damages to the village of Lipari. The RTL algorithm is widely used for investigating precursory seismicity changes before large and moderate earthquakes. We examined both the spatial and temporal characteristics of seismicity changes in the Aeolian Archipelago region before the M = 4.8 earthquake. The results obtained reveal 6-7 months of seismic quiescence which started about 15 months before the earthquake. The spatial distribution shows an extensive area characterized by seismic quiescence that suggests a relationship between quiescence and the Aeolian Archipelago regional tectonics. PMID:24511288

  13. Integrated Results from Analysis of the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit by the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, L. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Edgett, K. S.; Gellert, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malin, M. C.; Wiens, R. C.; Treiman, A. H.; Ming, D. W.; Eigenbrode, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover spent 45 sols (from sol 56-101) at an area called Rocknest (Fig. 1), characterizing local geology and ingesting its aeolian fines into the analytical instruments CheMin and SAM for mineralogical and chemical analysis. Many abstracts at this meeting present the contextual information and detailed data on these first solid samples analyzed in detail by Curiosity at Rocknest. Here, we present an integrated view of the results from Rocknest - the general agreement from discussions among the entire MSL Science Team.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of straw and corn stover: The effect of biological process optimization and pre-treatment on total bio-methane yield and energy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Serena; Wei, Qiao; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Dong, Renjie; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a useful method for producing renewable energy/biofuel. Today, biogas production uses a large amount of energy crops (EC), with the effect of increasing AD costs and creating conflict between food/feed vs. energy use. A partial solution to this might be the substitution of EC with agricultural wastes, e.g. straw. Straw and corn stover are widely available in the world and approximately 1600millionMgyear(-1) of these substrates are available. Straw can be useful used for biogas production but its characteristics limit its performance so that sometimes the energetic balance can be negative. In this review, the limits for the conversion of this substrate into biogas were investigated and solutions/proposals for getting higher straw biogas production performance are reported. In addition, energetic balances for untreated and pre-treated substrates are reported, giving indicative evaluations of the sustainability of straw and corn stover use for biogas production.

  15. Aeolian deposition change in the Peruvian central continental shelf during the last millennium and its relationship with atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Sifeddine, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a record of laminated sediment cores retrieved in the Pisco region (14 °S) characterized by local aeolian inputs. This record covers the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP) at centennial to sub-decadal resolution. The aim of the study is to reconstruct the patterns of aeolian sedimentation as well as the most important processes that control the input of this material to understand how these components reflect atmospheric climate variability during the last millennium. Assuming that the mineral fraction of the sediment is composed of several lognormally distributed particle populations, we applied an iterative least-square fitting routine to determine the number and the characteristics of the individual particles populations. This allows inferring the spatial and temporal variation of particles populations and thus transport mechanisms involved. Two components with grain size modes at 54±11 μm and 90±11 μm related with local aeolian erosion over the Pisco region were found. Our results showed active aeolian erosion during the second half of the MCA and rapid decrease from the MCA to the LIA. During the LIA the aeolian deposition exhibited a decreasing activity. During the CWP the aeolian deposition increased progressively. Comparison with others South American records indicates that those changes are linked to change in the meridional position of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) at the centennial time resolution. Finally the CWP period showed an increase in the aeolian deposition and thus in the wind intensity over the past two centuries. This likely represents the result of the modern position of the ITCZ-SPSH system and the associated intensification of the local and regional winds. Nevertheless, the aeolian deposition and in consequence the wind intensity and variability of the last 100 yr are stronger than during the second sequence of the MCA

  16. Bio4gas: Evaluation and analysis of wastewater treatment facilities in the scope of biogas production maximization and energy production optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, S. [Engiciclo - Environmental Engineering Ltd, Avenida Capitao Melecas 99 C/V Esq, 2815-099 Alverca (Portugal); Teixeira, E.; Kroff, P. [Simbiente - Environmental Engineering and Management Ltd, Praca Paulo Vidal, n 21, 4715-245 Braga (Portugal); Laia, C. [CEEETA - Centro de Estudos em Economia da Energia dos Transportes e do Ambiente, Rua Dr. Antonio Candido, n10 - 1, 1050-076 Lisboa (Portugal); Nogueira, R.; Brito, A.G. [Institute of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Department of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar 4710-057 Braga, (Portugal)

    2008-07-01

    The present work presents some of the results of five reports developed in the scope of optimization feasibility studies carried out at 6 small- and medium-sized wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Portugal. These 6 WWTP are operated by five companies that belong to the Aguas de Portugal holding. The objective of the studies was twofold: to assess to which extent the production of biogas could be increased by means of operational modifications and/or by the implementation of co-digestion regimes; and also to simulate different scenarios for feed-in tariff of electricity taking in account energy prices calculated based upon the DL n. 225/2007 of 11th May. In this way, several codigestion scenarios were defined based upon standard available organic residues. The results obtained showed that the implementation of co-digestion regimes represent a significative potential to increase the production of biogas, in some cases, over 600%. Even though, it was concluded that in some cases the costs of introducing new regimes of energy management were not supported by the increase of energy production, so a scale factor is associated to the revenues. This study contributed to the establishment of specific needs in terms of information management (digester operation, energy production/consumption, strategy for optimisation).

  17. Social Science Insights for the BioCCS Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Maree Dowd

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BioCCS is a technology gaining support as a possible emissions reduction policy option to address climate change. The process entails the capture, transport and storage of carbon dioxide produced during energy production from biomass. Globally, the most optimistic energy efficiency scenarios cannot avoid an average temperature increase of +2 °C without bioCCS. Although very much at the commencement stage, bioCCS demonstration projects can provide opportunity to garner knowledge, achieve consensus and build support around the technology’s properties. Yet many challenges face the bioCCS industry, including no guarantee biomass will always be from sustainable sources or potentially result in carbon stock losses. The operating environment also has no or limited policies, regulations and legal frameworks, and risk and safety concerns abound. Some state the key problem for bioCCS is cultural, lacking in a ‘community of support’, awareness and credibility amongst its own key stakeholders and the wider public. Therefore, the industry can benefit from the growing social science literature, drawing upon other energy and resource based industries with regard to social choice for future energy options. To this end, the following scoping review was conducted in order to ascertain gaps in existing public perception and acceptance research focusing on bioCCS.

  18. Environmental history recorded in aeolian deposits under stone pavements, Mojave Desert, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael; Dietze, Elisabeth; Lomax, Johanna; Fuchs, Markus; Kleber, Arno; Wells, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of arid landscapes is challenged by limited availability of appropriate environmental archives. A widespread surface feature - stone pavement - traps aeolian fines and forms a special accretionary archive. Seven stone pavement-covered sections on basalt flows in the eastern Mojave Desert are condensed into a composite section, comprising five sedimentological units supported by an OSL-based chronology. Three of the units are of accretionary nature and each is covered by a stone pavement. They were deposited > 50.9-36.6 ka, < 36.6-14.2 ka and < 14.2 ka, and they are intimately coupled with the history of nearby Lake Mojave, which advances the current understanding of regional aeolian activity. End-member modeling analysis of grain-size distributions yielded seven sediment transport regimes. The accretionary system operates in two modes: A) episodic formation of a stone pavement by lateral processes once a vesicular horizon has formed on a barren surface; and B) accretion of dust and eventual burial of the clast layer. These findings improve current concepts about stone pavement evolution and their environmental proxy function in arid landscapes. Stone pavement-covered accretionary deposits are a new key archive that allows quantifying the relative importance of dust accretion, slope processes, soil formation and vegetation cover.

  19. Luminescence dating of aeolian sands from archaeological sites in Northern Britain: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, A. A.; Sanderson, D. C. W.; Hansom, J. D.; Housley, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    Luminescence dating of aeolian sands from archaeological sites has potential to contribute to regional chronologies for sediment deposition and to provide a greater understanding of climatic influences on early communities. The Northern and Western Isles of Scotland provide important opportunities for sampling archaeologically intercalated sands for these purposes, and to provide constrained samples for method validation. A wide range of modern beaches have been sampled in the Western and Orkney Isles of Scotland to examine regional variations in luminescence sensitivity, residuals and ease of bleaching. These modern sands have negligible residuals for infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL), small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals and significant thermoluminescence residuals. The relationship between these signals and laboratory bleaching results may indicate the initial depositional environment, and hence lead to a means of identifying well-bleached dating samples. Both sensitivities and residuals show regional differences, reflecting local geology. Preliminary ages obtained from aeolian sands associated with archaeological sites at Amble (Northumbria) and Tofts Ness (Sanday, Orkney) using regenerative blue OSL techniques on extracted quartz are broadly consistent with external age controls from the first and third millennium BC.

  20. The origin of bimodal grain-size distribution for aeolian deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongchong; Mu, Guijin; Xu, Lishuai; Zhao, Xue

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric dust deposition is a common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid regions. Bimodal grain size distribution (BGSD) (including the fine component and coarse component) of aeolian deposits has been widely reported. But the origin of this pattern is still debated. Here, we focused on the sedimentary process of modern dust deposition, and analyzed the grain size distribution of modern dust deposition, foliar dust, and aggregation of the aeolian dust collected in Cele Oasis, southern margin of Tarim Basin. The results show that BGSD also appear in a dust deposition. The content of fine components (dust storm is significant less than that from subsequent floating dust. Fine component also varies with altitude. These indicate that modern dust deposition have experienced changing aerodynamic environment and be reworked during transportation and deposition, which is likely the main cause for BGSD. The dusts from different sources once being well-mixed in airflow are hard to form multiple peaks respectively corresponding with different sources. In addition, the dust deposition would appear BGSD whether aggregation or not. Modern dust deposition is the continuation of ancient dust deposition. They both may have the same cause of formation. Therefore, the origin of BGSD should provide a theoretical thinking for reconstructing the palaeo-environmental changes with the indicator of grain size.

  1. Regional aeolian dynamics and sand mixing in the Gran Desierto: Evidence from Landsat thematic mapper images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Smith, Milton O.; Adams, John B.; Greeley, Ronald; Christensen, Phillip R.

    1990-09-01

    Spatial variations in sand composition were mapped on a regional scale in a terrestrial sand sea, the Gran Desierto of Sonora, Mexico. Mesoscale mapping on a satellite image base allowed quantitative interpretation of the dynamic development of sand sheets and dunes. The results were used to interpret the Quaternary geologic history of the tectonically active region at the mouth of the Colorado River. Landsat thematic mapper multispectral images were used to predict the abundance of different mineralogies of sand grains in a mixed aeolian terrain. A spectral mixing model separated the effects of vegetation and topographically induced shading and shadow from the effects produced by different mineral and rock types. Compositions determined remotely agreed well with samples from selected areas within the spectral limitations of the thematic mapper. A simple discrimination capability for active versus inactive sand surfaces is demonstrated based upon differences in the percentage of low-albedo accessory grains occurring on dormant aeolian surfaces. A technique for discriminating between low-albedo materials and macroscopic shade is implemented by combining thermal images with the results of the spectral mixing model. The image analysis revealed important compositional variations over large areas that were not readily apparent in the field.

  2. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  3. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ji-Lu, E-mail: triace@163.com; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Swine carcasses can be converted to bio-oil by alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction. • It seems that the use of the bio-oil for heat or CHP is technically suitable. • Some valuable chemicals were found in the bio-oils. • The bio-oil and the solid residue constituted an energy efficiency of 93.63% for the feedstock. • The solid residue can be used as a soil amendment, to sequester C and for preparing activated carbon. - Abstract: It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2 wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35 MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22 wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250 °C, a reaction time of 60 min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels.

  4. Review on the Progress of Producing Bio-Energy from Microalgae%利用微藻制备生物能源的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝国礼; 刘佳; 陈超; 李兴杰

    2011-01-01

    This review provides a brief overview on the screening and cultivation of the Microalgae,the factors influencing oil-producing of Microalgae,the research on the current production condition,and the problems existing in the comprehensive utilization of microalgae.Here,we review the global research progress of microalgae energy in recent years,and the relationship between microalgae energy and low carbon.%结合目前能源微藻在藻种选育、影响微藻产油因素以及生产工艺方面的研究现状和微藻综合利用发展中存在的问题,综述了近年来各国在微藻能源开发方面的重要科研工作,以及微藻能源与低碳的关系,并对微藻能源开发的相关研究方向和进展进行了评述。

  5. Analysis of the variation effect of the mass in an aeolian shock absorber; Analisis del efecto de la variacion de la masa en un amortiguador eolico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares Arriaga, Abraham

    2007-06-15

    In Mexico as well as anywhere in the world, the lines of communication of electrical energy are subjected to vibration that can vary according to the characteristics of the airflow that produce them; in order to attenuate the vibration and with this, the faults that could be produced, mainly faults by fatigue or fracture, since the decade of 1930 have been used aeolian shock absorbers Stockbridge type to dissipate this energy. The main parameters of a shock absorber Stockbridge type are: the mass of the counterweight, the moment of inertia, the length of the messenger cable, the dampening coefficient, the properties of the messenger cable, etc. One of the most important parameters in the design of the aeolian shock absorbers is the adimensional coefficient of damping, reason why it is vital to know if this parameter varies as the characteristics of the aeolian shock absorber change. The present investigation concentrates in knowing if it exists or not a variation in the adimensional coefficient of damping with respect to the parameters of the shock absorber. In chapter 1 the phenomenon of the aeolian vibration is introduced and its basic characteristics. The equipment used for the reduction of the Aeolian vibration is described called shock absorbers Stockbridge type and the definition and the objective of these is considered. In chapter 2, two mathematical models are reviewed to describe the physical behavior of the aeolian shock absorbers, making greater emphasis in the model of two degrees of freedom for being this one employed in this investigation. The revision of the experiment design is realized in chapter 3. Factorial design 23 will be reviewed in detail since the use of this one will be made to carry out the experimentation. In order to measure the response of a system it is necessary to have the adequate instrumentation, it is for this reason in chapter 4 an introduction of the method is given to follow the vibration measurements, as well as of the

  6. Bio-climatic strategy for energy saving in corporative buildings. City Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico; Estrategia bioclimatica para ahorro energetico en edificios corporativos. Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staines Orozco, E. R.

    2008-07-01

    Ciudad Juarez Chihuahua in Mexico is located in of de biggest Desert of Arid America called Chihuahuan Desert, and is there in where this border city with United State of North America and one of the border cities of greater commercial importance (a million six hundred thousands pop. approx.) has been develop to great influence of wasteful constructive systems of nonrenewable resources as they are the gas and electricity. These building take back surpassed models. In this article presents a design of a model of corporative building of five floors that counts including all a strategy from the process of architectonic design to the applications of echo passive and active Technologies (hybrid) like one of a ventilation tower, strategy that applied guarantees the significant saving to use energy. (Author)

  7. The aeolian sedimentary system in the northern Qilian Shan and Hexi Corridor (N-China) - geomorphologic, sedimentologic and climatic drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottebaum, Veit; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The formation of aeolian deposits depends on the influence of climatic factors but also on non-climatic controls, such as local geomorphological setting and tectonic activity. Unravelling the environmental history needs a careful consideration of a set of sections to capture spatial variability and a detailed investigation of depositing processes and chronology. Along the northern margin of the Qilian Shan mountain range 22 OSL-dated loess and aeolian sand sections and additional surface samples reveal the interactions between climatic, geomorphologic and sedimentologic factors. Thin loess covers (~1-2 m) occur in elevations of 2000 to 3800 m asl, which were mainly accumulated during the Holocene. End-member modelling of loess grain size data exhibits three dominant aeolian transport pathways representing local transport from fluvial storages, dust storm contribution and background dust deposition. Their relative contributions show a clear dependence on geomorphological setting, and additionally, synchronous trends throughout the Holocene. Their relative changes allow conclusions about Holocene environmental conditions. Discontinuous archives (aeolian sand, lacustrine, and alluvial deposition) in the lower forelands of the Qilian Shan show a distinct spatial pattern contrasting western and eastern forelands. The comparison of OSL ages exhibits high sediment accumulation (~2 m/ka) in the drier western part during the Late Glacial, while the lack of Holocene ages indicates sediment discharge / deflation. In contrast, moister areas in the eastern foreland yield scattered Holocene ages. This indicates high sediment dynamics, benefiting from fluvial reworking and thus provided sediment availability. Fluvial sediment supply plays an important role in sediment recycling. Meanwhile, western forelands lack efficient sand sources and fluvial reworking agents. The study exemplifies the complex sedimentary systems acting along mountain to foreland transects which often host

  8. A review of the chronologies and geomorphology of the aeolian landforms in the northwestern Negev dunefield (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel

    2015-04-01

    The northwestern (NW) Negev Desert dunefield covering an area of only 1,300 km2, comprises the eastern end of the northern Sinai Peninsula - NW Negev erg and is probably the most densely dated dune body in the INQUA Dunes Atlas chronologic database. Over 230 luminescence ages (TL, IRSL, and mainly OSL) and radiocarbon dates have been retrieved over the past course of 20 years from calcic and sandy palaeosols serving as dune substrates, sand sheets, vegetated linear dunes (VLDs), fluvial deposits, and archaeological sites. Despite being from different deposit types and aeolian morphologies, and based on different methodologies, the chronologies usually show good compatibility. By reviewing and reassessing the significance of the Eastern Mediterranean INQUA Dunes Atlas chronologies, along with detailed stratigraphic, structural and geomorphologic data and understandings, the major, and possibly extreme, episodes of aeolian activity and stability are outlined. Repetitive chronostratigraphic sequences in VLDs indicate that this dune type, at least in the Negev, comprises a reliable recorder of main dune mobilization periods. This presentation demonstrates that certain combinations of research finds, using different OSL dating strategies and other regional and local late Quaternary records and in particular aeolian ones, are required assets for providing for acceptable local and regional palaeoclimatic interpretations. The distribution of the VLD chronologies points to rapid mobilization during the Heinrich 1 and Younger Dryas, characterized by powerful winds, though VLDs also form in late Holocene palaeoenvironments. Time slices illustrate the different sensitivities of the studied aeolian landforms to the source, availability, and supply of sediment; long- and short-term climate change, local human-induced environmental changes and also their joint effects, that enable evaluation of aeolian responses to future environmental and climate changes.

  9. Biodiversity impact of the aeolian periglacial geomorphologic evolution of the Fontainebleau Massif (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, M.; Liron, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Landscape features The geomorphology of the Fontainebleau Massif is noteworthy for its spectacular narrow ridges, up to 10 km long and 0.5 km wide, armored by tightly cemented sandstone lenses and which overhang sandy depressions of about 50m. Denudation of the sandstone pans lead to a highly contrasted landscape, with sandstone ridges ("platières") towering sandy depressions ("vallées") and limestone plateaus ("monts"). This forms the geological frame of the spectacular sceneries of the Fontainebleau Massif (Thiry & Liron, 2007). Nevertheless, there is little know about the erosive processes that have built-up these landscapes. Periglacial processes, and among them aeolian ones, appear significant in the development of the Fontainebleau Massif physiography. The periglacial aeolian geomorphology Dunes and dune fields are known since long and cover about 15% to 25% of the Fontainebleau Massif. The aeolian dunes developed as well on the higher parts of the landscape, as well as in the lower parts of the landscape. The dunes are especially well developed in the whole eastern part of the massif, whereas the western part of the massif is almost devoid of dunes. Nevertheless, detailed mapping shows that dunes can locally be found in the western district, they are of limited extension, restricted to the east facing backslope of outliers. Loamy-sand covers the limestone plateaus of the "monts". The loam cover is of variable thickness: schematically thicker in the central part of the plateaus, where it my reach 3 m; elsewhere it may thin down to 0,20-0,30 m, especially at the plateau edges. Blowout hollows are "negative" morphologies from where the sand has been withdrawed. Often these blowouts are decametric sized and well-delimited structures. Others, more complex structures, are made up of several elongated hectometric hollows relaying each other from and which outline deflation corridor more than 1 km long. A characteristic feature of these blowout hollows is the

  10. Remote sensing and spatial analysis of aeolian sand dunes: A review and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Levin, Noam; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Baddock, Matthew C.

    2012-03-01

    For more than four decades remote sensing images have been used to document and understand the evolution of aeolian sand dunes. Early studies focused on mapping and classifying dunes. Recent advances in sensor technology and software have allowed investigators to move towards quantitative investigation of dune form evolution and pattern development. These advances have taken place alongside progress in numerical models, which are capable of simulating the multitude of dune patterns observed in nature. The potential to integrate remote sensing (RS), spatial analysis (SA), and modeling to predict the future changes of real-world dune systems is steadily becoming a reality. Here we present a comprehensive review of significant recent advances involving RS and SA. Our objective is to demonstrate the capacity of these technologies to provide new insight on three important research domains: (1) dune activity, (2) dune patterns and hierarchies, and (3) extra-terrestrial dunes. We outline how several recent advances have capitalized on the improved spatial and spectral resolution of RS data, the availability of topographic data, and new SA methods and software. We also discuss some of the key research challenges and opportunities in the application of RS and SA dune field, including: the integration of RS data with field-based measurements of vegetation cover, structure, and aeolian transport rate in order to develop predictive models of dune field activity; expanding the observational evidence of dune form evolution at temporal and spatial scales that can be used to validate and refine simulation models; the development and application of objective and reproducible SA methods for characterizing dune field pattern; and, expanding efforts to quantify three-dimensional topographic changes of dune fields in order to develop improved understanding of spatio-temporal patterns of erosion and deposition. Overall, our review indicates a progressive evolution in the way sand dunes

  11. Constraints on aeolian sediment transport to foredunes within an undeveloped backshore enclave on a developed coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kayla L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.; Jackson, Nancy L.

    2016-10-01

    Landforms present in undeveloped beach enclaves located between properties developed with houses and infrastructure are often left to evolve naturally but are influenced by the human structures near them. This field study evaluates how buildings and sand-trapping fences change the direction of wind approach, reduce wind speed, and restrict fetch distances for sediment entrainment, thereby reducing the potential for aeolian transport and development of dunes in enclaves. Field data were gathered in an 80 m long, 44 m deep beach enclave on the ocean shoreline of New Jersey, USA. Comparison of wind characteristics in the enclave with a site unaffected by buildings revealed that offshore winds in the enclave are reduced in strength and altered in direction by landward houses, increasing the relative importance of longshore winds. Vertical arrays of anemometers on the foredune crest, foredune toe and berm crest in the enclave revealed increasing wind speed with distance offshore, with strongest winds on the berm crest. Vertical cylindrical traps on the foredune crest, foredune toe, mid-backshore, berm crest and upper foreshore revealed the greatest rate of sediment transport on the berm crest. Sediment samples from the beach and from traps revealed limited potential for aeolian transport because of coarse grain sizes. Strong oblique onshore winds are common in this region and are normally important for transporting sand to dunes. The length of an enclave and the setback distance on its landward side determine the degree to which sediment delivered by oblique winds contributes to dune growth. The landward edge of the enclave (defined by a sand fence near the dune toe) is sheltered along its entire length from winds blowing at an angle to the shoreline of 25° or less. A foredune set back this distance in an enclave the length of an individual lot (about 20 m) would be sheltered at an angle of 57° or less, reducing the opportunity for dune building by onshore winds

  12. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  13. A conceptual framework for dryland aeolian sediment transport along the grassland-forest continuum: Effects of woody plant canopy cover and disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, David D.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Zou, Chris B.; Field, Jason P.; Allen, Craig D.

    2009-04-01

    Aeolian processes are of particular importance in dryland ecosystems where ground cover is inherently sparse because of limited precipitation. Dryland ecosystems include grassland, shrubland, savanna, woodland, and forest, and can be viewed collectively as a continuum of woody plant cover spanning from grasslands with no woody plant cover up to forests with nearly complete woody plant cover. Along this continuum, the spacing and shape of woody plants determine the spatial density of roughness elements, which directly affects aeolian sediment transport. Despite the extensiveness of dryland ecosystems, studies of aeolian sediment transport have generally focused on agricultural fields, deserts, or highly disturbed sites where rates of transport are likely to be greatest. Until recently, few measurements have been made of aeolian sediment transport over multiple wind events and across a variety of types of dryland ecosystems. To evaluate potential trends in aeolian sediment transport as a function of woody plant cover, estimates of aeolian sediment transport from recently published studies, in concert with rates from four additional locations (two grassland and two woodland sites), are reported here. The synthesis of these reports leads to the development of a new conceptual framework for aeolian sediment transport in dryland ecosystems along the grassland-forest continuum. The findings suggest that: (1) for relatively undisturbed ecosystems, shrublands have inherently greater aeolian sediment transport because of wake interference flow associated with intermediate levels of density and spacing of woody plants; and (2) for disturbed ecosystems, the upper bound for aeolian sediment transport decreases as a function of increasing amounts of woody plant cover because of the effects of the height and density of the canopy on airflow patterns and ground cover associated with woody plant cover. Consequently, aeolian sediment transport following disturbance spans the largest

  14. bioética

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier León Correa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde el inicio de la publicación de la revista Cuadernos de Bioética, hemos podido comprobar una evolución importante en el desarrollo de esta disciplina, tanto en España como en Latinoamérica, que son los ámbitos donde muy especialmente se difunde. Trataré de señalar los aspectos que considero de mayor interés en los inicios y desarrollo de esta nueva disciplina, para poder entender mejor los retos actualesque enfrenta y cuáles son las líneas que ha seguido la revista en esta andadura inicial, y que deberá seguir para responder a los retos de los próximos años. Es un reto la realidad que vivimos en nuestros países, con la aprobación de leyes impuestas desde los poderes públicos con muy poca o ninguna discusión social que se parezca de lejos al diálogo tolerante racional que propugna la Bioética; con las reformas aceleradas e indecisas de los sistemas de salud; con el cambio del rol del médico y de la relación médico-paciente desde un paternalismo aún presente a un modelo participativo o contractual sin defi nir claramente; con importantes desigualdades en el acceso a la atención de salud dentro de cada propio país, pero a la vez con un creciente reconocimiento de los derechos de los pacientes y de su necesaria participación para mejorar la calidad de la asistencia clínica. Tiene especial importancia valorar cuáles han sido los instrumentos del éxito y de la difusión de la Bioética clínica, y cuáles pueden ser las nuevas propuestas para el desarrollo de la Bioética como una disciplina de debate ético social y político, ligada a las exigencias éticas de la justicia y el desarrollo social. Hemos de ver cuál ha sido el aporte en estos quince años de la revista Cuadernos de Bioética, con la colaboración de cientos de autores de diversos países, en que se ha mantenido fi el a la propuesta de los que la iniciamos en Santiago de Compostela en el año 1990: construir un buen aporte al debate actual de Bio

  15. Bio-forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. (Jill)

    2004-01-01

    Bioforensics presents significant technical challenges. Determining if an outbreak is natural or not, and then providing evidence to trace an outbreak to its origin is very complex. Los Alamos scientists pioneered research and development that has generated leading edge strain identification methods based on sequence data. Molecular characterization of environmental background samples enable development of highly specific pathogen signatures. Economic impacts of not knowing the relationships at the molecular level Many different kinds of data are needed for DNA-based bio-forensics.

  16. Bioética

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Cássia Regina Rodrigues [UNESP; Nunes,Amauri Porto

    2004-01-01

    A bioética é um novo campo de conhecimento e uma corrente de pensamento que vem se desenvolvendo amplamente no Brasil, principalmente a partir da década de 90. Nesse artigo buscamos contextualizar o seu surgimento, justificando a necessidade da criação desse neologismo, uma vez que a ética estava de certo modo esquecida, em relação à técnica, restringindo-se apenas à ética profissional. Hoje nos deparamos com uma ampla gama de produções nessa área que ajudam a nortear nossa ação enquanto cida...

  17. Recovery of bio energy from poultry manure ('Galigaz'); Valorisation bioenergetique de fumiers de volailles ('Galigaz')

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Membrez, Y. [EREP SA, Aclens (Switzerland); Clement-Arnold, E. [Kadima Ingenieur-Conseil, Avenches (Switzerland); Schwitzguebel, J.-P.; Dubois, B.; Kuhn, Ch. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire de biotechnologie environnementale (LBE), Lausanne (Switzerland); Heckly, C. [Optigal SA, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The annual production of poultry manure in Switzerland represents some 75,000 to 80,000 tonnes per year, of which approximately 15,000 to 20,000 tonnes are not covered by waste collection contracts and could be utilised for energy purposes. Both manure from fattening turkeys and chickens and manure from deep litter hens constitutes a dry manure (> 45% dry matter content), which is difficult to convert into methane. However, the manure produced by aviary hens (25 - 35% dry matter content) could be better suited to the production of biogas. Moreover, it does not contain any antibiotic residues likely to inhibit anaerobic digestion. The study consisted of various stages, each of which was adapted in accordance with the results obtained: bibliographic search of methanisation plants in laboratories and farms; survey to define the characteristics of the different types of manure and the factors affecting their composition; technical evaluation of methanisation in a factory handling 6000 m{sup 3} of poultry manure per year; effluent percolation and digestion tests in a laboratory reactor. The results obtained were disappointing; laboratory tests on the continuous digestion of fresh manure, using an inoculant from a sewage sludge digester in a first experiment and manure from a farm digester in a second experiment. The results of the latter experiment were encouraging but do not enable us to draw any conclusions regarding the technical feasibility, nor to determine a preliminary design basis; research to locate concentrations of laying hens and fattening poultry in order to identify possible sites for the installation of methanisation plants, each handling 1,500 tonnes of poultry manure per year. A dozen such installations could be built in three regions of Switzerland. On the basis of the data from the bibliographic search, it is estimated that each of these installations could produce between 250,000 and 300,000 Nm{sup 3} of biogas per year, corresponding to an output of

  18. Hydrothermal liquefaction of aquatic plants to bio-oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S.; Fu, H.; Chen, J. [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of producing bio-oils from aquatic plants by hydrothermal liquefaction using 2 typical aquatic plants as feedstocks, notably Enteromorpha prolifera and water hyacinth which are typical aquatic plants found in seawater and freshwater. Bio-oil production from these 2 feedstocks was studied in a batch reactor at controlled temperatures under an initial partial pressure of 2.0 MPa N2. The effects of temperature and reaction time on the liquefaction products yields were also studied. GC-MS and elemental analysis were carried out to analyze the composition of bio-oils. The bio-oil produced from Enteromorpha prolifera contained mainly fatty acids, esters and quite a few heterocyclic compounds. Phenols and their derivatives were found to be the main compounds in bio-oils produced from water hyacinth. An elemental analysis revealed that bio-oils produced from the 2 aquatic plants have higher energy density. It was concluded that the use of aquatic plants as feedstock for liquid fuel can contribute to environmental protection and sustainable energy development by reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Field measurements demonstrate distinct initiation and cessation thresholds governing aeolian sediment transport flux

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-blown sand and dust transport models depend sensitively on selection of the threshold wind stress. However, the coexistence of distinct "fluid" and "impact" thresholds for the respective initiation and cessation of aeolian saltation, which is suggested by laboratory and numerical experiments, produces ambiguity in wind-driven transport predictions. Based on comprehensive high-frequency field saltation measurements, we provide the first field-based demonstration of distinct fluid and impact thresholds, and we determine the respective importance of these thresholds for modeling wind-blown sediment flux. We show that statistically-determined "effective" threshold stress decreases linearly with the fraction of time that saltation is active. As saltation activity increases, potential threshold crossings are increasingly governed by impact threshold, whose value is only 80% of fluid threshold shear velocity. Though both fluid and impact thresholds are likely important for high-frequency saltation prediction, w...

  20. The Relationship of Land Cover to Aeolian Dust Production at the Jornada Basin, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, K. W.; Gill, T. E.; Gillette, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetation tends to reduce aeolian transport of surface sediments. However, not all vegetation types act in the same way to do so. In general, the more land cover the less erosion will occur; thus grasslands should experience less aeolian erosion than shrublands, which are characterized by patchy cover with open intershrub spaces. Five major ecosystem types are described at the Jornada Basin Long- Term Ecological Research site (Jornada LTER) in south-central New Mexico, USA: mesquite dunes, black grama grasslands, creosote bush shrublands, tarbush alluvial flats, and grass-dominated playas. Here we investigate the dry particle size distribution of material collected by BSNE aeolian particle samplers in 2006 in these five different vegetation types, allowing us to estimate dust production at sites with different land cover. As mesquite and creosote bush continue replacing historical grasslands at Jornada, understanding the characteristics of wind erosion will be important for future management plans. The mesquite sites had the greatest horizontal mass flux, although with substantial variation. M-NORT, a site with large sand dunes, had much greater mass flux than other mesquite sites. For most sites, the dry particle size distributions at 5, 10 and 20 cm heights above the land surface were very similar, dominated by sand, while the distributions for 50 and 100cm heights shifted towards a greater percentage of silt and clay (dust) particles. The playa site and one of three tarbush sites stand out as having the greatest percentages of dust particles, between 33- 52 % of total mass at all heights. After taking into account the differences in mass flux, the mesquite site with the larger dunes and the playa site had the greatest flux of dust-sized particles. These two sites demonstrate different mechanisms of producing dust at the Jornada LTER. The playa is a relatively major dust producer due to its high proportion of fine particles, whereas the mesquite site is a major

  1. Effects of particle optical properties on grain size measurements of aeolian dust deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Particle size data are holding crucial information on the sedimentary environment at the time the aeolian dust deposits were accumulated. Various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed from proper grain size distribution data. Laser diffraction methods provide much more accurate and reliable information on the major granulometric properties of wind-blown sediments compared to the sieve and pipette methods. The Fraunhofer and Mie scattering theories are generally used for laser diffraction grain size measurements. () The two different approaches need different 'background' information on the medium measured. During measurements following the Fraunhofer theory, the basic assumption is that parcticles are relatively large (over 25-30 µm) and opaque. The Mie theory could offer more accurate data on smaller fractions (clay and fine silt), assuming that a proper, a'priori knowledge on refraction and absorption indices exists, which is rarely the case for polymineral samples. This study is aimed at determining the effects of different optical parameters on grain size distributions (e.g. clay-content, median, mode). Multiple samples collected from Hungarian red clay and loess-paleosol records have been analysed using a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 laser diffraction particle sizer (with a Hydro LV unit). Additional grain size measurements have been made on a Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec and a Horiba Partica La-950 v2 instrument to investigate possible effects of the used laser sources with different wavelengths. XRF and XRD measurements have also been undertaken to gain insight into the geochemical/mineralogical compositions of the samples studied. Major findings include that measurements using the Mie theory provide more accurate data on the grain size distribution of aeolian dust deposits, when we use a proper optical setting. Significant

  2. Lasers for bio-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sona, Alberto

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are being increasingly used in bioptics and in life sciences in general, especially for medical applications for therapy and diagnostics. Lasers are also broadly used in environment sciences to monitor atmospheric parameters and concentrations of molecular species of natural origin or coming from human activities such as the various kind of pollutants. The peculiar features of lasers exploited in these areas are mainly the capability of developing an action or performing a measurement without physical contact with the target and, if required, from a remote position with the assistance of suitable beam delivery systems such as telescopes, microscopes, or optical fibers. These features are directly related to the space and time coherence of the laser light and to the energy storage capability of the laser material which allow an extremely effective concentration of the beam energy in space, direction frequency, or time. A short description of the principle of operation and relevant properties of lasers are given and the most significant properties of the laser emission are briefly reviewed. Lasers for medical applications (mainly for therapy) will be mentioned, pointing out the specific property exploited for the various applications. Finally, examples of laser applications to the environmental sciences will be reported. A summary of the properties exploited in the various bio-optical applications is shown.

  3. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the otindag dune field and holocene climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.L.; Lu, H.Y.; Mason, J.; Miao, X.D.; Swinehart, J.; Goble, R.

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are obtained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry variations in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ???2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world. ?? Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2008.

  4. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  5. Analysis of an optical gate device for measuring aeolian sand movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Nickling, W.; King, J. S.; Gillies, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Movement of sand in response to wind is the most important feature of aeolian sediment transport on Earth and other planets. Through sand blasting during saltation, large amounts of dust are ejected into the atmosphere and transported long distances, impacting climate and human health. Despite continuing improvements, currently available devices for field measurement of sand movement have limitations. An optical gate device (OGD) for detecting the movement, size, and possibly speed of individual sand grains during aeolian sediment transport was analyzed. The approach uses the highly time resolved signal from these sensors, which consist of a light emitter and a photosensitive sensor. A specific OGD that is manufactured by Optek (Carrollton, Texas, USA) was tested in a sediment transport wind tunnel alongside trap-style devices. The OGD device provided particle counts and total signal response that were well correlated with sand trap data (R2 between 0.66 and 0.88). Inter-comparison among eight identical units of the OGD showed excellent repeatability (R2 > 0.98 for 7 of 8 units). Subsequent tests revealed that the response of the phototransistor (light sensor) can be linear when operated within certain workable limits. Practical implications of this are that there is potential for extracting size distribution information. Limits imposed by noise levels in the signal and interferences from extraneous light sources were also identified. Despite the results presented being specific to the OGD model tested, much of the approach outlined is applicable to any OGD-type device (including Wenglor®) if the signal of the photo detector can be accessed directly.

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the Otindag dune field and Holocene climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; MASON; James; SWINEHART; Ronald; GOBLE

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are ob-tained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry varia-tions in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ~2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world.

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the Otindag dune field and Holocene climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YaLi; LU HuaYu; Joseph MASON; MIAO XiaoDong; James SWINEHART; Ronald GOBLE

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are ob-tained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry varia-tions in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ~2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world.

  8. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  9. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  10. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  11. Aeolian sediment transport over gobi: Field studies atop the Mogao Grottoes, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lihai; Zhang, Weimin; Qu, Jianjun; Wang, Junzhan; An, Zhishan; Li, Fang

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on field studies of aeolian sediment transport over a rough surface-gobi atop the Mogao Grottoes, China, in relation to sediment entrainment, saltation mass flux and transport rate prediction. Wind speeds were measured with five cup anemometers at different heights and sediment entrainment and transport measured with horizontal and vertical sediment traps coupled to weighing sensors, where sediment entrainment and transport were measured synchronously with wind speeds. Four sediment transport events, with a measurement duration ranging between 2.5 and 11 h, were studied. The entrainment threshold determined by the horizontal sediment trap varied between 0.28 and 0.33 m s-1, and the effect of non-erodible roughness elements-gravels increased the entrainment threshold approximately by 1.8 times compared to a uniform sand surface. Unlike the non-monotone curve shape of sediment flux density profile over gobi measured in wind tunnels, the flux density profile measured in the field showed an exponential form. Aeolian sediment transport over gobi could be predicted by an Owen-type saltation model: q = Aρ /gu∗ (u∗2- u∗t2), where q is sediment transport rate, A is a soil-related dimensionless factor, u∗ is the friction velocity, u∗t is the threshold friction velocity, g is the gravitational acceleration, ρ is the air density. This study indicates that the sediment flux sampling using horizontal and vertical sediment traps coupled to weighing sensors provides a practical method to determine values for A in this model that can provide good estimates of sediment transport rates in gobi areas.

  12. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  13. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  14. Mid to late Holocene aeolian activity revealed by a multiproxy peat record in continental CE Europe (Northern Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panait, Andrei Marian; Feurdean, Angelica; Hutchinson, Simon Mark; Tanţǎu, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs, and especially ombrogenous mire, are increasingly used as continental archives of aeolian dust and sand deposition. Since ombrogenous peat is formed above ground water level all the inputs are atmospheric. Dust is more influenced by regional climatic patterns due to its small size, whereas sand tends to record local patterns in storm frequency and intensity reflecting its larger particle size. However, both size fractions are significantly underused proxies of past climate variability. Here, an ombrogenous peat profile from Tǎul Muced in the Rodnei Mountains (Northern Romanian Carpathians), located in a temperate continental climate, with Atlantic and Baltic influences, provides the very first record of mid to late Holocene aeolian activity from Romania highlighting the interplay between local and regional controls in a continental area of CE Europe. We use a multiproxy approach combining radiocarbon dating, the physical properties of the peat (loss-on-ignition, bulk density), mineral magnetic measurements (ARM, SIRM), geochemical (Ti and Zr) and particle size analysis (via both laser diffraction and the manual counting of sand particles under a steromicroscope) to determine changes in: i) atmospheric dust deposition and ii) wind velocities during the last 7800 years. We found that the aeolian particles are mainly silt (3.9-63 μm) (dust) and sand (63-1200 μm). The mineralogical composition of the aeolian sediment in peat is mainly quartz, more rarely calcite and very rarely other minerals such as feldspar, sulphur, mica (biotite and muscovite), magnetite and other melanocrate minerals. The roundness of the sand particles varies from well-rounded to sub-angular and angular, and suggests that the sand particles have different source areas. Results from this study show that over the last 7600 years the pattern of wind frequency changed several times: there are periods characterised by a low aeolian input around 6950-6550, 5000-3900, 3500-2900, 1650

  15. Bio-tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    It is now forty six years since the separate topics of friction, lubrication, wear and bearing design were integrated under the title 'Tribology' [Department of Education and Science, Lubrication (Tribology) Education and Research. A Report on the Present Position and Industry's Needs, HMSO, London, 1966]. Significant developments have been reported in many established and new aspects of tribology during this period. The subject has contributed to improved performance of much familiar equipment, such as reciprocating engines, where there have been vast improvements in engine reliability and efficiency. Nano-tribology has been central to remarkable advances in information processing and digital equipment. Shortly after widespread introduction of the term tribology, integration with biology and medicine prompted rapid and extensive interest in the fascinating sub-field now known as Bio-tribology [D. Dowson and V. Wright, Bio-tribology, in The Rheology of Lubricants, ed. T. C. Davenport, Applied Science Publishers, Barking, 1973, pp. 81-88]. An outline will be given of some of the developments in the latter field.

  16. What is BioOne?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2005-01-01

    BioOne is a Web-based aggregation of full-text, high-impact bioscience research journals. Most of its titles are published by small societies or non-commercial publishers and have not been previously available in electronic format. This column describes the BioOne database and gives some basic information about the best ways to search its content.

  17. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

    2012-10-23

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  18. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald

    2014-09-16

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  19. Algal biodiesel economy and competition among bio-fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examines the possible results of policy support in developed and developing economies for developing algal biodiesel through to 2040. This investigation adopts the Taiwan General Equilibrium Model-Energy for Bio-fuels (TAIGEM-EB) to predict competition among the development of algal biodiesel, bioethanol and conventional crop-based biodiesel. Analytical results show that algal biodiesel will not be the major energy source in 2040 without strong support in developed economies. In contrast, bioethanol enjoys a development advantage relative to both forms of biodiesel. Finally, algal biodiesel will almost completely replace conventional biodiesel. CO(2) reduction benefits the development of the bio-fuels industry.

  20. BIO-ENERGY FROM PIG'S MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljanka Tomerlin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available After settling, in the sample of pig’s manure, before and after anaerobic fermentation different layers appear: foam, fine colloids, floating particle-colloids and sediment-rude particles. During the anaerobic treatment it being favourable for maintaining the anaerobic fermentation was examined. It was shown that the layer from the bottom, sediment-rude particles, achieved the best results. During the anaerobic fermentation pig’s manure was stabilized and its quality improved. Produced biogas contained more than 88 vol.% of methane. The degradation of organic matter was 50 % at pH value 6.5 and temperature 35 ºC during the anaerobic fermentation that lasted 7 days.

  1. Bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation from organic wastes and residues

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dawei; Angelidaki, Irini; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Min, Booki

    2008-01-01

    Der er stigende opmærksomhed omkring biohydrogen. Ved hydrogen fermentering kan kun en lille del af det organiske materiale eller COD i affald omdannes til hydrogen. Der findes endnu ingen full-skala bio-hydrogen anlæg, eftersom effektive rentable teknologier ikke er udviklet endnu. En to-trins proces der kombinerer bio-hydrogen og bio-metan produktionen er en attraktiv mulighed til at øge det totale energi-udbytte af fermentering af organisk materiale. I en to-trins proces, med bio-hydrogen ...

  2. Explore policies to stimulate Bio LNG using a social cost benefit analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Borne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the joint vision on the future energy mix LNG and bio LNG are being referred to as important opportunities for the Dutch economy to sustain heavy road transport fuels. New policies have to be developed to stimulate a transition to bio LNG in the Netherlands. The economic and societal effects of t

  3. Bio-reduction of pyrite investigated in a gas lift loop reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, A.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Weert, van G.; Kondos, P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    To liberate gold from refractory pyrite, oxidative destruction techniques that consume lots of energy and generate acidic waste streams are custom. As an alternative the “bio-reduction” of pyrite is proposed and investigated in this study. Bio-reduction is an anaerobic process based on sulfate/sulfu

  4. Environmentally Friendly Bio-Based Vinyl Ester Resins for Military Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Protection Agency, 2003: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production, Federal Register, 68...G.R., 2007: Fatty acid-based vinyl ester composites with low hazardous air pollutant contents, J. of BioBased Matl. and BioEnergy, 1, 409-416

  5. 接种菌剂和外加能源对污泥生物干化效果的影响%Effect of microbial inoculants and additional energy on bio-drying of dewatered sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余旺; 黄绍松; 孙水裕; 张小娟; 林伟雄; 陈港权; 许娉婷

    2012-01-01

    采用自主设计的试验装置,研究了接种菌剂和外加能源对城市污水处理厂脱水污泥生物干化效果的影响.结果表明:(1)试验7d,添加接种菌剂的物料升温累积值为66.0℃.d,比不添加接种菌剂(18.3℃.d)大261%;添加接种菌剂物料的水分去除率(27.33%)比不添加接种菌剂(18.56%)提高了8.77百分点;添加接种菌剂物料的挥发性固体(VS)降解率(20.90%)比不添加接种菌剂(12.31%)高8.59百分点;添加接种菌剂物料的减重率(18.67%)比不添加接种菌剂(10.80%)高7.87百分点.(2)试验8d,添加外加能源的升温累积值(69.5℃.d)比不加外加能源(46.2℃.d)大50.43%;添加外加能源物料的水分去除率(33.50%)比不加外加能源(28.56%)高4.94百分点;添加外加能源的物料VS降解率(22.62%)比不加外加能源(19.67%)高2.95百分点;添加外加能源物料的减重率(19.56%)比不加外加能源(17.87%)高1.69百分点.%Influences of microbial inoculants and additional energy on bio-drying of dewatered sludge were studied in self-designed experimental equipment. Results showed that after 7 days of experiment, the temperature cumulation (TO of microbial inoculated material reached to 66. 0 ℃ · d, which was 261% higher than that of no microbial inoculation materials (18. 3 ℃ · d). The moisture removal rate of microbial inoculation material was 27. 33%,which was 8. 77 percent higher than that of no microbial inoculation materials (18. 56%) ; VS degradation rate of microbial inoculation material was 20. 90%, which was 8. 59 percent higher than no microbial inoculation materials (12. 31%); weight loss rate of microbial inoculation materials was 18. 67% .which was 7. 87 percent higher than that of no microbial inoculation materials (10. 80%). Compared with groups of no additional energy,adding additional energy enhanced the TC of material by 50. 43% (from 46. 2 C · d to 69. 5 ℃ · d) after 8 days of experiment

  6. The densification of bio-char: Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the qualities of pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiang; Yang, Haiping; Yao, Dingding; Zhu, Danchen; Wang, Xianhua; Shao, Jingai; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    The densification of bio-chars pyrolyzed at different temperatures were investigated to elucidate the effect of temperature on the properties of bio-char pellets and determine the bonding mechanism of pellets. Optimized process conditions were obtained with 128MPa compressive pressure and 35% water addition content. Results showed that both the volume density and compressive strength of bio-char pellets initially decreased and subsequently increased, while the energy consumption increased first and then decreased, with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. The moisture adsorption of bio-char pellets was noticeably lower than raw woody shavings but had elevated than the corresponding char particles. Hydrophilic functional groups, particle size and binder were the main factors that contributed to the cementation of bio-char particles at different temperatures. The result indicated that pyrolysis of woody shavings at 550-650°C and followed by densification was suitable to form bio-char pellets for application as renewable biofuels.

  7. Bio-oil production from fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Ryu, Changkook; Suh, Dong Jin; Suh, Young-Woong; Yim, Jin-Heong; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The amount of waste furniture generated in Korea was over 2.4 million tons in the past 3 years, which can be used for renewable energy or fuel feedstock production. Fast pyrolysis is available for thermo-chemical conversion of the waste wood mostly into bio-oil. In this work, fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust was investigated under various reaction conditions (pyrolysis temperature, particle size, feed rate and flow rate of fluidizing medium) in a fluidized-bed reactor. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for increased yields of bio-oil was 450 degrees C. Excessively smaller or larger feed size negatively affected the production of bio-oil. Higher flow and feeding rates were more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not greatly affect the bio-oil yields within the tested ranges. The use of product gas as the fluidizing medium had a potential for increased bio-oil yields.

  8. Adaptation to life in aeolian sand: how the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, prevents sand particles from entering its lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Anna T.; Vihar, Boštjan; Günther, Mathias; Huemer, Michaela; Riedl, Martin; Shamiyeh, Stephanie; Mayrhofer, Bernhard; Böhme, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus (Squamata: Scincidae), spends nearly its whole life in aeolian sand and only comes to the surface for foraging, defecating and mating. It is not yet understood how the animal can respire without sand particles entering its respiratory organs when buried under thick layers of sand. In this work, we integrated biological studies, computational calculations and physical experiments to understand this phenomenon. We present a 3D model of the upper res...

  9. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modula......In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model...... that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot....

  10. Bio-Glasses An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This new work is dedicated to glasses and their variants which can be used as biomaterials to repair diseased and damaged tissues. Bio-glasses are superior to other biomaterials in many applications, such as healing bone by signaling stem cells to become bone cells.   Key features:  First book on biomaterials to focus on bio-glassesEdited by a leading authority on bio-glasses trained by one of its inventors, Dr Larry HenchSupported by the International Commission on Glass (ICG)Authored by members of the ICG Biomedical Glass Committee, with the goal of creating a seamless textb

  11. Bio-inspired nanotechnology from surface analysis to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the use of bio-inspired and biomimetic methods for the fabrication and activation of nanomaterials. This includes studies concerning the binding of the biomolecules to the surface of inorganic structures, structure/function relationships of the final materials, and extensive discussions on the final applications of such biomimetic materials in unique applications including energy harvesting/storage, biomedical diagnostics, and materials assembly. This book also: ·          Covers the sustainable features of bio-inspired nanotechnology ·          Includes studies on the unique applications of biomimetic materials, such as energy harvesting and biomedical diagnostics Bio-Inspired Nanotechnology: From Surface Analysis to Applications is an ideal book for researchers, students, nanomaterials engineers, bioengineers, chemists, biologists, physicists, and medical researchers.

  12. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  13. BioAir: Bio-Inspired Airborne Infrastructure Reconfiguration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    UAV ) in order to autonomously form and maintain a dynamic communication network. This system draws upon inspirations from biological cell...presents the BioAIR system for autonomous communication , command and control of a swarm of UAVs . The idea is to form a communication network comprised of...deployment, yet maintaining communications should not interfere with the primary tasks of these entities. The BioAIR system was developed to coordinate

  14. Contrasting sediment melt and fluid signatures for magma components in the Aeolian Arc: Implications for numerical modeling of subduction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Denis; Gazel, Esteban; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Cannatelli, Claudia; Lucchi, Federico; Atlas, Zachary D.; Trela, Jarek; Mazza, Sarah E.; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    The complex geodynamic evolution of Aeolian Arc in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea resulted in melts with some of the most pronounced along the arc geochemical variation in incompatible trace elements and radiogenic isotopes worldwide, likely reflecting variations in arc magma source components. Here we elucidate the effects of subducted components on magma sources along different sections of the Aeolian Arc by evaluating systematics of elements depleted in the upper mantle but enriched in the subducting slab, focusing on a new set of B, Be, As, and Li measurements. Based on our new results, we suggest that both hydrous fluids and silicate melts were involved in element transport from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. Hydrous fluids strongly influence the chemical composition of lavas in the central arc (Salina) while a melt component from subducted sediments probably plays a key role in metasomatic reactions in the mantle wedge below the peripheral islands (Stromboli). We also noted similarities in subducting components between the Aeolian Archipelago, the Phlegrean Fields, and other volcanic arcs/arc segments around the world (e.g., Sunda, Cascades, Mexican Volcanic Belt). We suggest that the presence of melt components in all these locations resulted from an increase in the mantle wedge temperature by inflow of hot asthenospheric material from tears/windows in the slab or from around the edges of the sinking slab.

  15. Holocene environment changes around the Sara Us River, northern China, revealed by optical dating of lacustrine-aeolian sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Sheng, Yongwei; Li, Bo; Fan, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    The Sara Us River is located along the boundary of the Mu Us Desert and the Chinese Loess Plateau in northern China. The river has cut down through Quaternary sediments creating 70-80 m deep valleys with thick lacustrine/aeolian sequences exposed. We applied optical stimulated luminescence on sediments from a Holocene section of aeolian sand/lacustrine deposits in the top of the river valley. The dating results show that a humid period existed from 7.1 to 2.0 ka ago as evidenced by two layers of peat and lacustrine sediments. However, compared to other published Holocene sections in the Sara Us River valleys close to the section under studying, the local environment experienced very complicated changes during the Holocene. All of the sections recorded a period with drought and/or cold before the Holocene at around 13 ka, and an episode of aridity after about 2 ka ago as evidenced by the layers of aeolian sand. However, the ages of the lacustrine and peat layers in these sections are substantially different. Geomorphological analysis by digital elevation models does not support the existence of a mega lake covering the study area at 2 ka. The intricate environmental changes may have been caused by the meandering of the Sara Us River. Environmental changes also strongly affected human migration in this area, which is documented by Chinese historical records.

  16. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  17. Development strategy of efficient bio-methane system by focused utilization of distributed biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Pingkai

    2014-01-01

    Bio-methane,as a promising renewable green energy,the component and thermal value of which are very close to that of natural gas,indicates an enormous resource potential and could be employed as the al-ternative of fossil energy through the development of agro-industrial integration and efficient bio-methane sys-tem. Establishment of high efficient agro-industrial integrated bio-methane system is an important component of the renewable energy system and also a significant way of emission reduction.

  18. Palaeomagnetism of welded, pyroclastic-fall scoriae at Vulcano, Aeolian Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, E.; De Astis, G.; Lanza, R.

    2001-06-01

    This paper deals with the magnetic fabric and remanent magnetization of welded scoriae fall deposits. Four scoriae blankets were emplaced on Vulcano (Aeolian Islands) from about 50 to 8 ka. Their detailed chronostratigraphic position has been debated in the literature and they have therefore been given a different interpretation in the reconstruction of the Vulcano's eruptive history. The aims of the study were a better understanding of the magnetic features of the scoriae fall deposits, which have so far been given little attention, and to set the chronostratigraphic relationships of the sampled deposits on the ground of their palaeomagnetic directions. Overall, the magnetic properties of the four deposits are alike. Investigation of isothermal remanence and susceptibility versus temperature measurements point to low-Ti titanomagnetite as the main ferromagnetic mineral. Magnetic foliation is well developed, moderately dispersed and in most cases close to horizontal. Lineation is either clustered or dispersed within the foliation plane. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization shows that secondary components are negligible in two units. In the other two, they are always completely removed in the first steps, below 20 mT or 400°C. Thereafter, the characteristic component (ChRM) is clearly isolated and the within-site dispersion of its direction is small ( α95fabric and remanence shows that no en masse movement of welded scoria occurred nor did individual spatter move with respect to one another after their emplacement. The scoriae therefore welded and cooled in situ. The between-site dispersion of the ChRM directions also is very small ( α95<3.5°) for three units, and their mean palaeomagnetic direction is consistent with the palaeosecular variation curve for Aeolian Islands. Statistical analysis of the results from two units whose isotopic ages are indistinguishable within the error range (Quadrara: 21.3±2.4 ka; Spiaggia Lunga: 24.0±5.0 ka

  19. Magnetic fabric and remanent magnetization of pyroclastic surge deposits from Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, E.; De Astis, G.; Dellino, P.; Lanza, R.; La Volpe, L.

    1999-11-01

    Tufi di Grotte dei Rossi Inferiori are unwelded, fine-grained pyroclastic deposits of hydromagmatic origin emplaced between 21 and 11-8.6 ka at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) by deposition through surges spreading laterally from inside the La Fossa caldera. In this study, the deposit's magnetic properties were investigated and interpreted in terms of eruptive and emplacement dynamics. Rock-magnetism data were supplemented by grain size and textural characteristic analyses as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations. Curie point measurements, isothermal remanent magnetization and microprobe analyses showed that magnetization is carried by low-Ti titanomagnetite. The size of the grains ranges from about 20 to 300 micrometres, their shape from equidimensional to highly elongated. The magnetic fabric is typical of fine-grained pyroclastics. Foliation is well developed and in most sites lineation is directed towards the source area of the La Fossa caldera. The remanent magnetization consists of two components whose blocking temperature spectra partially overlap. The direction of the low-temperature component is close to that of the axial dipole, and consistent with the palaeosecular variation curve for the Aeolian Islands. The high-temperature component is systematically shallowed and close to the direction of the magnetic lineation. The overall results suggest that the high-temperature component was acquired before, and the low-temperature component after, the actual deposition of grains. Immediately after eruption, the grains cooled and moved as free particles in the turbulent cloud during the expansion of the surge flows. Those particles with high blocking temperatures acquired a thermal remanence. They were then deposited and shear at the very base of the flow oriented them and imprinted the rock's fabric and high-temperature magnetization component. Volcanological and magnetic data suggest turbulent transportation and traction deposition of

  20. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to

  1. Energy- and momentum-conserving model of splash entrainment in sand and snow saltation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comola, Francesco; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Despite being the main sediment entrainment mechanism in aeolian transport, granular splash is still poorly understood. We provide a deeper insight into the dynamics of sand and snow ejection with a stochastic model derived from the energy and momentum conservation laws. Our analysis highlights that the ejection regime of uniform sand is inherently different from that of heterogeneous sand. Moreover, we show that cohesive snow presents a mixed ejection regime, statistically controlled either by energy or momentum conservation depending on the impact velocity. The proposed formulation can provide a solid base for granular splash simulations in saltation models, leading to more reliable assessments of aeolian transport on Earth and Mars.

  2. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  3. NIH NeuroBioBank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH NeuroBioBank (NBB), supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Eunice Kennedy...

  4. Aeolian processes and dune morphology in the Gobi and Badain Jaran Desert using LandSat Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Marco; Cannito, Arturo; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The Gobi and Badain Jaran Deserts are parts of the vast sand sea of the Alashan Region, one of the greatest dunefield in China [1]. They lie between the southern Mongolia and the northern China (latitude 37° 06'N - 41°50'N; longitude 99°10'E - 107°09'E) [2]. The studied area is characterized by an arid climate with low average annual rainfall between 50-60mm, extreme fluctuation in temperature, very strong winds and by the occurrence of mega dunes and permanent lakes within the dunefield [3]. According to our morphological analysis, wind action has been one of the main factors that have shaped the surface features inside the investigated area. We produce a detailed geomorphological map of the desertic zone, highlighting the aeolian morphologies, in order to characterize aeolian deposits and processes. The LandSat ETM+ data [4], providing a continuous coverage of the dune fields with no gaps, were processed using ENVI software and then ingested in a GIS project. We also used DTMs (30m / pixel) from Aster data [5]. The dune morphology was classified using McKee criteria [6] and we interpreted the pattern of the complex ergs as the result of self - organization within complex systems [7]. Compound transverse mega dunes and barchanoid dunes developed under a variable wind regime, star dunes in the northern area near the mountain have been formed under a multi directional wind regime. The area covered by mega dunes suggests a complex evolution of these features dominated by the wind activity. Different episodes of deposition, erosion and motion, could explain the height of these dunes measured by the DTMs. The diverse aeolian features identified in the investigated area suggest that aeolian activity play a key role for the evolution of the surface morphologies of the Gobi Desert. To understand the local dynamics of aeolian processes, we are currently comparing these features with meteorological data from mesoscale wind models. References: [1] E. D.McKee. A Study of

  5. Discrete Element Method simulations of the saturation of aeolian sand transport

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas; Carneiro, Marcus V; Araújo, Nuno A M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    The saturation length of aeolian sand transport ($L_s$), characterizing the distance needed by wind-blown sand to adapt to changes in the wind shear, is essential for accurate modeling of the morphodynamics of Earth's sandy landscapes and for explaining the formation and shape of sand dunes. In the last decade, it has become a widely-accepted hypothesis that $L_s$ is proportional to the characteristic distance needed by transported particles to reach the wind speed (the ``drag length''). Here we challenge this hypothesis. From extensive numerical Discrete Element Method simulations, we find that, for medium and strong winds, $L_s\\propto V_s^2/g$, where $V_s$ is the saturated value of the average speed of sand particles traveling above the surface and $g$ the gravitational constant. We show that this proportionality is consistent with a recent analytical model, in which the drag length is just one of four similarly important length scales relevant for sand transport saturation.

  6. First occurrence of close-to-ideal Kirkiite at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Daniela; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, anna;

    2006-01-01

    Samples of kirkiite from the high temperature fumaroles of La Fossa crater of Vulcano (Aeolian islands, Italy) were chemically and structurally investigated in this work. Associated minerals are vurroite, bismuthinite, galenobismutite, cannizzarite, lillianite, heyrovsk ite, galena, and other less...... characterized Pb(Bi)-sulfochlorides. Electron-microprobe analyses gave the average chemical formula Pb10.00Bi3.01As3.01(S18.47Se0.44C10.06) which is very close to the ideal composition of kirkiite, Pb10Bi3As3S19, and indeed significantly closer than the composition of the type specimen, Pb10.08Bi2.55Sb0.13As2...... in more regular and symmetric coordination polyhedra than in the holotype, as well as in the overall regularity of the structure. The increased Bi:As ratio produces an elongation of the a and b lattice periods, and a shortening of the c period, and increases the frequency of twinning in kirkiite....

  7. 3D numerical simulation of the evolutionary process of aeolian downsized crescent-shaped dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Li, Min

    2016-06-01

    A dune constitutive model was coupled with a large eddy simulation (LES) with the Smagorinsky subgrid-scale (SGS) model to accurately describe the evolutionary process of dunes from the macroscopic perspective of morphological dynamics. A 3D numerical simulation of the evolution of aeolian downsized crescent-shaped dunes was then performed. The evolution of the 3D structure of Gaussian-shaped dunes was simulated under the influence of gravity modulation, which was the same with the vertical oscillation of the sand bed to adjust the threshold of sand grain liftoff in wind tunnel experiments under the same wind speed. The influence of gravity modulation intensity on the characteristic scale parameter of the dune was discussed. Results indicated that the crescent shape of the dune was reproduced with the action of gravity during regulation of the saturation of wind-sand flow at specific times. The crescent shape was not dynamically maintained as time passed, and the dunes dwindled until they reached final decomposition because of wind erosion. The height of the dunes decreased over time, and the height-time curve converged as the intensity of modulation increased linearly. The results qualitatively agreed with those obtained from wind tunnel experiments.

  8. CFD-DEM simulation of three-dimensional aeolian sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional CFD-DEM model is proposed to investigate the aeolian sand movement.The results show that the mean particle horizontal velocity can be expressed by a power function of heights.The probability distribution of the impact and lift-off velocities of particles can be described by a log-normal function,and that of the impact and lift-off angles can be expressed by an exponential function.The probability distribution of particle horizontal velocity at different heights can be described as a lognormal function,while the probability distribution of longitudinal and vertical velocity can be described as a normal function.The comparison with previous two-dimensional calculations shows that the variations of mean particle horizontal velocity along the heights in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models are similar.However,the mean particle density of the two-dimensional model is larger than that in reality,which will result in the overestimation of sand transportation rate in the two-dimensional calculation.The study also shows that the predicted probability distributions of particle velocities are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Late Quaternary relative sea-level changes and vertical movements at Lipari (Aeolian Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanchi, N.; Lucchi, F.; Pirazzoli, P. A.; Romagnoli, C.; Tranne, C. A.; Radtke, U.; Reyss, J. L.; Rossi, P. L.

    2002-05-01

    Indicators of former sea-levels are recognised on the emergent portion of Lipari, Aeolian Islands. They correlate with three raised shorelines, located at elevations of 43-45 m above present sea-level (I), 23-27 m (II) and about 12 m (III). According to stratigraphical constraints, these shorelines correlate with the sea-level highstands corresponding to marine oxygen isotope substages 5e (124 ka), 5c (100 ka) and 5a (81 ka), respectively. The correlation of the shoreline I with substage 5e is supported by a U/Th age (119 +/- 6 ka) obtained from corals. Chronological and height data relevant to the fossil shorelines indicate that Lipari was affected by uplift with an average rate of 0.34 mm yr-1 during the past 125 ka. This uplift rate accords with the average uplift rates obtained, during the same time period, from the nearby islands of Filicudi (0.31 mm yr-1) and Salina (0.36 mm yr-1). Combined, these data suggest a similar uplift trend related to regional tectonic processes.In contrast to the long-term uplift, a localised submergence trend, documented especially for the last century, affects the eastern coast of Lipari. This subsidence is related to neo- and/or volcano-tectonic processes.

  10. Phytochemical analysis of Achillea ligustica All. from Lipari Island (Aeolian Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Alessandro; Guarcini, Laura; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Rosselli, Sergio; Bruno, Maurizio; Senatore, Felice

    2016-01-01

    A complete chemical investigation of Achillea ligustica All. growing at Lipari (Aeolian Island, Sicily) has been carried out. Seventeen metabolites have been isolated and characterised from dichloromethane and methanol extracts of flowers and aerial parts, and GC/MS analyses of petroleum ether extracts was carried out, revealing a composition in sesquiterpenoids similar to those reported for populations from Greece, Sicily and Algeria, showing the presence of (3RS,6RS)-2,6-dimethyl-1,7-octadiene-3,6-diol (1), 2,6-dimethyl-octa-3(E),7-diene-2,6-diol (2), iso-seco-tanapartholide (3) from DCM fraction. In addition from the methanolic extract of the aerial parts, peculiar flavonoid glucuronides have been isolated: i.e. apigenin-7-O-glucuronide (12) and quercetin 3-O-glucuronide (14). These metabolites have been reported in this species for the first time. The isolated flavonoids were previously recognised in several species of this complex genus and for this reason seems to be highly retained secondary metabolites of importance from the chemotaxonomic point of view.

  11. Laser particle counter validation for aeolian sand transport measurements using a highspeed camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Oyarte-Gálvez, Loreto; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.

    2017-04-01

    Measuring aeolian sand transport rates in the field has been a long-standing challenge. In this paper, we present the results of a laboratory experiment to test the ability of a laser particle counter sensor (Wenglor) to accurately count sand grains of various grain size classes and stainless steel beads. We compared the count data collected by the Wenglor with images from a Highspeed camera which revealed the actual number of grains passing the laser beam. A Silicon photodiode was used to record the laser intensity reduction induced by the sand grain passage through the laser beam to derive the minimal necessary reduction for the Wenglor to count grains. For the two possible settings of the Wenglor, i.e., Minimal Teach-in or Normal Teach-in, a minimum of 18% and 78% blocking of the laser beam was required for recording a count. This implies that the minimum grain size that can be observed by the Wenglor is 210 ± 3 μm and 495 ± 10 μm for the two settings respectively, which is considerably coarser than previously assumed. Due to the non-uniform power distribution of the laser sensor intensity, at the detection limit of 210 μm, only grains passing through the centre of the beam will be counted.

  12. The water footprint of sweeteners and bio-ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand for food together with a growing demand for energy crops result in an increasing demand for and competition over water. Sugar cane, sugar beet and maize are not only essential food crops, but also important feedstock for bio-ethanol. Crop growth requires water, a scarce resource

  13. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A; Kraiem, T; Naoui, S; Belayouni, H

    2014-01-01

    Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC-MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds...etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,...etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  14. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C.; Jones, Samuel T.; Pollard, Anthony

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to a method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also disclosed are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  15. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  16. The north-eastern aeolian 'European Sand Belt' as potential record of environmental changes: A case study from Eastern Latvia and Southern Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalińska-Nartiša, Edyta; Thiel, Christine; Nartišs, Māris; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Murray, Andrew S.

    2016-09-01

    The Latvian and Estonian inland dunes belong to the north-eastern part of the 'European Sand Belt' (ESB). These dunes are widely distributed over broad glaciolacustrine plains and Late Glacial alluvial deltas, considered to be potential sources for the aeolian material. Little is known about these aeolian sediments and their substratum; here we present a detailed sedimentary structural and textural characterisation together with a luminescence-based chronology. Through a comparison between grain-size, rounding of quartz grains and surface characteristics in medium/coarse (0.5-0.8 mm) sand, and the light mineral content, we found an alternation of aeolian and periglacial components. Further, short-lasting aeolian abrasion and/or transportation periods, and a significant contribution of a nearby sediment source are suggested. Luminescence dating points to aeolian sand accumulation and dune formation between ∼16 ka and ∼9 ka. However, we also observed some presumably watertable controlled environmental conditions at ∼13 ka; this corresponds with the occurrence of an ice-dammed/proglacial lake.

  17. Emissions and properties of Bio-oil and Natural Gas Co-combustion in a Pilot Stabilised Swirl Burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Dylan

    Fast pyrolysis oil, or bio-oil, has been investigated to replace traditional fossil fuels in industrial burners. However, flame stability is a challenge due to its high water content. In order to address its instability, bio-oil was co-fired with natural gas in a lab scale 10kW swirl burner at energy ratios from 0% bio-oil to 80% bio-oil. To evaluate the combustion, flame shape, exhaust and particulate emissions, temperatures, as well as infrared emission were monitored. As the bio-oil energy fraction increased, NO emissions increased due to the nitrogen content of bio-oil. CO and particulate emissions increased likely due to carbonaceous residue exiting the combustion zone. Unburnt Hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions increased rapidly as combustion became poor at 60-80% bio-oil energy. The temperature and infrared output decreased with more bio-oil energy. The natural gas proved to be effective at anchoring the bio-oil flame to the nozzle, decreasing instances of extinction or blowout.

  18. Harvesting microalgae by bio-flocculation and autoflocculation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Harvesting in commercial microalgae production plants is generally done by centrifugation, but this requires upto about 50% of the total energy gained from the microalgae. The energy needed for harvesting can be reduced considerably by pre-concentration of the microalgae prior to further dewatering. The focus of this thesis was on development of a controlled pre-concentration step in which bio-flocculation and autoflocculation using oleaginous microalgae is applied combined with gravity sedim...

  19. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  20. The water footprint of sweeteners and bio-ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbens-Leenes, Winnie; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2012-04-01

    An increasing demand for food together with a growing demand for energy crops result in an increasing demand for and competition over water. Sugar cane, sugar beet and maize are not only essential food crops, but also important feedstock for bio-ethanol. Crop growth requires water, a scarce resource. This study aims to assess the green, blue and grey water footprint (WF) of sweeteners and bio-ethanol from sugar cane, sugar beet and maize in the main producing countries. The WFs of sweeteners and bio-ethanol are mainly determined by the crop type that is used as a source and by agricultural practise and agro-climatic conditions; process water footprints are relatively small. The weighted global average WF of sugar cane is 209 m(3)/tonne; for sugar beet this is 133 m(3)/tonne and for maize 1222 m(3)/tonne. Large regional differences in WFs indicate that WFs of crops for sweeteners and bio-ethanol can be improved. It is more favourable to use maize as a feedstock for sweeteners or bio-ethanol than sugar beet or sugar cane. The WF of sugar cane contributes to water stress in the Indus and Ganges basins. In the Ukraine, the large grey WF of sugar beet contributes to water pollution. In some western European countries, blue WFs of sugar beet and maize need a large amount of available blue water for agriculture. The allocation of the limited global water resources to bio-energy on a large scale will be at the cost of water allocation to food and nature.

  1. Tephro- and chemo-stratigraphy of the Vulcanello Peninsula (Vulcano, Aeolian Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, M.; Fusillo, R.; di Traglia, F.; Pistolesi, M.; Todman, A.; Menzies, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    New stratigraphic studies of the Vulcanello Peninsula have been used to better define the small-scale evolution of this young (1000 AD and 325±100 BP) volcanic center and to re-investigate the last 1000 years of volcanic history for the Island of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Southern Italy). Vulcanello Peninsula is the northern-most part of the Island of Vulcano. It comprises a shoshonitic lava platform and a volcanic edifice made up of three overlying cones, which are shoshonitic to trachytic in composition. Volcanic activity in this area was coeval with the recent eruptions of the La Fossa Cone, the present-day active center of the island. Our goal is to constrain the recent volcanic development of this mafic volcano and to focus on the historic eruptive activity of the two other recent or active centres in the southern Aeolian Islands, Mt. Pilato (Island of Lipari) and La Fossa Cone. In order to do so, we reconstructed the stratigraphical setting of the proximal deposits of the three Vulcanello cones, through the investigation of 25 outcrops. We analyzed the stratigraphy of the tephra blankets deposited on the lava platform, studying 10 trenches. Our intention is to integrate morphological, textural and chemical data in order to correlate these deposits with the Vulcanello, La Fossa Cone or Mt Pilato. LA-MC-ICPMS (RHUL) analysis of juvenile clasts is underway in order to investigate the evolution of the Vulcanello juvenile clasts. In addition 14C dating is planned on selected organic matter from the volcanostratigraphic sections. Our preliminary data for the Vulcanello proximal deposits suggest that each of the three cones experienced several eruptions, with a wide spectrum of eruptive styles and a diversity of chemistry. The oldest cone (Vulcanello I) is characterised by four different eruptions separated by minor unconformities or reworking material indicative of little or not time breaks in the eruptive cycle. The eruptions shift from Violent Strombolian to

  2. The association of land cover with aeolian sediment production at Jornada Basin, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Kevin W.; Gill, Thomas E.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated amounts and particle size distributions (PSDs) of aeolian sediments collected at five heights in five ecosystem types at the Jornada Basin, Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA. Particle size distributions, mass fluxes, and percent of dust-sized (⩽50 μm) mass flux were determined for all heights and all ecosystem types. Differences between sites were determined using ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests to find groupings. For creosote shrublands, grasslands, and two tarbush-dominated alluvial flats, samples collected at 5, 10, and 20 cm had >80% sand-sized (>50 μm) particles, while one playa and tarbush site yielded ˜45% dust-sized particles at 5 and 10 cm. The transition from saltation to suspension was ˜20 cm for most sites. Two mesquite dune sites and an anthropogenically devegetated site, all with high overall mass fluxes, shifted to suspension at ˜50 cm. Highest dust fluxes occurred at the devegetated site, followed by the playa, a mesquite site with unvegetated "streets," and tarbush sites. These field observations are consistent with laboratory-based dust emission experiments and remote sensing studies in the Chihuahuan Desert. Playas and tarbush sites are major dust producers due to high proportions of fines, whereas the mesquite site produces much dust because of greater overall mass flux. Mesquite dunes covering most of the basin likely produce the most dust overall, though playas and tarbush-dominated alluvial flats (which cover about 8%) can emit large amounts of dust. Continuing shrubland encroachment will likely increase dust emissions from the Jornada Basin, as well as in other arid regions.

  3. Transient magmatic control in a tectonic domain: the central Aeolian volcanic arc (South Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2015-04-01

    The background stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by transient magmatic intrusions, generating local faulting. These events are rarely monitored and thus not fully understood, generating debate about the role of magma and tectonics in any geodynamic setting. Here we carried out a field structural analysis on the NNW-SSE strike-slip system of the central Aeolian Arc, Italy (Lipari and Vulcano islands) with ages constrained by stratigraphy to better capture the tectonic and magmatic evolution at the local and regional scales. We consider both islands as a single magmatic system and define 5 principal stratigraphic units based on magmatic and tectonic activity. We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites, mostly NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented with a dominant NS orientation. These structures are governed quasi exclusively by pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral slip, the latter being mostly related to old deposits (>50 ka). We further reconstructed the evolution of the Vulcano-Lipari system during the last ~20 ka and find that it consists of an overall half-graben-like structure, with faults with predominant eastward dips. Field evidence suggests that faulting occurs often in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, suggesting that most of the observable deformation derived from transient magmatic activity, rather than from steady regional tectonics. To explain the dominant magmatic and episodic extension in a tectonic dominant domain, we propose a model where the regional N-S trending maximum horizontal stress, responsible for strike-slip activity, locally rotates to vertical in response to transient pressurization of the magmatic system and magma rise below Lipari and Vulcano. This has possibly generated the propagation of N-S trending dikes in the past 1 ka along a 10 km long by 1 km wide crustal corridor, with important

  4. Bio-nanopatterning of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBio-nanopatterning of surfaces is a very active interdisciplinary field of research at the interface between biotechnology and nanotechnology. Precise patterning of biomolecules on surfaces with nanometre resolution has great potential in many medical and biological applications ranging from molecular diagnostics to advanced platforms for fundamental studies of molecular and cell biology. Bio-nanopatterning technology has advanced at a rapid pace in the last few years with a variety of patterning methodologies being developed for immobilising biomolecules such as DNA, peptides, proteins and viruses at the nanoscale on a broad range of substrates. In this review, the status of research and development are described, with particular focus on the recent advances on the use of nanolithographic techniques as tools for biomolecule immobilisation at the nanoscale. Present strengths and weaknesses, as well future challenges on the different nanolithographic bio-nanopatterning approaches are discussed.

  5. Bio-oil and bio-char from low temperature pyrolysis of spent grains using activated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Aimaro; Li, Sujing; Linforth, Rob; Smart, Katherine A; Andrésen, John M

    2011-11-01

    The pyrolysis of wheat and barley spent grains resulting from bio-ethanol and beer production respectively was investigated at temperatures between 460 and 540 °C using an activated alumina bed. The results showed that the bio-oil yield and quality depend principally on the applied temperature where pyrolysis at 460 °C leaves a bio-oil with lower nitrogen content in comparison with the original spent grains and low oxygen content. The viscosity profile of the spent grains indicated that activated alumina could promote liquefaction and prevent charring of the structure between 400 and 460 °C. The biochar contains about 10-12% of original carbon and 13-20% of starting nitrogen resulting very attractive as a soil amendment and for carbon sequestration. Overall, value can be added to the spent grains opening a new market in bio-fuel production without the needs of external energy. The bio-oil from spent grains could meet about 9% of the renewable obligation in the UK.

  6. Sulfur-bearing phases detected by evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite detected SO_2, H_(2)S, OCS, and CS_2 from ~450 to 800°C during evolved gas analysis (EGA) of materials from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater, Mars. This was the first detection of evolved sulfur species from a Martian surface sample during in situ EGA. SO_2 (~3–22 µmol) is consistent with the thermal decomposition of Fe sulfates or Ca sulfites, or evolution/desorption from sulfur-bearing amorphous phases. Reactions between reduced ...

  7. Comparative crystal-structure study of Ag-free lilliantite and galenobismutite from vulcano, Aeolian Islands, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Daniela; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of natural Ag-free lillianite of fumarolic origin from Vulcano, Aeolian Islands, Italy, Pb2.88Bi2.12(S5.67 Se0.33)S6.00, with a 13.567(1), b 20.655(2), c 4.1216(4) Å, V 1155.0(2) Å3, space group Bbmm, Z = 4, and galenobismutite also from Vulcano, Pb1.00Bi2.03(S3.87Se0...

  8. Volcanological implications of crystal-chemical variations in clinopyroxenes from the Aeolian Arc, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzareni, Sabrina; Molin, Gianmario; Peccerillo, Angelo; Zanazzi, Pier Francesco

    2001-03-01

    Crystal chemistry and structural data for clinopyroxene from the Aeolian islands (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) were determined with the aim of obtaining geobarometric information and exploring implications for the structure of volcanic plumbing systems. Cell and M1 site volumes for clinopyroxenes, which are known to decrease with increasing pressure of crystallization, revealed variable values, both within some single islands and along the entire arc, indicating polybaric conditions of crystallization. The lowest cell and M1 volumes were found at Filicudi, plotting close to values of clinopyroxenes from high-pressure ultramafic xenoliths entrained in alkali basalts. Indications of high-pressure crystallization were also found at Salina and, to a lesser extent, at Alicudi, all situated in the western sector of the Aeolian Arc. The central and eastern islands of Lipari, Vulcano, Panarea and Stromboli generally show higher values of cell parameters, suggesting crystallization in shallow magma chambers. These islands are characterized by the occurrence of large calderas, which are apparently lacking at Salina and Filicudi. Time-related variations were observed for cell and M1 volumes of clinopyroxene for some islands. At Salina, the early-erupted products display low values of cell parameters with respect to later activity, thus indicating a decrease in crystallization pressure with time. A similar, although less striking, pattern is observed at Alicudi and Lipari. An overall increase in cell parameters with time was observed at the scale of the entire arc. The observed variations in clinopyroxene structural parameters highlight the significance of pyroxene crystal chemistry for petrogenetic and volcanological interpretation. Correlation with time and the structural characteristics of volcanoes suggest significant regional and temporal modifications in the plumbing systems of Aeolian volcanoes. Clinopyroxenes from Filicudi and the older Salina crystallized at high

  9. Increasing aeolian dust deposition to snowpacks in the Rocky Mountains inferred from snowpack, wet deposition, and aerosol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Williams, Mark W.; Schuster, Paul F.

    2016-12-01

    Mountain snowpacks are a vital natural resource for ∼1.5 billion people in the northern Hemisphere, helping to meet human and ecological demand for water in excess of that provided by summer rain. Springtime warming and aeolian dust deposition accelerate snowmelt, increasing the risk of water shortages during late summer, when demand is greatest. While climate networks provide data that can be used to evaluate the effect of warming on snowpack resources, there are no established regional networks for monitoring aeolian dust deposition to snow. In this study, we test the hypothesis that chemistry of snow, wet deposition, and aerosols can be used as a surrogate for dust deposition to snow. We then analyze spatial patterns and temporal trends in inferred springtime dust deposition to snow across the Rocky Mountains, USA, for 1993-2014. Geochemical evidence, including strong correlations (r2 ≥ 0.94) between Ca2+, alkalinity, and dust concentrations in snow deposited during dust events, indicate that carbonate minerals in dust impart a strong chemical signature that can be used to track dust deposition to snow. Spatial patterns in chemistry of snow, wet deposition, and aerosols indicate that dust deposition increases from north to south in the Rocky Mountains, and temporal trends indicate that winter/spring dust deposition increased by 81% in the southern Rockies during 1993-2014. Using a multivariate modeling approach, we determined that increases in dust deposition and decreases in springtime snowfall combined to accelerate snowmelt timing in the southern Rockies by approximately 7-18 days between 1993 and 2014. Previous studies have shown that aeolian dust emissions may have doubled globally during the 20th century, possibly due to drought and land-use change. Climate projections for increased aridity in the southwestern U.S., northern Africa, and other mid-latitude regions of the northern Hemisphere suggest that aeolian dust emissions may continue to increase

  10. Bio-technologies; Biotechnologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawitz, X. [Systemes Bio-Industries, 92 - Boulogne Billancourt (France)

    1997-12-31

    The impact of the French 2910 decree concerning pollution emission (emission levels of boilers, turbines, engines and dryers) on the calculation of chimney stack height, gas ejection minimum speed and influence of obstacles, is reviewed. The energy efficiency improvement of 400 kW to 50 MW boilers and the implementation of a cogeneration plant are also described

  11. Bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation from organic wastes and residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dawei

    Der er stigende opmærksomhed omkring biohydrogen. Ved hydrogen fermentering kan kun en lille del af det organiske materiale eller COD i affald omdannes til hydrogen. Der findes endnu ingen full-skala bio-hydrogen anlæg, eftersom effektive rentable teknologier ikke er udviklet endnu. En to......-trins proces der kombinerer bio-hydrogen og bio-metan produktionen er en attraktiv mulighed til at øge det totale energi-udbytte af fermentering af organisk materiale. I en to-trins proces, med bio-hydrogen som første trin og bio-methan som andet trin, kunne der opnås 43mL-H2/gVSadded ved 37°C fra...

  12. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  13. Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of Stabilized Refinery-Ready Bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Meng, Jiajia [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); McCabe, Kevin [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Larson, Eric [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Environmental Inst.; Mastro, Kelly [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Southern Research (SR) in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bioenergy Technology Office (BETO), investigated a biomass liquefaction process for economic production of stabilized refinery-ready bio-oil. The project was awarded by DOE under a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA-0000686) for Bio-oil Stabilization and Commoditization that intended to evaluate the feasibility of using bio-oil as a potential feedstock in an existing petroleum refinery. SR investigated Topic Area 1 of the FOA at Technology Readiness Level 2-3 to develop thermochemical liquefaction technologies for producing a bio-oil feedstock from high-impact biomass that can be utilized within a petroleum refinery. Bio-oil obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a green intermediate that can be further upgraded into a biofuel for blending in a petroleum refinery using a hydro-deoxygenation (HDO) route. Co-processing pyrolysis bio-oil in a petroleum refinery is an attractive approach to leverage the refinery’s existing capital. However, the petroleum industry is reluctant to accept pyrolysis bio-oil because of a lack of a standard definition for an acceptable bio-oil feedstock in existing refinery processes. Also per BETO’s multiyear program plan, fast pyrolysis-based bio-fuel is presently not cost competitive with petroleum-based transportation fuels. SR aims to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective low-severity thermal liquefaction and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process to convert woody biomass to stabilized bio-oils that can be directly blended with hydrotreater input streams in a petroleum refinery for production of gasoline and/or diesel range hydrocarbons. The specific project objectives are to demonstrate the processes at laboratory scale, characterize the bio-oil product and develop a plan in partnership with a refinery company to move the technology towards commercialization.

  14. The renewable energies; Les energies renouvelables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The renewable energies are everywhere but also irregular. Thus they need savings in our energy consumptions. This document provides information, such as economics, capacity and implementation, on the following renewable energies: the wind power, the solar energy, the photovoltaic energy, the biogas, the geothermal energy, the hydroelectricity, the wood. It also presents a state of the art and examples of bio-climatic architecture. (A.L.B.)

  15. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  16. Aeolian sedimentation in the middle buntsandstein in the eifel north-south depression zone: Summary of the variability of sedimentary processes in a buntsandstein erg as a base for evaluation of the mutual relationships between aeolian sand seas and fluvial river systems in the mid-european buntsandstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    The spectrum of aeolian depositional subenvironments in the upper Middle Buntsandstein Karlstal-Schichten sequence in the Eifel North-South-zone at the western margin of the Mid-European Triassic Basin comprises trains of larger and higher narrowly-spaced dunes in sand seas, isolated smaller and lower widely-spaced dunes in floodplains and interdune playas, dry interdune sheet sands, damp interdune adhesive sandflats, wet interdune playa lakes, rainfall runoff watercourses and ephemeral channels cutting through the dune belt, and deflation gravel lag veneers. Distinction of aeolian and fluvial sediments within the succession of closely intertonguing wind- and water-laid deposits is possible by independent analysis of the conventional criteria and the more modern stratification styles. Thick cross-bedded aeolian sand sequences originate as barchanoid-type dunes which accumulate and migrate in the regime of narrow to wide unimodal southeasterly to southwesterly trade winds in low northern palaeolatitude in summer when the intertropical convergence zone is shifted to the north. The predominantly transverse-ridge dunes accrete mainly by grainfall and subcritical climbing of wind ripples, subordinately also by grainflow interfingering with grainfall. Horizontal-laminated aeolian sands form as sand sheets in dry interdune playas by subcritical migration of wind ripple trains, rarely also by plane bed accretion. Thin cross-bedded dune sands or horizontal-laminated aeolian sands capping fluvial cyclothems originate by deflation of emerged alluvial bar sands during low-water stages and subsequent accumulation of the winnowed sand as widely-spaced dunelets or chains of wind ripples in desiccated parts of the adjoining floodplain. The aeolian sand layers at the base of lacustrine cyclothems record migration of isolated little dunes across the dry playa floor at the beginning of a wetting-upwards cyclothem, with the sand deriving from deflation of fluvial incursions or

  17. Mineral composition of TALDICE aeolian ice core dust by means of synchrotron radiation XAS and XRF techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Hampai, D.; Maggi, V.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the first accurate non-destructive comparison of the mineral composition of atmospheric dusts contained in a deep ice core from Antarctica using synchrotron radiation. Different mineral assemblages reaching glaciated areas could be correlated to sources areas starting from the knowledge of the dust composition. In this investigation we demonstrate the possibility to characterize with SR the mineral composition of the dust in order to perform its geochemical characterization and to understand the pattern of the transport and the trajectories of the aerosol. This study has been focused on the elemental characterization and the identification of the iron oxidation state of aeolian Antarctic dust by means of synchrotron radiation X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. A set of twelve ice samples from the TALDICE (TD, 72˚ 46'S, 159˚ 04'E, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 80 kg*m-2*yr-1) ice core, corresponding to the warm climatic period, Holocene, and to the cold climatic period, Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS 3) have been measured. To obtain both the elemental composition and the iron oxidation state of the mineral dust we performed experiments on specially prepared samples at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) laboratory in the framework of the Proposal N.3082B. Actually, melted ice samples were filtered and then mineral particles were deposited onto Nuclepore polycarbonate membranes in a 1000 class clean room under a 100 class laminar flow bench for both XRF and XAS experiments. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, that allows performing different type of experimental technique on very low absorber concentration samples was developed and tested in Italy. The original experimental setup, including an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and a special alignment and docking sample system was installed at the beamline 10-2 at SSRL. For the x-ray detection a 7 mm2 high sensitive Silicon Drift Detector was

  18. BioMagResBank.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, E.L.; Akutsu, H.; Doreleijers, J.; Harano, Y.; Ioannidis, Y.E.; Lin, J.; Livny, M.; Mading, S.; Maziuk, D.; Miller, Z.; Nakatani, E.; Schulte, C.F.; Tolmie, D.E.; Wenger, R Kent; Yao, H.; Markley, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The BioMagResBank (BMRB: www.bmrb.wisc.edu) is a repository for experimental and derived data gathered from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies of biological molecules. BMRB is a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB). The BMRB archive consists of four main data deposi

  19. TO APPLICATION OF BIO-GAS UNITS: ORGANIZATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Nga Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the published papers written by national and foreign researchers reveals that an increasing global energy deficit, exhaustion of  fossil organic and nuclear fuels, chemical and radio-active contamination of the environment are main reasons in favour of  thorough investigation  and wide introduction of non-conventional and renewable energy sources. Nowadays Vietnamese Institute of Energy Science has been developing the state-of-the-art bio-gas technologies on the  basis of application and modernization of Chinese and Dutch family-style technologies. The most rational technologies are combined ones which operate using various types of energy raw materials, for example, solar and bio-gas energy because usage of solar energy expands operational possibilities of the bio-gas system, ensures its operation within wide temperature range creating necessary parameters for the required technological task.

  20. First X-Ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest Aeolian Bedform at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Sarrazin, P.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R. T.; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; Achilles, C. N.; Morookian, J. M.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Rampe, E. B.; Stolper, E. M.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.; Anderson, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous orbital and landed observations of the martian surface suggest a reasonably uniform martian soil composition, likely as a result of global aeolian mixing [1, 2]. Chemical data for martian soils are abundant [e.g., 2, 3], and phase information has been provided by lander thermal emission and Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements [3, 4, 5, 6]. However, until now no X-ray diffraction (XRD) data were available for martian soil nor has XRD ever been used on another body apart from Earth. XRD is generally considered the most definitive method for determining the crystalline phases in solid samples, and it is the method of choice for determining mineralogy. CheMin s first XRD analysis on Mars coincided with the 100th anniversary of the discovery of X-ray diffraction by von Laue. Curiosity delivered scooped samples of loose, unconsolidated material ("soil") acquired from an aeolian bedform at the Rocknest locality to instruments in the body of the rover (the laboratory). Imaging shows that the soil has a range of particle sizes, of 1-2 mm and smaller, presumably representing contributions from global, regional, and local sources.

  1. New insights into the Aeolian Islands and other arc source compositions from high-precision olivine chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Denis; Trela, Jarek; Gazel, Esteban; Sobolev, Alexander V.; Cannatelli, Claudia; Lucchi, Federico; Batanova, Valentina G.; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-02-01

    The Aeolian arc (Italy) is characterized by some of the strongest along-the-arc geochemical variations in the planet, making it an ideal location to study the effect of subducting components in modifying the mantle source of island arc melts. Here, we use high-precision element concentrations in primitive phenocrystic olivine from basalts along the arc to elucidate the effects of mantle source modification by the subduction process. Olivines from this arc have Ni concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that show similarity to peridotite sources that melted to produce mid-ocean ridge basalts. Nevertheless, they also have systematically lower Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that broadly overlap with olivines from the available global arc array. These phenocrysts also do not show significant variations in Ca as a function of olivine forsterite content. The global data suggest that all olivines crystallizing from island-arc melts have suppressed Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios, relative to olivines derived from melts at intraplate and mid-ocean ridge settings suggesting elevated H2O concentrations and higher oxidation state of the equilibrium melts. Based on olivine chemistry, we interpret a predominantly peridotite source (fluxed by subduction fluids) beneath the Aeolian Arc and also for other examples of arc-related lavas.

  2. Bronze Age pottery from the Aeolian Islands: definition of Temper Compositional Reference Units by an integrated mineralogical and microchemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, D.; Levi, S. T.; Fragnoli, P.; Renzulli, A.; Santi, P.; Paganelli, E.; Martinelli, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    An integrated microchemical-petrographic approach is here proposed to discriminate the provenance of archaeological pottery artefacts from distinct production centres. Our study focuses on a statistically significant sampling ( n=186) of volcanic temper-bearing potteries representative of the manufacturing and dispersion among the islands of the Aeolian Archipelago during the Bronze Age. The widespread establishment of new settlements and the abundant recovery of Aeolian-made ceramic in southern Italy attest for the increased vitality of the Archipelago during the Capo Graziano culture (Early Bronze Age-Middle Bronze Age 2; 2300-1430 BC). Potteries from three of the main known ancient communities (Lipari, Filicudi and Stromboli) have been studied integrating old collections and newly excavated material. Volcanic tempers have been first investigated through multivariate analyses of relative abundances of mineral and rock clasts along with petrographic characters. In addition, we performed in-situ mineral chemistry microanalyses by Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation—Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to assess major and trace element composition of the most common mineral phases. Four Temper Compositional Reference Units have been recognised based on compositional trends. Two units (AI and AX) are unequivocally distinct by their peculiar trace element enrichment and petrographic composition; they mostly contain samples from the sites of Lipari and Stromboli, respectively. Units AIV and AVIII, restricted to the sites of Filicudi and Stromboli, show distinct petrographic characters but overlapped geochemical fingerprints.

  3. Evidence for indigenous nitrogen in sedimentary and aeolian deposits from the Curiosity rover investigations at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Sutter, Brad; Freissinet, Caroline; Navarro-González, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.; Archer, P. Douglas; Buch, Arnaud; Brunner, Anna E.; Coll, Patrice; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Fairen, Alberto G.; Franz, Heather B.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kashyap, Srishti; McAdam, Amy C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril; Wray, James J.; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Zorzano, Maria-Paz; Conrad, Pamela G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Grotzinger, John; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; - Torres, F. Javier Martín; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d’Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover has detected oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during pyrolysis of scooped aeolian sediments and drilled sedimentary deposits within Gale crater. Total N concentrations ranged from 20 to 250 nmol N per sample. After subtraction of known N sources in SAM, our results support the equivalent of 110–300 ppm of nitrate in the Rocknest (RN) aeolian samples, and 70–260 and 330–1,100 ppm nitrate in John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) mudstone deposits, respectively. Discovery of indigenous martian nitrogen in Mars surface materials has important implications for habitability and, specifically, for the potential evolution of a nitrogen cycle at some point in martian history. The detection of nitrate in both wind-drifted fines (RN) and in mudstone (JK, CB) is likely a result of N2 fixation to nitrate generated by thermal shock from impact or volcanic plume lightning on ancient Mars. Fixed nitrogen could have facilitated the development of a primitive nitrogen cycle on the surface of ancient Mars, potentially providing a biochemically accessible source of nitrogen. PMID:25831544

  4. Effects of peat and weathered coal on the growth of Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica seedlings on aeolian sandy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The experiment was conducted at the Ganqika Sandy Land Ecological Station in Ke'erqinzuoyihouqi County, Inner Mongolia, in a growing season from April 28 to October 28, 2001. Peat and weathered coal wereadded to the aeolian sandy soil in different ratios. Two-year-old Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica seedlings and plastic pots wereused in the experiment. The experimental results indicat ed that: 1) the peat and weathered coal could significantly improve the physical and chemical properties of aeolian sandy soil, and thus promoted the growth of seedlings;2) the effect of peat on seedling growth, including height, base diam eter, root length and biomass, presented an order of 8%>10%>5%>2%>0 in terms of peat contents, and the effect of weathered coal on seedling growth presented an order of 5%>8%>10%>2%>0 in terms of weathered coal contents for height and basal diameter, 5%>8%>2% >10%>0 for root length, and 5%>2%>8% >10%>0 for biomass;3) the effects of peat were generally greater than that of weathered coal. Meanwhile, 8% peat was the best treatment to promote the growth of P. Sylvestris var. Mo ngolica seedlings.

  5. Design of temperature automatic control system based on solar energy compensation in photosynthetic bio-hydrogen reactor%基于太阳能温度补偿的光合生物制氢反应器自控系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜金宇; 王毅; 周雪花; 张全国

    2012-01-01

    In order to fufill the requirements of photosynthtic bio-hydrogen operation process by solar energy, the solar heating temperature compensation automatic control system was designed, STK12C5A0882 single chip microcomputer was chosen as controller, and Pt100 temperature sensors as temperature collector to realize the real-time temperature regulation curve online display. Photosynthetic bio-hydrogen reactor cooling and heating switched by relay control, and software design adopted PID algorithm progrem. The experiment result showed that the system adjusted accurately, controled stably and could fufill the data online monitoring, The corresponse time of detector was less than 10 ms.the response time of regulation was less than 30s, and the temperature fluctuation was less than ±2 ℃ , which indicates that the design can adjust the temperature of bio-reacter during (30 ± 2)℃ to meet the solar photosynthetic bio-hydrogen reactor temperature control requirements.%针对太阳能光合生物连续制氢运行工艺的要求,设计了太阳能加热温度补偿自控系统,以STK12C5A0882单片机作为控制器,选用Pt100型温度传感器采集温度,实现实时温度调节曲线的在线显示.光合生物制氢反应器制冷和制热的切换由继电器控制,软件设计采用了PID算法.试验结果表明,该系统具有调节精密,控制稳定,数据在线记录及监测等优点,系统检测响应是时间小于10 ms,调控响应时间小于30 s,可将温度控制在(30±2)℃,温度波动小于±2℃,能够有效提高太阳能光合生物制氢反应器的温度控制精度.

  6. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    originating from the top of the boundary layer, indicating a downwards direction of eddy motion. While directionality of turbulence cannot be definitively determined, our results indicate that the top-down turbulence model is a suitable explanation, further supported by the presence of 'incomplete' eddies which originate at higher elevations but fail to extend to the surface. This provides the first evidence in support of a top down turbulence model as observed in aeolian geomorphology, and we present preliminary findings on its relationship to sand transport activity. Lee, Z.S., Baas, A.C.W. (2016) Variable and conflicting shear stress estimates inside a boundary layer with sediment transport. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms; DOI: 10.1002/esp.3829

  7. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  8. 3D Airflow patterns over coastal foredunes: implications for aeolian sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, Andrew G.; Baas, Andreas C. W.; Lynch, Kevin; Beyers, Meiring

    2010-05-01

    across a high resolution LIDAR surface of the dunes and beach we have isolated key areas of wind direction and velocity patterns which are important in aeolian transport budgets. Results are particularly important in post-storm recovery of foredunes damaged under wave action as offshore winds can initiate significant onshore transport, re-supplying the backbeach and foredune zones.

  9. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  10. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  11. Production of bio-oil with flash pyrolysis; Biooeljyn tuotanto flash-pyrolyysillae ja sen poltto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyroenen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The target of the R and D work is to study the production of bio-oils using Flash-pyrolysis technology and utilisation of the bio-oil in oil-fuelled boilers. The PDU-unit was installed at VTT Energy in Otaniemi in April 1996. The first test were carried out in June. In the whole project Vapo Oy is responsible for: acquiring the 20 kg/h PDU-device for development; follow up of the engine tests; the investment of 5 MW demonstration plant; to carry on the boiler and engine tests with Finnish bio-oils. (orig.)

  12. Accumulation and erosion of aeolian sediments in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and implications for provenance to the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-Jun; Xiao, Guoqiao; E, Chongyi; Li, Xiangzhong; Lai, Zhongping; Yu, Lupeng; Wang, Zhong

    2017-03-01

    The northern and northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) is regarded as one important source region of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP). However, how the fine grain sediments in this region were transported to the CLP remains debatable. In this study, we dated aeolian sediments, alluviums, beach sediments, and sand wedges in the northeastern QTP using optical dating, combined with previously reported ages, explored the aeolian sediment deposition patterns in this region. The dating results shown that aeolian sediments mainly accumulated during the marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 and since the last deglaciation, alluvial sediments mainly deposited during the middle to late MIS 3 (between ∼40 ka and 22 ka), and sand wedges formed during the MIS 4 and MIS 2 cold intervals. Based on the sedimentary stratigraphic characteristics and existing optical dating chronologies, we propose that fine grain sediments in the northern and northeastern QTP were eroded and carried to the CLP by westerly wind during last glacial and stadial cold stages. However, during last interglacial and interstadial warm stages, aeolian sediments deflated from western barren lands and deserts were mainly trapped in the northeastern QTP, and some were transported to the Alax arid zone or Yinchuan-Hetao plain by rivers that flow out of QTP, then transported to the CLP by northwesterly Asian winter monsoon (AWM). This cold stage westerly wind transport, warm stage rivers plus AWM transport pattern has existed at least since the late middle Pleistocene.

  13. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  14. The north-eastern aeolian 'European Sand Belt' as potential record of environmental changes: A case study from Eastern Latvia and Southern Estonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalińska-Nartiša, Edyta; Thiel, Christine; Nartišs, Maris

    2016-01-01

    The Latvian and Estonian inland dunes belong to the north-eastern part of the 'European Sand Belt' (ESB). These dunes are widely distributed over broad glaciolacustrine plains and Late Glacial alluvial deltas, considered to be potential sources for the aeolian material. Little is known about...

  15. Episodes of aeolian sand movement on a large spit system (Skagen Odde, Denmark) and North Atlantic storminess during the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Hansen, Kristian W T;

    2015-01-01

    . A change in the atmospheric circulation, so that both the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) were negative, apparently led to an increased number of intense cyclones causing inland sand movement and dune building. The second and third phase of aeolian sand...

  16. Catalytic effect of ultrananocrystalline Fe₃O₄ on algal bio-crude production via HTL process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Pérez, Arnulfo; Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Frias-Flores, Cecilia B; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Das, K C; Weiner, Brad R; Morell, Gerardo; Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M

    2015-11-14

    We report a comprehensive quantitative study of the production of refined bio-crudes via a controlled hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process using Ulva fasciata macroalgae (UFMA) as biomass and ultrananocrystalline Fe3O4 (UNCFO) as catalyst. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were applied to elucidate the formation of the high-quality nanocatalysts. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and CHNS analyses showed that the bio-crude yield and carbon/oxygen ratios increase as the amount of UNCFO increases, reaching a peak value of 32% at 1.25 wt% (a 9% increase when compared to the catalyst-free yield). The bio-crude is mainly composed of fatty acids, alcohols, ketones, phenol and benzene derivatives, and hydrocarbons. Their relative abundance changes as a function of catalyst concentration. FTIR spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the as-produced bio-crudes are free of iron species, which accumulate in the generated bio-chars. Our findings also indicate that the energy recovery values via the HTL process are sensitive to the catalyst loading, with a threshold loading of 1.25 wt%. GC-MS studies show that the UNCFO not only influences the chemical nature of the resulting bio-crudes and bio-chars, but also the amount of fixed carbons in the solid residues. The detailed molecular characterization of the bio-crudes and bio-chars catalyzed by UNCFO represents the first systematic study reported using UFMA. This study brings forth new avenues to advance the highly-pure bio-crude production employing active, heterogeneous catalyst materials that are recoverable and recyclable for continuous thermochemical reactions.

  17. Types for BioAmbients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Capecchi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The BioAmbients calculus is a process algebra suitable for representing compartmentalization, molecular localization and movements between compartments. In this paper we enrich this calculus with a static type system classifying each ambient with group types specifying the kind of compartments in which the ambient can stay. The type system ensures that, in a well-typed process, ambients cannot be nested in a way that violates the type hierarchy. Exploiting the information given by the group types, we also extend the operational semantics of BioAmbients with rules signalling errors that may derive from undesired ambients' moves (i.e. merging incompatible tissues. Thus, the signal of errors can help the modeller to detect and locate unwanted situations that may arise in a biological system, and give practical hints on how to avoid the undesired behaviour.

  18. Types for BioAmbients

    CERN Document Server

    Capecchi, Sara; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.7

    2010-01-01

    The BioAmbients calculus is a process algebra suitable for representing compartmentalization, molecular localization and movements between compartments. In this paper we enrich this calculus with a static type system classifying each ambient with group types specifying the kind of compartments in which the ambient can stay. The type system ensures that, in a well-typed process, ambients cannot be nested in a way that violates the type hierarchy. Exploiting the information given by the group types, we also extend the operational semantics of BioAmbients with rules signalling errors that may derive from undesired ambients' moves (i.e. merging incompatible tissues). Thus, the signal of errors can help the modeller to detect and locate unwanted situations that may arise in a biological system, and give practical hints on how to avoid the undesired behaviour.

  19. Long-term sustainability of bio-components production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souček Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels play an increasingly important role in motor fuel market. The list of biofuels (bio-components in accordance with EU legislations contains a number of substances not widely used in the market. Traditionally these include: fatty acid methyl esters (FAME, in the Czech Republic methyl ether of rape seed oil and bioethanol (also ethyl terc. buthyl ether ETBE, based on bioethanol. The availability and possible utilizations of bio-component fuels in Czech Republic and Serbia are discussed. Additional attention is paid on the identification of the possibilities to improve effectiveness of rape seeds cultivation and utilization of by-products from FAME production (utilization of sew, rape-meal and glycerol which will allow fulfilment of the sustainability criteria for the first generation biofuels. The new approaches on renewable co-processing are commented. The concept of 3E (emissions, energy demand, and economics is introduced specifying three main attributes for effective production of FAME production in accordance with legal compliances. Bio-components price change is analyzed in comparison to the price of motor fuels, identifying possible (speculative crude price break-even point at the level of 149-176 USD/bbl at which point bio-fuels would become economically cost effective for the use by refiners.

  20. Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...meet an emerging national crisis (war), emergency (natural disaster), or major impact event (Y2K). Certain resources are generally critical to the

  1. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Duncan

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. All feedstock are suited for gasification, which produces syngas that can be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol and diesel, or can undergo steam reformation to produce hydrogen. Implementing a network of mobile facilities reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use a fraction of the biomass energy content to meet thermal or electrical demands. The total energy delivered by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energy content, respectively. However, implementing mobile facilities is economically feasible when large transport distances are required. For an annual harvest of 1.717 million m3 (equivalent to 2000 ODTPD), transport costs are reduced to less than 40% of the total levelised delivered feedstock cost when mobile facilities are implemented; transport costs account for up to 80% of feedstock costs for conventional woodchip delivery. Torrefaction provides the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.25 million m3 or when transport distances greater than 250 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs of feedstock are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, thermal and electrical demands of mobile facilities, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost

  2. Particle size distributions of aeolian sediments from five ecosystem types at the Jornada Basin, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, K. W.; Gill, T. E.; Gillette, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation protects surface sediments from wind erosion. Vegetation cover varies across landscapes, especially in arid lands where grasses are patchy and shrublands with open intershrub spaces tend to dominate: intershrub spaces tend to experience greater aeolian erosion than nearby grasslands. There are five major ecosystem types at the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in south-central New Mexico, USA: mesquite dunes, black grama grasslands, creosote shrublands, tarbush alluvial flats, and grass-dominated playas. We describe dry particle size distributions (PSDs) of material collected in BSNE aeolian sediment traps in late spring - early summer 2006 in these five ecosystem types. Four towers per site, three sites per ecosystem, collected sediment at 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 cm heights. Sediment PSDs were determined in dry state with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffractometer. The PSDs at 5 and 10 cm were generally very similar across the sites, most sites having > 80% sand-sized particles (>50 µm). The exceptions were the one playa site and one tarbush site, where 35% and 40% of the sediment at 5 cm was silt and clay (500 µm particles than at 5 and 10 cm. Two mesquite sites had nearly identical PSDs at 5, 10, and 20 cm heights, with the sediment at 50 cm slightly finer than lower heights, and the 100 cm height strongly shifted to finer particles. The same pattern was seen at an artificially de-vegetated site. Shifts in PSDs with height are consistent with a transition between saltation (coarser particle)-dominated transport and suspension (finer particle)-dominated transport. For most of the sites at Jornada, the transition occurred either at ~20 cm or between 20 and 50 cm. The tarbush site and playa site had unusually large percentages of fines at 5 cm, where larger particles are expected to dominate. These sites have aggregated fines which aerodynamically act as larger particles, and thus are too coarse to suspend. Our earlier work

  3. Production of bio-jet fuel from microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoraghy, Marian

    The increase in petroleum-based aviation fuel consumption, the decrease in petroleum resources, the fluctuation of the crude oil price, the increase in greenhouse gas emission and the need for energy security are motivating the development of an alternate jet fuel. Bio-jet fuel has to be a drop in fuel, technically and economically feasible, environmentally friendly, greener than jet fuel, produced locally and low gallon per Btu. Bic jet fuel has been produced by blending petro-based jet fuel with microalgae biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester, or simply FAME). Indoor microalgae growth, lipids extraction and transetrification to biodiesel are energy and fresh water intensive and time consuming. In addition, the quality of the biodiesel product and the physical properties of the bio-jet fuel blends are unknown. This work addressed these challenges. Minimizing the energy requirements and making microalgae growth process greener were accomplished by replacing fluorescent lights with light emitting diodes (LEDs). Reducing fresh water footprint in algae growth was accomplished by waste water use. Microalgae biodiesel production time was reduced using the one-step (in-situ transestrification) process. Yields up to 56.82 mg FAME/g dry algae were obtained. Predicted physical properties of in-situ FAME satisfied European and American standards confirming its quality. Lipid triggering by nitrogen deprivation was accomplished in order to increase the FAME production. Bio-jet fuel freezing points and heating values were measured for different jet fuel to biodiesel blend ratios.

  4. Modeling the Kinetics of Deactivation of Catalysts during the Upgrading of Bio-Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Robert S.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Wang, Huamin

    2015-01-25

    The fouling of catalysts for the upgrading of bio-oils appears to be very different from the fouling of catalysts for the hydroprocessing of petroleum-derived streams. There are two reasons for the differences: a) bio-oil contains polarizable components and phases that can stabilize reaction intermediates exhibiting charge separation and b) bio-oil components contain functional groups that contain O, notably carbonyls (>C=O). Aldol condensation of carbonyls affords very different pathways for the production of oligomeric, refractory deposits than does dehydrogenation/polymerization of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons. Colloquially, we refer to the bio-oil derived deposits as “gunk” to discriminate them from coke, the carbonaceous deposits encountered in petroleum refining. Classical gelation, appears to be a suitable model for the “gunking” reaction. Our work has helped explain the temperature range at which bio-oil should be pre-processed (“stabilized”) to confer longer lifetimes on the catalysts used for more severe processing. Stochastic modeling (kinetic Monte Carlo simulations) appears suitable to capture the rates of oligomerization of bio-oil. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  5. Project BioLex. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, J.; Broechner Andersen, M.; FORCE Technology

    2007-01-15

    The usage of biomass as a renewable source of energy is an important issue for a sustainable energy supply in Denmark. Due to pioneering work, Denmark has great experience in producing energy from biomass both in large scale CHP utilities as well as in small scale application such as domestic heating. This experience has been mainly focused in the usage of traditional domestic solid biomass fuels such as wood. However, the limited amounts available of these fuels and thereby following increasing prices have triggered the interest in using other sources of biomass. Rest and waste products from the agricultural industry is one examples of biomass which has a large potential to be used as a cheap biomass fuels. Projects of using these new types of biomass fuels are often hindered by insecurity whether this new biomass source can be applied as fuel or not. Thus in order to support usage of new sources of biomass a first step is to have knowledge on properties of the biomass fuel and be able to compare these to the known traditional fuels used. The BioLex was designed to provide this information about important properties of both traditional Danish as well as new more exotic solid biomass fuels in a database available to the public via the internet. (au)

  6. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University(SER-XMU)was founded in 2007,to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy,Chemical Energy,Bio-energy,Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics.

  7. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and ex-pand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Econom-ics.

  8. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007,to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy,Chemical Energy,Bio-energy,Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics.

  9. Controls on and effects of armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields: A numerical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  10. Bioética Bioética Boethics

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Regina Rodrigues Nunes; Amauri Porto Nunes

    2004-01-01

    A bioética é um novo campo de conhecimento e uma corrente de pensamento que vem se desenvolvendo amplamente no Brasil, principalmente a partir da década de 90. Nesse artigo buscamos contextualizar o seu surgimento, justificando a necessidade da criação desse neologismo, uma vez que a ética estava de certo modo esquecida, em relação à técnica, restringindo-se apenas à ética profissional. Hoje nos deparamos com uma ampla gama de produções nessa área que ajudam a nortear nossa ação enquanto cida...

  11. Bioética Bioética Boethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Regina Rodrigues Nunes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A bioética é um novo campo de conhecimento e uma corrente de pensamento que vem se desenvolvendo amplamente no Brasil, principalmente a partir da década de 90. Nesse artigo buscamos contextualizar o seu surgimento, justificando a necessidade da criação desse neologismo, uma vez que a ética estava de certo modo esquecida, em relação à técnica, restringindo-se apenas à ética profissional. Hoje nos deparamos com uma ampla gama de produções nessa área que ajudam a nortear nossa ação enquanto cidadãos que buscam qualidade de vida e a preservação da vida no planeta. A bioética, no entanto, preocupa-se com o modo de ser: pensamento-julgamento-ação, em relação aos seres humanos entre si e com a natureza.La bioética es un nuevo campo de conocimiento y una corriente del pensamiento que está en pleno desarrollo en Brasil, principalmente a partir de la década del 90. En este artículo explicamos el contexto de su surgimiento, justificando la necesidad de la creación de este neologismo, una vez que la ética estaba de una cierta manera relegada, con relación a la técnica, limitada apenas a la ética profesional. Hoy nosotros notamos una amplia gama de producciones en esta área que nos ayudan a orientar nuestras acciones como ciudadanos que buscan la calidad de vida y la preservación de la vida en el planeta. La bioética, sin embargo, se preocupa con el modo de ser: pensamiento-juicio-acción, con relación a los seres humanos entre sí y con la naturaleza.Bioethics is a new field of knowledge and a current of thought that has been largely developing in Brazil, especially since the Nineties. In this article, we try to contextualize its inception by justifying the need to create such a neologism, since ethics was somewhat forgotten, in relation to the technique, being restricted to professional ethics. We are nowadays faced with a wide scope of works in this area that help guide our action as citizens who want quality of life

  12. The Bio* toolkits--a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalam, Harry

    2002-09-01

    Bioinformatics research is often difficult to do with commercial software. The Open Source BioPerl, BioPython and Biojava projects provide toolkits with multiple functionality that make it easier to create customised pipelines or analysis. This review briefly compares the quirks of the underlying languages and the functionality, documentation, utility and relative advantages of the Bio counterparts, particularly from the point of view of the beginning biologist programmer.

  13. Aeolian to shallow-marine shelf architecture off a major desert since the Late Pleistocene (northern Mauritania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanebuth, T. J. J.; Mersmeyer, H.; Kudrass, H. R.; Westphal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Continental shelves off major desert regions are not expected to host substantial amounts of sediments due to long-lasting and unfocused material supply and a high re-mobilization potential of aeolian material. This study, in contrast, demonstrates that significant volumes of sediments have accumulated on the northern Mauritanian shelf under the arid climate conditions and prevail over consecutive climatic cycles. Eight late Pleistocene to Holocene depositional units, each formed under contrasting depositional conditions, are identified in high-resolution seismo-acoustic data and dated sediment cores. These are: (1) a highly differentiated Pleistocene paleo-landscape older than the past climatic cycle, (2) a continental dune complex (MIS-4), (3) a thick regressive shallow-water clinoform (late MIS-3), (4) a regressive to lowstand shore deposit (latest MIS-3), and (5) a local transgressive cover (LGM to deglacial). Additionally, (6) an open-shelf highstand cover, (7) an outer-shelf highstand wedge and (8) mid-shelf mud depocenters have formed during the Holocene sea-level highstand. The common local offshore formation and preservation of confined stratigraphic units, in particular from during MIS-3, mark the interplay of: a) episodes of pronounced arid climatic conditions resulting in enhanced aeolian and coastal sediment input, b) shelf current patterns focusing sediment deposition locally, and c) early post-depositional sediment stabilization providing protection against erosion. Prominent internal surfaces at 63 and 115 m modern water depths indicate widespread and intense erosional activity during late MIS-3 regression and MIS-2 lowstand to post-LGM transgression, hosting coarse shell sands and gravels from beach and shoreface paleo-environments. The reasons for the high preservation potential of confined stratigraphic units are: a) carbonaceous cementation, b) sediment composition (massive widespread shore-related gravel and shell beds with subtle minor

  14. Modeling aeolian transport in response to succession, disturbance and future climate: Dynamic long-term risk assessment for contaminant redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, D.D.; Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, J.J.; Field, J.P.; Allen, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aeolian sediment transport is a fundamental process redistributing sediment, nutrients, and contaminants in dryland ecosystems. Over time frames of centuries or longer, horizontal sediment fluxes and associated rates of contaminant transport are likely to be influenced by succession, disturbances, and changes in climate, yet models of horizontal sediment transport that account for these fundamental factors are lacking, precluding in large part accurate assessment of human health risks associated with persistent soil-bound contaminants. We present a simple model based on empirical measurements of horizontal sediment transport (predominantly saltation) to predict potential contaminant transport rates for recently disturbed sites such as a landfill cover. Omnidirectional transport is estimated within vegetation that changes using a simple Markov model that simulates successional trajectory and considers three types of short-term disturbances (surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced plant mortality) under current and projected climates. The model results highlight that movement of contaminated soil is sensitive to vegetation dynamics and increases substantially (e.g., > fivefold) when disturbance and/or future climate are considered. The time-dependent responses in horizontal sediment fluxes and associated contaminant fluxes were sensitive to variability in the timing of disturbance, with longer intervals between disturbance allowing woody plants to become dominant and crown fire and drought abruptly reducing woody plant cover. Our results, which have direct implications for contaminant transport and landfill management in the specific context of our assessment, also have general relevance because they highlight the need to more fully account for vegetation dynamics, disturbance, and changing climate in aeolian process studies. ?? 2011.

  15. Soilscape evolution of aeolian-dominated hillslopes during the Holocene: investigation of sediment transport mechanisms and climatic-anthropogenic drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sagy; Svoray, Tal; Sela, Shai; Hancock, Greg; Willgoose, Garry

    2017-01-01

    Here we study the soilscape (soil-landscape) evolution of a field site in the semiarid zone of Israel. This region, like similar regions around the world, was subject to intensive loess accumulation during the Pleistocene and early Holocene. Today, hillslopes in this region are dominated by exposed bedrock with deep loess depositions in the valleys and floodplains. The drivers and mechanism that led to this soilscape are unclear. Within this context, we use a soilscape evolution model (mARM5D) to study the potential mechanisms that led to this soilscape. We focus on advancing our conceptual understanding of the processes at the core of this soilscape evolution by studying the effects of fluvial and diffusive sediment transport mechanisms, and the potential effects of climatic and anthropogenic drivers. Our results show that, in our field site, dominated by aeolian soil development, hillslope fluvial sediment transport (e.g., surface wash and gullies) led to downslope thinning in soil, while diffusive transport (e.g., soil creep) led to deeper and more localized soil features at the lower sections of the hillslopes. The results suggest that, in this semiarid, aeolian-dominated and soil-depleted landscape, the top section of the hillslopes is dominated by diffusive transport and the bottom by fluvial transport. Temporal variability in environmental drivers had a considerable effect on soilscape evolution. Short but intensive changes during the late Holocene, imitating anthropogenic land use alterations, rapidly changed the site's soil distribution. This leads us to assume that this region's soil-depleted hillslopes are, at least in part, the result of anthropogenic drivers.

  16. The western Aeolian Islands volcanoes (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) : the temporal and chemical evolution of a complex magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leocat, E.; Peccerillo, A.; Gillot, P.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Aeolian Archipelago is located on the northern continental margin of the Calabro-Peloritan basement. This volcanic province emplaces in the geodynamic system linked to the convergence of African and European plates. In this study, we focused on Alicudi, Filicudi, Salina, Lipari and Vulcano to understand the temporal and geochemical evolution of western Aeolian Islands magmatism. These volcanoes contain the whole geochemical compositions typical of convergence settings ranging from calc-alkaline (CA) and high-K CA (HKCA) to shoshonitic (SHO) and potassic rocks (KS). Moreover, these magmas were emitted over a short time span, which attests to the complexity of the geodynamical setting. Geochemical data, consisting in major and trace elements whole rock analysis, were carried out on dated samples, whose geochronological data are based on K-Ar technique. The first magmas, emitted at Filicudi, Salina and Lipari after 300 ka, have relatively the same CA composition, whereas some Lipari lavas have early HKCA affinity. Around 120-130 ka, Alicudi and Vulcano emerged simultaneously in the western and central volcanic province that is influenced by two contrasted magmatic systems. In fact, the SHO magmatism in the central sector is coeval with CA activity in the western arc. After 40 ka, the last activity of Filicudi consists of mafic magmas of HKCA affinity while Salina and Alicudi emitted CA products. In contrast, mainly differentiated magmas of HKCA-SHO affinity were emplaced at Lipari and Vulcano. Overall, the K and incompatible elements enrichments increase through time mostly in the central arc. At the scale of the archipelago, the magmatic changes occurring around 120 and 40 ka may be explained by deep and regional processes, as mantle source contamination variations. However, at smaller space and time-scales, the magmatic evolution is more complex reflecting peculiar processes, as crustal assimilation and fractional crystallisation, specific to each volcano

  17. The western Aeolian Islands volcanoes (South Tyrrhenian Sea): highlight on their eruptive history based on K-Ar dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leocat, E.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Peccerillo, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Aeolian Islands volcanoes are located in southern Tyrrhenian Sea on the northern continental margin of the Calabro-Peloritan basement. The Stromboli, Panarea and Vulcano volcanoes of the half eastern sector are well studied as they are still active and they represent high volcanic hazard. While stratigraphic studies were carried out on volcanoes of the western sector, radiometric ages are lacking to well understand their eruptive history. Therefore, new geochronological and geochemical data were obtained for Alicudi, Filicudi, Salina and Lipari western volcanoes. The aim is to establish a complete time framework of the volcanism and to study possible time-related variations of magma compositions. The 37 new ages were obtained using K-Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique that is suitable for dating Quaternary volcanic rocks. The new geochemical data consist of whole rock major and trace elements analysis on dated samples. Our new sets of data give evidence that the Aeolian Islands are young volcanoes emplaced within the last 300 ka. The oldest products outcrop at Filicudi, Salina and Lipari. Te first emerged activity of Alicudi volcano occurred 120 ka ago. While quiescence activity of at least 50 ka is recognized at Filicudi and Lipari, and potentially at Salina, the volcanic activity of Alicudi would have been relatively continuous. These whole volcanoes were active within the last 30 ka which has to be considered for volcanic hazard assessment. At the scale of each volcano, the degree of differentiation increase roughly through time, except at Filicudi where the ultimate products correspond to mafic magma. At the scale of the archipelago, this process increases from western Alicudi and Filicudi volcanoes, where andesitic magmas are the most evolved magmas, to central Salina and Lipari volcanoes, where rhyolitic magmas are emitted during explosive eruption. Moreover, pulses of magmatic activity would have occurred around 30-40 and 110-120 ka when the four volcanoes

  18. Bio-logic设备优点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 世界第一台数字脑电图是Bio-logic厂家设计并生产 世界第一台数字视频脑电图是Bio-logic厂家设计并生产 在中国市场"癫痫刀"这个概念,也为Bio-logic厂家所推广 在美国市场,脑电图仪器的行业标准是以Bio-logic产品为基准定制的.

  19. Bio-Matematik ved Roskilde Universitet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2010-01-01

    Ved Institut for Natur, Systemer og Modeller ved Roskilde Universitet finder man en velkonsolideret gruppe af forskere, BioMath-gruppen, der beskæftiger sig med Bio-Matematik og Bio-Medicinsk Modellering. Faktisk startede BioMath-gruppen på det tidligere Institut for Studiet af Matematik og Fysik...... pumper; 3) Endokrin fysiologi; 4) Type 1 og type 2 diabetes; 5) Populationsdynamik og sygdomsspredning; og 6) Parameterestimering i patient-specifikke modeller.   Udover overnævnte modelleringsområder har vi ved instituttet en stærk tradition for at beskæftige os med metaaspekter af modellering, f...

  20. Authentifizierung von Bio-Milch im Labor

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In Deutschland ist die Nachfrage nach Bio-Lebensmitteln in den letzten Jahren stetig gestiegen. So erhöhte sich der Absatz von Bio-Trinkmilch in 2007 im Vergleich zum Vorjahr erneut kräftig um 34 Prozent (ZMP, Bonn) und der Bio-Anteil beträgt inzwischen bei Frischmilch knapp elf Prozent. Aufgrund sporadisch resultierender Lieferengpässe bei Bio-Milch sowie der vorhandenen Handelspreisdifferenz besteht zunehmend ein potenzielles Risiko der Falschdeklaration konventionell erzeugter Milch als Bi...

  1. Profitable use of bio fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, Mats [Strateco Develoment AB, Vega (Sweden)], e-mail: mats.e@strateco.se

    2012-11-01

    Traditionally, the transportation industry has been opposed to any new legislation and when rather stringent emission legislation occurred, they objected just as they did when new fuels came on the agenda. On very short notice, Taxi Stockholm lost 20 % of their business when the County decided to award all public transportation contracts to a competitor. It was time to change plans instead of complaining and to take advantage of new opportunities - 'The first mover advantage'. Making the use of bio fuels into a profitable business takes a change of a standard 'business model' to do and there is still much room others to do the same. With a new CEO, an active marketing department and active individuals among the Board of Directors, Taxi Stockholm massaged a strategy where more business and private customers would be attracted by justifying the green leaf on every cab. All initiatives were publically announced and Taxi Stockholm broke new ice by putting a ban on spike tires - a decision which the vice Mayor made part of her ruling for the whole city. The Ban on gasoline and diesel cars were announced and such a statement attracted business from a loyalty point of view and from companies that had a 'Green Transport Policy' to live up to. Taxi Stockholm has seen growth and profitability grow since and credit the green policy on bio fuels such as bio gas and ethanol for most of it. Preem, Stockholm Transit, Volvo and other market driven operators have all seen markets grow from green initiatives.

  2. Promoting Bio-Ethanol in the United States by Incorporating Lessons from Brazil's National Alcohol Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yangbo

    2007-01-01

    Current U.S. energy policy supports increasing the use of bio-ethanol as a gasoline substitute, which Brazil first produced on a large scale in response to the 1970s energy crises. Brazil's National Alcohol Program stood out among its contemporaries regarding its success at displacing a third of Brazil's gasoline requirements, primarily due to…

  3. E-bioética

    OpenAIRE

    López de la Vieja de la Torre, Mª Teresa

    2013-01-01

    In bioethics, the use of new technology facilitates access to information on issues affecting the beginning and end of life, as well as for research. However, the transparency and openness of information does not guarantee the participation and responsibility in decision-making. En Bioética, el uso de las nuevas tecnologías facilita el acceso a información sobre cuestiones que afectan al principio y al fin de la vida, así como a la investigación. Sin embargo, la transparencia y la apertura...

  4. Electric Vehicles - Promoting Fuel Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Danish Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of electric vehicles as energy carrier for renewable energy and fossil fuels, including comparisons with other energy carriers (hydrogen, bio-fuels)......Analysis of electric vehicles as energy carrier for renewable energy and fossil fuels, including comparisons with other energy carriers (hydrogen, bio-fuels)...

  5. A micro-sized bio-solar cell for self-sustaining power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-01-21

    Self-sustainable energy sources are essential for a wide array of wireless applications deployed in remote field locations. Due to their self-assembling and self-repairing properties, "biological solar (bio-solar) cells" are recently gaining attention for those applications. The bio-solar cell can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities under day-night cycles. Despite the vast potential and promise of bio-solar cells, they, however, have not yet successfully been translated into commercial applications, as they possess persistent performance limitations and scale-up bottlenecks. Here, we report an entirely self-sustainable and scalable microliter-sized bio-solar cell with significant power enhancement by maximizing solar energy capture, bacterial attachment, and air bubble volume in well-controlled microchambers. The bio-solar cell has a ~300 μL single chamber defined by laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates and it uses an air cathode to allow freely available oxygen to act as an electron acceptor. We generated a maximum power density of 0.9 mW m(-2) through photosynthetic reactions of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is the highest power density among all micro-sized bio-solar cells.

  6. Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-Oil to Hydrogen Rich Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane-Restrup, Rasmus

    Bio-oil is a liquid produced by pyrolysis of biomass and its main advantage compared with biomass is an up to ten times higher energy density. This entails lower transportation costs associated with the utilization of biomass for production of energy and fuels. Nevertheless, the bio-oil has a low...... heating value and high content of oxygen, which makes it unsuited for direct utilization in engines. One prospective technology for upgrading of bio-oil is steam reforming (SR), which can be used to produce H2 for upgrading of bio-oil through hydrodeoxygenation or synthesis gas for processes like...... the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the SR of bio-oil or biooil model compounds high degrees of conversion and high yields of H2 can be achieved, but stability with time-on-stream is rarely achieved. The deactivation is mainly due to carbon deposition and is one of the major hurdles in the SR of bio-oil...

  7. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential...... as high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...... transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Catalytic testing has been performed using guaiacol in 1-octanol acting as a model compound for bio-oil. Addition of sulphur (0.3 vol% octanethiol) in the feed...

  8. Electrifying white biotechnology: engineering and economic potential of electricity-driven bio-production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Falk; Rosa, Luis F M; Kracke, Frauke; Virdis, Bernardino; Krömer, Jens O

    2015-03-01

    The production of fuels and chemicals by electricity-driven bio-production (i.e., using electric energy to drive biosynthesis) holds great promises. However, this electrification of white biotechnology is particularly challenging to achieve because of the different optimal operating conditions of electrochemical and biochemical reactions. In this article, we address the technical parameters and obstacles to be taken into account when engineering microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) for bio-production. In addition, BES-based bio-production processes reported in the literature are compared against industrial needs showing that a still large gap has to be closed. Finally, the feasibility of BES bio-production is analysed based on bulk electricity prices. Using the example of lysine production from sucrose, we demonstrate that there is a realistic market potential as cost savings of 8.4 % (in EU) and 18.0 % (in US) could be anticipated, if the necessary yields can be obtained.

  9. Recirculation: A New Concept to Drive Innovation in Sustainable Product Design for Bio-Based Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sherwood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bio-based products are made from renewable materials, offering a promising basis for the production of sustainable chemicals, materials, and more complex articles. However, biomass is not a limitless resource or one without environmental and social impacts. Therefore, while it is important to use biomass and grow a bio-based economy, displacing the unsustainable petroleum basis of energy and chemical production, any resource must be used effectively to reduce waste. Standards have been developed to support the bio-based product market in order to achieve this aim. However, the design of bio-based products has not received the same level of attention. Reported here are the first steps towards the development of a framework of understanding which connects product design to resource efficiency. Research and development scientists and engineers are encouraged to think beyond simple functionality and associate value to the potential of materials in their primary use and beyond.

  10. Recirculation: A New Concept to Drive Innovation in Sustainable Product Design for Bio-Based Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James; Clark, James H; Farmer, Thomas J; Herrero-Davila, Lorenzo; Moity, Laurianne

    2016-12-29

    Bio-based products are made from renewable materials, offering a promising basis for the production of sustainable chemicals, materials, and more complex articles. However, biomass is not a limitless resource or one without environmental and social impacts. Therefore, while it is important to use biomass and grow a bio-based economy, displacing the unsustainable petroleum basis of energy and chemical production, any resource must be used effectively to reduce waste. Standards have been developed to support the bio-based product market in order to achieve this aim. However, the design of bio-based products has not received the same level of attention. Reported here are the first steps towards the development of a framework of understanding which connects product design to resource efficiency. Research and development scientists and engineers are encouraged to think beyond simple functionality and associate value to the potential of materials in their primary use and beyond.

  11. Wood to Bio-Methane demonstration project in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meijden, C.M.; Van der Drift, A.; Rietveld, G. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands); Koenemann, J.W. [Dahlman Renewable Technology, P.O. Box 438, 3140 AK Maassluis (Netherlands); Sierhuis, W. [HVCgroup, P.O. Box 9199, 1800 GD, Alkmaar (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) has developed a biomass gasification technology, called the MILENA technology. The Milena gasification technology has a high cold gas efficiency and high methane yield, making it very suitable for gas engine and turbine applications as well as upgrading of the gas into Bio-Methane. An overall efficiency from biomass to power of over 30% is possible, whereas 70% efficiency is achievable from biomass to gas grid quality methane. HVC Group (situated in Alkmaar, North Holland) is a modern public service waste company. HVC converts waste streams which cannot be recycled into usable forms of energy. HVC has a 75 MWth waste wood boiler in operation which produces heat and electricity, and an anaerobic digester which converts domestic fruit, vegetable and garden waste into Bio-Methane. HVC expects an important role for Bio-Methane in the future and HVC has decided to join ECN with the development, demonstration and implementation of the MILENA Bio-Methane technology. Linked to the Bio-Methane demonstration project is the Netherlands Expertise Centre for Biomass Gasification. The MILENA demonstration project and the Gasification Expert Centre are supported by the following companies and organizations: HVC, TAQA, Gasunie, Dahlman, province of North Holland, the Alkmaar municipality and ECN. In 2010 and 2012 extensive lab-scale and pilot scale tests have been executed by ECN and HVC to proof that the gasification and gas cleaning technology is ready for commercial application. The final step in this test program was a duration test in the 800 kWth MILENA pilot plant coupled to the OLGA tar removal unit. The goal was to show high availability. The result of the test was an availability of the gasifier of 96% and an overall availability (including gas cooling and gas cleaning) of 85%. The results of the duration tests convinced HVC and the other partners that the technology is ready for scale-up. The results produced in the

  12. Bio-oil fueled diesel power plant; Biooeljyllae toimiva dieselvoimala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, A. [Modigen Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    The project mission is to develop a diesel power plant which is capable of using liquid bio-oils as the main fuel of the power plant. The applicable bio-oils are rape seed oils and pyrolysis oils. The project was started in 1994 by installing a 1.5 MW Vasa 4L32 engine in VTT Energy laboratory in Otaniemi. During 1995 the first tests with the rape seed oils were made. The tests show that the rape seed oil can be used in Vasa 32 engines without difficulties. In the second phase of the project during 1996 and 1997 pyrolysis oil made of wood will be tested. Finally a diesel power plant concept with integrated pyrolysis oil, electricity and heat production will be developed

  13. Bio-oil fuelled diesel power plant; Biooeljyllae toimiva dieselvoimala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, A. [Modigen Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The project mission is to develop a diesel power plant which is capable of using liquid bio-oils as the main fuel of the power plant. The applicable bio-oils are rape seed oils and pyrolysis oils. The project was started in 1994 by installing a 1.5 MW Vasa 4L32 engine in VTT Energy laboratory in Otaniemi. During 1995 the first tests with the rape seed oils were made. The tests show that the rape seed oil can be used in Vasa 32 engines without difficulties. In the second phase of the project during 1996 pyrolysis oil made of wood was tested. Finally a diesel power plant concept with integrated pyrolysis oil, electricity and heat production will be developed

  14. Bio-oxidation of arsenopyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tao; LI Qian; YANG Yong-bin; LI Guang-hui; QIU Guan-zhou

    2008-01-01

    Oxidation of arsenopyrite with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied.The electrochemical results show that arsenopyrite is firstly oxidized to As2S2 at the potential of 0.2-0.3 V (vs SHE) and As2S2 covers the electrode and retards the process continuously.While at higher potential over 0.3 V (vs SHE),As2S2 is oxidized to H3AsO3,and H3AsO3 is then oxidized to H3AsO4 at 0.8 V (vs SHE).The leaching results show that the addition of FeS2 can promote the oxidation of As3+ to As5+ and increase the activity of the bacteria.The best bio-oxidation technical parameters are the initial pH of 1.8-2.0,particle sizes less than 0.074 mm,temperature in the range of 25-30 ℃ and rotating speed of the orbital incubator of 100-160 r/min.The results provide theoretical and technological supports of bio-oxidation arsenopyrite for pretreating refractory arsenic gold ores.

  15. A terracotta bio-battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Folusho F; Weigele, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Terracotta pots were converted into simple, single chamber, air-cathode bio-batteries. This bio-battery design used a graphite-felt anode and a conductive graphite coating without added catalyst on the exterior as a cathode. Bacteria enriched from river sediment served as the anode catalyst. These batteries gave an average OCV of 0.56 V ± 0.02, a Coulombic efficiency of 21 ± 5%, and a peak power of 1.06 mW ± 0.01(33.13 mW/m(2)). Stable current was also produced when the batteries were operated with hay extract in salt solution. The bacterial community on the anode of the batteries was tested for air tolerance and desiccation resistance over a period ranging from 2 days to 2 weeks. The results showed that the anode community could survive complete drying of the electrolyte for several days. These data support the further development of this technology as a potential power source for LED-based lighting in off-grid, rural communities.

  16. Israel Marine Bio-geographic Database (ISRAMAR-BIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greengrass, Eyal; Krivenko, Yevgeniya; Ozer, Tal; Ben Yosef, Dafna; Tom, Moshe; Gertman, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the space/time variations of species is the basis for any ecological investigations. While historical observations containing integral concentrations of biological parameters (chlorophyll, abundance, biomass…) are organized partly in ISRAMAR Cast Database, the taxon-specific data collected in Israel has not been sufficiently organized. This has been hindered by the lack of standards, variability of methods and complexity of biological data formalization. The ISRAMAR-BIO DB was developed to store various types of historical and future available information related to marine species observations and related metadata. Currently the DB allows to store biological data acquired by the following sampling devices such as: van veer grab, box corer, sampling bottles, nets (plankton, trawls and fish), quadrates, and cameras. The DB's logical unit is information regarding a specimen (taxa name, barcode, image), related attributes (abundance, size, age, contaminants…), habitat description, sampling device and method, time and space of sampling, responsible organization and scientist, source of information (cruise, project and publication). The following standardization of specimen and attributes naming were implemented: Taxonomy according to World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS: http://www.marinespecies.org). Habitat description according to Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS: http://www.cmecscatalog.org) Parameter name; Unit; Device name; Developmental stage; Institution name; Country name; Marine region according to SeaDataNet Vocabularies (http://www.seadatanet.org/Standards-Software/Common-Vocabularies). This system supports two types of data submission procedures, which support the above stated data structure. The first is a downloadable excel file with drop-down fields based on the ISRAMAR-BIO vocabularies. The file is filled and uploaded online by the data contributor. Alternatively, the same dataset can be assembled by

  17. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  18. Biosecurity--The Bio-Link Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elaine A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Bio-Link, the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Center for Biotechnology established with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Reports that Bio-Link, headquartered at City College of San Francisco, has created a national network and resource base for community colleges, industry, and others interested in biotechnology…

  19. Microorganisms interacting in a bio filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba-Avila, M. D.; Flores-Tene, F. J.; Moreno-Terrazas, R.; Ramirez-Lopez, E. M.

    2009-07-01

    Biofilm microorganisms developed on a bio filter support media allow the metabolism of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to carbon dioxide and water. VOCs are present in polluted gaseous streams for varied industrial activities. The main objective of this study was to identify the microorganisms present in the biofilm developed on a bio filter support media using molecular biology techniques. (Author)

  20. 76 FR 53631 - BioPreferred Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... biobased preferred procurement program (one part of the BioPreferred Program) is available on the Internet... reference Amend: to: And adding in its place: Sec. 2904.2, definition of ``Biobased part 2902 part 3201. content''. Sec. 2904.2, definition of part 2902 part 3201. ``BioPreferred Product''. Sec....

  1. Core ethical values: EuropaBio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    EuropaBio, the European Association for BioIndustries, represents 40 companies operating world wide and 14 national association (totaling around 600 small and medium-sized enterprises) involved in the research, development, testing, manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution of biotechnology products and services in the fields of healthcare, agriculture, food and the environment.

  2. 3-D Enzymatic Nanomaterial Architectures for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Logan et al., 2006; Luckarift et al., 2014). Since the chemical energy stored in ubiquitous fuels available in the environment is transformed into...such as enzymatic fuel cells, photo- bio energy harvesting devices, nano-biosensors, bio-actuators and other bio-nano-interfacial architectures is the...fossil fuels dwindling, there is an urgent need to find cheap, renewable, and alternate forms of energy using naturally abundant resources such as

  3. Episodes of aeolian sand movement on a large spit system (Skagen Odde, Denmark) and North Atlantic storminess during the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Hansen, Kristian W. T.;

    2015-01-01

    recognized. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating indicates that aeolian sand movement took place in four phases: around AD 1460, between AD 1730 and 1780, around AD 1870, and since about AD 1935. The first phase of sand movement occurred during cooling in the first part of the Little Ice Age....... A change in the atmospheric circulation, so that both the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) were negative, apparently led to an increased number of intense cyclones causing inland sand movement and dune building. The second and third phase of aeolian sand...... movement during the Little Ice Age also took place in periods of increased storminess, but during these events it appears that negative NAO values were coupled with positive AMO values. The final phase of sand movement is intimately linked to the modern formation of frontal dunes which takes place during...

  4. Records of human occupation from Pleistocene river terrace and aeolian sediments in the Arneiro depression (Lower Tejo River, central eastern Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Pedro P.; Almeida, Nelson A. C.; Aubry, Thierry; Martins, António A.; Murray, Andrew S.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Sohbati, Reza; Raposo, Luis; Rocha, Leonor

    2012-09-01

    In the uppermost reach of the Lower Tejo River (eastern central Portugal), where the river crosses two quartzite ridges that separate the Ródão (upstream) and Arneiro (downstream) depressions, Palaeolithic artefacts have been recovered from three lower river terrace levels and a cover unit of aeolian sands. This paper presents data on the discovery of archaeological artefacts from the terrace levels and the aeolian sands that can be linked to Middle and Upper Palaeolithic industries from new field sites at Tapada do Montinho and Castelejo. The archaeological data when placed in a geomorphological, sedimentary and chronological framework, contribute new information on the understanding of human occupation in western Iberia during cold-climate episodes of the last 62 to 12 ka; and especially during the cooler and driest conditions that occurred between 32 and 12 ka, when the climate favoured aeolian sediment transport. In the Lower Tejo River, the integration of absolute age datasets with archaeological, geomorphological and sedimentary data indicate that in westernmost Iberia the first appearance of artefacts in river terrace sediments suggests that the earliest marker for human occupation dates from the lower Acheulian (Lower Palaeolithic), probably corresponding to an age of ~ 340 ka. Data also suggest, for the first time, that Acheulian lithic industries were replaced by Middle Palaeolithic ones (namely the Levallois stone knapping technique) by ~ 160 ka (~ MIS6). Middle Palaeolithic industries were later replaced by Upper Palaeolithic industries at 32 ka. The post 32 ka period, dominated by aeolian sediment transport, is related to the onset of cold-dry climate conditions which resulted in low river flow discharges, floodplain exposure and reworking by NW winds. This cold-dry period is coeval with the disappearance of Megafauna and associated Neanderthal communities, and the replacement of the Middle Palaeolithic industries by Upper Palaeolithic ones in this

  5. Spatial pattern of grain-size distribution in surface sediments as a result of variations in the aeolian environment in China's Shapotou railway protective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiong; Zhang, Chunlai; Zhou, Na; Ma, Xiaojie

    2011-12-01

    China's Shapotou railway protective system provides effective protection against the region's mobile sands, but little quantitative evidence is available about how it affects the aeolian environment surrounding the railway. In the present study, we analyzed the grain-size distribution in surface sediments as a result of variations in the aeolian environment at different spatial scales: the scale of a cross-section of the protective system along the prevailing wind direction (from the northwest to southeast), of individual stabilized sand dunes in the area protected by straw checkerboards and unirrigated vegetation, of the area around individual plants in the protective system, and of individual straw checkerboards. Surface sediments were sampled to define the spatial pattern of the grain-size distribution at these four scales. Along the transect from the area of mobile dunes through the protective system, sediment particles became finer (silt and clay contents increased) and sorting decreased. This indicated that the protective system is a deposition-dominated aeolian environment, with sediment characteristics stabilizing with increasing distance inside the protected area. In such an environment, dune topographic relief also played an important role in determining the deposition pattern; the dune top is particularly fragile and subject to wind erosion if the straw checkerboards or planted vegetation are destroyed. The influences of the straw checkerboards and the plant canopies on the grain size of the surface sediments within a single checkerboard or near a single plant were limited. However, the combination of straw checkerboards and planted vegetation has synergistically produced a deposition-dominated aeolian environment.

  6. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W; Courtright, Ericha M; Hugenholtz, Ted M; Zobeck, Ted M; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E; Billings, Benjamin J; Boyd, Robert A.; Clingan, Scott D; Cooper, Brad F; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D; Fox, Fred A; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A; Metz, Loretta J; Nearing, Mark A; Norfleet, M Lee; Pierson, Frederick B; Sanderson, Matt A; Sharrat, Brenton S; Steiner, Jean L; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H; Todelo, David; Unnasch, Robert S; Van Pelt, R Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US. In support of Network activities, http://winderosionnetwork.org was developed as a portal for information about the Network, providing site descriptions, measurement protocols, and data visualization tools to facilitate collaboration with scientists and managers interested in the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides a mechanism for engaging national and international partners in a wind erosion research program that addresses the need for improved understanding and prediction of aeolian processes across complex and diverse land use types and management practices.

  7. Characterization of asphalt materials containing bio oil from michigan wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills-Beale, Julian

    oxidation in petroleum-based asphalt increases with increasing bioasphalt modifiers; 4) bioasphalt causes the asphaltene fractions in petroleum-based asphalt to precipitate out of the solvent maltene fractions; 5) there is no definite improvement or decline in the dynamic mix behavior of bio-modified mixes at low temperatures; 6) bio-modified asphalt mixes exhibit better rutting performance than traditional asphalt mixes; 7) bio-modified asphalt mixes have lower susceptibility to moisture damage; 8) more field compaction energy is needed to compact bio-modified mixes.

  8. Catalytic cracking of the top phase fraction of bio-oil into upgraded liquid oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarno, Rochmadi, Mulyono, Panut; Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    The energy consumption is increasing, while oil reserves as a primary energy resource are decreasing, so that is the reason seeking alternative energy source is inevitable. Biomass especially oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) which is abundant in Indonesia can be processed into bio-oil by pyrolysis process. The potential for direct substitution of bio-oil for petroleum may be limited due to the high viscosity, high oxygen content, low heating value, and corrosiveness. Consequently, upgrading of the bio-oil before use is inevitable to give a wider variety of applications of its liquid product. Furthermore, upgrading process to improve the quality of bio-oil by reduction of oxygenates involves process such as catalytic cracking. The objective of this research is to study the effect of operation temperature on yield and composition of upgraded liquid oil and to determine physical properties. Bio-oil derived from EFB was upgraded through catalytic cracking using series tubular reactor under atmospheric pressure on a silica-alumina catalyst. Results show that increasing temperature from 450 to 600 °C, resulting in decreasing of upgraded liquid oil (ULO) yield, decreasing viscosity and density of ULO, but increasing in calorimetric value of ULO. The increasing temperature of cracking also will increase the concentration of gasoline and kerosene in ULO.

  9. Facies control on seismites in an alluvial-aeolian system: The Pliocene dunefield of the Teruel half-graben basin (eastern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesa, Carlos L.; Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; Ezquerro, Lope; Alfaro, Pedro; Rodríguez-Pascua, Miguel Ángel; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Simón, José L.

    2016-10-01

    The recognition of seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS) in sedimentary successions characterized by different facies, and hence by different rheology, is challenging. This is the case for high porosity and high permeability aeolian facies interbedded with muddy wet interdune deposits and alluvial conglomerates and sandstones. Several types of SSDS have been studied in two exposures of the Upper Pliocene (2.9-2.6 Ma) sediments of a fault-bounded intracontinental aeolian dune field in the Teruel Basin (Iberian Chain, eastern Spain). Among SSDS, load and fluid-escape structures, apart from several animal tracks, have been recognized. Those structures show an irregular distribution through the studied stratigraphic sections, being scarce in homogenous aeolian sands and frequent in water-related facies. A detailed study of the distribution and geometry of SSDS and their relationships with respect to the stratigraphic architecture and facies has allowed a critical discrimination of trigger mechanisms, i.e. biological or physical overloading vs. earthquakes. The seismically induced structures are concentrated into seven deformed beds, showing an uneven lateral distribution and geometry closely controlled by the hosting sedimentary facies and their rheology. These seismites resulted from liquefaction during moderate earthquakes (estimated magnitude from 5.0 to 6.8). The most probable seismogenic source was the Sierra del Pobo normal fault zone, located 2 km to the East. Results show how an a