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Sample records for binding-leucine rich repeat-like

  1. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-Binding to Nucleotide-Binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Dixon, C.H.; Gittens, W.H.; Townsend, P.D.; Sharples, G.J.; Pålsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception.

  2. Silencing of a unique integrated domain nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat gene in wheat abolishes Diuraphis noxia resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, Vittorio Filippo; Venter, Eduard

    2018-03-13

    Plants respond in a similar manner to aphid feeding as to pathogen attack. Diuraphis noxia is a specialist aphid, feeding only on selected grasses that include wheat, barley, and oats. The wheat-Diuraphis noxia interaction is characterized by very similar responses as seen in wheat-pathogen interactions with none of the underlying resistance pathways and genes characterized yet. From wheat harboring the Dn1 resistance gene, we have identified a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) gene containing two integrated domains (IDs). These are three C-terminus ankyrin repeat-domains and an N-terminus WRKY domain. The NLR core of the gene can be traced through speciation events within the grass family, with a recent WRKY domain integration that is Triticum specific. Virus induced gene silencing of the gene in a resistant wheat line resulted in the abolishment of the resistance response and induced a highly susceptible phenotype. Silenced plants supported a higher number of aphids similar to the susceptible NIL and the intrinsic rate of increase of the aphids matched that of aphids feeding on the susceptible NIL. The presence of the gene is necessary for Dn1 resistance and we have named the gene Associated with Dn resistance 1 (Adr1) to reflect this function.

  3. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267...

  4. The soybean-Phytophthora resistance locus Rps1-k encompasses coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat-like genes and repetitive sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Madan K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of Rps (resistance to Pytophthora sojae genes have been protecting soybean from the root and stem rot disease caused by the Oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. Five Rps genes were mapped to the Rps1 locus located near the 28 cM map position on molecular linkage group N of the composite genetic soybean map. Among these five genes, Rps1-k was introgressed from the cultivar, Kingwa. Rps1-k has been providing stable and broad-spectrum Phytophthora resistance in the major soybean-producing regions of the United States. Rps1-k has been mapped and isolated. More than one functional Rps1-k gene was identified from the Rps1-k locus. The clustering feature at the Rps1-k locus might have facilitated the expansion of Rps1-k gene numbers and the generation of new recognition specificities. The Rps1-k region was sequenced to understand the possible evolutionary steps that shaped the generation of Phytophthora resistance genes in soybean. Results Here the analyses of sequences of three overlapping BAC clones containing the 184,111 bp Rps1-k region are reported. A shotgun sequencing strategy was applied in sequencing the BAC contig. Sequence analysis predicted a few full-length genes including two Rps1-k genes, Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2. Previously reported Rps1-k-3 from this genomic region 1 was evolved through intramolecular recombination between Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2 in Escherichia coli. The majority of the predicted genes are truncated and therefore most likely they are nonfunctional. A member of a highly abundant retroelement, SIRE1, was identified from the Rps1-k region. The Rps1-k region is primarily composed of repetitive sequences. Sixteen simple repeat and 63 tandem repeat sequences were identified from the locus. Conclusion These data indicate that the Rps1 locus is located in a gene-poor region. The abundance of repetitive sequences in the Rps1-k region suggested that the location of this locus is in or near a heterochromatic region. Poor recombination frequencies combined with presence of two functional Rps genes at this locus has been providing stable Phytophthora resistance in soybean.

  5. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-09

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  7. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  8. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  9. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  10. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  11. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms of haplotype divergence at the RGA08 nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat gene locus in wild banana (Musa balbisiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Miller, Robert N G; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite; MBéguié-A-MBéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2010-07-16

    Comparative sequence analysis of complex loci such as resistance gene analog clusters allows estimating the degree of sequence conservation and mechanisms of divergence at the intraspecies level. In banana (Musa sp.), two diploid wild species Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) contribute to the polyploid genome of many cultivars. The M. balbisiana species is associated with vigour and tolerance to pests and disease and little is known on the genome structure and haplotype diversity within this species. Here, we compare two genomic sequences of 253 and 223 kb corresponding to two haplotypes of the RGA08 resistance gene analog locus in M. balbisiana "Pisang Klutuk Wulung" (PKW). Sequence comparison revealed two regions of contrasting features. The first is a highly colinear gene-rich region where the two haplotypes diverge only by single nucleotide polymorphisms and two repetitive element insertions. The second corresponds to a large cluster of RGA08 genes, with 13 and 18 predicted RGA genes and pseudogenes spread over 131 and 152 kb respectively on each haplotype. The RGA08 cluster is enriched in repetitive element insertions, in duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences including low complexity regions and shows structural variations between haplotypes. Although some allelic relationships are retained, a large diversity of RGA08 genes occurs in this single M. balbisiana genotype, with several RGA08 paralogs specific to each haplotype. The RGA08 gene family has evolved by mechanisms of unequal recombination, intragenic sequence exchange and diversifying selection. An unequal recombination event taking place between duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences resulted in a different RGA08 gene content between haplotypes pointing out the role of such duplicated regions in the evolution of RGA clusters. Based on the synonymous substitution rate in coding sequences, we estimated a 1 million year divergence time for these M. balbisiana haplotypes. A

  14. Mechanisms of haplotype divergence at the RGA08 nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat gene locus in wild banana (Musa balbisiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Robert NG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative sequence analysis of complex loci such as resistance gene analog clusters allows estimating the degree of sequence conservation and mechanisms of divergence at the intraspecies level. In banana (Musa sp., two diploid wild species Musa acuminata (A genome and Musa balbisiana (B genome contribute to the polyploid genome of many cultivars. The M. balbisiana species is associated with vigour and tolerance to pests and disease and little is known on the genome structure and haplotype diversity within this species. Here, we compare two genomic sequences of 253 and 223 kb corresponding to two haplotypes of the RGA08 resistance gene analog locus in M. balbisiana "Pisang Klutuk Wulung" (PKW. Results Sequence comparison revealed two regions of contrasting features. The first is a highly colinear gene-rich region where the two haplotypes diverge only by single nucleotide polymorphisms and two repetitive element insertions. The second corresponds to a large cluster of RGA08 genes, with 13 and 18 predicted RGA genes and pseudogenes spread over 131 and 152 kb respectively on each haplotype. The RGA08 cluster is enriched in repetitive element insertions, in duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences including low complexity regions and shows structural variations between haplotypes. Although some allelic relationships are retained, a large diversity of RGA08 genes occurs in this single M. balbisiana genotype, with several RGA08 paralogs specific to each haplotype. The RGA08 gene family has evolved by mechanisms of unequal recombination, intragenic sequence exchange and diversifying selection. An unequal recombination event taking place between duplicated non-coding intergenic sequences resulted in a different RGA08 gene content between haplotypes pointing out the role of such duplicated regions in the evolution of RGA clusters. Based on the synonymous substitution rate in coding sequences, we estimated a 1 million year

  15. A harpin elicitor induces the expression of a coiled-coil nucleotide binding leucine rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) defense signaling gene and others functioning during defense to parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaafri, Weasam A R; McNeece, Brant T; Lawaju, Bisho R; Sharma, Keshav; Niruala, Prakash M; Pant, Shankar R; Long, David H; Lawrence, Kathy S; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2017-12-01

    The bacterial effector harpin induces the transcription of the Arabidopsis thaliana NON-RACE SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1/HARPIN INDUCED1 (NDR1/HIN1) coiled-coil nucleotide binding leucine rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) defense signaling gene. In Glycine max, Gm-NDR1-1 transcripts have been detected within root cells undergoing a natural resistant reaction to parasitism by the syncytium-forming nematode Heterodera glycines, functioning in the defense response. Expressing Gm-NDR1-1 in Gossypium hirsutum leads to resistance to Meloidogyne incognita parasitism. In experiments presented here, the heterologous expression of Gm-NDR1-1 in G. hirsutum impairs Rotylenchulus reniformis parasitism. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Gm-NDR1-1 expression functions broadly in generating a defense response. To examine a possible relationship with harpin, G. max plants topically treated with harpin result in induction of the transcription of Gm-NDR1-1. The result indicates the topical treatment of plants with harpin, itself, may lead to impaired nematode parasitism. Topical harpin treatments are shown to impair G. max parasitism by H. glycines, M. incognita and R. reniformis and G. hirsutum parasitism by M. incognita and R. reniformis. How harpin could function in defense has been examined in experiments showing it also induces transcription of G. max homologs of the proven defense genes ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1), TGA2, galactinol synthase, reticuline oxidase, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase, alpha soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (α-SNAP) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). In contrast, other defense genes are not directly transcriptionally activated by harpin. The results indicate harpin induces pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) defense processes in the root, activating defense to parasitic nematodes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  16. Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain-CUT Repeat-like Tandem of Special AT-rich Sequence Binding Protein 1 (SATB1) Reveals a Coordinating DNA-binding Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Shuang; Yang, Yin; Su, Xun-Cheng; Shen, Yuequan; Long, Jiafu

    2014-01-01

    SATB1 is essential for T-cell development and growth and metastasis of multitype tumors and acts as a global chromatin organizer and gene expression regulator. The DNA binding ability of SATB1 plays vital roles in its various biological functions. We report the crystal structure of the N-terminal module of SATB1. Interestingly, this module contains a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and a CUT repeat-like (CUTL) domain (ULD-CUTL tandem). Detailed biochemical experiments indicate that the N terminus of SATB1 (residues 1–248, SATB1(1–248)), including the extreme 70 N-terminal amino acids, and the ULD-CUTL tandem bind specifically to DNA targets. Our results show that the DNA binding ability of full-length SATB1 requires the contribution of the CUTL domain, as well as the CUT1-CUT2 tandem domain and the homeodomain. These findings may reveal a multiple-domain-coordinated mechanism whereby SATB1 recognizes DNA targets. PMID:25124042

  17. Crystal structure of the ubiquitin-like domain-CUT repeat-like tandem of special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB1) reveals a coordinating DNA-binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Shuang; Yang, Yin; Su, Xun-Cheng; Shen, Yuequan; Long, Jiafu

    2014-10-03

    SATB1 is essential for T-cell development and growth and metastasis of multitype tumors and acts as a global chromatin organizer and gene expression regulator. The DNA binding ability of SATB1 plays vital roles in its various biological functions. We report the crystal structure of the N-terminal module of SATB1. Interestingly, this module contains a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and a CUT repeat-like (CUTL) domain (ULD-CUTL tandem). Detailed biochemical experiments indicate that the N terminus of SATB1 (residues 1-248, SATB1((1-248))), including the extreme 70 N-terminal amino acids, and the ULD-CUTL tandem bind specifically to DNA targets. Our results show that the DNA binding ability of full-length SATB1 requires the contribution of the CUTL domain, as well as the CUT1-CUT2 tandem domain and the homeodomain. These findings may reveal a multiple-domain-coordinated mechanism whereby SATB1 recognizes DNA targets. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The Potato Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 is a Pathogen Dependent DNA-Deforming Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Townsend, P.D.; Dixon, C.H.; Spies, G.B.; Campillo, A.S.E.; Slootweg, E.J.; Westerhof, L.B.; Gawehns, F.K.K.; Knight, M.R.; Sharples, G.J.; Goverse, A.; Palsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant NLR proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus, however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously we noted a structural homology between the NB domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1

  19. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basini, G.; De Pascale, M.P.; Golden, R.L.; Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M.

    1995-01-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight

  20. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  1. Developments on RICH detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.

    1996-01-01

    The RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which is dedicated to Cherenkov radiation detection is described. An improvement made by replacing photo sensible vapor with solid photocathode is studied. A RICH detector prototype with a CsI photocathode has been built in Saclay and used with Saturne. The first results are presented. (A.C.)

  2. Kings Today, Rich Tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattoum, Asma

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the King vs. Rich dilemma that founder-CEOs face at IPO. When undertaking IPO, founders face two options. They can either get rich, but then run the risk of losing the control over their firms; or they can remain kings by introducing defensive mechanisms, but this is likel...

  3. Rich Design Research Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Sevaldson

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces and discusses a Rich Research Space as an inclusive methodological framework and scaffold for research-by-design. The Rich Research Space especially addresses the issue of richness in design processes and design-led research. There is a general trend towards increased complexity in design processes, caused on one hand by the increasing depth and width in the use of design media and methods, and on the other hand by the increasing complexity and interdependency of society due to globalisation. These issues confront the designer-researcher with new challenges. This paper formulates a research strategy for research-by-design in fields that have a high degree of richness in the use of media, the amount of information, and the methods involved. The Rich Research Space concept proposed takes into account the physical, social, and cultural spaces, and the virtual and visual media spaces in which the research-by-design takes place. The concept takes the form of a specific integral approach to design, and a holistic theoretical mindset. It embraces many types of investigation, from analytical to intuitive. The Rich Research Space provides a flexible framework within which the complexity of research-by-design can be interrelated, discussed, and reflected upon. Potentially, it can create a more involved role for the designer-researcher, a role that allows contributions towards the resolution of ever more pressing issues in our society. This approach is currently one of a limited number of possible frameworks that the design professions can utilize in order to make a difference in a world of at times overwhelming complexity. The concept of the Rich Research Space is discussed with reference to an art installation called Barely.Keywords: Research by design, collaborative design, complexity, creativity, research methods.

  4. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  5. Kings Today, Rich Tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattoum, Asma

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the King vs. Rich dilemma that founder-CEOs face at IPO. When undertaking IPO, founders face two options. They can either get rich, but then run the risk of losing the control over their firms; or they can remain kings by introducing defensive mechanisms, but this is likely...... to lead to lower IPO valuation. Using psychological ownership theory, we argue founder-CEOs to be more likely to choose the King option. This option forces them to leave money on the table at the IPO. However, their stewardship behavior allows them to recover that money on the long-run post IPO. We...... provide support for all hypotheses using a unique hand-collected dataset covering the full population of 467 IPOs undertaken in France between 1992 and 2011....

  6. Get rich blogging

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    The Sunday Mirror's former showbiz gossip columnist, Zoe Griffin, explains how she quit her job and started a blog in order to work less and earn more. In this book she explains how to Get Rich Blogging and how she has done just that with her Live Like A VIP blog ? which generates a six figure income. There is no need to be a technical wizard. All you need is this book, a laptop and internet access and you too could be blogging your way to wealth and happiness. Contributors include The Clothes Whisperer, The Fashion Editor at Large, Mumsnet, Tech Week, Music News and Mr Porter ? all finan

  7. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  8. Information rich display design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robin; Braseth, Alf Ove; Veland, Oeystein

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the concept Information Rich Displays. The purpose of Information Rich Displays (IRDs) is to condensate prevailing information in process displays in such a way that each display format (picture) contains more relevant information for the user. Compared to traditional process control displays, this new concept allows the operator to attain key information at a glance and at the same time allows for improved monitoring of larger portions of the process. This again allows for reduced navigation between both process and trend displays and ease the cognitive demand on the operator. This concept has been created while working on designing display prototypes for the offshore petroleum production facilities of tomorrow. Offshore installations basically consist of wells, separation trains (where oil, gas and water are separated from each other), an oil tax measurement system (where oil quality is measured and the pressure increased to allow for export), gas compression (compression of gas for export) and utility systems (water treatment, chemical systems etc.). This means that an offshore control room operator has to deal with a complex process that comprises several functionally different systems. The need for a new approach to offshore display format design is in particular based on shortcomings in today's designs related to the keyhole effect, where the display format only reveals a fraction of the whole process. Furthermore, the upcoming introduction of larger off- and on-shore operation centres will increase the size and complexity of the operators' work domain. In the light of the increased demands on the operator, the proposed IRDs aim to counter the negative effects this may have on the workload. In this work we have attempted to classify the wide range of different roles an operator can have in different situations. The information content and amount being presented to the operator in a display should be viewed in context of the roles the

  9. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey; /Chicago U.; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  10. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  11. The STAR-RICH Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasiuk, B; Braem, André; Cozza, D; Davenport, M; De Cataldo, G; Dell'Olio, L; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Dunlop, J C; Finch, E; Fraissard, Daniel; Franco, A; Gans, J; Ghidini, B; Harris, J W; Horsley, M; Kunde, G J; Lasiuk, B; Lesenechal, Y; Majka, R D; Martinengo, P; Morsch, Andreas; Nappi, E; Paic, G; Piuz, François; Posa, F; Raynaud, J; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Satinover, J; Schyns, E M; Smirnov, N; Van Beelen, J; Williams, T D; Xu, Z

    2002-01-01

    The STAR-RICH detector extends the particle idenfication capabilities of the STAR spectrometer for charged hadrons at mid-rapidity. It allows identification of pions and kaons up to ~3 GeV/c and protons up to ~5 GeV/c. The characteristics and performance of the device in the inaugural RHIC run are described.

  12. (Hochst ex A. Rich.) Harms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: Phytochemical investigations carried out on the seeds of Sphenostylis stenocarpa (Hochst ex A. Rich.) Harms (Family Fabaceae) revealed the presence of the flavonoids (tricin, apigenin, chrysoeriol and genisten), tannin and alkaloids. The three putative varieties previously separated on the basis of seed ...

  13. The HERA-B RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Korpar, S; Atiya, M; Broemmelsiek, D R; Carvalho, J; Dujmic, D; Eckmann, R; Garrido, L; Gorisek, A; Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Ispirian, M; Karabekian, S I; Krizan, P; Lau, K; Maas, P; McGill, J; Miquel, R; Pestotnik, R; Pyrlik, J; Ramachadran, D; Reeves, K; Rosen, J; Schwitters, Roy F; Staric, M; Stanovnik, A; Skrk, D

    1999-01-01

    The essential components of the ring imaging Cherenkov detector for the HERA-B experiment are briefly described. Results of the first test measurements with the HERA proton beam are presented and the capability of the RICH to identify kaons is estimated.

  14. Tryptophan-Rich and Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awdhesh Kumar Mishra

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing emergence of drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, there is a world-wide quest to develop new-generation antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are small peptides with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses and sometimes exhibit cytotoxic activity toward cancer cells. As a part of the native host defense system, most AMPs target the membrane integrity of the microorganism, leading to cell death by lysis. These membrane lytic effects are often toxic to mammalian cells and restrict their systemic application. However, AMPs containing predominantly either tryptophan or proline can kill microorganisms by targeting intracellular pathways and are therefore a promising source of next-generation antibiotics. A minimum length of six amino acids is required for high antimicrobial activity in tryptophan-rich AMPs and the position of these residues also affects their antimicrobial activity. The aromatic side chain of tryptophan is able to rapidly form hydrogen bonds with membrane bilayer components. Proline-rich AMPs interact with the 70S ribosome and disrupt protein synthesis. In addition, they can also target the heat shock protein in target pathogens, and consequently lead to protein misfolding. In this review, we will focus on describing the structures, sources, and mechanisms of action of the aforementioned AMPs.

  15. Conservation and Biodiversity of Rich Fens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel

    2014-01-01

    Rich fen is a habitat type dependent on a constant supply of nutrient poor, calcium rich groundwater. A high, stable groundwater table, relatively high pH combined with nutrient poor conditions support a special and very species rich vegetation including many rare and threatened plant species. In...

  16. The leucine-rich repeat structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, J; Hindle, K L; McEwan, P A; Lovell, S C

    2008-08-01

    The leucine-rich repeat is a widespread structural motif of 20-30 amino acids with a characteristic repetitive sequence pattern rich in leucines. Leucine-rich repeat domains are built from tandems of two or more repeats and form curved solenoid structures that are particularly suitable for protein-protein interactions. Thousands of protein sequences containing leucine-rich repeats have been identified by automatic annotation methods. Three-dimensional structures of leucine-rich repeat domains determined to date reveal a degree of structural variability that translates into the considerable functional versatility of this protein superfamily. As the essential structural principles become well established, the leucine-rich repeat architecture is emerging as an attractive framework for structural prediction and protein engineering. This review presents an update of the current understanding of leucine-rich repeat structure at the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary levels and discusses specific examples from recently determined three-dimensional structures.

  17. SOFTWARE SUPPORT FOR RICH PICTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    Rich pictures (RP) are common in object-oriented analysis and design courses, but students seem to have problems in integrating them in their projects' workflow. A new software tool is being developed, specific for RP authoring. To better understand students' issues and working practice with RP......, and gather requirements for the tool, we followed a user-centered design approach and performed a usability test with an early prototype. The findings suggest the presence of a gap between some of the modern object-oriented development practices and engineering students' values: some techniques, like RP......, presuppose design skills that are alien to our students. To bridge this gap our tool aims at making design-specific skills optional, enhancing the conceptual analytical skills that software analysis shares with design. Further studies will be conducted to assess the impact of the tool on learning....

  18. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Koester, B.P.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Rozo, E.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Evrard, A.E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Hansen, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Hao, J.; /Fermilab; Johnston, D.E.; /Fermilab; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  19. Adaptive and Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we present the client-side approach of Adaptive and Reactive Rich Internet Applications as the main result of our research into how to bring in time adaptivity to Rich Internet Applications. Our approach leverages previous work on adaptive hypermedia, event processing and other research disciplines. We present a holistic framework covering the design-time as well as the runtime aspects of Adaptive and Reactive Rich Internet Applications focusing especially on the run-time aspects.

  20. Conservation and Biodiversity of Rich Fens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel

    2014-01-01

    Rich fen is a habitat type dependent on a constant supply of nutrient poor, calcium rich groundwater. A high, stable groundwater table, relatively high pH combined with nutrient poor conditions support a special and very species rich vegetation including many rare and threatened plant species...... of the importance of environmental conditions for the number of typical rich fen species, the species composition within a distinct taxonomic group (the mosses) and for single species (the Fen orchid, Liparis loeselii). In conclusion, especially parameters related to nutrient availability and hydrology are found...

  1. LHCb RICH1 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, N; Metlica, F; Muir, A; Phillips, A; Buckley, A; Gibson, V; Harrison, K; Jones, C R; Katvars, S G; Lazzeroni, C; Storey, J; Ward, CP; Wotton, S; Alemi, M; Arnabaldi, C; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Negri, P; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Chamonal, R; Eisenhardt, S; Lawrence, J; McCarron, J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Walker, A; Cuneo, S; Fontanelli, F; Gracco, Valerio; Mini, G; Musico, P; Petrolini, A; Sannino, M; Bates, A; MacGregor, A; O'Shea, V; Parkes, C; Paterson, S; Petrie, D; Pickford, A; Rahman, M; Soler, F; Allebone, L; Barber, J H; Cameron, W; Clark, D; Dornan, Peter John; Duane, A; Egede, U; Hallam, R; Howard, A; Plackett, R; Price, D; Savidge, T; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Websdale, D M; Adinolfi, M; Bibby, J H; Cioffi, C; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Harnew, N; Harris, F; McArthur, I A; Newby, C; Ottewell, B; Rademacker, J; Senanayake, R; Somerville, L P; Soroko, A; Smale, N J; Topp-Jørgensen, S; Wilkinson, G; Yang, S; Benayoun, M; Khmelnikov, V A; Obraztsov, V F; Densham, C J; Easo, S; Franek, B; Kuznetsov, G; Loveridge, P W; Morrow, D; Morris, JV; Papanestis, A; Patrick, G N; Woodward, M L; Aglieri-Rinella, G; Albrecht, A; Braem, André; Campbell, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Forty, R W; Frei, C; Gys, Thierry; Jamet, O; Kanaya, N; Losasso, M; Moritz, M; Patel, M; Piedigrossi, D; Snoeys, W; Ullaland, O; Van Lysebetten, A; Wyllie, K

    2005-01-01

    This document describes the concepts of the engineering design to be adopted for the upstream Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH1) of the reoptimized LHCb detector. Our aim is to ensure that coherent solutions for the engineering design and integration for all components of RICH1 are available, before proceeding with the detailed design of these components.

  2. Particle Identification with the LHCb RICH System

    CERN Document Server

    Harnew, Neville

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system to provide particle identification over the momentum range 2-100 GeV/c. Two RICH detectors are employed. The upstream detector, RICH1, utilizes both aerogel and C$_4$F$_{10}$ gas radiators whilst the downstream RICH2 uses a CF$_4$ gas radiator. The RICH2 detector has been fabricated and is installed in the LHCb interaction region; RICH1 has a programme of phased design and construction. Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders to allow operation in magnetic fields up to 50mT. The performance of pre-series HPDs and the results obtained from a particle test beam using the full LHCb readout chain is presented. The production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has recently commenced. The expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from real...

  3. Particle identification with the LHCb RICH system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, Neville

    2006-07-01

    The LHCb experiment uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system to provide particle identification over the momentum range 2- 100 GeV/c. Two RICH detectors are employed. The upstream detector, RICH 1, utilizes both aerogel and C4F10 gas radiators whilst the downstream RICH 2 uses a CF4 gas radiator. The RICH 2 detector has been fabricated and is installed in the LHCb interaction region; RICH 1 has a programme of phased design and construction. Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders to allow operation in magnetic fields up to 50 mT. The performance of pre-series HPDs and the results obtained from a particle test beam using the full LHCb readout chain is presented. The production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has recently commenced. The expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from realistic simulation, is described.

  4. Dissociation Dynamics of Nitrogen Rich Cyclic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    Arlington, VA 2220 Abstract The photophysics and photochemistry of the nitrogen-rich compounds diazomethane and diazirine were studied both...experimentally and theoretically following excitation in the ultraviolet . These molecules are locally stable on their ground potential energy surfaces, but they...ABSTRACT The photophysics and photochemistry of the nitrogen-rich compounds diazomethane and diazirine were studied both experimentally and

  5. Platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, M; Karkos, P D; Markou, K; Grigoriadis, N

    2016-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a novel material that is being used more frequently in many surgical specialties. A literature review on the current and potential uses of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology was performed. There is limited evidence on the use of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology compared with other specialties: only 11 studies on various subspecialties (otology, rhinology and laryngology) were included in the final review. Based on the limited number of studies, we cannot draw safe conclusions about the value of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology. Nevertheless, the available literature suggests that platelet-rich plasma holds promise for future research and may have a number of clinical applications.

  6. Tree species richness of upper Amazonian forests

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, Alwyn H.

    1988-01-01

    Upper Amazonian data for tree species richness in 1-hectare plots are reported. All plants ≥10 cm diameter were censused and identified in six plots in Amazonian Peru and one on the Venezuela-Brazil border. The two plots from the everwet forests near Iquitos, Peru, are the most species-rich in the world, with ≈300 species ≥10 cm diameter in single hectares; all of the Peruvian plots are among the most species-rich ever reported. Contrary to accepted opinion, upper Amazonian forest, and perhap...

  7. Firm size diversity, functional richness, and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, Craig R.; Mittelstaedt, J.D.; Stow, C.A.; Ward, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies recent advances in ecology to our understanding of firm development, sustainability, and economic development. The ecological literature indicates that the greater the functional richness of species in a system, the greater its resilience - that is, its ability to persist in the face of substantial changes in the environment. This paper focuses on the effects of functional richness across firm size on the ability of industries to survive in the face of economic change. Our results indicate that industries with a richness of industrial functions are more resilient to employment volatility. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

  8. Evaluating Media Richness in Organizational Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evaluating Media Richness in Organizational Learning is an essential reference source for the latest scholarly research on the application of computational tools for knowledge management frameworks and strategies in organizations. Featuring a broad range of coverage on topics and perspectives...

  9. Species richness, area and climate correlates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogues, David Bravo; Bastos Araujo, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Aim Species richness-area theory predicts that more species should be found if one samples a larger area. To avoid biases from comparing species richness in areas of very different sizes, area is often controlled by counting the numbers of co-occupying species in near-equal area grid cells...... affects: (1) the selection of climate variables entering a species richness model; and (2) the accuracy of models in predicting species richness in unsampled grid cells. Location Western Europe. Methods Models are developed for European plant, breeding bird, mammal and herptile species richness using...... seven climate variables. Generalized additive models are used to relate species richness, climate and area. Results We found that variation in the grid cell area was large (50 × 50 km: 8-3311 km2; 220 × 220: 193-55,100 km2), but this did not affect the selection of variables in the models. Similarly...

  10. One for all: the receptor-associated kinase BAK1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinchilla, D.; Shan, L.; He, P.; Vries, de S.C.; Kemmerling, B.

    2009-01-01

    The plant receptor kinase BAK1/SERK3 has been identified as a partner of ligand-binding leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, in particular the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 and the immune receptor FLS2. BAK1 positively regulates BRI1 receptor function via physical interaction and

  11. Immune activation mediated by the late blight resistance protein R1 requires nuclear localization of R1 and the effector AVR1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Yu; Berg, Jeroen; Govers, Francine; Bouwmeester, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Resistance against oomycete pathogens is mainly governed by intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors that recognize matching avirulence (AVR) proteins from the pathogen, RXLR effectors that are delivered inside host cells. Detailed molecular understanding of how and where

  12. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  13. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases Pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Cagri A; Ertas, Nilgun Markal

    2017-11-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous solution of plasma containing 4 to 7 times the baseline concentration of human platelets. Platelet-rich plasma has been widely popular in facial rejuvenation to attenuate wrinkles and has been practically used. The authors have been encountering various patients of increased hiperpigmentation following PRP applications that were performed to attenuate the postinflammatory hiperpigmentation especially after laser treatment. The authors have been using PRP for facial rejuvenation in selected patients and in 1 patient the authors have encountered increased pigmentation over the pigmented skin lesions that were present before the application. The authors recommend that the PRP might increase pigmentation especially in the face region and precautions might be taken before and after the application. Platelet-rich plasma should not be used for the treatment of post inflammatory hiperpigmentation.

  14. Origin of the latitudinal richness gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engemann, Kristine; Sandel, Brody Steven; Enquist, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    predictions for the phylogenetic structure of communities. We test these hypotheses by comparing centers of species richness and phylogenetic clustering for vascular plants in the New World. Range maps for 88,417 plant species were extracted from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN) database...... and combined with the BIEN mega phylogeny of >80,000 species. We calculated the Phylogenetic Diversity Index (PDI) and Net Relatedness Index (NRI) for each cell in a 100×100 km grid using a new computationally efficient algorithm. Species richness patterns were compared to patterns of PDI and NRI. We found...... that, for all vascular plants, high species richness is associated with high phylogenetic clustering, supporting a “cradle” model of biodiversity hotspots. However, there is marked variation across plant families, which may be explained by variation in lifespans and growth forms....

  15. Fast Photon Detection for COMPASS RICH1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dibiase, N; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Diaz, V; Duic, v; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Pagano, P; Paul, S; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Rocco, E; Robinet, F; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Steiger, L; Sozzi, F; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2006-01-01

    The new photon detection system for COMPASS RICH-1 has been designed to cope with the demanding requests of operation at high beam intensity and at high trigger rates. The detection technique in the central region of RICH-1 has been changed with a system based on multianode photomultipliers coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and to a fast, almost dead time free readout system based on the MAD-4 amplifier-discriminator and the F1 TDC-chip. The new photon detection system design and construction are described, as well as its first response in the experiment.

  16. Experiments with neutron-rich isomeric beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Lewitowicz, M.; Pfuetzner, M.

    1998-01-01

    A review of experimental results obtained on microsecond-isomeric states in neutron-rich nuclei produced in fragmentation reactions and studied with SISSI-Alpha-LISE3 spectrometer system at GANIL Caen is given. The perspectives of experiments based on secondary reactions with isomeric beams are presented

  17. Origin of the latitudinal richness gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engemann, Kristine; Sandel, Brody Steven; Enquist, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    and combined with the BIEN mega phylogeny of >80,000 species. We calculated the Phylogenetic Diversity Index (PDI) and Net Relatedness Index (NRI) for each cell in a 100×100 km grid using a new computationally efficient algorithm. Species richness patterns were compared to patterns of PDI and NRI. We found...

  18. Proximity focusing RICH with TOF capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpar, S.; Adachi, I.; Fujita, K.; Fukushima, T.; Gorisek, A.; Hayashi, D.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawai, H.; Kozakai, Y.; Krizan, P.; Kuratani, A.; Mazuka, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Seki, T.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Unno, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A proximity focusing RICH counter with a multi-channel micro-channel plate (MCP) PMT was tested as a time-of-flight counter. Cherenkov photons emitted in the radiator medium as well as in the entrance window of the PMT were used for the time-of-flight measurement, and an excellent performance of the counter could be demonstrated

  19. Power Divider for Waveforms Rich in Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert, III

    2005-01-01

    A method for dividing the power of an electronic signal rich in harmonics involves the use of an improved divider topology. A divider designed with this topology could be used, for example, to propagate a square-wave signal in an amplifier designed with a push-pull configuration to enable the generation of more power than could be generated in another configuration.

  20. Leveraging data rich environments using marketing analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtrop, Niels

    2017-01-01

    With the onset of what is popularly known as “big data”, increased attention is being paid to creating value from these data rich environments. Within the field of marketing, the analysis of customer and market data supported by models is known as marketing analytics. The goal of these analyses is

  1. PREPARATION OF NOVOLACS USING PHENOLIC RICH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. The possibility of using phenolic rich components (water insoluble fraction) from biomass pyrolysis oil as partial substitute of phenol in synthesis of high-ortho phenolic novolac under the catalyst of. HCl/Zn(AC)2 has been proved using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transformed infrared.

  2. The HADES-RICH upgrade using Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs with DiRICH FEE + Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V.; Traxler, M.

    2018-03-01

    The High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) is operational since the year 2000 and uses a hadron blind RICH detector for electron identification. The RICH photon detector is currently replaced by Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs with a readout system based on the DiRICH front-end module. The electronic readout chain is being developed as a joint effort of the HADES-, CBM- and PANDA collaborations and will also be used in the photon detectors for the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) and PANDA experiments at FAIR . This article gives a brief overview on the photomultipliers and their quality assurance test measurements, as well as first measurements of the new DiRICH front-end module in final configurations.

  3. Development of the RICH detectors in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Easo, S

    2003-01-01

    For particle identification, LHCb plans to use two RICH detectors, one covering the charged particle momentum range 1-65 GeV/c using aerogel and C//4F//1//0 radiators and the other covering up to 150 Ge V/c using CF//4 radiator. Hybrid photo diodes (HPD) with 80 mm photocathode diameter are being developed to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs encapsulate silicon pixel anodes bump bonded to binary readout chips processed using 0.25 mum CMOS technology. Results obtained with prototype radiators and HPDs in test beams will be presented and the design and development of these RICH detectors will be reviewed.

  4. RICH upgrade: Current status and future perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Pistone, A

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The second long shutdown of the LHC is currently scheduled to begin in 2018. During this period the LHCb experiment with all its sub-detectors will be upgraded in order to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2×10$^{33}$ cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$ and to read out data at a rate of 40MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) system will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream detector. Tests of the prototype of the smallest constituent of the new RICH system have been performed during testbeam sessions at the Test Beam Facility SPS North Area (CERN) in Autumn 2014.

  5. The RICH detector of the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Patel, V.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Schetinin, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2017-12-01

    The CBM-RICH detector is designed to identify electrons with momenta up to 8 GeV/c and high purity as this is essential for the CBM physics program. The detector consist of a CO2-gaseous radiator, a spherical mirror system, and Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMT) of type H12700 from Hamamatsu as photon detectors. The detector concept was verified through R&D studies and a laterally scaled prototype. The results were summarized in a TDR, in which open issues were defined concerning the readout electronics, the shielding of the magnetic stray field in the MAPMT region, the radiation hardness of the MAPMT sensors, and the mechanical holding structure of the mirror system. In this article an overview is given on the CBM RICH development with focus on those open issues.

  6. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  7. The COMPASS RICH-1 detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, F; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schröder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2008-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN provides hadron identification in a wide momentum range employing a large size gaseous Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). The presence of large uncorrelated background in the COMPASS environment was limiting the efficiency of COMPASS RICH-1 in the very forward regime. A major upgrade of RICH-1 required a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several 10$^{6}$/s per channel in the central detector part, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors of the central region have been replaced with a fast photon detection system described here, while, in the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photo-cathodes have been equipped with a new read-out system based on APV preamplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new system consists of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes, and fast read-out electr...

  8. The COMPASS RICH-1 detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colantoni, M.L.; Panzieri, D.; Joosten, R.; Naehle, O.; Kolosov, V.N.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Schroeder, W.; Teufel, A.; Fischer, H.; Hagemann, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Konigsmann, K.; Mutter, A.; Nerling, F.; Schill, C.; Wollny, H.; Kramer, D.; Polak, J.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Silva, L.; Von Harrach, D.; Angerer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.; Paul, S.; Finger, M.; Finger, M. Jr.; Slunecka, M.; Steiger, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M. Jr.; Slunecka, M.; Steiger, L.; Abbon, P.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Kunne, F.; Magnon, A.; Neyret, D.; Panebianco, S.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Alekseev, M.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Costa, S.; Dibiase, N.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Maggiora, A.; Alekseev, M.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Costa, S.; Dibiase, N.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Maggiora, A.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Ciliberti, P.; Torre, S. Dalla; Diaz, V.; Duic, V.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Pagano, P.; Pesaro, G.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Sozzi, F.; Tessarotto, F.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Ciliberti, P.; Torre, S. Dalla; Diaz, V.; Duic, V.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Pagano, P.; Pesaro, G.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Sozzi, F.; Tessarotto, F.

    2008-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN provides hadron identification in a wide momentum range employing a large size gaseous Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH). The presence of large uncorrelated background in the COMPASS environment was limiting the efficiency of COMPASS RICH-1 in the very forward regime. A major upgrade of RICH-1 required a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several 10 6 /s per channel in the central detector part, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors of the central region have been replaced with a fast photon detection system described here, while, in the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photo-cathodes have been equipped with a new read-out system based on APV preamplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new system consists of multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes, and fast read-out electronics based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator and the dead-time free F1 TDC chip. The project was completely designed and implemented in less than two years: The upgraded detector is in operation since the 2006 CERN SPS run. We present the photon detection design, constructive aspects and test studies to characterise the single photon response of the MAPMTs coupled to the read-out system as well as the detector performance based on the 2006 data. (authors)

  9. Reconstruction and calibration strategies for the LHCb RICH detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    - LHCb particle identification - LHCb ring pattern recognition algorithm requirements - RICH pattern recognition - Cherenkov angle reconstruction online - Online PID - Hough transform - Metropolis- Hastings Markov chains - PID online: physics performances - Rich PID Callibration

  10. UStore: A Distributed Storage With Rich Semantics

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Anh; Wang, Ji; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Gang; Chin, Wei-Ngan; Lin, Qian; Ooi, Beng Chin; Ruan, Pingcheng; Tan, Kian-Lee; Xie, Zhongle; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Meihui

    2017-01-01

    Today's storage systems expose abstractions which are either too low-level (e.g., key-value store, raw-block store) that they require developers to re-invent the wheels, or too high-level (e.g., relational databases, Git) that they lack generality to support many classes of applications. In this work, we propose and implement a general distributed data storage system, called UStore, which has rich semantics. UStore delivers three key properties, namely immutability, sharing and security, whic...

  11. Mars: A water-rich planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    Good geomorphic evidence is presented for a planet that was once water rich, and that a lower limit on the amount of water available for a given Martian watershed may be estimated by assuming that the volume of material eroded was equal to the volume of water available. This estimate, coupled with high latitude water estimates of 50 to 100 m gives a global inventory of about 500 m total water in the subsurface. It was emphasized that this is a lower limit as considerable water may be bound in weathered debris and in primary minerals.

  12. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  13. How countries become rich and reduce poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    For the sake of less developed countries, it is time to adjust the discussion of international development assistance on poverty reduction. This article attempts to do so by reviewing new and old literature explaining why some countries are rich and others are poor. History has repeatedly shown...... that building up capabilities in manufacturing and improving the productivity of agriculture are the keys to wealth creation and long-term sustained poverty reduction. Furthermore, industrialisation and increased agricultural productivity are interdependent processes. Discussion about ending world poverty needs...

  14. ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Zedde

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is currently one of the most frequent injuries in athletes. Such rupture may be caused by a sudden dorsiflexion of the ankle, pushing off with the weight bearing forefoot while extending the knee or violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot. The treatment goal consists of restoring the normal tendon length and tension, as well as the function and strength of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. The biological repair process can be enhanced in all stages of recovery with the use of PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma without any side effects.

  15. Un contenu riche et diversifié

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Cloutier

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bonjour,Nous sommes très heureux de vous convier à lire ce nouveau numéro de notre revue. Son contenu est riche et diversifié. Plusieurs thèmes sont abordés : la santé et la sécurité du travail dans les petites entreprises, l’autoévaluation du stress au travail, une démarche ergonomique de transformation du contexte d’intervention, les risques routiers professionnels des conducteurs de travaux, un outil de gestion du sommeil, ainsi que les facteurs socioculturels et TMS. En premier lieu, un a...

  16. HTML5 Designing Rich Internet Applications

    CERN Document Server

    David, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Implement the powerful new multimedia and interactive capabilities offered by HTML5, including style control tools, illustration tools, video, audio, and rich media solutions. Understand how HTML5 is changing the Web development game with this full-color, project-based treatment that shows you-not just tells you-what HTML5 can do for your Web sites. Reinforce your practical understanding of the new standard with demo applications and tutorials, so that execution is one short step away. The companion website, visualizetheweb.com, is packed full of extra information, online code libraries, and

  17. COMPASS mirror wall of RICH 1

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment uses ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters to identify particles produced in high-energy muon collisions, to better understand the spin structure of the nucleon. Charged particles moving faster than the speed of light in the medium through which they are travelling emit a cone of Cherenkov radiation in the direction of their motion. The light in this cone is reflected from these mirrors onto a photo detector so that the size of the cone can be measured, which gives the energy of the particle.

  18. Modeling a neutron rich nuclei source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.; Bajeat, O.; Clapier, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Mueller, A.C.; Pauwels, N.; Proust, J.; Mirea, M.

    2000-01-01

    The deuteron break-up process in a suitable converter gives rise to intense neutron beams. A source of neutron rich nuclei based on the neutron induced fission can be realised using these beams. A theoretical optimization of such a facility as a function of the incident deuteron energy is reported. The model used to determine the fission products takes into account the excitation energy of the target nucleus and the evaporation of prompt neutrons. Results are presented in connection with a converter-target specific geometry. (authors)

  19. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  20. Mars: a water-rich planet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Good geomorphic evidence is presented for a planet that was once water rich, and that a lower limit on the amount of water available for a given Martian watershed may be estimated by assuming that the volume of material eroded was equal to the volume of water available. This estimate, coupled with high latitude water estimates of 50 to 100 m gives a global inventory of about 500 m total water in the subsurface. It was emphasized that this is a lower limit as considerable water may be bound in weathered debris and in primary minerals

  1. Development of a Rich Picture editor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    rich picture practice into software proved difficult, therefore, we decided to follow a user-centered approach: design and implement a prototype with basic functionalities, then run a usability test with a few students and professionals. The feedback collected in the test validated our hypothesis circa...... us in the design of the tool next version. At a more general level we realized that modern object-oriented development methodologies, such as agile methods, are informed by design, hence they sometimes assume design skills that programmers do not have or do not value....

  2. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Warsaw Univ.

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today's nuclear science is the ''journey to the limits'': of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective

  3. Domain walls collision in Fe-rich and Co-rich glass covered microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the investigation of domain walls propagation in Fe-rich and Co-rich microwires performed using Sixtus-Tonks and magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques. It was found that under certain experimental conditions we are able to create the regime of the motion of two domain walls moving to opposite directions which terminates by the collision of the domain walls. Also the domain walls collision was visualized using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope when the surface giant Barkhausen jump induced by circular magnetic field has been observed.

  4. Sports medicine applications of platelet rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Allan; Harmon, Kimberly; Woodall, James; Vieira, Amy

    2012-06-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a powerful new biologic tool in sports medicine. PRP is a fraction of autologous whole blood containing and increased number of platelets and a wide variety of cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-B1), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) among many others. Worldwide interest in this biologic technology has recently risen sharply. Basic science and preclinical data support the use of PRP for a variety of sports related injuries and disorders. The published, peer reviewed, human data on PRP is limited. Although the scientific evaluation of clinical efficacy is in the early stages, elite and recreational athletes already use PRP in the treatment of sports related injuries. Many questions remain to be answered regarding the use of PRP including optimal formulation, including of leukocytes, dosage and rehabilitation protocols. In this review, a classification for platelet rich plasma is proposed and the in-vitro, preclinical and human investigations of PRP applications in sports medicine will be reviewed as well as a discussion of rehabilitation after a PRP procedure. The regulation of PRP by the World Anti-Doping Agency will also be discussed. PRP is a promising technology in sports medicine; however, it will require more vigorous study in order to better understand how to apply it most effectively.

  5. Magnesium-rich Basalts on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2013-05-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers on NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft are making key measurements regarding the composition and properties of the surface of Mercury, allowing researchers to more clearly decipher the planet's formation and geologic history. The origin of the igneous rocks in the crust of Mercury is the focus of recent research by Karen Stockstill-Cahill and Tim McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), along with Larry Nittler and Shoshana Weider (Carnegie Institution of Washington) and Steven Hauck II (Case Western Reserve University). Using the well-known MELTS computer code Stockstill-Cahill and coauthors worked with MESSENGER-derived and rock-analog compositions to constrain petrologic models of the lavas that erupted on the surface of Mercury. Rock analogs included a partial melt of the Indarch meteorite and a range of Mg-rich terrestrial rocks. Their work shows the lavas on Mercury are most similar to terrestrial magnesian basalt (with lowered FeO content). The implications of the modeling are that Mg-rich lavas came from high-temperature sources in Mercury's mantle and erupted at high temperature with exceptionally low viscosity into thinly bedded and laterally extensive flows, concepts open to further evaluation by laboratory experiments and by geologic mapping of Mercury's surface using MESSENGER's imaging system and laser altimeter to document flow features and dimensions.

  6. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas.

  7. Platelet rich plasma in ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra, A C; Alonso-Herreros, J M; Merayo-Lloves, J

    2016-10-01

    The use of platelet-rich preparations has experienced a significant increase in recent years due to its role in tissue-repair and regeneration. The aim of this study is to examine the available evidence regarding the application of plasma rich in growth factors, and its variations, on the ocular surface. A review is also presented on the effects of platelet-derived growth factors, the implications of the preparation methods, and the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of these therapies in ocular surface diseases. Despite the widespread use of platelet preparations there is no consensus on the most appropriate preparation method, and growth factors concentration vary with different systems. These preparations have been used in the treatment of ocular surface diseases, such as dry eye or persistent epithelial defects, among others, with good safety and efficacy profiles, but further studies are needed to compare to the currently available alternatives. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: associations with grassland plant richness and biomass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Pärtel, M.; Davison, J.; Gerhold, P.; Metsis, M.; Moora, M.; Öpik, M.; Vasar, M.; Zobel, M.; Wilson, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 1 (2014), s. 233-244 ISSN 1469-8137 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : belowground plant richness * diversity * productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.545, year: 2013

  9. Is torrefaction of polysaccharides-rich biomass equivalent to carbonization of lignin-rich biomass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, E; Yaman, S; Haykiri-Acma, H; Kucukbayrak, S

    2016-01-01

    Waste biomass species such as lignin-rich hazelnut shell (HS) and polysaccharides-rich sunflower seed shell (SSS) were subjected to torrefaction at 300°C and carbonization at 600°C under nitrogen. The structural variations in torrefied and carbonized biomasses were compared. Also, the burning characteristics under dry air and pure oxygen (oxy-combustion) conditions were investigated. It was concluded that the effects of carbonization on HS are almost comparable with the effects of torrefaction on SSS in terms of devolatilization and deoxygenation potentials and the increases in carbon content and the heating value. Consequently, it can be proposed that torrefaction does not provide efficient devolatilization from the lignin-rich biomass while it is relatively more efficient for polysaccharides-rich biomass. Heat-induced variations in biomass led to significant changes in the burning characteristics under both burning conditions. That is, low temperature reactivity of biomass reduced considerably and the burning shifted to higher temperatures with very high burning rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Silica-Rich Soil in Gusev Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has found a patch of bright-toned soil so rich in silica that scientists propose water must have been involved in concentrating it. The silica-rich patch, informally named 'Gertrude Weise' after a player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, was exposed when Spirit drove over it during the 1,150th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's Mars surface mission (March 29, 2007). One of Spirit's six wheels no longer rotates, so it leaves a deep track as it drags through soil. Most patches of disturbed, bright soil that Spirit had investigated previously are rich in sulfur, but this one has very little sulfur and is about 90 percent silica. Spirit's panoramic camera imaged the bright patch through various filters on Sol 1,158 (April 6). This approximately true-color image combines images taken through three different filters. The track of disturbed soil is roughly 20 centimeters (8 inches) wide. Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, which can assess a target's mineral composition from a distance, examined the Gertrude Weise patch on Sol 1,172 (April 20). The indications it found for silica in the overturned soil prompted a decision to drive Spirit close enough to touch the soil with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, a chemical analyzer at the end of Spirit's robotic arm. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer collected data about this target on sols 1,189 and 1,190 (May 8 and May 9) and produced the finding of approximately 90 percent silica. Silica is silicon dioxide. On Earth, it commonly occurs as the crystalline mineral quartz and is the main ingredient in window glass. The Martian silica at Gertrude Weise is non-crystalline, with no detectable quartz. In most cases, water is required to produce such a concentrated deposit of silica, according to members of the rover science team. One possible origin for the silica could have been interaction of soil with acidic steam produced by volcanic activity

  11. Silica-Rich Soil Found by Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has found a patch of bright-toned soil so rich in silica that scientists propose water must have been involved in concentrating it. The silica-rich patch, informally named 'Gertrude Weise' after a player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, was exposed when Spirit drove over it during the 1,150th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's Mars surface mission (March 29, 2007). One of Spirit's six wheels no longer rotates, so it leaves a deep track as it drags through soil. Most patches of disturbed, bright soil that Spirit had investigated previously are rich in sulfur, but this one has very little sulfur and is about 90 percent silica. This image is a approximately true-color composite of three images taken through different filters by Spirit's panoramic camera on Sol 1,187 (May 6). The track of disturbed soil is roughly 20 centimeters (8 inches) wide. Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, which can assess a target's mineral composition from a distance, examined the Gertrude Weise patch on Sol 1,172 (April 20). The indications it found for silica in the overturned soil prompted a decision to drive Spirit close enough to touch the soil with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, a chemical analyzer at the end of Spirit's robotic arm. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer collected data about this target on sols 1,189 and 1,190 (May 8 and May 9) and produced the finding of approximately 90 percent silica. Silica is silicon dioxide. On Earth, it commonly occurs as the crystalline mineral quartz and is the main ingredient in window glass. The Martian silica at Gertrude Weise is non-crystalline, with no detectable quartz. In most cases, water is required to produce such a concentrated deposit of silica, according to members of the rover science team. One possible origin for the silica could have been interaction of soil with acidic steam produced by volcanic activity. Another could have been from water in a hot

  12. LHCb RICH 2 engineering design review report

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Allebone, L R; Ameri, M; Barber, G J; Barczyk, A; Bellunato, T F; Benayoun, M; Bibby, J; Braem, André; Brew, C A J; Brook, N; Buckley, A; Calvi, M; Campbell, M; Chamonal, R; Cole, J; Cuneo, S; D'Ambrosio, C; Damerell, G; Densham, C J; Dornan, Peter John; Duane, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Eisenhardt, S; Flavell, AJ; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R W; Franek, B J; Frei, C; George, K; Gibson, V; Girone, M; Gracco, Valerio; Guy, J; Gys, Thierry; Harnew, N; Head, R; Hill, R; Jolly, S; Jones, C; Katvars, S G; Khan, A; Laub, M; Lawrence, J; Libby, J; Lidbury, J A; Losasso, M; MacGregor, A; Matteuzzi, C; Mini, G; Morris, J V; Muheim, F; Musico, P; Musy, M; Negri, P; Newby, C; O'Shea, V; Papanestis, A; Parkes, CJ; Patrick, G N; Petrolini, A; Phillips, A; Piazzoni, C; Pickford, A N; Piedigrossi, D; Playfer, S; Presland, A; Price, D R; Radermacker, J; Sannino, M; Savage, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Smale, N J; Snoeys, W; Soler, F J P; Temple, S A; Topp-Jørgensen, S; Ullaland, O; Ward, C P; Websdale, D M; White, R; Wilkinson, G; Wilson, F; Woodward, M L; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, Ken H

    2002-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single arm spectrometer designed to exploit the large number of b-hadrons produced at the LHC in order to make precision studies of CP asymmetries and of rare decays in the B-meson system. It is therefore essential for the experiment that the detector configuration includes a particle identification system with high separation power between kaons and pions. We will present in this note the engineering solutions for the lightweight, high precision Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector, RICH2, of the spectrometer. The design is built around a large space frame used as a high stability support for the optical system and as a supporting structure for the magnetic shielding needed for the photon detectors. All material not essential for the operation of the detector is located outside the acceptance of the spectrometer. The space frame also defines the Cherenkov gas volume.

  13. Graphics performance in rich Internet applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzlein, Rama C

    2012-01-01

    Rendering performance for rich Internet applications (RIAs) has recently focused on the debate between using Flash and HTML5 for streaming video and gaming on mobile devices. A key area not widely explored, however, is the scalability of raw bitmap graphics performance for RIAs. Does Flash render animated sprites faster than HTML5? How much faster is WebGL than Flash? Answers to these questions are essential for developing large-scale data visualizations, online games, and truly dynamic websites. A new test methodology analyzes graphics performance across RIA frameworks and browsers, revealing specific performance outliers in existing frameworks. The results point toward a future in which all online experiences might be GPU accelerated.

  14. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Knop

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis.

  17. RICH High Voltages & PDF Analysis @ LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Fanchini, E

    2009-01-01

    In the LHCb experiment an important issue is the identification of the hadrons of the final states of the B mesons decays. Two RICH subdetectors are devoted to this task, and the Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) are the photodetectors used to detect Cherenkov light. In this poster there is a description of how the very high voltage (-18 KV) supply stability used to power the HPDs is monitored. It is also presented the basics of a study which can be done with the first collision data: the analysis of the dimuons from the Drell-Yan process. This process is well known and the acceptance of the LHCb detector in terms of pseudorapidity will be very useful to improve the knowledge of the proton structure functions or, alternatively, try to estimate the luminosity from it.

  18. The neutrino opacity of neutron rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcain, P. N.; Dorso, C. O.

    2017-05-01

    The study of neutron rich matter, present in neutron star, proto-neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, can lead to further understanding of the behavior of nuclear matter in highly asymmetric nuclei. Heterogeneous structures are expected to exist in these systems, often referred to as nuclear pasta. We have carried out a systematic study of neutrino opacity for different thermodynamic conditions in order to assess the impact that the structure has on it. We studied the dynamics of the neutrino opacity of the heterogeneous matter at different thermodynamic conditions with semiclassical molecular dynamics model already used to study nuclear multifragmentation. For different densities, proton fractions and temperature, we calculate the very long range opacity and the cluster distribution. The neutrino opacity is of crucial importance for the evolution of the core-collapse supernovae and the neutrino scattering.

  19. The neutrino opacity of neutron rich matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcain, P.N., E-mail: pabloalcain@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, FCEyN, UBA and IFIBA, Conicet, Pabellón 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA-CONICET (Argentina); Dorso, C.O. [Departamento de Física, FCEyN, UBA and IFIBA, Conicet, Pabellón 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA-CONICET (Argentina)

    2017-05-15

    The study of neutron rich matter, present in neutron star, proto-neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, can lead to further understanding of the behavior of nuclear matter in highly asymmetric nuclei. Heterogeneous structures are expected to exist in these systems, often referred to as nuclear pasta. We have carried out a systematic study of neutrino opacity for different thermodynamic conditions in order to assess the impact that the structure has on it. We studied the dynamics of the neutrino opacity of the heterogeneous matter at different thermodynamic conditions with semiclassical molecular dynamics model already used to study nuclear multifragmentation. For different densities, proton fractions and temperature, we calculate the very long range opacity and the cluster distribution. The neutrino opacity is of crucial importance for the evolution of the core-collapse supernovae and the neutrino scattering.

  20. A PUFA-rich diet improves fat oxidation following saturated fat-rich meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jada L; Miller, Mary K; Skillman, Hannah E; Paton, Chad M; Cooper, Jamie A

    2017-08-01

    To determine substrate oxidation responses to saturated fatty acid (SFA)-rich meals before and after a 7-day polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-rich diet versus control diet. Twenty-six, normal-weight, adults were randomly assigned to either PUFA or control diet. Following a 3-day lead-in diet, participants completed the pre-diet visit where anthropometrics and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured, and two SFA-rich HF meals (breakfast and lunch) were consumed. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine fat oxidation (Fox) and energy expenditure (EE) for 4 h after each meal. Participants then consumed a PUFA-rich diet (50 % carbohydrate, 15 % protein, 35 % fat, of which 21 % of total energy was PUFA) or control diet (50 % carbohydrate, 15 % protein, 35 % fat, of which 7 % of total energy was PUFA) for the next 7 days. Following the 7-day diet, participants completed the post-diet visit. From pre- to post-PUFA-rich diet, there was no change in RMR (16.3 ± 0.8 vs. 16.4 ± 0.8 kcal/20 min) or in incremental area under the curve for EE (118.9 ± 20.6-126.9 ± 14.1 kcal/8h, ns). Fasting respiratory exchange ratio increased from pre- to post-PUFA-rich diet only (0.83 ± 0.1-0.86 ± 0.1, p diet (0.03 ± 0.1-0.23 ± 0.1 g/15 min for cumulative Fox; p diet initiates greater fat oxidation after eating occasional high SFA meals compared to a control diet, an effect achieved in 7 days.

  1. Platelet-rich fibrin or platelet-rich plasma – which one is better? an opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The healing of hard and soft tissue in mediated by a wide range of intracellular and extracellular events that are regulated by signaling proteins. Platelets can play a crucial role in periodontal regeneration as they are the reservoirs of growth factors and cytokines which are the key factors for regeneration of bone and maturation of soft tissue. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is first generation platelet concentrate. However, the short duration of cytokine release and its poor mechanical properties have resulted in search of new material. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF is a natural fibrin-based biomaterial prepared from an anticoagulant-free blood harvest without any artificial biochemical modification (no bovine thrombin is required that allows obtaining fibrin membranes enriched with platelets and growth factors. The slow polymerization during centrifugation, fibrin-based structure, ease of preparation, minimal expense makes PRF somewhat superior in some aspect to PRP.

  2. The future of RICH detectors through the light of the LHCb RICH

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, C.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The limitations in performance of the present RICH system in the LHCb experiment are given by the natural chromatic dispersion of the gaseous Cherenkov radiator, the aberrations of the optical system and the pixel size of the photon detectors. Moreover, the overall PID performance can be affected by high detector occupancy as the pattern recognition becomes more difficult with high particle multiplicities. This paper shows a way to improve performance by systematically addressing each of the previously mentioned limitations. These ideas are applied in the present and future upgrade phases of the LHCb experiment. Although applied to specific circumstances, they are used as a paradigm on what is achievable in the development and realisation of high precision RICH detectors.

  3. arXiv The Future of RICH Detectors through the Light of the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C.; Easo, S.; Petrolini, A.; Ullaland, O.

    2017-12-21

    The limitations in performance of the present RICH system in the LHCb experiment are given by the natural chromatic dispersion of the gaseous Cherenkov radiator, the aberrations of the optical system and the pixel size of the photon detectors. Moreover, the overall PID performance can be affected by high detector occupancy as the pattern recognition becomes more difficult with high particle multiplicities. This paper shows a way to improve performance by systematically addressing each of the previously mentioned limitations. These ideas are applied in the present and future upgrade phases of the LHCb experiment. Although applied to specific circumstances, they are used as a paradigm on what is achievable in the development and realisation of high precision RICH detectors.

  4. Outlook of COMPASS RICH1 data handling algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Finger, Miroslav H

    2003-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS designed to study hadron spectroscopy with hadron beams and hadron structure with polarized muon beams. This paper is aiming to outlook the COMPASS RICH1 data handling algorithms in order to discuss some of the data analysis methods proposed for the RICH2 detector. The need for improvement and testing of COMPASS real data acquisition for better performance in realistic COMPASS environment is elaborated. The experience of more than 5 years of RICH1 software development and improvements oriented mainly on taking into account RICH1 constructive specifics, promises a similar hard work for RICH2 algorithmists. Its first stage is Monte Carlo simulation of RICH2 data. (14 refs).

  5. Synthesis and study of neutron-rich nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yixiao

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years our understanding of the decay properties and nuclear structure has been extended in a systematic fashion for the neutron-rich nuclei. This review will first sketch the production and identification of the neutron-rich nuclei throughout the whole mass region, and will then discuss the impressive progress in the studies of the exotic decay properties and nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei. Their astrophysical implications will also be outlined

  6. Hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhardt, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters use the pixel Hybrid Photon Detector (HPD) as a photo-sensitive device. Photo-electrons are produced in semi-transparent multi-alkali photo-cathode (S20) and are accelerated by a voltage of 20 kV onto a pixelated silicon anode. The anode is bump-bonded to the LHCBPIX1 pixel readout chip which amplifies and digitises the anode signals at the LHC speed of 40 MHz. Using a demagnification of five, the effective pixel size at the HPD window is 2.5 x 2.5 mm$^2$. Over the course of 18 months, 550 HPSs will undergo a quality-assurance programme to verify the specifications and to characterise the tubes. The tested parameters include the threshold and noise behaviour of the chip, the response to light emitting diode (LED) light, the demagnification of the electron optics, the leakage current and the depletion of the silicon sensor, the quality of the vacuum, the signal efficiency and the dark count rate. Results of tests of the first nine HPDs of the final design are pr...

  7. Methane rich gasification of wood pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work there are shown the results of experimental studies on methane rich gasification of pinewood pellets in Bio-CONOx technology. The experiment was carried out on a laboratory scale gasifier (5 kW, which design features allow producing a high quality gas with a high methane content. In the results there was identified the impact of the quantity of Bio-CONOx on the amount of flammable gas compounds (methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the synthesis gas and the gas calorific value. The additive was added in 10,20,30 and 50% concentrations to the gasifier chamber. It has been shown that increasing the amount of the additive has a positive effect on the calorific value of the synthesis gas (Fig.1,2. Gas with a high content of methane (and high calorific value was obtained from gasification of biomass with a 50% addition of Bio-CONOx. There was also examined the proportion of blowing air (gasifying medium for which the properties of obtained syngas were the best.

  8. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime.

  9. Photoconduction in silicon rich oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-López, J. A.; Aceves-Mijares, M.; Carrillo-López, J.; Morales-Sanchez, A.; Flores-Gracia, F. J.; Garcia-Salgado, G.

    2009-05-01

    Photoconduction of silicon rich oxide (SRO) thin films were studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements, where ultraviolet (UV) and white (Vis) light illumination were applied. SRO thin films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique, using SiH4 (silane) and N2O (nitrous oxide) as reactive gases at 700 °. The gas flow ratio, Ro = [N2O]/[SiH4] was used to control the silicon excess. The thickness and refractive index of the SRO films were 72.0 nm, 75.5 nm, 59.1 nm, 73.4 nm and 1.7, 1.5, 1.46, 1.45, corresponding to Ro = 10, 20, 30 and 50, respectively. These results were obtained by null ellipsometry. Si nanoparticles (Si-nps) and defects within SRO films permit to obtain interesting photoelectric properties as a high photocurrent and photoconduction. These effects strongly depend on the silicon excess, thickness and structure type. Two different structures (Al/SRO/Si and Al/SRO/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-like structures) were fabricated and used as devices. The photocurrent in these structures is dominated by the generation of carriers due to the incident photon energies (~3.0-1.6 eV and 5 eV). These structures showed large photoconductive response at room temperature. Therefore, these structures have potential applications in optoelectronics devices.

  10. Photoconduction in silicon rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Lopez, J A; Carrillo-Lopez, J; Flores-Gracia, F J; Garcia-Salgado, G [CIDS-ICUAP, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Ed. 103 D and C, col. San Manuel, Puebla, Pue. Mexico 72570 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M; Morales-Sanchez, A, E-mail: jluna@buap.siu.m, E-mail: jluna@inaoep.m [INAOE, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Apdo. 51, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico 72000 (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Photoconduction of silicon rich oxide (SRO) thin films were studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements, where ultraviolet (UV) and white (Vis) light illumination were applied. SRO thin films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique, using SiH{sub 4} (silane) and N{sub 2}O (nitrous oxide) as reactive gases at 700 {sup 0}. The gas flow ratio, Ro = [N{sub 2}O]/[SiH{sub 4}] was used to control the silicon excess. The thickness and refractive index of the SRO films were 72.0 nm, 75.5 nm, 59.1 nm, 73.4 nm and 1.7, 1.5, 1.46, 1.45, corresponding to R{sub o} = 10, 20, 30 and 50, respectively. These results were obtained by null ellipsometry. Si nanoparticles (Si-nps) and defects within SRO films permit to obtain interesting photoelectric properties as a high photocurrent and photoconduction. These effects strongly depend on the silicon excess, thickness and structure type. Two different structures (Al/SRO/Si and Al/SRO/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-like structures) were fabricated and used as devices. The photocurrent in these structures is dominated by the generation of carriers due to the incident photon energies ({approx}3.0-1.6 eV and 5 eV). These structures showed large photoconductive response at room temperature. Therefore, these structures have potential applications in optoelectronics devices.

  11. The HERMES dual-radiator RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, H E

    2003-01-01

    The HERMES experiment emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Most of the hadrons produced lie between 2 and 10 GeV, a region in which it had not previously been feasible to separate pions, kaons, and protons with standard particle identification (PID) techniques. The recent development of new clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic silica aerogel material with a low index of refraction offered the means to apply RICH PID techniques to this difficult momentum region. The HERMES instrument uses two radiators, C sub 4 F sub 1 sub 0 , a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. A lightweight spherical mirror constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality provides optical focusing on a photon detector consisting of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half. The PMT array is held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet. Ring recon...

  12. A Metadata-Rich File System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2009-01-07

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, metadata, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS includes Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the defacto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  13. Plasma rico en plaquetas Platelet -rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. González Lagunas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El Plasma Rico en Plaquetas es una suspensión concentrada de la sangre centrifugada que contiene elevadas concentraciones de trombocitos. Durante los últimos años, este producto ha aparecido de forma repetida en publicaciones científicas y en medios de comunicación generales como un producto que por sus características induce la curación y regeneración de los tejidos. La premisa de su uso es que las elevadas concentraciones de plaquetas en el PRP, liberan cantidades significativas de factores de crecimiento. En este artículo se van a recoger las evidencias científicas que se han presentado en la literatura médica con respecto al PRP y a la curación ósea, así como las diferentes aplicaciones clínicas que se han sugerido.Platelet-rich plasma is a by-product of centrifuged whole blood that contains high levels of thrombocytes. In the last decade, scientific and media interest has been generated by this product that apparently has the capacity of inducing and promoting tissue healing and regeneration. The premise of its use is that the large number of platelets in PRP release significant amounts of growth factors. In this paper, a critical review of the medical literature regarding PRP and bone healing will be presented. Also, the suggested clinical applications of the product will be addressed.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Eduardo; Paula, Luiz Eduardo de; Fuller, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  16. A General Aspect of Platelet Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur ORAL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is to introduce Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP cure method by people who never heard about it. People can hurt their selves, thus they can have damaged tissue; for instance broken bone, a scar or a wounded area. Furthe rmore damaged tissue can be a cartilage tissue, which takes very long time to heal. Platelets, those exist in the veins as thrombus, come up to repair those damaged tissues. However, platelets would be insufficient to cure damaged area in a short time. At this point PRP cure method give a hand to the healing process. By centrifuging people’s own blood via special kits, platelets can be separated from blood cells as plasma. That plasma’s platelet density is 3 - 5 times greater than that blood’s platelet densit y. Afterwards PRP method is implemented by injection of plasma to the damaged area or tissue. After implementation of 2 - 4 sessions per week, damaged tissue can be regenerated. It is fast healing method because densified platelet plasma is used; and it is s afe because that plasma is obtained from people’s own blood. PRP can be implemented on many areas; for instance on dentistry, sports medicine, different kind of surgeries such as plastic, vascular or orthopedic and so on. When soccer players brake their le gs, their sports life come to the end, but what if their broken legs was healed better and faster than general healing process? To sum up, PRP is very safe and the future of healing process.

  17. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [MNCN-CSIC, c/ J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Rivera, T. [CICATA-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or{sub 1}Ab{sub 99}. Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na{sup +} ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti{sup 4+}. The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  18. Theoretical and Methodological Foundations of Statistical Evaluation of the Rich

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk N.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper main approaches of rich people identification are analyzed, the classifications of estimation methods of mentioned social group are given. The method of rich threshold identification with the use of Household Living Conditions Survey Data and System of National Accounts Data by the method of statistical weight calibration is proposed.

  19. Theoretical and Methodological Foundations of Statistical Evaluation of the Rich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanchuk N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper main approaches of rich people identification are analyzed, the classifications of estimation methods of mentioned social group are given. The method of rich threshold identification with the use of Household Living Conditions Survey Data and System of National Accounts Data by the method of statistical weight calibration is proposed.

  20. Estimating tree species richness from forest inventory plot data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2007-01-01

    Montreal Process Criterion 1, Conservation of Biological Diversity, expresses species diversity in terms of number of forest dependent species. Species richness, defined as the total number of species present, is a common metric for analyzing species diversity. A crucial difficulty in estimating species richness from sample data obtained from sources such as inventory...

  1. Factors determining plant species richness in Alaskan artic tundra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, van der M.E.W.; Vermeulen, P.J.; Shaver, G.R.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relationship between plant N:P ratio, soil characteristics and species richness in wet sedge and tussock tundra in northern Alaska at seven sites. We also collected data on soil characteristics, above-ground biomass, species richness and composition. The N:P ratio of the vegetation

  2. Climate induced increases in species richness of marine fishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, J.G.; Hofstede, ter R.

    2008-01-01

    Climate change has been predicted to lead to changes in local and regional species richness through species extinctions and latitudinal ranges shifts. Here, we show that species richness of fish in the North Sea, a group of ecological and socio-economical importance, has increased over a 22-year

  3. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  4. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the aging skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Bi, Y; Ameye, L

    2006-01-01

    Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglyans (SLRPs) are major skeletal extracellular matrix (ECM) components that comprise a family of 13 members containing repeats of a leucine-rich motif. To examine SLRP function, we generated mice deficient in one or more member and analyzed them at the tissue, cell and m...

  5. Enhancing Mathematical Learning in a Technology-Rich Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Christopher J.; Douds, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    This article describes teachers working collaboratively to plan mathematics lessons in a technology-rich environment. Addressing the needs of their diverse students, in particular, English Language Learners and students with special needs, the authors discuss how a technology-rich learning environment influences critical features of the classroom.…

  6. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  7. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  8. Knowledge and Consumption pattern of Vitamin A rich-foods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to lack of knowledge, some of the household subject some foods rich in vitamin A to traditional medicine use rather than using them to enrich their meals. Conclusion: Knowledge of the technologies for storage and preservation of vitamin A rich foods is very important in stabilizing price and making the foods available ...

  9. Research Note Herbaceous plant species richness and composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between grazing veld condition and herbaceous plant species richness in the moist Midlands Mistbelt Grassland in KwaZulu-Natal. The observed herbaceous plant species richness and composition of 12 sample plots (50 m x 50 m) was determined in three study sites using quadrat ...

  10. Consumption patterns of iron and vitamin a rich foods and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The iron-rich foods most frequently consumed by the respondents were legumes, green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds which respectively, made 41.9%, 17.1% and 11.2% contributions to iron intakes of the women. Vitamin A-rich foods most frequently consumed by the respondents were palm oil and vegetables which ...

  11. Lexical richness and collocational competence in second-language writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vedder, I.; Benigno, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report on an experiment set up to investigate lexical richness and collocational competence in the written production of 39 low-intermediate and intermediate learners of Italian L2. Lexical richness was assessed by means of a lexical profiling method inspired by Laufer and Nation

  12. Synthesis and study of neutron-rich nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.X.

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years our understanding of the decay properties and nuclear structure has been extended in a systematic fashion for the neutron-rich nuclei. This review will discuss the impressive progress in the studies of the exotic decay properties and nuclear structure of n-rich nuclei. Their astrophysical implications will also be outlined. ((orig.))

  13. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the aging skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Bi, Y; Ameye, L

    2006-01-01

    Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglyans (SLRPs) are major skeletal extracellular matrix (ECM) components that comprise a family of 13 members containing repeats of a leucine-rich motif. To examine SLRP function, we generated mice deficient in one or more member and analyzed them at the tissue, cell...

  14. Rich Nations vs. Poor Nations: Baiting the Global Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    The growing differences between rich and poor nations effects the world's poor more immediately, but rich countries are vulnerable to resultant problems. This article faults American educational systems for not adequately addressing the nature of global dilemmas or their solutions. (DF)

  15. The Origin and Evolution of Rich Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Joseph

    Massive stars have an important role in many aspects of astrophysics, influencing the dynamics and composition of the ISM and shaping the structure of galaxies, and affect the formation of low mass stars and planets that form in their vicinity. However, the process of massive star formation is not as well understood as the formation of low-mass stars, and their study is made difficult because of their rarity and therefore large distances, and the high dust extinction present in the environment in which high mass stars form. Building on our successful Spitzer Legacy survey of the massive star formation region Cygnus-X, we propose to use Spitzer, Herschel, and WISE archival data, as well as other publicly available ancillary datasets, to extend our study of massive star forming regions to the richest clusters known outside of the Galactic center. With the data now available from these space missions, we now for the first time will be able to survey these regions to find and characterize the population of young stars in formation, locate the clusters and determine their relative ages, and explore the effects of feedback and triggering of new star formation by the massive stars in these regions. The star formation complexes we propose to study, which are at different evolutionary stages, will provide us with a view of massive star formation ranging from the early formation of the stars (protostars and protoclusters) to a revealed rich cluster. Moreover, we expect to significantly increase our statistics of the very rare high-mass protostars by identifying objects in the most active star-forming regions of the Galaxy. The existing data include several regions in the 5 kpc molecular ring, which is the most active region of star formation in our Galaxy. Star formation may be different in this region due to a higher overall density of massive molecular clouds and star formation, higher radiation fields and supernova rates, and a higher metallicity. Thus, the proposed

  16. Skipper Richness (Hesperiidae) Along Elevational Gradients in Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, E; Mielke, O H H; Casagrande, M M; Fiedler, K

    2014-02-01

    Hesperiidae are claimed to be a group of elusive butterflies that need major effort for sampling, thus being frequently omitted from tropical butterfly surveys. As no studies have associated species richness patterns of butterflies with environmental gradients of high altitudes in Brazil, we surveyed Hesperiidae ensembles in Serra do Mar along elevational transects (900-1,800 m above sea level) on three mountains. Transects were sampled 11-12 times on each mountain to evaluate how local species richness is influenced by mountain region, vegetation type, and elevational zones. Patterns were also analyzed for the subfamilies, and after disregarding species that exhibit hilltopping behavior. Species richness was evaluated by the observed richness, Jacknife2 estimator and Chao 1 estimator standardized by sample coverage. Overall, 155 species were collected, but extrapolation algorithms suggest a regional richness of about 220 species. Species richness was far higher in forest than in early successional vegetation or grassland. Richness decreased with elevation, and was higher on Anhangava mountain compared with the two others. Patterns were similar between observed and extrapolated Jacknife2 richness, but vegetation type and mountain richness became altered using sample coverage standardization. Hilltopping species were more easily detected than species that do not show this behavior; however, their inclusion did neither affect estimated richness nor modify the shape of the species accumulation curve. This is the first contribution to systematically study highland butterflies in southern Brazil where all records above 1,200 m are altitudinal extensions of the known geographical ranges of skipper species in the region.

  17. Revascularization of Immature Necrotic Teeth: Platelet rich Fibrin an Edge over Platelet rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Mittal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Revascularization is one such entity that has found its clinical application in the field of endodontics for the manage-ment of immature permanent necrotic teeth. The protocols for revascularization of such teeth focus especially on delivery of stem cells and scaffolds in a nonsurgical manner rather than concentrated growth micro molecules.The hypothesis: This article proposes the role of platelet concentrates such as platelet rich fibrin (PRF and platelet rich plasma (PRP in accelerating the regenerative process in such teeth. PRF unlike PRP is associated with slow, continuous and substantial re-lease of morphogens. It is hypothesized further if PRF instead of PRP when placed through immature apices in an orthograde manner can open newer gates for fast and controlled growth in young, ne-crotic, non-infected teeth.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Enhancement of the healing kinetics can be evaluated by change in size of periapical radiolucency, thickness of the dentinal walls, root elongation and apical closure compared between preoperative and postoperative standardized two dimensional/three dimensional radiographs taken on regular follow ups.

  18. Antimicrobial effect of platelet-rich plasma and platelet-rich fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badade, Pallavi S; Mahale, Swapna A; Panjwani, Alisha A; Vaidya, Prutha D; Warang, Ayushya D

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates have been extensively used in a variety of medical fields to promote soft- and hard-tissue regeneration. The significance behind their use lies in the abundance of growth factors (GFs) in platelets α-granules that promote wound healing. Other than releasing a pool of GFs upon activation, platelets also have many features that indicate their role in the anti-infective host defense. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) against periodontal disease-associated bacteria. Blood samples were obtained from ten adult male patients. PRP and PRF were procured using centrifugation. The antimicrobial activity of PRP and PRF was evaluated by microbial culturing using bacterial strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were inhibited by PRP but not by PRF. PRP is a potentially useful substance in the fight against periodontal pathogens. This might represent a valuable property in adjunct to the enhancement of tissue regeneration.

  19. An Arg-rich putative prebiotic protein is as stable as its Lys-rich variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-García, Fernando; Chakrabartty, Avijit; González, Carlos; Laurents, Douglas V

    2012-12-15

    An Arg-rich peptide called RIA7; sequence ac-ARAAAAAIRAIAAIIRAGGY-am, tetramerizes to form a well folded, four helix X-bundle protein. The Arg side chains are solvent exposed and the hydrophobic core is composed of the side chains from some Alas, all the Iles and the C-terminal Tyr. Since Gly, Ala and Ile, and in lesser amounts Arg and Tyr have been reported to form under putative prebiotic Earth conditions, it is plausible that RIA7-like peptides might have formed on the primitive Earth and interacted with RNAs. The interaction of RIA7 with two RNAs was tested and the formation of insoluble aggregates was observed. These results contrast with previous studies of a Lys-rich variant, called KIA7, which promotes the cleavage of RNAs. Their close structural similarity makes RIA7 and KIA7 an excellent system to compare the relative contributions of Arg and Lys to protein conformational stability. NMR-monitored hydrogen/deuterium exchange measurements and CD-monitored thermal denaturation experiments performed at different peptide and salt concentrations reveal that the conformational stabilities of RIA7 and KIA7 are practically the same. This finding has relevance for protein engineering as Lys is frequently replaced by Arg to improve ligand binding and membrane association and penetration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disturbance alters local-regional richness relationships in appalachian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belote, R.T.; Sanders, N.J.; Jones, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Whether biological diversity within communities is limited by local interactions or regional species pools remains an important question in ecology. In this paper, we investigate how an experimentally applied tree-harvesting disturbance gradient influenced local-regional richness relationships. Plant species richness was measured at three spatial scales (2 ha = regional; 576 m2 and 1 m2 = local) on three occasions (one year pre-disturbance, one year post-disturbance, and 10 years post-disturbance) across five disturbance treatments (uncut control through clearcut) replicated throughout the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. We investigated whether species richness in 576-m2 plots and 1-m2 subplots depended on species richness in 2-ha experimental units and whether this relationship changed through time before and after canopy disturbance. We found that, before disturbance, the relationship between local and regional richness was weak or nonexistent. One year after disturbance local richness was a positive function of regional richness, because local sites were colonized from the regional species pool. Ten years after disturbance, the positive relationship persisted, but the slope had decreased by half. These results suggest that disturbance can set the stage for strong influences of regional species pools on local community assembly in temperate forests. However, as time since disturbance increases, local controls on community assembly decouple the relationships between regional and local diversity. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  1. Structure of proton-rich nuclei of astrophysical interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Recent experimental data concerning proton-rich nuclei between A=20 and A=100 are presented and discussed with respect to their relevance to the astrophysical rp process and to the calibration of solar neutrino detectors. (orig.)

  2. Antioxidative and Hepatoprotective Activities of Deinoxanthin-Rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidative and Hepatoprotective Activities of Deinoxanthin-Rich Extract from Deinococcus radiodurans R1 against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Injury in Mice. J Cheng, Z Zhang, Z Zheng, G Lv, L Wang, B Tian, Y Hua ...

  3. Gridded Species Distribution, Version 1: Global Amphibians Family Richness Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Amphibians Family Richness Grids of the Gridded Species Distribution, Version 1 are aggregations of the presence grids data at the family level. They are...

  4. ELeaRNT: Evolutionary Learning of Rich Neural Network Topologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matteucci, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present ELeaRNT an evolutionary strategy which evolves rich neural network topologies in order to find an optimal domain specific non linear function approximator with a good generalization performance...

  5. Platelet Rich Plasma- mechanism of action and clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina N. Cozma; Laura Raducu; Cristian R. Jecan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a blood-derived fraction containing high level of platelets, a high concentration of leukocytes and growth factors. PRP therapy has been growing as a viable treatment alternative for a number of clinical applications and has a potential benefit for use in wound healing. Nowadays platelet rich plasma is used in stimulating wound healing in skin and soft tissue ulcerations, accelerating wound healing in diabetic patients and facilitating bone proliferation in ortho...

  6. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Geographic range size and determinants of avian species richness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jetz, Walter; Rahbek, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    species richness. Using both conventional and spatial regression models, we show that for sub-Saharan African birds, the apparent role of productivity diminishes with decreasing range size, whereas the significance of topographic heterogeneity increases. The relative importance of geometric constraints...... from the continental edge is moderate. Our findings highlight the failure of traditional species richness models to account for narrow-ranging species that frequently are also threatened....

  8. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Gayde, J.Ch.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polák, Jaroslav; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunečka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, Lukáš; Šulc, Miroslav; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 766, December (2014), s. 208-211 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors (RICH 2013)/8./. Hayama, Kanagawa, 02.12.2013-06.12.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : RICH * Cherenkov radiation * Mirror alignment * Photogrammetry Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900214008134#

  9. Partitioning sources of variation in vertebrate species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, R.B.; Krohn, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To explore biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates in Maine, USA using techniques that would describe local and spatial correlations with the environment. Location: Maine, USA. Methods: We delineated the ranges within Maine (86,156 km2) of 275 species using literature and expert review. Ranges were combined into species richness maps, and compared to geomorphology, climate, and woody plant distributions. Methods were adapted that compared richness of all vertebrate classes to each environmental correlate, rather than assessing a single explanatory theory. We partitioned variation in species richness into components using tree and multiple linear regression. Methods were used that allowed for useful comparisons between tree and linear regression results. For both methods we partitioned variation into broad-scale (spatially autocorrelated) and fine-scale (spatially uncorrelated) explained and unexplained components. By partitioning variance, and using both tree and linear regression in analyses, we explored the degree of variation in species richness for each vertebrate group that Could be explained by the relative contribution of each environmental variable. Results: In tree regression, climate variation explained richness better (92% of mean deviance explained for all species) than woody plant variation (87%) and geomorphology (86%). Reptiles were highly correlated with environmental variation (93%), followed by mammals, amphibians, and birds (each with 84-82% deviance explained). In multiple linear regression, climate was most closely associated with total vertebrate richness (78%), followed by woody plants (67%) and geomorphology (56%). Again, reptiles were closely correlated with the environment (95%), followed by mammals (73%), amphibians (63%) and birds (57%). Main conclusions: Comparing variation explained using tree and multiple linear regression quantified the importance of nonlinear relationships and local interactions between species

  10. Geomorphic controls on elevational gradients of species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Carrara, Francesco; Mari, Lorenzo; Altermatt, Florian; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-02-16

    Elevational gradients of biodiversity have been widely investigated, and yet a clear interpretation of the biotic and abiotic factors that determine how species richness varies with elevation is still elusive. In mountainous landscapes, habitats at different elevations are characterized by different areal extent and connectivity properties, key drivers of biodiversity, as predicted by metacommunity theory. However, most previous studies directly correlated species richness to elevational gradients of potential drivers, thus neglecting the interplay between such gradients and the environmental matrix. Here, we investigate the role of geomorphology in shaping patterns of species richness. We develop a spatially explicit zero-sum metacommunity model where species have an elevation-dependent fitness and otherwise neutral traits. Results show that ecological dynamics over complex terrains lead to the null expectation of a hump-shaped elevational gradient of species richness, a pattern widely observed empirically. Local species richness is found to be related to the landscape elevational connectivity, as quantified by a newly proposed metric that applies tools of complex network theory to measure the closeness of a site to others with similar habitat. Our theoretical results suggest clear geomorphic controls on elevational gradients of species richness and support the use of the landscape elevational connectivity as a null model for the analysis of the distribution of biodiversity.

  11. The Global Distribution and Drivers of Alien Bird Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Ellie E.; Cassey, Phillip; Redding, David W.; Collen, Ben; Franks, Victoria; Gaston, Kevin J.; Jones, Kate E.; Kark, Salit; Orme, C. David L.; Blackburn, Tim M.

    2017-01-01

    Alien species are a major component of human-induced environmental change. Variation in the numbers of alien species found in different areas is likely to depend on a combination of anthropogenic and environmental factors, with anthropogenic factors affecting the number of species introduced to new locations, and when, and environmental factors influencing how many species are able to persist there. However, global spatial and temporal variation in the drivers of alien introduction and species richness remain poorly understood. Here, we analyse an extensive new database of alien birds to explore what determines the global distribution of alien species richness for an entire taxonomic class. We demonstrate that the locations of origin and introduction of alien birds, and their identities, were initially driven largely by European (mainly British) colonialism. However, recent introductions are a wider phenomenon, involving more species and countries, and driven in part by increasing economic activity. We find that, globally, alien bird species richness is currently highest at midlatitudes and is strongly determined by anthropogenic effects, most notably the number of species introduced (i.e., “colonisation pressure”). Nevertheless, environmental drivers are also important, with native and alien species richness being strongly and consistently positively associated. Our results demonstrate that colonisation pressure is key to understanding alien species richness, show that areas of high native species richness are not resistant to colonisation by alien species at the global scale, and emphasise the likely ongoing threats to global environments from introductions of species. PMID:28081142

  12. Environmental heterogeneity–species richness relationships from a global perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Stein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial environmental heterogeneity (EH is considered one of the most important factors promoting species richness, but no general consent about the EH–richness relationship exists so far. This is because research methods and study settings vary widely, and because non-significant and negative associations have also been reported. My thesis provides a comprehensive review of the different measurements and terminologies of EH used in the literature, and presents strong quantitative evidence of a generally positive relationship between biotic and abiotic EH and species richness of terrestrial plants and animals from landscape to global extents. In a meta-analysis and a subsequent case study comparing multiple EH measures and their association with mammal species richness worldwide, I furthermore reveal that the outcome of EH–richness studies depends strongly on study design, including both the EH measure chosen and spatial scale. My research contributes to a better understanding of the EH–richness relationship, while identifying future research needs.

  13. Spatial heterogeneity influences native and nonnative plant species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Stohlgren, Thomas J; Chong, Geneva W

    2006-12-01

    Spatial heterogeneity may have differential effects on the distribution of native and nonnative plant species richness. We examined the effects of spatial heterogeneity on native and nonnative plant species richness distributions in the central part of Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. Spatial heterogeneity around vegetation plots was characterized using landscape metrics, environmental/topographic variables (slope, aspect, elevation, and distance from stream or river), and soil variables (nitrogen, clay, and sand). The landscape metrics represented five components of landscape heterogeneity and were measured at four spatial extents (within varying radii of 120, 240, 480, and 960 m) using the FRAGSTATS landscape pattern analysis program. Akaike's Information Criterion adjusted for small sample size (AICc) was used to select the best models from a set of multiple linear regression models developed for native and nonnative plant species richness at four spatial extents and three levels of ecological hierarchy (i.e., landscape, land cover, and community). Both native and nonnative plant species richness were positively correlated with edge density, Simpson's diversity index and interspersion/juxtaposition index, and were negatively correlated with mean patch size. The amount of variation explained at four spatial extents and three hierarchical levels ranged from 30% to 70%. At the landscape level, the best models explained 43% of the variation in native plant species richness and 70% of the variation in nonnative plant species richness (240-m extent). In general, the amount of variation explained was always higher for nonnative plant species richness, and the inclusion of landscape metrics always significantly improved the models. The best models explained 66% of the variation in nonnative plant species richness for both the conifer land cover type and lodgepole pine community. The relative influence of the components of spatial heterogeneity differed for

  14. Butterfly Species Richness in Selected West Albertine Rift Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Kasangaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly species richness of 17 forests located in the western arm of the Albertine Rift in Uganda was compared using cluster analysis and principal components analysis (PCA to assess similarities among the forests. The objective was to compare the butterfly species richness of the forests. A total of 630 butterfly species were collected in 5 main families. The different species fell into 7 ecological groupings with the closed forest group having the most species and the swamp/wetland group with the fewest number of species. Three clusters were obtained. The first cluster had forests characterized by relatively high altitude and low species richness despite the big area in the case of Rwenzori and being close to the supposed Pleistocene refugium. The second cluster had forests far away from the supposed refugium except Kisangi and moderate species richness with small areas, whereas the third cluster had those forests that were more disturbed, high species richness, and low altitudinal levels with big areas.

  15. The RICH detector of the NA62 experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aisa, D.; Anzivino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia dell' Università di Perugia (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Bizzetti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Bucci, F. [INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Campeggi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia dell' Università di Perugia (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Carassiti, V. [INFN – Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Cassese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Firenze (Italy); Cenci, P. [INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Ciaranfi, R. [INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Duk, V.; Farnesini, L. [INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Fry, J.R. [University of Liverpool (Italy); CERN (Italy); Iacopini, E. [INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Firenze (Italy); Lami, S. [INFN – Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Lenti, M.; Maletta, F. [INFN – Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Pepe, M. [INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Piandani, R. [INFN – Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Piccini, M. [INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Piluso, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia dell' Università di Perugia (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Perugia (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN aims to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare charged kaon decay K{sup +}→π{sup +}νν{sup ¯} with a 10% accuracy and with a background contamination at the 10% level. Since the branching ratio of this decay is O(10{sup −10}), to fulfill such request one of the main backgrounds, the decay K{sup +}→μ{sup +}ν (BR∼63%), must be suppressed by a rejection factor of 4×10{sup −13} (assuming 10% signal acceptance). This can be partially accomplished using a combination of kinematical cuts (8×10{sup −6}) and the different power of penetration through matter of pions and muons (10{sup −5}). A further 5×10{sup −3} suppression factor will be provided by a RICH detector, in a momentum range between 15 and 35 GeV/c. The details of the RICH project as well as the results from test runs performed on a RICH prototype of the same length of the final detector will be presented. The current status of the construction and the description of the final readout and trigger electronics will also be reviewed. - Highlights: • The RICH of the NA62 experiment will separate pions from muons in kaon decays. • Crossing time of charged particles is measured with a resolution better than 100 ps. • RICH will also be fundamental for the low level trigger of the experiment.

  16. Multi-Messenger Observations of Neutron Rich Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, C. J. [UTK/ORNL/Indiana University

    2012-01-01

    At very high densities, electrons react with protons to form neutron rich matter. This material is central to many fundamental questions in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Moreover, neutron rich matter is being studied with an extraordinary variety of new tools such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We describe the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) that uses parity violating electron scattering to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. This has important implications for neutron stars and their crusts. We discuss X-ray observations of neutron star radii. These also have important implications for neutron rich matter. Gravitational waves (GW) open a new window on neutron rich matter. They come from sources such as neutron star mergers, rotating neutron star mountains, and collective r-mode oscillations. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, we find neutron star crust to be very strong. It can support mountains on rotating neutron stars large enough to generate detectable gravitational waves. We believe that combing astronomical observations using photons, GW, and neutrinos, with laboratory experiments on nuclei, heavy ion collisions, and radioactive beams will fundamentally advance our knowledge of compact objects in the heavens, the dense phases of QCD, the origin of the elements, and of neutron rich matter.

  17. Human population, grasshopper and plant species richness in European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Claude E.; Pautasso, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Surprisingly, several studies over large scales have reported a positive spatial correlation of people and biodiversity. This pattern has important implications for conservation and has been documented for well studied taxa such as plants, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. However, it is unknown whether the pattern applies also to invertebrates other than butterflies and more work is needed to establish whether the species-people relationship is explained by both variables correlating with other environmental factors. We studied whether grasshopper species richness (Orthoptera, suborder Caelifera) is related to human population size in European countries. As expected, the number of Caelifera species increases significantly with increasing human population size. But this is not the case when controlling for country area, latitude and number of plant species. Variations in Caelifera species richness are primarily associated with variations in plant species richness. Caelifera species richness also increases with decreasing mean annual precipitation, Gross Domestic Product per capita (used as an indicator for economic development) and net fertility rate of the human population. Our analysis confirms the hypothesis that the broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can be explained by concurrent variations in factors other than human population size such as plant species richness, environmental productivity, or habitat heterogeneity. Nonetheless, more populated countries in Europe still have more Caelifera species than less populated countries and this poses a particular challenge for conservation.

  18. LHCB : The upgraded LHCb RICH detector: status and perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardinale, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The two RICH detectors installed in LHCb have performed successfully during the 2010-2012 data taking period. The data from these detectors were essential to most of the physics results published by LHCb. In order to extend its potential for discovery and study of new phenomena it is planned to upgrade the LHCb experiment in 2018 with a 40MHz readout and a much more flexible software-based triggering system. This would increase the readout rate and occupancies for the RICH detectors. The RICH detector will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream RICH detector. Tests of the complete opto-electronic chain have been performed during testbeam sessions in autumn 2014. The status and perspectives of the RICH upgrade project will be presented.

  19. Mapping and predictive variations of soil bacterial richness across France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Terrat

    Full Text Available Although numerous studies have demonstrated the key role of bacterial diversity in soil functions and ecosystem services, little is known about the variations and determinants of such diversity on a nationwide scale. The overall objectives of this study were i to describe the bacterial taxonomic richness variations across France, ii to identify the ecological processes (i.e. selection by the environment and dispersal limitation influencing this distribution, and iii to develop a statistical predictive model of soil bacterial richness. We used the French Soil Quality Monitoring Network (RMQS, which covers all of France with 2,173 sites. The soil bacterial richness (i.e. OTU number was determined by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes and related to the soil characteristics, climatic conditions, geomorphology, land use and space. Mapping of bacterial richness revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution, structured into patches of about 111km, where the main drivers were the soil physico-chemical properties (18% of explained variance, the spatial descriptors (5.25%, 1.89% and 1.02% for the fine, medium and coarse scales, respectively, and the land use (1.4%. Based on these drivers, a predictive model was developed, which allows a good prediction of the bacterial richness (R2adj of 0.56 and provides a reference value for a given pedoclimatic condition.

  20. Mapping and predictive variations of soil bacterial richness across France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrat, Sébastien; Horrigue, Walid; Dequiedt, Samuel; Saby, Nicolas P A; Lelièvre, Mélanie; Nowak, Virginie; Tripied, Julie; Régnier, Tiffanie; Jolivet, Claudy; Arrouays, Dominique; Wincker, Patrick; Cruaud, Corinne; Karimi, Battle; Bispo, Antonio; Maron, Pierre Alain; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Ranjard, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated the key role of bacterial diversity in soil functions and ecosystem services, little is known about the variations and determinants of such diversity on a nationwide scale. The overall objectives of this study were i) to describe the bacterial taxonomic richness variations across France, ii) to identify the ecological processes (i.e. selection by the environment and dispersal limitation) influencing this distribution, and iii) to develop a statistical predictive model of soil bacterial richness. We used the French Soil Quality Monitoring Network (RMQS), which covers all of France with 2,173 sites. The soil bacterial richness (i.e. OTU number) was determined by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes and related to the soil characteristics, climatic conditions, geomorphology, land use and space. Mapping of bacterial richness revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution, structured into patches of about 111km, where the main drivers were the soil physico-chemical properties (18% of explained variance), the spatial descriptors (5.25%, 1.89% and 1.02% for the fine, medium and coarse scales, respectively), and the land use (1.4%). Based on these drivers, a predictive model was developed, which allows a good prediction of the bacterial richness (R2adj of 0.56) and provides a reference value for a given pedoclimatic condition.

  1. Drivers of species richness in European Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Simone; Ulrich, Werner

    2012-08-01

    The species-area relationship (SAR) and the latitudinal gradient in species richness are the most widespread and best-documented patterns in ecology, yet few studies have explored how the two patterns are interrelated. We used tenebrionid beetles as a species rich invertebrate group to investigate how area, habitat heterogeneity, climate, and ecological history act together in shaping species richness across Europe. We tested the effects of various climatic gradients on tenebrionid richness, with separate analyses for endemics and non-endemics. To take into account differences in area size among geographical units, we included species-area relationships using simultaneous autoregressive models. Although area had a significant effect on richness, the signal associated with temperature is so strong that it is still evident as a major driver. Also, the effect of area was only apparent when the effect of spatial coordinates had been accounted for, which has important implications for the use of SARs to locate diversity hotspots. The influence of latitude was mainly explained by a temperature gradient. Our findings support a postglacial European colonisation mainly from glacial southern refuges. Large Mediterranean islands were also important refugial areas.

  2. How rich is consciousness? The partial awareness hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouider, Sid; de Gardelle, Vincent; Sackur, Jérôme; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2010-07-01

    Current theories of consciousness posit a dissociation between 'phenomenal' consciousness (rich) and 'access' consciousness (limited). Here, we argue that the empirical evidence for phenomenal consciousness without access is equivocal, resulting either from a confusion between phenomenal and unconscious contents, or from an impression of phenomenally rich experiences arising from illusory contents. We propose a refined account of access that relies on a hierarchy of representational levels and on the notion of partial awareness, whereby lower and higher levels are accessed independently. Reframing of the issue of dissociable forms of consciousness into dissociable levels of access provides a more parsimonious account of the existing evidence. In addition, the rich phenomenology illusion can be studied and described in terms of testable cognitive mechanisms. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits - An ideal lunar resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, B. R.; Clark, B.; Coombs, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    With a view of investigating possible economic benefits that a permanent lunar settlement might provide to the near-earth space infrastructures, consideration was given to the ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits as sources of oxygen (for use as a propellant) and He-3 (for nuclear fusion fuel). This paper demonstrates that ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits would be excellent sources of a wide variety of valuable elements besides O and He-3, including Fe, Ti, H2, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb. It is shown that several ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent exist on the lunar surface. The suitability of regional pyroclastic deposits for lunar mining operations, construction activities, and the establishment of permanent lunar settlements is examined.

  4. Plant species richness and ecosystem multifunctionality in global drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T.; Quero, Jose L.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Escudero, Adrian; Ochoa, Victoria; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Garcia-Gomez, Miguel; Bowker, Matthew A.; Soliveres, Santiago; Escolar, Cristina; Garcia-Palacios, Pablo; Berdugo, Miguel; Valencia, Enrique; Gozalo, Beatriz; Gallardo, Antonio; Aguilera, Lorgio; Arredondo, Tulio; Blones, Julio; Boeken, Bertrand; Bran, Donaldo; Conceicao, Abel A.; Cabrera, Omar; Chaieb, Mohamed; Derak, Mchich; Eldridge, David J.; Espinosa, Carlos I.; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitan, Juan; Gatica, M. Gabriel; Ghiloufi, Wahida; Gomez-Gonzalez, Susana; Gutie, Julio R.; Hernandez, Rosa M.; Huang, Xuewen; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Mau, Rebecca L.; Morici, Ernesto; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Polo, Vicente; Prina, Anibal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramirez-Collantes, David A.; Romao, Roberto; Tighe, Matthew; Torres-Diaz, Cristian; Val, James; Veiga, Jose P.; Wang, Deli; Zaady, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Experiments suggest that biodiversity enhances the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple functions, such as carbon storage, productivity, and the buildup of nutrient pools (multifunctionality). However, the relationship between biodiversity and multifunctionality has never been assessed globally in natural ecosystems. We report here on a global empirical study relating plant species richness and abiotic factors to multifunctionality in drylands, which collectively cover 41% of Earth's land surface and support over 38% of the human population. Multifunctionality was positively and significantly related to species richness. The best-fitting models accounted for over 55% of the variation in multifunctionality and always included species richness as a predictor variable. Our results suggest that the preservation of plant biodiversity is crucial to buffer negative effects of climate change and desertification in drylands.

  5. Global variation in woodpecker species richness shaped by tree availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Sigrid Kistrup; Kissling, W. Daniel; Fjeldså, Jon

    2017-01-01

    heterogeneity and biogeographical region. We further used structural equation models to test for direct and indirect effects of predictor variables. Results: There was a strong positive relationship between woodpecker species richness and current tree cover and annual precipitation, respectively. Precipitation...... a negative indirect effect on woodpecker species richness. Main conclusions: Global species richness of woodpeckers is primarily shaped by current tree cover and precipitation, reflecting a strong biotic association between woodpeckers and trees. Human influence can have a negative effect on woodpecker...... diversity when humans reduce tree availability. Hence, woodpeckers exemplify how broad-scale diversity patterns are predominantly shaped by a biotic factor, and how climate and human influence can have indirect effects on animal biodiversity via the effects on tree availability and forest cover....

  6. Functional richness: Overview of indices and underlying concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, G.; Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C.

    2018-02-01

    Functional richness, currently defined as the amount of niche space occupied by the species within a community, is one of the three major components of functional diversity. Different indices have been developed in order to quantify this component. However, the range of indices available for assessing functional richness, often mathematically complex and based on different rationales, can cause confusion for field ecologists and lead to misinterpretation of the results obtained. In this context, we have provided the first study exclusively focused on the comparison of the definitions, advantages and drawbacks of a large set of functional richness indices. The first part of this work is focused on four indices (FDP&G, FRic, TOP and N-hypervolumes indices) that are currently the most commonly used for assessing functional richness. We have completed our study by including recently developed indices that enable us to take into account the intraspecific trait variability (i.e. FRim index and TDP framework), because there is currently a growing scientific consensus regarding the necessity of including this aspect in the assessment of the functional diversity of communities. We demonstrate that although authors have argued that their index describes the functional richness, each of them describes only part of it, and this part may strongly differ from one index to another. Rather than advocating the general use of a single index and/or systematically avoiding others, our study highlights the need for selecting indices in close relation with the context, the available data and the aims of each study. Such a strategy is an essential preliminary step for preventing misunderstanding and artefactual controversies. Along these lines, we propose some guidelines to help users in selecting the most appropriate indices according both to the facet of functional richness on which they wish to focus and to the characteristics of the available data.

  7. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanna M. Evans

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of

  8. Cysteine-rich mini-proteins in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Vincent; Taft, Ryan J; Alewood, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between structure and function underpins both biochemistry and chemical biology, and has enabled the discovery of numerous agricultural and therapeutic agents. Small cysteine-rich proteins, which form a unique set of protein frameworks and folds, are found in all living organisms and often play crucial roles as hormones, growth factors, ion channel modulators and enzyme inhibitors in various biological pathways. Here we review secreted human cysteine-rich mini-proteins, classify them into broad families and briefly describe their structure and function. To systematically investigate this protein sub-class we designed a step-wise high throughput algorithm that is able to isolate the mature and active forms of human secreted cysteine-rich proteins (up to 200 amino acids in length) and extract their cysteine scaffolds. We limited our search to frameworks that contain an even number of cysteine residues (cysteine-rich frameworks spread over 378 secreted cysteine-rich mini-proteins. Restricting our search to those that contain >5% cysteine residues led to the identification of 22 cysteine-rich frameworks representing 21 protein families. Analysis of their molecular targets showed that these mini-proteins are frequently ligands for G protein- and enzyme-coupled receptors, transporters, extracellular enzyme inhibitors, and antimicrobial peptides. It is clear that these human secreted mini-proteins possess a wide diversity of frameworks and folds, some of which are conserved across the phylogenetic spectrum. Further study of these proteins will undoubtedly lead to insights into unresolved questions of basic biology, and the development of system-specific human therapeutics.

  9. Calculation of the radii of neutron rich light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charagi, S.K.; Gupta, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction cross section of a few unstable neutron rich nuclei have been measured using exotic isotope beams produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Interaction cross section of He, Li, Be and B isotope projectiles with Be, C and Al targets have thus been measured at 790 MeV/nucleon. We have made a comprehensive analysis of the data on the interaction cross section, to extract the radii of these neutron rich light nuclei. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. SOI MESFETs on high-resistivity, trap-rich substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Payam; Zhang, Xiong; Lepkowski, William; Li, Chaojiang; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2018-04-01

    The DC and RF characteristics of metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MESFETs) on conventional CMOS silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates are compared to nominally identical devices on high-resistivity, trap-rich SOI substrates. While the DC transfer characteristics are statistically identical on either substrate, the maximum available gain at GHz frequencies is enhanced by ∼2 dB when using the trap-rich substrates, with maximum operating frequencies, fmax, that are approximately 5-10% higher. The increased fmax is explained by the reduced substrate conduction at GHz frequencies using a lumped-element, small-signal model.

  11. Neutron-rich isotopes of the lightest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Kalpakchieva, R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of the experimental investigations on the stability of very neutron-rich light nuclei carried out at the JINR Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. Results on mass excess measurements are reported for 4 H, 5 H, 6 H, 7 H and for the superheavy helium isotope 9 He. Some results from the joint JINR-Ganil experiment on the search for and study of new neutron-rich light nuclei are also given. Analyzed are new possibilities for the investigation of multineutron decay of light nuclei. 14 refs.; 10 figs

  12. Properties of neutron-rich hafnium high-spin isomers

    CERN Multimedia

    Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Neyens, G; Billowes, J; Flanagan, K; Koester, U H; Litvinov, Y

    It is proposed to study highly-excited multi-quasiparticle isomers in neutron-rich hafnium (Z=72) isotopes. Long half-lives have already been measured for such isomers in the storage ring at GSI, ensuring their accessibility with ISOL production. The present proposal focuses on:\\\\ (i) an on-line experiment to measure isomer properties in $^{183}$Hf and $^{184}$Hf, and\\\\ (ii) an off-line molecular breakup test using REXTRAP, to provide Hf$^{+}$ beams for future laser spectroscopy and greater sensitivity for the future study of more neutron-rich isotopes.

  13. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain two...... areas of repeated amino acid sequences. Antibodies against recombinant GLURP489-1271, as well as against a synthetic peptide corresponding to GLURP899-916, and against a synthetic peptide representing the major glutamate rich repeat sequence from the P. falciparum ring erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155...

  14. LHCb Upgraded RICH 2 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Garsed, Philip John; Cardinale, Roberta; Petrolini, Alessandro; Benettoni, Massimo; Simi, Gabriele; Zago, M; Easo, Sajan; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Frei, Christoph; He, Jibo; Piedigrossi, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb experiment and, specifically, its two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors will undergo a major upgrade. RICH 2 will be refurbished with new photon detectors and their associated electronics, with the capability of up to 40 MHz sustained acquisition rate. A new support and cooling system has been developed for the two photodetector arrays, retaining the vessel, gas and optical systems unchanged. This document describes their new mechanical arrangement, its engineering design, installation and alignment. A summary of the project schedule and Institute responsibilities is provided.

  15. Proscene: A feature-rich framework for interactive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambos, Jean Pierre

    We introduce Proscene, a feature-rich, open-source framework for interactive environments. The design of Proscene comprises a three-layered onion-like software architecture, promoting different possible development scenarios. The framework innermost layer decouples user gesture parsing from user-defined actions. The in-between layer implements a feature-rich set of widely-used motion actions allowing the selection and manipulation of objects, including the scene viewpoint. The outermost layer exposes those features as a Processing library. The results have shown the feasibility of our approach together with the simplicity and flexibility of the Proscene framework API.

  16. Proscene: A feature-rich framework for interactive environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Charalambos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Proscene, a feature-rich, open-source framework for interactive environments. The design of Proscene comprises a three-layered onion-like software architecture, promoting different possible development scenarios. The framework innermost layer decouples user gesture parsing from user-defined actions. The in-between layer implements a feature-rich set of widely-used motion actions allowing the selection and manipulation of objects, including the scene viewpoint. The outermost layer exposes those features as a Processing library. The results have shown the feasibility of our approach together with the simplicity and flexibility of the Proscene framework API.

  17. Performance of the LHCb RICH detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N.H.; Coombes, M.; Hampson, T.; Rademacker, J.H.; Solomin, A.; Voong, D. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Aglieri Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; D' Ambrosio, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Kanaya, N.; Koblitz, S.; Mollen, A.; Morant, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Storaci, B.; Ullaland, O.; Vervink, K.; Wyllie, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Fanchini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Kucharczyk, M.; Maino, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Perego, D.L.; Pessina, G. [Sezione INFN di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Benson, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Kim, Y.M.; Lambert, D.; Main, A.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Sparkes, A.; Young, R. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Blake, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Blanks, C.; Cameron, B.; Carson, L.; Egede, U.; Owen, P.; Patel, M.; Plackett, R.; Savidge, T.; Sepp, I.; Soomro, F.; Websdale, D. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Brisbane, S.; Contu, A.; Gandini, P.; Gao, R.; Harnew, N.; Hill, D.; Hunt, P.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Malde, S.; Muresan, R.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Wilkinson, G.; Xing, F. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cardinale, R.; Fontanelli, F.; Mini' , G.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M. [Sezione INFN di Genova, Genova (Italy); Easo, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Garra Tico, J.; Gibson, V.; Gregson, S.; Haines, S.C.; Jones, C.R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Mangiafave, N.; Rogers, G.J.; Sigurdsson, S.; Wotton, S.A. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mountain, R. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Morris, J.V.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G.N.; Ricciardi, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sail, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Spradlin, P. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2013-05-15

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN since the end of 2009. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2-100 GeV/c. The operation and control, software, and online monitoring of the RICH system are described. The particle identification performance is presented, as measured using data from the LHC. Excellent separation of hadronic particle types ({pi}, K, p) is achieved. (orig.)

  18. THE REACH AND RICHNESS OF WIKINOMICS: IS THE FREE WEB-BASED ENCYCLOPEDIA WIKIPEDIA ONLY FOR RICH COUNTRIES?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a model of the patterns of correlation in Wikipedia, reach and richness, lays the foundation for studying whether the free Web-based encyclopedia Wikipedia is only for developed countries. Based on data from 12 different Wikipedia language editions, the author finds that the cent......In this article, a model of the patterns of correlation in Wikipedia, reach and richness, lays the foundation for studying whether the free Web-based encyclopedia Wikipedia is only for developed countries. Based on data from 12 different Wikipedia language editions, the author finds...... that the central structural effect is on the level of human development in the current country. In other words, Wikipedia is in general more for rich countries than for less developed countries. It is suggested that policy makers make investments in increasing the general level of literacy, education, and standard...

  19. Differential mode of antimicrobial actions of arginine-rich and lysine-rich histones against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shuu; Tagai, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Takayuki; Miyaji, Kazuyuki; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported the activities and modes of action of arginine (Arg)-rich histones H3 and H4 against Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the properties of the Arg-rich histones against Gram-positive bacteria in comparison with those of lysine (Lys)-rich histone H2B. In a standard microdilution assay, calf thymus histones H2B, H3, and H4 showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus with minimum effective concentration values of 4.0, 4.0, and 5.6 μM, respectively. Laser confocal microscopic analyses revealed that both the Arg-rich and Lys-rich histones associated with the surface of S. aureus. However, while the morphology of S. aureus treated with histone H2B appeared intact, those treated with the histones H3 and H4 closely resembled each other, and the cells were blurred. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay results revealed these histones have binding affinity to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), one of major cell surface components of Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that while histone H2B elicited no obvious changes in cell morphology, histones H3 and H4 disrupted the cell membrane structure with bleb formation in a manner similar to general antimicrobial peptides. Consequently, our results suggest that bacterial cell surface LTA initially attracts both the Arg- and Lys-rich histones, but the modes of antimicrobial action of these histones are different; the former involves cell membrane disruption and the latter involves the cell integrity disruption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ammonium transformation in a nitrogen-rich tidal freshwater marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Andersson, M.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2006-01-01

    The fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient rich Scheldt River, Belgium, was quantified in a whole ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. In late summer (September) we added 15N-NH4+ to the flood water entering a 3477 m2 tidal freshwater marsh...

  1. Species richness and composition of bird community in Abalo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents results of avifaunal survey made in Abalo-Gunacho forest, southern Ethiopia, in May 2014 to determine the species richness and to examine guild composition of bird community of the forest. Birds were surveyed using Timed-Species Count technique along eight randomly selected transects. Fifty-one ...

  2. The effect of intercropping Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst. (marula) is native to Africa occurring in the semi-arid, deciduous savannas of much of sub-Saharan Africa. It has multiple uses, including the fruits, kernels, oil, bark, wood and leaves which make it a key species to support the development of rural enterprises. Enhancing positive ...

  3. Structure of light neutron-rich nuclei through Coulomb dissociation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 57; Issue 2-3. Structure of light neutron-rich nuclei through Coulomb dissociation. U Datta Pramanik T Aumann D Cortina H Emling H Geissel M Hellström R Holzmann N Iwasa Y Leifels G Münzenberg M Rejmund C Scheidenberger K Sümmerer A Leistenschneider ...

  4. The effects of forest destruction on the abundance, species richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-04-25

    Apr 25, 2013 ... The effects of forest destruction on the abundance, species richness and diversity of butterflies in the. Bosomkese Forest Reserve, Brong Ahafo Region,. Ghana. Addai, G. and Baidoo P. K*. Department of Theoretical and Applied Biology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology,. Kumasi ...

  5. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  6. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares Correa Dias, A.; van Ruijven, J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  7. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, A.A.; Ruijven, van J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  8. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The fission decay of highly neutron-rich uranium isotopes is investigated which shows interesting new features in the barrier properties and neutron emission char- acteristics in the fission process. 233U and 235U are the nuclei in the actinide region in the beta stability valley which are thermally fissile and have ...

  9. Ant species richness of fynbos and forest ecosystems in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ant fauna in fynbos and forest habitats in the southern Cape are compared. There is no significant difference in ant species richness between the two undisturbed habitat types, and the only two species common to both are Acantholepis capensis and Camponotus maculatus. The degree of Hakea sericea infestation in ...

  10. High-spin structure of neutron-rich Dy isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In view of recent experimental progress on production and spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes of Dy with mass number A. 166 and 168, we have made theoretical investigations on the structure of high spin states of164 170Dy isotopes in the cranked Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (CHFB) theory employing a ...

  11. Species Richness and Diversity Reveal that Human-Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spider abundance differed significantly between habitat types and was influenced by the sampling methods used. Family diversity and richness showed no significant differences across the sites. The spider species consisted of primarily three functional groups: ground wanderers, web builders and plant wanderers, and ...

  12. A protocol for sampling vascular epiphyte richness and abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.H.D.; Gradstein, S.R.; Nadkarni, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    The sampling of epiphytes is fraught with methodological difficulties. We present a protocol to sample and analyse vascular epiphyte richness and abundance in forests of different structure (SVERA). Epiphyte abundance is estimated as biomass by recording the number of plant components in a range of

  13. Structure of light neutron-rich nuclei through Coulomb dissociation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O, the low-lying E1 strength amounts up to about 12% of the energy weighted dipole sum rule strength depending on neutron excess. The cluster sum rule limit with. ½. O as a core is almost exhausted for. ½,½. O, while for more neutron rich isotopes the strength with respect to that limit decreases. Keywords. Coulomb ...

  14. Algae of the Bohemian Forest. 1. Specieses richness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lederer, F.; Lukavský, Jaromír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2001), s. 97-104 ISSN 1211-7420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IA60504; GA ČR GA206/99/1411 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Bohemian Forest * species richness * biodiversity * algae * cyanobacteria * lakes * brooks * rivers * bogs Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The middle shore is primarily occupied by cirolanids and bivalves, and hippid crabs, bivalves and amphipods dominate the lower beach. Generally, species richness increases from upper to lower beach levels. Studies carried out on exposed sandy beaches of south-central Chile (ca. 40°S) show that different beach states ...

  16. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Instituto de Zoologia, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile. Received 22 Occobcr 1993; accepted 19 Jan.uary 1994. Species richness of the intertidal macroinfauna of exposed sandy beaches around South America is reviewed in relation to geographic location. This macrolnfauna is dominated by drolanid isopods ...

  17. Transition metal chemistry of hydroxy(–OH)-rich molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Transition metal chemistry of hydroxy(–OH)-rich molecules: Syntheses, crystal structures and solution reactivity studies. MISHTU DEY 1, P K SAARENKETO 2, E KOLEHMAINEN 2,. K RISSANEN 2 and CHEBROLU P RAO 1. 1Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of. Technology Bombay, Powai ...

  18. Relationships between Plant Biomass and Species Richness under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in a montane grassland of Kokosa District, West Arsi Zone of Oromia Region, southern Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between aboveground plant biomass and species richness in three farming systems and four grazing management systems. A total of 180 ...

  19. Knowledge and attitude of the community towards rich sources of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of rich sources of vitamin A and iron are paramount, but their utilization and application are unknown. This study therefore, is intended to assess knowledge and attitude of the community to curb down the existing traditional misconceptions and to promote integrated prevention of malnutrition. A cross sectional ...

  20. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclei with JYFLTRAP

    OpenAIRE

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-01-01

    The Penning trap setup JYFLTRAP, connected to the IGISOL facility, has been extensively used for atomic mass measurements of exotic nuclei. On the proton rich side of the chart of nuclei mass measurements have mostly contributed to fundamental physics and nuclear astrophysics studies with about 100 atomic masses measured.

  1. Recent results on neutron rich tin isotopes by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J E; Essabaa, S; Fedosseev, V; Geithner, W; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Horn, R; Kappertz, S; Lassen, J; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Le Scornet, G; Lettry, Jacques; Mishin, V I; Neugart, R; Obert, J; Oms, J; Ouchrif, A; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Ravn, H L; Sauvage, J; Verney, D

    2001-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron rich tin isotopes using the COMPLIS experimental setup. The nuclear charge radii of the even-even isotopes from A=108 to 132 are compared to the results of macroscopic and microscopic calculations. The improvements and optimizations needed to perform the isotope shift measurement on $^{134}$Sn are presented.

  2. Preparing Mathematics Teachers for Technology-Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdivant, Rodney X.; Dunham, Penelope; Jardine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article describes key elements for faculty development programs to prepare mathematics teachers for technology-rich environments. We offer practical examples from our experiences in teaching mathematics with technology and in teaching others to incorporate technology-based pedagogies. We address challenges faced by faculty using technology,…

  3. Small-Group Discourse: Establishing a Communication-Rich Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quebec Fuentes, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a communication-rich classroom can be difficult. This article describes the process and findings of a practitioner action research study addressing the question of how teachers can interact with their students while they are working in groups to encourage and enhance student-to-student communication. Recommended research-based teacher…

  4. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain two...

  5. Platelet-Rich Plasma for Frozen Shoulder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Aslani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frozen shoulder is a glenohumeral joint disorder that perturbs movement because of adhesion and the existence of fibrosis in the shoulder capsule. Platelet-rich plasma can produce collagen and growth factors, which increases stem cells and consequently enhances the healing. To date, there is no evidence regarding the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder. A 45-year-old man with shoulder adhesive capsulitis volunteered for this treatment. He underwent two consecutive platelet-rich plasma injections at the seventh and eighth month after initiation of symptoms. We measured pain, function, and ROM by the visual analogue scale (VAS, and scores from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire and goniometer; respectively. After the first injection, the patient reported 60% improvement regarding diurnal shoulder pain, and no night pains. Also, two-fold improvement for ROM and more than 70% improvement for function were reported. This study suggests the use of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder to be tested in randomized trials.

  6. Computational studies on energetic properties of nitrogen-rich ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computational studies on energetic properties of nitrogen-rich energetic materials with ditetrazoles. LI XIAO-HONGa,b,∗ and ZHANG RUI-ZHOUa. aCollege of Physics and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471 003, China. bLuoyang Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Functional Materials, ...

  7. Growth and alteration of uranium-rich microlite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giere, R.; Swope, R. J.; Buck, E. C.; Guggenheim, R.; Mathys, D.; Reusser, E.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium-rich microlite, a pyrochlore-group mineral, occurs in 440 Ma old lithium pegmatites of the Mozambique Belt in East Africa. Microlite exhibits a pronounced growth zoning, with a U-free core surrounded by a U-rich rim (UO 2 up to 17 wt.%). The core exhibits conjugate sets of straight cracks (cleavage planes) which provided pathways for a late-stage U-enriched pegmatitic fluid which interacted with the U-free microlite to produce a distinct U enrichment along the cracks and led to the formation of the U-rich rim. Following the stage of U incorporation into microlite, a second generation of hydrothermal fluids deposited mica along the cleavage planes. Subsequent to these two hydrothermal stages, the host rock was uplifted and subjected to intense low-temperature alteration during which Na, Ca and F were leached from the microlite crystals. This alteration also led to a hydration of microlite, but there is no evidence of U loss. These low-temperature alteration effects were only observed in the U-rich rim which is characterized by a large number of irregular cracks which are most probably the result of metamictization, as indicated by electron diffraction images and powder X-ray patterns. The pyrochlore-group minerals provide excellent natural analogues for pyrochlore-based nuclear waste forms, because samples of variable age and with high actinide contents are available

  8. Designing Interaction Spaces for Rich Internet Applications with UML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Stage, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for designing rich internet applications. The design process uses results from an object-oriented analysis and employs interaction spaces as the basic abstraction mechanism. State diagrams are employed as refinements of interaction spaces and task models...

  9. School Partnerships: Technology Rich Classrooms and the Student Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti; Hogan, Molly; Waffle, Julene; Samplaski, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Building upon an established relationship between a college and a local school district, this project formally designated a Partnership School, at which education students conduct field experience. In addition to providing these participating pre-service teachers (students) with a clinically rich experience through closer supervision by and…

  10. Growing Rich Together: Educational Images of the International Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna

    1982-01-01

    The view that poverty and riches are caused by two distinct personality traits is perpetuated through educational materials. Examples drawn from secondary social studies texts and adult education programs in India illustrate how an educational system is a medium of cultural dissemination and political control. (AM)

  11. A Childhood Rich in Culture Gives a Socioeconomic Bonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennye Düranc

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen ridser den nyeste forskning op inden for feltet 'art rich learning', altså æstetiske læreprocesser af god kvalitet. In the book ”Art and Culture Give Children a Life that Works” 60 (Danish and non-Danish) experts, practitioners, artists and several Ministers from the Danish Government...

  12. Chromian spinel-rich black sands from eastern shoreline of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Black sands rich in chromian spinel commonly occur in pockets along the eastern shoreline of Andaman. Island where various types of peridotites and volcanics belonging to the Andaman ophiolite suite are exposed in close vicinity. The chemistry of these detrital chromian spinels has been extensively used here.

  13. Impact of physicochemical factors on zooplankton species richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thermometer, pH meter, Secchi disk, DO meter and EC/TDS meter respectively. Monthly sampling was conducted between January, 2009 and December, 2010. Result showed reduced zooplankton species richness between 2009 and 2010 of 33 spp. and 21 spp. respectively. Likewise there was observed reduction in ...

  14. Genotypic richness and phenotypic similarity enhance population performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellers, J.; Rog, S.; Braam, C.; Berg, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in biodiversity can result from an increase in species richness, as well as from a higher genetic diversity within species. Intraspecific genetic diversity, measured as the number of genotypes, can enhance plant primary productivity and have cascading effects at higher trophic levels, such

  15. Genotypic richness and phenotypic dissimilarity enhance population performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellers, Jacintha; Rog, Stefanie; Braam, Ciska; Berg, Matty P

    Increases in biodiversity can result from an increase in species richness, as well as from a higher genetic diversity within species. Intraspecific genetic diversity, measured as the number of genotypes, can enhance plant primary productivity and have cascading effects at higher trophic levels, such

  16. Enzymatically induced mineralization of platelet-rich fibrin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, T.E.L.; Gassling, V.; Declercq, H.A.; Purcz, N.; Pamula, E.; Haugen, H.J.; Chasan, S.; Mulder, E.L.W. de; Jansen, J.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Membranes of the autologous blood-derived biomaterial platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) were functionalized by incorporation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in mineralization of bone, and subsequently incubated in calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) solution to induce PRFs mineralization with

  17. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Gayde, J. Ch; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-01-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM)

  18. Multiscale assessment of patterns of avian species richness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, C; Graves, G R

    2001-01-01

    The search for a common cause of species richness gradients has spawned more than 100 explanatory hypotheses in just the past two decades. Despite recent conceptual advances, further refinement of the most plausible models has been stifled by the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases ...

  19. Process for producing uranium oxide rich compositions from uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHollander, W.R.; Fenimore, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of gaseous uranium hexafluoride to a uranium dioxide rich composition in the presence of an active flame in a reactor defining a reaction zone is achieved by separately introducing a first gaseous reactant comprising a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and a reducing carrier gas, and a second gaseous reactant comprising an oxygen-containing gas. The reactants are separated by a shielding gas as they are introduced to the reaction zone. The shielding gas temporarily separates the gaseous reactants and temporarily prevents substantial mixing and reacting of the gaseous reactants. The flame occurring in the reaction zone is maintained away from contact with the inlet introducing the mixture to the reaction zone. After suitable treatment, the uranium dioxide rich composition is capable of being fabricated into bodies of desired configuration for loading into nuclear fuel rods. Alternatively, an oxygen-containing gas as a third gaseous reactant is introduced when the uranium hexafluoride conversion to the uranium dioxide rich composition is substantially complete. This results in oxidizing the uranium dioxide rich composition to a higher oxide of uranium with conversion of any residual reducing gas to its oxidized form

  20. Safety evaluation of polyphenol-rich extract from bamboo shavings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety evaluation of polyphenol-rich extract from bamboo shavings. ... (i) Acute toxicity test: The oral maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of EEBS was above 20 g/kg body weight for mice, thus the amount can be seen as practically non-toxic ... In conclusion, EEBS is safe and the results support the use of EEBS for various foods.

  1. Intraplate mantle oxidation by volatile-rich silicic magmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey M.; Médard, Etienne; Righter, Kevin; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    The upper subcontinental lithospheric mantle below the French Massif Central is more oxidized than the average continental lithosphere, although the origin of this anomaly remains unknown. Using iron oxidation analysis in clinopyroxene, oxybarometry, and melt inclusions in mantle xenoliths, we show that widespread infiltration of volatile (HCSO)-rich silicic melts played a major role in this oxidation. We propose the first comprehensive model of magmatism and mantle oxidation at an intraplate setting. Two oxidizing events occurred: (1) a 365–286 Ma old magmatic episode that produced alkaline vaugnerites, potassic lamprophyres, and K-rich calc-alkaline granitoids, related to the N–S Rhenohercynian subduction, and (2) < 30 Ma old magmatism related to W–E extension, producing carbonatites and hydrous potassic trachytes. These melts were capable of locally increasing the subcontinental lithospheric mantle fO2 to FMQ + 2.4. Both events originate from the melting of a metasomatized lithosphere containing carbonate + phlogopite ± amphibole. The persistence of this volatile-rich lithospheric source implies the potential for new episodes of volatile-rich magmatism. Similarities with worldwide magmatism also show that the importance of volatiles and the oxidation of the mantle in intraplate regions is underestimated.

  2. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Half-lives for alpha radioactivity from proton-rich even Pb isotopes in the range A = 182–202 have been calculated using the unified fission-like approach. The geometrical shape of the potential barrier is parametrized in terms of a highly versatile, asymmetric and analytically solvable form of potential based on ...

  3. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Half-lives for alpha radioactivity from proton-rich even Pb isotopes in the range = 182–202 have been calculated using the unified fission-like approach. The geometrical shape of the potential barrier is parametrized in terms of a highly versatile, asymmetric and analytically solvable form of potential based on Ginnochio's ...

  4. H2O Formation in C-rich AGB Winds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Royer, P.; de Koter, A.; Cox, N.L.J.; De Ridder, J.; Khouri, T.; Agúndez, M.; Blommaert, J.A.D.L.; Gernicharo, J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Groenewegen, M.A.T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Neufeld, D.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Herschel detection of warm H2O vapor emission from C-rich winds of AGB stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H2O formation. In the first, penetration of UV interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar

  5. Farewell to a Big and Rich Nuclear Power Club?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.

    2001-01-01

    For the last few decades of the 20th, century, we have seen a large number of big nuclear power plants being built and operated in a few rich countries like the United States, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Japan. They have standardized the 1000 MWe-type light water reactors, which have the actual generating capacity of more than 1100 MW. (author)

  6. Uncooked, lactobacilli-rich, vegan food and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenonen, M T; Helve, T A; Rauma, A L; Hänninen, O O

    1998-03-01

    We tested the effects of an uncooked vegan diet, rich in lactobacilli, in rheumatoid patients randomized into diet and control groups. The intervention group experienced subjective relief of rheumatic symptoms during intervention. A return to an omnivorous diet aggravated symptoms. Half of the patients experienced adverse effects (nausea, diarrhoea) during the diet and stopped the experiment prematurely. Indicators of rheumatic disease activity did not differ statistically between groups. The positive subjective effect experienced by the patients was not discernible in the more objective measures of disease activity (Health Assessment Questionnaire, duration of morning stiffness, pain at rest and pain on movement). However, a composite index showed a higher number of patients with 3-5 improved disease activity measures in the intervention group. Stepwise regression analysis associated a decrease in the disease activity (measured as change in the Disease Activity Score, DAS) with lactobacilli-rich and chlorophyll-rich drinks, increase in fibre intake, and no need for gold, methotrexate or steroid medication (R2=0.48, P=0.02). The results showed that an uncooked vegan diet, rich in lactobacilli, decreased subjective symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Large amounts of living lactobacilli consumed daily may also have positive effects on objective measures of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Chemical detection of cysteine-rich circular petides in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysteine-rich circular peptides (CRCs) comprise a large family of gene encoded and low molecular weight polypeptides that has recently engaged the attention of scientists. This class of peptides exhibit a continuous circular configuration and a cystine knot backbone, which defines their resilient nature-directed structural ...

  8. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion…

  9. Systematic study of neutron-rich Molybdenum isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudih, M.R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Benhamouda, N.

    2010-01-01

    The ground state properties of neutron-rich even-even Molybdenum isotopes are studied using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory. Quantities such as two-neutron separation energies and r.m.s radii have been investigated and compared with available experimental data. Deformations and shape coexistence for not yet observed nuclei are predicted.

  10. Glycaemic index of selected staple carbohydrate-rich foods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... Original Research: Glycaemic index of selected staple carbohydrate-rich foods commonly consumed in Botswana. 2013;26(4) ... United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO).5,6,17 However, the practical ... test, to fast for 10 hours, be at the testing site at 08h00 once a week over a period of six ...

  11. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antifungal Activities of Polyphenol-rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antioxidant and antifungal activities of polyphenol-rich extracts of the dried fruit pulp of Garcinia pedunculata (GP) and Garcinia morella (GM) to determine their traditional claims of therapeutic activity against certain diseases. Methods: Analysis of total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) contents of the ...

  12. Channel perceptions and usage: beyond media richness factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterson, Willem Jan; Teerling, Marije; Ebbers, Wolfgang E.; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Hans J.; Ferro, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we asses how service channel perceptions affect channel choice and channel usage. Building on communication theories, such as the Media Richness Theory, we explore how different channel characteristics are perceived by citizens in a Dutch governmental service chain. The results of our

  13. The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Information Richness on Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeah Mat Saat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept that describes the relationship between company  and society. The way a company portrays corporate ethics and social initiatives can evoke strong positive reactions among consumers. The emergence of Internet creates a new communicating culture and gives an idea for a company to deliver their CSR message. Applying Media Richness Theory (MRT in CSR message is believed could facilitate trust among consumer. Thus, this study aims to examine the impact of different level of CSR information richness with consumers trust towards the company. This study divides trust into three components that are competence, benevolence and integrity. An experimental design consisting of different levels of CSR information is selected (rich CSR information, lean CSR information and no CSR information as a control condition. The finding shows that rich CSR information has impacted on competence and integrity but not on benevolence. Result from this study is believed can assist companies in setting up their CSR communicating strategy in engaging consumers’ trust.

  14. Restoration of species-rich grasslands on reconstructed river dikes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrand, C.I.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Up until 30 years ago an extensive, flower-rich grassland vegetation containing many species rare in the Netherlands used to be common on Dutch river dikes. However, the deterioration of the flora on dikes was already being reported at the end of the 1960s. At that time too, ecologists

  15. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grace, James B.; Anderson, T. Michael; Seabloom, Eric W.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Adler, Peter B.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Damschen, Ellen I.; Davies, Kendi F.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M. H.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Smith, Melinda D.

    2016-01-01

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a

  16. Preparation of novolacs using phenolic rich components as partial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possibility of using phenolic rich components (water insoluble fraction) from biomass pyrolysis oil as partial substitute of phenol in synthesis of high-ortho phenolic novolac under the catalyst of HCl/Zn(AC)2 has been proved using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy ...

  17. Chromian spinel-rich black sands from eastern shoreline of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Black sands rich in chromian spinel commonly occur in pockets along the eastern shoreline of Andaman Island where various types of peridotites and volcanics belonging to the Andaman ophiolite suite are exposed in close vicinity. The chemistry of these detrital chromian spinels has been extensively used here in ...

  18. Antioxidative and Hepatoprotective Activities of Deinoxanthin-Rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary carotenoids and carotenoid-rich foods are considered to be beneficial for preventing a variety of major diseases, including eye diseases. Carotenoids are naturally synthesized by a variety of organisms, including bacteria, and are efficient scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) [4]. It has been reported that β-.

  19. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain t...

  20. Pectin-rich biomass as feedstock for fuel ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Meredith C.; Doran-Peterson, Joy [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2012-08-15

    The USA has proposed that 30 % of liquid transportation fuel be produced from renewable resources by 2030 (Perlack and Stokes 2011). It will be impossible to reach this goal using corn kernel-based ethanol alone. Pectin-rich biomass, an under-utilized waste product of the sugar and juice industry, can augment US ethanol supplies by capitalizing on this already established feedstock. Currently, pectin-rich biomass is sold (at low value) as animal feed. This review focuses on the three most studied types of pectin-rich biomass: sugar beet pulp, citrus waste and apple pomace. Fermentations of these materials have been conducted with a variety of ethanologens, including yeasts and bacteria. Escherichia coli can ferment a wide range of sugars including galacturonic acid, the primary component of pectin. However, the mixed acid metabolism of E. coli can produce unwanted side products. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot naturally ferment galacturonic acid nor pentose sugars but has a homoethanol pathway. Erwinia chrysanthemi is capable of degrading many of the cell wall components of pectin-rich materials, including pectin. Klebsiella oxytoca can metabolize a diverse array of sugars including cellobiose, one degradation product of cellulose. However, both E. chrysanthemi and K. oxytoca produce side products during fermentation, similar to E. coli. Using pectin-rich residues from industrial processes is beneficial because the material is already collected and partially pretreated to facilitate enzymatic deconstruction of the plant cell walls. Using biomass already produced for other purposes is an attractive practice because fewer greenhouse gases (GHG) will be anticipated from land-use changes. (orig.)

  1. Plant species richness enhances nitrogen retention in green roof plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine; Schweinhart, Shelbye; Buffam, Ishi

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs have become common in many cities and are projected to continue to increase in coverage, but little is known about the ecological properties of these engineered ecosystems. In this study, we tested the biodiversity-ecosystem function hypothesis using commercially available green roof trays as replicated plots with varying levels of plant species richness (0, 1, 3, or 6 common green roof species per plot, using plants with different functional characteristics). We estimated accumulated plant biomass near the peak of the first full growing season (July 2013) and measured runoff volume after nearly every rain event from September 2012 to September 2013 (33 events) and runoff fluxes of inorganic nutrients ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate from a subset of 10 events. We found that (1) total plant biomass increased with increasing species richness, (2) green roof plots were effective at reducing storm runoff, with vegetation increasing water retention more than soil-like substrate alone, but there was no significant effect of plant species identity or richness on runoff volume, (3) green roof substrate was a significant source of phosphate, regardless of presence/absence of plants, and (4) dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = nitrate + ammonium) runoff fluxes were different among plant species and decreased significantly with increasing plant species richness. The variation in N retention was positively related to variation in plant biomass. Notably, the increased biomass and N retention with species richness in this engineered ecosystem are similar to patterns observed in published studies from grasslands and other well-studied ecosystems. We suggest that more diverse plantings on vegetated roofs may enhance the retention capacity for reactive nitrogen. This is of importance for the sustained health of vegetated roof ecosystems, which over time often experience nitrogen limitation, and is also relevant for water quality in receiving waters

  2. Bryophyte and vascular plant responses to base-richness and water level gradients in Western Carpathian Sphagnum-rich mires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Petra; Hájek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 4 (2004), s. 335-351 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/02/0568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : fen * poor-rich gradient * water table Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2004

  3. The richness and reach of Wikinomics: Is the free web-based encyclopedia Wikipedia only for the rich countries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a model of the patterns of correlation in Wikipedia, reach and richness, lays the foundation for studying whether or not the free web-based encyclopedia Wikipedia is only for developed countries. Based upon data from 12 different Wikipedia language editions, we find that the centra...

  4. Black manganese-rich crusts on a Gothic cathedral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, Dorothea S.; Herrmann, Siegfried; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Laubscher, Thomas; Pfisterer, Jonas H. K.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Schwager, Beate; Weber, Bettina; Weigand, Markus; Domke, Katrin F.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-12-01

    Black manganese-rich crusts are found worldwide on the façades of historical buildings. In this study, they were studied exemplarily on the façade of the Freiburger Münster (Freiburg Minster), Germany, and measured in-situ by portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The XRF was calibrated to allow the conversion from apparent mass fractions to Mn surface density (Mn mass per area), to compensate for the fact that portable XRF mass fraction measurements from thin layers violate the assumption of a homogeneous measurement volume. Additionally, 200-nm femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (fs LA-ICP-MS) measurements, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS), Raman spectroscopy, and imaging by light microscopy were conducted to obtain further insight into the crust material, such as potential biogenic contributions, element distributions, trace element compositions, and organic functional groups. While black crusts of various types are present at many places on the minster's facade, crusts rich in Mn (with a Mn surface density >150 μg cm-2) are restricted to a maximum height of about 7 m. The only exceptions are those developed on the Renaissance-Vorhalle (Renaissance Portico) at a height of about 8 m. This part of the façade had been cleaned and treated with a silicon resin as recently as 2003. These crusts thus accumulated over a period of only 12 years. Yet, they are exceptionally Mn-rich with a surface density of 1200 μg cm-2, and therefore require an accumulation rate of about 100 μg cm-2 Mn per year. Trace element analyses support the theory that vehicle emissions are responsible for most of the Mn supply. Lead, barium, and zinc correlate with manganese, indicating that tire material, brake pads, and resuspended road dust are likely to be the element sources. Microscopic investigations show no organisms on or in the Mn-rich crusts. In contrast, Mn-free black

  5. Nucleon effective masses in neutron-rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Cai, Bao-Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Xu, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Various kinds of isovector nucleon effective masses are used in the literature to characterize the momentum/energy dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential or self-energy due to the space/time non-locality of the underlying isovector strong interaction in neutron-rich nucleonic matter. The multifaceted studies on nucleon isovector effective masses are multi-disciplinary in nature. Besides structures, masses and low-lying excited states of nuclei as well as nuclear reactions, studies of the isospin dependence of short-range correlations in nuclei from scatterings of high-energy electrons and protons on heavy nuclei also help understand nucleon effective masses especially the so-called E-mass in neutron-rich matter. A thorough understanding of all kinds of nucleon effective masses has multiple impacts on many interesting issues in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Indeed, essentially all microscopic many-body theories and phenomenological models with various nuclear forces available in the literature have been used to calculate single-nucleon potentials and the associated nucleon effective masses in neutron-rich matter. There are also fundamental principles connecting different aspects and impacts of isovector strong interactions. In particular, the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem connects analytically nuclear symmetry energy with both isoscalar and isovector nucleon effective masses as well as their own momentum dependences. It also reveals how the isospin-quartic term in the equation of state of neutron-rich matter depends on the high-order momentum-derivatives of both isoscalar and isovector nucleon potentials. The Migdal-Luttinger theorem facilitates the extraction of nucleon E-mass and its isospin dependence from experimentally constrained single-nucleon momentum distributions. The momentum/energy dependence of the symmetry potential and the corresponding neutron-proton effective mass splitting also affect transport properties and the liquid-gas phase

  6. Marine diversity: the paradigms in patterns of species richness examined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Gray

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The two central paradigms of marine diversity are that there is a latitudinal cline of increasing species richness from poles to tropics and that species richness increases with depth to a maximum around 2,000 m and thereafter decreases. However, these paradigms were based on data collected in the late 1950´s and early 1960´s. Here I show that the 1960´s data, are not representative and thus the paradigms need re-examination. New data from coastal areas in the northern hemisphere record species richness as high as the highest recorded in the deep-sea. Whilst this suggests that the cline of increasing diversity from shallow to deep-sea does not exist, however, the database for the deep sea is not sufficient to draw such a conclusion. The basic problem with the data from the 1960s is that samples were taken on ecological scales and yet they are used to answer evolutionary questions. The questions that such data were to answer were why do the tropics have higher species richness than polar regions or why do deep-sea sediments have more species than coastal sediments? Evolutionary questions need data from much larger spatial areas. Recently, data representative of large scales have been collected from coastal areas in the northern hemisphere and show that there is a cline of increasing species richness from the Arctic to the tropics, but there does not yet seem to be a similar cline in the southern hemisphere. A number of hypotheses have been proposed for the observed patterns in biodiversity. In terrestrial ecology the energy-productivity hypothesis has gained wide acceptance as an explanation for the latitudinal gradient. Here I examine this and other hypotheses critically. Finally an analysis of research priorities is made. Assessment is urgently needed of the spatial scales and dynamics of species richness from point samples to assemblages, habitats and landscapes, especially in coastal areas and in the tropics, where the threats to

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of silica rich zeolites and microporous martials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.K.; Chughtai, N.A.; Akhtar, J.; Arif, M.; Ahmed, M.

    1999-01-01

    A fast crystallization method for synthesis of silica rich aluminosilicate and ferro silicate zeotype materials has been reported. The method also permits for the complete crystallization of silico alumino phosphate microporous materials. Aluminosilicate and ferro silicate silica rich zeotype materials and silico alumino phosphate microporous materials have been synthesized from the reaction mixture of colloidal silica sol, reactive aluminum, ferrous and phosphorous salts, and the essential organic templates at 373-473 K and were characterized by TG/DTA/DSC, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. Crystallinity and unit cell parameters of the synthesized materials were found to be the function of Al and Fe content of zeolites. (author)

  8. On social inequality: Analyzing the rich-poor disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-05-01

    From the Old Testament to the Communist Manifesto, and from the French Revolution to the Occupy Wall Street protests, social inequality has always been at the focal point of public debate, as well as a major driver of political change. Although being of prime interest since Biblical times, the scientific investigation of the distributions of wealth and income in human societies began only at the close of the nineteenth century, and was pioneered by Pareto, Lorenz, Gini, and Pietra. The methodologies introduced by these trailblazing scholars form the bedrock of the contemporary science of social inequality. Based on this bedrock we present a new quantitative approach to the analysis of wealth and income distributions, which sets its spotlight on the most heated facet of the current global debate on social inequality-the rich-poor disparity. Our approach offers researchers highly applicable quantitative tools to empirically track and statistically analyze the growing gap between the rich and the poor.

  9. The photochemistry of carbon-rich circumstellar shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ambient ultraviolet photons on the chemical structure of carbon-rich, circumstellar envelopes is investigated with a simple formulation of the time-dependent, photochemical rate equations valid for optically thick shells. Molecules injected into the shielded inner envelope are broken down when they reach the outer regions where ambient ultraviolet photons can penetrate. A quantitative description of the abundance variations is obtained for the case of uniform expansion by detailed consideration of the shielding of the radiation by the dust and molecules of the envelope. Representative results are presented to illustrate the role of shielding in defining the extent of molecular envelopes, the formation of C I and C II shells by photodestruction of carbon-bearing molecules, and the development of layered chemical structures from the photobreakup of polyatomic molecules. Photochemistry makes the outer parts of thick, carbon-rich envelopes into complex regions containing radicals, ions, and atoms which are of considerable observational and theoretical interest.

  10. Phosphorus-rich structures and capsular architecture in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Caroline L; Gomes, Fabio M; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Almeida, Fernando P; Albuquerque, Priscila C; Kretschmer, Matthias; Kronstad, James W; Frases, Susana; de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Miranda, Kildare

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship of phosphorus-rich structures with surface architecture in Cryptococcus neoformans. Phosphorus-rich structures in C. neoformans were analyzed by combining fluorescence microscopy, biochemical extraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe x-ray microanalysis and 3D reconstruction of high pressure frozen and freeze substituted cells by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Intracellular and surface phosphorus-enriched structures were identified. These molecules were required for capsule assembly, as demonstrated in experiments using polysaccharide incorporation by capsule-deficient cells and mutants with defects in polyphosphate synthesis. The demonstration of intracellular and cell wall-associated polyphosphates in C. neoformans may lead to future studies involving their participation in both physiologic and pathogenic events.

  11. Platelet Rich Plasma- mechanism of action and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina N. Cozma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a blood-derived fraction containing high level of platelets, a high concentration of leukocytes and growth factors. PRP therapy has been growing as a viable treatment alternative for a number of clinical applications and has a potential benefit for use in wound healing. Nowadays platelet rich plasma is used in stimulating wound healing in skin and soft tissue ulcerations, accelerating wound healing in diabetic patients and facilitating bone proliferation in orthopedic and trauma surgery. It has also applications in maxillofacial surgery, spinal surgery, plastic and esthetic surgery, heart surgery and burns. This review of the literature shows a limited number of studies realized on humans that sustain PRP applications in orthopedic and plastic surgery. As the use of PRP increases, more properly structured clinical studies are necessary to confirm the results and to establish clearly the techniques of preparing, the conditions and the clinical indications of applying this therapy.

  12. Chiral-symmetry restoration in baryon-rich environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, J.; Matsuoka, H.; Stone, M.; Wyld, H.W.; Shenker, S.; Shigemitsu, J.; Sinclair, D.K.

    1983-04-01

    Chiral symmetry restoration in an environment rich in baryons is studied by computer simulation methods in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theories in the quenched approximation. The basic theory of symmetry restoration as a function of chemical potential is illustrated and the implementation of the ideas on a lattice is made explicit. A simple mean field model is presented to guide one's expectations. The second order conjugate-gradient iterative method and the pseudo-fermion Monte Carlo procedure are convergent methods of calculating the fermion propagator in an environment rich in baryons. Computer simulations of SU(3) gauge theory show an abrupt chiral symmetry restoring transition and the critical chemical potential and induced baryon density are estimated crudely. A smoother transition is observed for the color group SU(2)

  13. Digital literacy and problem solving in technology-rich environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Dolničar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development and progress, as well as the growing presence of information and communications technologies dictate the need for more highly developed digital skills in individuals. The paper focuses on the concepts of digital skills and problem solving in technology-rich environments. It examines these on the basis of empirical data obtained in the international study PIAAC. The introductory part presents an overview of the literature and the results of previous research in the field of measurement of digital skills, and data on the use of information society services among the EU Member States. The second part of the article refers to the results obtained in the study PIAAC. The results, confirmed by the results of other studies, showed the impact of age and education level on the problem solving in technology-rich environments. Article concludes with suggestions for improving the current state of integration of all population groups in training programs in the field of digital skills.

  14. Simulation of LHCb RICH Detectors using GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, I; Easo, S; Jones, C; Papanestis, A; Pokorski, W; Ranjard, F; Robbe, P

    2005-01-01

    LHCb is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It aims to make precision measurements of CP violation in the B-meson decays. The Detector simulation of LHCb was developed using the GEANT4 software toolkit interfaced to the LHCb software framework named GAUDI. This is now being used for a large production run of 210 million events. An important feature of the LHCb experiment is the use of Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counters (RICH) for particle identification. The Cherenkov photons created in this detector are focused onto an array of photodetectors made of Hybrid Photo- diodes. An brief overview of the GEANT4 based LHCb simulation program named GAUSS will be given with the main emphasis on RICH simulation and its verification.

  15. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications.

  16. Design and status of COMPASS FAST-RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dalla Torre, S; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Di Biase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Panebianco, S; Finger, M; Fisher, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Horikawa, S; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, Fabienne; Lehmann, A; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nahle, O; Neyret, D; Pagano, P; Finger, M Jr; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P C; Schiavon, Paolo; Schill, C; Schroder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1, we are developing a fast photodetection system for RICH counters, based on UV extended Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMT) and a custom, low dead-time electronic readout system. Photons are concentrated on the MAPMT photocathode by an optical system that preserves the position information. The ratio between the collection and the photosensitive surfaces is ∼7.5 in our design, larger than in previous applications. A new front-end electronics, based on a modified version of the MAD4 discriminator chip, is being realized to digitize the MAPMT signals. We report about the design of the photodetection system and of the associated electronic readout system, and on the preliminary test beam results.

  17. FunRich proteomics software analysis, let the fun begin!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Martin, Alberto; Peinado, Héctor

    2015-08-01

    Protein MS analysis is the preferred method for unbiased protein identification. It is normally applied to a large number of both small-scale and high-throughput studies. However, user-friendly computational tools for protein analysis are still needed. In this issue, Mathivanan and colleagues (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2597-2601) report the development of FunRich software, an open-access software that facilitates the analysis of proteomics data, providing tools for functional enrichment and interaction network analysis of genes and proteins. FunRich is a reinterpretation of proteomic software, a standalone tool combining ease of use with customizable databases, free access, and graphical representations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fast photon detection for the COMPASS RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Alekseev, M; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, Fabienne; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nahle, O; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Schiavon, Paolo; Schroder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2007-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the SPS accelerator at CERN uses a large scale Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) to identify pions, kaons and protons in a wide momentum range. For the data taking in 2006, the COMPASS RICH has been upgraded in the central photon detection area (25% of the surface) with a new technology to detect Cherenkov photons at very high count rates of several 10^6 per second and channel and a new dead-time free read-out system, which allows trigger rates up to 100 kHz. The Cherenkov photons are detected by an array of 576 visible and ultra-violet sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers with 16 channels each. The upgraded detector showed an excellent performance during the 2006 data taking.

  19. Tests of the CBM Rich readout and Daq prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Patel, V.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Schetinin, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2017-11-01

    The CBM RICH detector is an integral component of the future CBM experiment at FAIR, providing efficient electron identification and pion suppression necessary for the measurement of rare dileptonic probes in heavy ion collisions. An overview of the CBM RICH readout and DAQ system prototype is given, consisting of the PADIWA preamplifier-discriminator board, the TDC-HUB board TRBv3, and DAQ and analysis code in the CbmRoot framework. The laboratory setup built for studying the timing characteristics of the readout chain and the analysis results obtained using the laboratory measurements are presented. The fine time calibration and inter-channel delay correction techniques and their implementation and effect are discussed.

  20. Circular magnetic bistability in Co-rich amorphous microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chizhik, A; Gonzalez, J; Zhukov, A; Blanco, J M

    2003-01-01

    Circular magnetic bistability associated with a large Barkhausen jump between two states with opposite directions of circular magnetization have been observed by magneto-optical Kerr effect in nearly-zero magnetostrictive glass covered Co-rich amorphous microwire. The influence of external axial tensile stress on the circular switching field has been studied. Observed results have been related with a circular magneto-elastic anisotropy induced by a tensile stress in the outer transversally magnetized shell of the microwire

  1. Platelet Rich Plasma: What should the rheumatologist expect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Fernandes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, thousands of patients have benefited from platelet rich plasma (PRP therapies, emerging as a safe alternative in many different medical fields. Current evidence suggests that PRP may be of benefit over standard treatment in osteoarthritis patients and, in the musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries potential healing effects are waiting to be confirmed with robust evidence. Finally, in systemic rheumatic diseases PRP seems to have a role to play in the treatment of extra-articular symptoms.

  2. Direct versus sequential fragmentation of neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Hussein, M.S.

    1989-11-01

    The dissociation of neutron rich nuclei from secondary beams incident on several targets can be explained within two distinct models: a) the weakly bound neutrons form clusters near the nuclear surface, and, b) all protons can vibrate against all neutrons in a soft mode. We show that the momentum widths of the projectile fragments, as well as the total cross sections for the dissociation, is consistent with both hypothesis. The presently available data do not unambiguously distinguish between the two models. (author) [pt

  3. Rich or poor: Who should pay higher tax rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murilo Castro de Oliveira, Paulo

    2017-08-01

    A dynamic agent model is introduced with an annual random wealth multiplicative process followed by taxes paid according to a linear wealth-dependent tax rate. If poor agents pay higher tax rates than rich agents, eventually all wealth becomes concentrated in the hands of a single agent. By contrast, if poor agents are subject to lower tax rates, the economic collective process continues forever.

  4. Ionic Transport Through Metal-Rich Organic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    1 (2009): pp 1012-1013. 9. X. Zhang, F.Wang, Y. Du, “Effect of Nano-Sized Titanium Powder Addition on Corrosion Performance of Epoxy Coatings...choosing a coating is the substrate in question, the desired end use for the final product , and the environment in which the final product will be... product . Herein, we discuss the performance of one type of organic coating – metal-rich organic primer – as an ionic and electronic barrier for

  5. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumann, T.

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like 11 Li and 12 Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  6. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumann, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like {sup 11}Li and {sup 12}Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  7. A protocol for sampling vascular epiphyte richness and abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, J.H.D.; Gradstein, S.R.; Nadkarni, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    The sampling of epiphytes is fraught with methodological difficulties. We present a protocol to sample and analyse vascular epiphyte richness and abundance in forests of different structure (SVERA). Epiphyte abundance is estimated as biomass by recording the number of plant components in a range of size cohorts. Epiphyte species biomass is estimated on 35 sample-trees, evenly distributed over six trunk diameter-size cohorts (10 trees with dbh > 30 cm). Tree height, dbh and number of forks (di...

  8. Decay properties of some neutron-rich praseodymium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarnemark, G.; Aronsson, P.O.; Stender, E.; Trautmann, N.; Kaffrell, N.; Bjoernstad, T.; Kvale, E.; Skarestad, M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron-rich Pr isotopes produced in the thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U have been investigated by means of γ-γ coincidence experiments. The nuclides have been separated from the fission product mixture, using the fast chemical separation system SISAK in connection with a gas jet recoil transport system. The results include assignments of several new γ-ray energies and partial decay schemes for 147 Pr, 148 Pr, 149 Pr and 150 Pr. (orig.) [de

  9. Etude RICH Nursing. Plus de connaissances et de preuves scientifiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Maria

    2008-01-01

    L'importance et la validité des résultats de l'étude RICH-Nursing ont été récemment mises en cause par certains milieux, ce qui a provoqué certaines incertitudes chez les infirmières. Les auteurs reviennent sur l'impact actuel de cette étude et évoquent les perspectives d'avenir.

  10. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP applied during total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Fernandes Guerreiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma regarding healing, pain and hemostasis after total knee arthroplasty, by means of a blinded randomized controlled and blinded clinical study.METHODS: Forty patients who were going to undergo implantation of a total knee prosthesis were selected and randomized. In 20 of these patients, platelet-rich plasma was applied before the joint capsule was closed. The hemoglobin (mg/dL and hematocrit (% levels were assayed before the operation and 24 and 48 h afterwards. The Womac questionnaire and a verbal pain scale were applied and knee range of motion measurements were made up to the second postoperative month. The statistical analysis compared the results with the aim of determining whether there were any differences between the groups at each of the evaluation times.RESULTS: The hemoglobin (mg/dL and hematocrit (% measurements made before the operation and 24 and 48 h afterwards did not show any significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05. The Womac questionnaire and the range of motion measured before the operation and up to the first two months also did not show any statistical differences between the groups (p > 0.05. The pain evaluation using the verbal scale showed that there was an advantage for the group that received platelet-rich plasma, 24 h, 48 h, one week, three weeks and two months after the operation (p < 0.05.CONCLUSIONS: In the manner in which the platelet-rich plasma was used, it was not shown to be effective for reducing bleeding or improving knee function after arthroplasty, in comparison with the controls. There was an advantage on the postoperative verbal pain scale.

  11. Shell gap reduction in neutron-rich N=17 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obertelli, A.; Gillibert, A.; Alamanos, N.; Alvarez, M.; Auger, F.; Dayras, R.; Drouart, A.; France, G. de; Jurado, B.; Keeley, N.; Lapoux, V.; Mittig, W.; Mougeot, X.; Nalpas, L.; Pakou, A.; Patronis, N.; Pollacco, E.C.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Skaza, F.; Theisen, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The spectroscopy of 27 Ne has been investigated through the one-neutron transfer reaction 26 Ne(d,p) 27 Ne in inverse kinematics at 9.7 MeV/nucleon. The results strongly support the existence of a low-lying negative parity state in 27 Ne, which is a signature of a reduced sd-fp shell gap in the N=16 neutron-rich region, at variance with stable nuclei

  12. Natural Cr3+-rich ettringite: occurrence, properties, and crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Sokol, Ella V.; Kokh, Svetlana N.; Murashko, Mikhail N.

    2017-08-01

    Cr3+-rich ettringite with Cr3+→Al substitution and Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios up to 0.40-0.50 was found in mineral assemblages of the Ma'aleh Adumim area of Mottled Zone (Judean Desert). The Cr3+-rich compositions were the latest in the thaumasite → ettringite-thaumasite solid solution → ettringite → ettringite-bentorite solid solution series. The mineral-forming solution was enriched in Cr3+ and had a pH buffered by afwillite at 11-12. Chromium was inherited from larnite rocks produced by high-temperature combustion metamorphic alteration of bioproductive calcareous sediments. The Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios are within 0.10-0.15 in most of the analysed crystals. This degree of substitution imparts pink colouration to the crystals, but does not affect their habit (a combination of monohedra and a prism). The habit changes to pyramid faces in coarse and later Cr3+-bearing crystals as Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios increase abruptly to 0.40-0.50. Single-crystal XRD analysis of one Cr-free and two Cr3+-rich samples and their structure determination and refinement indicate that the Cr-rich crystals (with Cr/(Cr + Al) to 0.3) preserve the symmetry and metrics of ettringite. The Ca-O bonding network undergoes differentiation with increase of Cr3+ concentration at octahedral M sites. The compression of Ca2 and expansion of Ca1 polyhedra sub-networks correlates with the degree of Cr3+→Al substitution.

  13. Magnetotransport in Pd-rich PdFe alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, Ilja

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 1749-1752 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1228 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : galvanomagnetic transport * Pd-rich PdFe * long-range order * effect of temperature * anisotropic magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2013

  14. Particle identification with the fast COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbon, P.; Alexeev, M.; Angerer, H.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M.L.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Delagnes, E.; Denisov, O.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new photon detection system for the COMPASS RICH-1 detector has been designed and installed. In the central region, the project is based on multi-anode photo-multiplier technology accompanied by charge sensitive, high resolution and dead-time free time digitization. In the outer area, only the readout electronics for the existing photon detectors has been replaced. Details on the detector upgrade and its performance are presented.

  15. Spontaneous fission of neutron-rich superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gherghiescu, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron-rich isotopes of the superheavy elements 112, 114, and 116 have been studied for neutron numbers 184, 186, and 188. The spontaneous fission life-time calculations have been performed within the WKB method. Large values have been obtained due to the proton-shell closure 114. The maximum of the fission lifetime occurs for the double-magic superheavy nucleus (114,184). (author)

  16. Z-rich solar particle event characteristics 1972--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwickl, R.D.; Roelof, E.C.; Gold, R.E.; Krimigis, S.M.; Armstrong, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the hourly average Z> or =3 rate date (1972) September--1976 December) measured with the JHU/APL IMP 7 and IMP 8 detectors has revealed 13 short-lived events that have greatly enhanced Z> or = 3 fluxes. In addition to confirming the results of earlier studies that all 3 He-rich events are Fe-rich but not vice versa, we find that these 13 enriched events have several remarkable characteristics: (1) they are generally not associated with major solar flares but appear to be associated with low levels of activity (subflares) in western-hemisphere solar active regions that are located very close to the spacecraft's high coronal interplanetary magnetic field connection longitude; (2) they have very large and prolonged outward streaming anisotropies, sometimes persisting approx.1 day; (3) the spectra indices measured for p, α, and Z> or =3 particles during the times of maximum flux for the Z-rioch events are identical within errors to those measured in large flare events, while small impulsive and corotating events generally show a softer spectrum; and (4) Z-rich events appear to be associated with the low-speed wind that precedes the onset of solar wind streams. We conclude from this study that the same type of acceleration process that is responsible for the large proton events is responsible for the small Z-rich events, and therefore that the Z+ or =3 and 3 He enrichments are more likely due to enhanced abundances in the preaccelerated plasma than to preferential enrichment during the acceleration process. This interpretation is complementary to recent findings concerning abundances and coronal emission structure of low-speed solar wind. We conclude that compositional studies of low-energy solar particle events offer a good diagnostic of the flare acceleration process and possible inhomogeneities in the solar atmosphere, but are poor indicators of solar composition on a global scale

  17. Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eOppenheimer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how gases escape from particle-rich suspensions has important applications in nature and industry. Motivated by applications such as outgassing of crystal-rich magmas, we map gas migration patterns in experiments where we vary (1 particle fractions and liquid viscosity (10 Pa s – 500 Pa s, (2 container shape (horizontal parallel plates and upright cylinders, and (3 methods of bubble generation (single bubble injections, and multiple bubble generation with chemical reactions. We identify two successive changes in gas migration behavior that are determined by the normalized particle fraction (relative to random close packing, and are insensitive to liquid viscosity, bubble growth rate or container shape within the explored ranges. The first occurs at the random loose packing, when gas bubbles begin to deform; the second occurs near the random close packing, and is characterized by gas migration in a fracture-like manner. We suggest that changes in gas migration behavior are caused by dilation of the granular network, which locally resists bubble growth. The resulting bubble deformation increases the likelihood of bubble coalescence, and promotes the development of permeable pathways at low porosities. This behavior may explain the efficient loss of volatiles from viscous slurries such as crystal-rich magmas.

  18. Magnetic properties of tetrataenite-rich meteorites. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.; Funaki, M.; Danon, J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis and thermomagnetic characteristics of St. Severin (LL 6 ), Appley Bridge (LL 6 ) and Tuxtuac (LL 5 ) chondrites, which contain tetrataenite in their metallic components, are measured and analyzed in comparison with another tetrataenite-rich chondrite, Yamato 74160. The magnetic properties of tetrataenite-rich meteorites are characterized by (a) high magnetic coercive force (H sub(C)) which amounts to 520 Oe for St. Severin and 160 Oe for Appley Bridge, (b) essential flatness up to about 500 0 C and then a sharp irreversible drop down to Curie point of the first-run heating thermomagnetic curve. Both characteristic features are broken down to the ordinary features of disordered taenite by a breakdown of tetrataenite structure at elevated temperatures beyond the order-disorder transition temperature. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of tetrataenite-rich meteorites is extremely stable against AF-demagnetization and other magnetic disturbances because of the high magnetic coercivity of tetrataenite. The breakdown processes of ordered tetrataenite structure by heat treatments are experimentally pursued for the purpose of research of a possible formation process of tetrataenite phase in meteorites. (Author) [pt

  19. Neutron-rich B isotopes studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanada-En`yo, Y.; Horiuchi, H. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    Structure of odd-even B isotopes up to the neutron dripline is studied systematically with the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD method has already proved to be a powerful theoretical approach for the systematic study of nuclear structure in extensive region including exotic neutron-rich nuclei as well as ordinary nuclei. It is owing to its flexible nature free from any model assumptions such as the existence of clusters. The energies and other observed data of B isotopes are reproduced well. Especially very good reproduction of electromagnetic properties is obtained. The systematic behavior of the electromagnetic properties is explained in relation to the drastic change between clustering structure and shell-model-like structure. This explanation gives us an important indication that clustering structure in neutron-rich B nuclei is strongly suggested by the experimental data. It is shown that the structure change with increase of the neutron number is largely governed by the shell effect of neutron orbits. Exotic structure with new type of clustering is suggested to evolve in neutron-rich nuclei near the dripline.

  20. The invasive ant, Solenopsis invicta, reduces herpetofauna richness and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Birge, Hannah E.; Slater, J.; Wiggers, E.

    2017-01-01

    Amphibians and reptiles are declining globally. One potential cause of this decline includes impacts resulting from co-occurrence with non-native red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Although a growing body of anecdotal and observational evidence from laboratory experiments supports this hypothesis, there remains a lack of field scale manipulations testing the effect of fire ants on reptile and amphibian communities. We addressed this gap by measuring reptile and amphibian (“herpetofauna”) community response to successful fire ant reductions over the course of 2 years following hydramethylnon application to five 100–200 ha plots in southeastern coastal South Carolina. By assessing changes in relative abundance and species richness of herpetofauna in response to fire ant reductions, we were able to assess whether some species were particularly vulnerable to fire ant presence, and whether this sensitivity manifested at the community level. We found that herpetofauna abundance and species richness responded positively to fire ant reductions. Our results document that even moderate populations of red imported fire ants decrease both the abundance and diversity of herpetofauna. Given global herpetofauna population declines and continued spread of fire ants, there is urgency to understand the impacts of fire ants beyond anecdotal and singles species studies. Our results provides the first community level investigation addressing these dynamics, by manipulating fire ant abundance to reveal a response in herpetofauna species abundance and richness.

  1. The experience of building and operating COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Birsa, R; Rocco, E; Schiavon, P; Kramer, D; Schroder, W; Dafni, T; Tessarotto, F; Bressan, A; Schill, C; Deschamps, H; Mann, A; Sozzi, F; Colantoni, M; Dibiase, N; Abbon, P; Svec, M; Delagnes, E; Ketzer, B; Joosten, R; Steiger, L; Ciliberti, P; Konigsmann, K; Maggiora, A; Kolosov, V N; Giorgi, M; Sbrizzai, G; Nahle, O; Kunne, F; Sulc, M; Teufel, A; Paul, S; Neyret, D; Rebourgeard, P; Menon, G; Dalla Torre, S; Hagemann, R; Slunecka, M; Martin, A; Magnon, A; Takekawa, S; Finger, M; Bradamante, F; Heinsius, F H; Nerling, F; Gerassimov, S; Polak, J; Alexeev, M; Pizzolotto, C; Chiosso, M; Gobbo, B; Angerer, H; Denisov, O; Ferrero, A; Baum, G; Franco, C; Lehmann, A; Bordalo, P; Duic, V; Konorov, I; Mutter, A; Levorato, S; Robinet, F; von Harrach, D; Fischer, H; Schoenmeier, P; Pesaro, G; Wollny, H; Panzieri, D

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS RICH-1 is a large size gaseous Imaging Cherenkov Detector providing hadron identification in the range from 3 to 55 GeV/c, in the wide acceptance spectrometer of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS. It uses a 3 m long C(4)F(10) radiator, a 21 m(2) large VUV mirror surface and two kinds of photon detectors: MAPMTs and MWPCs with CsI photocathodes, covering a total of 5.5 m(2). It is in operation since 2002 and its performance has increased in time thanks to progressive optimization and mostly to a major upgrade which was implemented in 2006. The main characteristics of COMPASS RICH-1 components are described and some specific aspects related to the radiator gas system, the mirror alignment, the MWPC electrical stability and the readout electronics are discussed. Some key features of the event reconstruction and the PID analysis are presented together with results from the COMPASS RICH-1 performance characterization study. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cisplatin-Rich Polyoxazoline-Poly(aspartic acid) Supramolecular Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Kangjun; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaoke; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2017-12-01

    Cisplatin-rich supramolecular nanoparticles are constructed through the supramolecular inclusion interaction between the admantyl (Ad)-terminated poly(aspartic acid) (Ad-P(Asp)) and the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-terminated poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline). In the formation of the nanoparticles, the β-CD/admantane inclusion complex integrates poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(aspartic acid) chains to form pseudoblock copolymers, followed by the coordination between carboxyl groups in P(Asp) block and cisplatin. This coordination interaction drives the formation of nanoparticle and enables cisplatin incorporated into the nanoparticles. The spherical cisplatin-rich supramolecular nanoparticles have 53% cisplatin-loading content, good stability, and effective inhibition of the cell proliferation when it is tested in H22 cancer cells. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of tumor bearing mice reveals that the cisplatin-rich nanoparticles can target the tumor in vivo effectively. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Olivine-rich asteroids in the near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Marcel; Perna, D.; Barucci, M. A.; Fornasier, S.; Doressoundiram, A.; Lantz, C.; Merlin, F.; Belskaya, I. N.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    In the framework of a 30-night spectroscopic survey of small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) we present new results regarding the identification of olivine-rich objects. The following NEAs were classified as A-type using visible spectra obtained with 3.6 m NTT telescope: (293726) 2007 RQ17, (444584) 2006 UK, 2012 NP, 2014 YS34, 2015 HB117, 2015 LH, 2015 TB179, 2015 TW144. We determined a relative abundance of 5.4% (8 out of 147 observed targets) A-types at hundred meter size range of NEAs population. The ratio is at least five times larger compared with the previously known A-types, which represent less than ˜1% of NEAs taxonomically classified. By taking into account that part of our targets may not be confirmed as olivine-rich asteroids by their near-infrared spectra, or they can have a nebular origin, our result provides an upper-limit estimation of mantle fragments at size ranges bellow 300m. Our findings are compared with the "battered-to-bits" scenario, claiming that at small sizes the olivine-rich objects should be more abundant when compared with basaltic and iron ones.

  4. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythily Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies.

  5. Production and utilization of highly reactive calcium rich coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Nomura; H. Kitaguchi; H. Ayukawa [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment & Process Technology Center

    2005-07-01

    A method to produce coke in 'lump' form with high strength and reactivity through the addition of a catalyst was investigated in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. The addition of Ca compounds to coal before carbonization was found to considerably increase the reactivity of the coke at a low temperature range in the thermal reserve zone of a blast furnace. Furthermore it was proved that strong, highly reactive 'lump' form coke could be produced by adding a Ca-rich non-caking coal and adjusting the coal blend composition. Based on this fundamental study, the Ca-rich coke was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale. The use of the Ca-rich coke in a commercial scale blast furnace was found to cause a decrease in the reducing agent rate by 10 kg/t-p. This technology, producing coke of high reactivity and strength through catalyst addition, is promising as a means of improving the reaction efficiency of a blast furnace. 8 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Implementing a Java Based GUI for RICH Detector Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendacky, Andrew; Voloshin, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2016-09-01

    The CLAS12 detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is undergoing an upgrade. One of the improvements is the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector to improve particle identification in the 3-8 GeV/c momentum range. Approximately 400 multi anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are going to be used to detect Cherenkov Radiation in the single photoelectron spectra (SPS). The SPS of each pixel of all MAPMTs have been fitted to a mathematical model of roughly 45 parameters for 4 HVs, 3 OD. Out of those parameters, 9 can be used to evaluate the PMTs performance and placement in the detector. To help analyze data when the RICH is operational, a GUI application was written in Java using Swing and detector packages from TJNAF. To store and retrieve the data, a MySQL database program was written in Java using the JDBC package. Using the database, the GUI pulls the values and produces histograms and graphs for a selected PMT at a specific HV and OD. The GUI will allow researchers to easily view a PMT's performance and efficiency to help with data analysis and ring reconstruction when the RICH is finished.

  7. β decay of neutron-rich 53-56Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P. F.; Crawford, H. L.; Damaske, A.; Pinter, J. S.; Stoker, J. B.; Broda, R.; Fornal, B.; Hecht, A. A.; Hoteling, N.; Hoffman, C.; Tabor, S. L.; Walters, W. B.; Horoi, M.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Zhu, S.; Pereira, J.; Sumikama, T.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    β-decay properties of neutron-rich Ca isotopes have been obtained. Half-life values were determined for the first time for 54 Ca (86±7 ms), 55 Ca (22±2 ms), and 56 Ca (11±2 ms). The half-life of 230±60 ms deduced for 53 Ca is significantly longer than reported previously, where the decay chain 53 K → 53 Ca → 53 Sc was considered. A delayed γ ray with an energy of 247 keV was identified following β decay of 54 Ca and is proposed to depopulate the 1 1 + level in 54 Sc. The β-decay properties compare favorably with the results of shell-model calculations completed in the full pf space with the GXPF1 interaction. The half-lives of the neutron-rich Ca isotopes are also compared with gross β-decay theory. The systematic trend of the neutron-rich Ca half-lives is consistent with the presence of a subshell gap at N=32

  8. LHCb RICH Online-Monitor and Data-Quality

    CERN Multimedia

    Kerzel, U

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC (CERN) has been optimised for high precision measurements of the beauty quark sector. Its main objective is to precisely determine and over-constrain the parameters of the CKM mixing matrix, and to search for further sources of CP violation and new physics beyond the Standard Model in rare B-decays. Efficient particle identification at high purities over a wide momentum range from around 1 to ~100GeV/c is vital to many LHCb analyses. Central to the LHCb particle identification strategy are two Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detectors which use Silica Aerogel and C4F10 and CF4 gas radiators. A rigorous quality control scheme is being developed to insure that the data recorded by the RICH detector meets the stringent requirements of the physics analyses. The talk summarises the LHCb RICH online monitoring and data-quality strategy. Multiple dedicated algorithms are deployed to detect any potential issue already during data-taking ranging from integrity checks, mis-alignments to cha...

  9. [Platelet-rich plasma in knee osteoarthritis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Mendía, Mario Alberto; Vílchez-Cavazos, José Félix; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The biological changes that commonly cause degenerative articular cartilage injuries in the knee are primarily associated to misalignment of the joint and metabolic changes related to age, as occurs in osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the capacity for cartilage self-regeneration is quite limited due to the lack of vascularity of the tissue. To date there is no ideal treatment capable to stimulate cartilage regeneration; thus there is a need to seek alternative therapies for the treatment of such conditions. The number of publications demonstrating the therapeutic and regenerative benefits of using platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis has been increasing in recent years. In spite of encouraging results, there are still only a few randomised control studies with strong clinical evidence, lacking clarity on points such as the optimum formulation or the mechanism of action of platelet-rich plasma. Up to this point and based on the results of clinical studies, not all patients can benefit from this therapy. It is important to consider aspects such as the age and grade of cartilage degeneration. The aim of the present paper is to review the recent scientific literature on the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma, and the biological bases of this therapy, as well as presenting the current opinion on this subject. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Open architecture for health care systems: the European RICHE experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandji, B

    1997-01-01

    Groupe RICHE is bringing to the market of health IT the Open Systems approach allowing a new generation of health information systems to arise with benefit for patients, health care professionals, hospital managers, agencies and citizens. Groupe RICHE is a forum for exchanging information, expertise around open systems in health care. It is open to any organisation interested by open systems in health care and wanting to participate and influence the work done by its user, marketing and technical committees. The Technical Committee is in charge of the maintenance of the architecture and impact the results of industrial experiences on new releases. Any Groupe RICHE member is entitled to participate to this process. This unique approach in Europe allows health care professionals to benefit from applications supporting their business processes, including providing a cooperative working environment, a shared electronic record, in an integrated system where the information is entered only once, customised according to the user needs and available to the administrative applications. This allows Hospital managers to satisfy their health care professionals, to smoothly migrate from their existing environment (protecting their investment), to choose products in a competitive environment, being able to mix and match system components and services from different suppliers, being free to change suppliers without having to replace their existing system (minimising risk), in line with national and regional strategies. For suppliers, this means being able to commercialise products well fitted to their field of competence in a large market, reducing investments and increasing returns. The RICHE approach also allows agencies to define a strategy, allowing to create a supporting infrastructure, organising the market leaving enough freedom to health care organisations and suppliers. Such an approach is based on the definition of an open standard architecture. The RICHE esprit project

  11. On Infrared Excesses Associated with Li-Rich K Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, Luisa M.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Gibbs, John C.; Deeb, J. Elin; Larsen, Estefania; Black, David V.; Altepeter, Shailyn; Bucksbee, Ethan; Cashen, Sarah; Clarke, Matthew; hide

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) excesses around K-type red giants (RGs) have previously been discovered using Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data, and past studies have suggested a link between RGs with overabundant lithium and IR excesses, implying the ejection of circumstellar shells or disks. We revisit the question of IR excesses around RGs using higher spatial resolution IR data, primarily from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Our goal was to elucidate the link between three unusual RG properties: fast rotation, enriched lithium, and IR excess. Our sample of RGs includes those with previous IR detections, a sample with well-defined rotation and lithium abundance measurements with no previous IR measurements, and a large sample of RGs asserted to be lithium-rich in the literature; we have 316 targets thought to be K giants, about 40% of which we take to be Li-rich. In 24 cases with previous detections of IR excess at low spatial resolution, we believe that source confusion is playing a role, in that either (a) the source that is bright in the optical is not responsible for the IR flux, or (b) there is more than one source responsible for the IR flux as measured in IRAS. We looked for IR excesses in the remaining sources, identifying 28 that have significant IR excesses by approximately 20 micrometers (with possible excesses for 2 additional sources). There appears to be an intriguing correlation in that the largest IR excesses are all in Li-rich K giants, though very few lithium-rich K giants have IR excesses (large or small). These largest IR excesses also tend to be found in the fastest rotators. There is no correlation of IR excess with the carbon isotopic ratio, 12C/13C. IR excesses by 20 micrometers, though relatively rare, are at least twice as common among our sample of lithium-rich K giants. If dust shell production is a common by-product of Li enrichment mechanisms, these observations suggest that the IR excess stage is very short-lived, which is supported

  12. Platelet-rich plasma and the elimination of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain typically results from trauma-induced nociceptive neuron hyperexcitability and their spontaneous ectopic activity. This pain persists until the trauma-induced cascade of events runs its full course, which results in complete tissue repair, including the nociceptive neurons recovering their normal biophysical properties, ceasing to be hyperexcitable, and stopping having spontaneous electrical activity. However, if a wound undergoes no, insufficient, or too much inflammation, or if a wound becomes stuck in an inflammatory state, chronic neuropathic pain persists. Although various drugs and techniques provide temporary relief from chronic neuropathic pain, many have serious side effects, are not effective, none promotes the completion of the wound healing process, and none provides permanent pain relief. This paper examines the hypothesis that chronic neuropathic pain can be permanently eliminated by applying platelet-rich plasma to the site at which the pain originates, thereby triggering the complete cascade of events involved in normal wound repair. Many published papers claim that the clinical application of platelet-rich plasma to painful sites, such as muscle injuries and joints, or to the ends of nerves evoking chronic neuropathic pain, a process often referred to as prolotherapy, eliminates pain initiated at such sites. However, there is no published explanation of a possible mechanism/s by which platelet-rich plasma may accomplish this effect. This paper discusses the normal physiological cascade of trauma-induced events that lead to chronic neuropathic pain and its eventual elimination, techniques being studied to reduce or eliminate neuropathic pain, and how the application of platelet-rich plasma may lead to the permanent elimination of neuropathic pain. It concludes that platelet-rich plasma eliminates neuropathic pain primarily by platelet- and stem cell-released factors initiating the complex cascade of wound healing events

  13. Intratendon Delivery of Leukocyte-Poor Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Healing Compared With Leukocyte-Rich Platelet-Rich Plasma in a Rabbit Achilles Tendinopathy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruijian; Gu, Yanjia; Ran, Jisheng; Hu, Yejun; Zheng, Zefeng; Zeng, Mengfeng; Heng, Boon Chin; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Chen, Weishan; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a commonly occurring clinical problem that affects both athletes and inactive middle-aged patients. Although some studies have shown that different platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations could exert various therapeutic effects in vitro, the role of leukocytes in PRP has not yet been defined under tendinopathy conditions in vivo. This study compared the effects of the intratendon delivery of leukocyte-poor PRP (Lp-PRP) versus leukocyte-rich PRP (Lr-PRP) in a rabbit chronic tendinopathy model in vivo. Controlled laboratory study. Four weeks after a local injection of collagenase in the Achilles tendon, the following treatments were randomly administered on the lesions: injections of (1) 200 μL of Lp-PRP (n = 8), (2) 200 μL of Lr-PRP (n = 8), or (3) 200 μL of saline (n = 8). Healing outcomes were assessed at 4 weeks after therapy with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytokine quantification, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression, histology, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MRI revealed that the Lr-PRP and saline groups displayed higher signal intensities compared with the Lp-PRP group with T2 mapping. Histologically, the Lp-PRP group displayed significantly better general scores compared with the Lr-PRP ( P = .001) and saline ( P tendon healing and is a preferable option for the clinical treatment of tendinopathy. PRP is widely used in the clinical management of chronic tendinopathy. However, the clinical results are ambiguous. It is imperative to understand the influence of leukocytes on PRP-mediated tissue healing in vivo, which could facilitate the better clinical management of chronic tendinopathy. Further studies are needed to translate our findings to the clinical setting.

  14. Are parasite richness and abundance linked to prey species richness and individual feeding preferences in fish hosts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Stouffer, Daniel B; Poulin, Robert; Lagrue, Clément

    2016-01-01

    Variations in levels of parasitism among individuals in a population of hosts underpin the importance of parasites as an evolutionary or ecological force. Factors influencing parasite richness (number of parasite species) and load (abundance and biomass) at the individual host level ultimately form the basis of parasite infection patterns. In fish, diet range (number of prey taxa consumed) and prey selectivity (proportion of a particular prey taxon in the diet) have been shown to influence parasite infection levels. However, fish diet is most often characterized at the species or fish population level, thus ignoring variation among conspecific individuals and its potential effects on infection patterns among individuals. Here, we examined parasite infections and stomach contents of New Zealand freshwater fish at the individual level. We tested for potential links between the richness, abundance and biomass of helminth parasites and the diet range and prey selectivity of individual fish hosts. There was no obvious link between individual fish host diet and helminth infection levels. Our results were consistent across multiple fish host and parasite species and contrast with those of earlier studies in which fish diet and parasite infection were linked, hinting at a true disconnect between host diet and measures of parasite infections in our study systems. This absence of relationship between host diet and infection levels may be due to the relatively low richness of freshwater helminth parasites in New Zealand and high host-parasite specificity.

  15. Boron: Enabling Exciting Metal-Rich Structures and Magnetic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifers, Jan P; Zhang, Yuemei; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2017-09-19

    Boron's unique chemical properties and its reactions with metals have yielded the large class of metal borides with compositions ranging from the most boron-rich YB 66 (used as monochromator for synchrotron radiation) up to the most metal-rich Nd 2 Fe 14 B (the best permanent magnet to date). The excellent magnetic properties of the latter compound originate from its unique crystal structure to which the presence of boron is essential. In general, knowing the crystal structure of any given extended solid is the prerequisite to understanding its physical properties and eventually predicting new synthetic targets with desirable properties. The ability of boron to form strong chemical bonds with itself and with metallic elements has enabled us to construct new structures with exciting properties. In recent years, we have discovered new boride structures containing some unprecedented boron fragments (trigonal planar B 4 units, planar B 6 rings) and low-dimensional substructures of magnetically active elements (ladders, scaffolds, chains of triangles). The new boride structures have led to new superconducting materials (e.g., NbRuB) and to new itinerant magnetic materials (e.g., Nb 6 Fe 1-x Ir 6+x B 8 ). The study of boride compounds containing chains (Fe-chains in antiferromagnetic Sc 2 FeRu 5 B 2 ), ladders (Fe-ladders in ferromagnetic Ti 9 Fe 2 Rh 18 B 8 ), and chains of triangles (Cr 3 chains in ferrimagnetic and frustrated TiCrIr 2 B 2 ) of magnetically active elements allowed us to gain a deep understanding of the factors (using density functional theory calculations) that can affect magnetic ordering of such low-dimensional magnetic units. We discovered that the magnetic properties of phases containing these magnetic subunits can be drastically tuned by chemical substitution within the metallic nonmagnetic network. For example, the small hysteresis (measure of magnetic energy storage) of Ti 2 FeRh 5 B 2 can be successively increased up to 24-times by gradually

  16. Patterns of Freshwater Species Richness, Endemism, and Vulnerability in California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette K Howard

    Full Text Available The ranges and abundances of species that depend on freshwater habitats are declining worldwide. Efforts to counteract those trends are often hampered by a lack of information about species distribution and conservation status and are often strongly biased toward a few well-studied groups. We identified the 3,906 vascular plants, macroinvertebrates, and vertebrates native to California, USA, that depend on fresh water for at least one stage of their life history. We evaluated the conservation status for these taxa using existing government and non-governmental organization assessments (e.g., endangered species act, NatureServe, created a spatial database of locality observations or distribution information from ~400 data sources, and mapped patterns of richness, endemism, and vulnerability. Although nearly half of all taxa with conservation status (n = 1,939 are vulnerable to extinction, only 114 (6% of those vulnerable taxa have a legal mandate for protection in the form of formal inclusion on a state or federal endangered species list. Endemic taxa are at greater risk than non-endemics, with 90% of the 927 endemic taxa vulnerable to extinction. Records with spatial data were available for a total of 2,276 species (61%. The patterns of species richness differ depending on the taxonomic group analyzed, but are similar across taxonomic level. No particular taxonomic group represents an umbrella for all species, but hotspots of high richness for listed species cover 40% of the hotspots for all other species and 58% of the hotspots for vulnerable freshwater species. By mapping freshwater species hotspots we show locations that represent the top priority for conservation action in the state. This study identifies opportunities to fill gaps in the evaluation of conservation status for freshwater taxa in California, to address the lack of occurrence information for nearly 40% of freshwater taxa and nearly 40% of watersheds in the state, and to

  17. RECOILING MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN GAS-RICH GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Javiera; Madau, Piero; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric emission of gravitational waves produced during the coalescence of a massive black hole (MBH) binary imparts a velocity 'kick' to the system that can displace the hole from the center of its host. Here, we study the trajectories and observability of MBHs recoiling in three (one major, two minor) gas-rich galaxy merger remnants that were previously simulated at high resolution, and in which the pairing of the MBHs had been shown to be successful. We run new simulations of MBHs recoiling in the major merger remnant with Mach numbers in the range 1≤M≤6 and use simulation data to construct a semi-analytical model for the orbital evolution of MBHs in gas-rich systems. We show the following. (1) In major merger remnants the energy deposited by the moving hole into the rotationally supported, turbulent medium makes a negligible contribution to the thermodynamics of the gas. This contribution becomes significant in minor merger remnants, potentially allowing for an electromagnetic signature of MBH recoil. (2) In major merger remnants, the combination of both deeper central potential well and drag from high-density gas confines even MBHs with kick velocities as high as 1200 km s -1 within 1 kpc from the host's center. (3) Kinematically offset nuclei may be observable for timescales of a few Myr in major merger remnants in the case of recoil velocities in the range 700-1000 km s -1 . (4) In minor merger remnants the effect of gas drag is weaker, and MBHs with recoil speeds in the range 300-600 km s -1 will wander through the host halo for longer timescales. When accounting for the probability distribution of kick velocities, however, we find that the likelihood of observing recoiling MBHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers is very low even in the best-case scenario.

  18. High species richness of native pollinators in Brazilian tomato crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Silva-Neto

    Full Text Available Abstract Pollinators provide an essential service to natural ecosystems and agriculture. In tomatoes flowers, anthers are poricidal, pollen may drop from their pore when flowers are shaken by the wind. However, bees that vibrate these anthers increase pollen load on the stigma and in fruit production. The present study aimed to identify the pollinator richness of tomato flowers and investigate their morphological and functional traits related to the plant-pollinator interaction in plantations of Central Brazil. The time of anthesis, flower duration, and the number and viability of pollen grains and ovules were recorded. Floral visitors were observed and collected. Flower buds opened around 6h30 and closed around 18h00. They reopened on the following day at the same time in the morning, lasting on average 48 hours. The highest pollen availability occurred during the first hours of anthesis. Afterwards, the number of pollen grains declined, especially between 10h00 to 12h00, which is consistent with the pollinator visitation pattern. Forty bee species were found in the tomato fields, 30 of which were considered pollinators. We found that during the flowering period, plants offered an enormous amount of pollen to their visitors. These may explain the high richness and amount of bees that visit the tomato flowers in the study areas. The period of pollen availability and depletion throughout the day overlapped with the bees foraging period, suggesting that bees are highly effective in removing pollen grains from anthers. Many of these grains probably land on the stigma of the same flower, leading to self-pollination and subsequent fruit development. Native bees (Exomalopsis spp. are effective pollinators of tomato flowers and are likely to contribute to increasing crop productivity. On the other hand, here tomato flowers offer large amounts of pollen resource to a high richness and amount of bees, showing a strong plant-pollinator interaction in the

  19. Closure of Oroantral Communication With Plasma-Rich Fibrin Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetoglu, Umut; Ocak, Hakan; Bilge, Suheyb

    2018-02-26

    Oroantral communication (OAC) is the opening between the maxillary sinus and oral cavity. It may cause oroantral fistula or maxillary sinusitis if left untreated. The surgical closure of the OAC within 48 hours was recommended to avoid the complications like sinus infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the treatment of OACs with plasma-rich fibrin (PRF) which is safe and easy to implement in the OACs.This study was conducted with the patients, who required the treatment of the OAC, which was developed after the posterior maxillary tooth extraction in the Dental and Maxillofacial Department of the Faculty of Dentistry in Adnan Menderes University.Plasma-rich fibrin membranes were inserted in layers into the tooth socket so that they covered the OAC. Then these membranes were fixated with the sutures to the surrounding gingiva. Antibiotic (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1000 mg), analgesic (dexketoprofen trometamol and/or paracetamol), and oral rinse (0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate) agents were prescribed to all patients. The patients were examined in the 3rd and 7th days and 2 months after the operation.All patients tolerated PRF perfectly, and the soft tissue recovery was completed without any problem. Full epithelization was observed in the defect area in all patients. The OAC did not relapse in any patient.Plasma-rich fibrin technique is a simple and effective method, which can be used in the treatment of OACs with a diameter of 5 mm or less with a low risk of complications.

  20. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  1. Influence of platelet-rich fibrin on alveolar ridge preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttapreyasri, Srisurang; Leepong, Narit

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on early wound healing and preservation of the alveolar ridge shape following tooth extraction. In this clinical trial, 20 symmetrical, premolar extraction sockets using split-mouth design were randomly selected with PRF or blood clot. The evaluations of wound healing, alveolar ridge contour changes, and crestal bone resorption were performed in dental casts and periapical radiographs (T0, initial; T1, 1 week; T2, 2 weeks; T4, 4 weeks; T6, 6 weeks; T8, 8 weeks). Platelet-rich fibrin clinically showed early healing of soft tissue covering socket orifices in the first 4 weeks. At the first week, the horizontal resorption on buccal aspect of PRF (1.07 ± 0.31 mm) was significantly less than that of the control (1.81 ± 0.88 mm). Platelet-rich fibrin demonstrated the tendency to enter the steady stage after the fourth week following tooth extraction, whereas in the control group the progression of buccal contour contraction was still detected through the eighth week. Radiographically, the overall resorption of marginal bone levels at mesial and distal to the extraction site in PRF (0.70, 1.23 mm) was comparable to that of the control (1.33, 1.14 mm). Although the PRF group demonstrated faster bone healing compared with the control, no statistically significant difference was detected. This preliminary result demonstrated neither better alveolar ridge preservation nor enhanced bone formation of PRF in the extraction socket. The use of PRF revealed limited effectiveness by accelerated soft-tissue healing on the first 4 weeks.

  2. Synthesis of C-rich dust in CO nova outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Jordi; Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib F.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Classical novae are thermonuclear explosions that take place in the envelopes of accreting white dwarfs in stellar binary systems. The material transferred onto the white dwarf piles up under degenerate conditions, driving a thermonuclear runaway. In these outbursts, about 10-7-10-3 M⊙, enriched in CNO and sometimes other intermediate-mass elements (e.g., Ne, Na, Mg, or Al for ONe novae) are ejected into the interstellar medium. The large concentrations of metals spectroscopically inferred in the nova ejecta reveal that the solar-like material transferred from the secondary mixes with the outermost layers of the underlying white dwarf. Aims: Most theoretical models of nova outbursts reported to date yield, on average, outflows characterized by O > C, from which, in principle, only oxidized condensates (e.g., O-rich grains) would be expected. Methods: To specifically address whether CO novae can actually produce C-rich dust, six different hydrodynamic nova models have been evolved, from accretion to the expansion and ejection stages, with different choices for the composition of the substrate with which the solar-like accreted material mixes. Updated chemical profiles inside the H-exhausted core have been used, based on stellar evolution calculations for a progenitor of 8 M⊙ through H- and He-burning phases. Results: We show that these profiles lead to C-rich ejecta after the nova outburst. This extends the possible contribution of novae to the inventory of presolar grains identified in meteorites, particularly in a number of carbonaceous phases (I.e., nanodiamonds, silicon carbides, and graphites).

  3. On the kinematics and dynamics of crystal-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantz, George W.; Schleicher, Jillian M.; Burgisser, Alain

    2017-08-01

    Partially molten rocks, often called a mush, are examples of a hydrogranular mixture where the dynamics are controlled by both fluid and crystal-crystal interactions. An obstacle to progress in understanding high-temperature hydrogranular systems has been the lack of adequate levels of description of microphysical processes. Here we rationalize the hydrogranular kinematic and dynamic states by applying the concept of particle (crystal) force chains. We exemplify this with discrete-element computational fluid dynamic simulations of the intrusion of a basaltic melt into an olivine-basalt mush, where crystal-scale force chains, crystal transport, and melt mixing are resolved. To describe the microscale kinematics of the system, we introduce the coordination number and the fabric tensors of particle contacts and forces. We quantify the changing contact and force fabric anisotropy, coaxiality, and the connectedness of the mush, under dynamic conditions. To describe the dynamics, particle and fluid characteristic response times are derived. These are used to define local and bulk Stokes numbers, and viscous and inertia numbers, which quantify the multiphase coupling under crystal-rich conditions. We employ the Sommerfeld number, which describes the importance of crystal-melt lubrication, with a viscous number to illustrate the dynamic regimes of crystal-rich magmas. We show that the notion of mechanical "lock up" is not uniquely identified with a particular crystal volume fraction and that distinct mechanical behaviors can emerge simultaneously within a crystal-rich system. We also posit that this framework describes magmatic fabrics and processes which "unlock" a crystal mush prior to eruption or mixing.

  4. Shifts of community composition and population density substantially affect ecosystem function despite invariant richness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaak, Jurg W.; Baert, Jan M.; Baird, Donald J.; Eisenhauer, Nico; Maltby, Lorraine; Pomati, Francesco; Radchuk, Viktoriia; Rohr, Jason R.; Brink, van den Paul J.; Laender, De Frederik

    2017-01-01

    There has been considerable focus on the impacts of environmental change on ecosystem function arising from changes in species richness. However, environmental change may affect ecosystem function without affecting richness, most notably by affecting population densities and community

  5. Species richness of vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens along an altitudinal gradient in western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytnes, John Arvid; Heegaard, Einar; Ihlen, Per G.

    2006-05-01

    Species richness patterns of ground-dwelling vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens were compared along an altitudinal gradient (310-1135 m a.s.l.), in western Norway. Total species richness peaked at intermediate altitudes, vascular plant species richness peaked immediately above the forest limit (at 600-700 m a.s.l.), bryophyte species richness had no statistically significant trend, whereas lichen richness increased from the lowest point and up to the forest limit, with no trend above. It is proposed that the pattern in vascular plant species richness is enhanced by an ecotone effect. Bryophyte species richness responds to local scale factors whereas the lichen species richness may be responding to the shading from the forest trees.

  6. Cascade effects of crop species richness on the diversity of pest insects and their natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, PeiJian; Hui, Cang; Men, XingYuan; Zhao, ZiHua; Ouyang, Fang; Ge, Feng; Jin, XianShi; Cao, HaiFeng; Li, B Larry

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how plant species richness influences the diversity of herbivorous and predatory/parasitic arthropods is central to community ecology. We explore the effects of crop species richness on the diversity of pest insects and their natural enemies. Using data from a four-year experiment with five levels of crop species richness, we found that crop species richness significantly affected the pest species richness, but there were no significant effects on richness of the pests' natural enemies. In contrast, the species richness of pest insects significantly affected their natural enemies. These findings suggest a cascade effect where trophic interactions are strong between adjacent trophic levels, while the interactions between connected but nonadjacent trophic levels are weakened by the intermediate trophic level. High crop species richness resulted in a more stable arthropod community compared with communities in monoculture crops. Our results highlight the complicated cross-trophic interactions and the crucial role of crop diversity in the food webs of agro-ecosystems.

  7. Biogeography of species richness gradients : Linking adaptive traits, demography and diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Brotons, Lluis; Stefanescu, Constanti; Penuelas, Josep

    Here we review how adaptive traits contribute to the emergence and maintenance of species richness gradients through their influence on demographic and diversification processes. We start by reviewing how demographic dynamics change along species richness gradients. Empirical studies show that

  8. The Pad HPD as photodetector of the LHCb RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Filthaut, F; Go, A; Joram, C; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, Peter; Ypsilantis, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    This document is a proposal to equip the LHCb RICH detectors with Pad HPDs as photodetectors. The Pad HPD has been developed "in-house" at CERN. It is a five inch vacuum tube with bialkali cathode and segmented silicon anode, incorporating 2048 anode pads, each connected to analogue readout electronics, encapsulated within the vacuum envelope. The design of the baseline option is described. Results of R&D using measurements in laboratory and test beam are described. The future R&D programme and the detector costs and production schedule are outlined.

  9. Shape transition in the neutron rich sodium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, X.; Flocard, H.; Kerman, A.K.; Koonin, S.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1975-06-01

    Mass spectrometer measurements of the neutron rich sodium isotopes show a sudden increase at 31 Na in the values of the two neutron separation energies. The spherical shell model naturally predicts a sudden decrease at 32 Na after the N=20 shell closure. It is proposed that the explanation for this disagreement lies in the fact that sodium isotopes in this mass region are strongly deformed due to the filling of negative parity orbitals from the 1fsub(7/2) shell. Hartree-Fock calculations are presented in support of this conjecture [fr

  10. Platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: Boon or a bane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshdeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent spurt in application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. However, the details regarding use of PRP in various dermatological indications ranging from hair restoration to chronic ulcers are dispersed in literature, herein we have tried to focus all under one heading. Overall, PRP seems to be a promising therapeutic modality but the level of evidence as of now, from the available published data is low. This review will also stimulate readers to carry out well designed, larger population based trials, so as to validate its use in dermatology practice.

  11. Hartmann test of the COMPASS RICH-1 optical telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Polak, J; Alekseev, M; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, V M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dibiase, N; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Diaz, V; Duic, V; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Rebourgeard, P; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Pagano, P; Paul, S; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Menon, G; Rocco, E; Robinet, F; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Steiger, L; Sozzi, F; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2008-01-01

    The central region of COMPASS RICH-1 has been equipped with a new photon detection system based on MultiAnode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMT). The Cherenkov photons are focused by an array of 576 fused silica telescopes onto 576 MAPMTs. The quality and positioning of all optical components have been tested by Hartmann method. The validation procedures are described. The quality of the optical concentrators was checked and alignment corrections were made. The upgraded detector showed excellent performances during 2006 data taking.

  12. Angiographic features of rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konez, Orhan; Burrows, Patricia E.; Mulliken, John B.; Fishman, Steven J.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is a recently recognized entity in which the vascular tumor is fully developed at birth and undergoes rapid involution. Angiographic findings in two infants with congenital hemangioma are reported and compared with a more common postnatal infantile hemangioma and a congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. Congenital hemangiomas differed from infantile hemangiomas angiographically by inhomogeneous parenchymal staining, large and irregular feeding arteries in disorganized patterns, arterial aneurysms, direct arteriovenous shunts, and intravascular thrombi. Both infants had clinical evidence of a high-output cardiac failure and intralesional bleeding. This congenital high-flow vascular tumor is difficult to distinguish angiographically from arteriovenous malformation and congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. (orig.)

  13. Development of light-weight spherical mirrors for RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Metlica, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Glass-coated beryllium and carbon-fiber light-weight spherical mirrors, with radii of curvature of $\\sim$ 2700mm, have been successfully developed and tested as part of the LHCb RICH experimental programme. The low mass mirror is necessary to minimize the amount of material within the LHCb spectrometer acceptance, with a requirement of less than 2% of a radiation length. Both technologies are suitable for light-weight mirror applications. The R&D and characterization of the mirrors are reported.

  14. New proton and neutron magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Afsar

    2003-01-01

    It is now known that in neutron rich nuclei, old magic numbers disappear and new ones appear. Single nucleon and double nucleon separation energies are plotted here in all possible manner.Using this data it is shown here for the first time that nuclei with pair of proton number Z and neutron number N (Z,N) : (6,12), (8,16), (10,20), (11,22) and (12,24) exhibit exceptional stability or magicity. As such these magic numbers appear in pairs. This correlation is shown here to be indicative of pre...

  15. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need.......1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate...

  16. Fat, Stem Cells, and Platelet-Rich Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Isaac B; Coleman, Sydney R; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-07-01

    The ideal filler for aesthetic surgery is inexpensive and easy to obtain, natural in appearance and texture, immunologically compatible, and long lasting without risk of infection. By most metrics, autologous fat grafts meet these criteria perfectly. Although facial fat grafting is now a commonly accepted surgical procedure, there has been a wave of activity applying stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapies to aesthetic practice. This article addresses technical considerations in the use of autologous fat transfer for facial rejuvenation, and also explores the current evidence for these stem cell and PRP therapies in aesthetic practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Holes in the distribution of rich clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of voids in the distribution of Abell clusters of galaxies are described. Cluster voids, such as that in Bootes, serve as markers of large candidate voids of galaxies. The advantages and disadvantages of using rich clusters as tracers of large-scale structures are reviewed. One new 40/h Mpc diameter void of galaxies and clusters in Pisces-Cetus is described in detail. It is found that numerical simulations of models with Gaussian initial conditions do not reproduce the void or filament structures observed within the Abell cluster catalog. The implications of this discrepancy for future observations and models are discussed. 26 references

  18. Aluminum-rich mesoporous MFI - type zeolite single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustova, Marina; Kustov, Arkadii; Christensen, Christina Hviid

    2005-01-01

    are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and N-2 adsorption measurements. The obtained zeolites combine the high crystallinity and the characteristic micropores of zeolites with an intracrystalline mesopore system....... With this technique, only zeolites with relatively low Al contents were reported (Si/Al ratio about 100). In this work, the preparation of aluminum-rich mesoporous MFI-type zeolite single crystals (Si/Al similar to 16-50) using aluminum isopropoxide as the aluminum Source is reported for the first time. All samples...

  19. Multifragmentation Fission in Neutron-rich Uranium and Thorium Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Panda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural properties of the recently predicted thermally fissile neutron-rich Uranium and Thorium isotopes are studied using the relativistic mean field formalism. The investigation of the new phenomena of multifragmentation fission is analyzed. In addition to the fission properties, the total nuclear reaction cross section which is a measure of the probability of production of these nuclei is evaluated taking 6,11Li and 16,24O as projectiles. The possible use of nuclear fuel in an accelerator based reactor is discussed which may be the substitution of 233,235U and 239Pu for nuclear fuel in near future.

  20. Fast photon-detection for COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Chiosso, Michela; Alexeev, M; Angerer, H; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Delagnes, E; Denisov, O; Deschamps, H; Diaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger Jr, M; Fisher, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; von Harrac, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, P; Rocco, E; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmaier, W; Schröder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2008-01-01

    A fast photon-detection system for the detector RICH-1 of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS is in operation since the 2006 run. It is based on the use of Multi-Anode Photomultipliers (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and fast read-out electronics. It has been designed taking into account the high photon flux in the central region of the detector and the high rate requirements of the COMPASS Experiment. We present the photon-detection design and construction, together with its characterization and measured performances based on the data collected in 2006.

  1. Performance of Front-End Readout System for PHENIX RICH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, K.; Hamagaki, H.; Nishimura, S.; Shigaki, K.; Hayano, R.S.; Hibino, M.; Kametani, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Matsumoto, T.; Sakaguchi, T.; Ebisu, K.; Hara, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Ushiroda, T.; Moscone, C.G.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    A front-end electronics system has been developed for the Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector of the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). A high speed custom back-plane with source synchronous bus architecture, a full custom analog ASIC, and board modules with FPGA's and CPLD's were developed for high performance real time data acquisition. The transfer rate of the back-lane has reached 640 MB/s with 128 bits data bus. Total transaction time is estimated to be less than 30 micros per event. The design specifications and test results of the system are presented in this paper

  2. Magnetic moment of extremely proton-rich nucleus 23Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomo, T; Matsuta, K; Ozawa, A; Nakashima, Y; Matsumiya, R; Mihara, M; Yasuno, T; Chiba, A; Yamada, K; Momota; Ohtsubo, T; Ohta, M; Shinojima, D; Izumikawa, T; Tanaka, H; Yamaguchi, T; Nakajima, S; Maemura, H; Muranaka, K; Kumashiro, S; Fujiwara, H; Yoshida, K; Sumikama, T; Tanaka, K; Ogura, M; Minamisono, K; Fukuda, M; Minamisono, T; Nojiri, Y; Suzuki, T; Tanihata, I; Alonso, J R; Krebs, G F; Symons, T J M

    2005-01-01

    The g-factor of the extremely proton-rich nucleus 23 Al (T 1/2 = 0.47 s) has been measured by means of the β-NMR method for the first time. The g-factor were determined as |g| = 1.557(88) from the obtained NMR spectra. From the comparison between the experimental value and the shell model calculation, the spin parity of the ground state of 23 Al was determined as I π = 5/2 + . Thus, the magnetic moment of 23 Al was determined as vertical bar μvertical bar = 3.89(22)μ N

  3. Modern Embedded Computing Designing Connected, Pervasive, Media-Rich Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Modern embedded systems are used for connected, media-rich, and highly integrated handheld devices such as mobile phones, digital cameras, and MP3 players. All of these embedded systems require networking, graphic user interfaces, and integration with PCs, as opposed to traditional embedded processors that can perform only limited functions for industrial applications. While most books focus on these controllers, Modern Embedded Computing provides a thorough understanding of the platform architecture of modern embedded computing systems that drive mobile devices. The book offers a comprehen

  4. 18F-Labelling of electron rich iodonium ylides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I N; Villadsen, J; Hansen, H D

    2017-01-01

    (18)F-Labelling of aromatic moieties was limited to electron deficient aromatic systems for many years but recent developments have provided access to the direct labelling of electron rich aromatic systems. Herein we report the synthesis and (18)F-labelling of iodonium ylide precursors...... in the pursuit of (18)F-labelled 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET-ligands. Subsequent evaluation in pigs showed high brain uptake of the PET ligands but a blocking dose of ketanserin did not significantly reduce the signal in relevant brain regions - indicating that the ligands do not interact specifically with the 5...

  5. (18)F-Labelling of electron rich iodonium ylides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I N; Villadsen, J; Hansen, H D

    2017-01-01

    (18)F-Labelling of aromatic moieties was limited to electron deficient aromatic systems for many years but recent developments have provided access to the direct labelling of electron rich aromatic systems. Herein we report the synthesis and (18)F-labelling of iodonium ylide precursors...... in the pursuit of (18)F-labelled 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET-ligands. Subsequent evaluation in pigs showed high brain uptake of the PET ligands but a blocking dose of ketanserin did not significantly reduce the signal in relevant brain regions - indicating that the ligands do not interact specifically with the 5...

  6. Strontium-rich injectable hybrid system for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Nuno, E-mail: nsmneves@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); INEB — Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); FMUP — Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Cirurgia, Serviço de Ortopedia, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Campos, Bruno B. [FCUP — Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Centro de Investigação em Química, Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Rua do Campo Alegre 1021/1055, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Almeida, Isabel F.; Costa, Paulo C. [FFUP — Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratório de Tecnologia Farmacêutica, Departamento de Ciências do Medicamento, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Cabral, Abel Trigo [FMUP — Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Cirurgia, Serviço de Ortopedia, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); and others

    2016-02-01

    Current challenges in the development of scaffolds for bone regeneration include the engineering of materials that can withstand normal dynamic physiological mechanical stresses exerted on the bone and provide a matrix capable of supporting cell migration and tissue ingrowth. The objective of the present work was to develop and characterize a hybrid polymer–ceramic injectable system that consists of an alginate matrix crosslinked in situ in the presence of strontium (Sr), incorporating a ceramic reinforcement in the form of Sr-rich microspheres. The incorporation of Sr in the microspheres and in the vehicle relies on the growing evidence that Sr has beneficial effects in bone remodeling and in the treatment of osteopenic disorders and osteoporosis. Sr-rich porous hydroxyapatite microspheres with a uniform size and a mean diameter of 555 μm were prepared, and their compression strength and friability tested. A 3.5% (w/v) ultrapure sodium alginate solution was used as the vehicle and its in situ gelation was promoted by the addition of calcium (Ca) or Sr carbonate and Glucone-δ-lactone. Gelation times varied with temperature and crosslinking agent, being slower for Sr than for Ca, but adequate for injection in both cases. Injectability was evaluated using a device employed in vertebroplasty surgical procedures, coupled to a texture analyzer in compression mode. Compositions with 35% w of microspheres presented the best compromise between injectability and compression strength of the system, the force required to extrude it being lower than 100 N. Micro CT analysis revealed a homogeneous distribution of the microspheres inside the vehicle, and a mean inter-microspheres space of 220 μm. DMA results showed that elastic behavior of the hybrid is dominant over the viscous one and that the higher storage modulus was obtained for the 3.5%Alg–35%Sr-HAp-Sr formulation. - Highlights: • We developed a Sr rich viscoelastic hybrid system (alginate matrix crosslinked in

  7. Isotopic Hg in an Allende carbon-rich residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-rich residue from Allende subjected to stepwise heating yielded two isotopically resolvable types of Hg: one with an (Hg-196)/(Hg-202) concentration ratio the same as terrestrial (monitor) Hg; the other enriched in Hg-196 relative to Hg-202 by about 60 percent. Hg with the 202 isotope enriched relative to 196, as is found in bulk Allende, was not observed. Whether the result of mass fractionation or nucleosynthesis, the distinct types of Hg entered different carrier phases and were not thermally mobilized since the accretion of the Allende parent body.

  8. Isotopic Hg in an Allende carbon-rich residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, G.W. Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-rich residue from Allende subjected to stepwise heating yielded two isotopically resolvable types of Hg: one with an (Hg-196)/(Hg-202) concentration ratio the same as terrestrial (monitor) Hg; the other enriched in Hg-196 relative to Hg-202 by about 60 percent. Hg with the 202 isotope enriched relative to 196, as is found in bulk Allende, was not observed. Whether the result of mass fractionation or nucleosynthesis, the distinct types of Hg entered different carrier phases and were not thermally mobilized since the accretion of the Allende parent body. 9 refs

  9. Quantum Efficiency of Hybrid Photon Detectors for the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, R W

    2008-01-01

    The production of Hybrid Photon Detectors to be used as the single-photon sensors for the RICH detectors of the LHCb experiment has recently finished. We present the quantum efficiency measurements of the entire sample of 550 tubes. The manufacturer has succeeded in consistently improving the quantum efficiency of the employed S20-type multi-alkali photocathode above our expectations, by a relative 27 % integrated over the energy spectrum. We also report measurements of the vacuum quality using the photocurrent of the device as a monitor for possible vacuum degradation.

  10. Ring recognition in RICH detector using the elastic net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, S.; Kisel, I.; Tret'yak, V.

    2000-01-01

    Our interest to the elastic net method has practical reason. This method originally proposed by R. Durbin and D. Willshaw for the traveling salesman problem is now widely applied in different areas of optimization problems. The elastic net method is used, for instance, for finding trajectories of charged particles in high energy physics experiments and for other physics applications complicated by errors of measurements of input data and global tour features requirements like smoothness of trajectories. We propose here the application of the elastic net method for the ring recognition problem in RICH detector. (author)

  11. Cesium iodide photon converter performance in a gaseous RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gernhäuser, R; Homolka, J; Kastenmüller, A; Kienle, P; Körner, H J; Maier-Komor, P; Peter, M; Zeitelhack, K

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a 48x48 cm sup 2 multi-wire proportional chamber for VUV photon detection in a RICH setup is reported. The MWPC pad cathode was covered with a solid CsI photo converter layer of 230 mu g/cm sup 2 thickness deposited on a resin-stabilized graphite (RSG) coating. Cherenkov light radiated from cosmic muons was detected in the wavelength region 160 nm95% and a constant long-term stability of the photo cathode were observed.

  12. Compositional variations of chromiferous spinel in Mg-rich rocks of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composition of chromiferous spinel included in olivines of Mg-rich basalts and gabbros of the. Deccan Traps (Gujarat and Western Ghats) are reported here. They vary from Al-rich compo- sitions [Al2O3 = 53 wt.%; Cr#, 100Cr/(Cr + Al) = 12] to Cr-rich compositions [Cr2O3 = 51 wt.%;. Cr# = 84], and from Cr-Al rich ...

  13. Precursors of aluminum-rich chondrules from the Axtell (CV3) meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, G.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aluminum-rich chondrules are less refractory and have lower ^(26)Al abundance compared to Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) [1-3]. The presence of hibonite grains in a Sharps Al-rich chondrule [2], and of a spinel-fassaite fragment in an Allende ferromagnesian chondrule [4] suggest CAIs as plausible precursors of Al-rich chondrules. To investigate this possibility we have determined major ,-minor-, and rare-earth-element (REE) concentration in dominant mineral phases in CAIs and ...

  14. Study of neutron-rich Mo isotopes by the projected shell model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    also predicts a decrease in the quantum of triaxiality with increasing neutron number and angular momentum for odd mass neutron-rich Mo isotopes. Keywords. Neutron-rich nuclei; electromagnetic quantities; projected shell model. PACS Nos 21.60.Cs; 21.10.Ky; 21.10.Re; 27.60.+j. 1. Introduction. Neutron-rich nuclei in the ...

  15. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulos, Christos; Mantas, Dimitris; Philipidis, T; Kouskos, Efstatios; Antonopoulou, Zoi; Hatzinikolaou, Ml; Gogas, Helen

    2008-04-29

    Glycogen-rich carcinoma of the breast is a rare histological subtype of breast cancer, usually reported to have poor prognosis. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent a mastectomy for a 3.5 cm clinically palpable left breast carcinoma, originally diagnosed as fibroadenoma on a screening mammogram four years before presentation. Diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on certain histological characteristics of the tumour and immunohistochemical analysis (PAS staining, keratins AE1/AE3, EMA, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, melanosomes, vimentin, Chromogranin, Synaptophysin, S-100, SMA). No lymph node metastasis was found and as the tumour was ER positive and PgR negative, patient was treated only with an aromatase inhibitor upfront and remains free of disease 48 months now since operation. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor, its clinical behavior reported to be rather aggressive so far, might varies depending on special characteristics such as low grade and strongly positive ER expression.

  16. Synthetic Strategies towards Fullerene-Rich Dendrimer Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Nierengarten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The sphere-shaped fullerene has attracted considerable interest not least due to the peculiar electronic properties of this carbon allotrope and the fascinating materials emanating from fullerene-derived structures. The rapid development and tremendous advances in organic chemistry allow nowadays the modification of C60 to a great extent by pure chemical means. It is therefore not surprising that the fullerene moiety has also been part of dendrimers. At the initial stage, fullerenes have been examined at the center of the dendritic structure mainly aimed at possible shielding effects as exerted by the dendritic environment and light-harvesting effects due to multiple chromophores located at the periphery of the dendrimer. In recent years, also many research efforts have been devoted towards fullerene-rich nanohybrids containing multiple C60 units in the branches and/or as surface functional groups. In this review, synthetic efforts towards the construction of dendritic fullerene-rich nanostructures have been compiled and will be summarized herein.

  17. Laser Spectroscopy Studies in the Neutron-Rich Sn Region

    CERN Multimedia

    Obert, J

    2002-01-01

    We propose to use the powerful laser spectroscopy method to determine the magnetic moment $\\mu$ and the variation of the mean square charge radius ($\\delta\\,\\langle$r$_{c}^{2}\\,\\rangle$) for ground and long-lived isomeric states of the Sn isotopes from A=125 to the doubly-magic $^{132}$Sn isotope and beyond. For these neutron-rich Sn nuclei, numerous $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ curves have already been calculated and the predictions depend upon the effective interactions used. Therefore, a study of the effect of the shell closure N=82 on the $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ values in the Z=50 magic nuclei is of great interest, especially because $^{132}$Sn is located far from the stability valley. It will help to improve the parameters of the effective interactions and make them more suitable to predict the properties of exotic nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The neutron-rich Sn isotopes produced with an uranium carbide target, are ionized using either a hot plasma ion source or the resonant ionization laser ion ...

  18. Assessing rare earth elements in quartz rich geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, A; Thoss, V; Ribeiro Guevara, S; Urgast, D; Raab, A; Mastrolitti, S; Feldmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Sodium peroxide (Na2O2) fusion coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS) measurements was used to rapidly screen quartz-rich geological samples for rare earth element (REE) content. The method accuracy was checked with a geological reference material and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) measurements. The used mass-mode combinations presented accurate results (only exception being (157)Gd in He gas mode) with recovery of the geological reference material QLO-1 between 80% and 98% (lower values for Lu, Nd and Sm) and in general comparable to INAA measurements. Low limits of detection for all elements were achieved, generally below 10 pg g(-1), as well as measurement repeatability below 15%. Overall, the Na2O2/ICP-MS/MS method proved to be a suitable lab-based method to quickly and accurately screen rock samples originating from quartz-rich geological areas for rare earth element content; particularly useful if checking commercial viability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metallogenesis of rich uranium deposits in Xiangshan hydrothermal ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhijian; Du Letian; Liu Zhengyi

    2001-01-01

    Xiangshan Uranium Ore field located in Jiangxi Province, south of China, is one of the largest volcanogenic hydrothermal uranium ore fields in China. There are apparent difference in uranium metallogenesis between low-grade deposits and rich uranium ones (U > 0.3%, especially U > 1%) in Xiangshan hydrothermal uranium ore field. The special hydrothermal solution with higher content of P, Ti, K elements is a geochemical controlling factor for rich uranium mineralization. Fluorine is an important transporter for uranium migration in hydrothermal system, however, it plays a limited function of uranium mineralization. In fact, uranium and thorium are migrated and precipitated through some complicated processes including alkali-metasomatism, co-migration, colloid co-precipitation with phosphate minerals and gas reduction etc., which has been proved by field investigation, experiments and a number of analysis. The deeper the orebodies are located, the higher the grade of ore is. The reasonable explanation is as following: (1) the contents of P, Ti, F, K. U and reducing gases in hydrothermal solution increase along with deepness; (2) The temperature and pressure in deep are higher than that on shallower parts. All the factors mentioned above together play active roles in uranium enrichment. Some suggestions for further exploitation and exploration in Xiangshan area have been put forward

  20. Frugal chemoprevention: targeting Nrf2 with foods rich in sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Palliyaguru, Dushani L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2016-02-01

    With the properties of efficacy, safety, tolerability, practicability and low cost, foods containing bioactive phytochemicals are gaining significant attention as elements of chemoprevention strategies against cancer. Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane], a naturally occurring isothiocyanate produced by cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is found to be a highly promising chemoprevention agent against not only a variety of cancers such as breast, prostate, colon, skin, lung, stomach or bladder, but also cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. For reasons of experimental exigency, preclinical studies have focused principally on sulforaphane itself, while clinical studies have relied on broccoli sprout preparations rich in either sulforaphane or its biogenic precursor, glucoraphanin. Substantive subsequent evaluation of sulforaphane pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics has been undertaken using either pure compound or food matrices. Sulforaphane affects multiple targets in cells. One key molecular mechanism of action for sulforaphane entails activation of the Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathway although other actions contribute to the broad spectrum of efficacy in different animal models. This review summarizes the current status of pre-clinical chemoprevention studies with sulforaphane and highlights the progress and challenges for the application of foods rich in sulforaphane and/or glucoraphanin in the arena of clinical chemoprevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Demonstration of 5-Methylcytosine-Rich DNA Sequences in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus; Lomb, Christian; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine-rich heterochromatic regions were demonstrated in metaphase chromosomes of 5 species of Chiroptera by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-methylcytosine antibody. These species belong to 4 genera and 2 families and are characterized by divergent karyotypes. One species (Glauconycteris beatrix) has an extremely low diploid chromosome number of 2n = 22 with only meta- to submetacentric elements and remarkably large amounts of constitutive heterochromatin located in the centromeric and pericentromeric regions of all chromosome pairs. Two species (G. beatrix and Neoromicia cf. guineensis) possess X-autosome translocations. In all species, the hypermethylated chromosome segments correspond to constitutive heterochromatin, and the numbers and positions of hypermethylated chromosome segments in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. In some species (Pipistrellus hesperidus, Neoromicia cf. somalicus), there are several smaller chromosome pairs in which the bright anti-5-methylcytosine antibody labeling is not restricted to constitutively heterochromatic regions but is observed along the whole lengths of these chromosomes. The nature of these additional hypermethylated regions is discussed. The analysis of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions elucidates valuable data for chiropteran cytogenetics and reflects the high pace of evolution of the repetitive DNA fraction in their genomes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The LHCb RICH silica aerogel performance with LHC data

    CERN Multimedia

    Perego, D L

    2010-01-01

    In the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, powerful charged particle identification is performed by Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technology. In order to cover the full geometric acceptance and the wide momentum range (1-100 GeV/c), two detectors with three Cherenkov radiators have been designed and installed. In the medium (10-40 GeV/c) and high (30-100 GeV/c) momentum range, gas radiators are used (C4F10 and CF4 respectively). In the low momentum range (1 to a few GeV/c) pion/kaon/proton separation will be done with photons produced in solid silica aerogel. A set of 16 tiles, with the large transverse dimensions ever (20x20 cm$^2$) and nominal refractive index 1.03 have been produced. The tiles have excellent optical properties and homogeneity of refractive index within the tile of ~1%. The first data collected at LHC are used to understand the behaviour of the RICH: preliminary results will be presented and discussed on the performance of silica aerogel and of the gas radiators C4F10 and CF4.

  3. The COMPASS RICH-1 read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, G; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Chapiro, A; Cicuttin, A; Ciliberti, P; Colavita, A A; Costa, S; Crespo, M; Cristaudo, P; Dalla Torre, S; Díaz, V; Fauland, P; Fratnik, F

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the reconfigurable read-out system for the 82944 RICH-1 channels of the COMPASS experiment (NA58) at CERN. The system is based on 192 identical large front-end boards (BORA board). BORA was designed for acquiring, digitizing, threshold subtracting and transmitting event data. The overall operation of the board is controlled and supervised by a DSP tightly interacting with an FPGA that acts as a parallel co-processor. The DSP allows characterizing each analog channel by locally calculating noise and pedestal. Each BORA communicates with the outside world through two optical fibers and through a dedicated DSP network. One optical fiber is used to receive event triggers, and the other one is used to transmit event data to subsequent processing stages of the acquisition system. The DSP network allows reconfiguring and reprogramming the DSPs and FPGAs as well as acquiring sample events to visualize the overall operation of the system. The whole RICH has eight DSP networks working in parallel. ...

  4. The new gold rush the riches of space beckon!

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2017-01-01

    This book captures the most exciting advances in the harnessing of space as a global resource. The authors track the growing number of space businesses and opportunities for investors, and the many possible benefits of spaceplanes, space stations and even space colonies. The authors also discuss the need for more regulatory reform. Companies like Planetary Resources are now forming to find mineral-rich asteroids and bring back new riches to Earth. Solar power satellites in the next few years will start to beam clean energy back to Earth, to meet the growing demands of a still-developing world. Innovative space industries are vital to the survival of modern human life, and the authors demonstrate what can be done to encourage the growing of the "New Space" frontier. From lassoing and then mining asteroids to developing new methods of defending the planet from space hazards and setting up new hotels and adventures for tourists in space, this new industry will have profound effects on Earth, especially on its ec...

  5. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  6. Effects of urbanization on carnivore species distribution and richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenana, Miguel A.; Crooks, Kevin R.; Boydston, Erin E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Siudyla, Shalene; Haas, Christopher D.; Harris, Sierra; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Turschak, Greta M.; Miles, A. Keith; Van Vuren, Dirk H.

    2010-01-01

    Urban development can have multiple effects on mammalian carnivore communities. We conducted a meta-analysis of 7,929 photographs from 217 localities in 11 camera-trap studies across coastal southern California to describe habitat use and determine the effects of urban proximity (distance to urban edge) and intensity (percentage of area urbanized) on carnivore occurrence and species richness in natural habitats close to the urban boundary. Coyotes (Canis latrans) and bobcats (Lynx rufus) were distributed widely across the region. Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), raccoons (Procyon lotor), gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), mountain lions (Puma concolor), and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) were detected less frequently, and long-tailed weasels (Mustela frenata), American badgers (Taxidea taxus), western spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis), and domestic cats (Felis catus) were detected rarely. Habitat use generally reflected availability for most species. Coyote and raccoon occurrence increased with both proximity to and intensity of urbanization, whereas bobcat, gray fox, and mountain lion occurrence decreased with urban proximity and intensity. Domestic dogs and Virginia opossums exhibited positive and weak negative relationships, respectively, with urban intensity but were unaffected by urban proximity. Striped skunk occurrence increased with urban proximity but decreased with urban intensity. Native species richness was negatively associated with urban intensity but not urban proximity, probably because of the stronger negative response of individual species to urban intensity.

  7. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzinikolaou ML

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen-rich carcinoma of the breast is a rare histological subtype of breast cancer, usually reported to have poor prognosis. Case presentation We present the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent a mastectomy for a 3.5 cm clinically palpable left breast carcinoma, originally diagnosed as fibroadenoma on a screening mammogram four years before presentation. Diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on certain histological characteristics of the tumour and immunohistochemical analysis (PAS staining, keratins AE1/AE3, EMA, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, melanosomes, vimentin, Chromogranin, Synaptophysin, S-100, SMA. No lymph node metastasis was found and as the tumour was ER positive and PgR negative, patient was treated only with an aromatase inhibitor upfront and remains free of disease 48 months now since operation. Conclusion Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor, its clinical behavior reported to be rather aggressive so far, might varies depending on special characteristics such as low grade and strongly positive ER expression

  8. Role of plasma-rich fibrin in oral surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Retna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF is a fibrin meshwork, in which platelet cytokines, growth factors, and cells are entrapped and discharged after a period and can serve as a resorbable film. PRF is the next generation of platelet concentrates equipped to improve arrangement without biochemical blood handling; PRF is an evolution of the fibrin adhesive, which is widely used in the oral surgery. The guidelines of this innovation depend on concentrating platelets and growth factors in a plasma medium, and initiating them in a fibrin gel, keeping in mind the end goal to enhance the healing of wounds. Maxillary bone loss requires numerous regenerative techniques: as a supplement to the procedures of tissue regeneration, a platelet concentrate called PRF was tested for the 1st time in France by Dr. Choukroun. This article enriches the benefits and role of plasma-rich fibrin in oral surgery. Platelet-concentrate fibrin is an evolution of the fibrin glue, which is widely used in the oral surgery.

  9. Chemical abundances in the extremely carbon-rich and xenon-rich halo planetary nebula H4-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Masaaki [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tajitsu, Akito, E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: tajitsu@subaru.naoj.org [Subaru Telescope, NAOJ, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We performed detailed chemical abundance analysis of the extremely metal-poor ([Ar/H] ∼ –2) halo planetary nebula (PN) H4-1 based on the multi-wavelength spectra from Subaru/HDS, GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer/IRS and determined the abundances of 10 elements. The C and O abundances were derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and are almost consistent with abundances from recombination lines (RLs). We demonstrated that the large discrepancy in the C abundance between CEL and RL in H4-1 can be solved using the temperature fluctuation model. We reported the first detection of the [Xe III] λ5846 line in H4-1 and determination of its elemental abundance ([Xe/H] > +0.48). H4-1 is the most Xe-rich PN among the Xe-detected PNe. The observed abundances are close to the theoretical prediction by a 2.0 M {sub ☉} single star model with an initially element rich ([r/Fe] = +2.0 dex) rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). The observed Xe abundance would be a product of the r-process in primordial supernovae. The [C/O]-[Ba/(Eu or Xe)] diagram suggests that the progenitor of H4-1 shares the evolution with carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP)-r/s and CEMP-no stars. The progenitor of H4-1 is presumably a binary formed in an r-process-rich environment.

  10. Get rich quick: the signal to respond procedure reveals the time course of semantic richness effects during visual word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Ian S; Pexman, Penny M

    2014-05-01

    According to several current frameworks, semantic processing involves an early influence of language-based information followed by later influences of object-based information (e.g., situated simulations; Santos, Chaigneau, Simmons, & Barsalou, 2011). In the present study we examined whether these predictions extend to the influence of semantic variables in visual word recognition. We investigated the time course of semantic richness effects in visual word recognition using a signal-to-respond (STR) paradigm fitted to a lexical decision (LDT) and a semantic categorization (SCT) task. We used linear mixed effects to examine the relative contributions of language-based (number of senses, ARC) and object-based (imageability, number of features, body-object interaction ratings) descriptions of semantic richness at four STR durations (75, 100, 200, and 400ms). Results showed an early influence of number of senses and ARC in the SCT. In both LDT and SCT, object-based effects were the last to influence participants' decision latencies. We interpret our results within a framework in which semantic processes are available to influence word recognition as a function of their availability over time, and of their relevance to task-specific demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of platelet-rich plasma and platelet-rich fibrin in fat grafting: basic science and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Han-Tsung; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter

    2014-08-01

    Due to the natural properties of fat, fat grafting remains a popular procedure for soft tissue volume augmentation and reconstruction. However, clinical outcome varies and is technique dependent. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains α-granules, from which multiple growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, and epidermal growth factor can be released after activation. In recent years, the scope of PRP therapies has extended from bone regeneration, wound healing, and healing of musculoskeletal injuries, to enhancement of fat graft survival. In this review, we focus on the definition of PRP, the different PRP preparation and activation methods, and growth factor concentrations. In addition, we discuss possible mechanisms for the role of PRP in fat grafting by reviewing in vitro studies with adipose-derived stem cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes, and preclinical and clinical research. We also review platelet-rich fibrin, a so-called second generation PRP, and its slow-releasing biology and effects on fat grafts compared to PRP in both animal and clinical research. Finally, we provide a general foundation on which to critically evaluate earlier studies, discuss the limitations of previous research, and direct plans for future experiments to improve the optimal effects of PRP in fat grafting.

  12. Ultrasound-assisted HCl-NaCl leaching of lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong Liang; Zhang, Xiao Fei; Tang, Shu Zhen; Huang, Ai Dong

    2015-11-01

    Lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag was subjected to regular HCl-NaCl leaching, with the experimental conditions optimized under which ultrasound was introduced. After only 15 min of ultrasound-assisted leaching, the leaching rate of Sb resembled that after 45 min of regular leaching. Ultrasonic treatment considerably elevated the leaching rates of Sb and Pb, and shortened the leaching time. With the decrease of particle size, the leaching rate of Sb and Pb increased gradually. Especially, as the particle size of the slag was greater than 0.217 mm, the ultrasonic leaching effects of Sb and Pb were significantly higher than that of regular leaching effects. The temperature exhibited great effect on ultrasonic leaching performance. As the temperature increased, the leaching rates of Sb and Pb increased step by step. In case the temperature was higher than 85°C, the increasing speed of the leaching rates for Sb and Pb tended to be slow. Increasing ultrasonic power could augment the leaching rate or accelerate the procedure till the same leaching rate. However, since ultrasound failed to energize the formation of new reaction pathways, the maximum leaching rates of Sb and Pb were determined by their phase compositions rather than by ultrasonic field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mathematical modelling of anisotropy of illite-rich shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokov, E.M.; Tiwary, D.K.; Bayuk, I.O.; Sparkman, M.A.; Brown, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of illite-rich shale anisotropy to account for the alignment of clays and gas- or brine-filled cracks is presented via mathematical modelling. Such estimation requires analysis to interpret the dominance of one effect over another. This knowledge can help to evaluate the permeability in the unconventional reservoir, stress orientation, and the seal capacity for the conventional reservoir. Effective media modelling is used to predict the elastic properties of the illite-rich shale and to identify the dominant contributions to the shale anisotropy. We consider two principal reasons of the shale anisotropy: orientation of clay platelets and orientation of fluid-filled cracks. In reality, both of these two factors affect the shale anisotropy. The goal of this study is, first, to separately analyse the effect of these two factors to reveal the specific features in P- and S-wave velocity behaviour typical of each of the factors, and, then, consider a combined effect of the factors when the cracks are horizontally or vertically aligned. To do this, we construct four models of shale. The behaviour of P- and S-wave velocities is analysed when gas- and water-filled cracks embedded in a host matrix are randomly oriented, or horizontally or vertically aligned. The host matrix can be either isotropic or anisotropic (of VTI symmetry). In such a modelling, we use published data on mineralogy and clay platelet alignment along with other micromechanical measurements. In the model, where the host matrix is isotropic, the presence of a singularity point (when the difference VS1 - VS2 changes its sign) in shear wave velocities is an indicator of brine-filled aligned cracks. In the model with the VTI host matrix and horizontally aligned cracks filled with gas, an increase in their volume concentration leads to that the azimuth at which the singularity is observed moves toward the symmetry axis. In this case, if the clay content is small (around 20 per cent), the

  14. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient's peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  15. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C.; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.; Litke, Alan M.; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a “rich club.” We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  16. The geological characteristics and forming conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiangang; Tong Hangshou; Feng Mingyue; Li Yuexiang; Xu Zhan

    1993-03-01

    The forming conditions and concentration mechanism of rich ore, criteria of ore prospecting and selection of uranium-rich ore target area are introduced in the article that is based on the studying of geological characteristics and conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits of No 201 and 361 and on the comparisons of rich and poor ore deposits in geological conditions. Some new view points are also presented as the separate deposition of uranium minerals and gangue minerals is the main mechanism to form rich ore, for rich ore formation the ore enrichment by superimposition is not a universal regularity and most uranium-rich ore deposits are formed within one mineralization stage or mainly in one mineralization stage

  17. Vascular plant and vertebrate species richness in national parks of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jeffrey S.; Myrick, Kaci E.; Huston, Michael A.; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Green, M. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Given the estimates that species diversity is diminishing at 50-100 times the normal rate, it is critical that we be able to evaluate changes in species richness in order to make informed decisions for conserving species diversity. In this study, we examined the potential of vascular plant species richness to be used as a surrogate for vertebrate species richness in the classes of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Vascular plants, as primary producers, represent the biotic starting point for ecological community structure and are the logical place to start for understanding vertebrate species associations. We used data collected by the United States (US) National Park Service (NPS) on species presence within parks in the eastern US to estimate simple linear regressions between plant species richness and vertebrate richness. Because environmental factors may also influence species diversity, we performed simple linear regressions of species richness versus natural logarithm of park area, park latitude, mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, and human population density surrounding the parks. We then combined plant species richness and environmental variables in multiple regressions to determine the variables that remained as significant predictors of vertebrate species richness. As expected, we detected significant relationships between plant species richness and amphibian, bird, and mammal species richness. In some cases, plant species richness was predicted by park area alone. Species richness of mammals was only related to plant species richness. Reptile species richness, on the other hand, was related to plant species richness, park latitude and annual precipitation, while amphibian species richness was related to park latitude, park area, and plant species richness. Thus, plant species richness predicted species richness of different vertebrate groups to varying degrees and should not be used exclusively as a surrogate for vertebrate

  18. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ferrero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gayde, J.Ch. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Maggiora, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Martin, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Menon, G. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Panzieri, D. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines’ positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  19. Performance study of hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, N.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Wyllie, K.

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study CP violation and rare phenomena of B mesons with very high accuracy. The LHCb RICH detectors are essential for positive kaon identification, and several strict demands are required of its photon detectors to achieve excellent particle identification performance. In particular, they should have good single photon sensitivity for visible and UV wavelengths and large coverage with fine granularity. HPDs have been developed to meet these requirements in collaboration with industry. They have now been chosen as the photon detector for LHCb, and pre-series tubes are under test prior to mass production. At the same time, more detailed studies are on-going to understand more deeply their characteristics. The result of various performance tests of these tubes as well as the fraction of light reflection in the HPD are described in this paper

  20. Vorticity and Λ polarization in baryon rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Prokhorov, George; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg; Zakharov, Valentin

    2018-02-01

    The polarization of Λ hyperons due to axial chiral vortical effect is discussed. The effect is proportional to (strange) chemical potential and is pronounced at lower energies in baryon-rich matter. The polarization of ¯ has the same sihn and larger magnitude. The emergence of vortical structures is observed in kinetic QGSM models. The hydrodynamical helicity separation receives the contribution of longitudinal velocity and vorticity implying the quadrupole structure of the latter. The transition from the quark vortical effects to baryons in confined phase may be achieved by exploring the axial charge. At the hadronic level the polarization corresponds to the cores of quantized vortices in pionic superfluid. The chiral vortical effects may be also studied in the frmework of Wigner function establishing the relation to the thermodynamical approach to polarization.

  1. Novel test of modified Newtonian dynamics with gas rich galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2011-03-25

    The current cosmological paradigm, the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, requires that the mass-energy of the Universe be dominated by invisible components: dark matter and dark energy. An alternative to these dark components is that the law of gravity be modified on the relevant scales. A test of these ideas is provided by the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR), an empirical relation between the observed mass of a galaxy and its rotation velocity. Here, I report a test using gas rich galaxies for which both axes of the BTFR can be measured independently of the theories being tested and without the systematic uncertainty in stellar mass that affects the same test with star dominated spirals. The data fall precisely where predicted a priori by the modified Newtonian dynamics. The scatter in the BTFR is attributable entirely to observational uncertainty, consistent with a single effective force law.

  2. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments are......: 1) Pure carbonate chalk with mudstone texture from Stevns Klint (Denmark), 2) Relatively pure chalk sediments with varying content of microfossils from the Ontong Java Plateau (Western Pacific), 3) Clay-rich chalk and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The tested samples were characterised...... of microfossils and fine-grained silica and clay. Samples with relatively pure chalk mud supported texture compact along a common stress - matrix porosity trend. Microfossils thus have a passive role, apparently because they are supported by the chalk mud. Samples with fine-grained silica and clay can be modelled...

  3. Sustainable development in an N-rich/n-poor world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrings, Charles; Kinzig, Ann; Halkos, George

    2014-11-01

    Sustainable development requires that per capita inclusive wealth-produced, human, and natural capital-does not decline over time. We investigate the impact of changes in nitrogen on inclusive wealth. There are two sides to the nitrogen problem. Excess use of nitrogen in some places gives rise to N-pollution, which can cause environmental damage. Insufficient replacement of nitrogen in other places gives rise to N-depletion, or loss of nutrient stocks. Neither is explicitly accounted for in current wealth measures, but both affect wealth. We calculate an index of net N-replacement, and investigate its relationship to wealth. In countries with low levels of relative N-loss, we find that the uncompensated loss of soil nitrogen in poorer countries is associated with declining rates of growth of inclusive per capita wealth. What is less intuitive is that increasing fertilizer application in both rich and poor countries can increase per capita inclusive wealth.

  4. Adrienne Rich Şiirinde Sesin Önemi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Koçoğlu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how poetry can be a used as a pedagogical tool in teachingEnglish and provides a rationale for an integrated approach to teaching literature in thelanguage classroom by stylistically analyzing Adrienne Rich’s voice in her poetry. Inthe twentieth century, women poets use the act of "writing" to gain "voice" as movingfrom silence to way of speaking out. This voicing experience becomes one way forwomen poets to search for truth. I try to apply this concept of voice to the poetry of acontemporary American woman poet, Adrienne Rich. By creating a theory of voice, Iwant to show why and how voice becomes the central issue in women's poetry, and howthis theory of voice can be integrated into a foreign language classroom.

  5. A VUV prism spectrometer for RICH radiator refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Moyssides, P G; Fokitis, E

    2000-01-01

    A prism spectrometer has been developed to operate in the VUV wavelength range from 120 to 200 nm. It can be used as a pre- disperser in conjunction with a Fabry-Perot based gas refractometer. This instrument has also been used to measure the refractive index of the liquid radiator C/sub 6/F/sub 14/ in various spectral lines. This radiator is used in the RICH detectors of the DELPHI experiment and has been proposed for ALICE, and LHCb experiments. The spectral resolution of the system is improved as the wavelength decreases and the data are consistent with a wavelength accuracy about 0.4 nm at 140 nm. The results for the dispersion curve of the above liquid are presented. (17 refs).

  6. Waveguiding properties of Er-implanted silicon-rich oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Forcales, M.; Wilkinson, A.R.; Smith, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The optical properties of erbium-doped silicon-rich silicon-oxide waveguides containing amorphous silicon nanoclusters and/or silicon nanocrystals are reported. Both amorphous nanoclusters and nanocrystals are shown to act as effective sensitizers for Er, with nanocrystals being more effective at low pump powers and nanoclusters being more effective at higher pump powers. All samples are shown to exhibit photo-induced absorption, as measured for a guided 1.5 μm probe beam while the waveguide was illuminated from above with a 477 nm pump beam. At a given pump power samples containing silicon nanocrystals exhibited greater attenuation than samples containing amorphous nanoclusters. The absorption is shown to be consistent with confined-carrier absorption due to photoexcited carriers in the nanocrystals and/or nanoclusters

  7. Seasonal dynamics of Co60 accumulation by Elodea canadensis Rich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochenin, V.F.; Chebotina, M.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of Co 60 accumulation by one of the most widely distributed fresh-water plants, elodea (Elodea canadensis Rich), were studied. Accumulation was shown to vary with the season. A very low coefficient of accumulation (500-700 units) was typical for the summer period (June to August). It increased in the fall, reached its highest values (3500-4000) in mid-winter (January), and dropped sharply in the spring. Radioisotope concentrations in the plant varied similarly. The cumulative capacity of plants for Co 60 may vary by a factor of 6 to 7 during the year. It is suggested that the seasonal changes in Co 60 accumulation may be caused by both differences in the physiological state of the plants at different times of the year, and by seasonal variations in the hydrochemical regime of the water reservoir. Experiments were done to clarify which of these mechanisms is the determining factor. (V.A.P.)

  8. Clinical Applications of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Patellar Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, D. U.; Lee, C.-R.; Lee, J. H.; Pak, J.; Kang, L.-W.; Jeong, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers. PMID:25136568

  9. Encapsulation of astaxanthin-rich Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous for antioxidant delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Park, Sun-Ah; Chung, Donghwa; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2011-10-01

    Calcium alginate gel (CAG) beads were used to entrap the antioxidant astaxanthin-rich Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (ASX) by ionic gelation. ASX-CAG bead entrapment efficiency and release behavior, as influenced by alginate and CaCl(2) concentration and hardening time, were investigated. The optimized bead preparation conditions that gave rise to an efficient ASX release pattern were 1.5% alginate, 50mM CaCl(2), and a 5min hardening time. The antioxidant activity of non-encapsulated ASX was maintained for 4 days and then sharply decreased, whereas encapsulated ASX was maintained for 6 days. These results revealed that physical entrapment of ASX within CAG beads could be an effective technique for protecting the antioxidant activity of ASX from lipid peroxidation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare-gas-rich separates from carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J. H.; Frick, U.; Neil, J. M.; Phinney, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of carbon-rich separates prepared by demineralization of colloidal fractions after disaggregation of bulk samples of the type C2 meteorites Murray, Murchison, and Cold Bokkeveld, as well as a methanol colloid extracted from acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite (type C3V) obtained by dissolution of most of the minerals in HCl and HF acids. The carbonaceous separates, or lAlates (a coined word designating colloids prepared sometimes before and sometimes after acid treatment), are characterized incompletely and with difficulty. A stepwise heating experiment on a Murray lAlate is discussed which revealed bimodal release of all noble gases, with similar patterns for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Chemical reactions are suggested as the likely mechanism for gas release. The results are shown to support the concept of a carbonaceous gas carrier uniformly present in meteorites of various types.

  11. Predicting richness effects on ecosystem function in natural communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dangles, Olivier; Crespo-Pérez, Verónica; Andino, Patricio

    2011-01-01

    revealed that richness and identity effects on decomposition rates were lost with increasing shredder community complexity. Our approach of combining experimental and empirical data with modeling in species-poor ecosystems may serve as an impetus for new B-EF studies. If theory can explain B-EF in low....... Despite the increased complexity of experimental and theoretical studies on the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (B-EF) relationship, a major challenge is to demonstrate whether the observed importance of biodiversity in controlled experimental systems also persists in nature. Due...... to their structural simplicity and their low levels of human impacts, extreme species-poor ecosystems may provide new insights into B-EF relationships in natural systems. We address this issue using shredder invertebrate communities and organic matter decomposition rates in 24 high-altitude (3200-3900 m) Neotropical...

  12. N and P addition inhibits growth of rich fen bryophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Riis, Tenna

    2016-01-01

    vernicosus and paludella squarrosa) rich fen bryophytes were grown in mixed culture and subjected to rainwater or groundwater and three levels of N (0, 1 and 3 mg N L-1) and P (0, 0.05 and 0.1 mg P NL-1). All species responded negatively to higher N-levels and three of four species responded negatively...... to rainwater and higher P-levels. C. cuspidata had highest relative growth rate in all treatments, and the infrequently occurringrare species had lower relative growth rate and were more negatively affected by high levels of N than the frequently occurringcommon species. A negative effect of rainwater seemed...... to be caused by higher background levels of N in rainwater compared to groundwater rather than a pH-effect per se. We found a negative effect of high initial bryophyte density in three of four species indicating density dependent inhibition between species.We suggest that maintenance of oligotrophic conditions...

  13. Characterization of arabinogalactan-rich mucilage from Cereus triangularis cladodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petera, B; Delattre, C; Pierre, G; Wadouachi, A; Elboutachfaiti, R; Engel, E; Poughon, L; Michaud, P; Fenoradosoa, T A

    2015-01-01

    Cereus triangularis (Cactaceae) is a cactus used in food decoction as a traditional medicine in the North region of Madagascar to reduce stomach ache and intestinal diseases. Hydrocolloids were sequentially extracted from its cladodes with a yield of 24% (240 mg/g based on dried cladodes powder). Structural analyses has revealed that this polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 8430,000g/mol was mainly composed of a galactan backbone of a (1 → 4) linked β-d-Galp residues probably substituted at position 3 by L-arabinofuranosyl residues. In vitro antioxidant activity of this arabinogalactan-rich fraction was detected and quantified by radical DPPH scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, radical anion superoxide scavenging and reducing power method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Nguyen Quang; Kiet, Hoang Anh Tuan; Duc, Huynh Ngoc; Chuong, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance (PDR), which has been observed via the enhancement of the electric dipole strength E 1 of atomic nuclei, is studied within a microscopic collective model. The latter employs the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with effective nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Skyrme types plus the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results of the calculations obtained for various even-even nuclei such as 16-28 O, 40-58 Ca, 100-120 Sn, and 182-218 Pb show that the PDR is significantly enhanced when the number of neutrons outside the stable core of the nucleus is increased, that is, in the neutron-rich nuclei. As the result, the relative ratio between the energy weighted sum of the strength of the PDR and that of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) does not exceed 4%. The collectivity of the PDR and GDR states will be also discussed. (paper)

  15. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R

    2009-01-01

    S(CD) as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using...... canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect...... on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence...

  16. Optical telescopes for COMPASS RICH1 up-grade

    CERN Document Server

    Sulc, M; Alekseev, M; Angerer, H; Appolonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, V M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dibiase, N; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Diaz, V; Duic, V; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Pagano, P; Paul, S; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Rocco, E; Robinet, F; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Steiger, L; Sozzi, F; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2006-01-01

    The central photon detection area of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector at COMPASS, a particle physics experiment at CERN SPS dedicated to hadron physics, has been upgraded from the previous system formed by wire chambers with CsI layers to a very fast UV extended multi anode photo multiplier tube array (MAPMT), including 576 tubes. The active area covered by the MAPMTs is 7.3 times smaller than the one previously equipped with CsI photocathodes, so 576 optical concentrators transforming the image from the old system focal plane to the new photocathode plane were needed. The telescope system formed by two fused silica lenses was designed, produced and assembled. The first prismatic plano-convex field lens is placed in the focal plane of the RICH mirrors. The second condenser lens is off centered and tilted and has one aspherical surface. All lenses have antireflection coating.

  17. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  18. Proposal for PS beam tests of a fast rich detector

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Ypsilantis, Thomas; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1993-01-01

    A full scale prototype Fast RICH detector with pad readout for unambiguous imaging has been constructed for operation in a high luminosity environment. It uses the best photosensitive gas capable of fast response (TEA) or the intrinsically fast solid photocathode (CsI/TMAE), developed specifically for this purpose. It can be used at e+e- or hadron colliders as well as at fixed target facilities. It has time resolution of 20 ns with a 1.3 microsecond pipeline and parallel readout of 4000 pad sectors. Fast digital VLSI electronics has been developed for readout and 24000 channels have been tested. The prototype device (12000 pad channels) is assembled and ready for beam tests in 1993.

  19. Design and test results of the AMS RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Casadei, D.

    2002-01-01

    The AMS-02 detector will operate for at least 3 years on the International Space Station, measuring cosmic ray spectra at about 400 km above sea level over a wide range of geomagnetic latitude. The proximity focusing ring imaging \\v{C}erenkov counter of AMS-02 will measure the particle velocity $\\beta$ with $\\approx 0.1%$ uncertainty, making possible to discriminate Beryllium isotopes up to about 15 GeV/nucl. In addition its charge measurement will allow to study the elemental composition of cosmic rays up to Iron. A prototype of the RICH detector was tested with cosmic rays and on a ion beam accelerated by SPS, at CERN (October 2002).

  20. ISOL Beams of Neutron-Rich Oxygen Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Bergmann, U; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Dillmann, I; Dubois, M; Durantel, F; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Gaubert, G; Gaudefroy, L; Hallmann, O; Huet-Equilbec, C; Jacquot, B; Jardin, P; Kratz, K L; Lecesne, N; Leroy, R; López, A; Maunoury, L; Pacquet, J Y; Pfeiffer, B; Saint-Laurent, M G; Stodel, C; Villari, A C C; Weissman, L

    2005-01-01

    ISOL beams of $19-22^$O were produced at ISOLDE and GANIL. At ISOLDE the neutron-rich oxygen isotopes are produced by 1.4GeV proton-induced reactionsin a UC_X/graphite target. The target is connected via a water-cooled transfer line (to retain all non-volatile isobars) to an ISOLDE type FEBIAD ion source wherethe released CO is dominantly ionized as CO^+, $^19-22$O beams were also produced at SPIRAL (GANIL). A 77.5 MeV/nucleon $^36$S beam was fragmented in a thick graphite target, coupled by a cold tranfer tube to an ECR ion source which ionizes the released CO dominantly as O^+ and CO+.

  1. The VHMPID RICH upgrade project for ALICE at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, A; Levai, P; Smirnov, N; Pochybova, S; Futo, E; Son, C; Boldizsar, L; Volpe, G; Lipusz, C; Cuautle, E; Garcia, E; Denes, E; Mayani, D; Alfaro, R; Paic, G; Piuz, F; DeCataldo, G; Yi, J; Dominguez, I; Hamar, G; Van Beelen, J B; Varga, D; Agocs, A; Barnafoldi, G G; Molnar, L; Sgura, I; Yoo, I K; Ortiz, A; DiBari, D; Peskov, V; Pastore, C; Bencze, G; Fodor, Z; Martinengo, P; Harris, J W

    2011-01-01

    RHIC results have shown the importance of high momentum particles as hard probes and the need for particle identification (PID) in a very large momentum range. A Very High Momentum PID (VHMPID) detector has been proposed as upgrade of ALICE to extend the track-by-track identification capabilities for charged hadrons from the presents GeV/c limit to the momentum range 10-30 GeV/c. The VHMPID detector is a focusing RICH using C(4)F(10) gaseous radiator coupled to a CsI-based photon detector. Detector design studies, achievable Cherenkov angle resolution, expected performance and high momentum triggering will be discussed. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anomalously metal-rich fluids form hydrothermal ore deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie J; Stoffell, Barry; Wilkinson, Clara C; Jeffries, Teresa E; Appold, Martin S

    2009-02-06

    Hydrothermal ore deposits form when metals, often as sulfides, precipitate in abundance from aqueous solutions in Earth's crust. Much of our knowledge of the fluids involved comes from studies of fluid inclusions trapped in silicates or carbonates that are believed to represent aliquots of the same solutions that precipitated the ores. We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to test this paradigm by analysis of fluid inclusions in sphalerite from two contrasting zinc-lead ore systems. Metal contents in these inclusions are up to two orders of magnitude greater than those in quartz-hosted inclusions and are much higher than previously thought, suggesting that ore formation is linked to influx of anomalously metal-rich fluids into systems dominated by barren fluids for much of their life.

  3. Foundations for Protecting Renewable-Rich Distribution Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brahma, Sukumar [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Ranade, Satish [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    High proliferation of Inverter Interfaced Distributed Energy Resources (IIDERs) into the electric distribution grid introduces new challenges to protection of such systems. This is because the existing protection systems are designed with two assumptions: 1) system is single-sourced, resulting in unidirectional fault current, and (2) fault currents are easily detectable due to much higher magnitudes compared to load currents. Due to the fact that most renewables interface with the grid though inverters, and inverters restrict their current output to levels close to the full load currents, both these assumptions are no longer valid - the system becomes multi-sourced, and overcurrent-based protection does not work. The primary scope of this study is to analyze the response of a grid-tied inverter to different faults in the grid, leading to new guidelines on protecting renewable-rich distribution systems.

  4. Updates on Software development for a RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Lendacky, Andrew; Goodwill, Justin

    2017-01-01

    The CLAS12 detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is undergoing an upgrade. One of the improvements is the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector to improve particle identification in the 3-8 GeV/c momentum range. Approximately 400 multi anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are going to be used to detect Cherenkov Radiation in the single photoelectron spectra (SPS). Software development for slow control as well as online monitoring is under development. I will be presenting my work on the development of a java based programs for a monitor and explain its interaction with a Mysql database where the MAPMTs information is stored as well as the techniques used to visualize Cherenkov rings.

  5. Small-business employment in 22 rich economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, John; Lane, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Opponents of health care reform in the United States have often argued that such reform will be detrimental to small and medium-sized enterprises. The authors review the most recent data from a sample of 22 rich countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), all of which, except the United States, have universal health care systems. By every measure of small-business employment, the United States has among the world's smallest small-business sectors (as a proportion of total national employment). These findings hold for self-employed workers and across all industry groups for which the Paris-based OECD publishes internationally comparable data, including manufacturing, computer-related services, and research and development.

  6. Polyphenol-Rich Lentils and Their Health Promoting Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ganesan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds. There has been increasing scientific interest in the study area of lentils as the functional food due to its high nutritive value, polyphenols, and other bioactive compounds. These polyphenols and the bioactive compounds found in lentil play an important role in the prevention of those degenerative diseases in humans. Besides that, it has health-promoting effects. Based on the in vitro, in-vivo and clinical studies, the present review focuses to provide more information on the nutritional compositions, bioactive compounds including polyphenols and health-promoting effects of lentils. Health-promoting information was gathered and orchestrated at a suitable place in the review.

  7. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  8. Circumstellar ammonia in oxygen-rich evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K. T.; Menten, K. M.; Kamiński, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2018-04-01

    Context. The circumstellar ammonia (NH3) chemistry in evolved stars is poorly understood. Previous observations and modelling showed that NH3 abundance in oxygen-rich stars is several orders of magnitude above that predicted by equilibrium chemistry. Aims: We would like to characterise the spatial distribution and excitation of NH3 in the oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of four diverse targets: IK Tau, VY CMa, OH 231.8+4.2, and IRC +10420. Methods: We observed NH3 emission from the ground state in the inversion transitions near 1.3 cm with the Very Large Array (VLA) and submillimetre rotational transitions with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) aboard Herschel Space Observatory from all four targets. For IK Tau and VY CMa, we observed NH3 rovibrational absorption lines in the ν2 band near 10.5 μm with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We also attempted to search for the rotational transition within the excited vibrational state (v2 = 1) near 2 mm with the IRAM 30m Telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling, including radiative pumping to the vibrational state, was carried out to derive the radial distribution of NH3 in the CSEs of these targets. Results: We detected NH3 inversion and rotational emission in all four targets. IK Tau and VY CMa show blueshifted absorption in the rovibrational spectra. We did not detect vibrationally excited rotational transition from IK Tau. Spatially resolved VLA images of IK Tau and IRC +10420 show clumpy emission structures; unresolved images of VY CMa and OH 231.8+4.2 indicate that the spatial-kinematic distribution of NH3 is similar to that of assorted molecules, such as SO and SO2, that exhibit localised and clumpy emission. Our modelling shows that the NH3 abundance relative to molecular hydrogen is generally of the order of 10-7, which is a few times lower than previous estimates that were made without considering radiative

  9. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabloom, Eric W. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Buckley, Yvonne [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Cleland, Elsa E. [Ecology, Behavior & Evolution Section, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Davies, Kendi [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Firn, Jennifer [Queensland University of Technology, Biogeosciences, Brisbane Queensland 4000 Australia; Harpole, W. Stanley [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Hautier, Yann [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Lind, Eric [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; MacDougall, Andrew [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Prober, Suzanne M. [CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Private Bag 5 Wembley WA 6913 Australia; Adler, Peter [Department of Wildland Resources and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322 USA; Alberti, Juan [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Michael Anderson, T. [Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 USA; Bakker, Jonathan D. [School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-4115 USA; Biederman, Lori A. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Blumenthal, Dana [Rangeland Resources Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Fort Collins CO 80526 USA; Brown, Cynthia S. [Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Caldeira, Maria [Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon Portugal; Chu, Chengjin [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Crawley, Michael J. [Department of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Ascot SL5 7PY UK; Daleo, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; D' Antonio, Carla M. [Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106 USA; DeCrappeo, Nicole M. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Dickman, Chris R. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Du, Guozhen [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Fay, Philip A. [USDA-ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Lab, Temple TX 76502 USA; Frater, Paul [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Gruner, Daniel S. [Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Hagenah, Nicole [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Hector, Andrew [Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Helm, Aveliina [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Hillebrand, Helmut [Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Carl-von-Ossietzky University, Wilhelmshaven Germany; Hofmockel, Kirsten S. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Humphries, Hope C. [INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309-0450 USA; Iribarne, Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Jin, Virginia L. [USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit, Lincoln NE 68583 USA; Kay, Adam [Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul MN 55105 USA; Kirkman, Kevin P. [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Klein, Julia A. [Department Forest, Rangeland & Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523-1472 USA; Knops, Johannes M. H. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln NE 68588 USA; La Pierre, Kimberly J. [Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Ladwig, Laura M. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87103 USA; Lambrinos, John G. [Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Leakey, Andrew D. B. [Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL 61801 USA; Li, Qi [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 Qinghai China; Li, Wei [Yunnan Academy of Biodiversity, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 China; McCulley, Rebecca [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40546 USA; Melbourne, Brett [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Mitchell, Charles E. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC 27599 USA; Moore, Joslin L. [Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia; Morgan, John [Department of Botany, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086 Victoria Australia; Mortensen, Brent [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; O' Halloran, Lydia R. [Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Pärtel, Meelis [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Pascual, Jesús [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Pyke, David A. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Risch, Anita C. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Sankaran, Mahesh [National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bellary Road Bangalore 560065 India; Schuetz, Martin [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Simonsen, Anna [Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5S 3B2 Canada; Smith, Melinda [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Stevens, Carly [Lancaster Environment Center, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ UK; Sullivan, Lauren [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Wardle, Glenda M. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M. [Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 Canada; Wragg, Peter D. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Wright, Justin [Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Yang, Louie [Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA

    2013-10-16

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  10. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: Is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabloom, Eric; Borer, Elizabeth; Buckley, Yvonne; Cleland, Elsa E.; Davies, Kendi; Firn, Jennifer; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Lind, Eric M.; MacDougall, Andrew; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Adler, Peter; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori A.; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Caldeira, Maria; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Dickman, Chris R.; Du, Guozhen; Fay, Philip A.; Frater, Paul; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hagenah, Nicole; Hector, Andrew; Helm, Aveliina; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Humphries, Hope C.; Iribarne, Oscar; Jin, Virginia L.; Kay, Adam; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Ladwig, Laura M.; ,; John, G.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca; Melbourne, Brett; ,; Charles, E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Morgan, John; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Pärtel, Meelis; Pascual, Jesús; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Simonsen, Anna; Smith, Melinda; Stevens, Carly; Sullivan, Lauren; Wardle, Glenda M.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin; Yang, Louie

    2013-01-01

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  11. Platelet-rich plasma affects bacterial growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Erminia; Filardo, Giuseppe; Canella, Valentina; Berlingeri, Andrea; Bielli, Alessandra; Cattini, Luca; Landini, Maria Paola; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative rich in platelets, is a relatively new technique used in tissue regeneration and engineering. The increased quantity of platelets makes this formulation of considerable value for their role in tissue healing and microbicidal activity. This activity was investigated against five of the most important strains involved in nosocomial infections (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis) to understand the prophylactic role of pure (P)-PRP. Microbicidal proteins released from activated P-PRP platelets were also determined. The microbicidal activity of P-PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) was evaluated on different concentrations of the five bacterial strains incubated for 1, 2, 4 and 18 h and plated on agar for 18-24 h. P-PRP and PPP-released microbicidal proteins were evaluated by means of multiplex bead-based immunoassays. P-PRP and PPP inhibited bacterial growth for up to 2 h of incubation. The effect of P-PRP was significantly higher than that of PPP, mainly at the low seeding concentrations and/or shorter incubation times, depending on the bacterial strain. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-3, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-5 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-1 were the molecules mostly related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis inhibition. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were less influenced. The present results show that P-PRP might supply an early protection against bacterial contaminations during surgical interventions because the inhibitory activity is already evident from the first hour of treatment, which suggests that physiological molecules supplied in loco might be important in the time frame needed for the activation of the innate immune response. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Isomer spectroscopy of neutron-rich 168 Tb 103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgi, L. A.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P. -A.; Watanabe, H.; Walker, P. M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Nishimura, S.; Berry, T. A.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Isobe, T.; Baba, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Sakurai, H.; Sumikama, T.; Catford, W. N.; Bruce, A. M.; Browne, F.; Lane, G. J.; Kondev, F. G.; Odahara, A.; Wu, J.; Liu, H. L.; Xu, F. R.; Korkulu, Z.; Lee, P.; Liu, J. J.; Phong, V. H.; Yag, A.; Zhang, G. X.; Alharbi, T.; Carroll, R. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Dombradi, Zs.; Estrade, A.; Fukuda, N.; Griffin, C.; Ideguchi, E.; Inabe, N.; Kanaoka, H.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Lalkovski, S.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, C. S.; Lotay, G.; Moon, C. -B.; Nishizuka, I.; Nita, C. R.; Patel, Z.; Roberts, O. J.; Schaffner, H.; Shand, C. M.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Terashima, S.; Vajta, Zs.; Yoshida, S.; Valiente-Dòbon, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    In-flight fission of a 345 MeV per nucleon 238U primary beam on a 2 mm thick 9Be target has been used to produce and study the decays of a range of neutron-rich nuclei centred around the doubly mid-shell nucleus 170Dy at the RIBF Facility, RIKEN, Japan. The produced secondary fragments of interest were identified event-by-event using the BigRIPS separator. The fragments were implanted into the WAS3ABI position sensitive silicon active stopper which allowed pixelated correlations between implants and their subsequent β-decay. Discrete γ-ray transitions emitted following decays from either metastable states or excited states populated following beta decay were identified using the 84 coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors of the EURICA spectrometer, which was complemented by 18 additional cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) fast-timing scintillation detectors from the FATIMA collaboration. This paper presents the internal decay of a metastable isomeric excited state in the odd-odd nucleus 168Tb, which corresponds to a single proton-neutron hole configuration in the valence maximum nucleus 170Dy. These data represent the first information on excited states in this nucleus, which is the most neutron-rich odd-odd isotope of terbium (Z=65) studied to date. Nilsson configurations associated with an axially symmetric, prolate-deformed nucleus are proposed for the 168Tb ground state the observed isomeric state by comparison with Blocked BCS-Nilsson calculations.

  13. Isomer spectroscopy of neutron-rich 168Tb103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgi, L. A.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Walker, P. M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Nishimura, S.; Berry, T. A.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Isobe, T.; Baba, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Sakurai, H.; Sumikama, T.; Catford, W. N.; Bruce, A. M.; Browne, F.; Lane, G. J.; Kondev, F. G.; Odahara, A.; Wu, J.; Liu, H. L.; Xu, F. R.; Korkulu, Z.; Lee, P.; Liu, J. J.; Phong, V. H.; Yag, A.; Zhang, G. X.; Alharbi, T.; Carroll, R. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Dombradi, Zs.; Estrade, A.; Fukuda, N.; Griffin, C.; Ideguchi, E.; Inabe, N.; Kanaoka, H.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Lalkovski, S.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, C. S.; Lotay, G.; Moon, C.-B.; Nishizuka, I.; Nita, C. R.; Patel, Z.; Roberts, O. J.; Schaffner, H.; Shand, C. M.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Terashima, S.; Vajta, Zs.; Yoshida, S.; Valiente-Dòbon, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    In-flight fission of a 345 MeV per nucleon 238U primary beam on a 2 mm thick 9Be target has been used to produce and study the decays of a range of neutron-rich nuclei centred around the doubly mid-shell nucleus 170Dy at the RIBF Facility, RIKEN, Japan. The produced secondary fragments of interest were identified event-by-event using the BigRIPS separator. The fragments were implanted into the WAS3ABI position sensitive silicon active stopper which allowed pixelated correlations between implants and their subsequent β-decay. Discrete γ-ray transitions emitted following decays from either metastable states or excited states populated following beta decay were identified using the 84 coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors of the EURICA spectrometer, which was complemented by 18 additional cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) fast-timing scintillation detectors from the FATIMA collaboration. This paper presents the internal decay of a metastable isomeric excited state in the odd-odd nucleus 168Tb, which corresponds to a single proton-neutron hole configuration in the valence maximum nucleus 170Dy. These data represent the first information on excited states in this nucleus, which is the most neutron-rich odd-odd isotope of terbium (Z=65) studied to date. Nilsson configurations associated with an axially symmetric, prolate-deformed nucleus are proposed for the 168Tb ground state the observed isomeric state by comparison with Blocked BCS-Nilsson calculations.

  14. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  15. Mapping the Supernova-Rich Fireworks Galaxy NGC 6946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Locke; Levesque, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are the spectacularly violent deaths of evolved young massive stars, which expel a shock wave into the intergalactic medium that in turn can spark star formation and disperse heavy elements into their host galaxy. While a SN event can be classified by its spectral signature, determining the nature of a SN progenitor depends upon chance photometry taken prior to the event. By turning to the study of SN host environments and their surrounding interstellar medium within the unique and rare population of galaxies that have hosted three or more SN events within the last century, we are granted the opportunity to study the locations and environmental properties of stellar populations prone to supernova progenitor production. Using moderate-resolution optical slit spectra taken with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m DIS spectrograph, our goal is to map metallicity, ionization parameter, and star formation rates using emission line diagnostic ratios across each SN-rich galaxy. Dubbed the “Fireworks Galaxy” at a distance of 5.6 ± 1.5 Mpc, NGC 6946 is of particular interest as it has uniquely produced ten core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and several other massive star transients within the last century. We present spatially-resolved metallicity and star formation rate (SFR) maps of NGC 6946, tracing fifty-five slit orientations which span the face of the galaxy and cover all CCSN host sites. Future work will include both stellar population synthesis modelling to determine stellar populations, ages, and SFR histories in NGC 6946 and a further expansion of this analysis to the other SN-rich host galaxies in our sample.

  16. Tyrosine-rich crystals associated with oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilcrease, M Z; Nelson, F S; Guzman-Paz, M

    1998-07-01

    Crystalloids have been identified ultrastructurally within the epithelial cells of Warthin's tumors, but there have been no studies characterizing crystals or crystalloids in Warthin's tumors by light microscopy. The finding of abundant needle-shaped crystals in a fine-needle aspirate of a cystadenoma of the parotid prompted us to examine the prevalence of crystals and crystalloids in oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms. Ninety-seven oncocytic neoplasms (93 Warthin's tumors, 3 cystadenomas, and 1 oncocytoma) excised at our institution between 1950 and 1996 were examined, to identify crystals. Neoplasms with crystals were further characterized by means of a variety of histochemical stains and electron microscopy. Ninety-nine pleomorphic adenomas were similarly reviewed. Seven cases with crystals were identified. Five of these were Warthin's tumors, 1 was a cystadenoma, and 1 was an oncocytoma. The crystals were noted within tumor cysts but were not limited to the neoplasms. The crystals were predominantly either needle-shaped or tabular, but some cases contained mixtures of both as well as intermediate forms. They stained pink with hematoxylin-eosin, although the tabular forms also exhibited a focal yellow hue. The crystals were not discernible under polarized light. They stained a red-brown color with Millon's reagent, which indicated the presence of tyrosine. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff stain with diastase, alcian blue (pH 2.5), and Congo red stains were negative. Electron microscopy revealed sharply defined, elongate, electron-dense structures with periodicity, both extracellular and within epithelial cells. No crystals or crystalloids were identified in any of 99 pleomorphic adenomas reviewed. The findings indicate that tyrosine-rich crystals associated with several oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms are morphologically, histochemically, and ultrastructurally distinct from previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids and collagenous crystalloids of

  17. Learning in rich networks involves both positive and negative associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roembke, Tanja C; Wasserman, Edward A; McMurray, Bob

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive behaviors are believed to be shaped by both positive (the strengthening of correct associations) and negative (the pruning of incorrect associations or the building of inhibitory associations) forms of associative learning. However, there has been little direct documentation of how these basic processes participate in the learning of rich associative networks that support cognitive behaviors like categorization. Although negative associative learning is an important component of theories of development, it is not clear whether it involves acquiring specific (experience-dependent) content or represents a more general aspect of (experience-expectant) development. The authors thus trained pigeons on a complex many-to-many learning paradigm previously established as an analog to human word learning. Pigeons learned to map 16 objects onto 16 distinct report tokens; the authors manipulated the amount of negative associative learning that could occur by restricting which tokens were available as incorrect options. In testing, accuracy was lower on trials with foils that had not been presented with a target than on trials with previously experienced foils. Moreover, when the correct token was withheld, pigeons preferred foils novel to the target object over previously experienced foils. A second experiment replicated these results and further found that these effects only emerged after some positive associations had been acquired. Findings indicate that the learning of rich associative networks does not depend solely on positive associative learning, but also on negative associative learning; this conclusion has important implications for basic learning theories in both animals and humans, as well as for theories of development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Fast photon detection for the COMPASS RICH detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradainante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M.L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.

    2007-01-01

    Particle identification at high rates is a central aspect of many present and future experiments in high-energy particle physics. The COMPASS experiment at the SPS accelerator at CERN uses a large scale Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) to identify pions, kaons and protons in a wide momentum range. For the data taking in 2006, the COMPASS RICH has been upgraded in the central photon detection area (25% of the surface) with a new technology to detect Cherenkov photons at very high count rates of several 10 6 s -1 per channel and a new dead-time free read-out system, which allows trigger rates up to 100 kHz. The Cherenkov photons are detected by an array of 576 visible and ultra-violet sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers with 16 channels each. Lens telescopes of fused silica lenses have been designed and built to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the individual photomultipliers. The read-out electronics of the PMTs is based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator chip and the dead-time free high resolution F1-TDC. The 120 ps time resolution of the digital card guarantees negligible background from uncorrelated physical events. In the outer part of the detector, where the particle rates are lower, the present multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) with Cesium Iodide photo-cathodes have been upgraded with a new read-out electronic system based on the APV preamplifier and shaper ASIC with analog pipeline and sampling ADCs. The project was fully designed and implemented in the period November 2004 until May 2006. The upgraded detector showed an excellent performance during the 2006 data taking: the number of detected Cherenkov photons per ring was increased from 14 to above 60 at saturation. The time resolution was improved from about 3 microseconds to about one nanosecond which allows an excellent suppression of the background photons from uncorrelated events

  19. Methane Emission and Milk Production of Dairy Cows Grazing Pastures Rich in Legumes or Rich in Grasses in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gratton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact of changing pasture composition on reducing emissions of GHGs in dairy grazing systems is an important issue to mitigate climate change. The aim of this study was to estimate daily CH4 emissions of dairy cows grazing two mixed pastures with contrasting composition of grasses and legumes: L pasture with 60% legumes on Dry Matter (DM basis and G pasture with 75% grasses on DM basis. Milk production and CH4 emissions were compared over two periods of two weeks during spring using eight lactating Holstein cows in a 2 × 2 Latin square design. Herbage organic matter intake (HOMI was estimated by chromic oxide dilution and herbage organic matter digestibility (OMD was estimated by faecal index. Methane emission was estimated by using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 tracer technique adapted to collect breath samples over 5-day periods. OMD (0.71 and HOMI (15.7 kg OM were not affected by pasture composition. Milk production (20.3 kg/d, milk fat yield (742 g/d and milk protein yield (667 g/d were similar for both pastures. This may be explained by the high herbage allowance (30 kg DM above 5 cm/cow which allowed the cows to graze selectively, in particular in grass sward. Similarly, methane emission expressed as absolute value (368 g/d or 516 L/d or expressed as methane yield (6.6% of Gross Energy Intake (GEI was not affected by treatments. In conclusion, at high herbage allowance, the quality of the diet selected by grazing cows did not differ between pastures rich in legumes or rich in grasses, and therefore there was no effect on milk or methane production.

  20. Screening nitrogen-rich bases and oxygen-rich acids by theoretical calculations for forming highly stable salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Gong, Xuedong

    2014-08-04

    Nitrogen-rich heterocyclic bases and oxygen-rich acids react to produce energetic salts with potential application in the field of composite explosives and propellants. In this study, 12 salts formed by the reaction of the bases 4-amino-1,2,4-trizole (A), 1-amino-1,2,4-trizole (B), and 5-aminotetrazole (C), upon reaction with the acids HNO3 (I), HN(NO2 )2 (II), HClO4 (III), and HC(NO2 )3 (IV), are studied using DFT calculations at the B97-D/6-311++G** level of theory. For the reactions with the same base, those of HClO4 are the most exothermic and spontaneous, and the most negative Δr Gm in the formation reaction also corresponds to the highest decomposition temperature of the resulting salt. The ability of anions and cations to form hydrogen bonds decreases in the order NO3 (-) >N(NO2 )2 (-) >ClO4 (-) >C(NO2 )3 (-) , and C(+) >B(+) >A(+) . In particular, those different cation abilities are mainly due to their different conformations and charge distributions. For the salts with the same anion, the larger total hydrogen-bond energy (EH,tot ) leads to a higher melting point. The order of cations and anions on charge transfer (q), second-order perturbation energy (E2 ), and binding energy (Eb ) are the same to that of EH,tot , so larger q leads to larger E2 , Eb , and EH,tot . All salts have similar frontier orbitals distributions, and their HOMO and LUMO are derived from the anion and the cation, respectively. The molecular orbital shapes are kept as the ions form a salt. To produce energetic salts, 5-aminotetrazole and HClO4 are the preferred base and acid, respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Hemolytic and antimicrobial activities differ among saponin-rich extracts from guar, quillaja, yucca, and soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sherif M; Byrd, James A; Cartwright, Aubry L; Bailey, Chris A

    2010-10-01

    Hemolytic and antibacterial activities of eight serial concentrations ranged from 5-666 microg/mL of saponin-rich extracts from guar meal (GM), quillaja, yucca, and soybean were tested in 96-well plates and read by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate-well as 650 nm. Hemolytic assay used a 1% suspension of chicken red blood cells with water and phosphate buffered saline as positive and negative controls, respectively. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli were evaluated using ampicillin and bacteria without saponin-rich extract as positive and negative controls, respectively. The 100% MeOH GM and commercial quillaja saponin-rich extracts were significantly the highest in both hemolytic and antibacterial activities against all bacteria at the same concentration tested. Soybean saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against any of the bacteria at the concentrations tested while yucca saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria at the concentrations tested. GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts were hemolytic, while yucca and soybean saponin-rich extracts were not hemolytic at the concentrations tested. No saponin-rich extract source had antibacterial activity against S. typhimurium or E. coli at the concentrations tested. Both GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Saponin-rich extracts from different plant sources have different hemolytic and antibacterial activities.

  2. Elucidating the global elapid (Squamata) richness pattern under metabolic theory of ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rosana Talita; Oliveira de Grande, Thallita; de Souza Barreto, Bruno; Felizola Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2014-04-01

    Environmental determinants of global patterns in species richness are still uncertain. The Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) proposes that species richness patterns can be explained by environmental temperature acting on the metabolism of ectothermic organisms. However, the generality of this theory has been questioned due to its low fit to the geographic variation in species richness of different taxonomic groups. Here, we investigated whether the MTE drives elapid richness, testing the non-stationarity of the relationship between the natural logarithm of species richness (ln S) and the inverse function of temperature (1/kT) using a geographically weighted regression (GWR). The relationship between ln S and 1/kT varied systematically over space and showed non-stationarity. Few tropical locations were consistent with MTE predictions, whereas other regions fitted differently. Although the slope of the GWR model ranged from low to high, the temperature did not predict species richness strongly on average and did not limit the upper values of richness. The response of richness to temperature in some areas might reflect a recent history of colonization and diversification of species across tropical and subtropical regions. In regions not affected by temperature, species richness should be structured by other biotic and abiotic interactions. This scenario reveals that the non-stationarity of the relationship would be linked to idiosyncrasies in the sample sites, which can drift the magnitude or change the relationship between species richness and temperature throughout space.

  3. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Steve; Thorne, James H; Holguin, Andrew; Schwartz, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for significant losses of species richness or biodiversity, even within protected natural areas, is mounting. Managers are increasingly being asked to monitor biodiversity, yet estimating biodiversity is often prohibitively expensive. As a cost-effective option, we estimated the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness for four taxonomic groups (birds, mammals, herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians), and plants) within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks using only existing biological studies undertaken within the Parks and the Parks' long-term wildlife observation database. We used a rarefaction approach to model species richness for the four taxonomic groups and analyzed those groups by habitat type, elevation zone, and time period. We then mapped the spatial distributions of species richness values for the four taxonomic groups, as well as total species richness, for the Parks. We also estimated changes in species richness for birds, mammals, and herpetofauna since 1980. The modeled patterns of species richness either peaked at mid elevations (mammals, plants, and total species richness) or declined consistently with increasing elevation (herpetofauna and birds). Plants reached maximum species richness values at much higher elevations than did vertebrate taxa, and non-flying mammals reached maximum species richness values at higher elevations than did birds. Alpine plant communities, including sagebrush, had higher species richness values than did subalpine plant communities located below them in elevation. These results are supported by other papers published in the scientific literature. Perhaps reflecting climate change: birds and herpetofauna displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at low and middle elevations and mammals displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at all elevations.

  4. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Wathen

    Full Text Available Evidence for significant losses of species richness or biodiversity, even within protected natural areas, is mounting. Managers are increasingly being asked to monitor biodiversity, yet estimating biodiversity is often prohibitively expensive. As a cost-effective option, we estimated the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness for four taxonomic groups (birds, mammals, herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians, and plants within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks using only existing biological studies undertaken within the Parks and the Parks' long-term wildlife observation database. We used a rarefaction approach to model species richness for the four taxonomic groups and analyzed those groups by habitat type, elevation zone, and time period. We then mapped the spatial distributions of species richness values for the four taxonomic groups, as well as total species richness, for the Parks. We also estimated changes in species richness for birds, mammals, and herpetofauna since 1980. The modeled patterns of species richness either peaked at mid elevations (mammals, plants, and total species richness or declined consistently with increasing elevation (herpetofauna and birds. Plants reached maximum species richness values at much higher elevations than did vertebrate taxa, and non-flying mammals reached maximum species richness values at higher elevations than did birds. Alpine plant communities, including sagebrush, had higher species richness values than did subalpine plant communities located below them in elevation. These results are supported by other papers published in the scientific literature. Perhaps reflecting climate change: birds and herpetofauna displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at low and middle elevations and mammals displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at all elevations.

  5. Relative species richness and community completeness: avian communities and urbanization in the mid-Atlantic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, E.; Nichols, J.D.; Sauer, J.R.; Hines, J.E.; Flather, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    The idea that local factors govern local richness has been dominant for years, but recent theoretical and empirical studies have stressed the influence of regional factors on local richness. Fewer species at a site could reflect not only the influence of local factors, but also a smaller regional pool. The possible dependency of local richness on the regional pool should be taken into account when addressing the influence of local factors on local richness. It is possible to account for this potential dependency by comparing relative species richness among sites, rather than species richness per se. We consider estimation of a metric permitting assessment of relative species richness in a typical situation in which not all species are detected during sampling sessions. In this situation, estimates of absolute or relative species richness need to account for variation in species detection probability if they are to be unbiased. We present a method to estimate relative species richness based on capture-recapture models. This approach involves definition of a species list from regional data, and estimation of the number of species in that list that are present at a site-year of interest. We use this approach to address the influence of urbanization on relative richness of avian communities in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. There is a negative relationship between relative richness and landscape variables describing the level of urban development. We believe that this metric should prove very useful for conservation and management purposes because it is based on an estimator of species richness that both accounts for potential variation in species detection probability and allows flexibility in the specification of a 'reference community.' This metric can be used to assess ecological integrity, the richness of the community of interest relative to that of the 'original' community, or to assess change since some previous time in a community.

  6. Student Engagement in a Computer Rich Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jeffrey C.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the student lived experience when using computers in a rural science classroom. The overarching question the project sought to examine was: How do rural students relate to computers as a learning tool in comparison to a traditional science classroom? Participant data were collected using a pre-study survey, Experience Sampling during class and post-study interviews. Students want to use computers in their classrooms. Students shared that they overwhelmingly (75%) preferred a computer rich classroom to a traditional classroom (25%). Students reported a higher level of engagement in classes that use technology/computers (83%) versus those that do not use computers (17%). A computer rich classroom increased student control and motivation as reflected by a participant who shared; "by using computers I was more motivated to get the work done" (Maggie, April 25, 2014, survey). The researcher explored a rural school environment. Rural populations represent a large number of students and appear to be underrepresented in current research. The participants, tenth grade Biology students, were sampled in a traditional teacher led class without computers for one week followed by a week using computers daily. Data supported that there is a new gap that separates students, a device divide. This divide separates those who have access to devices that are robust enough to do high level class work from those who do not. Although cellular phones have reduced the number of students who cannot access the Internet, they may have created a false feeling that access to a computer is no longer necessary at home. As this study shows, although most students have Internet access, fewer have access to a device that enables them to complete rigorous class work at home. Participants received little or no training at school in proper, safe use of a computer and the Internet. It is clear that the majorities of students are self-taught or receive guidance

  7. Explaining the species richness of birds along a subtropical elevational gradient in the Hengduan Mountains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yongjie; Colwell, Robert K.; Rahbek, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    AimTo document the species richness pattern of birds in the Hengduan Mountains and to understand its causes. LocationHengduan Mountains, China. MethodsSpecies richness of 738 breeding bird species was calculated for each 100-m elevational band along a gradient from 100 to 6000m a.s.l. Climate data......) in each elevational band. Simple and multiple regression models were used to test the explanatory power of variables associated with different factors proposed to account for elevational species richness gradients. ResultsThe elevational pattern in species richness, for all breeding birds, was hump...... and energy factors along the elevational gradients; seasonality and productivity had a strong statistical relationship with species richness of montane birds in this study, with geometric constraints contributing to richness patterns for larger-ranged species endemic to the gradient. Main conclusionsWe found...

  8. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a O-16-rich reservoir and a O-17,O-18-rich reservoir produced via mass-independent fractionation. The composition of the O-16-rich reservoir is reasonably well constrained, but material representing the O-17,O-18-rich end-member is rare. Self-shielding models predict that cometary water, presumed to represent this reservoir, should be enriched in O-17 and O-18 18O by > 200%. Hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) rich in carbonaceous matter may be derived from comets; such particles likely contain the products of reaction between O-16-poor water and anhydrous silicates that formed in the inner solar system. Here we present mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of two C-rich hydrated IDPs, L2083E47 and L2071E35.

  9. Context-dependent interactions and the regulation of species richness in freshwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Andrew S.; Harvey, Eric; McCune, Jenny L.; Nilsson, Karin A.; Bennett, Joseph; Firn, Jennifer; Bartley, Timothy; Grace, James B.; Kelly, Jocelyn; Tunney, Tyler D.; McMeans, Bailey; Matsuzaki, Shin-Ichiro S.; Kadoya, Taku; Esch, Ellen; Cazelles, Kevin; Lester, Nigel; McCann, Kevin S.

    2018-01-01

    Species richness is regulated by a complex network of scale-dependent processes. This complexity can obscure the influence of limiting species interactions, making it difficult to determine if abiotic or biotic drivers are more predominant regulators of richness. Using integrative modeling of freshwater fish richness from 721 lakes along an 11olatitudinal gradient, we find negative interactions to be a relatively minor independent predictor of species richness in lakes despite the widespread presence of predators. Instead, interaction effects, when detectable among major functional groups and 231 species pairs, were strong, often positive, but contextually dependent on environment. These results are consistent with the idea that negative interactions internally structure lake communities but do not consistently ‘scale-up’ to regulate richness independently of the environment. The importance of environment for interaction outcomes and its role in the regulation of species richness highlights the potential sensitivity of fish communities to the environmental changes affecting lakes globally.

  10. A richness study of 14 distant X-ray clusters from the 160 square degree survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNamara, B.R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hornstrup, Allan

    2001-01-01

    (44) ergs s(-1), are among the most distant and luminous in our 160 deg(2) ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter cluster survey. We find that the clusters range between Abell richness classes 0 and 2 and have a most probable richness class of 1. We compare the richness distribution of our distant...... clusters to those for three samples of nearby clusters with similar X-ray luminosities. We find that the nearby and distant samples have similar richness distributions, which shows that clusters have apparently not evolved substantially in richness since redshift z = 0.5. There is, however, a marginal...... tendency for the distant clusters to be slightly poorer than nearby clusters, although deeper multicolor data for a large sample would be required to confirm this trend. We compare the distribution of distant X-ray clusters in the plane to the distribution of optically L-X-richness selected clusters from...

  11. The Fynbos and sUcculent Karoo biomes do not have exceptional local ant richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braschler, Brigitte; Chown, Steven L; Gaston, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    The Fynbos (FB) and Succulent Karoo biomes (SKB) have high regional plant diversity despite relatively low productivity. Local diversity in the region varies but is moderate. For insects, previous work suggests that strict phytophages, but not other taxa, may have high regional richness. However, what has yet to be investigated is whether the local insect species richness of FB and SKB is unusual for a region of this productivity level at this latitude, and whether regional richness is also high. Here we determine whether this is the case for ants. We use species richness data from pitfall traps in the FB and SKB in the Western Cape Province, South Africa and a global dataset of local ant richness extracted from the literature. We then relate the globally derived values of local richness to two energy-related predictors--productive energy (NDVI) and temperature, and to precipitation, and compare the data from the FB and SKB with these relationships. We further compare our local richness estimates with that of similar habitats worldwide, and regional ant richness with estimates derived from other regions. The local ant species richness of the FB and SKB falls within the general global pattern relating ant richness to energy, and is similar to that in comparable habitats elsewhere. At a regional scale, the richness of ants across all of our sites is not exceptional by comparison with other regional estimates from across the globe. Local richness of ants in the FB and SKB is not exceptional by global standards. Initial analyses suggest that regional diversity is also not exceptional for the group. It seems unlikely that the mechanisms which have contributed to the development of extraordinarily high regional plant diversity in these biomes have had a strong influence on the ants.

  12. Relationship between Bacterioplankton Richness, Respiration, and Production in the Southern North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Reinthaler, Thomas; Winter, Christian; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between bacterioplankton production (BP), respiration (BR), and community composition measured by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism in the southern North Sea over a seasonal cycle. Major changes in bacterioplankton richness were apparent from April to December. While cell-specific BP decreased highly significantly with increasing bacterioplankton richness, cell-specific BR was found to be variable along the richness gradient, suggesting that ba...

  13. Deficit in community species richness as explained by area and isolation of sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The potential community species richness was predicted for 85 patches of seminatural grassland in an agricultural landscape in Denmark. The basis of the prediction was a very large dataset on the vegetation, soil pH and topography in Danish grasslands and related communities. Species were inserte......, community richness deficit, varied considerably among patches. Community richness deficit exhibited a negative relationship with patch area, and for small patches a positive relationship with patch isolation....

  14. Evidence for halo kinematics among cool carbon-rich dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farihi, J.; Arendt, A. R.; Machado, H. S.; Whitehouse, L. J.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports preliminary yet compelling kinematical inferences for N ≳ 600 carbon-rich dwarf stars that demonstrate around 30% to 60% are members of the Galactic halo. The study uses a spectroscopically and non-kinematically selected sample of stars from the SDSS, and cross-correlates these data with three proper motion catalogs based on Gaia DR1 astrometry to generate estimates of their 3-D space velocities. The fraction of stars with halo-like kinematics is roughly 30% for distances based on a limited number of parallax measurements, with the remainder dominated by the thick disk, but close to 60% of the sample lie below an old, metal-poor disk isochrone in reduced proper motion. An ancient population is consistent with an extrinsic origin for C/O >1 in cool dwarfs, where a fixed mass of carbon pollution more readily surmounts lower oxygen abundances, and with a lack of detectable ultraviolet-blue flux from younger white dwarf companions. For an initial stellar mass function that favors low-mass stars as in the Galactic disk, the dC stars are likely to be the dominant source of carbon-enhanced, metal-poor stars in the Galaxy.

  15. A rich harvest of data from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After mastering operation with nominal bunch intensities in June, the number of nominal intensity bunches injected into the machine has been carefully increased over the last 3 weeks, and is presently 12 per beam. This achievement has allowed the LHC experiments to record more than 250 nb-1 of integrated luminosity, most of it in recent physics fills. This represents a rich harvest of data that the experiments are now analysing with a view to presenting their latest physics results at the ICHEP conference in Paris from 22 to 28 July. You can follow the event by watching the live webcast or by reading the blog.     The graph shows the loss of four bunches (red, green, pink, and blue in order of time). Other bunches were not affected, as indicated with the cyan trace. The cause and cure of the losses is under investigation. Operation with many nominal bunches is a major technical achievement which the operations teams have obtained this week. The total number of particles per beam in the LH...

  16. Alcohol taxes: do the poor pay more than the rich?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, T; Casswell, S; Gilmore, L

    1989-07-01

    Concern has often been expressed that alcohol taxes bear more heavily on the poor than on the rich, especially if these taxes are based on quantity rather than price. However, surprisingly little is known about how the tax burden is distributed across different income groups. Utilizing survey data from 3010 respondents in New Zealand, this study calculates exactly how much alcohol tax was paid by respondents in different income groups and in different types of households. These results were applied to household expenditure survey data to estimate the incidence of alcohol taxes across different households. The results suggest that, although in dollar terms the wealthiest households paid about four times as much alcohol tax as the poorest households, when expressed as a percentage of income, alcohol taxes are distributed proportionally across the lower income brackets but decline towards the upper end of the income scale. These taxes accounted for less than 1% of household income for all income groups. Households with children generally paid less alcohol tax than households without children. It is concluded that alcohol taxes in New Zealand do not seriously conflict with the broader equity objectives of government policy.

  17. Consolidation of vocabulary during sleep: The rich get richer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Emma; Gaskell, M Gareth; Weighall, Anna; Henderson, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Sleep plays a role in strengthening new words and integrating them with existing vocabulary knowledge, consistent with neural models of learning in which sleep supports hippocampal transfer to neocortical memory. Such models are based on adult research, yet neural maturation may mean that the mechanisms supporting word learning vary across development. Here, we propose a model in which children may capitalise on larger amounts of slow-wave sleep to support a greater demand on learning and neural reorganisation, whereas adults may benefit from a richer knowledge base to support consolidation. Such an argument is reinforced by the well-reported "Matthew effect", whereby rich vocabulary knowledge is associated with better acquisition of new vocabulary. We present a meta-analysis that supports this association between children's existing vocabulary knowledge and their integration of new words overnight. Whilst multiple mechanisms likely contribute to vocabulary consolidation and neural reorganisation across the lifespan, we propose that contributions of existing knowledge should be rigorously examined in developmental studies. Such research has potential to greatly enhance neural models of learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using ecological niche modeling to determine avian richness hotspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mirzaei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding distributions of wildlife species is a key step towards identifying biodiversity hotspots and designing effective conservation strategies. In this paper, the spatial pattern of diversity of birds in Golestan Province, Iran was estimated. Ecological niche modeling was used to determine distributions of 144 bird species across the province using a maximum entropy algorithm. Richness maps across all birds, and separately for rare and threatened species, were prepared as approximations to hotspots. Results showed close similarity between hotspots for all birds and those for rare birds; hotspots were concentrated in the southern and especially the southwestern parts of the province. Hotspots for threatened birds tended more to the central and especially the western parts of the province, which include coastal habitats. Based on three criteria, it is clear that the western part is the most important area of the province in terms of bird Faunas. Despite some shortcomings, hotspot analysis for birds could be applied to guide conservation efforts and provide useful tool towards efficient conservation action.

  19. Raman effect in icosahedral boron-rich solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Werheit, Volodymyr Filipov, Udo Kuhlmann, Ulrich Schwarz, Marc Armbrüster, Andreas Leithe-Jasper, Takaho Tanaka, Iwami Higashi, Torsten Lundström, Vladimir N Gurin and Maria M Korsukova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Raman spectra of numerous icosahedral boron-rich solids having the structure of α-rhombohedral, β-rhombohedral, α-tetragonal, β-tetragonal, YB66, orthorhombic or amorphous boron. The spectra were newly measured and, in some cases, compared with reported data and discussed. We emphasize the importance of a high signal-to-noise ratio in the Raman spectra for detecting weak effects evoked by the modification of compounds, accommodation of interstitial atoms and other structural defects. Vibrations of the icosahedra, occurring in all the spectra, are interpreted using the description of modes in α-rhombohedral boron by Beckel et al. The Raman spectrum of boron carbide is largely clarified. Relative intra- and inter-icosahedral bonding forces are estimated for the different structural groups and for vanadium-doped β-rhombohedral boron. The validity of Badger's rule is demonstrated for the force constants of inter-icosahedral B–B bonds, whereas the agreement is less satisfactory for the intra-icosahedral B–B bonds.

  20. The richness of plants in Art Nouveau gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pudelska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The turn of the 19th and the 20th centuries signified the appearance of a new trend in art called Art Nouveau in England, Stile floreale in Italy, and in Poland – secesja. It was an attempt to escape from the style that copied historical forms and set a new direction of development. The main inspiration for the creators of this period became nature, its asymmetry, variety of textures, subtle colors or smooth, and wavy lines. Artistic motifs were drawn from the richness of native flora and fauna. Flowering shrubs, perennials and creepers were especially inseparable decorative and compositional elements of a garden.  Secession had a significant impact on painting, sculpture, architecture, and garden design. The space surrounding people was treated comprehensively by blurring the boundaries between different arts. A multitude of shrubs – especially roses and lots of perennials such as Lilium, Iris, and Phlox, gave the impression of architecture immersing in the surrounding garden. The aim of the paper was to briefly analyze the Art Nouveau style and present the diversity of species used in the gardens of that period.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma for bone healing and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh; Moshiri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Successful healing of large bone defects (LBDs) is a complicated phenomenon because the body's natural ability often fails to effectively repair the LBDs. New modalities should be utilized to increase the quality and accelerate bone healing. Platelet concentrates in different forms can be considered an attractive option for such purpose. Platelets as a natural source of growth factors, cytokines, and other micro and macromolecules are hypothesized to improve bone healing. This review has covered important concepts regarding platelet-rich plasma (PRP) including mechanisms of action, preparation protocols and their differences, and factors affecting the PRP efficacy during bone healing. In addition, the most recent studies in different levels which evaluated the role of PRP on bone repair has been reviewed and discussed to clarify the controversies and conflicts, and to illustrate a future prospective and directions for orthopedic surgeons to overcome current limitations and difficulties. As the efficacy of PRP is dependent on various factors, the outcome of PRP therapy is variable and unpredictable in orthopedic patients. Therefore, it is still too soon to suggest PRP as the first line treatment option in complicated bone injuries such as LBDs and nonunions. However, combination of PRP with natural and synthetic biomaterials can enhance the effectiveness of PRP.

  2. High rate tests of the LHCb RICH Upgrade system

    CERN Multimedia

    Blago, Michele Piero

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for the upgrade of the LHCb RICH detectors from 2020 is to readout the photon detectors at the full 40 MHz rate of the LHC proton-proton collisions. A test facility has been setup at CERN with the purpose to investigate the behaviour of the Multi Anode PMTs, which have been proposed for the upgrade, and their readout electronics at high trigger rates. The MaPMTs are illuminated with a monochromatic laser that can be triggered independently of the readout electronics. A first series of tests, including threshold scans, is performed at low trigger rates (20 kHz) for both the readout and the laser with the purpose to characterise the behaviour of the system under test. Then the trigger rate is increased in two separate steps. First the MaPMTs are exposed to high illumination by triggering the pulsed laser at a high (20 MHz) repetition rate while the DAQ is readout at the same low rate as before. In this way the performance of the MaPMTs and the attached electronics can be evaluated ...

  3. Transition-metal interactions in aluminum-rich intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Lehyani, Ibrahim; Widom, Mike; Wang, Yang; Moghadam, Nassrin; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Moriarty, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The extension of the first-principles generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT) to transition-metal (TM) aluminides produces pair and many-body interactions that allow efficient calculations of total energies. In aluminum-rich systems treated at the pair-potential level, one practical limitation is a transition-metal overbinding that creates an unrealistic TM-TM attraction at short separations in the absence of balancing many-body contributions. Even with this limitation, the GPT pair potentials have been used effectively in total-energy calculations for Al-TM systems with TM atoms at separations greater than 4 Aa. An additional potential term may be added for systems with shorter TM atom separations, formally folding repulsive contributions of the three- and higher-body interactions into the pair potentials, resulting in structure-dependent TM-TM potentials. Towards this end, we have performed numerical ab initio total-energy calculations using the Vienna ab initio simulation package for an Al-Co-Ni compound in a particular quasicrystalline approximant structure. The results allow us to fit a short-ranged, many-body correction of the form a(r 0 /r) b to the GPT pair potentials for Co-Co, Co-Ni, and Ni-Ni interactions

  4. Primordial Molecular Cloud Material in Metal-Rich Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    The menagerie of objects that make up our Solar System reflects the composition of the huge molecular cloud in which the Sun formed, a late addition of short-lived isotopes from an exploding supernova or stellar winds from a neighboring massive star, heating and/or alteration by water in growing planetesimals that modified and segregated the primordial components, and mixing throughout the Solar System. Outer Solar System objects, such as comets, have always been cold, hence minimizing the changes experienced by more processed objects. They are thought to preserve information about the molecular cloud. Elishevah Van Kooten (Natural History Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen) and co-authors in Denmark and at the University of Hawai'i, measured the isotopic compositions of magnesium and chromium in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites. They found that the meteorites preserve an isotopic signature of primordial molecular cloud materials, providing a potentially detailed record of the molecular cloud's composition and of materials that formed in the outer Solar System.

  5. Basic Physical Properties of Ammonia-Rich Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandera, S. E.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-10-01

    We report simple measurements of the thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and microwave absorptivity of ammonia hydrate ices, which are likely to be abundant in the Saturnian system. Understanding the dielectric properties of ammonia ice could play an important role in interpreting data from the Cassini spacecraft, which will image Titan's surface by radar in 2004. Thermal conductivity measurements were made by freezing a thin copper wire in the center of ice samples. The wire acted as both heater and temperature sensor, calibrated by a thermocouple also frozen in the sample. Ices with concentrations of 5- 30% ammonia were compared to pure water ice and ices containing salts. Thermal conductivity was found to decrease with increasing concentration of ammonia - a factor of 3 or 4 less than pure water ice for the 30% peritectic composition. Microwave absorptivity was measured by placing insulated ice samples and calibration materials in a conventional microwave oven. The microwave absorptivity was found to increase with increasing concentration of ammonia, although the effect is strongly temperature dependent, and heat leak from the room made quantitative measurement difficult. Mechanical strength was estimated using a ball bearing/accelerometer indentation method. For temperatures 100-150K, ammonia-rich ice has a Young's modulus about 10x smaller than pure ice. These properties affect tidal dissipation and the likelihood and style of cryovolcanism on (and the radar appearance of) the icy satellites and Titan. This work was supported by the Cassini RADAR team and the Arizona Space Grant Consortium.

  6. Testing prototypes of novel radiator for LHCb-RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Saini, Divya

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN aims to look for signals for physics beyond the standard model in particle physics. The data from Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) in LHCb are used to identify the hadronic particles that are produced in proton-proton collisions in different momentum ranges. The particle identification performance of the current detector in the 1-10 GeV/c range needs a significant improvement. For this an R&D project to use a new type of radiator using photonic crystals is underway. In a laboratory at CERN, prototypes of crystals will be exposed to charged particles from a source and the Cherenkov photons created will be detected using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMTs). The data collected will be compared with expectations from optical simulations. These simulations use the solutions of Maxwell’s equations based on the quantum mechanical properties of the crystals. The MaPMTs and the optical components outside the crystals are simulated using GEANT4 and analysis involve using t...

  7. A carbohydrate-rich diet increases social immunity in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Adam D; Bruning, Abbie J; van Alst, Andy; Abrahamson, Tyler T; Hughes, W O H; Kaspari, Michael

    2014-03-07

    Increased potential for disease transmission among nest-mates means living in groups has inherent costs. This increased potential is predicted to select for disease resistance mechanisms that are enhanced by cooperative exchanges among group members, a phenomenon known as social immunity. One potential mediator of social immunity is diet nutritional balance because traits underlying immunity can require different nutritional mixtures. Here, we show how dietary protein-carbohydrate balance affects social immunity in ants. When challenged with a parasitic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, workers reared on a high-carbohydrate diet survived approximately 2.8× longer in worker groups than in solitary conditions, whereas workers reared on an isocaloric, high-protein diet survived only approximately 1.3× longer in worker groups versus solitary conditions. Nutrition had little effect on social grooming, a potential mechanism for social immunity. However, experimentally blocking metapleural glands, which secrete antibiotics, completely eliminated effects of social grouping and nutrition on immunity, suggesting a causal role for secretion exchange. A carbohydrate-rich diet also reduced worker mortality rates when whole colonies were challenged with Metarhizium. These results provide a novel mechanism by which carbohydrate exploitation could contribute to the ecological dominance of ants and other social groups.

  8. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  9. A rich diversity of opercle bone shape among teleost fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles B Kimmel

    Full Text Available The opercle is a prominent craniofacial bone supporting the gill cover in all bony fish and has been the subject of morphological, developmental, and genetic investigation. We surveyed the shapes of this bone among 110 families spanning the teleost tree and examined its pattern of occupancy in a principal component-based morphospace. Contrasting with expectations from the literature that suggest the local morphospace would be only sparsely occupied, we find primarily dense, broad filling of the morphological landscape, indicating rich diversity. Phylomorphospace plots suggest that dynamic evolution underlies the observed spatial patterning. Evolutionary transits through the morphospaces are sometimes long, and occur in a variety of directions. The trajectories seem to represent both evolutionary divergences and convergences, the latter supported by convevol analysis. We suggest that that this pattern of occupancy reflects the various adaptations of different groups of fishes, seemingly paralleling their diverse marine and freshwater ecologies and life histories. Opercle shape evolution within the acanthomorphs, spiny ray-finned fishes, appears to have been especially dynamic.

  10. Reversal of Myoblast Aging by Tocotrienol Rich Fraction Posttreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jye Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are heavily involved in the regeneration of skeletal muscle in response to the aging-related deterioration of the skeletal muscle mass, strength, and regenerative capacity, termed as sarcopenia. This study focused on the effect of tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF on regenerative capacity of myoblasts in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS. The myoblasts was grouped as young control, SIPS-induced, TRF control, TRF pretreatment, and TRF posttreatment. Optimum dose of TRF, morphological observation, activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-galactosidase, and cell proliferation were determined. 50 μg/mL TRF treatment exhibited the highest cell proliferation capacity. SIPS-induced myoblasts exhibit large flattened cells and prominent intermediate filaments (senescent-like morphology. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly increased, but the proliferation capacity was significantly reduced as compared to young control. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly reduced and cell proliferation was significantly increased in the posttreatment group whereas there was no significant difference in SA-β-galactosidase activity and proliferation capacity of pretreatment group as compared to SIPS-induced myoblasts. Based on the data, we hypothesized that TRF may reverse the myoblasts aging through replenishing the regenerative capacity of the cells. However, further investigation on the mechanism of TRF in reversing the myoblast aging is needed.

  11. Autologous Platelet-rich Plasma after Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandevivala, Adil; Sangle, Amit; Shah, Dinesh; Tejnani, Avneesh; Sayyed, Aatif; Khutwad, Gaurav; Patel, Arpit Arunbhai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the third molar impactions, with respect to: pain, swelling, healing, and periodontal status distal to the second molar in patients who need surgical removal of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars. Twenty-five patients of both sexes aged between 16 and 60 years who required bilateral surgical removal of their impacted third molars and met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. After surgical extraction of the third molar, primary closure was performed in the control group, whereas PRP was placed in the socket followed by primary closure in the case group. The outcome variables were pain, swelling, wound healing, and periodontal probe depth that were follow-up period of 2 months. Quantitative data are presented as mean. Statistical significance was checked by t -test. There was a difference in the pain (0.071) and facial swelling (0.184), reduction between test and control on day 3, but it was not found to be significant. Periodontal pocket depth (0.001) and wound healing (0.001) less in case group compared with the control group was found to be significant. The use of PRP lessens the severity of immediate postoperative sequelae and decreases preoperative pocket depth.

  12. [Platelet rich plasma (PRP): potentialities and techniques of extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, L; Casella, F; Maggiore, C

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the various techniques of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extraction codified in recent years and their use potential is evaluated. PRP is one of the techniques with which at the moment it is attempted to modulate and facilitate the cure of a wound. The use of PRP is based on the theoretical premise that by concentrating platelets the effects of the growth factors (PDGF, TGF-beta, IGF-I and -II) so released will be increased. Marx's original technique is described above all. This prescribes the sampling of a unit of blood (450-500 ml) and the use of a cell separator. We then analysed the technique of Marx and Hannon in which the quantity of blood sampled is reduced to 150 ml, and the two simplified techniques of the Sacchi and Bellanda group. Finally, a new PRP extraction technique is described. We conclude that platelet gel allows access to autologous growth factors which by definition are neither toxic nor immunogenic and are capable of accelerating the normal processes of bone regeneration. PRP can thus be considered a useful instrument for increasing the quality and final quantity of regenerated bone in oral and maxillo-facial surgery operations.

  13. Herpetofaunal richness of San Julian Universitary Farm, Patulul, Suchitepequez, Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Guerra-Centeno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The herpetofaunal richness of San Julian Universitary Farm (FUSJ, in Patulul, Suchitepequez, Guatemala, was investigated using three methods: (1 Capture/sighting of specimens, (2 social inquiry and (3 desk research. The field work was distributed over a 10 year period (2003-2013 at a rate of six fieldwork sessions each year. A 4.5 km long transect extending through the agricultural landscape of the farm was run repeatedly. Each fieldwork session included diurnal and nocturnal travels. The accumulated search time was 420 hr-transect. The equivalent to 337.5 of accumulated miles were traveled, including elevations between 1490 and 1833 feet above sea level. Three former hunters were interviewed and asked to identify species they think are present at the FUSJ. Published data were reviewed to determine which species were expected to occur in San Julian. Two lists (amphibians andreptiles totaling 97 species (including 95 expected, 38 found and 2 not expected was generated. The quality and significance of our data is discussed.

  14. The Fate of Gas-rich Satellites in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the stellar mass-loss of gas-rich galaxies falling into clusters due to the change in the gravitational potential caused by the ram-pressure-stripping of their gas. We model the satellites with exponential stellar and gas disk profiles, assume rapid ram-pressure-stripping, and follow the stellar orbits in the shocked potential. Due to the change of the potential, the stars move from circular orbits to elliptical orbits with apocenters that are often outside the tidal radius, causing those stars to be stripped. We explore the impact of the redshift of infall, gas fraction, satellite halo mass, and cluster mass on this process. The puffing of the satellites makes them appear as ultra-diffuse galaxies, and the stripped stars contribute to the intracluster light. Our results show that these effects are most significant for less massive satellites, which have larger gas fractions when they are accreted into clusters. The preferential destruction of low-mass systems causes the red fraction of cluster galaxies to be smaller at lower masses, an observation that is otherwise difficult to explain.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma for the spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Yoon, Won Yong; Chang, Ho Guen

    2018-01-01

    There has been a wide interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a therapeutic agent to enhance spinal fusion. There are two review articles based only on clinical studies regarding the effect of PRP on spinal fusion. However, with regard to both animal model studies and clinical studies, there is no review studies regarding its effect on spinal fusion and no review studies focusing on the platelet count and the concentration of the growth factor in the PRP. The purpose is to review the literatures about the effect of PRP on spinal fusion according to the animal model studies and clinical studies, focusing on the effect of the platelet count and the concentration of the growth factor in the PRP. A PubMed search was performed for English-language articles. We identified 20 articles regarding the effect of PRP on fusion in animal model studies and clinical studies, of which 16 articles met the study criteria of case-control studies or prospective randomized studies for the spinal fusion. The articles were categorized into small-sized animal model, middle-sized animal model, and clinical studies. Studies have shown both beneficial and inhibitory effects. The conclusion that PRP has the stimulating effect on spinal fusion was not reached. However, PRP might promote the human spinal fusion if the platelet count or the concentration of growth factors in the PRP increases.

  16. Ion transport by mitochondria-rich cells in toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ussing, H H; Spring, K R

    1987-01-01

    The optical sectioning video imaging technique was used for measurements of the volume of mitochondria-rich (m.r.) cells of the isolated epithelium of toad skin. Under short-circuit conditions, cell volume decreased by about 14% in response to bilateral exposure to Cl-free (gluconate substitution....... Unilateral exposure to a Cl-free solution did not prevent ouabain-induced cell swelling. It is concluded that m.r. cells have an amiloride-blockable Na conductance in the apical membrane, a ouabain-sensitive Na pump in the basolateral membrane, and a passive Cl permeability in both membranes. From...... the initial rate of ouabain-induced cell volume increase the active Na current carried by a single m.r. cell was estimated to be 9.9 +/- 1.3 pA. Voltage clamping of the preparation in the physiological range of potentials (0 to -100 mV, serosa grounded) resulted in a cell volume increase with a time course...

  17. Itqiy: A metal-rich enstatite meteorite with achondritic texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Andrea; Hill, Dolores H.; Boynton, William V.

    2001-11-01

    Itqiy is a unique coarse-grained, metal-rich enstatite meteorite that was found in the Western Sahara and consists of two rocks together weighing 4.72 kg, which are both completely coated with fusion crust. We report results from our electron microprobe and INAA techniques. Itqiy consists of subhedral, equigranular, millimeter-sized enstatite, ~ 25 vol% of mm-sized kamacite and a few tiny intergrowths of sulfides and kamacite. Relic chondrules are absent. Pyroxene (Fs 0.2) is chemically similar to enstatite in EL chondrites, but the metal is closer in composition to that in EH chondrites. Sulfides resemble those in E chondrites but their compositions are distinct from those in both EL and EH chondrites. Itqiy clearly formed under very reducing conditions, but it does not appear to have formed from EH or EL chondrites. Two thermal events can be distinguished. Silicate compositions including REE abundances indicate loss of partial melt and slow cooling. Heterogeneous sulfides indicate a subsequent reheating and quenching event, which may have been due to shock as many enstatite grains show shock stage S3 features.

  18. Delayed Particle Study of Neutron Rich Lithium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Marechal, F; Perrot, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to make a systematic complete coincidence study of $\\beta$-delayed particles from the decay of neutron-rich lithium isotopes. The lithium isotopes with A=9,10,11 have proven to contain a vast information on nuclear structure and especially on the formation of halo nuclei. A mapping of the $\\beta$-strength at high energies in the daughter nucleus will make possible a detailed test of our understanding of their structure. An essential step is the comparison of $\\beta$-strength patterns in $^{11}$Li and the core nucleus $^{9}$Li, another is the full characterization of the break-up processes following the $\\beta$-decay. To enable such a measurement of the full decay process we will use a highly segmented detection system where energy and emission angles of both charged and neutral particles are detected in coincidence and with high efficiency and accuracy. We ask for a total of 30 shifts (21 shifts for $^{11}$Li, 9 shifts $^{9}$Li adding 5 shifts for setting up with stable beam) using a Ta-foil target...

  19. Progressive Syntax-Rich Coding of Multichannel Audio Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Yang

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Being able to transmit the audio bitstream progressively is a highly desirable property for network transmission. MPEG-4 version 2 audio supports fine grain bit rate scalability in the generic audio coder (GAC. It has a bit-sliced arithmetic coding (BSAC tool, which provides scalability in the step of 1 Kbps per audio channel. There are also several other scalable audio coding methods, which have been proposed in recent years. However, these scalable audio tools are only available for mono and stereo audio material. Little work has been done on progressive coding of multichannel audio sources. MPEG advanced audio coding (AAC is one of the most distinguished multichannel digital audio compression systems. Based on AAC, we develop in this work a progressive syntax-rich multichannel audio codec (PSMAC. It not only supports fine grain bit rate scalability for the multichannel audio bitstream but also provides several other desirable functionalities. A formal subjective listening test shows that the proposed algorithm achieves an excellent performance at several different bit rates when compared with MPEG AAC.

  20. Design of progressive syntax-rich multichannel audio codec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dai; Ai, Hongmei; Kyriakakis, Christos; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2001-12-01

    Being able to transmit the audio bitstream progressively is a highly desirable property for network transmission. MPEG-4 version-2 audio supports fine grain bit rate scalability in the Generic Audio Coder (GAC). It has a Bit-Sliced Arithmetic Coding (BSAC) tool, which provides scalability in the step of 1kbit/sec per audio channel. However, this fine grain scalability tool is only available for mono and stereo audio material. Not much work has been done on progressively transmitting multichannel audio sources. MPEG Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is one of the most distinguished multichannel digital audio compression systems. Based on AAC, we develop a progressive syntax-rich multichannel audio codec in this work. It not only supports fine grain bit rate scalability for the multichannel audio bitstream, but also provides several other desirable functionalities. A formal subjective listening test shows that the proposed algorithm achieves a better performance at several different bit rates when compared with MPEG-4 BSAC for the mono audio sources.

  1. Progressive Syntax-Rich Coding of Multichannel Audio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dai; Ai, Hongmei; Kyriakakis, Chris; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2003-12-01

    Being able to transmit the audio bitstream progressively is a highly desirable property for network transmission. MPEG- [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] version [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] audio supports fine grain bit rate scalability in the generic audio coder (GAC). It has a bit-sliced arithmetic coding (BSAC) tool, which provides scalability in the step of 1 Kbps per audio channel. There are also several other scalable audio coding methods, which have been proposed in recent years. However, these scalable audio tools are only available for mono and stereo audio material. Little work has been done on progressive coding of multichannel audio sources. MPEG advanced audio coding (AAC) is one of the most distinguished multichannel digital audio compression systems. Based on AAC, we develop in this work a progressive syntax-rich multichannel audio codec (PSMAC). It not only supports fine grain bit rate scalability for the multichannel audio bitstream but also provides several other desirable functionalities. A formal subjective listening test shows that the proposed algorithm achieves an excellent performance at several different bit rates when compared with MPEG AAC.

  2. Graph embedding with rich information through heterogeneous graph

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Guolei

    2017-11-12

    Graph embedding, aiming to learn low-dimensional representations for nodes in graphs, has attracted increasing attention due to its critical application including node classification, link prediction and clustering in social network analysis. Most existing algorithms for graph embedding only rely on the topology information and fail to use the copious information in nodes as well as edges. As a result, their performance for many tasks may not be satisfactory. In this thesis, we proposed a novel and general framework for graph embedding with rich text information (GERI) through constructing a heterogeneous network, in which we integrate node and edge content information with graph topology. Specially, we designed a novel biased random walk to explore the constructed heterogeneous network with the notion of flexible neighborhood. Our sampling strategy can compromise between BFS and DFS local search on heterogeneous graph. To further improve our algorithm, we proposed semi-supervised GERI (SGERI), which learns graph embedding in an discriminative manner through heterogeneous network with label information. The efficacy of our method is demonstrated by extensive comparison experiments with 9 baselines over multi-label and multi-class classification on various datasets including Citeseer, Cora, DBLP and Wiki. It shows that GERI improves the Micro-F1 and Macro-F1 of node classification up to 10%, and SGERI improves GERI by 5% in Wiki.

  3. Radiochemical search for neutron-rich isotopes of element 107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaedel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent mass calculations have indicated that there is a region of deformed nuclei around neutron number N=162 that is especially stable against spontaneous fission. Barrier heights of about 5 MeV for Z = 107 nuclides can be extrapolated. To search for new, neutron-rich isotopes of element 107 in radiochemical experiments with 254 Es as a target an on-line chemical separation of element 107 (EKA-Rhenium), especially from the actinide elements is needed. An on-line gas-phase chemistry was developed with the homolog Re based on the volatility of the oxide which is transported in an O 2 containing atmosphere along a temperature gradient in a quartz tube and is condensed onto a thin Ta coated Ni-foil. The authors applied this technique in two series of experiments with their rotating wheel on-line gas-phase chemistry apparatus at the 88-inch cyclotron where they irradiated 254 Es as a target with 93 MeV and 96 MeV 16 O ions to search for 266 107. The assignment of the observed alpha events between 8 and 9 MeV to possibly (1) non actinide contaminants like 212 Po, (2) known isotopes of heavy elements like 261 105, or (3) a new isotope will be discussed

  4. [Treatment of corneal ulcers with platelet rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, L; Castro, M; Fernandez, M; Oliveres, E; Gomez-Demmel, E; Tartara, L

    2014-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of extensive corneal ulcers in albino rabbits. New Zealand rabbits, divided in 3 groups, were used for the study. Corneal ulcers of 10mm diameter were made. Rabbits blood was extracted for the preparation of the PRP of the corresponding group. The blood was processed by differential centrifugation. The first group, named control, was treated with sterile saline every 8h. The second group, named gel, was treated with deproteinized extract gel beef fat every 8h, and the third group, named PRP received one PRP drop on the first and third day of monitoring. The rabbits were monitored, by taking photographs, each day for the 7 days that the study lasted. A better outcome was observed in the group with deproteinized extract gel beef fat (GE group), and the PRP group (PL group), in comparison with the control group (CO group) (PSolcoseryl®), for the regeneration of the extensive and deep corneal ulcers. Besides, it stands out as a no surgical procedure is required, and there is easy access, low cost and reduced doses. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Antihypertensive properties of flavonoid-rich apple peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Nileeka; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2012-12-15

    Hypertension is a major public health problem rising across the globe. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is identified as a main therapeutic target in controlling high blood pressure. The present study investigated the ACE inhibitory property of a flavonoid-rich apple peel extract (FAE), its constituents, selected flavonoids and some quercetin metabolites using a biochemical assay of ACE inhibition and a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) model. FAE, all the tested flavonoids except genistein, and two quercetin metabolites (quercetin-3-O-glucuronic acid and quercetin-3-O-sulfate) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited ACE. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed that flavonoids are competitive inhibitors of ACE. In the HUVEC model, FAE, quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-glucuronic acid inhibited significantly (p<0.05) ACE activity. Overall, FAE and most of the flavonoids tested showed ACE inhibition in vitro which needs further investigations using animal and human clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transition probabilities in neutron-rich Se,8684

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzinger, J.; Blazhev, A.; Dewald, A.; Didierjean, F.; Duchêne, G.; Fransen, C.; Lozeva, R.; Sieja, K.; Verney, D.; de Angelis, G.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Braunroth, T.; Cederwall, B.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Ellinger, E.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goasduff, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hackstein, M.; Hess, H.; Ibrahim, F.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Kolos, K.; Korten, W.; Leoni, S.; Lunardi, S.; Maj, A.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatovic, T.; Million, B.; Möller, O.; Modamio, V.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Niikura, M.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente Dobón, J. J.; Vandone, V.; Vogt, A.

    2015-12-01

    Reduced quadrupole transition probabilities for low-lying transitions in neutron-rich Se,8684 are investigated with a recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) experiment. The experiment was performed at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro using the Cologne Plunger device for the RDDS technique and the AGATA Demonstrator array for the γ -ray detection coupled to the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer for an event-by-event particle identification. In 86Se the level lifetime of the yrast 21+ state and an upper limit for the lifetime of the 41+ state are determined for the first time. The results of 86Se are in agreement with previously reported predictions of large-scale shell-model calculations using Ni78-I and Ni78-II effective interactions. In addition, intrinsic shape parameters of lowest yrast states in 86Se are calculated. In semimagic 84Se level lifetimes of the yrast 41+ and 61+ states are determined for the first time. Large-scale shell-model calculations using effective interactions Ni78-II, JUN45, jj4b, and jj4pna are performed. The calculations describe B (E 2 ;21+→01+) and B (E 2 ;61+→41+) fairly well and point out problems in reproducing the experimental B (E 2 ;41+→21+) .

  7. Platelet-rich fibrin application in immediate implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Rajaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dental rehabilitation of a patient following single-tooth extraction in the esthetic zone is often clinically challenging. The treatment option for this is implant-supported single crown which has the advantage that adjacent teeth do not have to be prepared, as in a fixed prosthesis. This article presents a case of immediate implant placement in relation to 22 and a guided bone regeneration approach with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF and bone graft. After immediate implant placement, to compensate for the gap (jumping distance between the implant surface and bone walls of the socket, we used bone grafts and PRF clot as well as PRF membrane to achieve guided bone regeneration. PRF, which is the second generation platelet concentrate, offers the surgeon an access to growth factors with a simple and available technology. These growth factors, which are autologous, nontoxic, and nonimmunogenic, enhance and accelerate the normal bone regeneration pathways. The case presented showed successful outcome with a 1 year follow-up period.

  8. Corrosion of a Pu-doped zirconolite-rich ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A.J.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Bates, J.K.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a large Pu disposition program, a zirconolite-rich titanate ceramic is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as a possible immobilization material. This same material is being tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of this study is to describe the corrosion behavior of this ceramic, particularly the release of Pu and Gd, using results from several static corrosion tests (MCC-1, PCT-A, and PCT-B). The release of relatively large amounts of Al, Ba, and Ca in short-term tests (3 day MCC-1 and 7 day PCT-A) indicates that these elements are released from grain boundaries or from highly soluble phases. Results from long-term (28, 98, and 182 day) PCT-B show that the releases of Al, Ba, and Ca decrease with time, the releases of U and Zr increase with time, and that the releases of Cs, Gd, Mo, and Pu remain fairly constant. Formation of alteration phases may lead to the decrease of Ba and Ca in leachate solutions. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the material, the formation of alteration phases, and the inherently low solubility of several elements, no element(s) could be recommended as good markers for the overall corrosion of this ceramic. Data show that, due to the complex nature of this material, the release of each element should be considered separately

  9. [Application of platelet-rich plasma in clinical orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weili; Li, Qi; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the application status and progress of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in clinical orthopedics. The recent related literature concerning the application of PRP in clinical orthopedics was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Recently, a large number of clinical studies on PRP have been carried out, which are applied in bone defects or nonunion, spinal fusion, osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries, ligament reconstruction, muscle strain, tendon terminal diseases, and a variety of acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Some results show certain effectiveness, while others demonstrate invalid. Easily drawing, achieving autologous transplantation, and the biological repair potential of the musculoskeletal tissues make PRP to be widely used in clinical orthopedics. However, there are still no uniform standards accepted and reliable clinical guidelines about the application of PRP. Furthermore, a variety of PRP products and their respective indications are also different. The clinical evidences with the greater sample size and higher quality are still needed to further support the safety and effectiveness of PRP in clinical orthopedics.

  10. Design and Implementation of a Metadata-rich File System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2010-01-19

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of user-defined file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and semantic metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, user-defined attributes, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS incorporates Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the de facto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  11. Tropical epiphytes in a CO 2-rich atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, José Alberto Fernandez; Zotz, Gerhard; Körner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We tested the effect on epiphyte growth of a doubling of pre-industrial CO 2 concentration (280 vs. 560 ppm) combined with two light (three fold) and two nutrition (ten fold) treatments under close to natural humid conditions in daylight growth cabinets over 6 months. Across co-treatments and six species, elevated CO 2 increased relative growth rates by only 6% ( p = 0.03). Although the three C3 species, on average, grew 60% faster than the three CAM species, the two groups did not significantly differ in their CO 2 response. The two Orchidaceae, Bulbophyllum (CAM) and Oncidium (C3) showed no CO 2 response, and three out of four Bromeliaceae showed a positive one: Aechmea (CAM, +32% p = 0.08), Catopsis (C3, +11% p = 0.01) and Vriesea (C3, +4% p = 0.02). In contrast, the representative of the species-rich genus Tillandsia (CAM), which grew very well under experimental conditions, showed no stimulation. On average, high light increased growth by 21% and high nutrients by 10%. Interactions between CO 2, light and nutrient treatments (low vs. high) were inconsistent across species. CO 2 responsive taxa such as Catopsis, could accelerate tropical forest dynamics and increase branch breakage, but overall, the responses to doubling CO 2 of these epiphytes was relatively small and the responses were taxa specific.

  12. Bats prove to be rich reservoirs for emerging viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisher, Charles H.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Dominguez, Samuel R.; Schountz, Tony; Cryan, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging pathogens, many of them viruses, continue to surprise us, providing many newly recognized diseases to study and to try to control. Many of these emergent viruses are zoonotic, transmitted from reservoirs in wild or domestic animals to humans, either by insect vectors or by exposure to the droppings or tissues of such animals. One rich- but, until recently, underappreciated-source of emergent viruses is bats (Chiroptera, meaning "hand wing"). Accounting for 1,116, or nearly one fourth, of the 4,600 recognized species of mammals, bats are grouped into two suborders Megachiroptera, which contains a single family, Pteropodidae, consisting of 42 genera and 186 species, and Microchiroptera, which contains 17 families, 160 genera, and 930 species. Although bats are among the most abundant, diverse, and geographically dispersed orders of terrestrial mammals, research on these flying mammals historically focused more on their habits and outward characteristics than on their role in carrying microorganisms and transmitting pathogens to other species. Even in those cases where bats were known to carry particular pathogens, the microbiologists who studied those pathogens typically knew little about the bat hosts. Hence, investigators now are seeking to explain how variations of anatomy, physiology, ecology, and behavior influence the roles of bats as hosts for viral pathogens.

  13. Molecular Analyzer for Complex Refractory Organic-Rich Surfaces (MACROS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Cook, Jamie E.; Balvin, Manuel; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Li, Xiang; Grubisic, Andrej; Cornish, Timothy; Ferrance, Jerome; Southard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    The Molecular Analyzer for Complex Refractory Organic-rich Surfaces, MACROS, is a novel instrument package being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. MACROS enables the in situ characterization of a sample's composition by coupling two powerful techniques into one compact instrument package: (1) laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDMS) for broad detection of inorganic mineral composition and non-volatile organics, and (2) liquid-phase extraction methods to gently isolate the soluble organic and inorganic fraction of a planetary powder for enrichment and detailed analysis by liquid chromatographic separation coupled to LDMS. The LDMS is capable of positive and negative ion detection, precision mass selection, and fragment analysis. Two modes are included for LDMS: single laser LDMS as the broad survey mode and two step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS). The liquid-phase extraction will be done in a newly designed extraction module (EM) prototype, providing selectivity in the analysis of a complex sample. For the sample collection, a diamond drill front end will be used to collect rock/icy powder. With all these components and capabilities together, MACROS offers a versatile analytical instrument for a mission targeting an icy moon, carbonaceous asteroid, or comet, to fully characterize the surface composition and advance our understanding of the chemical inventory present on that body.

  14. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  15. A vegetable protein-rich diet for the treatment of liver cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Okita, Misako; Watanabe, Akiharu; Nagashima, Hideo

    1985-01-01

    Twelve patients were administered a vegetable protein-rich diet, which was low in methionine and high in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) to aromatic amino acid (AAA) molar ratio, and an animal protein-rich diet, high in methionine and low in the BCAA/AAA molar ratio. These diets were administered successively for one week each. Actually ingested amounts of tyrosine and methionine were significantly lower during the feeding of the vegetable protein-rich diet than the animal protein-rich d...

  16. Aquatic macrophyte richness in Danish lakes in relation to alkalinity, transparency, and lake area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Ole Skafte; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    alkalinity but 12.3 in lakes of high alkalinity due to a greater occurrence of the species-rich group of elodeids. Mean species richness per lake also increased significantly with increasing Secchi depth. No significant relationship between species richness and lake surface area was observed among the entire...... group of lakes or a subset of eutrophic lakes, as the growth of submerged macrophytes in large lakes may be restricted by wave action in shallow water and light restriction in deep water. In contrast, macrophyte species richness increased with lake surface area in transparent lakes, presumably due...

  17. Geomicrobiology of Fe-rich crusts in Lake Superior sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, M.; Monreau, L.; Quazi, S.; Raoof, B.; Chesnyuk, A.; Katsev, S.; Fulthorpe, R.

    2012-04-01

    The limnological puzzles of Lake Superior are increasingly attracting scientists, and very little is known about the sediments and their associated microflora. The sediments are organic poor (less than 5%C) and the lake is deep oligotrophic, with water temperatures at the bottom around 3C. Previous studies reveal Fe-rich layers in the sediments at multiple loccations around the lake. The origin and mechanisms of formation of this layer remain unknown. In this study we investigated geochemical and microbiological processes that may lead to the formation of a two cm thick iron layer about 10 cm below the sediment surface. Sediment cores from two stations (EM, 230m water depth and ED, 310m water depth) in the East Basin were used. We monitored oxygen and pH depth profiles with microsensors, porewater and sediment solid matter were analyzed for nutrient and metal contents. Furthermore, phosphorus and iron sequantial extractions of sediment cores have been perfomed. The total cell count was determined using DAPI epifluoresence microscopy. DNA was extracted from the sediment samples and 16S ribosonal RNA amplicons were analyzed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). For a more in depth analysis, DNA samples from 8-10 cm and 10-12 cm were sent to the Research and Testing Lab (Texas) for pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons amplified using barcoded universal primers 27f-519r. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images from the iron layer 10-12cm show filaments that were encrusted with spheres ca. 20 nm in diameter. SEM observations of thin sections also indicate the presence of very fine particles showing various morphologies. Analyses of the deposit material by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicate that bacteria cells surfaces served as nucleation surfaces for Fe-oxide formation. EDS line-scans through bacterial cells covered with precipitates reveal phosphorus and carbon peaks at interface between cell surface and Fe

  18. Molecular equilibria and condensation temperatures in carbon-rich gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, C. M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1995-04-01

    of SiC forms below the condensation temperature of AIN, due to the formation of CaS grains allowing some Si locked up in gaseous SiS to be released. This additional low temperature SiC could incorporate some AIN. Finally, we briefly investigated the equilibria when C/O ≤ 1. When C/O = 1 or slightly smaller, the results are very sensitive to the data. TiC can form at C/O = 0.98 but at lower temperatures than TiN and TiO. Below C/O = 0.98, no SiC forms. For C/O = 0.9, calculations show that this definitely is in the "oxygen-rich" regime when oxides and silicates but no carbides form. As SiO is one of the next most tightly bound oxides in the gas phase after CO, it is shown that the whole high temperature condensation chemistry takes on oxygen-rich aspects, when C/O < 0.96 for the solar Si/O ratio.

  19. A scalable, micropore, platelet rich plasma separation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Mary Nora; Amar, Levy; Hill, Michael; Schwartz, Joseph; Leonard, Edward F

    2012-12-01

    We have designed a novel, low energy platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) separator capable of producing 50 mL of PRP in 30 min, intended for military and emergency applications. Blood flows over a 3 mm length of sieve at high rates of shear. A plasma-platelet filtrate passes through the sieve's pores while erythrocytes remain. The filtrate is flowed over a second 3 mm length of smaller-pored sieve that withdraws plasma. Bulk blood volume is maintained by returning platelet-free plasma to the erythrocyte pool, enabling a nearly complete multi-pass platelet extraction. The total percentage of platelets extracted is:θ(T)=1-exp (-V(f)(T)Φ(P)/V) where V is the original plasma volume, V ( f )(T) is the total filtered volume, and ϕ ( P ) is platelet passage ratio (filtrate concentration/bulk average concentration) taken to be constant. Maximum θ(T) occurs at maximum V ( f )(T)× ϕ ( P ) Test microsieves, 3 mm long × 3 mm wide, were used. ϕ ( P ) values measured at various filtrate flow rates (20-100 uL/min) and utilizing various filter pore sizes (1.2-3.5 μm), was as high as 150 %. Maximum V ( f )(T)× ϕ ( P ) was achieved utilizing the 3.5 um filters at the highest flow rate, 100 uL/min. Erythrocyte leakages were always below 2,000/uL, far below the allowable limit stipulated by the American Association of Blood Banking. These data imply that a 13.7 cm(2) filter area is sufficient to achieve the target separation of 50 mL of platelet concentrate in 30 min. The filtration cartridge would consist of multiple microporous strips of 3 mm width arranged in parallel so that each element would see the conditions used in the prototype experiments presented here. Other microfiltration schemes suggest no method of scaling to practical levels.

  20. Extramitochondrial domain rich in carbonic anhydrase activity improves myocardial energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marie A; Ali, Mohammad A; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Supuran, Claudiu T; Clarke, Kieran; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Tyler, Damian J; Swietach, Pawel

    2013-03-05

    CO2 is produced abundantly by cardiac mitochondria. Thus an efficient means for its venting is required to support metabolism. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes, expressed at various sites in ventricular myocytes, may affect mitochondrial CO2 clearance by catalyzing CO2 hydration (to H(+) and HCO3(-)), thereby changing the gradient for CO2 venting. Using fluorescent dyes to measure changes in pH arising from the intracellular hydration of extracellularly supplied CO2, overall CA activity in the cytoplasm of isolated ventricular myocytes was found to be modest (2.7-fold above spontaneous kinetics). Experiments on ventricular mitochondria demonstrated negligible intramitochondrial CA activity. CA activity was also investigated in intact hearts by (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy from the rate of H(13)CO3(-) production from (13)CO2 released specifically from mitochondria by pyruvate dehydrogenase-mediated metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. CA activity measured upon [1-(13)C]pyruvate infusion was fourfold higher than the cytoplasm-averaged value. A fluorescent CA ligand colocalized with a mitochondrial marker, indicating that mitochondria are near a CA-rich domain. Based on immunoreactivity, this domain comprises the nominally cytoplasmic CA isoform CAII and sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated CAXIV. Inhibition of extramitochondrial CA activity acidified the matrix (as determined by fluorescence measurements in permeabilized myocytes and isolated mitochondria), impaired cardiac energetics (indexed by the phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio measured by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perfused hearts), and reduced contractility (as measured from the pressure developed in perfused hearts). These data provide evidence for a functional domain of high CA activity around mitochondria to support CO2 venting, particularly during elevated and fluctuating respiratory activity. Aberrant distribution of CA activity therefore may reduce the heart's energetic

  1. Richness and composition of niche-assembled viral pathogen communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W Seabloom

    Full Text Available The pathogen and parasite community that inhabits every free-living organism can control host vital rates including lifespan and reproductive output. To date, however, there have been few experiments examining pathogen community assembly replicated at large-enough spatial scales to inform our understanding of pathogen dynamics in natural systems. Pathogen community assembly may be driven by neutral stochastic colonization and extinction events or by niche differentiation that constrains pathogen distributions to particular environmental conditions, hosts, or vectors. Here, we present results from a regionally-replicated experiment investigating the community of barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses (B/CYDV's in over 5000 experimentally planted individuals of six grass species along a 700 km latitudinal gradient along the Pacific coast of North America (USA in response to experimentally manipulated nitrogen and phosphorus supplies. The composition of the virus community varied predictably among hosts and across nutrient-addition treatments, indicating niche differentiation among virus species. There were some concordant responses among the viral species. For example, the prevalence of most viral species increased consistently with perennial grass cover, leading to a 60% increase in the richness of the viral community within individual hosts (i.e., coinfection in perennial-dominated plots. Furthermore, infection rates of the six host species in the field were highly correlated with vector preferences assessed in laboratory trials. Our results reveal the importance of niche differentiation in structuring virus assemblages. Virus species distributions reflected a combination of local host community composition, host species-specific vector preferences, and virus responses to host nutrition. In addition, our results suggest that heterogeneity among host species in their capacity to attract vectors or support pathogens between growing seasons can

  2. Nutritional Evaluation of Oleogel Made from Micronutrient Rich Edible Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Begg, Faruk; Bhattacharyya, Dipak K; Bandyopadhya, Nilratan; Ghosh, Mahua

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the nutritional properties of trans-free edible oleogels made from oil blends of rice bran and flaxseed in animal model. Oleogels were prepared by using mixture of palm stearin (PS) with cetyl laurate (CL) and palm stearin (PS) with cetyl caprylate (CC) as oleogelators. The oleogel samples were prepared with 15 weight % oleogelators (2:1 molar ratio of PS:CC or PS:CL) at 60°C with 1 hr constant stirring in blended oil. The prepared oleogel samples were subjected to DSC and XRD studies in order to evaluate their melting and crystal characteristics. Oleogel formed by using PS and CC showed the desired thermal characteristics. The peak melting temperature of the said sample was almost 44.5°C as determined by the DSC technique. The X-ray diffraction study clearly signified that the crystals were well developed. For nutritional evaluation, Male Wister rats were fed with prepared oleogel samples along with control diet for 4 weeks. Animals were divided into four groups. The control group was fed with normal stock diet containing blend of rice bran oil and flaxseed oil (4:1); one was fed with TFA rich vanaspati (TFA content is about 11.20%); experimental groups were fed with oleogel prepared by using PS:CC and oleogel prepared by using PS:CL respectively. Analysis of the blood lipid profile of the four groups was done. In vivo study established the cholesterol lowering properties of prepared oleogel samples which further enhanced the novelty of oleogel as healthy alternative of trans fat. The positive changes were more pronounced in case of rats fed with oleogel prepared with PS:CC as oleogelators. This study provides an elegant approach of producing trans-free edible quality oleogel with recognized cholesterol lowering property.

  3. The effect of platelet-rich fibrin on implant stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncü, Elif; Alaaddinoğlu, E Emine

    2015-01-01

    Achieving accelerated implant osseointegration could make immediate or early loading of implants more predictable. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is frequently used to accelerate soft and hard tissue healing. The activated platelets in PRF release growth factors, resulting in cellular proliferation, collagen synthesis, and osteoid production. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of dental implants inserted in a one-stage surgical protocol with or without PRF application. Twenty healthy patients with adequate alveolar bone and two or more adjacent missing teeth extracted at least 6 months previously were included in this study. A minimum of two tapered implants (Ankylos, Dentsply/Friadent) were placed in each patient. After surgical preparation of the implant sockets, PRF that had been prepared preoperatively was placed randomly into one of the sockets (PRF+). The acellular plasma portion of PRF was used to wet the implant placed into the PRF-coated socket. Resonance frequency measurements were made after implant placement and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively. Mean implant stability quotients (ISQs) of the PRF+ implants was 69.3 ± 10.5, and mean ISQs for the PRF- implants was 64.5 ± 12.2 at the end of the first week. The mean ISQs at 4 weeks postoperatively were 77.1 ± 7.1 for the PRF+ group and 70.5 ± 7.7 for the PRF- group. In this study, PRF application increased implant stability during the early healing period, as evidenced by higher ISQ values. Simple application of this material seems to provide faster osseointegration.

  4. Schwertmannite stability in anoxic Fe(II)-rich aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paikaray, Susanta; Schröder, Christian; Peiffer, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Schwertmannite (SHM) is a powerful scavenger for As(III) leading to As(III)-enriched precipitates around acid mine drainage environments that may become exposed to aqueous Fe(II). In this study we have investigated the stability of pure SHM and SHM containing 0.92 wt% As(III) under Fe(II)aq-rich (0.4-1.0 mM) anoxic conditions using XRD, SEM, Mössbauer and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Schwertmannite transformation proceeded through an alkalinity-driven pathway releasing sulfate and a Fe(II)-catalyzed pathway that generated lepidocrocite and goethite at pH 6 and 6.9 in the presence of 1 mM Fe(II)aq. Lepidocrocite was found to be needle shaped if the SHM contained As(III) and platy for pure SHM. Goethite had a poor degree of crystallinity in As(III) containing SHM. Pre-adsorption of As(III) inhibited the extent of SHM transformation. Fe(II) sorption onto SHM was pH dependent and reflected a sorption edge with complete consumption at pH 6.9, while only ∼20% were adsorbed at pH 5. Surface coverage with Fe(II) appears to be the key parameter controlling extent and products of the transformation process. As(III) concentrations in solution are controlled by two mechanisms: (1) exchange of As(III) for sulfate upon alkalinity-driven transformation of schwertmannite and (2) re-adsorption to new phases formed upon Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation. The adsorbed As(III) has inhibited the extent of transformation and was partly released with the maximum release at pH 5 (0.5%) in the absence of Fe(II)aq.

  5. On the nature of hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Gall, E. E. E.; Leloudas, G.; Chen, T.-W.; Schulze, S.; Jerkstrand, A.; Nicholl, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Arcavi, I.; Benetti, S.; Cartier, R. A.; Childress, M.; Della Valle, M.; Flewelling, H.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Huber, M.; Kankare, E.; Krühler, T.; Magnier, E. A.; Maguire, K.; McCully, C.; Prajs, S.; Primak, N.; Scalzo, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Tucker, B. E.; Valenti, S.; Wilman, M.; Young, D. R.; Yuan, F.

    2018-03-01

    We present two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe): SN2103hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN2008es, are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad H α feature during the photospheric phase; also, they show no sign of strong interaction between fast moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Despite the fact that the peak luminosity of PS15br is fainter than that of the other two objects, the spectrophotometric evolution is similar to SN2103hx and different from any other supernova in a similar luminosity space. We group all of them as SLSNe II and hence they are distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a strong, multicomponent H α emission after 200 d past maximum, which we interpret as an indication of the interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to Type II supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evolve on slower time-scales. This is qualitatively similar to how SLSNe I compare with normal type Ic, in that the former are brighter and evolve more slowly. We apply a magnetar and an interaction semi-analytical code to fit the light curves of our two objects and SN2008es. The overall observational data set would tend to favour the magnetar, or central engine, model as the source of the peak luminosity, although the clear signature of late-time interaction indicates that interaction can play a role in the luminosity evolution of SLSNe II at some phases.

  6. A Chick Model of Retinal Detachment: Cone Rich and Novel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebulla, Colleen M.; Zelinka, Chris P.; Scott, Melissa A.; Lubow, Martin; Bingham, Amanda; Rasiah, Stephen; Mahmoud, Ashraf M.; Fischer, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of retinal detachment models in small animals can be difficult and expensive. Here we create and characterize a novel, cone-rich retinal detachment (RD) model in the chick. Methodology/Principal Findings Retinal detachments were created in chicks between postnatal days 7 and 21 by subretinal injections of either saline (SA) or hyaluronic acid (HA). Injections were performed through a dilated pupil with observation via surgical microscope, using the fellow eye as a control. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed at days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 after retinal detachment to evaluate the cellular responses of photoreceptors, Müller glia, microglia and nonastrocytic inner retinal glia (NIRG). Cell proliferation was detected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporation and by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cell death was detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). As in mammalian models of RD, there is shortening of photoreceptor outer segments and mis-trafficking of photoreceptor opsins in areas of RD. Photoreceptor cell death was maximal 1 day after RD, but continued until 14 days after RD. Müller glia up-regulated glial fibriliary acidic protein (GFAP), proliferated, showed interkinetic nuclear migration, and migrated to the subretinal space in areas of detachment. Microglia became reactive; they up-regulated CD45, acquired amoeboid morphology, and migrated toward outer retina in areas of RD. Reactive NIRG cells accumulated in detached areas. Conclusions/Significance Subretinal injections of SA or HA in the chick eye successfully produced retinal detachments and cellular responses similar to those seen in standard mammalian models. Given the relatively large eye size, and considering the low cost, the chick model of RD offers advantages for high-throughput studies. PMID:22970190

  7. Arsenic-Rich Polyarsenides Stabilized by Cp*Fe Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Monika; Konieczny, David; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Virovets, Alexander V; Balázs, Gabor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Riedlberger, Felix; Krauss, Hannes; Scheer, Manfred

    2017-06-12

    The redox chemistry of [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] (1, Cp*=η 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry, revealing a redox behavior similar to that of its lighter congener [Cp*Fe(η 5 -P 5 )]. However, the subsequent chemical reduction of 1 by KH led to the formation of a mixture of novel As n scaffolds with n up to 18 that are stabilized only by [Cp*Fe] fragments. These include the arsenic-poor triple-decker complex [K(dme) 2 ][{Cp*Fe(μ,η 2:2 -As 2 )} 2 ] (2) and the arsenic-rich complexes [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] (3), [K(dme) 2 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 2:2:2:2 -As 14 )] (4), and [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 4 (μ 4 ,η 4:3:3:2:2:1:1 -As 18 )] (5). Compound 4 and the polyarsenide complex 5 are the largest anionic As n ligand complexes reported thus far. Complexes 2-5 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, 1 H NMR spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy (2), and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, DFT calculations showed that the intermediate [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] - , which is presumably formed first, undergoes fast dimerization to the dianion [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] 2- . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effectiveness of platelets rich plasma versus corticosteroids in lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Khan, Imran; Inam, Muhammad; Saeed, Mohammad; Khan, Husnain; Iqbal, Malik Javed

    2015-11-01

    To compare the treatment modalities of lateral epicondylitis in terms of pain relief. The randomised controlled study was conducted at Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, Pakistan, from April 2013 to March 2014, and comprised cases of lateral epicondylitis. The patients were selected through consecutive sampling from the outpatient department and were randomly allocated to two equal groups; group A receiving corticosteroid injections, and group B receiving injection of platelet-rich plasma. The patients were followed up for three weeks to determine the effectiveness of intervention. The 102 patients in the study were divided into two groups of 51(50%) each. The over mean age was 33.9±10.3 years. Mean age of patients in the corticosteroid group was 34.2±10.2 years and in the other group it was 33.6±10.5 years. Mean baseline visual analogue score in group A were 6.5±1.2 and in group B it was 6.7±1.4. In group A, 74.5% of patients presented in moderate pain category and 25.5% presented in severe pain category. In group B, 70.6% presented in moderate with 29.4% presented in severe pain category. On follow-up, the mean pain score in group A was 4.0±2.6 and in group B it was 3.5±2.61. Group A showed effectiveness in 52.9% patients and group B showed effectiveness in 82.3% (p=0.001). PRP is an effective alternate to corticosteroid in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow).

  9. Distribution and Evolution of Yersinia Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yueming; Huang, He; Hui, Xinjie; Cheng, Xi; White, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, playing important roles in various protein-protein interaction processes. In Yersinia, the well-characterized type III secreted effector YopM also belongs to the LRR protein family and is encoded by virulence plasmids. However, little has been known about other LRR members encoded by Yersinia genomes or their evolution. In this study, the Yersinia LRR proteins were comprehensively screened, categorized, and compared. The LRR proteins encoded by chromosomes (LRR1 proteins) appeared to be more similar to each other and different from those encoded by plasmids (LRR2 proteins) with regard to repeat-unit length, amino acid composition profile, and gene expression regulation circuits. LRR1 proteins were also different from LRR2 proteins in that the LRR1 proteins contained an E3 ligase domain (NEL domain) in the C-terminal region or an NEL domain-encoding nucleotide relic in flanking genomic sequences. The LRR1 protein-encoding genes (LRR1 genes) varied dramatically and were categorized into 4 subgroups (a to d), with the LRR1a to -c genes evolving from the same ancestor and LRR1d genes evolving from another ancestor. The consensus and ancestor repeat-unit sequences were inferred for different LRR1 protein subgroups by use of a maximum parsimony modeling strategy. Structural modeling disclosed very similar repeat-unit structures between LRR1 and LRR2 proteins despite the different unit lengths and amino acid compositions. Structural constraints may serve as the driving force to explain the observed mutations in the LRR regions. This study suggests that there may be functional variation and lays the foundation for future experiments investigating the functions of the chromosomally encoded LRR proteins of Yersinia. PMID:27217422

  10. Optical clearing in collagen- and proteoglycan-rich osteochondral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Novak, T; Gilliland, K F; Marshall, P; Calve, S

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in optical clearing and microscopy technology have enabled the imaging of intact tissues at the millimeter scale to characterize cells via fluorescence labeling. While these techniques have facilitated the three-dimensional (3D) cellular characterization within brain and heart, study of dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system have been largely unexplored. Here, we quantify how optical clearing impacted the cell and tissue morphology of collagen-, proteoglycan-, and mineral-rich cartilage and bone from the articulating knee joint. Water-based fructose solutions were used for optical clearing of bovine osteochondral tissues, followed by imaging with transmission and confocal microscopy. To confirm preservation of tissue structure during the clearing process, samples were mechanically tested in unconfined compression and visualized by cryo-SEM. Optical clearing enhanced light transmission through cartilage, but not subchondral bone regions. Fluorescent staining and immunolabeling was preserved through sample preparations, enabling imaging to cartilage depths five times deeper than previously reported, limited only by the working distance of the microscope objective. Chondrocyte volume remained unchanged in response to, and upon the reversal, of clearing. Equilibrium modulus increased in cleared samples, and was attributed to exchange of interstitial fluid with the more viscous fructose solution, but returned to control levels upon unclearing. In addition, cryo-SEM-based analysis of cartilage showed no ultrastructural changes. We anticipate large-scale microscopy of diverse connective tissues will enable the study of intact, 3D interfaces (e.g., osteochondral) and cellular connectivity as a function of development, disease, and regeneration, which have been previously hindered by specimen opacity. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Colloidal membranes: The rich confluence of geometry and liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Cihan Nadir

    A simple and experimentally realizable model system of chiral symmetry breaking is liquid-crystalline monolayers of aligned, identical hard rods. In these materials, tuning the chirality at the molecular level affects the geometry at systems level, thereby inducing a myriad of morphological transitions. This thesis presents theoretical studies motivated by the rich phenomenology of these colloidal monolayers. High molecular chirality leads to assemblages of rods exhibiting macroscopic handedness. In the first part we consider one such geometry, twisted ribbons, which are minimal surfaces to a double helix. By employing a theoretical approach that combines liquid-crystalline order with the preferred shape, we focus on the phase transition from simple flat monolayers to these twisted structures. In these monolayers, regions of broken chiral symmetry nucleate at the interfaces, as in a chiral smectic A sample. The second part particularly focuses on the detailed structure and thermodynamic stability of two types of observed interfaces, the monolayer edge and domain walls in simple flat monolayers. Both the edge and "twist-walls" are quasi-one-dimensional bands of molecular twist deformations dictated by local chiral interactions and surface energy considerations. We develop a unified theory of these interfaces by utilizing the de Gennes framework accompanied by appropriate surface energy terms. The last part turns to colloidal "cookies", which form in mixtures of rods with opposite handedness. These elegant structures are essentially flat monolayers surrounded by an array of local, three dimensional cusp defects. We reveal the thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cookies. Furthermore, cookies provide us with a simple relation to determine the intrinsic curvature modulus of our model system, an important constant associated with topological properties of membranes. Our results may have impacts on a broader class of soft thin films.

  12. Climate-induced lake drying causes heterogeneous reductions in waterfowl species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Jennifer K.; Griffith, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    ContextLake size has declined on breeding grounds for international populations of waterfowl.ObjectivesOur objectives were to (1) model the relationship between waterfowl species richness and lake size; (2) use the model and trends in lake size to project historical, contemporary, and future richness at 2500+ lakes; (3) evaluate mechanisms for the species–area relationship (SAR); and (4) identify species most vulnerable to shrinking lakes.MethodsMonte Carlo simulations of the richness model were used to generate projections. Correlations between richness and both lake size and habitat diversity were compared to identify mechanisms for the SAR. Patterns of nestedness were used to identify vulnerable species.ResultsSpecies richness was greatest at lakes that were larger, closer to rivers, had more wetlands along their perimeters and were within 5 km of a large lake. Average richness per lake was projected to decline by 11 % from 1986 to 2050 but was heterogeneous across sub-regions and lakes. Richness in sub-regions with species-rich lakes was projected to remain stable, while richness in the sub-region with species-poor lakes was projected to decline. Lake size had a greater effect on richness than did habitat diversity, suggesting that large lakes have more species because they provide more habitat but not more habitat types. The vulnerability of species to shrinking lakes was related to species rarity rather than foraging guild.ConclusionsOur maps of projected changes in species richness and rank-ordered list of species most vulnerable to shrinking lakes can be used to identify targets for conservation or monitoring.

  13. Program SimAssem: software for simulating species assemblages and estimating species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon C. Reese; Kenneth R. Wilson; Curtis H. Flather

    2013-01-01

    1. Species richness, the number of species in a defined area, is the most frequently used biodiversity measure. Despite its intuitive appeal and conceptual simplicity, species richness is often difficult to quantify, even in well surveyed areas, because of sampling limitations such as survey effort and species detection probability....

  14. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  15. Evaluation of the Effect of Platelet-Rich Fibrin on the Alveolar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... nonsmokers or positively affect periodontal healing, but it positively affected postoperative pain levels. Keywords: Alveolar osteitis, mandibular third molar, platelet-rich fibrin, probing depth. Evaluation of the Effect of Platelet-Rich Fibrin on the Alveolar Osteitis. Incidence and Periodontal Probing Depth after ...

  16. Limited sampling hampers “big data” estimation of species richness in a tropical biodiversity hotspot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engemann, Kristine; Enquist, Brian J.; Sandel, Brody Steven

    2015-01-01

    in Ecuador, one of the most species-rich and climatically heterogeneous biodiversity hotspots. Species richness estimates were calculated based on 205,735 georeferenced specimens of 15,788 species using the Margalef diversity index, the Chao estimator, the second-order Jackknife and Bootstrapping resampling...

  17. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoudi, E.A.; Ribas, J.; Kaushik, G.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell-based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factors, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein-based approaches. Platelet-rich blood derivatives,

  18. Weed flora of University of Benin in terms of diversity and richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weeds are as important as man to himself and its environment. Weed flora in terms of diversity and richness of University of Benin, Ugbowo campus were determined from four habitable parts using two ecological models: Margalef species richness (d) and Shannon-Wiener diversity (H). Primary data were collected from an ...

  19. Kinetics of light-assisted physical ageing in S-rich arsenic sulphide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetics of light-assisted physical ageing in S-rich arsenic sulphide glasses. A KOZDRAS. Faculty of Physics, Opole University of Technology, Opole 45370, Poland. MS received 23 October 2015; accepted 18 February 2016. Abstract. The obtained results show that kinetics of light-assisted physical ageing in S-rich glasses ...

  20. Calcined iron rich clay as an adsorbent and a photocatalyst for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using the calcined clay obeys pseudo-first order kinetic model. The apparent rate constants (kapp) of the photocatalytic degradation of phenol using the calcined iron rich clay are higher than the reported kapp for the photocatalytic degradation of phenol using TiO2. The calcined iron rich ...

  1. Rheological behaviour of fibre-rich plant materials in fat-based food systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonarius, G.A.; Vieira, J.B.; Goot, van der A.J.; Bodnar, I.

    2014-01-01

    The potential use of fibre-rich materials as bulking agents to replace sucrose in chocolate confectionary products is investigated. Since the rheological behaviour of the molten chocolate mass is key in chocolate production, the rheology of fibre-rich materials in medium chain triglycerides (MCT) is

  2. Food plant diversity as broad-Scale Determinant of Avian Frugivore Richness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissling, W. Daniel; Rahbek, Carsten; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    The causes of variation in animal species richness at large spatial scales are intensively debated. Here, we examine whether the diversity of food plants, contemporary climate and energy, or habitat heterogeneity determine species richness patterns of avian frugivores across sub-Saharan Africa...

  3. Etching of GaAs substrates to create As-rich surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    All the procedures except HCl solution. (1 : 1) produce an As-rich surface. Also, none of the etchants except HF–ethanol solution produce Ga or As- rich (oxide free) surfaces. Optical microscopic study shows different etch pits produced due to etching in different solutions. Keywords. Etching; semi-insulating; XPS spectrum.

  4. Sulfurization of carbohydrates results in a sulfur-rich, unresolved complex mixture in kerogen pyrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dongen, B.E. van; Schouten, S.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrolysates of the organic carbon-rich and oil-prone rocks of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) are dominated by a sulfur-rich unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Structural characterization of this UCM by preparative capillary gas chromatography, gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography/mass

  5. Soil geomorphic classification, soil taxonomy, and effects on soil richness assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan D. Phillips; Daniel A. Marion

    2007-01-01

    The study of pedodiversity and soil richness depends on the notion of soils as discrete entities. Soil classifications are often criticized in this regard because they depend in part on arbitrary or subjective criteria. In this study soils were categorized on the basis of the presence or absence of six lithological and morphological characteristics. Richness vs. area...

  6. Environmental heterogeneity as a universal driver of species richness across taxa, biomes and spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Anke; Gerstner, Katharina; Kreft, Holger

    2014-07-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is regarded as one of the most important factors governing species richness gradients. An increase in available niche space, provision of refuges and opportunities for isolation and divergent adaptation are thought to enhance species coexistence, persistence and diversification. However, the extent and generality of positive heterogeneity-richness relationships are still debated. Apart from widespread evidence supporting positive relationships, negative and hump-shaped relationships have also been reported. In a meta-analysis of 1148 data points from 192 studies worldwide, we examine the strength and direction of the relationship between spatial environmental heterogeneity and species richness of terrestrial plants and animals. We find that separate effects of heterogeneity in land cover, vegetation, climate, soil and topography are significantly positive, with vegetation and topographic heterogeneity showing particularly strong associations with species richness. The use of equal-area study units, spatial grain and spatial extent emerge as key factors influencing the strength of heterogeneity-richness relationships, highlighting the pervasive influence of spatial scale in heterogeneity-richness studies. We provide the first quantitative support for the generality of positive heterogeneity-richness relationships across heterogeneity components, habitat types, taxa and spatial scales from landscape to global extents, and identify specific needs for future comparative heterogeneity-richness research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  7. RICH2 arrives in the LHCb tunnel after being lowered through a vertical shaft.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2005-01-01

    Due to constraints on the availability of space and time, RICH2 had to be built in Meyrin, away from the LHCb site. Its final positioning on Saturday marked a successful end to an epic journey for the RICH2 team and everyone collaborating in the project.

  8. Injection techniques of platelet-rich plasma into and around the Achilles tendon: a cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Reilingh, Mikel L.; de Jonge, Milko C.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are used to treat (Achilles) tendinopathies. Platelet-rich plasma has been injected at different locations, but the feasibility of PRP injections and the distribution after injection have not been studied. To evaluate (1) the feasibility of ultrasound-guided PRP

  9. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  10. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  11. Investigation of localization effect in GaN-rich InGaN alloys and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For sample C, obvious metallic indium segregation is found. Based on XRD and AFM measure- ments, we consider that In-rich clusters and metallic indium inclusions should be the origins of localization effect in sam- ple C. As In-rich clusters and metallic indium inclusions can cause larger potential fluctuation than small In ...

  12. Short-Term Summer Inundation as a Measure to Counteract Acidification in Rich Fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettrop, I.S.; Cusell, C.; Kooijman, A.M.; Lamers, L.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    In regions with intensive agriculture, water level fluctuation in wetlands has generally become constricted within narrow limits. Water authorities are, however, considering the re-establishment of fluctuating water levels as a management tool in biodiverse, base-rich fens (‘rich fens’). This

  13. Effect of Phytoplankton Richness on Phytoplankton Biomass Is Weak Where the Distribution of Herbivores is Patchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jerome J

    2016-01-01

    Positive effects of competitor species richness on competitor productivity can be more pronounced at a scale that includes heterogeneity in 'bottom-up' environmental factors, such as the supply of limiting nutrients. The effect of species richness is not well understood in landscapes where variation in 'top-down' factors, such as the abundance of predators or herbivores, has a strong influence competitor communities. I asked how phytoplankton species richness directly influenced standing phytoplankton biomass in replicate microcosm regions where one patch had a population of herbivores (Daphnia pulicaria) and one patch did not have herbivores. The effect of phytoplankton richness on standing phytoplankton biomass was positive but weak and not statistically significant at this regional scale. Among no-Daphnia patches, there was a significant positive effect of phytoplankton richness that resulted from positive selection effects for two dominant and productive species in polycultures. Among with-Daphnia patches there was not a significant effect of phytoplankton richness. The same two species dominated species-rich polycultures in no- and with-Daphnia patches but both species were relatively vulnerable to consumption by Daphnia. Consistent with previous studies, this experiment shows a measurable positive influence of primary producer richness on biomass when herbivores were absent. It also shows that given the patchy distribution of herbivores at a regional scale, a regional positive effect was not detected.

  14. Experimental study of various techniques to protect ice-rich cut slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cut slopes are usually required to achieve roadway design grades in the ice-rich permafrost areas in Alaska. However, excavation and exposure of a cut slope destroy the existing thermal balance and result in degradation of ice-rich permafrost. Enviro...

  15. Responses of predatory invertebrates to seeding density and plant species richness in experimental tallgrass prairie restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Kristine T.; Allen, Craig R.; Danielson, Stephen D.; Helzer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, agricultural producers and non-governmental organizations have restored thousands of hectares of former cropland in the central United States with native grasses and forbs. However, the ability of these grassland restorations to attract predatory invertebrates has not been well documented, even though predators provide an important ecosystem service to agricultural producers by naturally regulating herbivores. This study assessed the effects of plant richness and seeding density on the richness and abundance of surface-dwelling (ants, ground beetles, and spiders) and aboveground (ladybird beetles) predatory invertebrates. In the spring of 2006, twenty-four 55 m × 55 m-plots were planted to six replicates in each of four treatments: high richness (97 species typically planted by The Nature Conservancy), at low and high seeding densities, and low richness (15 species representing a typical Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservation Reserve Program mix, CP25), at low and high seeding densities. Ants, ground beetles, and spiders were sampled using pitfall traps and ladybird beetles were sampled using sweep netting in 2007–2009. The abundance of ants, ground beetles, and spiders showed no response to seed mix richness or seeding density but there was a significant positive effect of richness on ladybird beetle abundance. Seeding density had a significant positive effect on ground beetle and spider species richness and Shannon–Weaver diversity. These results may be related to differences in the plant species composition and relative amount of grass basal cover among the treatments rather than richness.

  16. Determinants of species richness patterns in the Netherlands across multiple taxonomic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Verweij, P.A.; Barendrecht, A.; Kleukers, R.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the species richness patterns of five different species groups (mosses, reptiles and amphibians, grasshoppers and crickets, dragonflies, and hoverflies) in the Netherlands (41,500 km2) using sampling units of 5 × 5 km. We compared the spatial patterns of species richness of the five

  17. Does richness of Oligochaeta (Annelida follows a linear distribution with habitat structural heterogeneity in aquatic sediments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio H. Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment of aquatic environments supports several local communities, among them aquatic invertebrates. Habitat structural heterogeneity in sediments of aquatic ecosystems is related to a number of factors, including variability in the particle size of the substrate and availability of different food resources, the two structures that comprise the aquatic sediment. These structures are necessary for the stability of zoobenthic community, including the Oligochaeta assemblage, favoring richness as habitat heterogeneity increases. To analyze the habitat structural heterogeneity, we use these following structures: granulometric composition and organic matter composition, and we tested these structures together (habitat heterogeneity and separately (granulometric and organic matter heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationship between habitat structural heterogeneity and richness of the Oligochaeta assemblage. We hypothesized that there is a positive linear relationship between habitat structural heterogeneity and richness of Oligochaeta, and  predicted that the granulometric composition is more important than organic matter composition for increasing richness. There was no linear relationship between Oligochaeta richness and habitat heterogeneity; but the analysis showed an asymmetric triangular dispersion pattern, being granulometric heterogeneity more important than organic matter heterogeneity for richness of Oligochaeta. These results indicated that habitat structural heterogeneity was beneficial for richness of Oligochaeta until certain threshold and after this, the relationship between structural heterogeneity of habitats and richness of Oligochaeta is negative with decrease of diversity due to the filling of interstitial spaces which gradually reduces the ability to colonize these habitats.

  18. Geography, topography, and history affect realized-to-potential tree species richness patterns in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jens-Christian Svenning; Matthew C. Fitzpatrick; Signe Normand; Catherine H. Graham; Peter B. Pearman; Louis R. Iverson; Flemming. Skov

    2010-01-01

    Environmental conditions and biotic interactions are generally thought to influence local species richness. However, immigration and the evolutionary and historical factors that shape regional species pools should also contribute to determining local species richness because local communities arise by assembly from regional species pools. Using the European tree flora...

  19. Shifts of community composition and population density substantially affect ecosystem function despite invariant richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, Jurg W; Baert, Jan M; Baird, Donald J; Eisenhauer, Nico; Maltby, Lorraine; Pomati, Francesco; Radchuk, Viktoriia; Rohr, Jason R; Van den Brink, Paul J; De Laender, Frederik

    2017-10-01

    There has been considerable focus on the impacts of environmental change on ecosystem function arising from changes in species richness. However, environmental change may affect ecosystem function without affecting richness, most notably by affecting population densities and community composition. Using a theoretical model, we find that, despite invariant richness, (1) small environmental effects may already lead to a collapse of function; (2) competitive strength may be a less important determinant of ecosystem function change than the selectivity of the environmental change driver and (3) effects on ecosystem function increase when effects on composition are larger. We also present a complementary statistical analysis of 13 data sets of phytoplankton and periphyton communities exposed to chemical stressors and show that effects on primary production under invariant richness ranged from -75% to +10%. We conclude that environmental protection goals relying on measures of richness could underestimate ecological impacts of environmental change. © 2017 The Authors Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Delayed addition of nitrogen-rich substrates during composting of municipal waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nigatu, Abebe Nigussie; Bruun, Sander; Kuyper, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    that split addition of the nitrogen-rich substrate reduced nitrogen losses by 9% when sawdust was used and 20% when coffee husks were used as the bulking agent. Depending on the bulking agent used, split addition increased cumulative N2O emissions by 400-600% compared to single addition. In contrast, single......-rich substrate (poultry manure) on nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions during composting and to link this effect to different bulking agents (coffee husks and sawdust), and (ii) to assess the effect of split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate on compost stability and sanitisation. The results showed...... addition increased methane emissions by up to 50% compared to split addition of the substrate. Hence, the timing of the addition of the N-rich substrate had only a marginal effect on total non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. Split addition of the N-rich substrate resulted in compost that was just as stable...