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Sample records for binding tumor imaging

  1. Pet imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junck, L.; Jewett, D.M.; Olsen, J.M.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Koeppe, R.A.; Young, A.B.; Greenberg, H.S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies in vitro have shown that the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) is present in moderate to high density on malignant gliomas as well as in areas of reactive gliosis, but in low density in normal brain. PK 11195 is an isoquinoline derivative that binds selectively to the PBBS but not to the central benzodiazepine receptor. We have used [ 11 C]PK 11195 with positron emission tomography (PET) to study brain tumors and cerebral infarcts. Preliminary results showed that, in 13 of 18 patients with astrocytomas, [ 11 C]PK 11195 radioactivity was increased in tumor compared to remote brain and that the concentration ratios of tumor-to-remote brain were higher for high grade astrocytomas than for low grade astrocytomas. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggests that the increased activity in tumor probably does not result from alterations in blood flow or vascular permeability. Patients with lymphoma, meningioma, medulloblastoma, brain metastasis, and neurosarcoidosis have also shown increased radioactivity in tumor. Among eight patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarcts, activity in the infarct was increased in seven and was often greatest at the periphery. We conclude that [ 11 C]PK 11195 is a promising radiopharmaceutical for further investigation of brain tumors as well as diseases characterized by reactive gliosis

  2. Relationship of binding specificity and structural property of the technetium-99m complexes for tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Z.F.

    2005-01-01

    The growth of tumor requires nutrition and oxygen. Tumor cells will become hypoxic when the supply of oxygen is insufficient. Hypoxic tumor cells will not only resist radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but also induce angiogenesis for oxygen supply and for metastasis. Therefore, detection of tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis with high sensitive radio labeled imaging agents is important. Hypoxic tumor cells may display some molecules as tumor markers for the specific binding with radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals, unlike the non-radioactive drugs, are trace compounds in a given dosage. Due to the extreme low concentration, the non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers by blood cells and proteins, tissues, and organs can be even more serious compared to the non-radioactive drugs. The non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers can make the ratios of tumor/tissue (in terms of i.d.%/g) falling to the range of 2∼7 [1-2]. Non-specific binding of radiopharmaceuticals is common, but detailed studies on it are poor documented. This presentation reports the study of the relationship of non-specific accumulation and the structural property of two type of 99m TC labeled compounds: (a) 99m Tc-(amine o xime) containing either 2-nitroimidazole (2-NI, as hypoxia tumor cells specific agents), or 4-nitro- imidazole (4-NI, as control), or aniline (as reference) groups; (b) 99m Tc-(arginine-glycine- aspartic acid, RGD, as tumor angiogenesis specific agents) and 99m Tc-(arginine-glycine- glutarmic acid, RGE, as control). The 99m Tc-(amine-oxime) complexes, in addition to the 2-NI, 4-NI, and aniline groups, contain methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, iso-butyl-, t-butyl-, phenyl-, and Benzyl- groups as well to make the radiotracers differing in structure and in lipophilicity , while the lipophilicity of a radiotracer plays an important role in non-specific cellular accumulation and protein binding, The results demonstrated that (1) the complex containing 2-NI showed specific

  3. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  4. Bromine-77-labeled estrogen receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElvany, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two derivatives of 16α-bromoestradiol, both with and without an 11β-methoxy substituent, have been labeled with bromine-77 and evaluated as potential breast tumor imaging agents. Extensive characterization of these radiotracers in animal models has demonstrated their effective concentration in estrogen target tissues. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of radiolabeled estrogens for breast tumor imaging; however, the suboptimal decay properties of bromine-77 limit the utility of these agents in imaging studies. These results with 77 -Br-labeled estrogens suggest that estrogen derivatives labeled with other radionuclides should provide enhanced image resolution with various imaging devices. Although the decay characteristics of bromine-77 are such that it is not ideally suited to imaging with conventional gamma cameras, it may be a useful radionuclide for therapeutic applications

  5. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  6. Improved decision making for prioritizing tumor targeting antibodies in human xenografts: Utility of fluorescence imaging to verify tumor target expression, antibody binding and optimization of dosage and application schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Michael; Haupt, Ute; Scheuer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical efficacy studies of antibodies targeting a tumor-associated antigen are only justified when the expression of the relevant antigen has been demonstrated. Conventionally, antigen expression level is examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue section. This method represents the diagnostic "gold standard" for tumor target evaluation, but is affected by a number of factors, such as epitope masking and insufficient antigen retrieval. As a consequence, variances and discrepancies in histological staining results can occur, which may influence decision-making and therapeutic outcome. To overcome these problems, we have used different fluorescence-labeled therapeutic antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family members and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in combination with fluorescence imaging modalities to determine tumor antigen expression, drug-target interaction, and biodistribution and tumor saturation kinetics in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. For this, whole-body fluorescence intensities of labeled antibodies, applied as a single compound or antibody mixture, were measured in Calu-1 and Calu-3 tumor-bearing mice, then ex vivo multispectral tumor tissue analysis at microscopic resolution was performed. With the aid of this simple and fast imaging method, we were able to analyze the tumor cell receptor status of HER1-3 and IGF1R, monitor the antibody-target interaction and evaluate the receptor binding sites of anti-HER2-targeting antibodies. Based on this, the most suitable tumor model, best therapeutic antibody, and optimal treatment dosage and application schedule was selected. Predictions drawn from obtained imaging data were in excellent concordance with outcome of conducted preclinical efficacy studies. Our results clearly demonstrate the great potential of combined in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging for the preclinical development and characterization of

  7. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  8. Bone tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, R.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this chapter is on the contribution of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the care of patients with bone neoplasms. These modalities are emphasized because of their relative newness and not because they are considered more significant than the other more established examinations. Routine radiographs remain the most informative and essential imaging procedures for the diagnosis of bone tumors

  9. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  10. Imaging of brain tumors

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    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  11. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  12. Application of lectins to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro binding of 125 I-lectins to Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells and in vivo uptake of 125 I-lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice. In in vitro binding assays, phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA), pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and concanavalia agglutinin (Con A) showed a high affinity for EAT cells. The in vivo biodistribution of 125 I-lectins showed 125 I-PSA to be significantly taken up into EST tissues 24 h postinjection. After IV injection of 125 I-PSA, uptake of the radioactivity into the tumor tissues reached a maximum at 6 h, and thereafter decreased. Rapid disappearance of the radioactivity from blood and its excretion into kidney soon after injection of 125 I-PSA were observed. When compared with the biodistribution of 67 Ga-citrate in EST bearing mice 24 h postinjection, tumor to liver (T/B), tumor to muscle (T/M), and tumor to blood (T/B) ratios were superior for 125 I-PSA. At 6 h postinjection, the T/B-ratio of 125 I-PSA was 2.5, and this value may be sufficient to enable discernable diagnostic images. Our results suggest that PSA might be a useful tumor imaging radiopharmaceutical. (orig.)

  13. Soft tissue tumors - imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    Soft Tissue Tumors - Imaging Methods: Imaging methods play an important diagnostic role in soft tissue tumors concerning a preoperative evaluation of localization, size, topographic relationship, dignity, and metastatic disease. The present paper gives an overview about diagnostic methods available today such as ultrasound, thermography, roentgenographic plain films and xeroradiography, radionuclide methods, computed tomography, lymphography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Besides sonography particularly computed tomography has the most important diagnostic value in soft tissue tumors. The application of a recently developed method, the magnetic resonance imaging, cannot yet be assessed in its significance. (orig.) [de

  14. Imaging tumors of the patella

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    Casadei, R., E-mail: roberto.casadei@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, R. [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E., E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, G., E-mail: giuseppe.bianchi@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location.

  15. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations.4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001. Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3 compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3. Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with

  16. Brain Tumor Image Segmentation in MRI Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peni Agustin Tjahyaningtijas, Hapsari

    2018-04-01

    Brain tumor segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. Treatment of patients with brain tumors is highly dependent on early detection of these tumors. Early detection of brain tumors will improve the patient’s life chances. Diagnosis of brain tumors by experts usually use a manual segmentation that is difficult and time consuming because of the necessary automatic segmentation. Nowadays automatic segmentation is very populer and can be a solution to the problem of tumor brain segmentation with better performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of MRI-based brain tumor segmentation methods. There are number of existing review papers, focusing on traditional methods for MRI-based brain tumor image segmentation. this paper, we focus on the recent trend of automatic segmentation in this field. First, an introduction to brain tumors and methods for brain tumor segmentation is given. Then, the state-of-the-art algorithms with a focus on recent trend of full automatic segmentaion are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the current state is presented and future developments to standardize MRI-based brain tumor segmentation methods into daily clinical routine are addressed.

  17. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

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    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  18. Synthesis of Tc-99m labeled 1,2,3-triazole-4-yl c-met binding peptide as a potential c-met receptor kinase positive tumor imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Joung, Min-Hee; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Kim, Dong Wook

    2010-07-15

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met), which is related to tumor cell growth, angiogenesis and metastases, is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types. In this study, we synthesized technetium-99m labeled 1,2,3-triazole-4-yl c-Met binding peptide (cMBP) derivatives, prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis and the 'click-to-chelate' protocol for the introduction of tricarbonyl technetium-99m, as a potential c-Met receptor kinase positive tumor imaging agent, and evaluated their in vitro c-Met binding affinity, cellular uptake, and stability. The (99m)Tc labeled cMBP derivatives ([(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]12, [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]13, and [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]14) were prepared in 85-90% radiochemical yields. The cold surrogate cMBP derivatives, [Re(CO)(3)]12, [Re(CO)(3)]13, and [Re(CO)(3)]14, were shown to have high binding affinities (0.13 microM, 0.06 microM, and 0.16 microM, respectively) to a purified cMet/Fc chimeric recombinant protein. In addition, the in vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies demonstrated the high specific binding of these (99m)Tc labeled cMBP derivatives ([(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]12-14) to c-Met receptor positive U87MG cells. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  20. Experimental research for tumor VIP receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qianwei; Tan Tianzhi

    1998-01-01

    To study the possibility of radioactive labelled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) for tumor VIP receptor imaging. 125 I-VIP was prepared by chloramine-T method, and purified by Sephadex G-50 column chromatography. The bioactivity and stability of 125 I-VIP were measured by silica 60 F 254 TLC and competition test to SGC7901 cell in vitro. The biodistribution of 125 I-VIP was studied in the nude mice bearing tumor. The results showed that labelled rate of 125 I was 73.8%, the specific activity was 18.2 PBq/mol, the radiochemical purity (RCP) was over 98% and remained 96.3% after 48 days stored at -80 degree C. The specific binding of 125 I-VIP to the SGC7901 cell was inhibited by VIP in dose dependence in the competition experiment. The radioactivity of tumor was higher than that of muscles in all phases (P<0.05-0.01), the peak activity of tumor occurred at 30 min (3.58 +- 0.48ID%/g) and the peak ratio of T/N occurred at 60 min after the injection. The activity of lungs was obviously higher than that of blood, the intestine was always in low level. Most of the activity in the body was mainly eliminated from kidney. The present study demonstrated that the radioactive labelled VIP is a promising agent for tumor VIP receptor scintigraphy

  1. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  2. Imaging of intraperitoneal tumors with technetium-99m GSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Meili; Sakahara, Harumi; Saga, Tsuneo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Sato, Noriko; Zhao, Songji; Konishi, Junji; Arano, Yasushi

    1998-01-01

    99m Tc labeled galactosyl serum albumin (GSA) has been used clinically as a receptor-binding agent for the assessment of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of 99m Tc-GSA in intraperitoneal (i.p.) tumor imaging. A tumor model was established by i.p. inoculating nude mice with human ovarian cancer cell SHIN-3, or colon cancer cell LS180. Radiolabels were i.p. injected into the tumor-bearing mice and the biodistribution of radioactivity was examined. After administration, 99m Tc-GSA rapidly accumulated in the tumor. The tumor uptake was 5.82-8.46% ID/g from 30 min to 6 h after the injection. Radioactivity in the blood was very low, less than 0.3% ID/g, resulting in high tumor-to-blood ratio. Tumors could be clearly seen by scintigraphic imaging. Accumulation of i.p.-injected 99m Tc labeled human serum albumin (HSA) in i.p. tumors was similar to that of 99m Tc-GSA, but radioactivity of 99m Tc-HSA in the circulation was high, resulting in a significantly lower tumor-to-blood ratio. In conclusion, 99m Tc-GSA, when i.p. injected, accumulated in i.p. tumors and cleared from circulation rapidly, which would make it useful for the imaging of i.p. tumors. (author)

  3. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

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    Yu-Qing Liu, M D [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Radiology, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Inst.

    1996-12-31

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.).

  4. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.)

  5. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  6. Brain's tumor image processing using shearlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Luis; Espinosa, Nikolai; Cadena, Franklin; Korneeva, Anna; Kruglyakov, Alexey; Legalov, Alexander; Romanenko, Alexey; Zotin, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Brain tumor detection is well known research area for medical and computer scientists. In last decades there has been much research done on tumor detection, segmentation, and classification. Medical imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of brain tumors and nowadays uses methods non-invasive, high-resolution techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Edge detection is a fundamental tool in image processing, particularly in the areas of feature detection and feature extraction, which aim at identifying points in a digital image at which the image has discontinuities. Shearlets is the most successful frameworks for the efficient representation of multidimensional data, capturing edges and other anisotropic features which frequently dominate multidimensional phenomena. The paper proposes an improved brain tumor detection method by automatically detecting tumor location in MR images, its features are extracted by new shearlet transform.

  7. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eKraeber-Bodéré

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed.

  8. NMR imaging of soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval-Jeantet, M.; Tobolsk, F.; Delepine, N.; Delepine, G.; Roger, B.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary findings on NMR imaging of 30 soft tissue tumors demonstrated the indispensable value of this examination (particularly when a surface antenna is used) for preoperative investigation and diagnosis of tumoral recurrence when compared with other radiologic techniques. The possible potential of NMR imaging for characterization of tissues, apart from lipoma or liposarcoma, cannot be evaluated at the present time [fr

  9. Fn3 proteins engineered to recognize tumor biomarker mesothelin internalize upon binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison R Sirois

    Full Text Available Mesothelin is a cell surface protein that is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including breast, ovarian, lung, liver, and pancreatic tumors. Aberrant expression of mesothelin has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis through interaction with established tumor biomarker CA125. Therefore, molecules that specifically bind to mesothelin have potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, no mesothelin-targeting molecules are currently approved for routine clinical use. While antibodies that target mesothelin are in development, some clinical applications may require a targeting molecule with an alternative protein fold. For example, non-antibody proteins are more suitable for molecular imaging and may facilitate diverse chemical conjugation strategies to create drug delivery complexes. In this work, we engineered variants of the fibronectin type III domain (Fn3 non-antibody protein scaffold to bind to mesothelin with high affinity, using directed evolution and yeast surface display. Lead engineered Fn3 variants were solubly produced and purified from bacterial culture at high yield. Upon specific binding to mesothelin on human cancer cell lines, the engineered Fn3 proteins internalized and co-localized to early endosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-antibody proteins engineered to bind mesothelin. The results validate that non-antibody proteins can be engineered to bind to tumor biomarker mesothelin, and encourage the continued development of engineered variants for applications such as targeted diagnostics and therapeutics.

  10. Radioiodinated VEGF to image tumor angiogenesis in a LS180 tumor xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Nishii, Ryuichi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kawai, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth or metastasis. A method involving noninvasive detection of angiogenic activity in vivo would provide diagnostic information regarding antiangiogenic therapy targeting vascular endothelial cells as well as important insight into the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (flt-1 and KDR) system in tumor biology. We evaluated radioiodinated VEGF 121 , which displays high binding affinity for KDR, and VEGF 165 , which possesses high binding affinity for flt-1 and low affinity for KDR, as angiogenesis imaging agents using the LS180 tumor xenograft model. Methods: VEGF 121 and VEGF 165 were labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method. Biodistribution was observed in an LS180 human colon cancer xenograft model. Additionally, autoradiographic imaging and immunohistochemical staining of tumors were performed with 125 I-VEGF 121 . Results: 125 I-VEGF 121 and 125 I-VEGF 165 exhibited strong, continuous uptake by tumors and the uterus, an organ characterized by angiogenesis. 125 I-VEGF 121 uptake in tumors was twofold higher than that of 125 I-VEGF 165 (9.12±98 and 4.79±1.08 %ID/g at 2 h, respectively). 125 I-VEGF 121 displayed higher tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratios in most normal organs in comparison with 125 I-VEGF 165 . 125 I-VEGF 121 accumulation in tumors decreased with increasing tumor volume. Autoradiographic and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that the difference in 125 I-VEGF 121 tumor accumulation correlated with degree of tumor vascularity. Conclusion: Radioiodinated VEGF 121 is a promising tracer for noninvasive delineation of angiogenesis in vivo

  11. MR imaging of the brain: tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.

    1999-01-01

    The radiologic modality that most likely provides the imaging information needed in a patient suspected of having a brain tumor is MR imaging. A brain tumor can be reliably ruled out if the MR examination is performed properly and experts interpret the results as negative. If there is a tumor, however, its exact location and topography must be determined. Important for therapy and prognosis are also tumor properties such as histologic type and grade, as well as effects on adjacent brain structures. Although potentially a noninvasive method of in vivo neuropathology, MR is still far from being sufficiently specific, as dissimilar lesions may look the same despite the use of refined imaging protocols. The evolution of MR imaging continues, however, making further methodologic improvement likely. Presently, advanced methods, such as diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging, functional MR imaging, neuronavigation based on MR imaging data, and the use of MR imaging during surgery (intraoperative MR imaging), influence the way patients are treated. Likewise, follow-up imaging (monitoring) of tumor patients by MR has become more effective, and experience has shown how to distinguish reactive changes from recurrent tumor. In the future, MR imaging may gain importance in the development of novel therapeutic concepts. (orig.)

  12. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori; Harada, Tsutomu; Ishida, Yoshikazu.

    1988-01-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients with cardiac tumor (1 with rhabdomyoma, 1 with left atrial myxoma, and 2 with tumor of the left ventricular wall) for morphological evaluation of the tumor. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo imaging technique using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. Spatial extension of the tumor was clearly demonstrated in all the patients. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), was used in the 2 patients with tumor of the left ventricular myocardium to enhance the contrast, and allowed clear visualization of the tumor. These findings show the usefulness of MRI and MRI with Gd-DTPA for morphological evaluation of cardiac tumor. (author)

  15. Recent development of fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Eiji; Morii, Takashi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Increasing recent studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are described here on strategies of molecular targeting, metabolic specificity and hypoxic circumstance. There is described an instance of a conjugate of antibody and pH-activable fluorescent ligand, which specifically binds to the tumor cells, is internalized in the cellular lysozomes where their pH is low, and then is activated to become fluorescent only in viable tumor cells. For the case of metabolic specificity, excessive loading of the precursor (5-aminolevulinic acid) of protoporphyrin IX (ppIX), due to their low activity to convert ppIX to heme B, results in making tumors observable in red as ppIX emits fluorescence (red, 585 nm) when excited by blue ray of 410 nm. Similarly, imaging with indocyanine green which is accumulated in hepatoma cells is reported in success in detection of small lesion and metastasis when the dye is administered during operation. Reductive reactions exceed in tumor hypoxic conditions, of which feature is usable for imaging. Conjugates of nitroimidazole and fluorescent dye are reported to successfully image tumors by nitro reduction. Authors' UTX-12 is a non-fluorescent nitroaromatic derivative of pH-sensitive fluorescent dye seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), and is designed for the nitro group, the hypoxia-responding sensor, to be reduced in tumor hypoxic conditions and then for the aromatic moiety to be cleaved to release free SNARF. Use of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) for imaging has been also reported in many. As above, studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are mostly at fundamental step but its future is conceivably promising along with advances in other technology like fluorescent endoscopy and multimodal imaging. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro

    1991-01-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T 1 -weighted image (T 1 WI) and the T 2 -weighted image (T 2 WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T 1 WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T[sub 1]-weighted image (T[sub 1]WI) and the T[sub 2]-weighted image (T[sub 2]WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T[sub 1]WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author).

  18. MR imaging manifestations of skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-hyon; Kim, Jee Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Chun, Kyung Ah [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary Hospital, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Sung, Mi-Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Holy family Hospital, Bucheon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated MR imaging findings of skin tumors and categorized them into four types: (1) discrete mass lesions of the dermis and epidermis, (2) mass lesions of the subcutis with or without abutment to the skin, (3) diffuse or localized skin thickening without a true mass, and (4) a skin mass with bone destruction. The categorization of MR images may be useful in the differential diagnosis of skin tumors. (orig.)

  19. Image Denoising And Segmentation Approchto Detect Tumor From BRAINMRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta Rangaswamy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the Brain Tumor is a challenging problem, due to the structure of the Tumor cells in the brain. This project presents a systematic method that enhances the detection of brain tumor cells and to analyze functional structures by training and classification of the samples in SVM and tumor cell segmentation of the sample using DWT algorithm. From the input MRI Images collected, first noise is removed from MRI images by applying wiener filtering technique. In image enhancement phase, all the color components of MRI Images will be converted into gray scale image and make the edges clear in the image to get better identification and improvised quality of the image. In the segmentation phase, DWT on MRI Image to segment the grey-scale image is performed. During the post-processing, classification of tumor is performed by using SVM classifier. Wiener Filter, DWT, SVM Segmentation strategies were used to find and group the tumor position in the MRI filtered picture respectively. An essential perception in this work is that multi arrange approach utilizes various leveled classification strategy which supports execution altogether. This technique diminishes the computational complexity quality in time and memory. This classification strategy works accurately on all images and have achieved the accuracy of 93%.

  20. Enhanced tumor imaging with pokeweed mitogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitner, D.M.; Mann, P.L.; D'Souza, P.; Wenk, R.; Baughman, D.G.; Quesada, S.M.; Purvis, R.; Born, J.L.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Eshima, D.

    1993-01-01

    Traditional tumor imaging with biotracer techniques relies solely on the target specificity of the biomolecule. We hypothesize that specific imaging is possible by altering the rate of tissue clearance of any given radiotracer. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as a biomodulator, represents a class of molecules which regulate cellular differentiation and cell-cell interactions and, as part of these mechanisms alter tissue clearance rates. Utilizing the B-16/C57BL/6 model, 7 days post-transplantation, 10 animals were imaged following an i.v. injection of 1-2 mCi 99m Tc-PWM in order to visualize the tumors and determine the optimal imaging kinetics. A specific tumor image is achieved between 120 and 240 min post-injection. In addition, tumor imaging studies using a non-tumor-specific biomolecule were conducted by injecting 19 animals i.v. with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-human serum albumin (HSA). Twelve of these animals were given 10 μg of PWM i.p. at various intervals prior to the 99m Tc-HAS administration. Imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at various intervals up to 2 h post- 99m Tc-HSA injection. A 32-59% increase in the tumor-to-muscle ratio was observed in the PWM-treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. To further investigate the PWM-induced tissue clearance alteration hypothesis, tissue clearance studies using 99m Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were conducted in non-tumor bearing ICR mice and the B-16/C57BL/6 tumor bearing animals. 99m Tc-DTPA normal tissue clearance rates were significantly increased in the PWM treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. (author)

  1. Imaging of pancreatic tumors with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanzi, I.; Robeson, W.; Vinciquerra, V.; Chaly, T.; Kroop, S.; Dahl, R.; Schulman, P.; Goldman, S.; Margouleff, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies pancreatic tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). PET studies were performed in 13 patients with pancreatic tumors (11 adenocarcinomas; two islet cell tumors) using FDG. Data were acquired for 1 hour and in 14 contiguous 7-mm sections after attenuation correction. Suspicious areas were evaluated using quantitative techniques. In seven of 11 patients with adenocarcinomas, focal increase in FDG uptake correlated with pancreatic tumor shown on CT scans or MR images. Of the remaining four, one had a previous Whipple procedure, another had completed chemotherapy, and in two the tumor was out of the limited region imaged; in these four patients, liver metastases were identified in three

  2. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabander, Tessa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Feelders, Richard A.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Teunissen, Jaap J. M.; Papotti, M; DeHerder, WW

    2015-01-01

    An important role is reserved for nuclear imaging techniques in the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with In-111-DTPA-octreotide is currently the most important tracer in the diagnosis, staging and selection for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

  4. Comparison of in vitro cell binding characteristics of four monoclonal antibodies and their individual tumor localization properties in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, S.M.; Johnstone, R.W.; Russell, S.M.; McKenzie, I.F.; Pietersz, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Although many antibodies are being used for imaging studies, it is not clear which in vitro properties of antibodies will best reflect their in vivo characteristics. The ability to correlate in vitro binding characteristics of monoclonal antibodies to tumor antigens with their in vivo localization characteristics, particularly with respect to tumor localization properties, is desirable for rapid selection of monoclonal antibodies with potential for clinical use. The in vitro binding characteristics of three monoclonal antibodies to the murine Ly-2.1 antigen and one to the Ly-3.1 antigen have been studied on cultured tumor cells bearing these antigens. The association and dissociation rate constants, apparent affinity, and immunoreactivity of each antibody in vitro were compared with their ability to localize the s.c. tumors from the same cell line growing in Ly-2.1-/Ly-3.1-mice. The antibody with the highest affinity and fastest association rate localized to tumor at the earliest time (16-20 h after injection) and had the highest percentage of the injected dose/g in the tumor (greater than 25%). The antibody with the lowest affinity showed significantly less localization to tumor cells, compared with the other three antibodies. The ranking of the antibodies by affinity agreed with the ranking in terms of their ability to localize to tumors, but the in vitro immunoreactivity of the antibodies, as measured by a cell binding assay, did not correlate with their tumor localization properties. Immunoscintigraphic studies did not precisely correlate with biodistribution data or in vitro binding characteristics, because tumors could be satisfactorily imaged with each antibody, although it was noted that the antibody with the highest affinity gave the best image

  5. MR imaging and histopathology of cartilage tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Hirokazu; Ohba, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Takanobu; Matui, Norio; Nakamura, Takaaki (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    The MR imaging-pathologic correlation of cartilaginous bone tumors and the value of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging was studied. The MR studies were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were examined with 0.5 T and 1.0 T scanner and all cases were pathologically proved. We discussed the following MR findings: signal intensities of tumors, Gd-DTPA features, morphological findings, and associated findings. Hyaline cartilage tumors showed low signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images and very high signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images. Lobulated marginal enhancements were recognized in chondrosarcomas. This may be an important finding to suspect chondrosarcoma. (author).

  6. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes; Cassali, Geovanni D.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  7. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: consuelo@pq.cnpq.br; Cassali, Geovanni D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada], e-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  8. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakihara, Junji; Kanoh, Naoyuki; Hayakawa, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used in the examination of three patients with nasopharyngeal malignant tumor and cranial nerve symptoms. Coronal and saggital sections were very useful for determining skull base invasion. Its high contrast resolution enabled us to visualize several cranial nerves directly. Differentiation between tumor and effusion in the paranasal sinuses was easy especially in T2 weighted images. Bone destruction could also be detected as bone marrow replacement by tumor or as interruption of the black line of compact bone. Local relationships of tumor and large blood vessels were visualized by MRI without invasive contrast enhancing methods. Despite such advantages, in one patient whose symptoms were highly suggestive of cranial invasion, no cranial invasion was detected by CT or MRI. (author)

  10. Stabilization of neurotensin analogues: effect on peptide catabolism, biodistribution and tumor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruehlmeier, Matthias E-mail: peter.blaeuenstein@psi.ch; Garayoa, Elisa Garcia; Blanc, Alain; Holzer, Barbara; Gergely, Suzanne; Tourwe, Dirk; Schubiger, Pius August; Blaeuenstein, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Neurotensin (NT) receptors in pancreatic and other neuroendocrine tumors are promising targets for imaging and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report on the effect of distinct changes in the peptide chain on catabolism in vitro for five radiolabeled [{sup 99m}Tc] neurotensin analogues having high affinity for neurotensin receptors. Substitution of NT(1-7) by (N{alpha}His)Ac--the Tc-binding moiety--combined with a reduced bond 8-9 (CH{sub 2}NH), N-methylation of peptide bonds or replacement of Ile(12) by tertiary leucin (Tle) led to peptide stabilization of various degrees. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing HT29 xenografts showed higher tumor uptake with more stable peptides, yielding high tumor to blood ratios of up to 70.

  11. Childhood kidney tumors - the relevance of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, J.-P.; Schrader, C.; Ley, S.; Troeger, J.; Guenther, P.; Furtwaengler, R.; Graf, N.; Leuschner, I.; Edelhaeuser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Kidney tumors represent 6.2% of malignant tumors in children. History, clinical course and radiological findings are necessary elements in the differential diagnosis of the different renal tumors. In the case of nephroblastoma, chemotherapy is based solely on the radiological diagnosis without prior histology. In therapy-optimizing studies of the Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, preoperative chemotherapy is performed. Therapy monitoring is performed in the course of and after preoperative chemotherapy to verify tumor response. Radiological staging plays a significant role in deciding on further treatment and in operative planning. Three-dimensional visualization of the abdominal situs can assist preoperative planning. In summary, diagnostic imaging in renal tumors in children plays a role in differential diagnosis, staging, monitoring of therapy, and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of parotid tumors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Yamashita, Toshio; Inoue, Toshiya; Kumazawa, Tadami; Kato, Tsutomu; Sawada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1987-01-01

    We compared the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with that of X-ray computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors. We performed in 13 patients with parotid tumors and 10 of them were operated. The MRI equipment had a magnetic fild of 0.15 Tesla. We used the spine echo acquisition technique and a repetition time of 600, 1000 and 2000 milli-seconds, and echo time of 40 and 80 milli-seconds. We found that the T 1 weighted image well visualized the duct of the parotid gland, the T 2 weighted image provided fine pictures of the parotid tumor. The facial nerve of normal parotid glands could not be visualized by MRI. (author)

  13. Early skin tumor detection from microscopic images through image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, A.A.; Narejo, G.B.; Khan, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The research is done to provide appropriate detection technique for skin tumor detection. The work is done by using the image processing toolbox of MATLAB. Skin tumors are unwanted skin growth with different causes and varying extent of malignant cells. It is a syndrome in which skin cells mislay the ability to divide and grow normally. Early detection of tumor is the most important factor affecting the endurance of a patient. Studying the pattern of the skin cells is the fundamental problem in medical image analysis. The study of skin tumor has been of great interest to the researchers. DIP (Digital Image Processing) allows the use of much more complex algorithms for image processing, and hence, can offer both more sophisticated performance at simple task, and the implementation of methods which would be impossibly by analog means. It allows much wider range of algorithms to be applied to the input data and can avoid problems such as build up of noise and signal distortion during processing. The study shows that few works has been done on cellular scale for the images of skin. This research allows few checks for the early detection of skin tumor using microscopic images after testing and observing various algorithms. After analytical evaluation the result has been observed that the proposed checks are time efficient techniques and appropriate for the tumor detection. The algorithm applied provides promising results in lesser time with accuracy. The GUI (Graphical User Interface) that is generated for the algorithm makes the system user friendly. (author)

  14. Cross sectional imaging of cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Primary cardiac tumors are a rare entity whose incidence, according to surgery and autopsy reports, is 0.3% to 0.7% of all cardiac tumors. Metastasis to the heart from other primary cancers is 30 times more common. Only 25% of primary cardiac tumors are malignant, and, of these, 75% are sarcomas. Malignant primary cardiac sarcomas are usually located in the right atrium and are most commonly angiosarcoma. In the left atrium, the most common malignant tumors are pleomorphic sarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. Symptom presentation for cardiac tumors is quite varied, but it is dependent upon tumor location and size, rather than upon histologic characteristics. Presentation includes congestive heart failure from intracardiac obstruction, systemic embolization, constitutional symptoms, and arrhythmias. Left atrial sarcomas tend to be more solid and less infiltrative than right-sided sarcomas; consequently, they tend to metastasize later. They usually present with symptoms of blood-flow obstruction and substantial, life-threatening congestive heart failure. Right-sided cardiac tumors are usually malignant and appear as bulky, infiltrative masses that grow in an outward pattern. These are usually fast-growing tumors that metastasize early and do not present with congestive heart failure until late in the disease. The diagnosis of cardiac tumors relies heavily on the use of multiple imaging techniques, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and echocardiography. Important imaging data to collect include information on the size of the intracardiac mass, the mobility of the mass (an important predictor of prognosis and embolic potential), myocardial invasion, and cardiac chamber location. These factors will provide the means to diagnosis and prognosis. Other important data to collect include the mechanism of tumor implantation, the relationship of the tumor with adjacent structures, the surgeon route of access to the heart

  15. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko Tatyana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5% PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung

  16. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  17. Thick tissue diffusion model with binding to optimize topical staining in fluorescence breast cancer margin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Kang, Soyoung; Navarro-Comes, Eric; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative tumor/surgical margin assessment is required to achieve higher tumor resection rate in breast-conserving surgery. Though current histology provides incomparable accuracy in margin assessment, thin tissue sectioning and the limited field of view of microscopy makes histology too time-consuming for intraoperative applications. If thick tissue, wide-field imaging can provide an acceptable assessment of tumor cells at the surface of resected tissues, an intraoperative protocol can be developed to guide the surgery and provide immediate feedback for surgeons. Topical staining of margins with cancer-targeted molecular imaging agents has the potential to provide the sensitivity needed to see microscopic cancer on a wide-field image; however, diffusion and nonspecific retention of imaging agents in thick tissue can significantly diminish tumor contrast with conventional methods. Here, we present a mathematical model to accurately simulate nonspecific retention, binding, and diffusion of imaging agents in thick tissue topical staining to guide and optimize future thick tissue staining and imaging protocol. In order to verify the accuracy and applicability of the model, diffusion profiles of cancer targeted and untargeted (control) nanoparticles at different staining times in A431 tumor xenografts were acquired for model comparison and tuning. The initial findings suggest the existence of nonspecific retention in the tissue, especially at the tissue surface. The simulator can be used to compare the effect of nonspecific retention, receptor binding and diffusion under various conditions (tissue type, imaging agent) and provides optimal staining and imaging protocols for targeted and control imaging agent.

  18. Fluorescence Imaging/Agents in Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummer, Walter; Suero Molina, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging allows real-time identification of diseased tissue during surgery without being influenced by brain shift and surgery interruption. 5-Aminolevulinic acid, useful for malignant gliomas and other tumors, is the most broadly explored compound approved for fluorescence-guided resection. Intravenous fluorescein sodium has recently received attention, highlighting tumor tissue based on extravasation at the blood-brain barrier (defective in many brain tumors). Fluorescein in perfused brain, unselective extravasation in brain perturbed by surgery, and propagation with edema are concerns. Fluorescein is not approved but targeted fluorochromes with affinity to brain tumor cells, in development, may offer future advantages. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  20. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  1. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  2. Radiolabeling, biodistribution and tumor imaging of stealth liposomes containing methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, N; Arulsudar, N; Chuttani, K; Mishra, P; Sharma, R.K; Murthy, R.S.R

    2003-01-01

    To study the utility of sterically stabilized liposomes (stealth liposomes) in tumor scintigraphy by studying its biodistribution and accumulation in target tissue after radiolabeling with Technetium-99m (99mTC). Conventional and Stealth liposomes were prepared by lipid film hydration method using methotrexate as model anticancer drug. Radiolabeling of the liposomes was carried out by direct labeling using reduced 99mTc. Experimental conditions for maximum labeling yield were optimized. The stability studies were carried out to check binding strength of the radiolabeled complexes. The blood kinetic study was carried out in rabbits after giving the labeled complex by intravenous administration through ear vein. The biodistribution studies were carried out in the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) bearing mice after intravenous administration through tail vein, showed prolonged circulation in blood and significant increase in the accumulation in tumor for the sterically stabilized liposomes compared to the conventional liposomes. The gamma scintigraphic image shows the distribution of the stealth liposomes in liver, spleen, kidney and tumor. The study gives precise idea about the use of stealth liposomes in tumor scintigraphy and organ distribution studies (Au)

  3. Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic, E-mail: fredclare5@msn.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Bonneville, Fabrice [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Rangueil, Toulouse University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse (France); Rousseau, Audrey [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Galanaud, Damien [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Kujas, Michele [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Naggara, Olivier [Department of Neuroradiology, St Anne Hospital, 75014 Paris (France); Cornu, Philippe [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Chiras, Jacques [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To study the neuroimaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFTs). Materials and methods: Retrospective study of neuroimaging features of 9 consecutive histopathologically proven ISFT cases. Location, size, shape, density, signal intensity and gadolinium uptake were studied at CT and MRI. Data collected from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (3 patients), perfusion imaging and MR spectroscopy (2 patients), and DSA (4 patients) were also analyzed. Results: The tumors most frequently arose from the intracranial meninges (7/9), while the other lesions were intraventricular. Tumor size ranged from 2.5 to 10 cm (mean = 6.6 cm). They presented multilobular shape in 6/9 patients. Most ISFTs were heterogeneous (7/9) with areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhanced after gadolinium administration (6/8). Erosion of the skull was present in about half of the cases (4/9). Components with decreased apparent diffusion coefficient were seen in 2/3 ISFTs on DWI. Spectroscopy revealed elevated peaks of choline and myo-inositol. MR perfusion showed features of hyperperfusion. Conclusion: ISFT should be considered in cases of extra-axial, supratentorial, heterogeneous, hypervascular tumor. Areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhance after gadolinium injection are suggestive of this diagnosis. Restricted diffusion and elevated peak of myo-inositol may be additional valuable features.

  4. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  5. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  6. Segmentation of liver tumors on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescia, D.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to 3D segmentation of liver tumors in CT images. This is a task of great clinical interest since it allows physicians benefiting from reproducible and reliable methods for segmenting such lesions. Accurate segmentation would indeed help them during the evaluation of the lesions, the choice of treatment and treatment planning. Such a complex segmentation task should cope with three main scientific challenges: (i) the highly variable shape of the structures being sought, (ii) their similarity of appearance compared with their surrounding medium and finally (iii) the low signal to noise ratio being observed in these images. This problem is addressed in a clinical context through a two step approach, consisting of the segmentation of the entire liver envelope, before segmenting the tumors which are present within the envelope. We begin by proposing an atlas-based approach for computing pathological liver envelopes. Initially images are pre-processed to compute the envelopes that wrap around binary masks in an attempt to obtain liver envelopes from estimated segmentation of healthy liver parenchyma. A new statistical atlas is then introduced and used to segmentation through its diffeomorphic registration to the new image. This segmentation is achieved through the combination of image matching costs as well as spatial and appearance prior using a multi-scale approach with MRF. The second step of our approach is dedicated to lesions segmentation contained within the envelopes using a combination of machine learning techniques and graph based methods. First, an appropriate feature space is considered that involves texture descriptors being determined through filtering using various scales and orientations. Then, state of the art machine learning techniques are used to determine the most relevant features, as well as the hyper plane that separates the feature space of tumoral voxels to the ones corresponding to healthy tissues. Segmentation is then

  7. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  8. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  9. Malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qiang; Wen Feng; Zhao Zhenguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the imaging features of malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor (mGDST)as an aid to its diagnosis. Methods: The unenhanced and multi-phasic contrast-enhanced CT scans of 24 patients with pathologically proven mGDST and air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies(15 patients) were reviewed by two radiologists. The tumor location, size, contour, margin, growth type, contrast enhancement pattern and presence of ulcer were recorded. Results: The mGDST was located in the gastric fundus (15), gastric body(3), pylorus(2) and duodenum(4). The pathological types were submucosal(9), intramuscular(9) and subserosal(6). CT findings of mGDST included lobular shape(17), tumor size>5cm(14), central necrosis(15), large and deep ulcer(6), heterogeneous contrast enhancement(1), metastasis(1). The diagnostic accuracy of air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies and CT for location of mGDST was 93.3% and 100% respectively, for malignant features was both 75.0%. Conclusion: Most mGDST have some characteristic appearances including large tumor size greater than 5 cm, lobular shape, central necrosis, large and deep ulcer, heterogeneous contrast enhancement and metastasis. Lymph node enlargement was uncommon. The diagnostic accuracy can be improved by CT scan combined with upper gastrointestinal barium examination. (authors)

  10. Imaging Findings of Scrotal Tumors in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hee [Kang-Dong Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Eun [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dal Mo [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The diagnosis of scrotal tumors in children can be challenging because of the rarity, vague symptoms, and varied imaging features of the tumors. The pathology and frequency of scrotal tumors that occur in children are different from tumors that arise in adults. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate the imaging findings of scrotal tumors in children with pathological correlations. In addition, we present the clinical manifestations that are valuable for a differential diagnosis. Familiarity with the imaging findings and clinical manifestations of pediatric scrotal tumors may be helpful in making an accurate diagnosis and providing proper patient management

  11. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  12. MR imaging assisted radiation therapy planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, M.; Roesler, H.P.; Higer, H.P.; Kutzner, J.; Thelen, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the improvement of the accuracy of treatment portals in radiation therapy of brain tumors with use of MR imaging. After proper processing, the parasagittal MR image showing the largest tumor size and the midline sagittal image were superimposed. With common anatomic landmarks of midline tomogram and lateral simulation radiograph, commensurate reference grids were laid over both images in identical positions. Tumor coordinates were then transferred from the synthesized MR image to the lateral radiograph. Rectangular fields or individual shielding blocks encompassing the tumor could be drawn directly. This new method was used in 17 patients, and results were compared with CT-assisted results

  13. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in brain-stem tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisazumi; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with brain-stem tumors underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after radiotherapy. The brain-stem tumors were seen as a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and as a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. A tumor and its anatomic involvement were more clearly visualized on MRI than on cuncurrently performed CT. Changes in tumor before and after radiotherapy could be determined by measuring the diameter of tumor on sagittal and coronal images. This allowed quantitative evaluation of the reduction of tumor in association with improvement of symptoms. The mean T1 value in the central part of tumors was shortened in all patients after radiotherapy. The results indicate that MRI may assist in determining the effect of radiotherapy for brain-stem tumors. (Namekawa, K)

  15. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Breast: Imaging Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eun Deok; Kim, Min Kyun; Kim, Jeong Soo; Whang, In Yong

    2013-01-01

    Focal neuroendocrine differentiation can be found in diverse histological types of breast tumors. However, the term, neuroendocrine breast tumor, indicates the diffuse expression of neuroendocrine markers in more than 50% of the tumor cell population. The imaging features of neuroendocrine breast tumor have not been accurately described due to extreme rarity of this tumor type. We present a case of a pathologically confirmed, primary neuroendocrine breast tumor in a 42-year-old woman, with imaging findings difficult to be differentiated from that of invasive ductal carcinoma

  16. Tumor scintigraphy by the method for subtracting the initial image with technetium-99m labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Kentaro; Ito, Sanae; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro; Kuroki, Masahide; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The method for subtracting the initial image from the localization image was evaluated for radioimmunoscintigraphy of tumors with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were parental mouse and mouse-human chimeric antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), designated F11-39 and ChF11-39, respectively, both of which have been found to discriminate CEA in tumor tissues from the CEA-related antigens. After reduction of the intrinsic disulfide bonds, these antibodies were labeled with Tc-99m. In vivo studies were performed on athymic nude mice bearing the human CEA-producing gastric carcinoma xenografts. Though biodistribution results showed selective and progressive accumulation of Tc-99m labeled antibodies at the tumor site, high radioactivity in blood was inappropriate for scintigraphic visualization of the tumors within a few hours. We examined the subtraction of the initial Tc-99m image from the Tc-99m localization image after a few hours. Subtracted images of the same count reflected the in vivo behavior of the Tc-99m radioactivity. The subtracted scintigrams revealed excellent tumor images with no significant extrarenal background. Visualization of the tumor site was dependent on antigen-specific binding and nonspecific exudation. These results demonstrate that a method of subtraction of the initial image may serve as a potentially useful diagnostic method for an abnormal site for agents with a low pharmacokinetic value. (author)

  17. Bridging from Brain to Tumor Imaging: (S-(−- and (R-(+-[18F]Fluspidine for Investigation of Sigma-1 Receptors in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kranz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptors (Sig1R are highly expressed in various human cancer cells and hence imaging of this target with positron emission tomography (PET can contribute to a better understanding of tumor pathophysiology and support the development of antineoplastic drugs. Two Sig1R-specific radiolabeled enantiomers (S-(−- and (R-(+-[18F]fluspidine were investigated in several tumor cell lines including melanoma, squamous cell/epidermoid carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, and glioblastoma. Dynamic PET scans were performed in mice to investigate the suitability of both radiotracers for tumor imaging. The Sig1R expression in the respective tumors was confirmed by Western blot. Rather low radiotracer uptake was found in heterotopically (subcutaneously implanted tumors. Therefore, a brain tumor model (U87-MG with orthotopic implantation was chosen to investigate the suitability of the two Sig1R radiotracers for brain tumor imaging. High tumor uptake as well as a favorable tumor-to-background ratio was found. These results suggest that Sig1R PET imaging of brain tumors with [18F]fluspidine could be possible. Further studies with this tumor model will be performed to confirm specific binding and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB.

  18. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-02-17

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn't showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins.

  19. Phosphorescent light-emitting iridium complexes serve as a hypoxia-sensing probe for tumor imaging in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Shaojuan; Negishi, Kazuya; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Hosaka, Masahiro; Tobita, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Iridium complex, a promising organic light-emitting diode material for next generation television and computer displays, emits phosphorescence. Phosphorescence is quenched by oxygen. We used this oxygen-quenching feature for imaging tumor hypoxia. Red light-emitting iridium complex Ir(btp)2(acac) (BTP) presented hypoxia-dependent light emission in culture cell lines, whose intensity was in parallel with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 expression. BTP was further applied to imaging five nude mouse-transplanted tumors. All tumors presented a bright BTP-emitting image as early as 5 min after the injection. The BTP-dependent tumor image peaked at 1 to 2 h after the injection, and was then removed from tumors within 24 h. The minimal BTP image recognition size was at least 2 mm in diameter. By morphological examination and phosphorescence lifetime measurement, BTP is presumed to localize to the tumor cells, not to stay in the tumor microvessels by binding to albumin. The primary problem on suse of luminescent probe for tumor imaging is its weak penetrance to deep tissues from the skin surface. Since BTP is easily modifiable, we made BTP analogues with a longer excitation/emission wavelength to improve the tissue penetrance. One of them, BTPHSA, displayed 560/720 wavelength, and depicted its clear imaging from tumors transplanted over 6-7 mm deep from the skin surface. We suggest that BTP analogues have a vast potential for imaging hypoxic lesions such as tumor tissues.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of syrinx cavity. Differentiation between syrinx with spinal cord tumor and without tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Nemoto, Yutaka

    1987-12-01

    Syrinx cavity may result from a number of intramedullary tumors or non-neoplastic conditions such as Chiari malformation, trauma and meningitis. The surgical procedure to repair the syrinx is quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, it is important to determine whether syrinx is associated with tumor or not before surgery. We reviewed MR images of 26 cases with syrinx cavity; 20 of which were not associated with tumor (12 Chiari malformation, 5 trauma, 1 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus, 1 idiopathic) and 6 of which were associated with intramedullary tumor (3 ependymoma, 2 astrocytoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma). The syrinx showed low signal in all 26 cases on T1 weighted images (SE 600/40). All 6 cases with syrinx associated with intramedullary tumor showed high intensity on T2 weighted images (SE 2000/120). On the other hand, the syrinx of 19 of 20 cases with no tumor condition showed reduced intensity on T2 weighted images. Only one post-traumatic small syrinx showed high signal. This was quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, when the syrinx cavity shows high signal on T2 weighted images, an intramedullary tumor is strongly suggested.

  1. Imaging modalities of abdominal tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reither, M.

    1993-01-01

    Further technological progress in cross-sectional imaging modalities, accumuting experience with increasingly refined hardware and software and accumulating specific contrast media allow new algorithms for the assessment of abdominal tumors in children. However, ultrasound remains the diagnostic method of choice: Conventional roentgenology with or without contrast media is decreasing, but often reveals further differential diagnostic details. MRI is becoming more prominent and is often performed immediately after ultrasound. The inauguration of gradient echo sequences and consequent shorter examination times combined with the elimination of pulsation and motion artefacts extends the diagnostic spectrum of the upper and middle abdomen. The application of oral or rectal contrast agents for imaging of the GI tract ameliorates the differentiation of pathologic processes. Recently volumetric CT/ultrafast CT has been gaining in importance for abdominal examinations in the pediatric age group. CT especially is helpful if there are bony structures in the region being examined. CT, however, involves ionizing radiation and timely administration of oral and intravenous contrast material. Moreover, as pediatric radiologists, we must strongly withstand tendencies to perform CT more often because it is less expensive, rather than avoiding ionizing radiation by using MRI. (orig.) [de

  2. MR imaging of malignant ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kang, Heoung Keun; Moon, Woong Jae; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Ho Sun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of malignant ovarian tumors. MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed in 25 patients with surgically confirmed 30 malignant ovarian tumors(common epithelial tumor; 23, sex cord stromal tumor; 2, endo dermal sinus tumor; 1, metastatic tumor; 4). The findings evaluated were the lesion size, solid and/or cystic component, wall thickness, septal thickness, necrosis, invasion of adjacent organ, ascites, and adenopathy. MRI findings of the malignant ovarian tumors were as follow: Size of lesion was 5-35cm(mean 14cm); solid component was present in 80%(24/30); wall thickness was more than 3mm in 90%(27/30); septal thickness was more than 3mm in 70%(21/30); tumor necrosis was present in 40%(12/30%); invasion of adjacent organ was present in 76%(19/25); ascites was present in 56%(14/25); lymphadenopathy was present in 24% (6/25). MRI findings of absence of solid component(6/6), even wall and septal thickness(7/7, 19/19) were found only in epithelial tumors. Uneven septal thickness more than 3mm(7/11) was a predominant MRI findings of non-epithelial tumors. Well-defined cystic lesion within solid component was seen in Krukenberg tumors. Evaluation of the lesion size, internal architecture, invasion of adjacent organ, ascites, and lymphadenopathy in MRI would enable diagnosis of malignant ovarian tumors and could lead to possible differential diagnosis of epithelial tumors from non-epithelial tumors

  3. In vitro binding of 67Ga to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, S.; Kubodera, A.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of 67 Ga to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (ETC) was studied in vitro. Acid mucopolysaccharide (AMPS) present at the cell surface of ETC was identified as heparan sulfate (HS). The extent of 67 Ga binding to ETC reached a plateau (ca. 10% of the added dose) at 1-2 h after the start of incubation. The binding was higher under neutral or alkaline conditions than under acidic conditions. Heparin and heparitinase treatment both significantly decreased the extent of 67 Ga binding to ETC. Mild treatment with protease, including trypsin or papain, also decreased the binding. On the contrary, the treatment with trypsin under severe conditions markedly increased the extent of 67 Ga binding to ETC. These results support the hypothesis that HS plays an important role as a 67 Ga receptor in the mechanism of gallium binding to ETC. (orig.)

  4. Mesenchymal Tumors of the Breast: Imaging and the Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Kim, Eun Kyung; You, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Yee Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Various benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors can occur in the breast. Most radiologists are unfamiliar with the imaging features of these tumors and the imaging features have not been described in the radiologic literature. It is important that radiologists should be familiar with the broad spectrum of imaging features of rare mesenchymal breast tumors. In this pictorial review, we demonstrate the sonographic findings and the corresponding pathologic findings of various mesenchymal tumors of the breast as defined by the World Health Organization classification system

  5. Hierarchy of ADAM12 binding to integrins in tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Fröhlich, Camilla; Nielsen, Christian Kamp

    2005-01-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of cell surface proteins with protease and cell-binding activities. Using different forms and fragments of ADAM12 as substrates in cell adhesion and spreading assays, we demonstrated that alpha9beta1 integrin is the main receptor for ADA...

  6. CISS MR imaging findings of epidermoid tumor : comparison with spin-echo images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Sang Yoel; Heo, Jin Sam; Jung, Hoon Sik; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Wha [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate CISS MR imaging findings of epidermoid tumor in comparison with conventional spin-echo images. We studied 6 cases of epidermoid tumor in the subarachnoid space. We used a 1.5T MR unit to obtain CISS images(TR/TE/FA ; 12.3msec/5.9 msec/700) and T1- and T2- weighted spin-echo images. CISS MR imaging findings were evaluated with respect to tumor's signal intensity , contour, and relation with adjacent structures. Conspicuity of the tumor was compared between CISS and spin-echo images. A quantitative analysis was performed by measuring tumor to CSF contrast. In qualitative analysis, three radiologists independently compared CISS image and conventional spin-echo images for visibility of the tumor and graded them into three categories( poor, good, and excellent). Epidermoid tumors were located in the cerebellopontine angle in 4 cases, the prepontine cisstern in 1 case, and the cerebellopontine angle-prepontine cistern in 1 case. The tumors were hyperintense relative to brain parenchyma and hypointense relative to CSF on CISS images, were lobulated, encased adjacent cranial nerve and vessels, and invaginated into brain parenchyma. In qualitative analysis, CISS images showed clear demarcation between tumor and CSF, exact tumor extension, and tumor's relation with cranial nerves and vessels better than conventional spin-echo images. In quantitative analysis, the mean contrast values of tumor to CSF on T1-, T2-weighted images, and CISS images were 0.12, 0.06, and 0.52, respectively. The contrast value for CISS images was significantly higher than that for T1-and T2-weighted images(p<0.05). Epidermoid tumors in the subarachnoid space are better demonstrated on CISS images than on conventional spin-echo images. This special MR sequence can be added as a routine protocol in the diagnosis of subarachnoid epidermoid tumor.

  7. Multichannel imaging to quantify four classes of pharmacokinetic distribution in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Liao, Jianshan; Cilliers, Cornelius; Thurber, Greg M

    2014-10-01

    Low and heterogeneous delivery of drugs and imaging agents to tumors results in decreased efficacy and poor imaging results. Systemic delivery involves a complex interplay of drug properties and physiological factors, and heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment makes predicting and overcoming these limitations exceptionally difficult. Theoretical models have indicated that there are four different classes of pharmacokinetic behavior in tissue, depending on the fundamental steps in distribution. In order to study these limiting behaviors, we used multichannel fluorescence microscopy and stitching of high-resolution images to examine the distribution of four agents in the same tumor microenvironment. A validated generic partial differential equation model with a graphical user interface was used to select fluorescent agents exhibiting these four classes of behavior, and the imaging results agreed with predictions. BODIPY-FL exhibited higher concentrations in tissue with high blood flow, cetuximab gave perivascular distribution limited by permeability, high plasma protein and target binding resulted in diffusion-limited distribution for Hoechst 33342, and Integrisense 680 was limited by the number of binding sites in the tissue. Together, the probes and simulations can be used to investigate distribution in other tumor models, predict tumor drug distribution profiles, and design and interpret in vivo experiments. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Tumor Imaging in Patients with Advanced Tumors Using a New 99mTc-Radiolabeled Vitamin B12 Derivative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sah, Bert-Ram; Schibli, Roger; Waibel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Targeting cancer cells with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is hampered by unwanted physiologic tissue uptake mediated by transcobalamin. Adhering to good manufacturing practice, we have developed a new (99m)Tc-cobalamin derivative ((99m)Tc(CO)3-[(4-amido-butyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyl-amino-acetato] cobalamin......, (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin). The derivative shows no binding to transcobalamin but is recognized by haptocorrin, a protein present in the circulation and notably expressed in many tumor cells. In this prospective study, we investigated cancer-specific uptake of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin in 10 patients...... with various metastatic tumors. METHODS: Ten patients with biopsy-proven metastatic cancer were included. Dynamic imaging was started immediately after injection of 300-500 MBq of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin, and whole-body scintigrams were obtained at 10, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min and after 24 h. The relative tumor...

  9. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  10. Characterization of Soft Tissue Tumors by Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kahya, Mehmet Onur; Kaya, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive method for investigation of tumor histological content. It has been applied for some musculoskeletal tumors and reported to be useful. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors and to determine if ADC can help differentiate these tumors. DWI was performed on 25 histologically proven soft tissue masses. It was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging technique using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) machine. The mean ADC values were calculated. We grouped soft tissue tumors as benign cystic, benign solid or mixed, malignant cystic and malignant solid or mixed tumors and compared mean ADC values between these groups. There was only one patient with a malignant cystic tumor and was not included in the statistical analysis. The median ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 2.31 ± 1.29 and 0.90 ± 0.70 (median ± interquartile range), respectively. The mean ADC values were different between benign and malignant tumors (P = 0.031). Benign cystic tumors had significantly higher ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors and malignant solid or mixed tumors (p values were < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Malignant solid or mixed tumors had lower ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors (P = 0.02). Our preliminary results have shown that although there is some overlap between benign and malignant tumors, adding DWI, MR imaging to routine soft tissue tumor protocols may improve diagnostic accuracy

  11. Relationship between laminin binding capacity and laminin expression on tumor cells sensitive or resistant to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laybourn, K.A.; Varani, J.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Hiserodt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the presence of laminin binding sites on murine NK and NC sensitive tumor cells by 125 I-laminin binding and laminin induced cell-cell aggregation. The finding that the addition of exogenous laminin inhibits NK/NC binding to sensitive tumor cells suggests laminin binding sites may serve as target antigens for NK cells. The present study extends earlier reports by analyzing a large panel of tumor cells for laminin binding capacity, laminin expression and sensitivity to NK/NC killing. The data indicate that all tumor cells which bind to NK/NC cells (8 lines tested) express laminin binding sites. All of these tumor cells were capable of competing for NK lysis of YAC-1 cells in cold target competition assays, and all bound enriched NK cells in direct single cell binding assays. In contrast, tumor cells expressing high levels of surface laminin (B16 melanomas, C57B1/6 fibrosarcomas, and RAS transfected 3T3 fibroblasts) but low levels of laminin binding capacity did not bind NK/NC cells and were resistant to lysis. These data support the hypothesis that expression of laminin/laminin binding sites may contribute to tumor cell sensitivity to NK/NC binding and/or killing

  12. Imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shuilian; Man Yuping; Ma Longbai; Liu Ying; Wei Qiang; Zhu Youkai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFT). Methods: Ten patients with ISFT proven histopathologically were collected. Four cases had CT data and all cases had MR data. The imaging features and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases were misdiagnosed as meningioma at pre-operation. All lesions arose from intracranial meninges including 5 lesions above the tentorium, 4 lesions beneath the tentorium and 1 lesion growing around the tentorium. The margins of all the masses were well defined, and 8 lesions presented multilobular shape. CT demonstrated hyerattenuated masses in all 4 lesions, smooth erosion of the basicranial skull in 1 lesion, and punctiform calcification of the capsule in 1 lesion. T 1 WI showed most lesions with isointense or slight hyperintense signals including homogeneous in 4 lesions and heterogeneous in 6 lesions. T 2 WI demonstrated isointense or slight hyperintense in 2 lesions, mixed hypointense and hyperintense signals in 4, cystic portion in 2, and two distinct portion of hyperintense and hypointense signal, so called 'yin-yang' pattern, in 2. Strong enhanced was found in all lesions, especially in 8 lesion with heterogeneous with the low T 2 signal. 'Dural tail' was found in 4 lesions. Conclusions: ISFI has some specific CT and MR features including heterogeneous signal intensity on T 2 WI, strong enhancement of areas with low T 2 signal intensity, slight or no 'dural tail', without skull thickening, and the typical 'yin-yang' pattern. (authors)

  13. Bone tumors of the pediatric foot: imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro-Dominguez, Pablo; Navarro, Oscar M. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Tumors of the foot are rare in children. This review illustrates radiographic, CT and MR imaging findings of foot bone tumors in children based on all cases presented in a tertiary pediatric hospital during the 15-year period of 1999-2014. This search revealed 155 tumors of the foot, 72 of the bones and 83 of the soft tissues. Osteochondroma, bone cyst and fibrous dysplasia were the most frequent benign bone lesions. Ewing sarcoma was the most common malignant osseous tumor. Some tumors showed higher prevalence in certain age ranges and others showed predilection for specific bones. Radiographs are useful for diagnosis in the majority of cases but CT and MR imaging provide additional valuable information in select cases for diagnosis and determining extent of the lesions. Radiologists should be aware of some typical imaging findings in bone tumors of the foot in order to establish diagnosis and facilitate patient management. (orig.)

  14. Molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Seitz, Michael; Singer, Bernhard B; Irmak, Ster; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades many efforts have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis. The introduction of anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy during the last few years necessitates the establishment of new techniques enabling molecular imaging of tumor vascular remodelling. The determination of tumor size as commonly used is not appropriate since the extended necrosis under anti-angiogenic therapy does not necessarily result in the reduction of tumor diameter. The basis for the molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels is the remodelling of the tumor vessels under anti-angiogenic therapy which obviously occurs at an early stage and seems to be a convincing parameter. Beside the enormous progress in this field during the last few years the resolution is still not high enough to evaluate the remodelling of the micro tumor vessels. New imaging approaches combining specific molecular markers for tumor vessels with the different imaging techniques are needed to overcome this issue as exemplarily discussed for prostate cancer in this review. Molecular contrast agents targeting the vasculature will allow clinicians the visualization of vascular remodelling processes taking place under anti-angiogenic therapy and improve tumor diagnosis and follow-up.

  15. Phosphatidylserine is a marker of tumor vasculature and a potential target for cancer imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran, Sophia; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To determine whether exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs on vascular endothelium in solid tumors in mice. (2) To determine whether PS exposure can be induced on viable endothelial cells in tissue culture by conditions present in the tumor microenvironment. Methods and Materials: Externalized PS in vivo was detected by injecting mice with a monoclonal anti-PS antibody and examining frozen sections of tumors and normal tissues for anti-PS antibody bound to vascular endothelium. Apoptotic cells were identified by anti-active caspase-3 antibody or by TUNEL assay. PS exposure on cultured endothelial cells was determined by 125 I-annexin V binding. Results: Anti-PS antibody bound specifically to vascular endothelium in six tumor models. The percentage of PS-positive vessels ranged from 4% to 40% in different tumor types. Vascular endothelium in normal organs was unstained. Very few tumor vessels expressed apoptotic markers. Hypoxia/reoxygenation, acidity, inflammatory cytokines, thrombin, or hydrogen peroxide induced PS exposure on cultured endothelial cells without causing loss of viability. Conclusions: Vascular endothelial cells in tumors, but not in normal tissues, externalize PS. PS exposure might be induced by tumor-associated oxidative stress and activating cytokines. PS is an abundant and accessible marker of tumor vasculature and could be used for tumor imaging and therapy

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in the head and neck tumor diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Masahito; Miyata, Mamoru; Sonoda, Tetsushi; Miyoshi, Shunji; Hiraide, Fumihisa; Morita, Mamoru; Tanaka, Osamu

    1987-06-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a new diagnostic technique that is being applied to study disease processes that involve the upper aero-digestive tract and cranial nerves of interest to otolaryngologist. Seventy four patients with head and neck tumor were enrolled to study the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). Five cases of head and neck tumors were presented. Characteristic findings of MRI were discussed. T2 weighted images are very useful in the diagnosis of head and neck tumors. Tumors in the areas surrounded by bone tissue were clearly imaged without such artifacts as recognized in X-ray CT. Information from mutiplane imaging, especially from coronal and sagittal sections, made it easier to determine the type and extent of the lesion. High signal linear parts which are in the periphery of the tumor offer important information that no adhesion is present.

  17. Clinical relevance of F-18 FDG PET for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Baum, R.P.; Hoer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are characterized immunocytochemically by the expression of different peptides and biogenic amines. Hormones induce their biological action by binding to and stimulating specific membrane-associated receptors for e.g. somatostatin. The presence of somatostatin receptors (SR) has been described mainly in endocrine glands and the central nervous system. Interestingly, a large variety of human tumors, including gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumors and medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) also express a high density of SR and can be imaged with [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 ]-pentetreotide. Cell proliferative activity is an important indicator of the growth of various malignant tumors associated with a poorer prognosis and Ki-67 expression. 18 F-FDG is a marker of tumor viability, based upon the increased glycolysis that is associated with malignancy as compared with normal tissue. SR-containing neuroendocrine tumors are well-differentiated and tend to grow slowly. Furthermore, these tumors demonstrate inverse relationship between in vivo SR expression, cell proliferation (low Ki-67 expression) and FDG uptake (normal biodistribution). In comparison, less differentiated tumors, e.g. atypical carcinoids or MTC with increasing CEA levels show mitotic activity (high levels of Ki-67 immunoreactivity and increased FDG uptake) and often lack of SR. In conclusion, SR scintigraphy has been shown to localize well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. In contrast, PET imaging is valuable for predicting malignancy only in less differentiated tumors with increased glucose metabolism. Therefore, an additional F-18 FDG PET should be performed if SR scintigraphy (GEP tumors) or combined imaging using [ 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 ]-pentetreotide and 99m Tc(V)-DMSA (MTC) is negative. (orig.) [de

  18. Measuring Response to Therapy by Near-Infrared Imaging of Tumors Using a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging tumors and their response to treatment could be a valuable biomarker toward early assessment of therapy in patients with cancer. Phosphatidylserine (PS is confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in normal cells but is externalized on tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs and tumor cells, and PS exposure is further enhanced in response to radiation and chemotherapy. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a PS-targeting human F(ab'2 antibody fragment, PGN650, to detect exposure of PS in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was measured by near-infrared optical imaging in human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. PGN650 specifically targeted tumors and was shown to target CD31-positive ECs and tumor cells. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was significantly higher in animals pretreated with docetaxel. The peak tumor to normal tissue (T/N ratio of probe was observed at 24 hours postinjection of probe, and tumor binding was detected for at least 120 hours. In repeat dose studies, PGN650 uptake in tumors was significantly higher following pretreatment with docetaxel compared to baseline uptake prior to treatment. PGN650 may be a useful probe to detect PS exposed in tumors and to monitor enhanced PS exposure to optimize therapeutic agents to treat tumors.

  19. A novel Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled arginine-arginine-leucine-containing peptide as a multimodal tumor imaging agent in a murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2018-06-15

    We developed a Tc-99m and TAMRA-labeled peptide, Tc-99m arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide (TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL), to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with PC-3 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL determined by saturation binding was 41.7 ± 7.8 nM. Confocal microscopy images of PC-3 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of RRL. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In conclusion, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled elastin-derived peptide, VAPG for multimodal tumor imaging in murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled peptide, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was synthesized by using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG with Tc-99m was done by using ligand exchange via tartrate. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with SW620 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry by using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG determined by saturation binding was 16.8 ± 3.6 nM. Confocal microscopy images of SW620 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of VAPG. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumor cells. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is distinct from normal tissue as a result of abnormal vascular network characterized by hypoxia, low pH, high interstitial fluid pressure and elevated glycolytic activity. This poses a barrier to treatments including radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging methods...... spectroscopic imaging. Imaging pO2 in tumors is now a robust pre-clinical imaging modality with potential for implementation clinically. Pre-clinical studies and an initial clinical study with hyperpolarized metabolic MR have been successful and suggest that the method may be part of image-guided radiotherapy...

  2. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  3. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  4. MR imaging of gestational trophoblastic tumor: role of gadolinium enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Si Young; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Su; Yun, Young Hyun; Mun, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Sin; Kim, Byung Kee; Bae, Seog Nyeon; Shinn, Kyung Sub.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of gadolinium enhanced MR imaging in the evaluation of gestational trophoblastic tumors (invasive mole and choriocarcinoma). Pre-enhanced T1-and T2-weighted images and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted images of 34 gestational trophoblastic tumors (15 choriocarcinomas, 19 invasive moles) were retrospectively evaluated and enhancement patterns were analyzed. Morphologica differences and structural characteristics were analyzed by the evaluation of tumor margin, patterns of hemorrhagic necroses, the development of intratumoral vascularity, and molar villi. Graded scores of MR findings between pre- and gadolinium enhanced images were based on the following criteria : 1) visualization of tumor margin 2) distinction between tumor necrosis and zone of trophoblastic proliferation ; and 3) molar villi. Statistical differences between graded scores of pre- and post-enhanced images were analyzed. Gadolinium enhanced MR imaging was helpful for the visualization of tumor characteristics in gestational trophoblastic tumors and in differential diagnosis between invasive mole and choriocarcinoma. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Visualization of Tumor Angiogenesis Using MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibody Conjugate in a Mouse Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Hong Young; Yin, Hong Hua; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon Kwon Ha Yoon

    2010-01-01

    To visualize tumor angiogenesis using the MRI contrast agent, Gd- DTPA-anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody conjugate, with a 4.7-Tesla MRI instrument in a mouse model. We designed a tumor angiogenesis-targeting T1 contrast agent that was prepared by the bioconjugation of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) antibody. The specific binding of the agent complex to cells that express VEGFR2 was examined in cultured murine endothelial cells (MS-1 cells) with a 4.7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Angiogenesis-specific T1 enhancement was imaged with the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate using a CT-26 adenocarcinoma tumor model in eight mice. As a control, the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-rat immunoglobulin G (Gd-DTPA-anti-rat IgG) was imaged with a tumor model in eight mice. Statistical significance was assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate showed predominant binding to cultured endothelial cells that expressed a high level of VEGFR2. Signal enhancement was approximately three-fold for in vivo T1-weighted MR imaging with the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as compared with the Gd-DTPA-rat IgG in the mouse tumor model (p < 0.05). VEGFR2 expression in CT-26 tumor vessels was demonstrated using immunohistochemical staining. MR imaging using the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as a contrast agent is useful in visualizing noninvasively tumor angiogenesis in a murine tumor model

  6. Visualization of Tumor Angiogenesis Using MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibody Conjugate in a Mouse Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Hong Young; Yin, Hong Hua; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon Kwon Ha Yoon [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To visualize tumor angiogenesis using the MRI contrast agent, Gd- DTPA-anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody conjugate, with a 4.7-Tesla MRI instrument in a mouse model. We designed a tumor angiogenesis-targeting T1 contrast agent that was prepared by the bioconjugation of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) antibody. The specific binding of the agent complex to cells that express VEGFR2 was examined in cultured murine endothelial cells (MS-1 cells) with a 4.7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Angiogenesis-specific T1 enhancement was imaged with the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate using a CT-26 adenocarcinoma tumor model in eight mice. As a control, the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-rat immunoglobulin G (Gd-DTPA-anti-rat IgG) was imaged with a tumor model in eight mice. Statistical significance was assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate showed predominant binding to cultured endothelial cells that expressed a high level of VEGFR2. Signal enhancement was approximately three-fold for in vivo T1-weighted MR imaging with the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as compared with the Gd-DTPA-rat IgG in the mouse tumor model (p < 0.05). VEGFR2 expression in CT-26 tumor vessels was demonstrated using immunohistochemical staining. MR imaging using the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as a contrast agent is useful in visualizing noninvasively tumor angiogenesis in a murine tumor model

  7. Imaging of benign tumors of the osseous spine

    OpenAIRE

    Riahi, Hend; Mechri, Meriem; Barsaoui, Maher; Bouaziz, Mouna; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Ladeb, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the imaging features of the most prevalent benign bone tumors involving the spine. Benign tumors of the osseous spine account approximately for 1% of all primary skeletal tumors. Many lesions exhibit characteristic radiologic features. In addition to age and location of the lesion, radiographs are an essential step in the initial detection and characterization but are limited to complex anatomy and superposition. CT and MR imagi...

  8. Imaging manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct tumor thrombi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingyu; Chen Jianyu; Liang Biling; Hu Tao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombi. Methods: Thirteen patients with bile duct tumor thrombi proved pathologically underwent imaging examination. MR and CT were performed in 3 cases, and 2 cases had CT only and 8 cases had MRI only. Ultrasonography(US) was performed in all 13 patients. The accuracy of bile duct tumor thrombi detection was compared between US, CT and MRI with Fisher test. Results: Liver tumors and bile duct tumor thrombi were demonstrated in all patients on CT or MRI. Presence of intraluminal soft tissue mass was found in four of five cases on CT, and mild enhancement of the intraluminal mass in the arterial phase was noted, dilated bile duct distal to tumor thrombi was detected in all five patients. Eleven Tumor thrombi showed slight low signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight high signal intensity on T 2 WI, and mild to moderate contrast enhancement on the contrast-enhanced MR images. The MRCP findings of tumor thrombi were as follows: interruption, stricture of the bile ducts or irregular filling defect in the bile ducts with dilated intrahepatic ducts, bile duet was abruptly interrupted or showed a 'rat-tail' stricture (n=5); the common bile duct was filled with tumor thrombi, intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and missing common bile duct was noted on MRCP (n=2). Bile duct tumor thrombi were correctly diagnosed in 7 cases on US, and 12 cases on CT or MRI. Six cases were misdiagnosed or miss-diagnosed on US, and 4 cases were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI. There was no significant difference between US and CT/MRI in diagnosis of bile duct tumor thrombi (P=0.270). Conclusion: CT or MR imaging is useful for the diagnosis of HCC with biliary tumor thrombi and for evaluating the extension of thrombi. (authors)

  9. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Blas, C.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.; Bittoun, J.

    1986-01-01

    In 60 patients with spinal cord tumors, MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-T unit (GE Signa) and a planar surface coil, 5-mm-thick sections, and spin-echo pulse sequences (TE/TR = 25/600 and 25-100/2,000-2,500 msec). There were 32 astrocytomas, 13 ependymomas, and five hemangioblastomas. Ten patients were not operated on. Surgical follow-up was available in 35 patients. The MR imaging results were correlated with findings on CT, myelography, intraoperative US, surgery, and pathologic examination. In all cases the tumor appeared markedly inhomogeneous. Four imaging patterns corresponding to structural abnormalities were observed: low signal intensity of the tumor core on both T1- and T2-weighted images; hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (low-protein cyst, syrinx, edema); isointensity on T1-weighted and slight hypertensity on T2-weighted images (high-protein tumoral necrotic cyst); and high spinal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images (chronic hemorrhage). MR imaging contributes the most information in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors and delineation of their extent, and consequently has a potential impact on surgical management

  10. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  11. Valine-based biphenylsulphonamide matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@ugent.be; Staelens, Ludovicus [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Kersemans, Veerle [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cornelissen, Bart [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Frankenne, Francis [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Foidart, Jean-Michel [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Gent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2006-06-15

    Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the subfamily of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) is of particular interest due to their ability to degrade type IV collagen and other non-fibrillar collagen domains and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Whilst malignant cells often over-express various MMPs, the gelatinases have been most consistently detected in malignant tissues and associated with tumor growth, metastatic potential and angiogenesis. Radiosynthesis of carboxylic (1') and hydroxamic (2') MMPIs resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. Evaluation in A549-inoculated athymic mice showed a tumor uptake of 2.0+/-0.7%ID/g (3h p.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 0.5 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 4.6 at 48hp.i. for 1'. For compound 2' a tumor uptake of 0.7+/-0.2%ID/g (3hp.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 1.2 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 1.8 at 24hp.i. were observed. HPLC analysis of the blood (plasma) showed no dehalogenation or other metabolites of 1' 2hp.i. For compound 2', 65.4% of intact compound was found in the blood (plasma) and one polar metabolite (31%) was detected whereas in the tumor 91.8% of the accumulated activity was caused by intact compound and only 8.1% by the metabolite. Planar imaging, using a Toshiba GCA-9300A/hg SPECT camera, showed that tumor tissue could be visualized and that image quality improved by decreasing specific activity resulting in lower liver uptake, indicating some degree of saturable binding in the liver. In vivo evaluation of these radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers revealed that MMP inhibitors could have potential as tumor imaging agents, but that further research is necessary.

  12. Valine-based biphenylsulphonamide matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth; Staelens, Ludovicus; Kersemans, Veerle; Cornelissen, Bart; Frankenne, Francis; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Wiele, Christophe van de; Slegers, Guido

    2006-01-01

    Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the subfamily of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) is of particular interest due to their ability to degrade type IV collagen and other non-fibrillar collagen domains and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Whilst malignant cells often over-express various MMPs, the gelatinases have been most consistently detected in malignant tissues and associated with tumor growth, metastatic potential and angiogenesis. Radiosynthesis of carboxylic (1') and hydroxamic (2') MMPIs resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. Evaluation in A549-inoculated athymic mice showed a tumor uptake of 2.0+/-0.7%ID/g (3h p.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 0.5 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 4.6 at 48hp.i. for 1'. For compound 2' a tumor uptake of 0.7+/-0.2%ID/g (3hp.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 1.2 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 1.8 at 24hp.i. were observed. HPLC analysis of the blood (plasma) showed no dehalogenation or other metabolites of 1' 2hp.i. For compound 2', 65.4% of intact compound was found in the blood (plasma) and one polar metabolite (31%) was detected whereas in the tumor 91.8% of the accumulated activity was caused by intact compound and only 8.1% by the metabolite. Planar imaging, using a Toshiba GCA-9300A/hg SPECT camera, showed that tumor tissue could be visualized and that image quality improved by decreasing specific activity resulting in lower liver uptake, indicating some degree of saturable binding in the liver. In vivo evaluation of these radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers revealed that MMP inhibitors could have potential as tumor imaging agents, but that further research is necessary

  13. Sequential computed tomographic imaging of a transplantable rabbit brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Beck, T.J.; Ahn, H.S.; Anderson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy of CT imaging in evaluating VX-2 tumor growth in the rabbit brain was assessed. CT scanning was performed in 5 outbred New Zealand white male rabbits before and at 4, 7, 9 and 13 (in 3 animals) days after surgical implantation of 3 x 10 5 viable VX-2 tumor cells in the frontoparietal lobes. The CT studies were correlated with gross pathology in each. The tumor was visualized with CT in all 5 rabbits by the 9th day post implantation when the tumor ranged in size from 4-6 x 3-4 x 2-3 mm. Between the 9th and 13th day, the tumor increased 6-fold in two rabbits and 12-fold in the third rabbit. CT is a useful technique to evaluate brain tumor growth in this model and should be valuable in documenting the efficacy of chemotherapy on tumor growth. (orig.)

  14. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  15. Radiopharmacological evaluation of 18F-labeled phosphatidylserine-binding peptides for molecular imaging of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, Melinda; Perreault, Amanda; Kapty, Janice; Richter, Susan; Foerster, Christian; Bergman, Cody; Way, Jenilee; Mercer, John; Wuest, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiolabeled phosphatidylserine (PS)-binding peptides represent an innovative strategy for molecular imaging of apoptosis with positron emission tomography (PET). The goal of this study was the radiopharmacological evaluation of radiolabeled peptides for their binding to PS on apoptotic cancer cells, involving metabolic stability, cellular uptake, biodistribution, and dynamic PET imaging experiments. Methods: Binding of peptides LIKKPF, PGDLSR, FBz-LIKKPF, FBz-PGDLSR, FBAM-CLIKKPF and FBAM-CPGDLSR to PS was analyzed in a newly developed radiometric binding assay using 64 Cu-labeled wild-type annexin-V as radiotracer. Radiolabeling of most potent peptides with fluorine-18 was carried out with thiol-selective prosthetic group [ 18 F]FBAM to give [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. [ 18 F]FBAM-labeled peptides were studied in camptothecin-induced apoptotic human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells, and in a murine EL4 tumor model of apoptosis using dynamic PET imaging and biodistribution. Results: Peptides LIKKPF and PGDLSR inhibited binding of 64 Cu-labeled annexin-V to immobilized PS in the millimolar range (IC 50 10–15 mM) compared to annexin-V (45 nM). Introduction of FBAM prosthetic group slightly increased inhibitory potencies (FBAM-CLIKKPF: IC 50 = 1 mM; FBAM-CPGDLSR: IC 50 = 6 mM). Radiolabeling succeeded in good radiochemical yields of 50–54% using a chemoselective alkylation reaction of peptides CLIKKPF and CPGDLSR with [ 18 F]FBAM. In vivo metabolic stability studies in mice revealed 40–60% of intact peptides at 5 min p.i. decreasing to 25% for [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and less than 5% for [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR at 15 min p.i.. Cell binding of [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in drug-treated Jurkat cells was significantly higher compared to untreated cells, but this was not observed for [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. Dynamic PET imaging experiments showed that baseline uptake of [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in EL4 tumors was higher (SUV 5min 0.46, SUV 60min 0.13) compared to

  16. Imaging of brain tumors with histological correlations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, Antonios (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    This volume provides a deeper understanding of the diagnosis of brain tumors by correlating radiographic imaging features with the underlying pathological abnormalities. All modern imaging modalities are used to complete a diagnostic overview of brain tumors with emphasis on recent advances in diagnostic neuroradiology. High-quality illustrations depicting common and uncommon imaging characteristics of a wide range of brain tumors are presented and analysed, drawing attention to the ways in which these characteristics reflect different aspects of pathology. Important theoretical considerations are also discussed. Since the first edition, chapters have been revised and updated and new material has been added, including detailed information on the clinical application of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Radiologists and other clinicians interested in the current diagnostic approach to brain tumors will find this book to be an invaluable and enlightening clinical tool. (orig.)

  17. 99mTc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP peptide for MCF-7 breast tumor targeting and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpour, Sajjad; Noaparast, Zohreh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2018-02-19

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the world. Development of novel tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals for early breast tumor diagnosis is highly desirable. In this study we developed 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-Lys-FROP peptide with the ability of specific binding to MCF-7 breast tumor. The FROP-1 peptide was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and labeled with 99m Tc using tricine/EDDA co-ligand. The cellular specific binding of 99m Tc-HYNIC-FROP was evaluated on different cell lines as well as with blocking experiment on MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma). The tumor targeting and imaging of this labeled peptide were performed on MCF-7 tumor bearing mice. Radiochemical purity for 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP was 99% which was determined with ITLC method. This radiolabeled peptide showed high stability in normal saline and serum about 98% which was monitored with HPLC method. In saturation binding experiments, the binding constant (K d ) to MCF-7 cells was determined to be 158 nM. Biodistribution results revealed that the 99m Tc-HYNIC-FROP was mainly exerted from urinary route. The maximum tumor uptake was found after 30 min post injection (p.i.); however maximum tumor/muscle ratio was seen at 15 min p.i. The tumor uptake of this labeled peptide was specific and blocked by co-injection of excess FROP. According to the planar gamma imaging result, tumor was clearly visible due to the tumor uptake of 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP in mouse after 15 min p.i. The 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP is considered a promising probe with high specific binding to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in 38 cases of acoustic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Masafumi; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Matsumoto, Mikiro; Shibata, Iekado; Terao, Hideo [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kohno, Takeshi; Sanpei, Kenji; Mano, Isamu

    1989-08-01

    The value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acoustic tumors was retrospectively assessed in 38 cases. A 0.15 Tesla permanent magnet and a 1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet were employed in 24 and 14 cases, respectively. Gadolinium diethlene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), a paramagnetic contrast agent, was used in 10 cases. Acoustic tumors were identified in all cases. Small, medium, and large tumors were depicted with equal clarity by MRI and computed tomography (CT). However, tumor contour and extension, accompanying cysts, and brainstem displacement were more clarly visualized on MRI. The use of Gd-DTPA improved the quality of the MR images by markedly enhancing the acoustic tumors in all cases. In particular, detection of small acoustic tumors and intra- or paratumoral cysts was facilitated by the use of Gd-DTPA. The possibility of a correlation between acoustic tumor histology and MRI features was studied by calculation of the contrast to noise (C/N) ratio in 10 cases of acoustic tumor and 7 cases of meningioma. No definite correlation was demonstrated, but there appeared to be some difference in the C/N ratio between acoustic tumors and meningiomas. In three volunteers, MRI demonstrated intracanalicular nerves, separately. Because of its higher resolution, MRI can be expected to replace CT and air CT in the diagnosis of acoustic tumors. (author).

  19. Contrast-enhanced CISS imaging of cerebellopontine angle tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Toyoda, Keiko; Hata, Yuichi; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Katano, Shuichi

    1999-10-01

    Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of contrast-enhanced CISS-3DFT MR imaging for the diagnosis of CP angle tumors. CISS-3DFT MR imaging is expected for screening procedure of acoustic schwannoma because of excellent spatial resolution. Recently, we discovered contrast enhancement effect on CISS sequence in spite of heavily T{sub 2}-weighted images. Fourteen patients with CP angle tumors were performed on a 1.0 T MR unit. Transaxial CISS-3DFT MRI was obtained both before and after intravenous injections of Gd-DTPA. Multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) were performed in all cases. Contrast enhancement effect of CP angle tumors, and the relationship between tumors and the adjacent cranial nerves were evaluated. Contrast enhancement effect of the tumors was present in all cases in spite of heavily T{sub 2}-weighted images of CISS sequences. In the internal auditory canal, relationship between the tumors and the cranial nerves was demonstrated in 6 cases (6/9). In the cerebellopontine cistern, all cases were demonstrated (11/11). Contrast-enhanced CISS-3DFT MR imaging with a good contrast resolution and an excellent spatial resolution is useful for the diagnosis of CP angle tumors. (author)

  20. Usefulness of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Yang Gu; Suh, Soo Jhi; Zeon, Seok Kil; Woo, Sung Ku; Kim, Hong; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Sung Moon; Lee, Hee Jung; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of dynamic MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Dynamic MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with histopathologically proved brain tumors. Serial images were sequentially obtained every 30 seconds for 3-5 minutes with use of spin-echo technique(TR 200msec/TE 15msec) after rapid injection of Gd-DTPA in a dose of 0.1mmol/kg body weight. Dynamics of contrast enhancement of the brain tumors were analyzed visually and by the sequential contrast enhancement ratio(CER). On the dynamic MR imaging, contrast enhancement pattern of the gliomas showed gradual increase in signal intensity(SI) till 180 seconds and usually had a longer time to peak of the CER. The SI of metastatic brain tumors increased steeply till 30 seconds and then rapidly or gradually decreased and the tumors had a shorter time to peak of the CER. Meningiomas showed a rapid ascent in SI till 30 to 60 seconds and then made a plateau or slight descent of the CER. Lymphomas and germinomas showed relatively rapid increase of SI till 30 seconds and usually had a longer time peak of the CER. Dynamic MR imaging with Gd-DTPA may lead to further information about the brain tumors as the sequential contrast enhancement pattern and CER parameters seem to be helpful in discriminating among the brain tumors

  1. Gd-DTPA MR imaging enhancement of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, W.P.; Bolla, K.; Mark, A.S.; Tsudura, J.S.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen patients with suspected spinal cord tumors were imaged with T1- and T2-weighted sequences before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Eleven of the 19 patients had spinal cord tumors (three unproven). Eight of 11 patients had intramedullary tumors (four astrocytomas, two ependymomas) and two had extra-medullary tumors (one meningioma, one metastatic melanoma). Other lesions studied include idiopathic syringomyelia (two), spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (one), posttraumatic arachnoiditis (one), and cord infarct (one). All of the tumors enhanced after the administration of Gd-DTPA. Spinal cord enhancement was also noted in association with a spinal cord AVM, a suspected cord infarct, and in the patient with severe arachnoiditis. No enhancement was present in patients with idiopathic or posttraumatic syringomyelia or in the three normal patients. In six of the patients, enhancement was critical in confirming disease that was questionable on the precontrast MR images. Gadolinium enhancement allowed differentiation of tumor from postoperative changes in two patients with spinal cord tumors. Enhanced images localized the lesion more accurately than precontrast MR images in eight patients. In four patients a lesion could only be detected after the administration of contrast. The postcontrast images better defined the margin of tumor from surrounding edema, operative scarring, and cord cavitation. The AVM case had enhancement of slowly flowing veins with Gd-DTPA posterior to an ischemic cord segment. Gd-DTPA enhancement is extremely useful in the detection and therapeutic assessment of spinal cord tumors; however, enhancement is not specific for tumors and should be interpreted in light of the clinical setting

  2. Glomus Tumors: Symptom Variations and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Weon Ham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The typical clinical symptoms of glomus tumors are pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change, and the presence of these clinical findings is helpful in diagnosis. However, the tumors often pose diagnostic difficulty because of variations in presentation and the nonspecific symptoms of glomus tumors. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have reported on the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in diagnosing glomus tumors in patients with unspecific symptoms.Methods The inclusion criteria of this study were: having undergone surgery for subungual glomus tumor of the hand, histopathologic confirmation of glomus tumor, and having undergone preoperative MRI. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The characteristics of the tumors and the presenting symptoms including pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change were retrospectively reviewed.Results Five out of 21 patients (23% did not show the typical glomus tumor symptom triad because they did not complain of pain provoked by coldness. Nevertheless, preoperative MRI showed well-defined small soft-tissue lesions on T1- and T2-weighted images, which are typical findings of glomus tumors. The tumors were completely resected and confirmed as glomus tumor histopathologically.Conclusions Early occult lesions of glomus tumor in the hand may not be revealed by physical examination because of their barely detectable symptoms. Moreover, subungual lesions may be particularly difficult to evaluate on physical examination. Our cases showed that MRI offers excellent diagnostic information in clinically undiagnosed or misdiagnosed patients. Preoperative MRI can accurately define the character and extent of glomus tumor, even though it is impalpable and invisible.

  3. Glomus Tumors: Symptom Variations and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Weon Ham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe typical clinical symptoms of glomus tumors are pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change, and the presence of these clinical findings is helpful in diagnosis. However, the tumors often pose diagnostic difficulty because of variations in presentation and the nonspecific symptoms of glomus tumors. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have reported on the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in diagnosing glomus tumors in patients with unspecific symptoms.MethodsThe inclusion criteria of this study were: having undergone surgery for subungual glomus tumor of the hand, histopathologic confirmation of glomus tumor, and having undergone preoperative MRI. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The characteristics of the tumors and the presenting symptoms including pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsFive out of 21 patients (23% did not show the typical glomus tumor symptom triad because they did not complain of pain provoked by coldness. Nevertheless, preoperative MRI showed well-defined small soft-tissue lesions on T1- and T2-weighted images, which are typical findings of glomus tumors. The tumors were completely resected and confirmed as glomus tumor histopathologically.ConclusionsEarly occult lesions of glomus tumor in the hand may not be revealed by physical examination because of their barely detectable symptoms. Moreover, subungual lesions may be particularly difficult to evaluate on physical examination. Our cases showed that MRI offers excellent diagnostic information in clinically undiagnosed or misdiagnosed patients. Preoperative MRI can accurately define the character and extent of glomus tumor, even though it is impalpable and invisible.

  4. Benign fatty tumors: classification, clinical course, imaging appearance, and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, Laura W.; Kransdorf, Mark J.; Peterson, Jeffrey J.; O'Connor, Mary I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoma is the most common soft-tissue tumor, with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and imaging appearances. Several subtypes are described, ranging from lesions entirely composed of mature adipose tissue to tumors intimately associated with nonadipose tissue, to those composed of brown fat. The imaging appearance of these fatty masses is frequently sufficiently characteristic to allow a specific diagnosis. However, in other cases, although a specific diagnosis is not achievable, a meaningful limited differential diagnosis can be established. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the spectrum of benign fatty tumors highlighting the current classification system, clinical presentation and behavior, spectrum of imaging appearances, and treatment. The imaging review emphasizes computed tomography (CT) scanning and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, differentiating radiologic features. (orig.)

  5. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  6. Differentiated thyroid carcinomas: prediction of tumor invasion with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, S.; Takayama, F.; Wang, Q.; Kawakami, S.; Saito, A.; Sone, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess diagnostic accuracy for tumor invasion of surrounding organs by measurement of tumor circumferences on MR images in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Material and Methods: Surgical and MR imaging findings in 50 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (43 primary, 7 recurrent lesions) were retrospectively reviewed. The degrees of circumference of tumor encroachment to the organs were measured, and the measurements and morphologic diagnosis of tumor invasion made by a head and neck radiologist were compared with surgical and pathologic findings using receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: Diagnosis of tumor invasion by the radiologist was superior to the measurements of the carotid artery and cartilage, while the reverse was true for the trachea and esophagus. However, no statistical differences were noted between them for each structure. Optimal thresholds for tumor invasion were 90 deg or more for the cartilage (94% accuracy) and esophagus (86% accuracy), 135 deg or more for the trachea (86% accuracy), and 225 deg or more for the carotid artery (90% accuracy). Conclusion: Tumor invasion was more accurately diagnosed by measurement of tumor circumferences of each organ on MR images

  7. Theranostic GO-based nanohybrid for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Feng, Jun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang-Ji; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-12

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based theranostic nanohybrid is designed for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy. The anti-tumor drug, Doxorubicin (DOX) is chemically conjugated to the poly(ethylenimine)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG) grafted GO via a MMP2-cleavable PLGLAG peptide linkage. The therapeutic efficacy of DOX is chemically locked and its intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by GO under normal physiological condition. Once stimulated by the MMP2 enzyme over-expressed in tumor tissues, the resulting peptide cleavage permits the unloading of DOX for tumor therapy and concurrent fluorescence recovery of DOX for in situ tumor cell imaging. Attractively, this PEI-bearing nanohybrid can mediate efficient DNA transfection and shows great potential for combinational drug/gene therapy. This tumor induced imaging and potential combinational therapy will open a window for tumor treatment by offering a unique theranostic approach through merging the diagnostic capability and pathology-responsive therapeutic function. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Imaging analysis of colonic villous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Yung Tae; Yang, Ik

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the CT and US features of the colonic villous tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the CT findings of 11 cases with histologically proved colonic villous tumor. CT parameters evaluated were morphological appearances and enhancing pattern (size, shape, margin, presence or absence of fronds, bowel wall thickening). CT features of six cases with malignant change were compared with five tumors without malignant change. US features available in 10 patients were also analyzed. On CT, the tumors showed irregular margin(n=9), presence of fronds(n=6), lobulated shape(n=11), with pericolonic invasion(n=1). Six cases with malignant change were larger(mean, 6.8 cm in diameter) than those without malignant change(mean, 3.3cm). US features in 10 cases were intraluminal mass(n=5), colonic wall thickening(n=5), with variable echogenicity. Colonic villous tumor appeared as a nonspecific mass on CT and US with a difficulty in distinguishing from colon carcinoma

  9. Analysis of hyperspectral fluorescence images for poultry skin tumor inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong G.; Chen, Yud-Ren; Kim, Intaek; Kim, Moon S.

    2004-02-01

    We present a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system with a fuzzy inference scheme for detecting skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral images reveal spatial and spectral information useful for finding pathological lesions or contaminants on agricultural products. Skin tumors are not obvious because the visual signature appears as a shape distortion rather than a discoloration. Fluorescence imaging allows the visualization of poultry skin tumors more easily than reflectance. The hyperspectral image samples obtained for this poultry tumor inspection contain 65 spectral bands of fluorescence in the visible region of the spectrum at wavelengths ranging from 425 to 711 nm. The large amount of hyperspectral image data is compressed by use of a discrete wavelet transform in the spatial domain. Principal-component analysis provides an effective compressed representation of the spectral signal of each pixel in the spectral domain. A small number of significant features are extracted from two major spectral peaks of relative fluorescence intensity that have been identified as meaningful spectral bands for detecting tumors. A fuzzy inference scheme that uses a small number of fuzzy rules and Gaussian membership functions successfully detects skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Spatial-filtering techniques are used to significantly reduce false positives.

  10. Imaging of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions. Techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A. Mark; Sundaram, Murali; James, Steven L.J.

    2009-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook that provides a detailed description of the imaging techniques and findings in patients with benign and malignant bone tumors. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging bone tumors are discussed in detail. Individual chapters are devoted to MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, and interventional procedures. The second part of the book gives an authoritative review of the role of these imaging techniques in diagnosis, surgical staging, biopsy, and assessment of response to therapy. The third part of the book covers the imaging features of each major tumor subtype, with separate chapters on osteogenic tumors, cartilaginous tumors, etc. The final part of the book reviews the imaging features of bone tumors at particular anatomical sites such as the spine, ribs, pelvis, and scapula. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, and oncologists. (orig.)

  11. Early-postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in glial tumors: prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence

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    Ekinci, Gazanfer; Akpinar, Ihsan N. E-mail: i.akpinar@mailcity.com; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz; Erzen, Canan; Kilic, Tuerker; Elmaci, Ilhan; Pamir, Necmettin

    2003-02-01

    Objective: This study investigated the value of early-postoperative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging in the detection of residual glial tumor and investigated the role of EPMR for the prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance imaging results from 50 adult patients who underwent surgical treatment for supratentorial glial tumor. There were glioblastoma multiforme in 25 patients, astrocytoma (grades II and III) in 11 patients, oligodendroglioma (grades II and III) in 9 patients, and oligoastrocytoma (grades II and III) in 5 patients. EPMR imaging was performed within 24 h after surgery. EPMR findings were compared with the neurosurgeon's intraoperative estimation of gross tumor removal. Patterns of contrast enhancement at the resection site, in residual and developing tumor tissue and blood at the resection site were evaluated on EPMR and in follow-up studies. 'Residual tumor' was defined as contrast enhancing mass at the operative site on EPMR. 'Regrowth' was defined as contrast enhancing mass detected on follow-up in the same location as the primary tumor. 'Recurrence' was defined as appearance of a mass lesion in the brain parenchyma distant from the resection bed during follow-up. Results: Nineteen patients showed no evidence of residual tumor, regrowth, or recurrence on EPMR or any of the later follow-up radiological examinations. EPMR identified 20 cases of residual tumor. Follow-up showed tumor regrowth in 10 patients, and tumor recurrence in 1 case. EPMR showed contrast enhancement of the resection bed in 45 of the 50 patients. Four of the 20 residual tumors showed a thick linear enhancement pattern, and the other 16 cases exhibited thick linear-nodular enhancement. No thin linear enhancement was observed in the residual tumor group. Nine of the 10-regrowth tumors showed a thick linear-nodular enhancement pattern, and one

  12. Imaging after radiation therapy of thoracic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaye, B.; Wanet, M.; El Hajjam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is frequent after therapeutic irradiation of thoracic malignancies. Many technique-, treatment-, tumor- and patient-related factors influence the degree of injury sustained by the lung after irradiation. Based on the time interval after the completion of the treatment RILD presents as early and late features characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes, respectively. They are usually confined to the radiation port. Though the typical pattern of RILD is easily recognized after conventional two-dimensional radiation therapy (RT), RILD may present with atypical patterns after more recent types of three or four-dimensional RT treatment. Three atypical patterns are reported: the modified conventional, the mass-like and the scar-like patterns. Knowledge of the various features and patterns of RILD is important for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. RILD should be differentiated from recurrent tumoral disease, infection and radiation-induced tumors. Due to RILD, the follow-up after RT may be difficult as response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) criteria may be unreliable to assess tumor control particularly after stereotactic ablation RT (SABR). Long-term follow-up should be based on clinical examination and morphological and/or functional investigations including CT, PET-CT, pulmonary functional tests, MRI and PET-MRI. (authors)

  13. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  14. Design of site specific radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. (Parts I and II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dort, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Part I. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of several iodinated benzoic acid hydrazides as labeling moieties for indirect tagging of carbonyl-containing bio-molecules and potential tumor-imaging agents. Biodistribution studies conducted in mice on the derivatives having the I-125 label ortho to a phenolic OH demonstrated a rapid in vivo deiodination. Part II. The reported high melanin binding affinity of quinoline and other heterocyclic antimalarial drugs led to the development of many analogues of such molecules as potential melanoma-imaging agents. Once such analogue iodochloroquine does exhibit high melanin binding, but has found limited clinical use due to appreciable accumulation in non-target tissues such as the adrenal cortex and inner ear. This project developed a new series of candidate melanoma imaging agents which would be easier to radio-label, could yield higher specific activity product, and which might demonstrate more favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics compared to iodochloroquine

  15. MR imaging of benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, V.; Goeranson, H.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective, nonblind review of MR imaging of 15 benign peripheral nerve neoplasms in 13 patients, the signal pattern of the tumors (including contrast-enhanced images) and stage were assessed. One lesion was subcutaneous, 9 intramuscular, 2 intermuscular and 3 extracompartmental. One lesion was located to the trunk, 5 to the upper extremity and 9 to the lower. The signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images was homogeneous isointense compared to adjacent muscle in 11 lesions and in 2 slightly hyper- and in 2 slightly hypointense. T2-weighted spin-echo images, acquired in all but one examination, showed a hyperintense signal, homogeneous in 8 and centrally inhomogeneous in 6 lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images of 11 lesions, showed a strong signal, with an inhomogeneous enhancement in the center of the lesion similar to that obtained in T2-weighted images. In 2 cases there were signal characteristics indicating bleeding in the tumor. In one lesion both the nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed a hypointense signal in the tumor center suggestive of intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well delineated without reactive edema. In all cases, anatomic tumor location was correctly assessed. Although the findings were not pathognomonic for neurinoma, MR imaging provided valuable information confirming the clinical and cytologic assessments. (orig.)

  16. In vivo type 2 cannabinoid receptor-targeted tumor optical imaging using a near infrared fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojuan; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-11-20

    The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) plays a vital role in carcinogenesis and progression and is emerging as a therapeutic target for cancers. However, the exact role of CB2R in cancer progression and therapy remains unclear. This has driven the increasing efforts to study CB2R and cancers using molecular imaging tools. In addition, many types of cancers overexpress CB2R, and the expression levels of CB2R appear to be associated with tumor aggressiveness. Such upregulation of the receptor in cancer cells provides opportunities for CB2R-targeted imaging with high contrast and for therapy with low side effects. In the present study, we report the first in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging using a novel CB2R-targeted near-infrared probe. In vitro cell fluorescent imaging and a competitive binding assay indicated specific binding of NIR760-mbc94 to CB2R in CB2-mid delayed brain tumor (DBT) cells. NIR760-mbc94 also preferentially labeled CB2-mid DBT tumors in vivo, with a 3.7-fold tumor-to-normal contrast enhancement at 72 h postinjection, whereas the fluorescence signal from the tumors of the mice treated with NIR760 free dye was nearly at the background level at the same time point. SR144528, a CB2R competitor, significantly inhibited tumor uptake of NIR760-mbc94, indicating that NIR760-mbc94 binds to CB2R specifically. In summary, NIR760-mbc94 specifically binds to CB2R in vitro and in vivo and appears to be a promising molecular tool that may have great potential for use in diagnostic imaging of CB2R-positive cancers and therapeutic monitoring as well as in elucidating the role of CB2R in cancer progression and therapy.

  17. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro.The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization.This study demonstrates the specific binding and rapid

  18. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  19. 3-D Image Analysis of Fluorescent Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raquel Miquel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent ligands provide the means of studying receptors in whole tissues using confocal laser scanning microscopy and have advantages over antibody- or non-fluorescence-based method. Confocal microscopy provides large volumes of images to be measured. Histogram analysis of 3-D image volumes is proposed as a method of graphically displaying large amounts of volumetric image data to be quickly analyzed and compared. The fluorescent ligand BODIPY FL-prazosin (QAPB was used in mouse aorta. Histogram analysis reports the amount of ligand-receptor binding under different conditions and the technique is sensitive enough to detect changes in receptor availability after antagonist incubation or genetic manipulations. QAPB binding was concentration dependent, causing concentration-related rightward shifts in the histogram. In the presence of 10 μM phenoxybenzamine (blocking agent, the QAPB (50 nM histogram overlaps the autofluorescence curve. The histogram obtained for the 1D knockout aorta lay to the left of that of control and 1B knockout aorta, indicating a reduction in 1D receptors. We have shown, for the first time, that it is possible to graphically display binding of a fluorescent drug to a biological tissue. Although our application is specific to adrenergic receptors, the general method could be applied to any volumetric, fluorescence-image-based assay.

  20. Detection limits of intraoperative near infrared imaging for tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-12-01

    The application of fluorescent molecular imaging to surgical oncology is a developing field with the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. However, the detection thresholds and other requirements for successful intervention remain poorly understood. Here we modeled and experimentally validated depth and size of detection of tumor deposits, trade-offs in coverage and resolution of areas of interest, and required pharmacokinetics of probes based on differing levels of tumor target presentation. Three orthotopic tumor models were imaged by widefield epifluorescence and confocal microscopes, and the experimental results were compared with pharmacokinetic models and light scattering simulations to determine detection thresholds. Widefield epifluorescence imaging can provide sufficient contrast to visualize tumor margins and detect tumor deposits 3-5  mm deep based on labeled monoclonal antibodies at low objective magnification. At higher magnification, surface tumor deposits at cellular resolution are detectable at TBR ratios achieved with highly expressed antigens. A widefield illumination system with the capability for macroscopic surveying and microscopic imaging provides the greatest utility for varying surgical goals. These results have implications for system and agent designs, which ultimately should aid complete resection in most surgical beds and provide real-time feedback to obtain clean margins. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Basic studies on the tumor imaging using antibodies to human alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakahara, Harumi; Endo, Keigo; Nakashima, Tetsuo; Ohta, Hitoya; Torizuka, Kanji

    1984-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies to human α-fetoprotein (AFP), the effect of iodination on the antibody activity and tumor accumulation of radioiodinated antibodies in tumor bearing nude mice were examined. Antibodies, obtained from horse antiserum and purified by affinity chromatography, were iodinated by the chloramine-T method and their antibody activity was evaluated using RIA and Scatchard plot analysis. When high concentrations of chloramine-T were used or more than 2.6 iodine atoms were incorporated per antibody molecule, the antigen binding capacity rather than the affinity constant was affected by the iodination. The antibody activity was completely destroyed at an iodine to antibody molar ratio of 15.4. Antibodies, however, which were iodinated under low concentrations of chloramine-T and contained less than 0.8 iodines per antibody molecule, showed almost full retention of their antibody activity. Nude mice transplanted with AFP producing human testicular tumor or AFP non-producing human urinary bladder tumor were administered intravenously with 131 I-labeled antibodies to human AFP. Scintigrams were taken at 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after the injection of labeled antibodies. At day 7, nude mice were sacrificed and organs and tumor were removed, weighed and counted. In nude mice bearing testicular tumor, tumor image became gradually clear with decreasing background activity and tumor to blood ratio, obtained, was 0.82 for testicular tumor compared to 0.42 for bladder tumor. These results indicated a specific in vivo localization of 131 I-labeled antihuman AFP antibodies in AFP producing tumor. (author)

  2. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in thoracic inlet tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Eiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the detectability of tumor invasion to the thoracic inlet, MRI was performed in 57 patients with thoracic inlet tumor, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI was compared with that of CT concerning the utility for thoracic inlet lesions. And we assessed abnormal findings in comparison with surgical or autopsy findings. In the local extent of the tumor, the accuracy for tumor invasion to the vessels such as subclavian artery and vein was 94.9% for MRI, and 83.5% for CT, and to the brachial plexus was 95.0% for MRI, and 60.0% for CT. MRI was superior to CT, but MRI was equivalent to CT with regard to invasion to the base of the neck, lateral chest wall, ribs, and vertebral bodies. However on MRI, it is easier to understand the longitudinal tumor extent than on CT. CT has superior spatial resolusion but CT has also disadvantages, such as streak artifact caused by shoulder joints, resulting in image degradation. In contrast, MRI has inherent advantages, and multiple images which facilitate the relationship between tumor and normal structures. Coronal and sagittal MR images facilitated three-dimensional observation of tumor of invasion in the thoracic inlet. Furthermore to improve image quality of MRI for the thoracic inlet, we newly devised a high molecular polyester shell for fixing a surface coil. On the high resolution MR (HR-MR) imaging using our shell, normal lymph nodes, muscles, blood vessels and the branches of the branchial plexus were clearly visualized in detail. Our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation. In conclusion, MRI was very useful for detecting lesions of the thoracic inlet and in deciding surgical indication and the planning for radiotherapy. (author).

  3. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errani, C; Kreshak, J; Ruggieri, P; Alberghini, M; Picci, P; Vanel, D

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor VEGF-R2 imaging with Tc-99m DTPA-dextran-DC101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. M.; Jeong, H. J.; Kim, S. L.; Jeong, S. J.; Lee, C. M.; Kim, D. W.; Lim, S. T.; Sohn, M. H.

    2007-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (fetal liver kinase 1/kinase insert domain-containing receptor) play an important role in vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the Tc-99m DC101-dextran for VEGF-R2 imaging in tumor xenografted mice. DTPA conjugated amino-dextran was synthesized and then this was reacted with sulfo-LC-SPDP. Synthesis was identified by 1H-NMR. DTPA-dextran-SPDP was reacted with DC101. Binding affinity was checked by ELISA assay. Female athymic nude mice bearing B16F10 tumors were each injected via the tail vein with about 18.5 MBq of the Tc-99m DTPA-dextran-DC101, Tc-99m DTPA-DC101 and I-131 DC101. Biodistribution was performed at 1, 6, and 24h. DTPA-dextran-DC101 bind to FLK-1 in a dose-dependent manner. And this was blocked by significantly by free DC101. Labeling efficiency was approximately above 99% at 24 hr. Tc-99m DTPA-DC101 and I-131 DC101 showed rapid liver uptake, whereas Tc-99m DTPA-dextran-DC101 weak liver uptake and kidney elimination. In biodistribution results, Tc-99m DTPA-dextran-DC101 showed rapid renal clearance, and increased tumor uptake according to the time. Conjugation of antibody with dextran polymer is responsible for the decreased liver uptake and increased tumor uptake

  5. MR imaging assessment of direct hepatic invasion by adjacent tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeser, P.M.; Karstaedt, N.; Wolfman, N.T.; Bechtold, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The proper staging of right renal and adrenal tumors requires accurate prediction of hepatic invasion. The authors retrospectively reviewed MR studies of 35 patients with right renal or adrenal masses to assess the utility of MR imaging in predicting direct hepatic invasion. Twenty-three patients were selected for study on the basis of absence of the fat plane between tumor and liver. Hepatic signal and tumor-liver interface characteristics were used to predict invasion. In 14 patients with renal tumors, absence of abnormal signal from hepatic parenchyma correlated well with absence of invasion, but the presence of abnormal hepatic signal did not necessarily indicate hepatic invasion. Inversion-recovery pulse sequences optimally demonstrated abnormal hepatic signal as well as the tumor-liver interface. The authors are currently reviewing the studies in the nine patients with adrenal masses

  6. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pancreas: Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Heon Ju; Byun, Jae Ho; Kang, Jun; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2008-01-01

    We report here a case of a pathologically proven solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas. A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass that was found incidentally. CT, MR imaging, and endoscopic ultrasonography showed a well-defined, enhancing mass with cystic portions of the pancreas body. MR cholangiopancreatography showed no pancreatic duct dilatation. A solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas is a very rare lesion

  7. Functional imaging for brain tumors (perfusion, DTI and MR spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Giesel, F.; Stieltjes, B.; Weber, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution considers the possibilities involved with using functional methods in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics for brain tumors. Of the functional methods available, we discuss perfusion MRI (PWI), diffusion MRI (DWI and DTI) and MR spectroscopy (H-MRS). In cases of brain tumor, PWI aids in grading and better differentiation in diagnostics as well as for pre-therapeutic planning. In addition, the course of treatment, both after chemo- as well as radiotherapy in combination with surgical treatment, can be optimized. PWI allows better estimates of biological activity and aggressiveness in low grade brain tumors, and in the case of WHO grade II astrocytoma showing anaplastically transformed tumor areas, allows more rapid visualization and a better prediction of the course of the disease than conventional MRI diagnostics. Diffusion MRI, due to the directional dependence of the diffusion, can illustrate the course and direction of the nerve fibers, as well as reconstructing the nerve tracts in the cerebrum, pons and cerebellum 3-dimensionally. Diffusion imaging can be used for describing brain tumors, for evaluating contralateral involvement and the course of the nerve fibers near the tumor. Due to its operator dependence, DTI based fiber tracking for defining risk structures is controversial. DWI can also not differentiate accurately between cystic and necrotic brain tumors, or between metastases and brain abscesses. H-MRS provides information on cell membrane metabolism, neuronal integrity and the function of neuronal structures, energy metabolism and the formation of tumors and brain tissue necroses. Diagnostic problems such as the differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions, grading cerebral glioma and distinguishing between primary brain tumors and metastases can be resolved. An additional contribution will discuss the control of the course of glial tumors after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  8. Radiogallium localization in tumors: blood binding and transport and the role of transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallabhajosula, S.R.; Harwig, J.F.; Siemsen, J.K.; Wolf, W.

    1980-01-01

    As a crucial step toward the understanding of the tumor localization of gallium, we have re-investigated its binding and transport in blood. The studies were performed in vivo by injection of gallium-67 citrate in rabbits, and in vitro by incubation of gallium-67 citrate with individual plasma proteins. By ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography, rabbit plasma samples showed essentially complete protein binding, whereas dialysis indicated considerable nonprotein-bound gallium, the amount depending on the dialysis medium. According to electrophoresis, total binding was inversely proportional to electrophoresis time. Affinity chromatography showed all gallium to be bound to transferrin, whereas electrophoresis caused continuous dissociation of gallium from transferrin, with the resulting unbound radioactivity appearing in various other protein bands. Similarly, the binding of gallium to transferrin in the in vitro incubation studies was inversely proportional to electrophoresis time, whereas ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography showed all gallium to be transferrin-bound. No binding of gallium to other proteins, such as albumin, was observed. This study demonstrates that gallium at the tracer level in blood is exclusively bound to and transported by transferrin, and indicates that electrophoresis and dialysis of easily dissociable metal complexes are subject to significant artifacts. Accurate determination of protein binding of radiopharmaceuticals requires a combination of analytical techniques and cautious interpretation of the results

  9. Clinical evaluation of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) as a marker of liver tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, S

    1984-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB) as a marker of liver tumors, in conjection with the liver scintigram. Of 30 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC), 22 (73.3%) showed significantly higher TBG concentrations. Eight patients (26.7%) showed normal TBG concentrations. In the case of 27 our of 30 patients with definite liver tumors, defects were apparent on the scintigrams. But seven of them had normal TBG concentrations in spite of the defects on the scintigrams. Out of 33 postoperative patients with liver metastasis, 28 (84%) had a raised TBG concentration. Only five (15.2%) had a normal TBG level. In 31 patients (93.9%) out of 33 with liver metastasis, a definite diagnosis was made on the basis of the liver scintigram. In 28 (90.3%) of these 31 people, the TBG concentration was higher than normal. Among 63 patients with liver tumors, both primary and metastatic, the test sensitivity for liver tumors was 92.1% (58/63) based on the accuracy of the liver scintigram. It was 79.4% (50/63) based on the TBG measurement. Why TBG increases to such an extent in spite of the euthyroid state remains unexplained. But it may be concluded that elevated TBG with positive liver scintigram furnishes a sensitive, fairly reliable, nonspecific tumor marker to determine liver tumors, especially in the case of liver metastasis.

  10. Clinical evaluation of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) as a marker of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terui, S.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB) as a marker of liver tumors, in conjection with the liver scintigram. Of 30 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC), 22 (73.3%) showed significantly higher TBG concentrations. Eight patients (26.7%) showed normal TBG concentrations. In the case of 27 our of 30 patients with definite liver tumors, defects were apparent on the scintigrams. But seven of them had normal TBG concentrations in spite of the defects on the scintigrams. Out of 33 postoperative patients with liver metastasis, 28 (84%) had a raised TBG concentration. Only five (15.2%) had a normal TBG level. In 31 patients (93.9%) out of 33 with liver metastasis, a definite diagnosis was made on the basis of the liver scintigram. In 28 (90.3%) of these 31 people, the TBG concentration was higher than normal. Among 63 patients with liver tumors, both primary and metastatic, the test sensitivity for liver tumors was 92.1% (58/63) based on the accuracy of the liver scintigram. It was 79.4% (50/63) based on the TBG measurement. Why TBG increases to such an extent in spite of the euthyroid state remains unexplained. But it may be concluded that elevated TBG with positive liver scintigram furnishes a sensitive, fairly reliable, nonspecific tumor marker to determine liver tumors, especially in the case of liver metastasis. (orig.)

  11. Detecting brain tumor in pathological slides using hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Samuel; Fabelo, Himar; Camacho, Rafael; de la Luz Plaza, María; Callicó, Gustavo M; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technology for medical diagnosis. This research work presents a proof-of-concept on the use of HSI data to automatically detect human brain tumor tissue in pathological slides. The samples, consisting of hyperspectral cubes collected from 400 nm to 1000 nm, were acquired from ten different patients diagnosed with high-grade glioma. Based on the diagnosis provided by pathologists, a spectral library of normal and tumor tissues was created and processed using three different supervised classification algorithms. Results prove that HSI is a suitable technique to automatically detect high-grade tumors from pathological slides.

  12. Noninvasive perfusion imaging of human brain tumors with EPISTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaa, J. [Department of Radiology, AN-234, MRI, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Warach, S. [Department of Radiology, AN-234, MRI, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wen, P. [Department of Neurology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Thangaraj, V. [Department of Radiology, AN-234, MRI, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wielopolski, P. [Department of Radiology, AN-234, MRI, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Edelman, R.R. [Department of Radiology, AN-234, MRI, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A total of 17 patients with histologically proven diagnoses of low-grade astrocytoma (n = 4), high-grade astrocytoma (n = 8), lymphoma (n = 3), and meningioma (n = 2) were examined by using EPISTAR MR imaging. Meningiomas had the highest EPISTAR tumor/white matter contrast and low-grade astrocytomas and lymphomas the lowest. High-grade astrocytomas demonstrated elevated EPISTAR signal with marked regional heterogeneity. There was agreement between tumor vascularity by SPECT and EPISTAR in the five cases where both were done. Our results show that tumor vascularity can be assessed qualitatively by using EPISTAR without the need for contrast medium injection. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  13. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  14. Primary hyperparathyroidism, adrenal tumors and neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas - clinical diagnosis and imaging requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auernhammer, C.J.; Engelhardt, D.; Goeke, B.

    2003-01-01

    Diseases of the parathyroids, the adrenals and of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas are primarily diagnosed by clinical and endocrinological evaluation.The requirements concerning various imaging techniques and their relative importance in localization strategies of the different tumors are complex. Current literature search, using PubMed. Evaluation of primary hyperparathyroidism requires bone densitometry by DXA and search for nephrolithiasis by ultrasound or native CT examination.While ultrasound of the thyroid and parathyroids seems useful before any parathyroid surgery,more extensive preoperative localization strategies (sestamibi scintigraphy, MRI) should be restricted to minimal invasive parathyroid surgery or re-operations.For adrenal tumors CT and MRI are of similar diagnostic value. Imaging of pheochromocytomas should be completed by MIBG scintigraphy. Each adrenal incidentaloma requires an endocrinological work-up.A fine-needle aspiration or core needle biopsy of an adrenal tumor is rarely indicated.Before adrenal biopsy a pheochromocytoma has to be excluded.Successful localization strategies for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas include somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, endoscopic ultrasound and MRI.Discussion Specific localization strategies have been established for the aforementioned tumors.The continuous progress of different imaging techniques requires a regular reevaluation of these localization strategies. (orig.) [de

  15. Malignant fatty tumors: classification, clinical course, imaging appearance and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.J.; Kransdorf, M.J.; Bancroft, L.W.; O'Connor, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Liposarcoma is a relatively common soft tissue malignancy with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and imaging appearances. Several subtypes are described, ranging from lesions nearly entirely composed of mature adipose tissue, to tumors with very sparse adipose elements. The imaging appearance of these fatty masses is frequently sufficiently characteristic to allow a specific diagnosis, while in other cases, although a specific diagnosis is not achievable, a meaningful limited differential diagnosis can be established. The purpose of this paper is to review the spectrum of malignant fatty tumors, highlighting the current classification system, clinical presentation and behavior, treatment and spectrum of imaging appearances. The imaging review will emphasize CT scanning and MR imaging, and will stress differentiating radiologic features. (orig.)

  16. In Vivo Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Monitors Binding of Specific Probes to Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Griffiths, Gary; Vasalatiy, Olga; Smirnov, Aleksandr V.; Knutson, Jay R.; Lyakhov, Ilya; Achilefu, Samuel; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB) as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR) fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu)-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the “image and treat” concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:22384092

  17. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  18. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Ryan P; Keating, Jane J; DeJesus, Elizabeth M; Jiang, Jack X; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E; Arlauckas, Sean P; Low, Phillip S; Delikatny, E James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-11-13

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth.

  19. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [ 18 F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an α-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of α-aminoisobutyric acid

  20. Imaging of breast tumors using MR-elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Sinkus, R.; Leussler, C.; Dargatz, M.; Roeschmann, P.; Schrader, D.; Lorenzen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging of breast tumors using MR-Elastography. Material and method: Low-frequency mechanical waves are transmitted into breast-tissue by means of an oscillator. The local characteristics of the mechanical wave are determined by the elastic properties of the tissue. By means of a motion-sensitive spin-echo-sequence these waves can be displayed within the phase of the MR image. Subsequently, these images can be used to reconstruct the local distribution of elasticity. In-vivo measurements were performed in 3 female patients with malignant tumors of the breast. Results: All patients tolerated the measurement set-up without any untoward sensation in the contact area of skin and oscillator. The waves completely penetrated the breast, encompassing the axilla and regions close to the chest wall. All tumors were localized by MRE as structures of markedly stiffer tissue when compared to the surrounding tissue. Furthermore, in one patient, a metastasis in an axillary lymph node was detected. In all patients, local regions of increased elasticity were found in the remaining parenchyma of the breast, which, however, did not reach the high levels of elasticity found in the tumors. Conclusion: MRE is an imaging modality enabling adjunct tissue differentiation of mammary tumors. (orig.) [de

  1. Congenital salivary gland anlage tumor - in utero and postnatal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Koch, Bernadette L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Elluru, Ravindhra G. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present a case of an infant with congenital salivary gland anlage tumor, with fetal and postnatal imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case describing the in utero imaging findings of salivary gland anlage tumor. A fetal MRI was performed secondary to the clinical finding of polyhydramnios, which identified a nasopharyngeal mass. Because findings were concerning for airway obstruction, the fetus was delivered by ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) to airway procedure. A postnatal CT confirmed the findings of the fetal MRI. The lesion was resected when the baby was 4 days old and recovery was uneventful. (orig.)

  2. Management of Renal Tumors by Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation: Experience in 105 Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, David J.; Rutherford, Elizabeth E.; Stedman, Brian; Roy-Choudhury, Shuvro H.; Cast, James E. I.; Hayes, Matthew C.; Smart, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. In this article we present our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of 105 renal tumors. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 105 renal tumors in 97 patients, with a mean tumor size of 32 mm (11-68 mm). The mean patient age was 71.7 years (range, 36-89 years). The ablations were carried out under ultrasound (n = 43) or CT (n = 62) guidance. Imaging follow-up was by contrast-enhanced CT within 10 days and then at 6-monthly intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine variables associated with procedural outcome. Results. Eighty-three tumors were completely treated at a single sitting (79%). Twelve of the remaining tumors were successfully re-treated and a clinical decision was made not to re-treat seven patients. A patient with a small residual crescent of tumor is under follow-up and may require further treatment. In another patient, re-treatment was abandoned due to complicating pneumothorax and difficult access. One patient is awaiting further re-treatment. The overall technical success rate was 90.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size to be the only significant variable affecting procedural outcome. (p = 0.007, Pearson χ 2 ) Five patients had complications. There have been no local recurrences. Conclusion. Our experience to date suggests that RFA is a safe and effective, minimally invasive treatment for small renal tumors

  3. The role of imaging for translational research in bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benassi, Maria Serena; Rimondi, Eugenio; Balladelli, Alba; Ghinelli, Cristina; Magagnoli, Giovanna; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare connective tissue tumors, representing 1% of adult and 15% of childhood cancers for which biological and pathological information is still incomplete. In bone tumors patients with metastatic disease at onset, those who relapse and those with post-surgical secondary lesions still have a dismal outcome because of poor response to current therapies. Different molecular biology approaches have identified activated cell signalling pathways or specific molecular endpoints that may be considered potential drug targets or markers useful for diagnosis/prognosis in musculoskeletal pathology. Recently, advances in the field of molecular imaging allow visualization of cell and metabolic functions with the use of targets that include cell membrane receptors, enzymes of intracellular transport. Moreover advanced non-invasive newer imaging techniques like 18-FDG PET, quantitative dynamic-contrast MR imaging, diffusion weighted imaging have all shown a potential in distinguish malignant from benign lesions, in revealing the efficacy of therapy in tumors, the onset of recurrence and a good reliability in reckoning the percentage of necrosis in Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Thus, in vivo detection of imaging cancer biomarkers may be useful to better characterize those complex pathologic processes, such as apoptosis, proliferation and angiogenesis that determine tumor aggressiveness, providing not only complementary information of prognostic metabolic indicators, but also data in real-time on the efficacy of the treatment through the modulation of the cell metabolism

  4. The role of imaging for translational research in bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benassi, Maria Serena, E-mail: mariaserena.benassi@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, Eugenio, E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, Alba, E-mail: alba.balladelli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Ghinelli, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.ghinelli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Magagnoli, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.magagnoli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Vanel, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Bone Tumor Center, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare connective tissue tumors, representing 1% of adult and 15% of childhood cancers for which biological and pathological information is still incomplete. In bone tumors patients with metastatic disease at onset, those who relapse and those with post-surgical secondary lesions still have a dismal outcome because of poor response to current therapies. Different molecular biology approaches have identified activated cell signalling pathways or specific molecular endpoints that may be considered potential drug targets or markers useful for diagnosis/prognosis in musculoskeletal pathology. Recently, advances in the field of molecular imaging allow visualization of cell and metabolic functions with the use of targets that include cell membrane receptors, enzymes of intracellular transport. Moreover advanced non-invasive newer imaging techniques like 18-FDG PET, quantitative dynamic-contrast MR imaging, diffusion weighted imaging have all shown a potential in distinguish malignant from benign lesions, in revealing the efficacy of therapy in tumors, the onset of recurrence and a good reliability in reckoning the percentage of necrosis in Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Thus, in vivo detection of imaging cancer biomarkers may be useful to better characterize those complex pathologic processes, such as apoptosis, proliferation and angiogenesis that determine tumor aggressiveness, providing not only complementary information of prognostic metabolic indicators, but also data in real-time on the efficacy of the treatment through the modulation of the cell metabolism.

  5. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding

  6. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding. Finally, I

  7. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Third Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Overexpression of CD105 (endoglin) correlates with poor prognosis in many solid tumor types. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD105 staining is the current gold standard for evaluating tumor angiogenesis in the clinic. The goal of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with {sup 64}Cu. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the ability of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105 to target tumor angiogenesis. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 64}Cu labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of the tracer was 8.0 {+-} 0.5, 10.4 {+-} 2.8, and 9.7 {+-} 1.8%ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection, respectively (n = 3), higher than most organs at late time points which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105. This is the first successful PET imaging study of CD105 expression. Fast, prominent, persistent, and CD105-specific uptake of the tracer in the 4T1 tumor was observed. Further studies are warranted and currently underway. (orig.)

  8. Noninvasive imaging of tumor integrin expression using 18F-labeled RGD dimer peptide with PEG4 linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaofei; Liu, Shuanglong; Wang, Fan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Various radiolabeled Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides have been previously investigated for tumor integrin α v β 3 imaging. To further develop RGD radiotracers with enhanced tumor-targeting efficacy and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics, we designed a new RGD homodimeric peptide with two PEG 4 spacers (PEG 4 = 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid) between the two monomeric RGD motifs and one PEG 4 linker on the glutamate α-amino group ( 18 F-labeled PEG 4 -E[PEG 4 -c(RGDfK)] 2 , P-PRGD2), as a promising agent for noninvasive imaging of integrin expression in mouse models. P-PRGD2 was labeled with 18 F via 4-nitrophenyl 2- 18 F-fluoropropionate ( 18 F-FP) prosthetic group. In vitro and in vivo characteristics of the new dimeric RGD peptide tracer 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 were investigated and compared with those of 18 F-FP-P-RGD2 ( 18 F-labeled RGD dimer without two PEG 4 spacers between the two RGD motifs). The ability of 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 to image tumor vascular integrin expression was evaluated in a 4T1 murine breast tumor model. With the insertion of two PEG 4 spacers between the two RGD motifs, 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 showed enhanced integrin α v β 3 -binding affinity, increased tumor uptake and tumor-to-nontumor background ratios compared with 18 F-FP-P-RGD2 in U87MG tumors. MicroPET imaging with 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 revealed high tumor contrast and low background in tumor-bearing nude mice. Biodistribution studies confirmed the in vivo integrin α v β 3 -binding specificity of 18 F-FP-P-RGD2. 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 can specifically image integrin α v β 3 on the activated endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 can provide important information on integrin expression on the tumor vasculature. The high integrin binding affinity and specificity, excellent pharmacokinetic properties and metabolic stability make the new RGD dimeric tracer 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 a promising agent for PET imaging of tumor angiogenesis and for monitoring the efficacy of antiangiogenic

  9. NMR imaging of bladder tumors in males. Preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Rein, A.J.J.T.; Atlan, H.; Lanir, A.; Kedar, S.; Segal, S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the normal and pathologic bladder was performed in 10 male subjects: 5 normal volunteers, 4 with bladder primary carcinoma, 1 with bladder metastasis. All scanning was done using a superconductive magnet operating at 0.5 T. Spin echo was used as pulse sequence. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by NMR imaging. The ability of the technique to provide images in axial, sagital and coronal planes allowed a precise assessment of the morphology and the size of the tumors. The lack of hazards and the quality of images may promote NMR imaging to a prominent role in the diagnosis of human bladder cancer [fr

  10. A radiogallium-DOTA-based bivalent peptidic ligand targeting a chemokine receptor, CXCR4, for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kohei; Masuda, Ryo; Hisada, Hayato; Oishi, Shinya; Shimokawa, Kenta; Ono, Masahiro; Fujii, Nobutaka; Saji, Hideo; Mukai, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a novel radiogallium (Ga)-DOTA-based bivalent peptidic ligand targeting a chemokine receptor, CXCR4, for tumor imaging. A CXCR4 imaging probe with two CXCR4 antagonists (Ac-TZ14011) on Ga-DOTA core, Ga-DOTA-TZ2, was synthesized, and the affinity and binding to CXCR4 was evaluated in CXCR4 expressing cells in vitro. The affinity of Ga-DOTA-TZ2 for CXCR4 was 20-fold greater than the corresponding monovalent probe, Ga-DOTA-TZ1. (67)Ga-DOTA-TZ2 showed the significantly higher accumulation in CXCR4-expressing tumor cells compared with (67)Ga-DOTA-TZ1, suggesting the bivalent effect enhances its binding to CXCR4. The incorporation of two CXCR4 antagonists to Ga-DOTA could be effective in detecting CXCR4-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative imaging of magnesium distribution at single-cell resolution in brain tumors and infiltrating tumor cells with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Parker, Dylan J.; Barth, Rolf F.; Pannullo, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of human brain tumors. The infiltrative pattern of growth of these tumors includes the spread of individual and/or clusters of tumor cells at some distance from the main tumor mass in parts of the brain protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier. Pathophysiological studies of GBM could be greatly enhanced by analytical techniques capable of in situ single-cell resolution measurements of infiltrating tumor cells. Magnesium homeostasis is an area of active investigation in high grade gliomas. In the present study, we have used the F98 rat glioma as a model of human GBM and an elemental/isotopic imaging technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a CAMECA IMS-3f ion microscope, for studying Mg distributions with single-cell resolution in freeze-dried brain tissue cryosections. Quantitative observations were made on tumor cells in the main tumor mass, contiguous brain tissue, and infiltrating tumor cells in adjacent normal brain. The brain tissue contained a significantly lower total Mg concentration of 4.70 ± 0.93 mmol/Kg wet weight (mean ± SD) in comparison to 11.64 ± 1.96 mmol/Kg wet weight in tumor cells of the main tumor mass and 10.72 ± 1.76 mmol/Kg wet weight in infiltrating tumor cells (p<0.05). The nucleus of individual tumor cells contained elevated levels of bound Mg. These observations demonstrate enhanced Mg-influx and increased binding of Mg in tumor cells and provide strong support for further investigation of GBMs for altered Mg homeostasis and activation of Mg-transporting channels as possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26703785

  12. Bovine lactoferrin binds oleic acid to form an anti-tumor complex similar to HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Mai; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hui Yuan; Ren, Fa Zheng

    2014-04-04

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) can bind oleic acid (OA) to form HAMLET-like complexes, which exhibited highly selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Considering the structural similarity to α-LA, we conjectured that lactoferrin (LF) could also bind OA to obtain a complex with anti-tumor activity. In this study, LF-OA was prepared and its activity and structural changes were compared with α-LA-OA. The anti-tumor activity was evaluated by methylene blue assay, while the apoptosis mechanism was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blot. Structural changes of LF-OA were measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The interactions of OA with LF and α-LA were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). LF-OA was obtained by heat-treatment at pH8.0 with LD50 of 4.88, 4.95 and 4.62μM for HepG2, HT29, and MCF-7 cells, respectively, all of which were 10 times higher than those of α-LA-OA. Similar to HAMLET, LF-OA induced apoptosis in tumor cells through both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Exposure of tryptophan residues and the hydrophobic regions as well as the loss of tertiary structure were observed in LF-OA. Besides these similarities, LF showed different secondary structure changes when compared with α-LA, with a decrease of α-helix and β-turn and an increase of β-sheet and random coil. ITC results showed that there was a higher binding number of OA to LF than to α-LA, while both of the proteins interacted with OA through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. This study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of protein-OA complexes. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of tumors of the lung apex by imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda, J.; Serrano, F.; Pain, M.I.; Rodriguez, F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value of MR in the preoperative staging of tumors of the lung apex and detection of local invasion of adjacent structures to determine its influence on the therapeutic approach. We obtained plain X-ray images in two planes, as well as CT and Mr images, in 12 patients with Pan coast tumor in whom there was surgical (n=8) or clinical (n=4) evidence of invasion. The objective was to assess local infiltration of brain stem and chest wall soft tissue, enveloping of the subclavian artery, substantial involvement of the brachial plexus and destruction of the vertebral body. In our series, MR was superior to the other imaging techniques in predicting the involvement of the structures surrounding the tumor. In conclusion, MR should be performed in a patient diagnosed by plain radiography as having an apical tumors to assess local tumor extension, while CT should be done to detect mediastinal lymph node involvement and distant metastases. 19 refs

  14. MR imaging of edema accompanying benign and malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L.; Holscher, H.C.; Woude, H.J. van der; Reijnierse, M.; Taminiau, A.H.M.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence, quantity, and presentation of intra- and extraosseous edema accompanying benign and malignant primary bone lesions, the magnetic resonance (MR) studies of 63 consecutive patients with histologically proven primary bone tumors were reviewed. MR scans were assessed for the presence and quantity of marrow and soft tissue edema and correlated with preoperative findings, resected specimens and follow-up data. The signal intensity and enhancement of tumor and edema prior to and after intravenous administration (if any) of gadolinium-labled diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) was analyzed. Marrow edema was encountered adjacent to 8 of 39 maglinant tumors and 14 of 24 benign lesions. Soft tissue edema was found accompanying 28 of 39 malignancies and 10 of 24 benign disorders. On enhanced T1-weighted MR images tumor and edema were difficult to differentiate. Tumor inhomogeneity made this differentiation easier on T2-weighted sequences. In 36 patients the contrast medium Gd-DTPA was used. Edema was present in 27 of these patients and the respective enhancement of tumor and edema could be compared. Edema always enhanced homogeneously, and in most cases it enhanced to a similar degree as or more than tumor. Marrow and, more specifically, soft tissue edema is a frequent finding adjacent to primary bone tumors. The mere presence and quantity of marrow and soft tissue edema are unreliable indicators of the biologic potential of a lesion. Unenhanced MR scans cannot always differentiate between tumor and edema, but the administration of Gd-DTPA is of assistance in differentiating tumor from edema. Awareness of marrow and/or soft tissue edema adjacent to bone lesions is of importance because edema can be a pitfall in the diagnostic work-up and staging prior to biopsy or surgery. (orig.)

  15. Quantitative imaging of tumor vasculature using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are often more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We hypothesized that MSOT could reveal both tumor vascular density and function based on modulation of blood oxygenation. We performed MSOT on nude mice (n=8) bearing subcutaneous xenograft PC3 tumors using an inVision 256 (iThera Medical). The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified from 21% to 100% and back. After imaging, Hoechst 33348 was injected to indicate vascular perfusion and permeability. Tumors were then extracted for histopathological analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The acquired data was analyzed to extract a bulk measurement of blood oxygenation (SO2MSOT) from the whole tumor using different approaches. The tumors were also automatically segmented into 5 regions to investigate the effect of depth on SO2MSOT. Baseline SO2MSOT values at 21% and 100% oxygen breathing showed no relationship with ex vivo measures of vascular density or function, while the change in SO2MSOT showed a strong negative correlation to Hoechst intensity (r=- 0.92, p=0.0016). Tumor voxels responding to oxygen challenge were spatially heterogeneous. We observed a significant drop in SO2 MSOT value with tumor depth following a switch of respiratory gas from air to oxygen (0.323+/-0.017 vs. 0.11+/-0.05, p=0.009 between 0 and 1.5mm depth), but no such effect for air breathing (0.265+/-0.013 vs. 0.19+/-0.04, p=0.14 between 0 and 1.5mm depth). Our results indicate that in subcutaneous prostate tumors, baseline SO2MSOT levels do not correlate to tumor vascular density or function while the magnitude of the response to oxygen

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.; Baudouin, C.J.; Steiner, R.E.; Hajnal, J.V.; Young, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the effect of anisotropic diffusion weighting on the appearances of cerebral tumors as well as vasogenic and interstitial edema. Diffusion weighting produced a reduction in signal intensity in all or part of the tumors in the majority of cases. However, a relative increase in signal intensity was apparent in four cases. The decrease in signal intensity in vasogenic edema depended on the site and direction of gradient sensitization. Marked increase in conspicuity between tumor and edema was apparent in three cases. Changes in interstitial edema depended in detail in fiber direction. Differentiation between tumor and edema can be improved with diffusion-weighted imaging. Anisotropic change is seen in both vasogenic and interstitial edema

  17. In vivo tumor targeting and imaging with engineered trivalent antibody fragments containing collagen-derived sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel M Cuesta

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop new and effective agents for cancer targeting. In this work, a multivalent antibody is characterized in vivo in living animals. The antibody, termed "trimerbody", comprises a single-chain antibody (scFv fragment connected to the N-terminal trimerization subdomain of collagen XVIII NC1 by a flexible linker. As indicated by computer graphic modeling, the trimerbody has a tripod-shaped structure with three highly flexible scFv heads radially outward oriented. Trimerbodies are trimeric in solution and exhibited multivalent binding, which provides them with at least a 100-fold increase in functional affinity than the monovalent scFv. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of producing functional bispecific trimerbodies, which concurrently bind two different ligands. A trimerbody specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a classic tumor-associated antigen, showed efficient tumor targeting after systemic administration in mice bearing CEA-positive tumors. Importantly, a trimerbody that recognizes an angiogenesis-associated laminin epitope, showed excellent tumor localization in several cancer types, including fibrosarcomas and carcinomas. These results illustrate the potential of this new antibody format for imaging and therapeutic applications, and suggest that some laminin epitopes might be universal targets for cancer targeting.

  18. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m-labeled RRL-containing peptide as a non-invasive tumor imaging agent in a mouse fibrosarcoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2015-11-01

    Arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) is considered a tumor endothelial cell-specific binding sequence. RRL-containing peptide targeting tumor vessels is an excellent candidate for tumor imaging. In this study, we developed RRL-containing hexapeptides and evaluated their feasibility as a tumor imaging agent in a HT-1080 fibrosarcoma-bearing murine model. The hexapeptide, glutamic acid-cysteine-glycine (ECG)-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling efficiency was evaluated using instant thin-layer chromatography. Uptake of Tc-99m ECG-RRL within HT-1080 cells was evaluated in vitro by confocal microscopy and cellular binding affinity was calculated. Gamma images were acquired In HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumor-bearing mice, and the tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio was calculated. The inflammatory-to-normal muscle uptake ratio was also calculated in an inflammation mouse model. A biodistribution study was performed to calculate %ID/g. A high yield of Tc-99m ECG-RRL complexes was prepared after Tc-99m radiolabeling. Binding of Tc-99m ECG-RRL to tumor cells had was confirmed by in vitro studies. Gamma camera imaging in the murine model showed that Tc-99m ECG-RRL accumulated substantially in the subcutaneously engrafted tumor and that tumoral uptake was blocked by co-injecting excess RRL. Moreover, Tc-99m ECG-RRL accumulated minimally in inflammatory lesions. We successfully developed Tc-99m ECG-RRL as a new tumor imaging candidate. Specific tumoral uptake of Tc-99m ECG-RRL was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo, and it was determined to be a good tumor imaging candidate. Additionally, Tc-99m ECG-RRL effectively distinguished between cancerous tissue and inflammatory lesions.

  20. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  2. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Yoshida, Chisato; Odaka, Kenichi; Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. 125 I- and 111 In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both 125 I- and 111 In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10 9 M -1 ). Internalization assay showed that 125 I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of 125 I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, 111 In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of 125 I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of 111 In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of 111 In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  3. Novel strategies of Raman imaging for brain tumor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Imiela; Bartosz, Polis; Lech, Polis; Halina, Abramczyk

    2017-10-17

    Raman diagnostics and imaging have been shown to be an effective tool for the analysis and discrimination of human brain tumors from normal structures. Raman spectroscopic methods have potential to be applied in clinical practice as they allow for identification of tumor margins during surgery. In this study, we investigate medulloblastoma (grade IV WHO) (n= 5), low-grade astrocytoma (grades I-II WHO) (n =4), ependymoma (n=3) and metastatic brain tumors (n= 1) and the tissue from the negative margins used as normal controls. We compare a high grade medulloblastoma, low grade astrocytoma and non-tumor samples from human central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Based on the properties of the Raman vibrational features and Raman images we provide a real-time feedback method that is label-free to monitor tumor metabolism that reveals reprogramming of biosynthesis of lipids, proteins, DNA and RNA. Our results indicate marked metabolic differences between low and high grade brain tumors. We discuss molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes, particularly lipid alterations in malignant medulloblastoma and low grade gliomas that may shed light on the mechanisms driving tumor recurrence thereby revealing new approaches for the treatment of malignant glioma. We have found that the high-grade tumors of central nervous system (medulloblastoma) exhibit enhanced level of β-sheet conformation and down-regulated level of α-helix conformation when comparing against normal tissue. We have found that almost all tumors studied in the paper have increased Raman signals of nucleic acids. This increase can be interpreted as increased DNA/RNA turnover in brain tumors. We have shown that the ratio of Raman intensities I 2930 /I 2845 at 2930 and 2845 cm -1 is a good source of information on the ratio of lipid and protein contents. We have found that the ratio reflects the different lipid and protein contents of cancerous brain tissue compared to the non-tumor tissue. We found that

  4. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  5. Benign and malignant hepatocellular tumors: evaluation of tumoral enhancement after mangafodipir trisodium injection on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, C.M.; Diche, T.; Mahfouz, A.E.; Alexandre, M.; Caseiro-Alves, F.; Rahmouni, A.; Vasile, N.; Mathieu, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ability of mangafodipir trisodium (Mn-DPDP)-enhanced MR imaging in differentiating malignant from benign hepatocellular tumors. Eleven patients with pathologically proved hepatocellular carcinomas, six with focal nodular hyperplasias, and one with a single hepatocellular adenoma were examined by spin-echo and gradient-echo T1-weighted sequences before, 1 h after, and 24 h after intravenous injection of Mn-DPDP (5 μmol/kg). Quantitative analysis including enhancement and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio, and qualitative analysis including the presence of a central area and a capsule were done on pre- and post-Mn-DPDP-enhanced images. Enhancement was observed in all the tumors with significant improvement (p < 0.05) in contrast-to-noise ratio 1 h after, and 24 h after intravenous injection of Mn-DPDP. There were no significant differences in the mean enhancement and the mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between benign and malignant tumors. No enhancement was seen within internal areas observed in 7 hepatocellular carcinomas, and in 5 focal nodular hyperplasias, and within capsules which were observed in 9 hepatocellular carcinomas. In our study, Mn-DPDP increased CNR of both benign and malignant tumors but did not enable differentiation between benign and malignant tumors of hepatocellular nature. (orig.)

  6. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, 77 Br was used because of its longer half-life. Methods: (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Conclusion: These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET

  7. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, (77)Br was used because of its longer half-life. (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register ...

  9. Hypoxic fraction and binding of misonidazole in EMT6/Ed multicellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Misonidazole has been shown to bind selectively to hypoxic cells in tissue culture and to cells which are presumed to be chronically hypoxic in EMT6 spheroids and tumors. Thus it has considerable potential as a marker of hypoxic cells in vivo. To further evaluate this potential EMT6/Ed spheroids were used to quantitate misonidazole binding under conditions which resulted in hypoxic fractions between 0 and 1. The patterns of binding of 14 C-labeled misonidazole determined by autoradiography were consistent with the regions of radiobiological hypoxia as predicted by oxygen diffusion theory. The overall uptake of 3 H-labeled misonidazole by spheroids correlated well with the hypoxic fraction, although binding to aerobic cells and necrotic tissue contributed appreciably to the total label in the spheroids. It is concluded that misonidazole is an excellent marker of hypoxia in EMT6/Ed spheroids at the microscopic level, and the total amount bound per spheroid provides a potentially useful measure of the hypoxic fraction

  10. Tumor necrosis factor: specific binding and internalization in sensitive and resistant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Yip, Y.K.; Vilcek, J.

    1985-01-01

    Highly purified, Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was labeled with 125 I and employed to determine receptor binding, internalization, and intracellular degradation in murine L929 cells (highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of TNF) and in diploid human FS-4 cells (resistant to TNF cytotoxicity). 125 I-labeled TNF bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on both L929 and FS-4 cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated the presence of 2200 binding sites per L929 cell and 7500 binding sites per FS-4 cell. The calculated dissociation constants are 6.1 x 10 -10 M and 3.2 x 10 -10 M for L929 and FS-4 cells, respectively. In both L929 and FS-4 cells, incubation at 37 0 C resulted in a rapid internalization of the bulk of the cell-bound TNF, followed by the appearance of trichloroacetic acid-soluble 125 I radioactivity in the tissue culture medium, due to degradation of TNF. Degradation but not cellular uptake of TNF was inhibited in the presence of chloroquine (an inhibitor of lysosomal proteases) in both L929 and FS-4 cells, suggesting that degradation occurs intracellularly, probably within lysosomes. These results show that resistance of FS-4 cells to TNF cytotoxicity is not due to a lack of receptors or their inability to internalize and degrade TNF

  11. In vivo metabolite-specific imaging in tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical method using proton MR imaging to map the level and distribution of metabolites in vivo. Of particular interest to the biochemist and the clinician is the presence of excess lactic acid in tissues, indicating hypoxia such as is found in certain solid tumors, or in ischemia that would occur during cardiac infarct or stroke. A two-dimensional double quantum coherence technique has been optimized to greatly reduce signal intensity from biologic water and to provide unambiguous editing of the lactic acid resonance from interfering lipid resonances. The method was tested using a General Electric 2.0-T CSI instrument fitted with actively shielded gradients. Two-dimensional double quantum coherence lactic acid edited images were obtained from an implanted RIF-1 tumor in C3H mice, showing heterogeneous distribution of lactic acid within the tumor. Very little lipid signal with respect to the lactic acid methyl resonance was observed. The lactic acid concentration of the tumor was determined to be 10 μmol/g wet by enzymatic assay. Metabolite-specific imaging using double quantum coherence transfer promises to yield noninvasive information about lactic acid levels and distribution in vivo at low field, relatively quickly, with low radio frequency power disposition and without the need for complex presaturation pulses

  12. Imaging modalities in radiation treatment planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, D.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation therapy is a standard treatment after surgery for most of malignant and some of benignant brain tumors. The restriction in acquiring local tumor control is an inability in realization of high dose without causing radiation necrosis in irradiated area and sparing normal tissues. The development of imaging modalities during the last years is responsible for better treatment results and lower early and late toxicity. Essential is the role of image methods not only in the diagnosis and also in the precise anatomical (during last years also functional) localisation, spreading of the tumor, treatment planning process and the effects of the treatment. Target delineation is one of the great geometrical uncertainties in the treatment planning process. Early studies on the use of CT in treatment planning documented that tumor coverage without CT was clearly inadequate in 20% of the patients and marginal in another 27 %. The image fusion of CT, MBI and PET and also the use of contrast materia helps to get over those restrictions. The use of contrast material enhances the signal in 10 % of the patients with glioblastoma multiform and in a higher percentage of the patients with low-grade gliomas

  13. 68Ga/177Lu-labeled DOTA-TATE shows similar imaging and biodistribution in neuroendocrine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhu, Hua; Yu, Jiangyuan; Han, Xuedi; Xie, Qinghua; Liu, Teli; Xia, Chuanqin; Li, Nan; Yang, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Somatostatin receptors are overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors, whose endogenous ligands are somatostatin. DOTA-TATE is an analogue of somatostatin, which shows high binding affinity to somatostatin receptors. We aim to evaluate the 68 Ga/ 177 Lu-labeling DOTA-TATE kit in neuroendocrine tumor model for molecular imaging and to try human-positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE in neuroendocrine tumor patients. DOTA-TATE kits were formulated and radiolabeled with 68 Ga/ 177 Lu for 68 Ga/ 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE (M-DOTA-TATE). In vitro and in vivo stability of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE were performed. Nude mice bearing human tumors were injected with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE or 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE for micro-positron emission tomography and micro-single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging separately, and clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography images of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE were obtained at 1 h post-intravenous injection from patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Micro-positron emission tomography and micro-single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE both showed clear tumor uptake which could be blocked by excess DOTA-TATE. In addition, 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE-positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in neuroendocrine tumor patients could show primary and metastatic lesions. 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE could accumulate in tumors in animal models, paving the way for better clinical peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients in Asian population.

  14. Integrated imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, intravenous urography) in diagnosing renal tumors and tumor-like formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drudi, F.M.; Capanna, G.; Poggi, R.; Occhiato, R.; Iannicelli, E.; Nardo, R.; di Passariello, R.

    1994-01-01

    This is an assessment of semiologic imaging criteria based on computerised tomography, ultrasound diagnosis and intravenous urography in renal tumors. The purpose is to obtain differential diagnostic data capable to modify the treatment approach. Over the last three years, a total of 570 cases of kidney tumors are observed. In 490 of them (86%) the imaging patterns obtained by either of the three techniques leads to correct diagnosis. In 62 of the remaining 80 patients, the integration of two techniques allows to unveil the neoplastic nature of the disease (27 cases), or the presence of a benign process (35 cases). In 15 of the remaining 18 cases only integration of the three techniques results in diagnosing renal tumors or tumor-like conditions (3 adeno-carcinomas, 5 abscesses, 3 cases of tuberculosis, 2 - pyeloxanthogranulomatosis, 2 dysmorphisms). In the last three cases definite diagnosis is made on the basis of needle biopsy. The radiological diagnosis is confirmed intraoperatively or during clinical follow-up study. The obtained data underscore the clinical relevance of imaging integration in evaluating renal lesions. This is particularly valid whenever the clinical data are nonspecific or misleading. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs. (orig.)

  15. Functional histology of tumors as a basis of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, A.S.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.; Van Der Kogel, A.; Kaanders, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the various elements of the microenvironment and their interrelationships by quantitative image analysis. Tumor cell proliferation, hypoxia, and apoptosis are detected by immunohistochemical methods, and mapped in relation to the vasculature. This allows quantitative relationships to be measured in the context of tissue structure. Guided by e.g., gene expression profiles for hypoxia induced-genes, several molecular markers of tumor hypoxia were identified and are immunohistochemically detectable. We have thus far concentrated on the glucose transporters glut-1 and glut-3, as well as a pH-regulating enzyme, carbonic anhydrase IX. The extent and distribution of hypoxia is assessed by administering nitroimidazole-based markers such as pimonidazole, that can be detected immunohistochemically. Multiple hypoxia markers (CCI-103F, pimonidazole) can be used to study the effects of modifiers of perfusion or oxygenation on the distribution and dynamics of hypoxic cells in the same tumor. Proliferating cells are detected by thymidine analogues. Apoptotic cells are imaged by TUNEL and caspase-3 detection. In xenografted human tumors, examples of the use of quantitative imaging of hypoxia and proliferation are the study of reoxygenation after irradiation, or the investigation of the lifespan and dynamics of hypoxic cell populations over time. Perturbation of the microenvironment after cytotoxic treatments has been investigated by co-registration of the various markers, e.g. after treatment with the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine. The combination of well-timed administration of external markers of hypoxia and proliferation with the detection of intrinsic molecular markers followed by quantitative image-registration yields a comprehensive view of the dynamics of the microenvironment in individual tumors

  16. Development of a radioiodinated triazolopyrimidine probe for nuclear medical imaging of fatty acid binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantaro Nishigori

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 is the most well-characterized FABP isoform. FABP4 regulates inflammatory pathways in adipocytes and macrophages and is involved in both inflammatory diseases and tumor formation. FABP4 expression was recently reported for glioblastoma, where it may participate in disease malignancy. While FABP4 is a potential molecular imaging target, with the exception of a tritium labeled probe there are no reports of other nuclear imaging probes that target this protein. Here we designed and synthesized a nuclear imaging probe, [123I]TAP1, and evaluated its potential as a FABP4 targeting probe in in vitro and in vivo assays. We focused on the unique structure of a triazolopyrimidine scaffold that lacks a carboxylic acid to design the TAP1 probe that can undergo facilitated delivery across cell membranes. The affinity of synthesized TAP1 was measured using FABP4 and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid. [125I]TAP1 was synthesized by iododestannylation of a precursor, followed by affinity and selectivity measurements using immobilized FABPs. Biodistributions in normal and C6 glioblastoma-bearing mice were evaluated, and excised tumors were subjected to autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. TAP1 and [125I]TAP1 showed high affinity for FABP4 (Ki = 44.5±9.8 nM, Kd = 69.1±12.3 nM. The FABP4 binding affinity of [125I]TAP1 was 11.5- and 35.5-fold higher than for FABP3 and FABP5, respectively. In an in vivo study [125I]TAP1 displayed high stability against deiodination and degradation, and moderate radioactivity accumulation in C6 tumors (1.37±0.24% dose/g 3 hr after injection. The radioactivity distribution profile in tumors partially corresponded to the FABP4 positive area and was also affected by perfusion. The results indicate that [125I]TAP1 could detect FABP4 in vitro and partly in vivo. As such, [125I]TAP1 is a promising lead compound for further refinement for use in in vivo FABP4 imaging.

  17. 99mTc-glycopeptide: Synthesis, biodistribution and imaging in breast tumor-bearing rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, I-C.; Tsao Ning; Huang Yahui; Ho Yensheng; Wu Chungchin; Yu Dongfang; Yang, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to develop a glycopeptide (GP) to be used as a carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan using carbodiimide as a coupling agent. Elemental analysis and capillary electrophoresis confirmed the purity was >95%. GP was labeled with sodium pertechnetate (Na 99m TcO 4 ) for in vitro and in vivo studies. Rhenium-GP was synthesized to support the binding site of 99m Tc at the glutamate positions 3-5. In vitro cellular uptake of 99m Tc-GP was performed in breast cancer cells. Cytosol had 60% whereas nucleus had 40% uptake of 99m Tc-GP. When cancer cells were incubated with glutamate or aspartate, followed by 99m Tc-GP, there was decreased uptake in cells treated with glutamate but not aspartate. The findings indicated that cellular uptake of 99m Tc-GP was via glutamate transporters. In addition, 99m Tc-GP was able to measure uptake differences after cells treated with paclitaxel. Biodistribution and planar imaging were conducted in breast tumor-bearing rats. Biodistribution of 99m Tc-GP showed increased tumor-to-tissue ratios as a function of time. Planar images confirmed that 99m Tc-GP could assess tumor uptake changes after paclitaxel treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that GP could target tumor cells, thus, GP may be a useful carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery

  18. Radiological imaging detection of tumors localized in fossa cranii posterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin; Ahmetgjekaj, Ilir; Gashi, Sanije; Fazliu, Ilir; Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Shala, Nexhmedin

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial tumors are characterized by a variety imaging aspects and their detection is always a challenge. Clinical application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computerized Tomography has provided an earlier detection and treatment of many CNS pathologies. The aim of this study is to estimate the role of CT and MRI in the determination of posterior fossa tumors. During period 2000-2005 in UCCK-Prishtina, 368 patients were diagnosed with intracranial tumors. Fifty-nine of them were found to have tumor localized in fossa crani posterior (FCP) without any significant difference between genders (50.8% female vs. 49.2% male, chi2 test=0.02 p=0.896). The average age of patients with FCP tumors was 33.1 (SD +/- 22.5, rank 1-70). The most of these patients were registered in 2003 (20.3%) whereas the least in 2000 (11.9%). The most affected age-group was 0-9 (25.4%) and 50-59 (23.7%) whereas the incidences was between 30-39 years of age (3.4%). Tumor types that more often were found in young's individuals were: Astrocytomas with a peak incidence in teenagers (average age was 12-year-old SD +/- 7.5, rank 3-23), next was Medulloblastomas (average age was 11-years-old, SD +/- 2.9, rank 6-16 years) and ependymomas (average age was 6.8-years-old, SD +/- 4.6, rank 1-12). Patients with osseous tumors are characterized by older age than median (61.0, SD +/- 4.2, rank 58-64), then metastases (53.0, SD +/- 5.3, rank 45-60) and meningiomas (50.8, SD +/- 7.7, rank 38-63). The overall average mortality was 0.41 cases per 100,000 inhabitants with variations through years from 0.30-0.50/100,000 inhabitants. Comparing with other countries, for some types of FCP tumors, lower morbidity is shown in Kosova, with mean incidence 0.41/100,000. The most frequent tumors in children were medulloblastomas, brainstem gliomas, astrocytomas and ependymomas whereas meningiomas and metastasis were most often found in adults. For FCP tumors detection, MRI had 100% sensitivity, specificity and

  19. Cancer Metabolism and Tumor Heterogeneity: Imaging Perspectives Using MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigin Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to maintain viability via genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations, expressing overall dynamic heterogeneity. The complex relaxation mechanisms of nuclear spins provide unique and convertible tissue contrasts, making magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS pertinent imaging tools in both clinics and research. In this review, we summarized MR methods that visualize tumor characteristics and its metabolic phenotypes on an anatomical, microvascular, microstructural, microenvironmental, and metabolomics scale. The review will progress from the utilities of basic spin-relaxation contrasts in cancer imaging to more advanced imaging methods that measure tumor-distinctive parameters such as perfusion, water diffusion, magnetic susceptibility, oxygenation, acidosis, redox state, and cell death. Analytical methods to assess tumor heterogeneity are also reviewed in brief. Although the clinical utility of tumor heterogeneity from imaging is debatable, the quantification of tumor heterogeneity using functional and metabolic MR images with development of robust analytical methods and improved MR methods may offer more critical roles of tumor heterogeneity data in clinics. MRI/MRS can also provide insightful information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, disease diagnosis and prognosis, and treatment response. With these future directions in mind, we anticipate the widespread utilization of these MR-based techniques in studying in vivo cancer biology to better address significant clinical needs.

  20. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of pancreatic islet cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Baris; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Poyanli, Arzu; Rozanes, Izzet; Acunas, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study is to demonstrate the feasibility of body diffusion weighted (DW) MR imaging in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) and to define apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for these tumors. Materials and methods: 12 normal volunteers and 12 patients with histopathologically proven pancreatic ICT by surgery were included in the study. DW MR images were obtained by a body-phased array coil using a multisection single-shot echo planar sequence on the axial plane without breath holding. In addition, the routine abdominal imaging protocol for pancreas was applied in the patient group. We measured the ADC value within the normal pancreas in control group, pancreatic ICT, and surrounding pancreas parenchyma. Mann-Whitney U-test has been used to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and normal pancreatic tissues of the volunteers. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was preferred to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and surrounding pancreatic parenchyma of the patients. Results: In 11 patients out of 12, conventional MR sequences were able to demonstrate ICTs successfully. In 1 patient an indistinct suspicious lesion was noted at the pancreatic tail. DW sequence was able to demonstrate the lesions in all of the 12 patients. On the DW images, all ICTs demonstrated high signal intensity relative to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma. The mean and standard deviations of the ADC values (x10 -3 mm 2 /s) were as follows: ICT (n = 12), 1.51 ± 0.35 (0.91-2.11), surrounding parenchyma (n = 11) 0.76 ± 0.15 (0.51-1.01) and normal pancreas in normal volunteers (n = 12), 0.80 ± 0.06 (0.72-0.90). ADC values of the ICT were significantly higher compared with those of surrounding parenchyma (p < 0.01) and normal pancreas (p < 0.001). Conclusion: DW MR imaging does not appear to provide significant contribution to routine MR imaging protocol in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors. But it can be added to MR imaging

  1. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  2. A phantom study of tumor contouring on PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Song; Li Xuena; Li Yaming; Yin Yafu; Li Na; Han Chunqi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore an algorithm to define the threshold value for tumor contouring on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging. Methods: A National Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA)NU 2 1994 PET phantom with 5 spheres of different diameters were filled with 18 F-FDG. Seven different sphere-to-background ratios were obtained and the phantom was scanned by Discovery LS 4. For each sphere-to-background ratio, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each sphere, the SUV of the border of each sphere (SUV border ), the mean SUV of a 1 cm region of background (SUV bg ) and the diameter (D) of each sphere were measured. SPSS 13.0 software was used for curve fitting and regression analysis to obtain the threshold algorithm. The calculated thresholds were applied to delineate 29 pathologically confirmed lung cancer lesions on PET images and the obtained volumes were compared with the volumes contoured on CT images in lung window. Results: The algorithm for defining contour threshold is TH% = 33.1% + 46.8% SUV bg /SUV max + 13.9%/D (r = 0.994) by phantom studies. For 29 lung cancer lesions, the average gross tumor volumes (GTV) delineated on PET and CT are (7.36±1.62) ml and (8.31±2.05) ml, respectively (t = -1.26, P>0.05). Conclusion: The proposed threshold algorithm for tumor contouring on PET image could provide comparable GTV with CT. (authors)

  3. Differentiation of Solid Renal Tumors with Multiparametric MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Vendrami, Camila; Parada Villavicencio, Carolina; DeJulio, Todd J; Chatterjee, Argha; Casalino, David D; Horowitz, Jeanne M; Oberlin, Daniel T; Yang, Guang-Yu; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of renal tumors is critical to determine the best therapeutic approach and improve overall patient survival. Because of increased use of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging in clinical practice, renal masses are being discovered with increased frequency. As a result, accurate imaging characterization of these lesions is more important than ever. However, because of the wide array of imaging features encountered as well as overlapping characteristics, identifying reliable imaging criteria for differentiating malignant from benign renal masses remains a challenge. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based on various anatomic and functional parameters has an important role and adds diagnostic value in detection and characterization of renal masses. MR imaging may allow distinction of benign solid renal masses from several renal cell carcinoma (RCC) subtypes, potentially suggest the histologic grade of a neoplasm, and play an important role in ensuring appropriate patient management to avoid unnecessary surgery or other interventions. It is also a useful noninvasive imaging tool for patients who undergo active surveillance of renal masses and for follow-up after treatment of a renal mass. The purpose of this article is to review the characteristic MR imaging features of RCC and common benign renal masses and propose a diagnostic imaging approach to evaluation of solid renal masses using multiparametric MR imaging. © RSNA, 2017.

  4. Method of image segmentation using a neural network. Application to MR imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, E.; Gautherie, M.

    1992-01-01

    An original method of numerical images segmentation has been developed. This method is based on pixel clustering using a formal neural network configurated by supervised learning of pre-classified examples. The method has been applied to series of MR images of brain tumors (gliomas) with a view to proceed with a 3D-extraction of the tumor volume. This study is part of a project on cancer thermotherapy including the development of a scan-focused ultrasound system of tumor heating and a 3D-numerical thermal model

  5. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antich, Peter P; Constantinescu, Anca; Lewis, Matthew; Mason, Ralph; Richer, Edmond

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our project is to image tumor growth, metastatic development and vascular changes, both to characterize tumor dynamics during growth for application in diagnostic and prognostic imaging...

  6. Perfusion and diffusion MR imaging in enhancing malignant cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calli, Cem; Kitis, Omer; Yunten, Nilgun; Yurtseven, Taskin; Islekel, Sertac; Akalin, Taner

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Common contrast-enhancing malignant tumors of the brain are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs), anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), metastases, and lymphomas, all of which have sometimes similar conventional MRI findings. Our aim was to evaluate the role of perfusion MR imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiation of these contrast-enhancing malignant cerebral tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-eight patients with contrast-enhancing and histologically proven brain tumors, 14 AAs, 17 GBMs, nine metastases, and eight lymphomas, were included in the study. All patients have undergone routine MR examination where DWI and PWI were performed in the same session. DWI was performed with b values of 0, 500, and 1000 mm 2 /s. Minimum ADC values (ADC min ) of each tumor was later calculated from ADC map images. PWI was applied using dynamic susceptibility contrast technique and maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV max ) was calculated from each tumor, given in ratio with contralateral normal white matter. Comparisons of ADC min and rCBV max values with the histological types of the enhancing tumors were made with a one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test. A P value less than 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. Results: The ADC min values (mean ± S.D.) in GBMs, AAs, lymphomas, and metastases were 0.79 ± 0.21 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), 0.75 ± 0.21 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), 0.51 ± 0.09 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), and 0.68 ± 0.11 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), respectively. The difference in ADC min values were statistically significant between lymphomas and GBMs (P max ratio (mean ± S.D.) in GBMs were 6.33 ± 2.03, whereas it was 3.66 ± 1.79 in AAs, 2.33 ± 0.68 in lymphomas, and 4.45 ± 1.87 in metastases. These values were statistically different between GBMs and AAs (P min and rCBV max calculations, may aid routine MR imaging in the differentiation of common cerebral contrast-enhancing malignant tumors

  7. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  8. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Truwit, C.L.; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanel, Maïa, E-mail: maiavanel@yahoo.fr [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Blond, Laurent [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Vanel, Daniel [The Rizzoli Institute, Via del Barbiano 1-10, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  10. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all

  11. Imaging findings in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongna; Zhang Shengjian; Liu Haiquan; Peng Weijun; Li Ruimin; Gu Yajia; Wang Xiaohong; Mao Jian; Shen Xigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiological appearance and pathological features of breast phyllodes tumors (PTs), and to enhance the recognition of the tumor. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed in 24 women with PTs confirmed by surgical pathology. All of the 24 patients had preoperative MRI and sonography, and 10 had preoperative mammography. Results: The histologic findings were benign, borderline and malignant PTs in 16.7% (4/24), 45.8% (11/24) and 37.5% (9/24) of cases, respectively. The tumor size (p = 0.001), irregular shape on sonographic imaging (p = 0.039), internal non-enhanced septations (p = 0.009), silt-like changes in enhanced images (p = 0.006) and signal changes from T2-weighted to enhanced images on MRI (p = 0.001) correlated significantly with the histologic grade; the BI-RADS category of the MRI could reflect the PT's histologic grade with a correlation coefficient of 0.440 (p = 0.031). If the category BI-RADS ≥4a was considered to be a suspicious malignant lesion, the diagnostic accuracy of mammography, US and MRI would be 70% (7/10), 62.5% (15/24) and 95.8% (23/24), respectively. Conclusion: The tumor size and several US and MRI findings can be used to help preoperatively determine the histologic grade of breast PTs. When a patient presents with a progressively enlarging, painless breast mass, MRI should be recommended first.

  12. Complicated giant polycystic ovary mimicking tumor: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Eqilmez, Hulusi; Oeztoprak, Bilge; Guemues, Cesur

    2007-01-01

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with a 1-year history of abdominal pain that had worsened during the past 4 days. She had a right lower abdominal mass that was initially diagnosed as an ovarian tumor. MR imaging revealed a unilaterally enlarged and partially torted left polycystic ovary. Polycystic ovary is a common cause of increased ovarian volume in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by numerous small peripherally located follicles and increased stroma. It may mimic a neoplasm and lead to difficulties in diagnosis. In this case report, we discuss the unusual MR imaging findings and the pitfalls in diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Complicated giant polycystic ovary mimicking tumor: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Eqilmez, Hulusi; Oeztoprak, Bilge; Guemues, Cesur [Cumhuriyet University, Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, AD Sivas (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with a 1-year history of abdominal pain that had worsened during the past 4 days. She had a right lower abdominal mass that was initially diagnosed as an ovarian tumor. MR imaging revealed a unilaterally enlarged and partially torted left polycystic ovary. Polycystic ovary is a common cause of increased ovarian volume in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by numerous small peripherally located follicles and increased stroma. It may mimic a neoplasm and lead to difficulties in diagnosis. In this case report, we discuss the unusual MR imaging findings and the pitfalls in diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. LCP nanoparticle for tumor and lymph node metastasis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle formulation (particle diameter ˜25 nm) has previously been developed to delivery siRNA with superior efficiency. In this work, 111In was formulated into LCP nanoparticles to form 111In-LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. With necessary modifications and improvements of the LCP core-washing and surface-coating methods, 111In-LCP grafted with polyethylene glycol exhibited reduced uptake by the mononuclear phagocytic system. SPECT/CT imaging supported performed biodistribution studies, showing clear tumor images with accumulation of 8% or higher injected dose per gram tissue (ID/g) in subcutaneous, human-H460, lung-cancer xenograft and mouse-4T1, breast cancer metastasis models. Both the liver and the spleen accumulated ˜20% ID/g. Accumulation in the tumor was limited by the enhanced permeation and retention effect and was independent of the presence of a targeting ligand. A surprisingly high accumulation in the lymph nodes (˜70% ID/g) was observed. In the 4T1 lymph node metastasis model, the capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize the size-enlarged and tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated. By analyzing the SPECT/CT images taken at different time points, the PK profiles of 111In-LCP in the blood and major organs were determined. The results indicated that the decrement of 111In-LCP blood concentration was not due to excretion, but to tissue penetration, leading to lymphatic accumulation. Larger LCP (diameter ˜65 nm) nanoparticles were also prepared for the purpose of comparison. Results indicated that larger LCP achieved slightly lower accumulation in the tumor and lymph nodes, but much higher accumulation in the liver and spleen; thus, larger nanoparticles might not be favorable for imaging purposes. We also demonstrated that LCP with a diameter of ˜25 nm were better able to penetrate into tissues, travel in the lymphatic system and preferentially accumulate in the lymph nodes due to 1) small

  15. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC) suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage-Sleiman, Rouba; Herveau, Stéphanie; Matera, Eva-Laure; Laurier, Jean-Fabien; Dumontet, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC), a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents both in vitro and in xenografts. These

  16. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  17. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M. Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P.; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis. PMID:16581912

  18. Cancer Metabolism and Tumor Heterogeneity: Imaging Perspectives Using MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Gigin; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Park, Jae Mo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to maintain viability via genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations, expressing overall dynamic heterogeneity. The complex relaxation mechanisms of nuclear spins provide unique and convertible tissue contrasts, making magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) pertinent imaging tools in both clinics and research. In this review, we summarized MR methods that visualize tumor characteristics and its metabolic phenotypes ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary bladder carcinoma: tumor staging and gadolinium contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doringer, E.; Joos, H.; Forstner, R.; Schmoller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with urinary bladder carcinomas underwent pre-operative examinations using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The results of the MR examinations were correlated with the clinical-pathological findings following transurethral resection (TUR) and bimanual palpation (n = 47) or radical cystectomy (n = 2). The results of pre-contrast MR tumor staging (T1, T2), viewing stages Tis-T2 collectively, and subsequent to separate assessments of stages T3b-T4b, were correct 76.6% of the time. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced examinations (pre-contrast T1 and after Gd-DTPA) showed a staging accuracy rate of 85.7%. T2-weighted images did not indicate any advantage when compared to T1-weighted images following Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity ratios of tumor/fat and tumor/muscle tissue were measured on T1-weighted pre-contrast images and following Gd-DTPA and then evaluated statistically, whereby the increased tumor signal intensity was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.01). Due to the relatively short examination time needed for T1-weighted images and the specific tumor enhancement, the administration of Gd-DTPA proves valuable in the diagnosis of bladder carcinomas. T2-weighted images are not necessary. (orig.)

  20. Deep learning for tumor classification in imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Jens; Etmann, Christian; Boskamp, Tobias; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Maaß, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Tumor classification using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) data has a high potential for future applications in pathology. Due to the complexity and size of the data, automated feature extraction and classification steps are required to fully process the data. Since mass spectra exhibit certain structural similarities to image data, deep learning may offer a promising strategy for classification of IMS data as it has been successfully applied to image classification. Methodologically, we propose an adapted architecture based on deep convolutional networks to handle the characteristics of mass spectrometry data, as well as a strategy to interpret the learned model in the spectral domain based on a sensitivity analysis. The proposed methods are evaluated on two algorithmically challenging tumor classification tasks and compared to a baseline approach. Competitiveness of the proposed methods is shown on both tasks by studying the performance via cross-validation. Moreover, the learned models are analyzed by the proposed sensitivity analysis revealing biologically plausible effects as well as confounding factors of the considered tasks. Thus, this study may serve as a starting point for further development of deep learning approaches in IMS classification tasks. https://gitlab.informatik.uni-bremen.de/digipath/Deep_Learning_for_Tumor_Classification_in_IMS. jbehrmann@uni-bremen.de or christianetmann@uni-bremen.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of a novel HS-mimetic-vascular endothelial growth factor binding small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Sugahara

    Full Text Available The angiogenic process is controlled by variety of factors of which the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway plays a major role. A series of heparan sulfate mimetic small molecules targeting VEGF/VEGFR pathway has been synthesized. Among them, compound 8 (2-butyl-5-chloro-3-(4-nitro-benzyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde was identified as a significant binding molecule for the heparin-binding domain of VEGF, determined by high-throughput-surface plasmon resonance assay. The data predicted strong binding of compound 8 with VEGF which may prevent the binding of VEGF to its receptor. We compared the structure of compound 8 with heparan sulfate (HS, which have in common the functional ionic groups such as sulfate, nitro and carbaldehyde that can be located in similar positions of the disaccharide structure of HS. Molecular docking studies predicted that compound 8 binds at the heparin binding domain of VEGF through strong hydrogen bonding with Lys-30 and Gln-20 amino acid residues, and consistent with the prediction, compound 8 inhibited binding of VEGF to immobilized heparin. In vitro studies showed that compound 8 inhibits the VEGF-induced proliferation migration and tube formation of mouse vascular endothelial cells, and finally the invasion of a murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8G7 which secrets high levels of VEGF. In vivo, these effects produce significant decrease of tumor burden in an experimental model of liver metastasis. Collectively, these data indicate that compound 8 may prevent tumor growth through a direct effect on tumor cell proliferation and by inhibition of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis mediated by VEGF. In conclusion, compound 8 may normalize the tumor vasculature and microenvironment in tumors probably by inhibiting the binding of VEGF to its receptor.

  2. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors.

  3. Contrast agents for tumor diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Rensuke; Doi, Hisayoshi; Okada, Shoji [University of Shizuoka (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Science; Yano, Masayuki; Katano, Susumu; Nakajima, Nobuaki

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop contrast agents for tumor diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we investigated the effects of several gadolinium complexes on T{sub 1} relaxation time of proton in some tissues of Ehrlich solid tumor-bearing mice. L-Aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, DL-homocysteine, L-glutamyl-glutamic acid, glutathione, sperimidine and ethylenediaminetetrakis (methylenephosphate) (EDTMP) were used as ligands for Gd{sup 3+}. Since each Gd-complex could not be purified except Gd-EDTMP, the mixture of GdCl{sub 3} and a ligand was administered intravenously. Among the compounds tested, the mixture of aspartic acid, glutathione or spermidine with GdCl{sub 3} showed almost the same or above reduction of T{sub 1} relaxation times in the tumor tissue compared with Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) which is used clinically. Furthermore, the contrast-enhancing effect of the three mixtures in the tumor was observed by in vivo T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The in vivo tissue distribution using radioactive {sup 153}Gd{sup 3+} showed that these mixtures mentioned above were also taken up more highly in the tumor than {sup 153}GdCl{sub 3} itself and {sup 153}Gd-DTPA, suggesting the formation of Gd-complexes. However, the overall tissue distribution of the mixtures was similar to that of {sup 153}GdCl{sub 3} because the Gd-complexes were not purified. Gd-EDTMP exhibited the almost same effects with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent. (author).

  4. Tumor-specific binding of radiolabeled G-22 monoclonal antibody in glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Jun; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Masaaki; Sugita, Kenichiro; Oshima, Motoo; Tadokoro, Masanori; Sakuma, Sadayuki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Seo, Hisao

    1992-03-01

    Iodine-131-labeled G-22 monoclonal antibody F(ab'){sub 2} fragment reacting specifically with a glioma-associated surface glycoprotein was administered to 12 glioma patients to investigate its use in radioimaging of intracranial gliomas. No immediate or delayed side effects were attributable to antibody injection. Nine patients received the radiolabeled complex intravenously. The images of low-grade gliomas were generally poor and disappeared within 4 days. High-contrast images were obtained beyond the 7th day in high-grade gliomas except one case in the pineal region. Three patients received intraventricular or intratumoral administration. Clear images of all tumors were demonstrated from the 2nd until later than the 7th day. One patient with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dissemination of brainstem glioma demonstrated negative CSF cytology after intraventricular administration. (author).

  5. Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Labeled Glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe as a Potential Tumor Imaging Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Ji Sun; Sung, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae Ho; An, Gwang Il; Chi, Dae Yoon; Lee, Byung Chul; Moon, Byung Seok; Choi, Tae Hyun; Chuna, Kwon Soo

    2005-01-01

    The α v β 3 integrin is an important receptor affecting tumor growth, metastatic potential on proliferating endothelial cells as well as on tumor cells of various origin, tumor-induced angiogenesis could be blocked by antagonizing the α v β 3 integrin with RGD. Therefore, α v β 3 integrin is a target for angiogenesis imaging that might be useful in assessing tumor-induced angiogenesis and identifying tumor metastasis. To design potent radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis containing a cRGD moiety should include low hepatic uptake in vivo. Tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), naturally existed in extracellular matrix proteins, is known to be the primary binding site of the α v β 3 integrin. The imaging of α v β 3 receptor expression will give the information of the metastatic ability of the tumor which is not available by [ 18 F]FDG. Our interest in developing new radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo visualization of angiogenesis has led us to synthesize derivatives of cRGD (cyclic arginineglycine-aspartic acid) that contains glucose moiety. Because sugar-protein interaction is a key step in metastasis and angiogenesis, it has also been proposed to play an intriguing role in imaging of tumor. We designed and synthesized two fluorine-18 labeled RGD glycopeptides . N-fluorobenzyl-diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([ 18 F]fluorobenzyl-glucose-KRGDf, and Nfluorobenzoyl- diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([ 18 F]fluorobenzoyl-glucose-KRGDf, from same precursor as a diagnostic tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 labeled cRGD glycopeptides were prepared using two different simple labeling methods: one is reductive alkylation of an amine with [ 18 F]fluorobenzaldehyde and the other is amide condensation with [ 18 F]fluorobenzoic acid

  6. In vivo VEGF imaging with radiolabeled bevacizumab in a human ovarian tumor xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B.; Hospers, Geke A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Jong, Johan R.; Hollema, Harry; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; van Dongen, Guns A.; Perk, Lars R.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), released by tumor cells, is an important growth factor in tumor angiogenesis. The humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab blocks VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis by binding, thereby neutralizing VEGF. Our aim was to develop radiolabeled bevacizumab for

  7. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  8. The use of image morphing to improve the detection of tumors in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykstra, C.; Greer, K.; Jaszczak, R.; Celler, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two of the limitations on the utility of SPECT and planar scintigraphy for the non-invasive detection of carcinoma are the small sizes of many tumors and the possible low contrast between tumor uptake and background. This is particularly true for breast imaging. Use of some form of image processing can improve the visibility of tumors which are at the limit of hardware resolution. Smoothing, by some form of image averaging, either during or post-reconstruction, is widely used to reduce noise and thereby improve the detectability of regions of elevated activity. However, smoothing degrades resolution and, by averaging together closely spaced noise, may make noise look like a valid region of increased uptake. Image morphing by erosion and dilation does not average together image values; it instead selectively removes small features and irregularities from an image without changing the larger features. Application of morphing to emission images has shown that it does not, therefore, degrade resolution and does not always degrade contrast. For these reasons it may be a better method of image processing for noise removal in some images. In this paper the authors present a comparison of the effects of smoothing and morphing using breast and liver studies

  9. Imaging tumor endothelial marker 8 using an 18F-labeled peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Qimeng; Yang, Min; Gao, Haokao; Zhu, Lei; Lin, Xin; Guo, Ning; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Guixiang; Eden, Henry S.; Niu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) has been reported to be upregulated in both tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells in several cancer types. TEM8 antagonists and TEM8-targeted delivery of toxins have been developed as effective cancer therapeutics. The ability to image TEM8 expression would be of use in evaluating TEM8-targeted cancer therapy. A 13-meric peptide, KYNDRLPLYISNP (QQM), identified from the small loop in domain IV of protective antigen of anthrax toxin was evaluated for TEM8 binding and labeled with 18 F for small-animal PET imaging in both UM-SCC1 head-and-neck cancer and MDA-MB-435 melanoma models. A modified ELISA showed that QQM peptide bound specifically to the extracellular vWA domain of TEM8 with an IC 50 value of 304 nM. Coupling 4-nitrophenyl 2- 18 F-fluoropropionate with QQM gave almost quantitative yield and a high specific activity (79.2 ± 7.4 TBq/mmol, n = 5) of 18 F-FP-QQM at the end of synthesis. 18 F-FP-QQM showed predominantly renal clearance and had significantly higher accumulation in TEM8 high-expressing UM-SCC1 tumors (2.96 ± 0.84 %ID/g at 1 h after injection) than TEM8 low-expressing MDA-MB-435 tumors (1.38 ± 0.56 %ID/g at 1 h after injection). QQM peptide bound specifically to the extracellular domain of TEM8. 18 F-FP-QQM peptide tracer would be a promising lead compound for measuring TEM8 expression. Further efforts to improve the affinity and specificity of the tracer and to increase its metabolic stability are warranted. (orig.)

  10. 68Ga-DOTA-NGR as a novel molecular probe for APN-positive tumor imaging using MicroPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Lu, Xiaoli; Wan, Nan; Hua, Zichun; Wang, Zizheng; Huang, Hongbo; Yang, Min; Wang, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is selectively expressed on many tumors and the endothelium of tumor neovasculature, and may serve as a promising target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) peptides have been shown to bind specifically to the APN receptor and have served as vehicles for the delivery of various therapeutic drugs in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate the efficacy of a (68)Ga-labeled NGR peptide as a new molecular probe that binds to APN. NGR peptide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with (68)Ga at 95°C for 10 min. In vitro uptake and binding analysis was performed with A549 and MDA-MB231 cells. Biodistribution of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was determined in normal mice by dissection method. (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR PET was performed in A549 and MDA-MB231 xenografts, and included dynamic and static imaging. APN expression in tumors and new vasculatures was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The radiochemical purity of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was 98.0% ± 1.4% with a specific activity of about 17.49 MBq/nmol. The uptake of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR in A549 cells increased with longer incubation times, and could be blocked by cold DOTA-NGR, while no specific uptake was found in MDA-MB231 cells. In vivo biodistribution studies showed that (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was mainly excreted from the kidney, and rapidly cleared from blood and nonspecific organs. MicroPET imaging showed that high focal accumulation had occurred in the tumor site at 1 h post-injection (pi) in A549 tumor xenografts. A significant reduction of tumor uptake was observed following coinjection with a blocking dose of DOTA-NGR, whereas only mild uptake was found in MDA-MB231 tumor xenografts. Tumor uptake, measured as the tumor/lung ratio, increased with time peaking at 12.58 ± 1.26 at 1.5 h pi. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that APN was overexpressed on A549 cells and neovasculature. (68)Ga

  11. Genetic induction of the gastrin releasing peptide receptor on tumor cells for radiolabeled peptide binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raben, David; Stackhouse, Murray; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Mikheeva, Galeena; Khazaeli, M.B.; McLean, Stephanie; Kirkman, Richard; Krasnykh, Victor; Curiel, David T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To improve upon existing radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) approaches, we have devised a strategy to genetically induce high levels of new membrane-associated receptors on human cancer cells targetable by radiolabeled peptides. In this context, we report successful adenoviral-mediated transduction of tumor cells to express the murine gastrin releasing peptide receptor (mGRPr) as demonstrated by 125 I-labeled bombesin binding. Materials and Methods: To demonstrate the feasibility of our strategy and to provide rapid proof of principle, we constructed a plasmid encoding the mGRPr gene. We cloned the mGRPr gene into the adenoviral shuttle vector pACMVpLpARS+ (F. Graham). We then utilized the methodology of adenovirus-polylysine-mediated transfection (AdpLmGRPr) to accomplish transient gene expression of mGRPr in two human cancer cell lines including A427 non-small cell lung cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Murine GRPr expression was then measured by a live-cell binding assay using 125 I-labeled bombesin. In order to develop this strategy further, it was necessary to construct a vector that would be more efficient for in vivo transduction. In this regard, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdCMVGRPr) encoding the mGRPr under the control of the CMV promoter based on in vivo homologous recombination methods. The recombinant shuttle vector containing mGRPr was co-transfected with the adenoviral rescue plasmid pJM17 into the E1A trans complementing cell line 293 allowing for derivation of replication-incompetent, recombinant adenoviral vector. Individual plaques were isolated and subjected to two further rounds of plaque purification. The identity of the virus was confirmed at each step by PCR employing primers for mGRPr. The absence of wild-type adenovirus was confirmed by PCR using primers to the adenoviral E1A gene. SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were transduced in vitro with AdCMVGRPr at

  12. Evaluation of radiolabeled ML04, a putative irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, as a bioprobe for PET imaging of EGFR-overexpressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abourbeh, Galith; Dissoki, Samar; Jacobson, Orit; Litchi, Amir; Daniel, Revital Ben; Laki, Desirediu; Levitzki, Alexander; Mishani, Eyal

    2007-01-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in tumor development and malignancy. Evaluating the degree of EGFR expression in tumors could aid in identifying patients for EGFR-targeted therapies and in monitoring treatment. Nevertheless, no currently available assay can reliably quantify receptor content in tumors. Radiolabeled inhibitors of EGFR-TK could be developed as bioprobes for positron emission tomography imaging. Such imaging agents would not only provide a noninvasive quantitative measurement of EGFR content in tumors but also serve as radionuclide carriers for targeted radiotherapy. The potency, reversibility, selectivity and specific binding characteristics of ML04, an alleged irreversible inhibitor of EGFR, were established in vitro. The distribution of the F-18-labeled compound and the extent of EGFR-specific tumor uptake were evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. ML04 demonstrated potent, irreversible and selective inhibition of EGFR, combined with specific binding to the receptor in intact cells. In vivo distribution of the radiolabeled compound revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of about 7 and 5, respectively, 3 h following administration of a radiotracer. Nevertheless, only minor EGFR-specific uptake of the compound was detected in these studies, using either EGFR-negative tumors or blocking studies as controls. To improve the in vivo performance of ML04, administration via prolonged intravenous infusion is proposed. Detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of this bioprobe could assist in the development of a kinetic model that would afford accurate measurement of EGFR content in tumors

  13. Tumor image signatures and habitats: a processing pipeline of multimodality metabolic and physiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daekeun; Kim, Michelle M; Aryal, Madhava P; Parmar, Hemant; Piert, Morand; Lawrence, Theodore S; Cao, Yue

    2018-01-01

    To create tumor "habitats" from the "signatures" discovered from multimodality metabolic and physiological images, we developed a framework of a processing pipeline. The processing pipeline consists of six major steps: (1) creating superpixels as a spatial unit in a tumor volume; (2) forming a data matrix [Formula: see text] containing all multimodality image parameters at superpixels; (3) forming and clustering a covariance or correlation matrix [Formula: see text] of the image parameters to discover major image "signatures;" (4) clustering the superpixels and organizing the parameter order of the [Formula: see text] matrix according to the one found in step 3; (5) creating "habitats" in the image space from the superpixels associated with the "signatures;" and (6) pooling and clustering a matrix consisting of correlation coefficients of each pair of image parameters from all patients to discover subgroup patterns of the tumors. The pipeline was applied to a dataset of multimodality images in glioblastoma (GBM) first, which consisted of 10 image parameters. Three major image "signatures" were identified. The three major "habitats" plus their overlaps were created. To test generalizability of the processing pipeline, a second image dataset from GBM, acquired on the scanners different from the first one, was processed. Also, to demonstrate the clinical association of image-defined "signatures" and "habitats," the patterns of recurrence of the patients were analyzed together with image parameters acquired prechemoradiation therapy. An association of the recurrence patterns with image-defined "signatures" and "habitats" was revealed. These image-defined "signatures" and "habitats" can be used to guide stereotactic tissue biopsy for genetic and mutation status analysis and to analyze for prediction of treatment outcomes, e.g., patterns of failure.

  14. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Woman' s University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun Kyoung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  15. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  16. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Mi; Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Cho, Hyun-Hae; You, Sun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging in tumor invasion of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Lang, P.; Schorner, W.; Sander, B.; Weiss, T.; Loddenkemper, R.; Kaiser, D.; Felix, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used MR imaging to study 22 patients who had intrathoracic, pleura-related malignancies and whose CT findings had suggested chest wall invasion. ECG-gated T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences were used in all patients. Additionally, in 10 patients an ungated, multisection, gradient-echo sequence was used, which was repeated after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA in five patients. Surgery confirmed chest wall invasion in 19 patients. CT showed tumor invasion only in 14 of these 19 patients. MR imaging showed high-signal-intensity lesion within chest wall and pleura in T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images as the typical pattern of chest wall invasion in all 19 patients. Two of the three patients with pleural inflammation and without chest wall invasion had high-signal-intensity pleural lesions, but none of these lesions were within the chest wall

  18. The development of fluoroandrogens and fluoroprogestins as potential imaging agents for receptor-positive prostate and breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, S.J.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The assay of progesterone receptor (PR) concentration in breast tumors and androgen receptor (AR) concentration in prostate tumors enables hormone responsive neoplasms to be distinguished from those that are non-responsive. In principle, a positron-emitting progestin or androgen with suitably high affinity and selectivity for PR and AR, respectively, and an adequately high specific activity might provide a means for imaging receptor-positive tumors and quantifying their receptor content in vivo. The use of fluorine-18 as a radiolabel, coupled with the use of positron emission transaxial tomography, appears to be a most favorable approach in the development of receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo imaging. Therefore, we have begun a systematic investigation of the development of fluorine-substituted androgens and progestins that might be prepared in F-18 labeled form as probes for AR and PR. (author)

  19. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  20. [Fluorine-18 labeled androgens and progestins; imaging agents for tumors of prostate and breast]: Technical progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project develops fluorine-18 labeled steroids that possess high binding affinity and selectivity for androgen and progesterone receptors and can be used as positron-emission tomographic imaging agents for prostate tumors and breast tumors, respectively. These novel diagnostic agents may enable an accurate estimation of tumor dissemination, such as metastasis of prostate cancer and lymph node involvement of breast cancer, and an in vivo determination of the endocrine responsiveness of these tumors. They will provide essential information for the selection of alternative therapies thereby improving the management of prostate and breast cancer patients. 14 refs., 1 tab

  1. Characteristics Studies of 125I- and total PSA antibody's Binding with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in Human Uterus Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mudaffar, S.; Al-Salihi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Two groups of uterus tumors (benign and malignant) postmenopausal patients were used to investigate the presence of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary experiments were performed to follow the binding of '1 25 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA in uterus tissues homogenates of the two groups with their corresponding antigen and found to be (8.8,7.1%) for benign and malignant tumors, respectively. An Immuno Radio Metric Assay (IRMA) procedure was developed for measuring PSA in benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates. The optimum conditions of the binding of 125 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA were as follows: PSA concentration (150,200 μg protein),tracer antibody concentration (125,250 μg protein), p H (7.6,7.2), temp (15,25?C) and time (1.5 hrs) for postmenopausal benign and malignant uterus tumors tissue homogenates, respectively. The use of different concentrations of Na + and Mg 2+ ions were shown to cause an increase in the binding at concentration of (125,75 mΜ) of Na 1+ ions (75,225 mΜ) of Mg 2+ ions for benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates, respectively, while the use of different concentrations of urea and polyethylene glycol (PEG) Caused a decrease in the binding with the increase in the concentration of each of urea and PEG in the both cases

  2. MR imaging of non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiroyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroiwa, Toshiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the MR imaging characteristics of patients with non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fourteen patients with these tumors underwent MR imaging. The signal characteristics of the tumor on T 1 -, T 2 -, and contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images were evaluated. The enhancement pattern of the tumor on dynamic study was also examined. The degree of stromal fibrosis was evaluated on the pathologic specimen, and was then classified as mild, moderate, or marked fibrosis. On T 1 -weighted images, the tumors were hypointense in 12 of 14 cases. The signals of the tumors on T 2 -weighted images were varied. The tumors were hypointense in 1 case, isointense in 2 cases, hyperintense in 6 cases, and very hyperintense in the other 5 cases. On contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images, the tumors were hyperintense in 8 cases and very hyperintense in 5 cases. On T 2 - and contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images, 4 of 5 malignant tumors were very hyperintense. Dynamic study revealed prolonged enhancement in 10 of 11 cases. Pathologic analysis revealed moderate or marked fibrosis in 10 of 14 cases, and prolonged enhancement was considered to be related stromal fibrosis. In conclusion, MR imaging findings of non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas vary in relation to pathological variety. Prolonged enhancement of the tumor on dynamic study is considered to be one of the characteristic MR imaging findings that corresponds to stromal fibrosis of the tumor. (author)

  3. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Guangming; Wu, Rongchun; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)–curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA–CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA–CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA–CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes. (paper)

  4. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guangming; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Wu, Rongchun; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)-curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA-CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA-CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA-CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes.

  5. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guangming; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Wu, Rongchun; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-30

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)-curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA-CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA-CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA-CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes.

  6. In vivo tumor angiogenesis imaging with site-specific labeled 99mTc-HYNIC-VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenberg, Francis G.; Backer, Marina V.; Patel, Vimalkumar; Backer, Joseph M.; Levashova, Zoia

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed a cysteine-containing peptide tag (C-tag) that allows for site-specific modification of C-tag-containing fusion proteins with a bifunctional chelator, HYNIC (hydrazine nicotinamide)-maleimide. We then constructed and expressed C-tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and labeled it with HYNIC. We wished to test 99m Tc-HYNIC-C-tagged VEGF ( 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF) for the imaging of tumor vasculature before and after antiangiogenic (low continuous dosing, metronomic) and tumoricidal (high-dose) cyclophosphamide treatment. HYNIC-maleimide was reacted with the two thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF without any effect on biologic activity in vitro. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF was prepared using tin/tricine as an exchange reagent, and injected via the tail vein (200-300 μCi, 1-2 μg protein) followed by microSPECT imaging 1 h later. Sequencing analysis of HYNIC-containing peptides obtained after digestion confirmed the site-specific labeling of the two accessible thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF. Tumor vascularity was easily visualized with 99m Tc/VEGF in Balb/c mice with 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma 10 days after implantation into the left axillary fat pad in controls (12.3±5.0 tumor/bkg, n=27) along with its decrease following treatment with high (150 mg/kg q.o.d. x 4; 1.14±0.48 tumor/bkg, n=9) or low (25 mg/kg q.d. x 7; 1.03±0.18 tumor/bkg, n=9) dose cyclophosphamide. Binding specificity was confirmed by observing a 75% decrease in tumor uptake of 99m Tc/biotin-inactivated VEGF, as compared with 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF. 99m Tc can be loaded onto C-tagged VEGF in a site-specific fashion without reducing its bioactivity. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF can be rapidly prepared for the imaging of tumor vasculature and its response to different types of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Noninvasive imaging of malignant tumors using laminin peptide fragments YIGSR labeled with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, G.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; Hu, J.; An, R.; Gao, Z.R.; Cao, G.X.; Hnatowich, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals that localize specifically at certain sites (such as peptides directed against receptors expressed on tumor cells or antibodies with high binding affinities for bacterial determinants) may be expected to display greater specificity of localization. Peptides, which diffuse rapidly into target lesions and clear rapidly elsewhere, may be expected to enjoy a pharmacokinetic advantage over those, such as antibodies, which accumulate and clear more slowly. The laminin peptide fragments YIGSR is known to bind to a 67-kDa laminin receptor. This receptor is understood to be expressed at higher than normal levels in malignant tumor cells, particularly those of breast and colon carcinomas. Methods 1 peptide conjugation and labeling A 2.5 mg/mL solution of YIGSR in 0.1 M N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer, pH8.0, and a fresh 10mg/mL solution of NHS-S-acetyl-MAG 3 in dimethylformamide dried over molecular sieve were prepared. 2 biodistribution and imaging studies A colony of KM mice (15-20g) were inoculated with 1x10 6 Ehrlich (breast) carcinoma tumor cells in the right thigh, and the tumors were allowed to grow for 6-7 days to a size of 1.0-1.5 cm in diameter. Biodistribution studies were performed in 40 KM mice after 50 μCi per mouse of 99m Tc-labeled YIGSR were injected intravenously. A total of 10 mice were injected intravenously in the tail vein with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled YIGSR, immobilized with ketamine hydrochloride and imaged periodically from 0.5 hr to 24 hr with a gamma camera. The identical imaging procedure was also performed in mice with sterile infection/inflammation lesions to evaluate the specificity. Results Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The highest accumulation of label was in the kidney first, with the liver and small bowel next. The injected activity localized in the lesion as early as 15 min and reached a saturation value at 3

  8. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xia; Zhang Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  9. Imaging diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huimao; Lai Ying; Yang Shuqin; Yang Haishan; Murakami, K.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of intraductal papillary mucinous tumor (IPMT) of the pancreas, and to assess its clinical and characteristic radiological features. Methods: Thirty-six cases with IPMT who underwent CT and MRI with plain and contrast enhancement before operation were reviewed. The clinical presentation and characteristic imaging findings of main duct type (8 cases) and branch duct type (28 cases) were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Typical imaging findings of main duct type were segmental or diffuse dilation of MPD (diameter was over 9 mm) with enhanced mural nodules after contrast medium administration. MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) showed dilation of MPD with flat/nodule filling defects in 4 cases and MPD dilatation in the head side in 2 cases. Branch duct type was more frequently located in the head or uncinate. Typical imaging findings of branch duct type were unilocular or multilocular cystic tumors with septa, mural nodules, and MPD dilatation. MRCP showed septa in 24 cases, filling defects in 15 cases, and MPD dilatation in 8 cases. Communication between the cystic lesion and the MPD was demonstrated in 19 cases by MRCP. Conclusion: It is extremely important to accurately make the diagnosis of IPMT for planning the surgical strategy. MRCP is a noninvasive and useful method in detecting and making definite diagnosis of IPMT. (authors)

  10. A review of 99mTc labeled myocardial imaging agents for tumor-positive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Shian; Zhang Yongxue; An Rui

    2002-01-01

    The tumor-positive imaging with high sensitivity and specificity was useful in primary tumor and recurrences and metastases. The 99m Tc labeled myocardial imaging agents are easily available and stable and the radiochemical purity is high. 99m Tc is the preferred choice in routine works because its physical properties. The preparation, quality control, mechanism of accumulation and the clinical use of 99m Tc-sestamibi, 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, 99m Tc-furifosmin, and 99m Tc-N-NOET were reviewed

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of pseudomalignant osseous tumor of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehara, Shigeru [Center for Radiological Sciences, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Nishida, Jun [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Abe, Masataka [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Mizutani, Hirokazu [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohba, Satoru [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    Noninfectious, nonneoplastic reactive processes of the hand, such as myositis ossificans circumscripta, pseudomalignant osseous tumor of soft tissue, and florid reactive periostitis, appear similar radiologically and histologically and are often difficult to differentiate. Magnetic resonance (MR) findings in two such lesions are reported. The extensive reactive change in the extraosseous soft tissue and the bone marrow and the relatively small extent of ossification may be characteristic. Although low-grade infection and small osseous neoplasms with reactive changes, such as osteoid osteoma, may still remain possible causes, MR imaging provides essential evidence for including noninfective, nonneoplastic reactive processes of uncertain cause in the list of differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  12. Biological activity of cloned mammary tumor virus DNA fragments that bind purified glucocorticoid receptor protein in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, K.R.; Payvar, F.; Firestone, G.L.; Maler, B.A.; Wrange, O.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Chandler, V.L.; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    To test whether high-affinity receptor:DNA interactions can be correlated with receptor effects on promoter function in vivo, we have mapped in greater detail the receptor-binding regions on murine mammary tumor virus DNA, using both nitrocellulose-filter binding and electron microscopy. Recombinant plasmids bearing these receptor-binding domains have been transfected into cultured cells, and the expression of the plasmid sequences has been monitored for hormonal regulation. The results are considered in terms of a speculative proposal that the glucocorticoid receptor may effect changes in promoter activity via specific alteration of chromatin and/or DNA structure. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of primary intracranial tumors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The experience in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of primary intracranial neoplasia at University of California, San Francisco is reviewed. Seventy patients have been evaluated by MR and computerized tomography (CT). MR scans were performed using a multi-slice spin echo technique with a long pulse repetition time (TR = 2000 msec), and long echo sampling delay (TE = 56 msec). This method was most sensitive in differentiating normal gray and white matter and in detecting both cerebral edema and abnormal tissue with prolonged T 2 characteristics. More sensitive to slight alterations in normal tissue, MR may detect a focal lesion in cases in which CT shows only mass effect. Moreover, MR may demonstrate more thoroughly the extent of tumor infiltration and broaden the characterization of abnormal tissue. Posterior fossa and brainstem anatomy are invariably better depicted by MR. The major limitations of MR include its inability to detect foci of tumor calcification, demonstrate the severity of bone destruction, or reliably distinguish tumor nidus from surrounding edema

  14. Imaging Review of Skeletal Tumors of the Pelvis—Part I: Benign Tumors of the Pelvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandikota Girish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osseous pelvis is a well-recognized site of origin of numerous primary and secondary musculoskeletal tumors. The radiologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion often begins with the plain film and proceeds to computed tomography (CT, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and possibly biopsy. Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses. Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

  15. Sensitive and selective tumor imaging with novel and highly activatable fluorescence probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive tumor imaging in vivo is one of the most requested methodologies in medical sciences. Although several imaging modalities have been developed including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of tumors, none of these modalities can activate the signals upon being accumulated or uptaken to tumor sites. Among these modalities, only optical fluorescence imaging has a marked advantage, that is, their signals can be dramatically increased upon detecting some biological features. In this short review, I will introduce some recent strategies for activatable optical fluorescence imaging of tumors, and discuss their advantages over other modalities. (author)

  16. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments

  17. Clinical application of positron emission tomography imaging in urologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wu Guangyuan

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an advanced noninvasive molecular imaging modality that is being investigated for use in the differentiation, diagnosis, and guiding therapy ora variety of cancer types. FDG PET has the unique clinical value in the differentiation, diagnosis, and monitoring therapy of prostate, such as bladder, renal, and testicle cancer. However, high false-positive and false-negative findings are observed in the detection of these tumors with FDG PET. 11 C-Choline (CH) and 11 C-acetate (AC) can overcome the pitfall of FDG, and appear to be more successful than FGD in imaging prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The short half-life of 11 C prevents the widespread use of CH and AC and 18 F-fluorocholine (FCH) and 18 F-fluoroacetate (FAC) seem to be potential tracers. Potential clinical value of the new PET tracers, such as 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), 18 F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT), and 9-(4- 18 F-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)-guanine( 18 F-FHBG) in the detection of urologic tumors, can deserve further study. (authors)

  18. Parosteal osteoliposarcoma: A new bone tumor (from imaging to immunophenotype)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larousserie, F. [Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Chen, X. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Ding, Y. [Department of pathology, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Kreshak, J.; Cocchi, S. [Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Huang, Xiaoyuan [Department of pathology, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Niu, Xiaohui, E-mail: niuxiaohui@263.net [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Alberghini, M.; Vanel, D. [Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Parosteal osteosarcomas and well-differentiated liposarcomas (WDLPS) of soft tissue share several features: they are slowly progressive, locally aggressive tumors, tend to recur locally, and rarely or never metastasizes if not dedifferentiated. Their treatment is wide surgical resection. Microscopically, both are well differentiated tumors, very like their normal tissue counterpart. They share simple karyotypes with supernumerary ring chromosomes or giant marker chromosomes containing amplified 12q sequences including MDM2 and CDK4 genes, with subsequent overexpression of MDM2 and CDK4 proteins. We present the case of a parosteal osteoliposarcoma made of closely intermingled components of a low-grade osteosarcoma and a WDLPS. Case: In a 34 year-old woman with a slowly growing mass of the arm, imaging revealed a large well-defined heterogeneous parosteal mass of the upper humerus, with two main components: bone at the base and fat at the periphery. Microscopically, these two components were consistent respectively with low grade osteosarcoma and WDLPS. Cells of the two components were labeled with anti-CDK4 antibody. No labeling with anti-MDM2 antibody and no signal detected with MDM2 FISH analysis were likely due overdecalcification. No frozen tumor tissue was available for FISH analysis nor array-CGH. Discussion: Differential diagnoses of this new entity would be a well-differentiated liposarcoma with a low-grade osteosarcomatous component that originates from the soft tissues, ruled out on imaging, and an ossifying parosteal lipoma, ruled out on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: This is the first description of a low-grade parosteal sarcoma with two components that morphologically and immunophenotypically demonstrate characteristics of a parosteal osteosarcoma and of a well-differentiated liposarcoma.

  19. Computer-aided analysis of CT images for the differentiation of cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, M.; Michalik, S.; Bornholdt, F.

    1988-01-01

    For the integration of CT imaging into the differential diagnostics of intracranial space occupations, the selection and description of characteristics facilitating a good discrimination of serveral classes of tumors becomes a very important task. From images of 93 patients with the most frequent brain tumors the optimal set of characteristics was determined. The four most significant characteristics for the differentiation of brain tumors are 'uptake of contrast medium by the tumor', 'deliniation of the tumor contours', 'progression of the tumor' and the 'average tumor density after administration of contrast media'. Very good results were obtained for the differentiation of menigneomas with and without anaplasia and for the differentiation of meningeomas from all other tumors examined. The differentiation of the degree of malignancy for various gliomatous tumors was difficult. An accurate reclassification with the computer program was obtained for 83.4% of all tumors. (author)

  20. An improved 99mTc-HYNIC-(Ser)3-LTVSPWY peptide with EDDA/tricine as co-ligands for targeting and imaging of HER2 overexpression tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadust, Fatemeh; Ahmadpour, Sajjad; Aligholikhamseh, Nazan; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2018-01-20

    Overexpression of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2) has given the opportunity for targeting and delivering of imaging radiotracers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 99m Tc-HYNIC-(EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY peptide for tumor targeting and imaging of tumor with overexpression of HER2. The HYNIC-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY was labeled with 99m Tc in presence of EDDA/tricine mixture as co-ligands. The in vitro and in vivo studies of this radiolabeled peptide were performed for cellular specific binding and tumor targeting. The high radiochemical purity of 99m Tc-HYNIC (EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY was obtained to be 99%. It exhibited high stability in normal saline and human serum. In HER2 binding affinity study, a significant reduction in uptake of radiolabeled peptide (7.7 fold) was observed by blocking SKOV-3 cells receptors with unlabeled peptide. The K D and B max values for this radiolabeled peptide were determined as 3.3 ± 1.0 nM and 2.9 ± 0.3 × 10 6 CPM/pMol, respectively. Biodistribution study revealed tumor to blood and tumor to muscle ratios about 6.9 and 4 respectively after 4 h. Tumor imaging by gamma camera demonstrated considerable high contrast tumor uptake. This developed 99m Tc-HYNIC-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY peptide selectively targeted on HER2 tumor and exhibited a high target uptake combined with acceptable low background activity for tumor imaging in mice. The results of this study and its comparison with another study showed that 99m Tc-HYNIC-(EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY is much better than previously reported radiolabeled peptide as 99m Tc-CSSS-LTVSPWY for HER2 overexpression tumor targeting and imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17 α-methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Tritiated 17α-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17α-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10 -10 M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17α-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 α-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical

  2. Assessment of the image quality and tumor detectability of breath-hold T2-weighted imaging of liver tumors using a fast gradient MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kotaro; Suto, Yuji; Sugihara, Shuji; Tokuda, Yukiko

    1996-01-01

    Fourteen patients with various types of focal liver tumors were imaged with turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE (BH-TSE) and half-Fourier single-shot TSE (HASTE) pulse sequences using a fast gradient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. We compared the T2-weighted images of the liver with the TSE, BH-TSE, HASTE and conventional spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences in order to determine whether those fast T2-weighted images, including fat suppressed images, could replace SE images. In quantitative and qualitative analysis, the fast T2-weighted images were slightly superior to the SE images, but they were inferior in the conspicuousness of liver tumor to the SE images. These findings suggest that the fast T2-weighted images can shorten the examination time of the liver MRI, but cannot replace the T2-weighted SE images because of the low conspicuousness. (author)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of a radioiodinated thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor as a tumor diagnostic agent for angiogenic enzyme imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akizawa, Hiromichi; Zhao, Songji; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Seki, Koh-ichi; Ohkura, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is closely associated with angiogenesis, tumor invasiveness and activation of antitumor agents. We evaluated radioiodinated 5-iodo-6-[(2-iminoimidazolidinyl)methyl]uracil ([ 125 I]IIMU) having high TP-inhibitory potency as the new radiotracer for SPECT targeting of TP expression in tumors. Methods: The characteristics of the radioiodinated TP inhibitor IIMU were determined by evaluating the uptake by tumor cells in vitro and by biodistribution studies in vivo. The distribution of the radiotracer and the extent of TP-specific uptake by tumors were evaluated by a counting method in tumor-bearing mice. Results: The in vitro uptake of radiolabeled IIMU by A431 cells along with high TP expressions was attributed to the binding of the radiotracer to its target enzyme, i.e., TP. In vivo distribution of the radiotracer in A431 tumor-bearing mice revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of 36 and 106, respectively, at 3 h after the radiotracer injection. On using low TP-expressing tumors and TP blocking studies as controls, minor TP-specific accumulation of the radiotracer was detected in these studies. Conclusion: According to the binding of radioiodinated IIMU to the angiogenic enzyme TP, it can be concluded that radioiodinated IIMU might be suitable as a SPECT tracer for tumor imaging.

  5. CT and MR imaging findings of endocrine tumor of the pancreas according to WHO classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rha, Sung Eun; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Kang Hoon; Ku, Young Mi; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Mun

    2007-01-01

    The pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas originating from totipotential stem cells or differentiated mature endocrine cells within the exocrine gland. Endocrine tumors are usually classified into functioning and non-functioning tumors and presents with a range of benignity or malignancy. In this article, we present the various CT and MR imaging findings of endocrine tumors of pancreas according to recent WHO classification

  6. Lack of Evidence for a Direct Interaction of Progranulin and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-2 From Cellular Binding Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell Lang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Progranulin (PGRN is a secreted anti-inflammatory protein which can be processed by neutrophil proteases to various granulins. It has been reported that at least a significant portion of the anti-inflammatory effects of PGRN is due to direct high affinity binding to tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1 and TNFR2 and inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-induced TNFR1/2 signaling. Two studies failed to reproduce the interaction of TNFR1 and TNFR2 with PGRN, but follow up reports speculated that this was due to varying experimental circumstances and/or the use of PGRN from different sources. However, even under consideration of these speculations, there is still a striking discrepancy in the literature between the concentrations of PGRN needed to inhibit TNF signaling and the concentrations required to block TNF binding to TNFR1 and TNFR2. While signaling events induced by 0.2–2 nM of TNF have been efficiently inhibited by low, near to equimolar concentrations (0.5–2.5 nM of PGRN in various studies, the reported inhibitory effects of PGRN on TNF-binding to TNFR1/2 required a huge excess of PGRN (100–1,000-fold. Therefore, we investigated the effect of PGRN on TNF binding to TNFR1 and TNFR2 in highly sensitive cellular binding studies. Unlabeled TNF inhibited >95% of the specific binding of a Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpL fusion protein of TNF to TNFR1 and TNFR2 and blocked binding of soluble GpL fusion proteins of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to membrane TNF expressing cells to >95%, too. Purified PGRN, however, showed in both assays no effect on TNF–TNFR1/2 interaction even when applied in huge excess. To rule out that tags and purification- or storage-related effects compromise the potential ability of PGRN to bind TNF receptors, we directly co-expressed PGRN, and as control TNF, in TNFR1- and TNFR2-expressing cells and looked for binding of GpL-TNF. While expression of TNF strongly inhibited binding of GpL-TNF to TNFR1/2, co

  7. Advance of apoptosis imaging with radiolabeled annexin V in tumor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Daijuan

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important reasons that cause tumor is decrease or complete absence of apoptosis of tumor cells. Conversely successful anti-tumor therapy is correlated with the introduction of apoptosis into tumor cells. Radiolabeled annexin V is used to image in vivo the phosphatidylserine (PS) that explode on the outer surface of cell membrane after apoptosis so that apoptosis can be detected on the early stage. This imaging method can be introduced into the research of tumor in order to help direct the choose of tumor therapy, inspect the effect and evaluate the prognosis

  8. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  9. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  10. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Jie Gu,1,* Kun-Feng Li,1,* Lan-Xin Zhang,1 Huan Wang,1 Li-Si Liu,2 Zhuo-Zhao Zheng,2 Nan-Yin Han,1 Zhen-Jun Yang,1 Tian-Yuan Fan1 1State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 2Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N'-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs. Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA, gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, gadolinium, liposomes, tenascin-C, GBI-10 aptamer, tumor targeting

  11. Ubiquitinated proteins enriched from tumor cells by a ubiquitin binding protein Vx3(A7) as a potent cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldarouish, Mohanad; Wang, Huzhan; Zhou, Meng; Hu, Hong-Ming; Wang, Li-Xin

    2015-04-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that autophagosome-enriched vaccine (named DRibbles: DRiPs-containing blebs) induce a potent anti-tumor efficacy in different murine tumor models, in which DRibble-containing ubiquitinated proteins are efficient tumor-specific antigen source for the cross-presentation after being loaded onto dendritic cells. In this study, we sought to detect whether ubiquitinated proteins enriched from tumor cells could be used directly as a novel cancer vaccine. The ubiquitin binding protein Vx3(A7) was used to isolate ubiquitinated proteins from EL4 and B16-F10 tumor cells after blocking their proteasomal degradation pathway. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with different doses of Ub-enriched proteins via inguinal lymph nodes or subcutaneous injection and with DRibbles, Ub-depleted proteins and whole cell lysate as comparison groups, respectively. The lymphocytes from the vaccinated mice were re-stimulated with inactivated tumor cells and the levels of IFN-γ in the supernatant were detected by ELISA. Anti-tumor efficacy of Ub-enriched proteins vaccine was evaluated by monitoring tumor growth in established tumor mice models. Graphpad Prism 5.0 was used for all statistical analysis. We found that after stimulation with inactivated tumor cells, the lymphocytes from the Ub-enriched proteins-vaccinated mice secreted high level of IFN-γ in dose dependent manner, in which the priming vaccination via inguinal lymph nodes injection induced higher IFN-γ level than that via subcutaneous injection. Moreover, the level of secreted IFN-γ in the Ub-enriched proteins group was markedly higher than that in the whole cell lysate and Ub-depleted proteins. Interestingly, the lymphocytes from mice vaccinated with Ub-enriched proteins, but not Ub-depleted proteins and whole cell lysates, isolated from EL4 or B16-F10 tumor cells also produced an obvious level of IFN-γ when stimulated alternately with inactivated B16-F10 or EL4 tumor cells. Furthermore, Ub

  12. 99m Tc- la bed somatostatin analogs for imaging somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, M.; Najafi, R.; Shafiei, A.; Sadat Ebrahimi, E.; Babaie, M.H.; Rabani, M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the least few years, 111 In-DTPA- Octreotide has found widespread clinical applicability, especially in oncology. However limitation, especially concerning availability, imaging properties, and costs, remain and have stimulated research on radiolabeling with many alternative radionuclides. The purpose of this investigation was to labeling somatostatin analogs with 99 m Tc and evaluate their suitability as an agents for in vivo use. Octreotide and Tyr-3-Octreotide were labeled by 99 mTc with direct and indirect methods. Sodium ascorbate and sodium dithionite were used for reduction of cystine bridge and HYNIC was used as bifunctional agents and different co ligands used for labeling by 99 mTc. Yield of labeling, purity, stability, internalisation, binding affinity and biodistribution of peptide conjugates were studied. Direct labeling of octreotide was simple, rapid, efficient and yield was good (%60). K d for binding affinity as high (10 -9 ) but stability was low. Labeling for HYNIC-Tyr-Octreotide had a high yield (>%90), good stability, internalisation and biodistribution. with more experimental work and some improve this peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals can be employed in all nuclear medicine centers as a useful agent for imaging of tumors

  13. Treatment of malignant brain tumor. Today and tomorrow. Image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor. A current perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Yasukazu; Fujii, Masazumi; Yoshida, Jun; Maesawa, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although usefulness of the image-guided neurosurgery is well documented, there are scarce facilities having the actually operating system in Japan. Since 2006, authors' Nagoya University Hospital has had an operating room named ''Brain THEATER'', where an open MRI system APERTO (Hitachi-Medical Co.) and a navigation system Vector Vision (BrainLAB) are connected to conduct the complete image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor by using the intraoperative MRI for continuously updating the residual tumor tissue to be dissected out. The room is pre- and intra-operatively supported by Departments of image analysis and of radiation technology in the University, and as well, is connected by net-working with another image-guided surgical room ''Brain Suite'' (Siemens 1.5 T MRI system: BrainLAB) in the neighboring facility, Nagoya Central Hospital. This paper describes the circumstances of the introduction of these systems in the Hospital, details of the image-guided surgery in the operation rooms with illustration of actual photos of the rooms and of pre-, intra- and post-operative images, outcomes of image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor reported hitherto, image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor's future perspectives involving robotic surgery and operation on the virtual 3D image including the net-worked one. Efforts should be made to further spread the system for performing the more non-invasive and precise surgery, and for conducting the diagnosis united with treatment. (R.T.)

  14. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  15. Role of Gd-DTPA enhanced fat-suppression MR imaging on ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Moon, Woong Jae; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Choi, Ho Sun

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of Gd-DTPA enhanced fat-suppression (GEFS) MR imaging in the characterization and differentiation of benign from malignant ovarian tumors. MRI findings of thirty-seven patients with surgically proved 44 ovarian tumors (30 benign, 14 malignant) were studied retrospectively. MR imaging with conventional spin echo (CSE; T1-weighted image TR/TE 450/20, T2-weighted image TR/TE 3500/30, 90) and GEFS were performed with a 1.5T GE signa. MRI findings of tumors including cystic or solid, wall and septal thickness, necrosis, invasion to adjacent organ, ascites and lymphadenopathy were assessed separately by using CSE and GEFS images, and then tumors were characterized as benign or malignant. Compared with CSE image, GEFS MR image showed better visualization of solid component in 5 malignant lesions, wall thickness in 5 malignant and 1 benign lesions, septal thickness in 3 malignant and 1 benign lesions, necrosis in 1 malignant lesion, and adjacent soft tissue invasion in 5 malignant lesions. Correct characterization of malignant tumors was increased from 71% on CSE image to 93% on GEFS image. However, correct characterization of benign tumors was 93% on both images. GEFS MR imaging could be useful for characterization of ovarian tumors, especially in malignant cases, and employed for differentiation of benign from malignant tumors

  16. Evaluation of technetium-99M labeled RGD-containing peptide as potential tumor imaging agents in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Silong; Zeng Jun; Zhang Lihua

    2004-01-01

    Integrins (especially α v β 3 ) play a important role in angiogenesis, growth and metastasis of a solid tumor. Targeting tumor with radiolabeled ligands of the α V β 3 integrin may provide information about the receptor status and enable specific therapeutic strategy. A tripeptidic sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) is often the primary site of recognition by integrins. The aim of this study examine 99m Tc-labeled elevenfold peptide (GRGDSRGDSCY, GY11) that target the α V β 3 integrin to determine if this agent target tumors for diagnostic imaging and/or targeted radiotherapy of cancer. Methods: GY11 was radiolabelled with 99 Tc m via cystine residue by means of stannous chloride. 99 Tc m -GY11 was injected through tail vein into nude mice bearing A375 human melanoma. Biodistribution was investigated at 1,2,4 and 6 hours after injection. Percentage injected dose/gram of tissue (%ID/g) and tumor/non-tumor ratios were calculated. Planar images were acquired with SPECT at 1,2,4,6hrs, respectively. Results: 99 Tc m -GY11 was rapidly cleared from blood and excreted predominantly from the kidney. Tumor uptake at 2h postinjection was 3.1%ID/g. The ratios of tumor/blood and tumor/muscle increased from 0.9-6.2, 4.3-13.5 from 1-6hrs postinjection, respectively. Planar images confirmed that tumor could be visualized at 4h after administration of 99 Tc m -GY11. Conclusion: The results suggest that 99 Tc m -GY11 is a promising compound for noninvasive determining the α V β 3 integrin status. 99 Tc m -GY11 SPECT may be useful to imaging α V β 3 -positive tumor and also guide proper utility of α V β 3 antagonist therapy and radionuclide therapy for cancer. (authors)

  17. Gadolinium-DTPA in MR imaging of intracranial and spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakitsubata, Yousuke; Harada, Kuniko; Mori, Yukiko; Kihara, Yasushi; Kakitsubata, Sachiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance(MR) imaging was performed on 23 patients with intracranial and spinal tumors, before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Contrast enhancement was observed in 20 of the 23 tumors. Glioblastomas, intracranial metastases, meningiomas and hemangioblastomas were markedly enhanced by Gd-DTPA. In precontrast scan, tumor delineation was best shown by T 2 weighted images. But T 1 weighted images showed better tumor delineation than T 2 weighted images after administration of Gd-DTPA. No side effects were encountered following administration of Gd-DTPA. (author)

  18. Comparison of fundamental and wideband harmonic contrast imaging of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, F; Liu, J B; Chiou, H J; Rawool, N M; Parker, L; Goldberg, B B

    2000-03-01

    Wideband harmonic imaging (with phase inversion for improved tissue suppression) was compared to fundamental imaging in vivo. Four woodchucks with naturally occurring liver tumors were injected with Imagent (Alliance Pharmaceutical Corp., San Diego, CA). Randomized combinations of dose (0.05, 0.2 and 0.4 ml/kg) and acoustic output power (AO; 5, 25 and 63% or MI Siemens Medical Systems, Issaquah, WA). Tumor vascularity, conspicuity and contrast enhancement were rated by three independent observers. Imagent produced marked tumor enhancement and improved depiction of neovascularity at all dosages and AO settings in both modes. Tumor vascularity and enhancement correlated with mode, dose and AO (P < 0.002). Fundamental imaging produced more enhancement (P < 0.05), but tumor vascularity and conspicuity were best appreciated in harmonic mode (P < 0.05). Under the conditions studied here, the best approach was wideband harmonic imaging with 0.2 ml/kg of Imagent at an AO of 25%.

  19. Imaging of sigma receptors in tumors by PET with [C-11]SA4503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Oda, K.; Ishiwata, K.; Kubota, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sigma receptors are implicated in some diseases in the central nervous system (CNS), such as schizophrenia, depression, dementia and ischemia, and are also expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as melanoma, carcinoma of the breast, lung and prostate, and the brain tumor. Therefore, several radioligands have been proposed for imaging of sigma receptors by positron emission tomography (PET) and by single photon emission computed tomography. Recently, we have applied [C-11]labeled 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ([C-11]SA4503) to mapping sigma1 receptors in the brain of monkeys and human. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of the [C-11]SA4503 PET for imaging of sigma receptors using the AH109A bearing rats, and the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits. Materials and Methods: [C-11]SA4503 was injected i.v. into AH109A bearing rats, and the tissue distribution was measured by tissue dissection. To determine the receptor-specific uptake, cold SA4503 or haloperidol was co-injected into the other group of rats. The PET scanning were performed in the rats in the baseline condition and after pretreatment with haloperidol. In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, PET scanning was also performed in the baseline and blockade conditions. The sigma receptors in the AH109A and VX-2 were measured in vitro by the standard membrane binding assays. Results: The sigma receptors were found in AH109A and VX-2. The density was much higher in VX-2 than in AH109A. In the tissue dissection study, the AH109A uptake of [C-11]SA4503 increased for 60 min after injection. By the co-injection of SA4503 or haloperidol, the AH109A uptake was enhanced. The PET study also confirmed that the radioactivity level in the AH109A was enhanced by the pretreatment with haloperidol. On the other hand, In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, the radioactivity level of in VX-2 remained constant after initial uptake in the baseline PET measurement, but the VX-2 uptake was

  20. CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Makita, Hiroki; Kato, Keizo; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Palatal tumors commonly arise from the minor salivary glands, and benign tumors account for approximately half of all minor salivary gland tumors. Minor salivary gland tumors have an affinity for the posterior hard palate and soft palate and virtually never arise in the midline, probably because of the distribution of palatal salivary glands. The majority of benign salivary gland tumors of the palate are pleomorphic adenomas, while the most common malignant salivary gland tumor is adenoid cystic carcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Epithelial tumors frequently arise from the soft palate. The majority of benign epithelial tumors of the palate are papillomas, while most malignant epithelial tumors are squamous cell carcinomas. Various types of mesenchymal tumors, including fibromas, lipomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas, also involve the palate. This article describes the CT and MR findings of benign and malignant palatal tumors

  1. CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki, E-mail: hkato@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki, E-mail: masa_gif@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Makita, Hiroki, E-mail: makitah@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Keizo, E-mail: keizo@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Hatakeyama, Daijiro, E-mail: hatakeya@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Shibata, Toshiyuki, E-mail: shibat@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke, E-mail: kmizuta@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Aoki, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: aoki@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Palatal tumors commonly arise from the minor salivary glands, and benign tumors account for approximately half of all minor salivary gland tumors. Minor salivary gland tumors have an affinity for the posterior hard palate and soft palate and virtually never arise in the midline, probably because of the distribution of palatal salivary glands. The majority of benign salivary gland tumors of the palate are pleomorphic adenomas, while the most common malignant salivary gland tumor is adenoid cystic carcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Epithelial tumors frequently arise from the soft palate. The majority of benign epithelial tumors of the palate are papillomas, while most malignant epithelial tumors are squamous cell carcinomas. Various types of mesenchymal tumors, including fibromas, lipomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas, also involve the palate. This article describes the CT and MR findings of benign and malignant palatal tumors.

  2. Tumor grading of adult astrocytic glioma on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Seon Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Hong Sik [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine predictive MR features for grading of astrocytic gliomas and to evaluate the accuracy of MR grading in these tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 135 cases of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult (age > 15 years), all of which were proved by open biopsy. Two observers analysed MR images independently with criteria of margin, edema, mass effect, signal heterogeneity, necrosis, cyst formation, hemorrhage, tumor vascularity, enhancement degree, and enhancement size. The patterns of enhancement were categorized into no, homogeneous, heterogeneous, thin smooth rim, thin irregular rim, and thick irregular rim enhancement patterns. Observers finally diagnosed each case as one of low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme. Statistically significant MR features for grading of these tumors were revealed as necrosis (p < 0.001), edema (0.008), and signal heterogeneity (p < 0.025). When compared with histopathologic grading, MR graded correctly 76%- 77% of cases in two tired system(low-grade astrocytoma versus high-grade astrocytoma), but only 67%-69% of cases in three tiered system(low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme). No contrast enhancement was seen in 45% and 23% of low-grade astrocytoma and anaplastic astrocytoma respectively. Glioblastoma multiforme frequently showed thick irregular rim enhancement (57%), but no enhancement at all in 8%. We have concluded that necrosis and edema are significant predictive MR features for grading of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult, and MR was correct in 76%-77% of cases for predicting pathologic grading astrocytomas in two tiered system.

  3. Tumor grading of adult astrocytic glioma on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Seon Kyu; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul; Choi, Kyu Ho; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Woo Suk

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine predictive MR features for grading of astrocytic gliomas and to evaluate the accuracy of MR grading in these tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 135 cases of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult (age > 15 years), all of which were proved by open biopsy. Two observers analysed MR images independently with criteria of margin, edema, mass effect, signal heterogeneity, necrosis, cyst formation, hemorrhage, tumor vascularity, enhancement degree, and enhancement size. The patterns of enhancement were categorized into no, homogeneous, heterogeneous, thin smooth rim, thin irregular rim, and thick irregular rim enhancement patterns. Observers finally diagnosed each case as one of low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme. Statistically significant MR features for grading of these tumors were revealed as necrosis (p < 0.001), edema (0.008), and signal heterogeneity (p < 0.025). When compared with histopathologic grading, MR graded correctly 76%- 77% of cases in two tired system(low-grade astrocytoma versus high-grade astrocytoma), but only 67%-69% of cases in three tiered system(low-grade astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme). No contrast enhancement was seen in 45% and 23% of low-grade astrocytoma and anaplastic astrocytoma respectively. Glioblastoma multiforme frequently showed thick irregular rim enhancement (57%), but no enhancement at all in 8%. We have concluded that necrosis and edema are significant predictive MR features for grading of supratentorial astrocytic gliomas in adult, and MR was correct in 76%-77% of cases for predicting pathologic grading astrocytomas in two tiered system

  4. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  5. Molecular imaging of tumor photoimmunotherapy: Evidence of photosensitized tumor necrosis and hemodynamic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kishimoto, Shun; Oshima, Nobu; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi

    2018-01-01

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR PIT) employs the photoabsorbing dye IR700 conjugated to antibodies specific for cell surface epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). NIR PIT has shown highly selective cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Cell necrosis is thought to be the main mode of cytotox......Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR PIT) employs the photoabsorbing dye IR700 conjugated to antibodies specific for cell surface epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). NIR PIT has shown highly selective cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Cell necrosis is thought to be the main mode...... of cytotoxicity based mainly on in vitro studies. To better understand the acute effects of NIR PIT, molecular imaging studies were performed to assess its cellular and vascular effects.In addition to in vitro studies for cytotoxicity of NIR PIT, the in vivo tumoricidal effects and hemodynamic changes induced....... Following NIR PIT, metabolic MRI using hyperpolarized fumarate showed the production of malate in EGFR-expressing A431 tumor xenografts, providing direct evidence for photosensitized tumor necrosis induced by NIR PIT. R2* mapping studies showed temporal changes in oxygenation, with an accompanying increase...

  6. Research progress in nanographene oxide with tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOU Peihong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanographene oxide,one of graphene oxide derivatives and a novel two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial,has become a popular research topic in nanomedicine due to its unique properties such as ultra-high surface-to-volume ratio and great photo-thermal effect.It contains a large amount of reactive chemical groups,including carboxy group,carbonyl group,hydroxyl group and epoxy group,which enable its easy biological and chemical functionalization and excellent biocompatibility.Therefore,it has potential applications in biomedical field.This paper briefly describes the preparation and functionalization of nanographeme oxide,and then mainly focuses on its application studies in the biomedical field,including in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests and advanced research progress of tumor imaging and treatment.

  7. Contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Wook Jae; Byun Hong Sik; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jong hyun

    2000-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) MR imaging in patients with brain tumors. This study involved 31 patients with pathologically proven brain tumors and nine with clinically diagnosed metastases. In all patients, T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, images were visual contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were obtained. Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were visually compared with other MR sequences in terms of tumor conspicuity. In order to distinguish tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were compared with fast FLAIR and T2-weighted images. The tumor-to- white matter contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), as demonstrated by T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, were quantitatively assessed and compared. For the visual assessment of tumor conspicuity, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image imaging superior to fast FLAIR in 60% of cases (24/40), and superior to T2-weighted in 70% (28/40). Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was inferior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted in 58% of cases (23/40). For distinguishing between tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was superior to fast FLAIR or T2-weighted in 22 of 27 tumors with peritumoral edema (81%). Quantitatively, CNR was the highest on contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image and the lowest on fast FLAIR. For the detection of leptomeningeal metastases, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR was partially superior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in two of three high-grade gliomas. Although contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging should not be seen as a replacement for conventional modalities, it provides additional informaton for assessment of the extent of glial cell tumors and leptomeningeal metastases in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  8. Intravital imaging of cancer stem cell plasticity in mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A.; Ellenbroek, S.I.; Ritsma, L.; Beerling, E.; Vrisekoop, N.; van Rheenen, J.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely debated whether all tumor cells in mammary tumors have the same potential to propagate and maintain tumor growth or whether there is a hierarchical organization. Evidence for the latter theory is mainly based on the ability or failure of transplanted tumor cells to produce detectable

  9. Intravital imaging of plasticity during tumor growth and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, Anoek

    2015-01-01

    Most tumors consist of a heterogeneous mixture of genetically and epigenetically distinct tumor cells. In addition, tumors display regional differences in the tumor microenvironment comprising non-transformed cell types such as immune cells and non-cellular factors including growth factors and the

  10. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  11. Fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR image in the intracranial tumors: comparison with fast spin-echo image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kwang, Hyoen Joo; Baek, Seoung Yeon; Lee, Sun Wha

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) magnetic resonance(MR) images for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors. MR imaging was used to study 15 patients with various intracranial tumors and were compared the findings according to fast spin echo and fast FLAIR images. In 12 of 15 patients, tumor signal intensities on FLAIR images were consistent with those shown on T2-weighted(T2W) images. In seven of eight patients who had cystic or necrotic components within the mass, FLAIR images showed isosignal intensity and in the other patient, high signal intensity was seen. There was variation in the signal intensity from cerebrospinal fluid(CSF). In 12 of 13 patients in whom edema was associated with tumor, FLAIR images were clearer than T2W images as their signal intensity was brighter. In eight patients, however, FLAIR and T2W images provided a similar definition of the margin between edema and tumor. In six patients with intratumoral hemorrhage except the chronic cystic stage. We concluded that in the diagnosis of intracranial tumors, FLAIR images can supplement conventional spin-echo images

  12. Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Jaehong; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

  13. Imaging tumor hypoxia: Blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is fundamentally different in hypoxia subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vaupel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tissue subvolumes are a hallmark feature of solid malignant tumors, relevant for cancer therapy and patient outcome because they increase both the intrinsic aggressiveness of tumor cells and their resistance to several commonly used anticancer strategies. Pathogenetic mechanisms leading to hypoxia are diverse, may coexist within the same tumor and are commonly grouped according to the duration of their effects. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations resulting from enlarged intercapillary distances and adverse diffusion geometries and — to a lesser extent — by hypoxemia, compromised perfusion or long-lasting microregional flow stops. Conversely, acute hypoxia preferentially results from transient disruptions in perfusion. While each of these features of the tumor microenvironment can contribute to a critical reduction of oxygen availability, the delivery of imaging agents (as well as nutrients and anticancer agents may be compromised or remain unaffected. Thus, a critical appraisal of the effects of the various mechanisms leading to hypoxia with regard to the blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is necessary to judge their ability to correctly represent the hypoxic phenotype of solid malignancies.

  14. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-C. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jeng-Jong [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw; Ting, G. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Y.-L. [Taiwan Liposome Company, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, J. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China)

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R {sup 2}=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm{sup 3} (R {sup 2}=0.907). {gamma} Scintigraphy combined with [{sup 131}I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-C.; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, G.; Tseng, Y.-L.; Wang, S.-J.; Whang-Peng, J.

    2007-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R 2 =0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 (R 2 =0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131 I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs

  16. Development of an automated extraction method for liver tumors in three dimensional multiphase multislice CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Junya; Shimizu, Akinobu; Kobatake, Hidefumi

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a tumor detection method using four phase three dimensional (3D) CT images of livers, i.e. non-contrast, early, portal, and late phase images. The method extracts liver regions from the four phase images and enhances tumors in the livers using a 3D adaptive convergence index filter. Then it detects local maximum points and extracts tumor candidates by a region growing method. Subsequently several features of the candidates are measured and each candidate is classified into true tumor or normal tissue based on Mahalanobis distances. Above processes except liver region extraction are applied to four phase images, independently and four resultant images are integrated into one. We applied the proposed method to 3D abdominal CT images of ten patients obtained with multi-detector row CT scanner and confirmed that tumor detection rate was 100% without false positives, which was quite promising results. (author)

  17. Pulsed terahertz imaging of breast cancer in freshly excised murine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Chavez, Tanny; Khan, Kamrul; Wu, Jingxian; Chakraborty, Avishek; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Bailey, Keith; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates terahertz (THz) imaging and classification of freshly excised murine xenograft breast cancer tumors. These tumors are grown via injection of E0771 breast adenocarcinoma cells into the flank of mice maintained on high-fat diet. Within 1 h of excision, the tumor and adjacent tissues are imaged using a pulsed THz system in the reflection mode. The THz images are classified using a statistical Bayesian mixture model with unsupervised and supervised approaches. Correlation with digitized pathology images is conducted using classification images assigned by a modal class decision rule. The corresponding receiver operating characteristic curves are obtained based on the classification results. A total of 13 tumor samples obtained from 9 tumors are investigated. The results show good correlation of THz images with pathology results in all samples of cancer and fat tissues. For tumor samples of cancer, fat, and muscle tissues, THz images show reasonable correlation with pathology where the primary challenge lies in the overlapping dielectric properties of cancer and muscle tissues. The use of a supervised regression approach shows improvement in the classification images although not consistently in all tissue regions. Advancing THz imaging of breast tumors from mice and the development of accurate statistical models will ultimately progress the technique for the assessment of human breast tumor margins.

  18. Granular Cell Tumor of the Neurohypophysis: A Case Report with Magnetic Resonance and CT Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Ka Yeon; Lee, Sun Jin; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeon Soo [Dept. of Pathology, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeun, Shin Soo [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A granular cell tumor (GCT) usually occurs as a small, solitary, nodular tumor and is more prevalent in adult females. The authors report the magnetic resonance (MR) and CT imaging findings in a 61-year-old woman with GCT of the neurohypophysis presenting with a history of reduced visual acuity in her right eye. MR images showed a suprasellar mass with an isointense signal on a T1-weighted image and an hypointense signal on a T2-weighted image. The histopathological examination revealed a granular cell tumor. In this article, the MR and CT imaging findings of GCT of the neurohypophysis with the literature reviews are discussed.

  19. Granular Cell Tumor of the Neurohypophysis: A Case Report with Magnetic Resonance and CT Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ka Yeon; Lee, Sun Jin; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Lee, Yeon Soo; Jeun, Shin Soo

    2011-01-01

    A granular cell tumor (GCT) usually occurs as a small, solitary, nodular tumor and is more prevalent in adult females. The authors report the magnetic resonance (MR) and CT imaging findings in a 61-year-old woman with GCT of the neurohypophysis presenting with a history of reduced visual acuity in her right eye. MR images showed a suprasellar mass with an isointense signal on a T1-weighted image and an hypointense signal on a T2-weighted image. The histopathological examination revealed a granular cell tumor. In this article, the MR and CT imaging findings of GCT of the neurohypophysis with the literature reviews are discussed.

  20. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  1. DEMARCATE: Density-based magnetic resonance image clustering for assessing tumor heterogeneity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijoy; Banerjee, Sayantan; Kurtek, Sebastian; Narang, Shivali; Lee, Joonsang; Rao, Ganesh; Martinez, Juan; Bharath, Karthik; Rao, Arvind U K; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a crucial area of cancer research wherein inter- and intra-tumor differences are investigated to assess and monitor disease development and progression, especially in cancer. The proliferation of imaging and linked genomic data has enabled us to evaluate tumor heterogeneity on multiple levels. In this work, we examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with brain cancer to assess image-based tumor heterogeneity. Standard approaches to this problem use scalar summary measures (e.g., intensity-based histogram statistics) that do not adequately capture the complete and finer scale information in the voxel-level data. In this paper, we introduce a novel technique, DEMARCATE (DEnsity-based MAgnetic Resonance image Clustering for Assessing Tumor hEterogeneity) to explore the entire tumor heterogeneity density profiles (THDPs) obtained from the full tumor voxel space. THDPs are smoothed representations of the probability density function of the tumor images. We develop tools for analyzing such objects under the Fisher-Rao Riemannian framework that allows us to construct metrics for THDP comparisons across patients, which can be used in conjunction with standard clustering approaches. Our analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) based Glioblastoma dataset reveal two significant clusters of patients with marked differences in tumor morphology, genomic characteristics and prognostic clinical outcomes. In addition, we see enrichment of image-based clusters with known molecular subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme, which further validates our representation of tumor heterogeneity and subsequent clustering techniques.

  2. Evaluation of 18F-labeled icotinib derivatives as potential PET agents for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongyu Ren; Hongyu Ning; Jin Chang; Mingxia Zhao; Yong He; Yan Chong; Chuanmin Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, three 18 F-labeled crown ether fused anilinoquinazoline derivatives ([ 18 F]11a-c) were synthesized and evaluated as potential tumor imaging probes. The biodistribution results of [ 18 F]11b were good. Compared with [ 18 F]-fludeoxyglucose and l-[ 18 F]-fluoroethyltyrosine in the same animal model, [ 18 F]11b had better tumor/brain, tumor/muscle, and tumor/blood uptake ratios. Overall, these results suggest that [ 18 F]11b is promising as a tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography. (author)

  3. Platelets Promote Metastasis via Binding Tumor CD97 Leading to Bidirectional Signaling that Coordinates Transendothelial Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvona Ward

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tumor cells initiate platelet activation leading to the secretion of bioactive molecules, which promote metastasis. Platelet receptors on tumors have not been well-characterized, resulting in a critical gap in knowledge concerning platelet-promoted metastasis. We identify a direct interaction between platelets and tumor CD97 that stimulates rapid bidirectional signaling. CD97, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, is an overexpressed tumor antigen in several cancer types. Purified CD97 extracellular domain or tumor cell-associated CD97 stimulated platelet activation. CD97-initiated platelet activation led to granule secretion, including the release of ATP, a mediator of endothelial junction disruption. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA derived from platelets induced tumor invasiveness via proximal CD97-LPAR heterodimer signaling, coupling coincident tumor cell migration and vascular permeability to promote transendothelial migration. Consistent with this, CD97 was necessary for tumor cell-induced vascular permeability in vivo and metastasis formation in preclinical models. These findings support targeted blockade of tumor CD97 as an approach to ameliorate metastatic spread. : Tumor-initiated platelet activation promotes tissue invasion of cancer cells and metastasis. Ward et al. demonstrate that a common tumor-associated antigen, CD97, accounts for platelet activation and participates directly in LPA-mediated signal transduction leading to tumor cell invasion. CD97 promotes vascular extravasation and metastasis in pre-clinical models. Keywords: platelets, metastasis, transendothelial migration, circulating tumor cells, CD97, adhesion GPCR, LPA

  4. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  5. Gd-DOTA enhancement of cerebral and spinal tumors on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, I.; Manelfe, C.; Chastin, I.; Arrue, P.; Prere, J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of Gd-DOTA as a contrast agent in MR imaging to improve the diagnosis of cerebral and spinal tumors was assessed in 20 patients, ten with brain tumors and ten with spinal tumors. Imaging was performed with a 0.5-T Magniscan 5000 unit. T1-weighted (spin-echo and gradient-echo) and T2-weighted (spin-echo) images were acquired before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DOTA, 0.1 mmol/kg. On T1-weighted images, Gd-DOTA enhanced sites of presumed disruption of the blood-brain barrier. This made some brain tumors more conspicuous and helped target biopsies, but did not reveal any additional lesions. On the other hand, the use of Gd-DOTA significantly improved the reliability of spinal tumor imaging compared to imaging performed without contrast agent, allowing delineation of abnormalities on T1-weighted images, which frequently contain fewer artifacts than the most sensitive T2-weighted images. Images obtained with Gd-DOTA could be used by the physician to rule out residual tumor after surgery and to assess recurrences. Additional work should be done to discover whether spinal tumor exploration with MR imaging could include solely T1-weighted sequences, performed before and after contrast agent administration, without T2-weighted sequences

  6. Contrast-enhanced helical CT of the pancreas. Optimal timing of imaging for pancreatic tumor evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Ryuzo

    2001-01-01

    We performed three-phase helical CT in patients suspected pancreatic tumors and investigated the optimal timing of imaging for evaluation of the pancreatic mass. The pancreatic-phase was superior in detecting pancreatic tumors, including islet cell tumors that may show strong enhancement. However, portal vein-phase imaging was also superior in 16.7% of our patients. Taking into account examination for hepatic metastasis, helical CT of any pancreatic tumor should include images obtained in the pancreatic and portal vein phases. (author)

  7. An accurate algorithm to match imperfectly matched images for lung tumor detection without markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Timothy; Bereg, Sergey; Yan, Yulong; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Kearney, Vasant; Jiang, Lan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-05-08

    In order to locate lung tumors on kV projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are created and compared with projection images. However, lung tumors always move due to respiration and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs. In addition, global image intensity discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image orientations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported to match imperfectly matched projection images and DRRs. The kV projection images were matched with different DRRs in two steps. Preprocessing was performed in advance to generate two sets of DRRs. The tumors were removed from the planning 3D CT for a single phase of planning 4D CT images using planning contours of tumors. DRRs of background and DRRs of tumors were generated separately for every projection angle. The first step was to match projection images with DRRs of background signals. This method divided global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities were evaluated by calculating normalized cross-correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) was automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single projection tile that had a bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel-based linear transformation was determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The background DRRs were transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contained only the tumor. The second step was to register DRRs of tumors to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. This method was successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (BrainLAB) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers were

  8. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Kim, E.E.; Tresukosol, D.; Kudelka, A.P.; Edwards, C.L.; Kavanagh, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Amide proton transfer imaging of high intensity focused ultrasound-treated tumor tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, S.J.C.G.; Jacobs, I.; Strijkers, G.J.; Nicolay, K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. Methods: APT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  10. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Treated Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Jacobs, Igor; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    PurposeIn this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. MethodsAPT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  11. High contrast tumor imaging with radio-labeled antibody Fab fragments tailored for optimized pharmacokinetics via PASylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Claudia T; Friedrich, Lars; Laitinen, Iina; Schlapschy, Martin; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Skerra, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of antibodies constitute established tracers for in vivo radiodiagnostics, their functionality is hampered by a very short circulation half-life. PASylation, the genetic fusion with a long, conformationally disordered amino acid chain comprising Pro, Ala and Ser, provides a convenient way to expand protein size and, consequently, retard renal filtration. Humanized αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs were systematically fused with 100 to 600 PAS residues and produced in E. coli. Cytofluorimetric titration analysis on tumor cell lines confirmed that antigen-binding activities of the parental antibodies were retained. The radio-iodinated PASylated Fabs were studied by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution analysis in mouse tumor xenograft models. While the unmodified αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs showed weak tumor uptake (0.8% and 0.2% ID/g, respectively; 24 h p.i.) tumor-associated radioactivity was boosted with increasing PAS length (up to 9 and 26-fold, respectively), approaching an optimum for Fab-PAS400. Remarkably, 6- and 5-fold higher tumor-to-blood ratios compared with the unmodified Fabs were measured in the biodistribution analysis (48 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200, respectively. These findings were confirmed by PET studies, showing high imaging contrast in line with tumor-to-blood ratios of 12.2 and 5.7 (24 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200. Even stronger tumor signals were obtained with the corresponding αCD20 Fabs, both in PET imaging and biodistribution analysis, with an uptake of 2.8% ID/g for Fab-PAS100 vs. 0.24% ID/g for the unmodified Fab. Hence, by engineering Fabs via PASylation, plasma half-life can be tailored to significantly improve tracer uptake and tumor contrast, thus optimally matching reagent/target interactions.

  12. Three-Dimensional Segmentation of the Tumor in Computed Tomographic Images of Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Deglint, Hanford J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Ayres, Fábio J.; Boag, Graham S.; Zuffo, Marcelo K.

    2006-01-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative ...

  13. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Huang Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A; Humm, John L; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S; Martin, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ∼0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ∼0.8 mm could be obtained.

  14. Dual-modality optical and positron emission tomography imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor vasculature using quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-01-01

    To date, the in vivo imaging of quantum dots (QDs) has been mostly qualitative or semiquantitative. The development of a dual-function positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe might allow the accurate assessment of the tumor-targeting efficacy of QDs. An amine-functionalized QD was conjugated with VEGF protein and DOTA chelator for VEGFR-targeted PET/NIRF imaging after 64 Cu-labeling. The targeting efficacy of this dual functional probe was evaluated in vitro and in vivo through cell-binding assay, cell staining, in vivo optical/PET imaging, ex vivo optical/PET imaging, and histology. The DOTA-QD-VEGF exhibited VEGFR-specific binding in both cell-binding assay and cell staining experiment. Both NIR fluorescence imaging and microPET showed VEGFR-specific delivery of conjugated DOTA-QD-VEGF nanoparticle and prominent reticuloendothelial system uptake. The U87MG tumor uptake of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD was less than one percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g), significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD-VEGF (1.52±0.6%ID/g, 2.81±0.3%ID/g, 3.84± 0.4%ID/g, and 4.16±0.5%ID/g at 1,4,16, and 24 h post injection, respectively; n=3). Good correlation was also observed between the results measured by ex vivo PET and NIRF organ imaging. Histologic examination revealed that DOTA-QD-VEGF primarily targets the tumor vasculature through a VEGF-VEGFR interaction. We have successfully developed a QD-based nanoprobe for dual PET and NIRF imaging of tumor VEGFR expression. The success of this bifunctional imaging approach may render higher degree of accuracy for the quantitative targeted NIRF imaging in deep tissue. (orig.)

  15. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  16. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallery, F.; Michel, D.; Constans, J.M.; Gondry-Jouet, C. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amiens (France); Bouzerar, R.; Promelle, V.; Baledent, O. [University Hospital, Department of Imaging and Biophysics, Amiens (France); Attencourt, C. [University Hospital, Departement of Pathology, Amiens (France); Peltier, J. [University Hospital, Departement of Neurosurgery, Amiens (France)

    2017-11-15

    The use of DSC-MR imaging in pediatric neuroradiology is gradually growing. However, the number of studies listed in the literature remains limited. We propose to assess the perfusion and permeability parameters in pediatric brain tumor grading. Thirty children with a brain tumor having benefited from a DSC-MR perfusion sequence have been retrospectively explored. Relative CBF and CBV were computed on the ROI with the largest lesion coverage. Assessment of the lesion's permeability was also performed through the semi-quantitative PSR parameter and the K2 model-based parameter on the whole-lesion ROI and a reduced ROI drawn on the permeability maps. A statistical comparison of high- and low-grade groups (HG, LG) as well as a ROC analysis was performed on the histogram-based parameters. Our results showed a statistically significant difference between LG and HG groups for mean rCBV (p < 10{sup -3}), rCBF (p < 10{sup -3}), and for PSR (p = 0.03) but not for the K2 factor (p = 0.5). However, the ratio K2/PSR was shown to be a strong discriminating factor between the two groups of lesions (p < 10{sup -3}). For rCBV and rCBF indicators, high values of ROC AUC were obtained (> 0.9) and mean value thresholds were observed at 1.07 and 1.03, respectively. For K2/PSR in the reduced area, AUC was also superior to 0.9. The implementation of a dynamic T2* perfusion sequence provided reliable results using an objective whole-lesion ROI. Perfusion parameters as well as a new permeability indicator could efficiently discriminate high-grade from low-grade lesions in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  17. Deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 protein (DMBT1): a pattern recognition receptor with multiple binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Veerman, Enno C I

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1(SAG)), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1(GP340)) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW). Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs.

  18. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 Protein (DMBT1: A Pattern Recognition Receptor with Multiple Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enno C. I. Veerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1, salivary agglutinin (DMBT1SAG, and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1GP340 are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW. Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs.

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  20. Imaging of Hsp70-positive tumors with cmHsp70.1 antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehrmann MK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mathias K Gehrmann,1 Melanie A Kimm,2 Stefan Stangl,1 Thomas E Schmid,1 Peter B Noël,2 Ernst J Rummeny,2 Gabriele Multhoff11Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Real-time imaging of small tumors is still one of the challenges in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of clinical outcome. Targeting novel biomarkers that are selectively expressed on a large variety of different tumors but not normal cells has the potential to improve the imaging capacity of existing methods such as computed tomography. Herein, we present a novel technique using cmHsp70.1 monoclonal antibody-conjugated spherical gold nanoparticles for quantification of the targeted uptake of gold nanoparticles into membrane Hsp70-positive tumor cells. Upon binding, cmHsp70.1-conjugated gold nanoparticles but not nanoparticles coupled to an isotype-matched IgG1 antibody or empty nanoparticles are rapidly taken up by highly malignant Hsp70 membrane-positive mouse tumor cells. After 24 hours, the cmHsp70.1-conjugated gold nanoparticles are found to be enriched in the perinuclear region. Specificity for membrane Hsp70 was shown by using an Hsp70 knockout tumor cell system. Toxic side effects of the cmHsp70.1-conjugated nanoparticles are not observed at a concentration of 1–10 µg/mL. Experiments are ongoing to evaluate whether cmHsp70.1 antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles are suitable for the detection of membrane-Hsp70-positive tumors in vivo.Keywords: heat shock protein 70, tumor biomarker, theranostics, multimodal CT, multispectral CT, k-edge

  1. Experimental study of 99Tcm-tri-peptide as a novel tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wenhui; Cai Xiaojia; Liu Ciyi; Zeng Jun; Zhang Lihua; Lei Bei; Huang Gang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 99 Tc m -Arg-Glu-Ser ( 99 Tc m -RES) as a potential tumor imaging agent. Methods: RES was synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis. The optimal labeling conditions of RES were determined under different reagents and reacting temperatures using SnC1 2 as reducing agent.The biodistribution of 99 Tc m -RES was studied in nude mice bearing human lung cancer A549. Results: The radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -RES was up to 85% and the radiochemical purity was 75% ever after 6 h at room temperature. The tumor uptake of 99 Tc m -RES was obvious and the radioactivity ratios of tumor/blood, tumor/heart, tumor/liver, tumor/lung, tumor/spleen and tumor/muscle were 5.31, 1.88, 1.57, 3.58, 4.16 and 5.92, respectively at 6 h after 99 Tc m -RES injection. Gamma camera imaging showed that tumor uptake of 99 Tc m -RES was negative in rabbits with inflammatory mass but positive in those bearing tumor. The radioactivity ratio of tumor/inflammation was 3.12 at 6 h after injection. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -RES might possibly become a potential tumor imaging agent. (authors)

  2. Diagnostic value of the fast-FLAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husstedt, H.W.; Sickert, M.; Koestler, H.; Haubitz, B.; Becker, H.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify imaging characteristics of fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in brain tumors compared with T1-postcontrast- and T2-sequences. Fast-FLAIR-, T2 fast spin echo (FSE)-, and T1 SE postcontrast images of 74 patients with intracranial neoplasms were analyzed. Four neuroradiologists rated signal intensity and inhomogeneity of the tumor, rendering of cystic parts, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, of the tumor vs edema and of brain vs edema, as well as the presence of motion and of other artifacts. Data analysis was performed for histologically proven astrocytomas, glioblastomas, and meningiomas, for tumors with poor contrast enhancement, and for all patients pooled. Only for tumors with poor contrast enhancement (n = 12) did fast FLAIR provide additional information about the lesion. In these cases, signal intensity, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, and differentiation of the tumor vs edema were best using fast FLAIR. In all cases, rendering of the tumor's inner structure was poor. For all other tumor types, fast FLAIR did not give clinically relevant information, the only exception being a better demarcation of the edema from brain tissue. Artifacts rarely interfered with evaluation of fast-FLAIR images. Thus, fast FLAIR cannot replace T2-weighted series. It provides additional information only in tumors with poor contrast enhancement. It is helpful for defining the exact extent of the edema of any tumor but gives little information about their inner structure. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic value of the fast-FLAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husstedt, H W; Sickert, M; Köstler, H; Haubitz, B; Becker, H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify imaging characteristics of fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in brain tumors compared with T1-postcontrast- and T2-sequences. Fast-FLAIR-, T2 fast spin echo (FSE)-, and T1 SE postcontrast images of 74 patients with intracranial neoplasms were analyzed. Four neuroradiologists rated signal intensity and inhomogeneity of the tumor, rendering of cystic parts, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, of the tumor vs edema and of brain vs edema, as well as the presence of motion and of other artifacts. Data analysis was performed for histologically proven astrocytomas, glioblastomas, and meningiomas, for tumors with poor contrast enhancement, and for all patients pooled. Only for tumors with poor contrast enhancement (n = 12) did fast FLAIR provide additional information about the lesion. In these cases, signal intensity, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, and differentiation of the tumor vs edema were best using fast FLAIR. In all cases, rendering of the tumor's inner structure was poor. For all other tumor types, fast FLAIR did not give clinically relevant information, the only exception being a better demarcation of the edema from brain tissue. Artifacts rarely interfered with evaluation of fast-FLAIR images. Thus, fast FLAIR cannot replace T2-weighted series. It provides additional information only in tumors with poor contrast enhancement. It is helpful for defining the exact extent of the edema of any tumor but gives little information about their inner structure.

  4. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  5. A simple method for detecting tumor in T2-weighted MRI brain images. An image-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Phooi-Yee; Ozawa, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a decision support system which uses a computer-based procedure to detect tumor blocks or lesions in digitized medical images. The authors developed a simple method with a low computation effort to detect tumors on T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain images, focusing on the connection between the spatial pixel value and tumor properties from four different perspectives: cases having minuscule differences between two images using a fixed block-based method, tumor shape and size using the edge and binary images, tumor properties based on texture values using spatial pixel intensity distribution controlled by a global discriminate value, and the occurrence of content-specific tumor pixel for threshold images. Measurements of the following medical datasets were performed: different time interval images, and different brain disease images on single and multiple slice images. Experimental results have revealed that our proposed technique incurred an overall error smaller than those in other proposed methods. In particular, the proposed method allowed decrements of false alarm and missed alarm errors, which demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed technique. In this paper, we also present a prototype system, known as PCB, to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods by actual experiments, comparing the detection accuracy and system performance. (author)

  6. Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.W.; Barrett, K.; Chantry, D.; Turner, M.; Feldmann, M.

    1990-01-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extracellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10 -9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ)

  7. Somatostatin-receptor imaging in the localization of endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.; Bakker, W.H.; Reubi, J.C.; Krenning, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    A number of different tumors have receptors for somatostatin. We evaluated the efficacy of scanning with 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, for tumor localization in 42 patients with carcinoid tumors, pancreatic endocrine tumors, or paragangliomas. We then evaluated the response to octreotide therapy in some of these patients. Primary tumors or metastases, often previously unrecognized, were visualized in 12 of 13 patients with carcinoid tumors and in 7 of 9 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors. The endocrine symptoms of these patients responded well to therapy with octreotide. Among 20 patients with paragangliomas, 8 of whom had more than one tumor, 10 temporal (tympanic or jugular), 9 carotid, and 10 vagal tumors could be visualized. One small tympanic tumor and one small carotid tumor were not seen on the scan. The 123 I-labeled Tyr3-octreotide scanning technique is a rapid and safe procedure for the visualization of some tumors with somatostatin receptors. A positive scan may predict the ability of octreotide therapy to control symptoms of hormonal hypersecretion

  8. Evaluation of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1 as a tumor-homing imaging agent targeting metastasis with SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Cheng, Teng; Dong, Qingjian; Wei, Rui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Luo, Danfeng; Ma, Xiangyi; Wang, Shixuan; Gao, Qinglei; Ma, Ding; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xi, Ling

    2015-03-01

    TMTP1 (NVVRQ) is a novel tumor-homing peptide, which specifically targets tumor metastases, even at the early stage of occult metastasis foci. Fusing TMTP1 to therapeutic peptides or proteins can increase its anti-cancer efficacy both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we labeled TMTP1 with (99m)Tc to evaluate its targeting properties in an ovarian cancer xenograft tumor mouse model and a gastric cancer xenograft mouse model. The invasion ability of SKOV3 and highly metastatic SKOV3.ip cell lines were performed by the Transwell Invasion Assays, and then Rhodamine-TMTP1 was used to detect its affinity to these two cells. Using the co-ligand ethylenediamine-N, N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) and the bifunctional chelator 6-hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC), the TMTP1 peptide was labeled with (99m)Tc. A cell-binding assay was performed by incubating cancer cells with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1 with or without an excess dose of cold HYNIC-TMTP1. To evaluate the probe in vivo, nude mice bearing SKOV3, SKOV3.ip and MNK-45 tumor cells were established and subjected to SPECT imaging after injection with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1. Ex vivo γ-counting of dissected tissues from the mice was used to evaluate its biodistribution. (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1 was successfully synthesized. The radiotracer also exhibited high hydrophilicity and excellent stability in vitro and in vivo. It has strong affinity to highly metastatic cancer cell lines but not to poorly metastatic cell lines. After mice were injected with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1, non-invasive SPECT imaging detected SKOV3.ip and MNK-45 xenograft tumors but not SKOV3 xenograft tumors. This result can be inhibited by excess HYNIC-TMTP1. The uptake of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1 in SKOV3.ip xenograft tumors was 0.182±0.017% ID/g at 2h p.i. with high renal uptake (74.32±15.05% ID/g at 2h p.i.). (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TMTP1 biodistribution and SPECT imaging demonstrated its ability to target highly metastatic tumors. Therefore, metastasis can be non-invasively investigated by SPECT

  9. Development of a Tc-99m labeled sigma-2 receptor-specific ligand as a potential breast tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok-Rye; Yang, Biao; Ploessl, Karl; Chumpradit, Sumalee; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Acton, Paul D.; Wheeler, Kenneth; Mach, Robert H.; Kung, Hank F.

    2001-01-01

    A novel in vivo imaging agent, 99m Tc labeled [(N-[2-((3'-N'-propyl-[3,3,1]aza-bicyclononan-3α-yl)(2''-methoxy-5- methyl-phenylcarbamate) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato] technetium(V) oxide), [ 99m Tc]2, displaying specific binding towards sigma-2 receptors was prepared and characterized. In vitro binding assays showed that the rhenium surrogate of [ 99m Tc]2, Re-2, displayed excellent binding affinity and selectivity towards sigma-2 receptors (K i = 2,723 and 22 nM for sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor, respectively). Preparation of [ 99m Tc]2 was achieved by heating the S-protected starting material, 1, in the presence of acid, reducing agent (stannous glucoheptonate) and sodium [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate. The lipophilic racemic mixture was successfully prepared in 10 to 50% yield and the radiochemical purity was >98%. Separation of the isomers, peak A and peak B, was successfully achieved by using a chiralpak AD column eluted with an isocratic solvent (n-hexane/isopropanol; 3:1; v/v). The peak A and peak B appear to co-elute with the isomers of the surrogate, Re-2, under the same HPLC condition. Biodistribution studies in tumor bearing mice (mouse mammary adenocarcinoma, cell line 66, which is known to over-express sigma-2 receptors) showed that the racemic [ 99m Tc]2 localized in the tumor. Uptake in the tumor was 2.11, 1.30 and 1.11 %dose/gram at 1, 4 and 8 hr post iv injection, respectively, suggesting good uptake and retention in the tumor cells. The tumor uptake was significantly, but incompletely, blocked (about 25-30% blockage) by co-injection of 'cold' (+)pentazocine or haloperidol (1 mg/Kg). A majority of the radioactivity localized in the tumor tissue was extractable (>60%), and the HPLC analysis showed that it is the original compound, racemic [ 99m Tc]2 (>98% pure). The distribution of the purified peak A and peak B was determined in the same tumor bearing mice at 4 hr post iv injection. The tumor uptake was similar for both isomers

  10. Comparison of MR imaging and CT in the evaluation of uterine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janus, C.L.; Dottino, P.; Brodman, M.; Goodman, H.; Gendal, E.S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors compared the usefulness of MR imaging and CT in staging uterine tumors. Forty women with known cervical carcinoma, endometrial cancer, or leiomyosarcoma underwent CT and MR imaging within 1 week prior to surgery. MR imaging was better than CT for localizing tumors to the endometrium of myometrium and in the evaluation of lymph node involvement and extension to the cervix and parametria. MR imaging, with its superior ability to demonstrate pelvic anatomy and its lack of ionizing radiation and risk from iodinated contrast media, has an important place in the staging of uterine tumors

  11. Image Analysis of Endosocopic Ultrasonography in Submucosal Tumor Using Fuzzy Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Baek Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopists usually make a diagnosis in the submucosal tumor depending on the subjective evaluation about general images obtained by endoscopic ultrasonography. In this paper, we propose a method to extract areas of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST and lipoma automatically from the ultrasonic image to assist those specialists. We also propose an algorithm to differentiate GIST from non-GIST by fuzzy inference from such images after applying ROC curve with mean and standard deviation of brightness information. In experiments using real images that medical specialists use, we verify that our method is sufficiently helpful for such specialists for efficient classification of submucosal tumors.

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Experimental Melanoma Tumors using the Novel Radiotracer 68Ga-NODAGA-Procainamide (PCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, István; Vida, András; Nagy, Gábor; Emri, Miklós; Farkas, Antal; Kis, Adrienn; Angyal, János; Dénes, Noémi; Szabó, Judit P; Kovács, Tünde; Bai, Péter; Trencsényi, György

    2017-01-01

    The most aggressive form of skin cancer is the malignant melanoma. Because of its high metastatic potential the early detection of primary melanoma tumors and metastases using non-invasive PET imaging determines the outcome of the disease. Previous studies have already shown that benzamide derivatives, such as procainamide (PCA) specifically bind to melanin pigment. The aim of this study was to synthesize and investigate the melanin specificity of the novel 68 Ga-labeled NODAGA-PCA molecule in vitro and in vivo using PET techniques. Procainamide (PCA) was conjugated with NODAGA chelator and was labeled with Ga-68 ( 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA). The melanin specificity of 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA was tested in vitro , ex vivo and in vivo using melanotic B16-F10 and amelanotic Melur melanoma cell lines. By subcutaneous and intravenous injection of melanoma cells tumor-bearing mice were prepared, on which biodistribution studies and small animal PET/CT scans were performed for 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA and 18 FDG tracers. 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA was produced with high specific activity (14.9±3.9 GBq/µmol) and with excellent radiochemical purity (98%PCA uptake of B16-F10 cells was significantly ( p ≤0.01) higher than Melur cells. Ex vivo biodistribution and in vivo PET/CT studies using subcutaneous and metastatic tumor models showed significantly ( p ≤0.01) higher 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake in B16-F10 primary tumors and lung metastases in comparison with amelanotic Melur tumors. In experiments where 18 FDG and 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake of B16-F10 tumors was compared, we found that the tumor-to-muscle (T/M) and tumor-to-lung (T/L) ratios were significantly ( p ≤0.05 and p ≤0.01) higher using 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA than the 18 FDG accumulation. Our novel radiotracer 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA showed specific binding to the melanin producing experimental melanoma tumors. Therefore, 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA is a suitable diagnostic radiotracer for the detection of melanoma tumors and metastases in vivo .

  13. Digital tumor fluoroscopy (DTF)--a new direct imaging system in the therapy planning for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, M; Fröder, M

    1990-01-01

    Digital Tumor Fluoroscopy is an expanded x-ray video chain optimized to iodine contrast with an extended Gy scale up to 64000 Gy values. Series of pictures are taken before and after injection of contrast medium. With the most recent unit, up to ten images can be taken and stored. The microprogrammable processor allows the subtraction of images recorded at any moment of the examination. Dynamic views of the distribution of contrast medium in the intravasal and extravasal spaces of brain and tumor tissue are gained by the subtraction of stored images. Tumors can be differentiated by studying the storage and drainage behavior of the contrast medium during the period of examination. Meningiomas store contrast medium very intensively during the whole time of investigation, whereas astrocytomas grade 2-3 pick it up less strongly at the beginning and release it within 2 min. Glioblastomas show a massive but delayed accumulation of contrast medium and a decreased flow-off-rate. In comparison with radiography and MR-imaging the most important advantage of Digital Tumor Fluoroscopy is that direct information on tumor localization is gained in relation to the skull-cap. This enables the radiotherapist to mark the treatment field directly on the skull. Therefore it is no longer necessary to calculate the tumor volume from several CT scans for localization. In radiotherapy Digital Tumor Fluoroscopy a unit combined with a simulator can replace CT planning. This would help overcome the disadvantages arising from the lack of a collimating system, and the inaccuracies which result from completely different geometric relationships between a CT unit and a therapy machine.

  14. Synthesis, in vitro binding, and tissue distribution of radioiodinated 2-[125I]N-(N-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-iodo benzamide, 2-[125I]BP: a potential σ receptor marker for human prostate tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Christy S.; Gulden, Mary E.; Li, Jinghua; Bowen, Wayne D.; McAfee, John G.; Thakur, Mathew L.

    1998-01-01

    The preclinical evaluation of a σ receptor-specific radiopharmaceutical that binds to human prostate tumor cells with a high affinity is described. We have synthesized and radioiodinated 2-[ 125 I]-N-(N-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-iodobenzamide (2-[ 125 I]BP) that possesses high affinity for both σ-1 and σ-2 receptor subtypes that are expressed on a variety of tumor cells. 2-IBP was synthesized, purified and characterized by routine spectroscopic and analytical methods. Radioiodination was accomplished using an oxidative iododestannylation reaction in the presence of chloramine T in high yields (76%-93%) with a very high-specific activity (1700-1900 Ci/mmol). The in vitro competition binding studies of 2-[ 125 I]BP with various σ receptor ligands in LnCAP human prostate tumor cells showed a dose-dependent saturable binding. The inhibition constants (K i , nM) for binding of 2-[ 125 I]BP to human prostate tumor cells for 4-IBP, haloperidol and 2-IBP were 4.09, 6.34 and 1.6 nM, respectively. The clearance of 2-[ 125 I]BP, in Sprague-Dawley rats, was rapid from the blood pool, other normal tissues and the total body. Tissue distribution studies in nude mice bearing human prostate tumor (DU-145) also showed a fast clearance from normal organs. The tumor had the highest percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g) of all tissues at 4 h as well as 24 h (2.0 ± 0.05 and 0.147 ± 0.038 ID/g, respectively) postinjection. The in vivo receptor binding specificity was demonstrated using haloperidol (a known high-affinity σ receptor ligand). A significant decrease (>50%, p = 0.001) was observed in tumor concentration when haloperidol was used as a blocking agent. The high affinity of 2-[ 125 I]BP for σ receptor-binding sites, its fast in vivo clearance from normal organs and its high uptake and retention in tumor implies that 2-[ 123 I]BP or 2-[ 131 I]BP may be a promising tracer for noninvasive imaging of human prostate tumors

  15. Evaluation of the first 44Sc-labeled Affibody molecule for imaging of HER2-expressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honarvar, Hadis; Müller, Cristina; Cohrs, Susan; Haller, Stephanie; Westerlund, Kristina; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson; Meulen, Nicholas P. van der; Schibli, Roger; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Affibody molecules are small (58 amino acids) high-affinity proteins based on a tri-helix non-immunoglobulin scaffold. A clinical study has demonstrated that PET imaging using Affibody molecules labeled with 68 Ga (T ½ = 68 min) can visualize metastases of breast cancer expressing human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) and provide discrimination between tumors with high and low expression level. This may help to identify breast cancer patients benefiting from HER2-targeting therapies. The best discrimination was at 4 h post injection. Due to longer half-life, a positron-emitting radionuclide 44 Sc (T ½ = 4.04 h) might be a preferable label for Affibody molecules for imaging at several hours after injection. Methods: A synthetic second-generation anti-HER2 Affibody molecule Z HER2:2891 was labeled with 44 Sc via a DOTA-chelator conjugated to the N-terminal amino group. Binding specificity, affinity and cellular processing 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 were compared in vitro using HER2-expressing cells. Biodistribution and imaging properties of 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 were evaluated in Balb/c nude mice bearing HER2-expression xenografts. Results: The labeling yield of 98 ± 2% and specific activity of 7.8 GBq/μmol were obtained. The conjugate demonstrated specific binding to HER2-expressing SKOV3.ip cells in vitro and to SKOV3.ip xenografts in nude mice. The distribution of radioactivity at 3 h post injection was similar for 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 , but the blood clearance of the 44 Sc-labeled variant was slower and the tumor-to-blood ratio was reduced (15 ± 2 for 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 vs 46 ± 9 for 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 ). At 6 h after injection of 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 the tumor uptake was 8 ± 2% IA/g and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 51 ± 8. Imaging using small-animal PET/CT demonstrated that 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 provides specific and high

  16. Mechanism of tumor and liver concentration of /sup 67/Ga: /sup 67/Ga binding substances in tumor tissues and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, A; Ando, I; Hiraki, T; Takeshita, M; Hisada, K

    1983-01-01

    Tumor-bearing animals were administered with /sup 67/Ga citrate and tumor homogenates, from which nuclear fraction was removed, and mitochondrial fraction of the host livers were digested with protease (pronase P). After digestion, the supernatants of the reaction mixtures were applied to a Sephadex G-100 column. Resultant eluates were analyzed for radioactivity, protein, uronic acid and sialic acids. Three peaks of radioactivity were obtained by gel filtration. The first peak eluted in the void volume contained a species whose molecular weight exceeded 40,000. The second peak consisted of substances with molecular weights of 9400-40,000. Radioactivity in the third peak was from liberated gallium-67. /sup 67/Ga in the second peak was bound to acid mucopolysaccharide and/or the sulfated carbohydrate chain of sulfated glycoprotein. It was thought that /sup 67/Ga in the first peak might be bound to some acid mucopolysaccharides. Considering the results of cellulose acetate electrophoresis, /sup 67/Ga in the second peak seemed to be bound to acid mucopolysaccharide which contained no uronic acids, and/or to the sulfated carbohydrate chain of sulfated glycoprotein. It was concluded that /sup 67/Ga was bound to the acid mucopolysaccharides and/or the sulfated carbohydrate chain of sulfated glycoprotein in tumor tissues and liver lysosomes.

  17. Analogues of estradiol as potential breast tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Ferriera, N.L.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The radioiodinated analogue of estradiol, 11β-methoxy-17α-[/sup 125/I]iodovinylestradiol (MIVE/sub 2/), has been shown to be a good candidate for the imaging of estrogen dependent breast tumors. Although there has been no extensive study on the sensitivity of radiotracers of this type, the authors have not observed localization of the radiotracer in metastatic lesions containing less than 20 fmole estrogen receptor/mg protein or in bone metasteses. In order to improve the sensitivity, they have examined several structural analogues of moxestrol (the parent structure for MIVE/sub 2/) for affinity to the ER isolated from immature rat uterus. The 11β-ethyl analogue (EEE/sub 2/) of ethynyl estradiol (EE/sub 2/) exhibits the highest affinity with the 11β-methyl analogue second best. Although the lipophilicity is also very high this compound should not be much more lipophilic than 16-iodoestradiol or MIVE/sub 2/ since the introduction of iodine increases the log P by greater than 1. The distribution of the tritiated derivative of EEE/sub 2/ is under study

  18. Helical 3D-CT images of soft tissue tumors in the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiraku; Tan, Akihiro; Hamanishi, Chiaki; Tanaka, Seisuke [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    X-ray, ultrasonograph CT, MRI and angiography are used to detect tumoral lesions. Recently, helical CT has been revealed to be a useful method for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of soft tissue tumors, by which high quality and accurate three dimensional (3D) images can be obtained quickly. We analyzed the preoperative 3D-CT images of soft tissue tumors in the hands of 11 cases (hemangioma in 6 cases, giant cell tumor, lipoma, angiofibroma, chondrosarcoma and malignant fibro-histiocytoma in one case each). Enhanced 3D-CT clearly visualized hemangiomas and solid tumors from the surrounding tissues. The tumors could easily be observed from any direction and color-coded according to the CT number. Helical 3D-CT was thus confirmed to be useful for the diagnosis and preoperative planning by indicating the details of tumor expansion into surrounding tissues. (author)

  19. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  20. 68Ga-labeling and in vivo evaluation of a uPAR binding DOTA- and NODAGA-conjugated peptide for PET imaging of invasive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    , uPAR binding affinity and cell uptake were determined. To characterize the in vivo properties, dynamic microPET imaging was carried out in nude mice bearing human glioma U87MG tumor xenograft. RESULTS: In vitro experiments revealed uPAR binding affinities in the lower nM range for both conjugated......-AE105-NH(2) was observed. Good stability in phosphate-buffered saline and mouse plasma was observed. High cell uptake was found for both tracers in U87MG tumor cells. Dynamic microPET imaging demonstrated good tumor-to-background ratio for both tracers. Tumor uptake was 2.1% ID/g and 1.3% ID/g 30 min...... positron emission tomography (PET) in human cancer xenograft mice models. Here we introduce (68)Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH(2) and (68)Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH(2) and evaluate their imaging properties using small-animal PET. METHODS: Synthesis of DOTA-AE105-NH(2) and NODAGA-AE105-NH(2) was based on solid-phase peptide...

  1. An assessment tumor targeting ability of 177Lu labeled cyclic CCK analogue peptide by binding with cholecystokinin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Cho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is known as a receptor that is overexpressed in many human tumors. The present study was designed to investigate the targeting ability of cyclic CCK analogue in AR42J pancreatic cells. The CCK analogues, DOTA-K(glucose-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe (DOTA-glucose-CCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo(Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, were synthesized and radiolabeled with 177Lu, and competitive binding was evaluated. The binding appearance of synthesized peptide with AR42J cells was evaluated by confocal microscopy. And bio-distribution was performed in AR42J xenografted mice. Synthesized peptides were prepared by a solid phase synthesis method, and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 177Lu-labeling, in which the peptides were radiolabeled with 177Lu by a high radiolabeling yield. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J cells revealed that the 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 was 12.3 nM of DOTA-glucose-CCK and 1.7 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Radio-labeled peptides were accumulated in AR42J tumor in vivo, and %ID/g of the tumor was 0.4 and 0.9 at 2 h p.i. It was concluded that 177Lu-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK has higher binding affinity than 177Lu-DOTA-glucose-CCK and can be a potential candidate as a targeting modality for a CCK receptor over-expressing tumors.

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and a Novel Mammary Derived Growth Inhibitor Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG in Suppression of Mammary Tumor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yiliang

    2001-01-01

    We have previously identified and characterized a novel tumor growth inhibitor and a fatty acid binding protein in human mammary gland and named it as Mammary derived growth inhibitor Related Gene MRG...

  3. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Cristina Montesi, Maria; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice

  4. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fecher

    Full Text Available Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future.

  5. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  7. Recurrent medulloblastoma: Frequency of tumor enhancement on Gd-DTPA MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, N.; Mendelsohn, D.; Mulne, A.; Barton, R.; Diehl, J.; Reyes, N.; Sklar, F.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two children with medulloblastoma were evaluated postoperatively with conventional and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Eleven patients had abnormal cranial MR studies; nine of these had recurrent tumor. In six patients recurrent tumor enhanced with Gd, while in the other three patients recurrent tumor did not enhance. The remaining two patients had areas of abnormal Gd enhancement that were caused by radiation-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier rather than by recurrent tumor. This study shows that not all recurrent medulloblastoma enhances and that the absence of Gd enhancement does not necessarily indicate the absence of recurrent tumor

  8. EGF receptor targeted tumor imaging with biotin-PEG-EGF linked to 99mTc-HYNIC labeled avidin and streptavidin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Park, Jin Won; Paik, Jin-Young; Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As direct radiolabeled peptides suffer limitations for in vivo imaging, we investigated the usefulness of radioloabeled avidin and streptavidin as cores to link peptide ligands for targeted tumor imaging. Methods: Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) was site specifically conjugated with a single PEG-biotin molecule and linked to 99m Tc-HYNIC labeled avidin-FITC (Av) or streptavidin-Cy5.5 (Sav). Receptor targeting was verified in vitro, and in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles were studied in normal mice. Scintigraphic imaging was performed in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor xenografted nude mice. Results: Whereas both 99m Tc-Av-EGF and 99m Tc-Sav-EGF retained receptor-specific binding in vitro, the two probes substantially diverged in pharmacokinetic and biodistribution behavior in vivo. 99m Tc-Av-EGF was rapidly eliminated from the circulation with a T1/2 of 4.3 min, and showed intense hepatic accumulation but poor tumor uptake (0.6%ID/gm at 4 h). 99m Tc-Sav-EGF displayed favorable in vivo profiles of longer circulation (T1/2β, 51.5 min) and lower nonspecific uptake that resulted in higher tumor uptake (3.8 %ID/gm) and clear tumor visualization at 15 h. Conclusion: 99m Tc-HYNIC labeled streptavidin linked with growth factor peptides may be useful as a protein-ligand complex for targeted imaging of tumor receptors.

  9. Evaluation of Tumor Heterogeneity of Prostate Carcinoma by Flow- and Image DNA Cytometry and Histopathological Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naining Wang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heterogeneity of prostate carcinoma is one of the reasons for pretreatment underestimation of tumor aggressiveness. We studied tumor heterogeneity and the probability of finding the highest tumor grade and DNA aneuploidy with relation to the number of biopsies. Material and methods. Specimens simulating core biopsies from five randomly selected tumor areas from each of 16 Böcking’s grade II and 23 grade III prostate carcinomas were analyzed for tumor grade and DNA ploidy by flow‐ and fluorescence image cytometry (FCM, FICM. Cell cycle composition was measured by FCM. Results. By determination of ploidy and cell cycle composition, morphologically defined tumors can further be subdivided. Heterogeneity of tumor grade and DNA ploidy (FCM was 54% and 50%. Coexistence of diploid tumor cells in aneuploid specimens represents another form of tumor heterogeneity. The proportion of diploid tumor cells decreased significantly with tumor grade and with increase in the fraction of proliferating cell of the aneuploid tumor part. The probability of estimating the highest tumor grade or aneuploidy increased from 40% for one biopsy to 95% for 5 biopsies studied. By combining the tumor grade with DNA ploidy, the probability of detecting a highly aggressive tumor increased from 40% to 70% and 90% for one and two biopsies, respectively. Conclusion. Specimens of the size of core biopsies can be used for evaluation of DNA ploidy and cell cycle composition. Underestimation of aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma due to tumor heterogeneity is minimized by simultaneous study of the tumor grade and DNA ploidy more than by increasing the number of biopsies. The biological significance of coexistent diploid tumor cell in aneuploid lesions remains to be evaluated.

  10. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  11. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Nolte, Lutz-P.; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines.

  12. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Stefan; Nolte, Lutz-P; Reyes, Mauricio; Wiest, Roland

    2013-01-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines. (topical review)

  13. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  14. Intraoperative Detection of Superficial Liver Tumors by Fluorescence Imaging Using Indocyanine Green and 5-aminolevulinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaibori, Masaki; Matsui, Kosuke; Ishizaki, Morihiko; Iida, Hiroya; Okumura, Tadayoshi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuma; Inoue, Kentaro; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Asano, Hiroaki; Kon, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) and the porphyrin precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) have been approved as fluorescence imaging agents in the clinical setting. This study evaluated the usefulness of fluorescence imaging with both ICG and 5-ALA for intraoperative identification of latent small liver tumors. There were 48 patients who had main tumors within 5 mm of the liver surface. 5-ALA hydrochloride was orally administered to patients 3 h before surgery. ICG had been intravenously injected within 14 days prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, after visual inspection, manual palpation and ultrasonography fluorescence images of the liver surface were obtained with ICG and 5-ALA prior to resection. With ICG, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the preoperatively identified main tumors were 96%, 50% and 94%, respectively. Twelve latent small tumors were newly detected on the liver surface using ICG, five of which proved to be carcinomas. With 5-ALA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the main tumors were 57%, 100% and 58%, respectively. Five latent small tumors were newly detected using 5-ALA; all were carcinomas. Overall, five new tumors were detected by both ICG and 5-ALA fluorescence imaging; two were hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and three were metastases of colorectal cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of ICG fluorescence imaging for main tumor detection were relatively high and low, respectively, but the opposite was true of 5-ALA imaging. Fluorescence imaging using 5-ALA may provide greater specificity in the detection of surface-invisible malignant liver tumors than using ICG fluorescence imaging alone. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Emphasis on the MR imaging findings of brown tumor: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Won Sun; Sung, Mi Sook; Chun, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jee-Young; Lim, Hyun Wook; Lim, Yeon Soo; Yoo, Won Jong; Chung, Myung Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Won [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dongjak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Haeng [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Brown tumors are focal reactive osteolytic lesions that are encountered in patients with primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism, and these tumors have nonspecific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. However, there are only a few reports on MR imaging of brown tumors. The purpose of this study is to describe the spectrum of MR imaging findings of brown tumors. The MR imaging features of five patients with clinical and pathological evidence of brown tumor were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. The patients had primary hyperparathyroidism, which was confirmed as parathyroid adenoma (n = 2) and parathyroid carcinoma (n = 3). The MR images were evaluated for the presence of solid or cystic portions, the signal intensity of the lesions, the contrast enhancement pattern and the presence of cortex destruction and fluid-fluid levels. Twelve bone lesions were detected on the MR images of five patients; three lesions in two patients, four lesions in one patient, and one lesion in two patients. The tumor was solid in three lesions, mixed solid and cystic in four, and cystic in five. All the solid lesions were accompanied by mixed lesions. Discontinuity of the cortex and adjacent soft-tissue enhancement were seen in all the solid lesions. Fluid-fluid levels were seen in two cases within the cystic component of the mixed lesions and cystic lesions. The five patients with brown tumor demonstrated a wide spectrum of MR imaging findings. There are few lesions that are osteolytic on the radiographs and that show a short T2 on MR imaging, such as brown tumor. Multiple cystic or mixed lesions are the expected findings of brown tumors. (orig.)

  16. MR imaging findings in granular cell tumor of the neurohypophysis: a difficult preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica (MEDTEC), Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Paramo, C. [Servicio de Endocrinologia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Conde, C. [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Fernandez, R. [Servicio de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain)

    2000-12-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare neoplasm arising within the neurohypophysis. We describe the MR imaging findings in two symptomatic patients. In one patient with history of panhypopituitarism, MR images showed a large sellar and suprasellar mass. The other patient presented with acute loss of vision in her left eye, and MR images showed a suprasellar mass with compression of the optic chiasm. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging findings in granular cell tumor of the neurohypophysis: a difficult preoperative diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J.; Paramo, C.; Conde, C.; Fernandez, R.

    2000-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare neoplasm arising within the neurohypophysis. We describe the MR imaging findings in two symptomatic patients. In one patient with history of panhypopituitarism, MR images showed a large sellar and suprasellar mass. The other patient presented with acute loss of vision in her left eye, and MR images showed a suprasellar mass with compression of the optic chiasm. (orig.)

  18. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevargez, Athour; Groenemeyer, Dietrich H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with spinal tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (25 men, 16 women; age range, 46-82 years) with nonresectable primary or secondary tumor involvement of the spine unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy received RFA treatment. Two radiofrequency ablation systems, one with a cool-tip electrode and one with an expandable electrode catheter, were used. Both systems work impedance controlled with a power output of 150- 200 W. Each coagulation cycle lasted 12-15 min depending on tumor impedance. Several single RFA cycles of 15 min each were used for overlapping RFAs in tumors with diameters of more than 3 cm. Temperature was kept between 50 deg. C and 120 deg. C and was chosen according to spinal cord distance and patient heat tolerance during the ablation. Multi-slice computed tomography (CT) combined with C-arm fluoroscopy guided the intervention. Efficacy outcomes were assessed after about 6 weeks, 6 months, and more than 6 months using standardized questionnaires and indices regarding tumor pain, pain disability, functional activities, quality of life, neurological status, and tumor progression. Results: RFA significantly reduced tumor-induced pain within 6 weeks, improved daily activities, and maintained quality of life. Mean time to tumor progression was 730 ± 54 days (Kaplan-Meier estimate). No RFA-associated complications were reported. Conclusion: RFA of primary and secondary spinal tumors, which were unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy and prone to progression, is a safe, resource-saving, and highly effective percutaneous technique in patients with nonresectable spinal tumors

  19. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K trans values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p trans decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p trans values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p e and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K trans values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological properties different from those of the R-18 tumors.

  20. SPECT imaging of fibrin using fibrin-binding peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starmans, L.W.E.; Duijnhoven, van S.M.J.; Rossin, R.; Aime, S.; Daemen, M.J.A.P.; Nicolay, K.; Grüll, H.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive detection of fibrin in vivo using diagnostic imaging modalities may improve clinical decision-making on possible therapeutic options in atherosclerosis, cancer and thrombus-related pathologies such as pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. The aim of this study was to assess the

  1. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor.

  2. Development of 68Ga-Glycopeptide as an Imaging Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tsao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed to study tissue distribution and tumor imaging potential of 68Ga-glycopeptide (GP in tumor-bearing rodents by PET. Methods. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan. GP was labeled with 68Ga chloride for in vitro and in vivo studies. Computer outlined region of interest (counts per pixel of the tumor and muscle (at the symmetric site was used to determine tumor-to-muscle count density ratios. To ascertain the feasibility of 68Ga-GP in tumor imaging in large animals, PET/CT imaging of 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors. Standard uptake value of tumors were determined by PET up to 45 min. To determine blood clearance and half-life of 68Ga-GP, blood samples were collected from 10 seconds to 20 min. Results. Radiochemical purity of 68Ga-GP determined by instant thin-layer chromatography was >95%. Tumor uptake values (SUV for 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors were 3.25 versus 7.04. PET images in tumor-bearing rats and rabbits confirmed that 68Ga-GP could assess tumor uptake. From blood clearance curve, the half-life of 68Ga-GP was 1.84 hr. Conclusion Our data indicate that it is feasible to use 68Ga-GP to assess tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truillet, Charles; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Sancey, Lucie; Denat, Franck; Boschetti, Frédéric; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A; Lux, François; Perriat, P; Tillement, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  4. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truillet, Charles [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos [Radiochemistry Studies Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Athens (Greece); Sancey, Lucie [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Denat, Franck [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de l’Université de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 6302, University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Boschetti, Frédéric [CheMatech, 21000 Dijon (France); Stellas, Dimitris [Department of Cancer Biology, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D [Center for Experimental Surgery, Clinical and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A [Department of Radiology, University of Athens Medical School, Areteion Hospital, Athens (Greece); Lux, François [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Perriat, P [Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Tillement, Olivier [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-29

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  5. Differential diagnosis and staging of urological tumors by magnetic resonance imaging compared with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Okada, Yusaku; Takeuchi, Hideo; Miyakawa, Mieko; Okada, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kazumasa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 49 urological tumors (11 renal cell carcinomas, 3 renal pelvic cancers, 2 renal angiomyolipomas, 1 renal leiomyosarcoma, 1 large renal cvst, 4 adrenal tumors, 11 bladder cancers, 2 bone metastasis from bladder cancer, 10 prostatic cancers, 1 prostatic sarcoma, 1 urethral cancer, 1 penile cancer and 1 perivesical granuloma) since October 1985 to September 1986. MRI was performed using a Signa (G.E.) with a 1.5 T superconductive magnet and 3 images, including T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and proton density image, were obtained. In conclusion MRI is a noninvasive examination and gives more information than computed tomography despite its high cost. In renal cell carcinoma, the chemical shift in MRI and clear visualization of tumor thrombus enable accurate staging. Differential diagnosis from other renal mass lesions may be possible by the T2 weighted image. In adrenal disease, most of the adrenal masses can be differentiated, but in some cases it is impossible. In bladder cancer, wall invasion of tumor may be evaluated in T2 weighted image, and MRI is suitable for staging of locally advanced tumor. In prostatic cancer, visualization of periprostatic plexus and differentiation between internal and external gland may enable local staging and identification of low stage tumors. (author)

  6. Longitudinal imaging studies of tumor microenvironment in mice treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Saito

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an allosteric inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, and inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Recent studies suggested a possibility that rapamycin renormalizes aberrant tumor vasculature and improves tumor oxygenation. The longitudinal effects of rapamycin on angiogenesis and tumor oxygenation were evaluated in murine squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify an optimal time after rapamycin treatment for enhanced tumor radioresponse. Rapamycin treatment was initiated on SCCVII solid tumors 8 days after implantation (500-750 mm(3 and measurements of tumor pO(2 and blood volume were conducted from day 8 to 14 by EPRI/MRI. Microvessel density was evaluated over the same time period by immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor blood volume as measured by MRI significantly decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment. Tumor pO(2 levels modestly but significantly increased 2 days after rapamycin treatment; whereas, it decreased in non-treated control tumors. Furthermore, the fraction of hypoxic area (pixels with pO(2<10 mm Hg in the tumor region decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor microvessel density and pericyte coverage revealed that microvessel density decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment, but pericyte coverage did not change, similar to what was seen with anti-angiogenic agents such as sunitinib which cause vascular renormalization. Collectively, EPRI/MRI co-imaging can provide non-invasive evidence of rapamycin-induced vascular renormalization and resultant transient increase in tumor oxygenation. Improved oxygenation by rapamycin treatment provides a temporal window for anti-cancer therapies to realize enhanced response to radiotherapy.

  7. An HRE-Binding Py-Im Polyamide Impairs Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablowski, Jerzy O; Raskatov, Jevgenij A; Dervan, Peter B

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic gene expression contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases, including organ fibrosis, age-related macular degeneration, and cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), a transcription factor central to the hypoxic gene expression, mediates multiple processes including neovascularization, cancer metastasis, and cell survival. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide 1: has been shown to inhibit HIF1-mediated gene expression in cell culture but its activity in vivo was unknown. This study reports activity of polyamide 1: in subcutaneous tumors capable of mounting a hypoxic response and showing neovascularization. We show that 1: distributes into subcutaneous tumor xenografts and normal tissues, reduces the expression of proangiogenic and prometastatic factors, inhibits the formation of new tumor blood vessels, and suppresses tumor growth. Tumors treated with 1: show no increase in HIF1α and have reduced ability to adapt to the hypoxic conditions, as evidenced by increased apoptosis in HIF1α-positive regions and the increased proximity of necrotic regions to vasculature. Overall, these results show that a molecule designed to block the transcriptional activity of HIF1 has potent antitumor activity in vivo, consistent with partial inhibition of the tumor hypoxic response. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 608-17. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Small Animal [18F]FDG PET Imaging for Tumor Model Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2008-01-01

    PET allows non-invasive, quantitative and repetitive imaging of biological function in living animals. Small animal PET imaging with [ 18 F]FDG has been successfully applied to investigation of metabolism, receptor, ligand interactions, gene expression, adoptive cell therapy and somatic gene therapy. Experimental condition of animal handling impacts on the biodistribution of [ 18 F]FDG in small animal study. The small animal PET and CT images were registered using the hardware fiducial markers and small animal contour point. Tumor imaging in small animal with small animal [ 18 F]FDG PET should be considered fasting, warming, and isoflurane anesthesia level. Registered imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of tumor. Small animal experimental condition of animal handling and registration method will be of most importance for small lesion detection of metastases tumor model

  9. Validity of bioluminescence measurements for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor load in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Clara P. W.; Overmeer, Renée M.; Niers, Tatjana M. H.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Richel, Dick J.; Buckle, Tessa; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    A relatively new strategy to longitudinally monitor tumor load in intact animals and the effects of therapy is noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The validity of BLI for quantitative assessment of tumor load in small animals is critically evaluated in the present review. Cancer cells are

  10. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  11. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 ± 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% ± 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 ± 0.08 mm and 96.7% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 ± 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% ± 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking

  12. Evaluation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Fabiano Elias; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Pelizon, Christina Helena de Toledo

    2005-01-01

    This article presents three cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical manifestations and pathological features, along with differential diagnoses, with special emphasis on multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. (author)

  13. New method for extracting tumors in PET/CT images based on the probability distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Shuhei; Hontani, Hidekata; Hukami, Tadanori

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we propose a method for extracting tumors from PET/CT images by referring to the probability distribution of pixel values in the PET image. In the proposed method, first, the organs that normally take up fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (e.g., the liver, kidneys, and brain) are extracted. Then, the tumors are extracted from the images. The distribution of pixel values in PET images differs in each region of the body. Therefore, the threshold for detecting tumors is adaptively determined by referring to the distribution. We applied the proposed method to 37 cases and evaluated its performance. This report also presents the results of experiments comparing the proposed method and another method in which the pixel values are normalized for extracting tumors. (author)

  14. 99mTc-Hynic-minigastrin 1: a promising radiopharmaceutical for imaging gastrin/CCK-positive tumors: preclinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Decristoforo, C.; Behe, M.; Behr, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Gastrin/CCK receptors are over expressed in a number of tumors such as MW and SCLC. Therefore gastrin analogues binding to the CCK-B receptor are. promising peptides for Nuclear Medicine imaging. Recently minigastrin 1 has been labeled with 131 I, 111 In and 90 Y (Behr et al 1999). HYNIC as bifunctional chelator has shown favorable properties for 99m Tc-labeling of small peptides. The aim of this study was the preparation, 99m Tc-labeling and evaluation in vitro and in vivo of HYNIC-minigastrin 1. HYNIC-minigastrin 1 was prepared by coupling protected HYNIC to minigastrin immobilized on a resin, followed by TFA cleavage and HPLC purification. The peptide was characterized by RP-HPLC and MS. 99m Tc-labeling was performed using different coligands, such as tricine, EDDA, tricine ternary ligand systems. In vitro stability was tested in plasma and towards cystein, plasma protein binding was determined. Receptor binding assays using a CCK-B receptor positive cellline (AR42J) were performed and biodistribution in normal Wistar rats was studied with a gamma camera followed by dissection. At specific activities >1 Ci/μmol HYNIC-minigastrin 1 could be labeled with yields >95 % only using tricine as coligand. Other coligands or addition of a ternary ligand failed to give reasonable labeling yields. Two isomers of 99m Tc-tricine-HYNIC-minigastrin 1 were observed. At higher temperature quantitative yields of a stable isomer with high hydrophilicity, low protein binding and low intestinal excretion in rat biodistribution studies was obtained. Overall biodistribution in rats was similar to 111 In-DTPA-minigastrin 1 with rapid renal excretion and high kidney retention. 99m Tc-Tricine-HYNIC-minigastrin could be displaced by unlabelled Minigastrin from AR4-2J cell-membranes. A gastrin derivative could be labeled at high specific activities with 99m Tc showing isomerism dependent on labeling conditions. 99m Tc-labelled HYNIC-minigastrin 1 shows promising in vitro and in

  15. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes.

  16. CT and MR imaging features in phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-mixed connective tissue: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenshan; Deng, Yiqiong; Li, Xiumei; Li, Yueming; Cao, Dairong; Coossa, Vikash Sahadeo

    2018-04-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-mixed connective tissue (PMT-MCT) is rare and usually benign and slow-growing. The majority of these tumors is associated with sporadic tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) or rickets, affect middle-aged individuals and are located in the extremities. Previous imaging studies often focused on seeking the causative tumors of TIO, not on the radiological features of these tumors, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. PMT-MCT remains a largely misdiagnosed, ignored or unknown entity by most radiologists and clinicians. In the present case report, a review of the known literature of PMT-MCT was conducted and the CT and MRI findings from three patient cases were described for diagnosing the small subcutaneous tumor. Typical MRI appearances of PMT-MCT were isointense relative to the muscles on T1-weighted imaging, and markedly hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging containing variably flow voids, with markedly heterogeneous/homogenous enhancement on post contrast T1-weighted fat-suppression imaging. Short time inversion recovery was demonstrated to be the optimal sequence in localizing the tumor.

  17. Styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated zinc protoporphyrin as a candidate drug for tumor-targeted therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Eguchi, Kanami; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated the potential of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) as an antitumor agent targeting to the tumor survival factor heme oxygenase-1, and/or for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, to achieve tumor-targeted delivery, styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP) was synthesized via amide bond, which showed good water solubility, having ZnPP loading of 15%. More importantly, it forms micelles in aqueous solution with a mean particle size of 111.6 nm, whereas it has an apparent Mw of 65 kDa. This micelle formation was not detracted by serum albumin, suggesting it is stable in circulation. Further SMA-ZnPP conjugate will behave as an albumin complex in blood with much larger size (235 kDa) by virtue of the albumin binding property of SMA. Consequently, SMA-ZnPP conjugate exhibited prolonged circulating retention and preferential tumor accumulation by taking advantage of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Clear tumor imaging was thus achieved by detecting the fluorescence of ZnPP. In addition, the cytotoxicity and PDT effect of SMA-ZnPP conjugate was confirmed in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Light irradiation remarkably increased the cytotoxicity (IC50, from 33 to 5 μM). These findings may provide new options and knowledge for developing ZnPP based anticancer theranostic drugs.

  18. Estimation of Tumor Angiogenesis With Contrast Enhanced Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forsberg, Flemming

    2001-01-01

    ...) and receiving at the subharmonic (f0) . Because of no subharmonic generation in tissue and significant subharmonic scattering from some new contrast agents SHI has the potential to detect slow, small volume blood flow associated with tumor...

  19. Prediction of tumor-brain adhesion in intracranial meningiomas by MR imaging and DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeguchi, Takashi; Miki, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ohue, Shiro; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and DSA (digital subtraction angiography) by using preoperative MRI and DSA findings in the examination of meningiomas before excision. In particular, we focused on their usefulness in predicting tumor-brain adhesion during surgery. The subjects were 36 patients with intracranial meningioma who underwent tumor excision at which time neurosurgeons examined the tumor-brain adhesion. Two neurosurgeons evaluated the degree of tumor-brain adhesion from operation records and videotapes recorded during surgery. Two neuroradiologists retrospectively evaluated the preoperative MRI findings including tumor diameter, signal intensity of the tumor parenchyma obtained with T 2 -weighted imaging (T 2 WI), characteristics of the tumor-brain interface, and degree of peritumoral brain edema. The vascular supply was also evaluated from the preoperative DSA findings. The relationship between these MRI and DSA findings and the degree of tumor-brain adhesion during surgery as classified by the neurosurgeons was statistically analyzed. The degree of peritumoral brain edema and the shapes and characteristics of the tumor-brain interface, including the findings of FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) imaging and vascular supply observed by DSA, were significantly correlated with tumor-brain adhesion. In particular, the shapes and characteristics of the tumor-brain interface as observed by T 1 -weighted imaging (T 1 WI), T2WI, and FLAIR, respectively, as well as the vascular supply observed by DSA, were closely correlated with the degree of tumor-brain adhesion encountered during surgery. According to these results, we developed a method of predicting tumor-brain adhesion that considers the shape of the tumor-brain interface revealed by MRI and the vascular supply revealed by DSA. We retrospectively examined the findings of MRI and DSA performed before excision of meningioma and clarified

  20. Differential diagnosis of oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumors using imaging results: the added value of perfusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kook Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jin Hee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeun, Shin Soo; Hong, Yong Kil [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The purposes of the present study are to assess whether different characteristics of oligodendrogliomas and astrocytic tumors are visible on MR imaging and to determine the added value of perfusion imaging in conventional MR imaging when differentiating oligodendrogliomas from astrocytic tumors. We retrospectively studied 22 oligodendroglioma and 54 astrocytic tumor patients, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The morphological tumor characteristics were evaluated using MR imaging. The rCBV, K{sup trans}, and V{sub e} values were recorded. All imaging and clinical values were compared. The ability to discriminate between the two entities was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. Separate comparison analysis between oligodendroglioma and astrocytic tumors excluding GBM was also performed. The presence of calcification, higher cortex involvement ratio, and lower V{sub e} value were more representative of oligodendrogliomas than astrocytic tumors (P = <0.001, 0.038, and <0.001, respectively). The area under the curve (AUC) value of a combination of calcification and cortex involvement ratio was 0.796. The combination of all three parameters, including V{sub e}, further increased the diagnostic performance (AUC = 0.881). Comparison test of the two AUC areas revealed significant difference (P = 0.0474). The presence of calcification and higher cortex involvement ratio were the only findings suggestive of oligodendrogliomas than astrocytic tumors with exclusion of GBMs (P = 0.014 and <0.001, respectively). Cortex involvement ratio and the presence of calcification with V{sub e} values were diagnostically accurate in identifying oligodendrogliomas. The V{sub e} value calculated from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging could be a supportive tool for differentiating between oligodendrogliomas and astrocytic tumors including GBMs. (orig.)

  1. Percutaneous Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of tumors in inoperable patients - immediate complications and overall safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sahay

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Percutaneous image-guided RFA is an option in patients where most other tumor management modalities have been exhausted or rejected. RFA may not be free from side effects such as postablation syndrome, pain, and there may be other serious complications such as bleeding, but based on our observations, percutaneous image-guided RFA of tumors is a safe palliative and therapeutic treatment option.

  2. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  3. Unusual imaging presentation of spinal glomus tumor: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Jau-Ching

    2017-01-01

    A glomangioma, also known as a glomus tumor, is a benign lesion and had rare occurrence of spine region. In this study, we presented a spinal glomus tumor with an unusual radiological presentation, which is different from osteolytic intraosseous patterns illustrated before. A 26-year-old male with compressive myelopathy caused by epidural intraspinal lesion over T11 level. Radiological presentation revealed reactive sclerotic change over the body and lamina was found on the same level in comp...

  4. In Vivo Imaging of Xenograft Tumors Using an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Affibody Molecule Labeled with a Near-infrared Fluorophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff with a near-infrared (NIR dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800 in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors.

  5. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled folate-tripeptide conjugate as a folate receptor-targeeted imaging agent in a tumor-bearing mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Dae Weung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Hyoung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The folate receptor (FR) is an attractive molecular target since it is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors. The purpose of the present study was to synthesize and evaluate the feasibility of a novel {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA (Glu-Cys-Gly-ethylenediamine)-folate as an FR-positive tumor imaging agent in a mouse tumor model. ECG-EDA-folate was synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc using tripeptide ECG as a chelator. FR-positive KB cells were inoculated in athymic nude mice. Following injection of {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate, serial scintigraphy and micro-SPECT/CT imaging were performed at various time points with and without pre-administration of excess free folate. Mean count densities (MCD) for regions of interest drawn on KB tumors and major normal organs at each time point were measured, and uptake ratios of tumor to normal organs were calculated. ECG-EDA-folate was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc with high radiolabeling efficiency and stability (>96 %). FR-positive tumors were clearly visualized on both scintigraphy and micro-SPECT/CT images and the tumor uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate was markedly suppressed with faint visualization of tumors by pre-administration of excess free folate on serial planar scintigraphy, indicating FR-specific binding of the agent. Furthermore, semiquantitative analysis of MCD data showed again that both tumor MCD and tumor-to-normal organ ratios decreased considerably by pre-administration of excess free folate, supporting FR-specific tumor uptake. Tumor-to-normal organ ratios approximately increased with time after injection until 4 h. The present study demonstrated that 9{sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate can bind specifically to FR with clear visualization of FR-positive tumors in a mouse tumor model.

  7. ELISA quantification of CCI-103F binding in canine tumors prior to and during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, D.E.; McEntee, M.C.; Cline, J.M.; Raleigh, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate injections of CCI-103F, a marker of hypoxia, as a method to quantify alterations in tumor hypoxia during irradiation. Twelve dogs with spontaneous solid tumors were given intravenous CCI-103F, and tumor biopsies were taken at various times after injection. CCI-103F antigen concentration was quantified by ELISA. Four of the dogs were given one injection of CCI-103F, and the other eight received two injections. In dogs receiving two injections, CCI-103F was administered before irradiation and 7 days later, following a total dose of 15.0 Gy. Plasma CCI-103F pharmacokinetics were assessed in dogs receiving two injections. CCI-103F antigen was detectable in the initial biopsy in each of the four dogs receiving one injection, and the amount of detectable antigen decreased in subsequent biopsies with an initial half life of approximately 19 h. This suggests that multiple injections of CCI-103F could be used in the same subject to monitor tumor hypoxia as a function of time or during a course of treatment. In the eight dogs receiving two injections of CCI-103F, the CCI-103F antigen concentration in the 24 h samples ranged from 4.66-151.9 μmole CCI-103F antigen/kg tumor, a difference of a factor of approximately 33. The ratio of maximum to minimum concentration of CCI-103F antigen in 51 paired biopsy samples ranged from 1.01-4.07, with a mean of 1.67. Seventy-five percent of the ratios were ≤ 2.02. There was no apparent relationship between the magnitude of the ratio, i.e., intratumoral variation, and tumor volume or the absolute tumor concentration of CCI-103F antigen in dogs given two injections of CCI-103F was consistent with little change in pretreatment oxygen status in six dogs, and an increase in tumor oxygenation in two dogs. It appears possible to obtain an estimate of the change in tumor hypoxia over time by assaying biopsies for CCI-103F concentration. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  8. The Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Color Doppler Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Salivary Gland Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Davachi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Although salivary gland tumors are not very common, early diagnosis and treatment is crucial because of their proximity to vital organs, and therefore, determining the efficacy of new imaging procedures becomes important. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and color doppler ultrasonography parameters in the diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional study, color doppler ultrasonography and MRI were performed for 22 patients with salivary gland tumor. Demographic data as well as MRI, color doppler ultrasonography, and surgical parameters including tumor site, signal in MRI images, ultrasound echo, tumor border, lymphadenopathy, invasion, perfusion, vascular resistance index (RI, vascular pulse index (PI were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and independent ttest. Results. The mean age of patients was 46.59±13.97 years (8 males and 14 females. Patients with malignant tumors were older (P < 0.01. The most common tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (36.4%, metastasis (36.4%, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (9%. Nine tumors (40.9% were benign and 13 (59.1% were malignant. The overall accuracy of MRI and color doppler ultrasonography in determining tumor site was 100% and 95%, respectively. No significant difference observed between RI and PI and the diagnosis of tumor. Conclusion. Both MRI and ultrasonography have high accuracy in the localization of tumors. Well-identified border was a sign of benign tumors. Also, invasion to adjacent structures was a predictive factor for malignancy.

  9. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  10. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capolla S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Capolla,1 Chiara Garrovo,2 Sonia Zorzet,1 Andrea Lorenzon,3 Enrico Rampazzo,4 Ruben Spretz,5 Gabriele Pozzato,6 Luis Núñez,7 Claudio Tripodo,8 Paolo Macor,1,9 Stefania Biffi2 1Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, 2Institute for Maternal and Child Health – IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Trieste, 3Animal Care Unit, Cluster in Biomedicine (CBM scrl, Trieste, Italy; 4Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 5LNK Chemsolutions LLC, Lincoln, NE, USA; 6Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; 7Bio-Target, Inc., University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 8Department of Human Pathology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 9Callerio Foundation Onlus, Institutes of Biological Researches, Trieste, Italy Abstract: The expectations of nanoparticle (NP-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together

  11. Akt Phosphorylation and PI (3, 4, 5) P3 Binding Coordinately Inhibit the Tumor Suppressive Activity of Merlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    GSK3h and merlin S315 phosphorylation tightly correlated with Akt1 expression and activation profiles (Fig. 3B, right). Compared with wild-type NTD...Fig. S4 for a bigger image). (f) Akt phosphorylates merlin in mammalian cells. Akt and merlin protein levels in cell lysates were confirmed (top...II (contains 1-590 residues) had a low level of binding to Akt. Interestingly, neither full-length merlin I nor merlin II interacted with Akt (Fig

  12. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  13. Comparison of peritoneal tumor imaging using conventional MR imaging and diffusion-weighted MR imaging with different b values

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    Bozkurt, Mahmut [Buhara Private Hospital Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Doganay, Selim [Erciyes University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kayseri (Turkey); Kantarci, Mecit, E-mail: akkanrad@hotmail.com [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Yalcin, Ahmet; Eren, Suat [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Atamanalp, S. Selcuk [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Erzurum (Turkey); Yuce, Ihsan [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Yildirgan, M. Ilhan [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of DW MRI with two different b values in identifying peritoneal tumors in oncology patients. Materials and methods: Nineteen patients with known malignancy underwent abdominal and pelvic MRI before surgery. MRI included free-breathing DWI with b values of 400 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}, T1-weighted fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo, T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo spin-echo, and 5-min delayed gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Two observers reviewed images for peritoneal tumors at ten anatomic sites within consensus. The results of laparatomy and histopathological evaluation were compared with MRI results. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of identifying peritoneal metastases were calculated for conventional MRI, combined DWI with a b value of 400 s/mm{sup 2} and conventional MRI, and combined DWI with a b value of 800 s/mm{sup 2} and conventional MRI by consensus of two observers. Results: One-hundred and twenty-five peritoneal metastasis sites were confirmed by surgical and histopathological findings. Conventional MRI alone identified 72 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.58; specificity, 0.87; accuracy, 0.67). Combined DWI with a b value of 400 s/mm{sup 2} and conventional MRI revealed 106 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.85; specificity, 0.88; accuracy, 0.85). Finally, combined DWI with a b value of 800 s/mm{sup 2} and conventional MRI revealed 103 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.83; specificity, 0.94; accuracy, 0.86). Conclusion: DWI with a high b value provides complementary information that can improve the detection of peritoneal tumors when combined with conventional MRI. We recommend combined MRI and DWI with a high b value for increasing the sensitivity and accuracy of the preoperative detection of peritoneal tumors.

  14. Comparison of peritoneal tumor imaging using conventional MR imaging and diffusion-weighted MR imaging with different b values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkurt, Mahmut; Doganay, Selim; Kantarci, Mecit; Yalcin, Ahmet; Eren, Suat; Atamanalp, S. Selcuk; Yuce, Ihsan; Yildirgan, M. Ilhan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of DW MRI with two different b values in identifying peritoneal tumors in oncology patients. Materials and methods: Nineteen patients with known malignancy underwent abdominal and pelvic MRI before surgery. MRI included free-breathing DWI with b values of 400 and 800 s/mm 2 , T1-weighted fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo, T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo spin-echo, and 5-min delayed gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Two observers reviewed images for peritoneal tumors at ten anatomic sites within consensus. The results of laparatomy and histopathological evaluation were compared with MRI results. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of identifying peritoneal metastases were calculated for conventional MRI, combined DWI with a b value of 400 s/mm 2 and conventional MRI, and combined DWI with a b value of 800 s/mm 2 and conventional MRI by consensus of two observers. Results: One-hundred and twenty-five peritoneal metastasis sites were confirmed by surgical and histopathological findings. Conventional MRI alone identified 72 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.58; specificity, 0.87; accuracy, 0.67). Combined DWI with a b value of 400 s/mm 2 and conventional MRI revealed 106 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.85; specificity, 0.88; accuracy, 0.85). Finally, combined DWI with a b value of 800 s/mm 2 and conventional MRI revealed 103 peritoneal metastases (sensitivity, 0.83; specificity, 0.94; accuracy, 0.86). Conclusion: DWI with a high b value provides complementary information that can improve the detection of peritoneal tumors when combined with conventional MRI. We recommend combined MRI and DWI with a high b value for increasing the sensitivity and accuracy of the preoperative detection of peritoneal tumors.

  15. THE INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCE OF ABILITY BINDING BRAIN TUMOR CELLS WITH IMMUNOGLOBULIN G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Ostreiko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Were researched IgG on the surface cells of different histological types tumors of cerebrum, using fluorescing staphylococcus A-protein. The study of target IgG shows divers intensive of microscopic fluorescent illumination. This results associate related with level amount IgG. The maximum concentrate of surface’s IgG was on the cells of malignant tumors and there was direct correlate with aggressive manner and quickly recurrence of tumor’s growth, and shot survival. The fraction of IgG with specific antitumor’s antibody covers tumor’s antigens has been block this antigens for receptors of T-lymphocytes. Linked with immunological anticell’s deficit phenomenon may be one from famous reasons of malignant clinical type tumor disease. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 6, pp 593-596.

  16. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor ReceptorTyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom,Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor,Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standingdrug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteendialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emittingisotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitroassays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. Thesecharacteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schemato identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of thecompounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFRtyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFRtyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimatedoctanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline aswell as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the bestcombination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling andfurther evaluation in tumor-bearing mice.

  17. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom, Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor, Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standing drug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteen dialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emitting isotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitro assays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. These characteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schema to identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of the compounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFR tyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimated octanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline as well as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the best combination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling and further evaluation in tumor-bearing mice

  18. THE INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCE OF ABILITY BINDING BRAIN TUMOR CELLS WITH IMMUNOGLOBULIN G

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Ostreiko; S. V. Mozhaev; V. E. Olushin; R. A. Pantina; M. V. Filatov

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. Were researched IgG on the surface cells of different histological types tumors of cerebrum, using fluorescing staphylococcus A-protein. The study of target IgG shows divers intensive of microscopic fluorescent illumination. This results associate related with level amount IgG. The maximum concentrate of surface’s IgG was on the cells of malignant tumors and there was direct correlate with aggressive manner and quickly recurrence of tumor’s growth, and shot survival. The fraction of...

  19. Near infrared spatial frequency domain fluorescence imaging of tumor phantoms containing erythrocyte-derived optical nanoplatforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joshua M.; Schaefer, Elise; Anvari, Bahman

    2018-02-01

    Light-activated theranostic constructs provide a multi-functional platform for optical imaging and phototherapeutic applications. Our group has engineered nano-sized vesicles derived from erythrocytes that encapsulate the FDAapproved near infrared (NIR) absorber indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these constructs as NIR erythrocytemimicking transducers (NETs). Once photo-excited by NIR light these constructs can transduce the photons energy to emit fluorescence, generate heat, or induce chemical reactions. In this study, we investigated fluorescence imaging of NETs embedded within tumor phantoms using spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI). Using SFDI, we were able to fluorescently image simulated tumors doped with different concentration of NETs. These preliminary results suggest that NETs can be used in conjunction with SFDI for potential tumor imaging applications.

  20. CT and MR imaging of primary tumors of the masticator space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspestrand, F.; Boysen, M.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of CT and MR examinations in 14 patients with benign and malignant tumors originating in the masticator space is presented. At presentation, 12 patients revealed tumor extension to adjacent regions and spaces. Perineutral tumor spread along trigeminal nerve branches to the cavernous sinus and orbits was combined with facial pain, and/or numbness, ophthalmoplegia, and exophthalmus. Detailed analysis of tumor growth and spread, enhancement and signal features at CT and MR imaging indicated that tumor histology was, with a few exceptions, nonspecific. More extensive growth and bone destruction was noted only among malignant tumors. MR imaging was found superior to CT in delineating tumor extension due to better soft tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar imaging. Posttreatment examinations were available in 11 patients and showed long-standing regional edema of the adjacent temporal lobe and masticator muscles in 4 out of 5 patients without clinical evidence of tumor. In 6 patients, CT and MR features were found almost unchanged with only small size differences after various forms of treatment. (orig.)

  1. Functional MRI procedures in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, M.; Heiland, S.; Sartor, K.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the increased diagnostic accuracy of contrast material enhanced MR imaging, specification and grading of brain tumors are still only approximate at best: neither morphology, nor relaxation times or contrast material enhancement reliably predict tumor histology or tumor grade. As histology and tumor grade strongly influence which therapy concept is chosen, a more precise diagnosis is mandatory. With diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI, PWI) it is now possible to obtain important information regarding the cellular matrix and the relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) of brain tumors, which cannot be obtained with standard MR techniques. These dynamic-functional imaging techniques are very useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, lymphomas, and metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from abscesses, atypical ischemic infarctions, and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, they appear suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy and therapy. After therapy these techniques are helpful to better assess the tumor response to therapy, possible therapy failure and therapy complications such as radiation necrosis. (orig.) [de

  2. MR imaging of a case of adenomatoid tumor of the adrenal gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo Gasque, C.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R.; Gonzalez Martinez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an incidentally found adenomatoid tumor of the adrenal gland, and to evaluate the utility of MRI in characterizing this type of tumor. The appearance of the tumor was nonspecific on T1-weighted in-phase, opposed-phase, and T2-weighted images, as well as its behavior after paramagnetic contrast administration, outlining the differential diagnosis among carcinoma, metastatic tumors, and pheochromocytoma. After surgery, the pathologic diagnosis was adenomatoid benign tumor of mesothelial origin. Although MRI enables the characterization of most benign lesions of the adrenal gland, the appearance of other lesions is nonspecific. In our case, MRI did not assist in preoperative diagnosis, guiding us towards a diagnosis of malignancy. (orig.)

  3. A primary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the scapula in a child: imaging findings

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    Inarejos Clemente, Emilio J.; Riaza Martin, Lucia [University of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [University of Girona, Clinica Girona, Hospital Sta. Caterina, Girona (Spain); Guirao-Marin, Sara [CETIR Clinica Girona-ERESA, Girona (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is an uncommon tumor characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration and differentiated myofibroblastic spindle cells. IMT was first described in the lung and retroperitoneum. Occurrence in bone has been well described in the maxilla and occasionally in the long bones in the adult population. We present a unique case of IMT arising primarily from the scapula in an 8-year-old patient, not described previously in the pediatric or adult literature. Imaging demonstrated an ill-defined and aggressive osteolytic lesion with cortical bone destruction associated with an important soft tissue component that extended into the adjacent muscles. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle and polygonal cells distributed in an inflammatory background with different proportions of plasma cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils. The absence of cellular atypia helped to differentiate this entity from malignant spindle cell tumors, and imaging could differentiate the tumor from the nontumoral inflammatory reaction. (orig.)

  4. Consideration on the diagnostic ability of various imaging techniques in relation to renal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ike, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Radiological diagnosis of renal tumors is being improved with the increased imaging accuracy which has resulted from advancement in the various equipment used and improvement in techniques. However, at the clinical level, diagnostic procedures based on the characteristics of the delineated images are not yet established and the diverse diagnostic procedures are being conducted currently in a stereotyped manner. In this study, the images of 61 cases diagnosed as renal tumor were analysed retrospectively with the purpose of establishing the imaging accuracy, capacity for diagnosis based on image characteristics and a subseguent proper diagnostic procedure. It was found that CT and Angio gave similar diagnostic accuracy. It was further revealed that US images enabled to differentiate renal tumors from the more commonly experienced renal cystic disease. For determination of tunica involucrum infiltration, which is essential to diagnose Stage I and II renal tumors, CT was proved to be superior to Angio. CT and US were also to be so in the determination of metastasis to para-aortic lymph nodes which is a Stage III criterion. In recent years, CT and US imaging accuracies have increased, hence the improvement in the capacity to diagnose non-observable renal tumors is highly expected. (author)

  5. Facilitating tumor functional assessment by spatially relating 3D tumor histology and in vivo MRI: image registration approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Alic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, together with histology, is widely used to diagnose and to monitor treatment in oncology. Spatial correspondence between these modalities provides information about the ability of MRI to characterize cancerous tissue. However, registration is complicated by deformations during pathological processing, and differences in scale and information content. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study proposes a methodology for establishing an accurate 3D relation between histological sections and high resolution in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are: 1 standardized acquisition and processing, 2 use of an intermediate ex vivo MRI, 3 use of a reference cutting plane, 4 dense histological sampling, 5 elastic registration, and 6 use of complete 3D data sets. Five rat pancreatic tumors imaged by T2*-w MRI were used to evaluate the proposed methodology. The registration accuracy was assessed by root mean squared (RMS distances between manually annotated landmark points in both modalities. After elastic registration the average RMS distance decreased from 1.4 to 0.7 mm. The intermediate ex vivo MRI and the reference cutting plane shared by all three 3D images (in vivo MRI, ex vivo MRI, and 3D histology data were found to be crucial for the accurate co-registration between the 3D histological data set and in vivo MRI. The MR intensity in necrotic regions, as manually annotated in 3D histology, was significantly different from other histologically confirmed regions (i.e., viable and hemorrhagic. However, the viable and the hemorrhagic regions showed a large overlap in T2(*-w MRI signal intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The established 3D correspondence between tumor histology and in vivo MRI enables extraction of MRI characteristics for histologically confirmed regions. The proposed methodology allows the creation of a tumor database of spatially registered multi-spectral MR images and multi-stained 3D

  6. Functional Imaging of Proteolysis: Stromal and Inflammatory Cells Increase Tumor Proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The underlying basement membrane is degraded during progression of breast and colon carcinoma. Thus, we imaged degradation of a quenched fluorescent derivative of basement membrane type IV collagen (DQ-collagen IV by living human breast and colon tumor spheroids. Proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by HCT 116 and HKh-2 human colon tumor spheroids was both intracellular and pericellular. In contrast, proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by BT20 human breast tumor spheroids was pericellular. As stromal elements can contribute to proteolytic activities associated with tumors, we also examined degradation of DQ-collagen IV by human monocytes/macrophages and colon and breast fibroblasts. Fibroblasts themselves exhibited a modest amount of pericellular degradation. Degradation was increased 4–17-fold in cocultures of fibroblasts and tumor cells as compared to either cell type alone. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, plasmin, and the cysteine protease, cathepsin B, all reduced degradation in the cocultures. Monocytes did not degrade DQ-collagen IV; however, macrophages degraded DQ-collagen IV intracellularly. In coculture of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages, degradation of DQ-collagen IV was further increased. Imaging of living tumor and stromal cells has, thus, allowed us to establish that tumor proteolysis occurs pericellularly and intracellularly and that tumor, stromal, and inflammatory cells all contribute to degradative processes.

  7. Application of Benchtop-magnetic resonance imaging in a nude mouse tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäder Karsten

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI plays a key role in the preclinical development of new drugs, diagnostics and their delivery systems. However, very high installation and running costs of existing superconducting MRI machines limit the spread of MRI. The new method of Benchtop-MRI (BT-MRI has the potential to overcome this limitation due to much lower installation and almost no running costs. However, due to the low field strength and decreased magnet homogeneity it is questionable, whether BT-MRI can achieve sufficient image quality to provide useful information for preclinical in vivo studies. It was the aim of the current study to explore the potential of BT-MRI on tumor models in mice. Methods We used a prototype of an in vivo BT-MRI apparatus to visualise organs and tumors and to analyse tumor progression in nude mouse xenograft models of human testicular germ cell tumor and colon carcinoma. Results Subcutaneous xenografts were easily identified as relative hypointense areas in transaxial slices of NMR images. Monitoring of tumor progression evaluated by pixel extension analyses based on NMR images correlated with increasing tumor volume calculated by calliper measurement. Gd-BOPTA contrast agent injection resulted in a better differentiation between parts of the urinary tissues and organs due to fast elimination of the agent via kidneys. In addition, interior structuring of tumors could be observed. A strong contrast enhancement within a tumor was associated with a central necrotic/fibrotic area. Conclusions BT-MRI provides satisfactory image quality to visualize organs and tumors and to monitor tumor progression and structure in mouse models.

  8. Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measured Lung Tumor Motion Consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Danny [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Ludbrook, Joanna; Arm, Jameen; Hunter, Perry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Pollock, Sean; Makhija, Kuldeep; O' brien, Ricky T. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Kim, Taeho [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Keall, Paul, E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sidney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback on intra- and interfraction tumor motion for lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Lung tumor motion was investigated in 9 lung cancer patients who underwent a breathing training session with AV biofeedback before 2 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions. The breathing training session was performed to allow patients to become familiar with AV biofeedback, which uses a guiding wave customized for each patient according to a reference breathing pattern. In the first MRI session (pretreatment), 2-dimensional cine-MR images with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback were obtained, and the second MRI session was repeated within 3-6 weeks (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were directly measured from cine-MR images using an auto-segmentation technique; the centroid and outlier motions of the lung tumors were measured from the segmented tumors. Free breathing and AV biofeedback were compared using several metrics: intra- and interfraction tumor motion consistency in displacement and period, and the outlier motion ratio. Results: Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved intrafraction tumor motion consistency by 34% in displacement (P=.019) and by 73% in period (P<.001). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved interfraction tumor motion consistency by 42% in displacement (P<.046) and by 74% in period (P=.005). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback reduced the outlier motion ratio by 21% (P<.001). Conclusions: These results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved intra- and interfraction lung tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results demonstrate that AV biofeedback can facilitate consistent tumor motion, which is advantageous toward achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  9. Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measured Lung Tumor Motion Consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Ludbrook, Joanna; Arm, Jameen; Hunter, Perry; Pollock, Sean; Makhija, Kuldeep; O'brien, Ricky T.; Kim, Taeho; Keall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback on intra- and interfraction tumor motion for lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Lung tumor motion was investigated in 9 lung cancer patients who underwent a breathing training session with AV biofeedback before 2 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions. The breathing training session was performed to allow patients to become familiar with AV biofeedback, which uses a guiding wave customized for each patient according to a reference breathing pattern. In the first MRI session (pretreatment), 2-dimensional cine-MR images with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback were obtained, and the second MRI session was repeated within 3-6 weeks (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were directly measured from cine-MR images using an auto-segmentation technique; the centroid and outlier motions of the lung tumors were measured from the segmented tumors. Free breathing and AV biofeedback were compared using several metrics: intra- and interfraction tumor motion consistency in displacement and period, and the outlier motion ratio. Results: Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved intrafraction tumor motion consistency by 34% in displacement (P=.019) and by 73% in period (P<.001). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved interfraction tumor motion consistency by 42% in displacement (P<.046) and by 74% in period (P=.005). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback reduced the outlier motion ratio by 21% (P<.001). Conclusions: These results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved intra- and interfraction lung tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results demonstrate that AV biofeedback can facilitate consistent tumor motion, which is advantageous toward achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  10. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using 23Na-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, T.; Apfaltrer, P.; Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C.; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L.; Schmid-Bindert, G.; Manegold, C.; Wenz, F.

    2012-01-01

    23 Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of 23 Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of 23 Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of 23 Na-MRI with 1 H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. 23 Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All 23 Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of 23 Na-MRI images with 1 H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 ± 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 ± 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. 23 Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative characterization of liver tumor radiodensity in CT images: a phantom study between two scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Benjamin Paul; Li, Qin; McKenney, Sarah; Fricke, Stanley Thomas; Fang, Yuan; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Petrick, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative assessment of tumor radiodensity is important for the clinical evaluation of contrast enhancement and treatment response, as well as for the extraction of texture-related features for image analysis or radiomics. Radiodensity estimation, Hounsfield Units (HU) in CT images, can be affected by patient factors such as tumor size, and by system factors such as acquisition and reconstruction protocols. In this project, we quantified the measurability of liver tumor HU using a 3D-printed phantom, imaged with two CT systems: Siemens Somatom Force and GE Lightspeed VCT. The phantom was printed by dithering two materials to create spherical tumors (10, 14 mm) with uniform densities (90, 95, 100, 105 HU). Image datasets were acquired at 120 kVp including 15 repeats using two matching exposures across the CT systems, and reconstructed using comparable algorithms. The radiodensity of each tumor was measured using an automated matched-filter method. We assessed the performance of each protocol using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as the metric for distinguishing between tumors with different radiodensities. The AUC ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 and was affected by tumor size, radiodensity, and scanner; the lowest AUC values corresponded to low dose measurements of 10 mm tumors with less than 5 HU difference. The two scanners exhibited similar performance >0.9 AUC for large lesions with contrast above 7 HU, though differences were observed for the smallest and lowest contrast tumors. These results show that HU estimation should be carefully examined, considering that uncertainty in the tumor radiodensity may propagate to quantification of other characteristics, such as size and texture.

  12. Capsule of parotid gland tumor: evaluation by 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Mana; Fujii, Shinya; Nishihara, Keisuke; Matsusue, Eiji; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide; Kawamoto, Katsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of parotid gland tumors has been widely reported, although few reports have evaluated the capsule of parotid gland tumors in detail. Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of 3.0 T MR imaging with surface coils for detection of the parotid gland tumor capsule, and to clarify the characteristics of the capsules. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight patients with parotid gland tumors (63 benign and 15 malignant) were evaluated. Axial and coronal T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained using a 3.0 T MR scanner with 70 mm surface coils. It was retrospectively assessed whether each parotid gland tumor was completely surrounded by a capsule. The capsule was classified as regular or irregular in terms of capsular thickness, and as none, mildly, or strongly enhancing in terms of contrast enhancement. Visual interpretations were compared with histopathological findings to evaluate the diagnostic ability of MR imaging to detect parotid gland tumor capsules. Statistical evaluation was conducted concerning the presence of capsules, capsular irregularity, and the difference in contrast enhancement between benign and malignant tumors, and that between pleomorphic adenomas and Warthin's tumors. Results: Capsules completely surrounding the tumor on MR imaging yielded a sensitivity of 87.7% (50/57), specificity of 90.5% (19/21), and accuracy of 88.5% (69/78). Benign tumors had a capsule completely surrounding the tumor significantly more often than malignant tumors (P = 0.009). Concerning capsular irregularity, malignant tumors tended to have more irregular capsules than benign tumors, although there were no significant differences. The capsules of malignant tumors enhanced significantly more strongly than those of benign tumors (P = 0.018). Conclusion: 3.0 T MR imaging using surface coils could correctly depict parotid gland tumor capsules in most cases. Most benign and some malignant tumors had capsules

  13. In vivo (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding: imaging of receptor regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    The use of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam as a ligand to measure alterations in benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in rats was investigated. Animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam i.v., arterial samples of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam were obtained and, later, the animals were sacrificed to assay brain binding. (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam enters the brain rapidly and binds to benzodiazepine receptors. About two-thirds of this binding is blocked by predosing the animals with 5 mg/kg of clonazepam. The amount of remaining (nonspecific) binding correlates very well (r = 0.88) with the amount of radioactivity found in plasma at the time of death. A series of rats were lesioned unilaterally with kainic acid in the caudate-putamen several months before the infusion of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. In vivo autoradiography in lesioned rats showed that benzodiazepine binding in globus pallidus and substantia nigra on the side of the lesion was increased significantly as compared to the intact side. The observed changes in benzodiazepine binding were similar to those observed previously in lesioned rats using in vitro techniques. Thus, benzodiazepine receptor regulation can be imaged quantitatively using in vivo binding techniques.

  14. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Dual-Modality Glyco-Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available d-Glucosamine (DG was conjugated to a core-cross linked polymeric micelle (CCPM system equipped with both a near-infrared fluorophore (NIRF and a gamma emitter (111In. The resultant nano-scale tumor-targeting imaging tracer, 111In-DG-NIRF-CCPM, selectively accumulated in a human epithelial carcinoma A-431 xenograft model in mice. At 24 hrs post injection, the tumor uptake was 2.62 ± 0.80 % of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g. Tumors were clearly delineated in both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and optical imaging. The results suggest that the prepared imaging tracer is a promising agent for tumor diagnosis.

  15. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  16. Overexpression of inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID)-1 protein related to angiogenesis in tumor advancement of ovarian cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maw, Min Khine; Fujimoto, Jiro; Tamaya, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID) has been involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. This prompted us to study ID functions in tumor advancement of ovarian cancers. Sixty patients underwent surgery for ovarian cancers. In ovarian cancers, the levels of ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3 mRNAs were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The histoscore with the localization of ID-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Patient prognosis was analyzed with a 36-month survival rate. Microvessel counts were determined by immunohistochemistry for CD34 and factor VIII-related antigen. ID-1 histoscores and mRNA levels both significantly (p < 0.001) increased in ovarian cancers according to clinical stage, regardless of histopathological type. Furthermore, 30 patients with high ID-1 expression had a lower survival rate (53%) compared to patients with low ID-1 expression (80%). ID-1 histoscores and mRNA levels significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with microvessel counts in ovarian cancers. ID-1 increased in ovarian cancer cells during tumor progression. Moreover, ID-1 expression levels correlated with microvessel counts. Therefore, ID-1 might work on tumor advancement via angiogenesis and is considered to be a candidate for a prognostic indicator in ovarian cancers

  17. Single-level dynamic spiral CT of hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between imaging features and tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weixia; Min Pengqiu; Song Bin; Xiao Bangliang; Liu Yan; Wang Wendong; Chen Xian; Xu Jianying

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of the enhancement imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and relevant parameters revealed by single-level dynamic spiral CT scanning with tumor microvessel counting (MVC). Methods: The study included 26 histopathologically proven HCC patients. Target-slice dynamic scanning and portal venous phase scanning were performed for all patients. The time-density curves were generated with measurement of relevant parameters including: peak value (PV) and contrast enhancement ratio (CER), and the gross enhancement morphology analyzed. Histopathological slides were carefully prepared for the standard F8RA and VEGF immunohistochemical staining and tumor microvessel counting and calculation of VEGF expression percentage of tumor cells. The enhancement imaging features of HCC lesions were correlatively studied with tumor MVC and VEGF expression. Results: Peak value of HCC lesions were 7.9 to 75.2 HU, CER were 3.8% to 36.0%. MVC were 6 to 91, and the VEGF expression percentage were 32.1% to 78.3%. The PV and CER were significantly correlated with tumor tissue MVC (r = 0.508 and 0.423, P < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). There were no correlations between PV and CER and VEGF expression percentage. Both the patterns of time-density curve and the gross enhancement morphology of HCC lesions were also correlated with tumor MVC, and reflected the distribution characteristics of tumor microvessels within HCC lesions. A close association was found between the likelihood of intrahepatic metastasis of HCC lesions with densely enhanced pseudo capsules and the presence of rich tumor microvessels within these pseudo capsules. Conclusion: The parameters and the enhancement imaging features of HCC lesions on target-slice dynamic scanning are correlated with tumor MVC, and can reflect the distribution characteristics of tumor microvessels within HCC lesions. Dynamic spiral CT scanning is a valuable means to assess the angiogenic activity and

  18. A comparative study between magnetic resonance imaging and histological findings of bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Koichi

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic methodology for bone and soft tissue tumors has made great strides recently through the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report a comparative assessment of the histological findings of bone and soft tissue tumors with MRI from 212 cases. The accuracy of a qualitative diagnosis was observed in a solitary bone cyst, enchondroma, giant cell tumor, chondrosarcoma, lipoma, hemangioma, neurinoma, and in a synovial cyst. However, the qualitative diagnosis of a malignant tumor was difficult because of the variety of the intratumoral histological changes. An enhanced-image using Gd-DTPA was useful for differentiation of the viable region in the internal area of a tumor, discrimination of the reactive zone of an edema or assessing vascularity, and for discrimination between a cyst and a solid tumor. Based on comparison with findings from the excised specimen, it was found that histological changes such as calcification, fibrosis, hemorrhaging and necrosis, and the presence or absence of a tumor capsule had been reflected accurately on MR images. However, infiltration of the tumor into the bone cortex and into the articular cartilage were found frequently to be false-positive on MRI. Although problems remained to be solved regarding the evaluation of the presence or absence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissue, the depiction of periosteal reaction, and regarding differentiation from inflammatory disease, MRI was a very useful information source for operative planning because it could evaluate the relationship between the tumor and adjacent blood vessels or nerves, the effect of preoperative therapy, and effectively discriminate between benign and malignant tumors. (author)

  19. Quantification of Esophageal Tumor Motion on Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lever, Frederiek M.; Lips, Irene M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P.M.; Reerink, Onne; Lier, Astrid L.H.M.W. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van; Meijer, Gert J., E-mail: g.j.meijer@umcutrecht.nl

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the movement of esophageal tumors noninvasively on cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by use of a semiautomatic method to visualize tumor movement directly throughout multiple breathing cycles. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with esophageal tumors underwent MRI. Tumors were located in the upper (8), middle (7), and lower (21) esophagus. Cine-MR images were collected in the coronal and sagittal plane during 60 seconds at a rate of 2 Hz. An adaptive correlation filter was used to automatically track a previously marked reference point. Tumor movement was measured in the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) directions and its relationship along the longitudinal axis of the esophagus was investigated. Results: Tumor registration within the individual images was typically done at a millisecond time scale. The mean (SD) peak-to-peak displacements in the CC, AP, and LR directions were 13.3 (5.2) mm, 4.9 (2.5) mm, and 2.7 (1.2) mm, respectively. The bandwidth to cover 95% of excursions from the mean position (c95) was also calculated to exclude outliers caused by sporadic movements. The mean (SD) c95 values were 10.1 (3.8) mm, 3.7 (1.9) mm, and 2.0 (0.9) mm in the CC, AP, and LR dimensions. The end-exhale phase provided a stable position in the respiratory cycle, compared with more variety in the end-inhale phase. Furthermore, lower tumors showed more movement than did higher tumors in the CC and AP directions. Conclusions: Intrafraction tumor movement was highly variable between patients. Tumor position proved the most stable during the respiratory cycle in the end-exhale phase. A better understanding of tumor motion makes it possible to individualize radiation delivery strategies accordingly. Cine-MRI is a successful noninvasive modality to analyze motion for this purpose in the future.

  20. Quantification of Esophageal Tumor Motion on Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, Frederiek M.; Lips, Irene M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P.M.; Reerink, Onne; Lier, Astrid L.H.M.W. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van; Meijer, Gert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the movement of esophageal tumors noninvasively on cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by use of a semiautomatic method to visualize tumor movement directly throughout multiple breathing cycles. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with esophageal tumors underwent MRI. Tumors were located in the upper (8), middle (7), and lower (21) esophagus. Cine-MR images were collected in the coronal and sagittal plane during 60 seconds at a rate of 2 Hz. An adaptive correlation filter was used to automatically track a previously marked reference point. Tumor movement was measured in the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) directions and its relationship along the longitudinal axis of the esophagus was investigated. Results: Tumor registration within the individual images was typically done at a millisecond time scale. The mean (SD) peak-to-peak displacements in the CC, AP, and LR directions were 13.3 (5.2) mm, 4.9 (2.5) mm, and 2.7 (1.2) mm, respectively. The bandwidth to cover 95% of excursions from the mean position (c95) was also calculated to exclude outliers caused by sporadic movements. The mean (SD) c95 values were 10.1 (3.8) mm, 3.7 (1.9) mm, and 2.0 (0.9) mm in the CC, AP, and LR dimensions. The end-exhale phase provided a stable position in the respiratory cycle, compared with more variety in the end-inhale phase. Furthermore, lower tumors showed more movement than did higher tumors in the CC and AP directions. Conclusions: Intrafraction tumor movement was highly variable between patients. Tumor position proved the most stable during the respiratory cycle in the end-exhale phase. A better understanding of tumor motion makes it possible to individualize radiation delivery strategies accordingly. Cine-MRI is a successful noninvasive modality to analyze motion for this purpose in the future

  1. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  2. In vivo preclinical photoacoustic imaging of tumor vasculature development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Pedley, Barbara; Beard, Paul

    2012-05-01

    The use of a novel all-optical photoacoustic scanner for imaging the development of tumor vasculature and its response to a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent is described. The scanner employs a Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for mapping the photoacoustic waves and an image reconstruction algorithm based upon attenuation-compensated acoustic time reversal. The system was used to noninvasively image human colorectal tumor xenografts implanted subcutaneously in mice. Label-free three-dimensional in vivo images of whole tumors to depths of almost 10 mm with sub-100-micron spatial resolution were acquired in a longitudinal manner. This enabled the development of tumor-related vascular features, such as vessel tortuosity, feeding vessel recruitment, and necrosis to be visualized over time. The system was also used to study the temporal evolution of the response of the tumor vasculature following the administration of a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent (OXi4503). This revealed the well-known destruction and recovery phases associated with this agent. These studies illustrate the broader potential of this technology as an imaging tool for the preclinical and clinical study of tumors and other pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  3. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Tianlong; Du, Xiangke; Zhang, Sen; Liu, Xia; Li, Xubing

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor. Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd(3+), and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin alphanubeta3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo Tianlong [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: huotianlong@bjmu.edu.cn; Du Xiangke [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: duxk@263.net; Zhang Sen [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: skagerrak_s@yahoo.com.cn; Liu Xia [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: iamliuxia@126.com; Li Xubing [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: lixb@bjmu.edu.cn

    2010-02-15

    Rationale and objective: The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor. Materials and methods: Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd{sup 3+}, and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90 min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Results: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90 min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90 min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Conclusion: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor.

  5. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Tianlong; Du Xiangke; Zhang Sen; Liu Xia; Li Xubing

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and objective: The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor. Materials and methods: Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd 3+ , and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin ανβ3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90 min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Results: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90 min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90 min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Conclusion: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor.

  6. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  7. Imaging of bone tumors: evaluation of direct magnification radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, T.M.; Hillmann, A.; Erlemann, R.; Groenefeld, A.; Haeussler, M.; Heppe, A.E.; Vestring, T.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the potentials of magnification radiography as compared with conventional radiography in diagnosing bone tumors. Design and patients. Sixty-two patients with primary bone tumors and tumorlike lesions underwent radiography with both conventional (non-magnified) and magnification (fivefold) techniques. All radiographs were analyzed by four radiologists and the findings correlated with the histopathology findings. The microfocal X-ray unit used for magnification radiography had a focal spot size of 20-130 μm. Digital luminescence radiography was employed with magnification, while normal film-screen systems were used with conventional radiography. Results. The diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions as well as the individual tumor diagnosis were determined with higher accuracy using magnification compared with conventional radiography (88% vs 75% and 71% vs 52%, p<0.01). Margins of destruction, periosteal reactions and matrix patterns were evaluated with higher certainty by all of the radiologists (p<0.01). Conclusion. Magnification radiography may improve the evaluation and diagnosis of bone tumors. (orig.). With 6 tabs

  8. Rapid ex vivo imaging of PAIII prostate to bone tumor with SWIFT-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhach, Ihor; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Lynch, Conor C; Corum, Curt; Martinez, Gary V; Garwood, Michael; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    The limiting factor for MRI of skeletal/mineralized tissue is fast transverse relaxation. A recent advancement in MRI technology, SWIFT (Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform), is emerging as a new approach to overcome this difficulty. Among other techniques like UTE, ZTE, and WASPI, the application of SWIFT technology has the strong potential to impact preclinical and clinical imaging, particularly in the context of primary or metastatic bone cancers because it has the added advantage of imaging water in mineralized tissues of bone allowing MRI images to be obtained of tissues previously visible only with modalities such as computed tomography (CT). The goal of the current study is to examine the feasibility of SWIFT for the assessment of the prostate cancer induced changes in bone formation (osteogenesis) and destruction (osteolysis) in ex vivo specimens. A luciferase expressing prostate cancer cell line (PAIII) or saline control was inoculated directly into the tibia of 6-week-old immunocompromised male mice. Tumor growth was assessed weekly for 3 weeks before euthanasia and dissection of the tumor bearing and sham tibias. The ex vivo mouse tibia specimens were imaged with a 9.4 Tesla (T) and 7T MRI systems. SWIFT images are compared with traditional gradient-echo and spin-echo MRI images as well as CT and histological sections. SWIFT images with nominal resolution of 78 μm are obtained with the tumor and different bone structures identified. Prostate cancer induced changes in the bone microstructure are visible in SWIFT images, which is supported by spin-echo, high resolution CT and histological analysis. SWIFT MRI is capable of high-quality high-resolution ex vivo imaging of bone tumor and surrounding bone and soft tissues. Furthermore, SWIFT MRI shows promise for in vivo bone tumor imaging, with the added benefits of nonexposure to ionizing radiation, quietness, and speed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distributi