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Sample records for binding scatchard analysis

  1. Computer program for Scatchard analysis of protein: Ligand interaction - use for determination of soluble and nuclear steroid receptor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leake, R.; Cowan, S.; Eason, R.

    1998-01-01

    Steroid receptor concentration may be determined routinely in biopsy samples of breast and endometrial cancer by the competition method. This method yields data for both the soluble and nuclear fractions of the tissue. The data are usually subject to Scatchard analysis. This Appendix describes a computer program written initially for a PDP-11. It has been modified for use with IBM, Apple Macintosh and BBC microcomputers. The nature of the correction for competition is described and examples of the printout are given. The program is flexible and its use for different receptors is explained. The program can be readily adapted to other assays in which Scatchard analysis is appropriate

  2. Specific binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to gonadal tissue: comparison of limited-point saturation analyses to Scatchard analyses for determining binding capacities and factors affecting estimates of binding capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.J.; Ireland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare gonadotropin binding capacity calculated from limited-point saturation analyses to those obtained from Scatchard analyses, and to test the effects of membrane purity and source of gonadotropin receptors on determining the maximum percentage of radioiodinated hormone bound to receptors (maximum bindability). One- to four-point saturation analyses gave results comparable to results by Scatchard analyses when examining relative binding capacities of receptors. Crude testicular homogenates had lower estimates of maximum bindability of 125 I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin than more purified gonadotropin receptor preparations. Under similar preparation techniques, some gonadotropin receptor sources exhibited low maximum bindability

  3. Improved receptor analysis in PET using a priori information from in vitro binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litton, J.-E.; Hall, H.; Blomqvist, G. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    An accurate determination of non-specific binding is required for the analysis of in vitro and in vivo receptor binding data. For some radioligands the non-specific binding is of the same magnitude as the specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro measurements have shown that the non-specific binding can be different in different brain regions. If this is the case in a PET study for determining B{sub max} and K{sub d}, a correction for the non-specific binding has to be applied. The aim of the present communication is to present a means for determining corrected B{sub max} and K{sub d} with Scatchard analysis using in vitro binding studies. The influence of non-specific binding on the free and specifically bound radioligand is expressed with the aid of a correction factor, which can be calculated from measurable quantities. Introduction of the corrected free and specifically bound radioligand should give binding parameters closer to reality than previously obtained results. (author)

  4. Studies of cellulose binding by cellobiose dehydrogenase and a comparison with cellobiohydrolase 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, G; Salumets, A; Divne, C; Pettersson, G

    1997-01-01

    The binding isotherm to cellulose of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been compared with that of cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH 1) from Trichoderma reesei. CDH binds more strongly but more sparsely to cellulose than does CBH 1. In a classical Scatchard analysis, a better fit to a one-site binding model was obtained for CDH than for CBH 1. The binding of both enzymes decreased in the presence of ethylene glycol, increased in the presence of ammonium sulphate and wa...

  5. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. Studies of cellulose binding by cellobiose dehydrogenase and a comparison with cellobiohydrolase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, G; Salumets, A; Divne, C; Pettersson, G

    1997-01-01

    The binding isotherm to cellulose of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been compared with that of cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH 1) from Trichoderma reesei. CDH binds more strongly but more sparsely to cellulose than does CBH 1. In a classical Scatchard analysis, a better fit to a one-site binding model was obtained for CDH than for CBH 1. The binding of both enzymes decreased in the presence of ethylene glycol, increased in the presence of ammonium sulphate and was unaffected by sodium chloride. Attempts to localize the cellulose-binding site on CDH have also been made by exposing enzymically digested CDH to cellulose and isolating the cellulose-bound peptides. The results suggest that the cellulose-binding site is located internally in the amino acid sequence of CDH. PMID:9210407

  7. Binding of an oxindole alkaloid from Uncaria tomentosa to amyloid protein (Abeta1-40).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackowiak, Teresa; Baczek, Tomasz; Roman, Kaliszana; Zbikowska, Beata; Gleńsk, Michał; Fecka, Izabela; Cisowski, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The primary aim of this work was to determine the interactions of an oxindole alkaloid (mitraphylline) isolated from Uncaria tomentosa with beta-amyloid 1-40 (Abeta1-40 protein) applying the capillary electrophoresis (CE) method. Specifically the Hummel-Dreyer method and Scatchard analysis were performed to study the binding of oxindole alkaloids with Abeta1-40 protein. Prior to these studies extraction of the alkaloid of interest was carried out. Identification of the isolated alkaloid was performed by the use of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The proposed approach was proved to be an efficient and accurate method for specific compound isolation and identification purposes. Moreover, analytical information from the CE approach can be considered as the valuable tool for binding constant determination. The binding constant of mitraphylline with Abeta1-40 protein determined by the Hummel-Dreyer method and Scatchard analysis equals K = 9.95 x 10(5) M(-1). The results obtained showed the significant binding of the tested compound with Abeta1-40 protein. These results are discussed and interpreted in the view of developing a strategy for identification of novel compounds of great importance in Alzheimer disease therapy.

  8. Measurement of specific [3H]-ouabain binding to different types of human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Arnold; Oh, V M; Taylor, John E.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the specific binding of [3H]-ouabain to intact mononuclear leucocytes (82% lymphocytes) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes. In both types of cells [3H]-ouabain binding was saturable, confined to a single site of high affinity, slow to reach equilibrium, slow to reverse, temperature......-dependent, competitively antagonized by potassium, and facilitated by the presence of divalent cations. The equilibrium dissociation constants were 2.4 +/- 0.7 nmol/l (polymorphs) and 2.4 +/- 0.4 nmol/l (mononuclear cells) (NS). The values of maximal specific ouabain binding, measured by Scatchard analysis...... were expressed per square micron of cell surface area the difference between the two cell types was proportionately greater (83 and 186 sites per micron 2 respectively). We conclude that the [3H]-ouabain binding sites on mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leucocytes are similar in nature, but different...

  9. Opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: evidence for distinct morphine (. mu. ) and enkephalin (delta) binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmi, S.M.I.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-06-13

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exhibited a heterogeneous population of ..mu.. and delta types of opioid binding sites. These specific binding sites displayed the characteristic saturability, stereospecificity and reversibility, expected of a receptor. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin (DADLE) in the presence of 10/sup -5/M D-Pro/sup 4/-morphiceptin (to block the ..mu.. receptors) and the competitive displacement by various highly selective ligands yielded the binding parameters of delta sites which closely resemble those of the delta receptors in brain and mouse neuroblastoma clones. Similarly, the high affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine, together with the higher potency of morphine analogues to displace (/sup 3/H)-naloxone binding established the presence of ..mu.. sites. Guanine nucleotides and NaCl significantly inhibited the association and increased the dissociation of (/sup 3/H)-DADLE binding.

  10. Binding of (3H)dihydroergocryptine to an alpha-adrenergic site in the stalk median eminence of the steer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.T.; Roberts, J.M.; Weiner, R.I.

    1981-12-01

    Dihydroergocryptine (DHE), a potent dopamine agonist and alpha-adrenergic antagonist, has been used as a radioligand to characterize both dopamine and alpha-adrenergic receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H)DHE to particulate fractions of the steer stalk median eminence was characterized using a filtration assay. Specific binding was defined by the presence of 10 microM phentolamine or by an iterative nonlinear hyperbolic curve-fitting program. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium isotherms of specific binding defined a single high affinity (Kd . 1.78 +/- 0.22 nM), saturable (maximum binding, 481 +/- 39 fmol/mg protein), stereoselective binding site. The Kd, calculated from the ratio of the rate constants k2 and k1, was 2.8 +/- 0.14 nM. The rank order of potency of agonists to compete for (3H)DHE binding (l-epinephrine greater than l-norepinephrine greater than dopamine greater than l-isoproterenol) was consistent with interactions at an alpha-adrenergic site. The rank order of potency of alpha-antagonists (phentolamine greater than yohimbine greater than prazosin) suggested that this was an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. The affinity of dopamine agonists for the (3H)DHE-binding site was 10-fold lower relative to their potency at known dopamine receptors, while the affinity of dopaminergic antagonists was 100-fold lower. Furthermore, Scatchard analysis of specific (3H)DHE binding in the presence of a concentration of spiperone which should saturate dopamine receptors, only decreased the number of binding sites by 9%. These data demonstrate the presence of large numbers of alpha-adrenergic receptors in the stalk median eminence of the steer. Only a small number of dopaminergic binding sites for (3H)DHE appeared to be present.

  11. Analysis of binding interaction between the natural apocarotenoid bixin and human serum albumin by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Molnár, Péter; Deli, József

    2005-06-01

    Bixin is an important, pharmacologically active dietary cis-carotenoid, but its interaction with potential macromolecular targets is completely unexplored. This work was aimed to study the binding of bixin to human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in combination with UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching techniques were applied. Appearance of induced CD bands in the UV- and VIS-absorption spectral regions indicated the formation of non-covalent carotenoid-albumin complexes. Shape and spectral position of the extrinsic Cotton effects suggested the binding of a single bixin molecule to HSA in chiral conformation. Scatchard and non-linear regression analyses of CD titration data resulted in similar values for the association constant (Ka = 6.6 and 4.6x10(5) M(-1), resp.) and for the number of binding sites (n = 1). The binding interaction was independently confirmed by fluorescence-quenching experiment from which the binding parameters were also calculated. CD Displacement measurements performed with marker ligands established that the main drug binding sites of HSA are not involved in binding of bixin. Palmitic acid decreased the amplitude of the induced CD bands suggesting a common albumin binding site for bixin and long-chain fatty acids. The above data indicate that HSA plays a significant role in the plasma transportation of bixin and related dietary carboxylic acid carotenoids.

  12. Binding sites analyser (BiSA: software for genomic binding sites archiving and overlap analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    Full Text Available Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA, for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net.

  13. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  14. Binding properties and immunolocalization of a fatty acid-binding protein in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S M T; Maache, M; de la Guardia, R Díaz; Córdova, O M; García, J R Gil; Galiana, M; Acuña Castroviejo, D; Martins, M; Osuna, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    We describe here a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated and purified from the parasitic protozoon Giardia lamblia. The protein has a molecular mass of 8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.96. A Scatchard analysis of the data at equilibrium revealed a dissociation constant of 3.12 x 10(-8) M when the labeled oleic acid was displaced by a 10-fold greater concentration of unlabeled oleic acid. Testosterone, sodium desoxycholate, taurocholate, metronidazol, and alpha-tocopherol, together with butyric, arachidonic, palmitic, retinoic, and glycocholic acids, were also bound to the protein. Assays with polyclonal antibodies revealed that the protein is located in the ventral disk and also appears in the dorsal membrane, the cytoplasm, and in the vicinity of the lipid vacuoles.

  15. Characterization of soluble fibronectin binding to Bacille Calmette-Guérin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Brown, E J; Quillin, S P; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1989-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a 420 kDa glycoprotein, consists of two similar subunits linked by a disulphide bond near the C-terminal end. FN is present in soluble and matrix forms in various body fluids and tissues and has been shown to bind to variety of organisms. We characterized the conditions required for 125I-FN binding to Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). The binding was dose-dependent, reached saturation within 3 min, and was essentially irreversible for at least 24 h under optimal binding conditions at pH 6.0. In contrast, the binding was reversible (greater than 90% in 24 h) when the pH was increased to 10.0. Scatchard analysis of the dose-response experiments produced a straight line, suggesting the presence of a single class of FN receptor on BCG. 125I-FN binding was trypsin-sensitive, suggesting that the BCG-binding molecule is a protein. The number of FN receptors was determined to be 8000-15,000 per bacterium. 125I-FN binding was pH dependent, with maximal binding at acidic pH. 125I-FN binding was sensitive to the presence of NaCl, with 0.08 M-NaCl inhibiting binding by 85%. These data demonstrate that soluble FN binds to a trypsin-sensitive cell-surface component of BCG in an essentially irreversible manner.

  16. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  17. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  18. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  19. Human chorionic ganodotropin binding sites in the human endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, J.; Sen, S.; Manna, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of high-affinity and low-capacity specific binding sites for luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been reported in porcine, rabbit and rat uteri. The authors have identified the hCG binding sites in the human endometrium collected from 35-42-year-old ovulatory and anovulatory women. The binding characteristics of hCG to endometrial tissue preparations from ovulatory and anovulatory women showed saturability with high affinity and low capacity. Scatchard plot analysis showed the dissociation constant of specific binding sites in the ovulatory women to be 3.5x10 -10 mol/l and in anovulatory women to be 3.1x10 -10 mol/l. The maximum binding capacity varied considerably between ovulatory and anovulatory endometrium. Among the divalent metal ions tested Zn 2+ effected a remarkable increase in [ 125 I]hCG binding to the endometrium, whereas Mn 2+ showed a marginal increase and other metal ions did not have any effect. Data obtained with human endometrium indicate an influence of the functional state of the ovary on [ 125 I]hCG binding to endometrium. 14 refs., 3 figs

  20. Modulatory effects of peroxovanadates on insulin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, D W; Leung, W N; Xu, M; Zhu, S Q; Cheng, C H

    1996-11-15

    The insulin-mimetic effects exhibited by vanadate, hydrogen peroxide, and some peroxovanadates have recently been shown to occur, at least in part, through an activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, we examine the effects of these compounds on insulin receptor binding using receptor preparations from human placental membranes. Among the 16 vanadium(V)-peroxo complexes studied, the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion, where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, was found to increase insulin receptor binding by 24%, whereas the [VO(O2)2(en)]- ion, where en = ethylenediamine, was found to reduce insulin receptor binding by about the same amount under steady-state conditions. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicates that the observed effect of the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion on insulin receptor binding is exerted mainly at the high-capacity low-affinity sites. Furthermore, this modulatory effect is reversible and requires a continuous presence of the compound. By perturbing the membrane environment of the insulin receptor, we have shown that an intact membrane structure is essential for an observable effect. The observed modulation of insulin receptor binding by peroxovanadates is interpreted in terms of a ternary complex model in which the peroxovanadate acts as an allosteric effector modulating the binding equilibrium between insulin and its receptor.

  1. [3H]-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the 3 H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo

  2. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  3. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  4. Growth hormone-binding proteins in high-speed cytosols of multiple tissues of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Roupas, P; Stevenson, J

    1986-04-11

    Soluble, specific binding protein(s) for growth hormone (GH) have been identified and partially characterized in high-speed cytosolic preparations from a number of rabbit tissues. The binding of 125I-labelled human GH to proteins in liver, heart, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and kidney cytosols was dependent on time and cytosolic protein concentration. By Scatchard analysis, the binding affinities (KA: (2-7) X 10(9) M-1) were somewhat higher than those generally reported for membrane GH receptors. The binding proteins had a greater specificity for somatotrophic hormones than lactogenic hormones, although the kidney appeared to have, in addition, a lactogen-binding protein. By gel filtration, the Mr of the cytosolic GH-binding protein was approximately 100 000 in all tissues. None of the binding proteins was detectable by the poly(ethylene glycol) precipitation method used widely for soluble hormone receptors. The cytosolic GH-binding proteins also cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the rabbit liver membrane GH receptor. These results indicate the ubiquitous presence of apparently naturally soluble GH-binding proteins in the cytosolic fractions of several tissues in the rabbit. Of great interest is their presence in muscle, where GH receptors or binding proteins have not previously been detected, despite muscle being recognized as a classical GH target tissue.

  5. Methodological aspects on drug receptor binding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, A.

    1978-01-01

    Although drug receptors occur in relatively low concentrations, they can be visualized by the use of appropriate radioindicators. In most cases the procedure is rapid and can reach a high degree of accuracy. Specificity of the interaction is studied by competition analysis. The necessity of using several radioindicators to define a receptor population is emphasized. It may be possible to define isoreceptors and drugs with selectivity for one isoreceptor. (Author)

  6. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of comprehensive synaptic connectivity in short- and long-term cultured rat hippocampal neurons with new analytical methods inspired by Scatchard and Hill plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanamoto, Ryo; Shindo, Yutaka; Niwano, Mariko [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshinori [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University (Japan); Miki, Norihisa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 223-8522 (Japan); Hotta, Kohji [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University (Japan); Oka, Kotaro, E-mail: oka@bio.keio.ac.jp [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University (Japan)

    2016-03-18

    To investigate comprehensive synaptic connectivity, we examined Ca{sup 2+} responses with quantitative electric current stimulation by indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass electrode with transparent and high electro-conductivity. The number of neurons with Ca{sup 2+} responses was low during the application of stepwise increase of electric current in short-term cultured neurons (less than 17 days in-vitro (DIV)). The neurons cultured over 17 DIV showed two-type responses: S-shaped (sigmoid) and monotonous saturated responses, and Scatchard plots well illustrated the difference of these two responses. Furthermore, sigmoid like neural network responses over 17 DIV were altered to the monotonous saturated ones by the application of the mixture of AP5 and CNQX, specific blockers of NMDA and AMPA receptors, respectively. This alternation was also characterized by the change of Hill coefficients. These findings indicate that the neural network with sigmoid-like responses has strong synergetic or cooperative synaptic connectivity via excitatory glutamate synapses. - Highlights: • We succeed to evaluate the maturation of neural network by Scathard and Hill Plots. • Long-term cultured neurons showed two-type responses: sigmoid and monotonous. • The sigmoid-like increase indicates the cooperatevity of neural networks. • Excitatory glutamate synapses cause the cooperatevity of neural networks.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of comprehensive synaptic connectivity in short- and long-term cultured rat hippocampal neurons with new analytical methods inspired by Scatchard and Hill plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanamoto, Ryo; Shindo, Yutaka; Niwano, Mariko; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Miki, Norihisa; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate comprehensive synaptic connectivity, we examined Ca 2+ responses with quantitative electric current stimulation by indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass electrode with transparent and high electro-conductivity. The number of neurons with Ca 2+ responses was low during the application of stepwise increase of electric current in short-term cultured neurons (less than 17 days in-vitro (DIV)). The neurons cultured over 17 DIV showed two-type responses: S-shaped (sigmoid) and monotonous saturated responses, and Scatchard plots well illustrated the difference of these two responses. Furthermore, sigmoid like neural network responses over 17 DIV were altered to the monotonous saturated ones by the application of the mixture of AP5 and CNQX, specific blockers of NMDA and AMPA receptors, respectively. This alternation was also characterized by the change of Hill coefficients. These findings indicate that the neural network with sigmoid-like responses has strong synergetic or cooperative synaptic connectivity via excitatory glutamate synapses. - Highlights: • We succeed to evaluate the maturation of neural network by Scathard and Hill Plots. • Long-term cultured neurons showed two-type responses: sigmoid and monotonous. • The sigmoid-like increase indicates the cooperatevity of neural networks. • Excitatory glutamate synapses cause the cooperatevity of neural networks.

  9. Binding Characteristics Of Ivermectin To Blood Cells | Nweke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The binding characteristics of Ivermectin were determined using scatchard plots. The percentage binding to platelet rich plasma, white blood cells and red blood cells were 90.00 + 1.00, 96-90 + 1.05 and 46.20 + 1.10 S.D respectively. It was found to bind the highest to white blood cells and the least to red blood cells.

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of a blue copper- binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Cloning and expression analysis of a blue copper- binding protein gene from Dasypyrum Villosum. Huagang He1*, Shanying Zhu1, Wenbing Wang1, Tongde Bie2 and Peidu Chen3. 1Jiangsu University. Zhenjiang 212013, P. R. China. 2Yangzhou Academy of Agricultural ...

  11. Specific binding of an immunoreactive and biologically active 125I-labeled substance P derivative to mouse mesencephalic cells in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Herbet, A.; Daguet, M.C.; Glowinski, J.; Prochiantz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Binding characteristics of 125 I-labeled Bolton-Hunter substance P ([ 125 I]BHSP), a radioactive analogue of substance P, were studied with mesencephalic primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse brain. Nonspecific binding represented no more than 20% of the total binding observed on the cells. In contrast, significant specific binding--saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent--was demonstrated. Scatchard analysis of concentration-dependent binding saturation indicates a single population of noninteracting sites with a high affinity (Kd . 169 pM). Substance P and different substance P analogues were tested for their competitive potencies with regard to [ 125 I]BHSP binding. BHSP itself, substance P, (Tyr8)-substance P, and (nor-Leu11)-substance P strongly inhibited the binding. Good inhibition was also obtained with physalaemin and eledoisin, two peptides structurally related to substance P. When substance P C-terminal fragments were tested for their ability to compete with [ 125 I]BHSP binding, a good relationship was found between competitive activity and peptide length. Regional distribution of [ 125 I]BHSP binding sites was found using primary cultures obtained from different regions of embryonic mouse brain. Mesencephalic, hypothalamic, and striatal cultures had the highest [ 125 I]BHSP binding capacities, whereas cortical, hippocampal, and cerebellar cells shared only little binding activity. Finally, when mesencephalic cells were grown under conditions impairing glial development, [ 125 I]BHSP binding was not affected, demonstrating that binding sites are located on neuronal cells

  12. Effects of heparin on insulin binding and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriauciunas, K.M.; Grigorescu, F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan known to alter the function of many proteins, on insulin binding and bioactivity was studied. Cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) were incubated with varying concentrations of heparin, then extensively washed, and 125 I-labeled insulin binding was measured. Heparin at concentrations used clinically for anticoagulation (1-50 U/ml) inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner; 50% inhibition of binding occurred with 5-10 U/ml. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding was due to a decrease in both the affinity and the apparent number of available insulin receptors. The effect occurred within 10 min at 22 degrees C and persisted even after the cells were extensively washed. Inhibition of insulin binding also occurred when cells were preincubated with heparinized plasma or heparinized serum but not when cells were incubated with normal serum or plasma from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. By contrast, other polyanions and polycations, e.g., poly-L-glutamic acid, poly-L-lysine, succinylated poly-L-lysine, and histone, did not inhibit binding. Heparin also inhibited insulin binding in Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-transformed lymphocytes but had no effect on insulin binding to isolated adipocytes, human erythrocytes, or intact hepatoma cells. When isolated adipocytes were incubated with heparin, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and, to a lesser extent, of basal glucose oxidation. Although heparin has no effect on insulin binding to intact hepatoma cells, heparin inhibited both insulin binding and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in receptors solubilized from these cells

  13. Convulxin binding to platelet receptor GPVI: competition with collagen related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedergang, F; Alcover, A; Knight, C G; Farndale, R W; Barnes, M J; Francischetti, I M; Bon, C; Leduc, M

    2000-06-24

    Convulxin (CVX), a potent platelet aggregating protein from the venom of the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus, is known to bind to the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI). CVX binding to human platelets was investigated by flow cytometry, using fluorescein labeled convulxin (FITC-CVX). Scatchard analysis indicated high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of 0.6 and 4 nM and Bmax values of 1200 and 2000 binding sites per platelet. FITC-CVX binding was inhibited by collagen related peptides (CRPs) comprising a repeated GPO sequence, namely GCO(GPO)(10)GCOGNH(2) and GKO(GPO)(10)GKOGNH(2), which also bind to receptor GPVI. These peptides (monomeric or cross-linked forms) gave a high affinity inhibition of 10-20% for concentrations between 10 ng/ml and 5 microg/ml, followed by a second phase of inhibition at concentrations greater than 5 microg/ml. It was shown also that the inhibition of FITC-CVX binding by CRPs was independent on the time of preincubation of platelets with CRPs, and the same percentage of inhibition was seen with various concentrations of convulxin. Confocal microscopy of the distribution of FITC-CVX binding sites on platelets showed an homogeneous distribution of FITC-CVX bound to GPVI, although some limited clustering may exist. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. 2[125I]Iodomelatonin binding sites in spleens of guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Pang, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    2-[ 125 I]Iodomelatonin was found to bind specifically to the membrane preparations of the spleens of guinea pigs with high affinity. The binding was rapid, stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of the binding assays revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 49.8±4.12 pmol/l and binding site density (Bmax) of 0.69±0.082 fmol/mg protein at mid-light. There was no significant change in the Kd or the Bmax at mid-dark. Kinetic analysis showed a Kd of 23.13±4.81 pmol/l, in agreement to that derived from the saturation studies. The 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites have the following order of potency: 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 6-chloromelatonin much-gt N-acetylserotonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol > serotonin, 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid > 5-hydroxytryptophol, 3-acetylindole, 1-acetylindole-3-carboxyaldehyde, L-tryptophan > tryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Differential centrifugation studies showed that the binding sites are localized mainly in the nuclear fraction, the rest are distributed in the microsomal fraction, mitochondrial fraction and cytosolic fraction. The demonstration of 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites in the spleen suggests the presence of melatonin receptors and a direct mechanism of action of melatonin on the immune system

  15. A microcalorimetry and binding study on interaction of dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide with wigeon hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordbar, A.K.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A.; Amini, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters for the binding of dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) with wigeon hemoglobin (Hb) in aqueous solution at various pH and 27 deg. C have been measured by equilibrium dialysis and titration microcalorimetry techniques. The Scatchard plots represent unusual features at neutral and alkaline pH and specific binding at acidic pH. This leads us to analyze the binding data by fitting the data to the Hill equation for multiclasses of binding sites. The best fit was obtained with the equation for one class at acidic pH and two classes at neutral and alkaline pH. The thermodynamic analysis of the binding process shows that the strength of binding at neutral pH is more than these at other pH values. This can be related to the more accessible hydrophobic surface area of wigeon hemoglobin at this pH. The endothermic enthalpy data which was measured by microcalorimetry confirms the binding data analysis and represents the more regular and stable structure of wigeon hemoglobin at neutral pH

  16. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  17. Dopamine receptors in the guinea-pig heart. A binding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrini, M.; Benelli, A.; Baraldi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists to guinea-pig myocardial membrane preparations was studied using 3 H-dopamine and 3 H-spiperone as radioligand. 3 H-Dopamine bound specifically to heart membranes while 3 H-spiperone did not. A Scatchard analysis of 3 H-dopamine binding showed a curvilinear plot indicating the presence of two dopamine receptor populations that we have termed high- (K/sub d/ = 1.2 nM, B/sub mx/ = 52.9 fmol/mg prot.) and low- (K/sub d/ = 11.8 nM, B/sub mx/ = 267.3 fmol/gm prot.) affinity binding sites, respectively. The charactization of the high-affinity component of 3 H-dopamine binding indicated that the binding is rapid, saturable, stereospecific, pH- and temperature-dependent, and displaced by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists known to act similarly in vivo. The finding that pretreatment with dibenamine (which has been described as an α-adrenoceptor irreversible blocker) did not affect the binding of dopamine to cardiac membrane preparations suggests that α-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors have separate recognition sites in the heart. It is concluded that 3 H-dopamine binds to specific dopamine receptors in the heart of guinea-pigs

  18. Spectroscopic studies on the binding interaction of phenothiazinium dyes toluidine blue O, azure A and azure B to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Puja; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2013-04-01

    In this study a detailed characterization of the binding aspects of three phenothiazinium dyes, toluidine blue O (TBO), azure A and azure B with herring testes DNA is presented employing spectroscopic techniques. The absorbance and fluorescence properties of these dyes have been remarkably modified upon binding with DNA and the interaction is manifested through noncooperative binding as revealed form non-linear Scatchard plots with negative slopes at all binding ratios. The binding clearly revealed the high preference of TBO to DNA followed by the other two dyes azure A and azure B. The affinity of TBO was higher by about two times than that of the azures. From the series of studies using absorption, steady-state emission, the effect of ferrocyanide ion-induced steady-state fluorescence quenching, fluorescence polarization anisotropy, circular dichroism, the mode of binding of these dyes to the DNA double helix has been substantiated to be principally intercalative in nature. The stoichiometry of the association of these dyes to DNA was determined by the continuous variation analysis of Job from fluorescence data. The conformational aspects of the interaction was delineated from circular dichroism studies wherein higher perturbation was observed with TBO. Hydrodynamic study using viscosity measurements of linear rod like DNA confirmed that the binding was intercalative and strongest for TBO and weaker for azure A and azure B. The utility of the present work lies in exploring the potential binding applicability of these dyes to DNA for their development as effective therapeutic agents.

  19. Characterization of 125ITSH binding to its receptor in thyroid hyperplasies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.C.; Nunes, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    An unpredictable and unbalanced response to a stimulus like TSH is indeed a striking characteristic of the follicles of the simple goiter. Since it is known that the first step for TSH action on its target cell is binding to specific TSH plasma membrane receptors, the binding of 125 ITSH to these receptors was studied in normal and ''cold'' hyperplastic thyroid fragments obtained at surgery. Through the Scatchard analysis it was verified that there are no differences with regard to the binding capacity of TSH receptors between normal and hyperplastic tissues. On the other hand, a significant decrease of the dissociation constant (Kd) was observed in hyperplastic tissue indicating higher affinity for TSH binding. It is known that intracellular iodine content can interfere with the TSH induced modifications on the thyroid folicular cells. It is supposed that this is mediated by interference on TSH binding to its receptor and/or activation of adenylate cyclase. Due to impaired organification capacity of ''cold'' tissue it is assumed that these cells present decreased intracellular iodine content. Therefore it is proposed that alterations of TSH binding to its receptors detected in the present investigation are consequent of the low iodine content of the hyperplastic folicular cell. (author) [pt

  20. Solubility and solubilizing capabilities of aqueous solutions of Extractum Taraxaci e radix cum herba aqu. siccum in light of selected values of general Hildebrand-Scatchard-Fedors theory of solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczyński Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The general Hildebrand-Scatchard theory of solubility supplemented by Fedors’ solubility parameter −δ12$- \\delta ^{{1 \\over 2}} $ was used to estimate the real solubility by −log x2 (log of the mole fraction of phytochemicals contained in Ext. Taraxaci e radix cum herba aqu. siccum. Surface activity of aqueous solution of extracts was determined and quantified – solubilizing capabilities of solutions of cexp. ≥cmc in relation to cholesterol particle size of Ø=1.00 mm, as well as of ketoprofen were defined.

  1. Binding analysis of carbon nanoparticles to human immunoglobulin G: Elucidation of the cytotoxicity of CNPs and perturbation of immunoglobulin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengrui; Yang, Haitao; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The chemical compositions, sizes and fluorescent properties of synthesized carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were characterized. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were used as a model to study the cytotoxicity of CNPs, and the results of the cellular uptake of CNPs yielded excellent results: the CNPs demonstrated good biocompatibility and were non-toxic to the growth of the E. coli cells. Moreover, to assess the potential toxicity of CNPs to human health, the binding behavior of CNPs with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) was examined by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching constants and parameters for the interaction at different temperatures had been calculated according to Scatchard. The thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and free energy change (ΔG), were calculated, and the results indicated strong static quenching and showed that van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the CNP-HIgG complex. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra provided information regarding the conformational alteration of HIgG in the presence of CNPs. These findings help to characterize the interactions between CNPs and HIgG, which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of CNPs, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  2. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Specific binding of the glycosaminoglycan /sup 3/H-heparin to bull, monkey, and rabbit spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrow, R.R.; Boehm, S.K.; Lenz, R.W.; Robinson, J.A.; Ax, R.L.

    In Vitro binding and some binding parameters of the glycosaminoglycan heparin to viable epididymal or ejaculated bull spermatozoa, ejaculated rabbit spermatozoa, and frozen-thawed rhesus monkey spermatozoa were investigated. Nonspecific binding was affected only by the concentration of /sup 3/H-heparin, whereas specific binding was saturable, reversible, and dependent on the pH, temperature, and calcium concentration of the incubation medium. Magnesium concentration dependence was observed in the presence of calcium but could not be detected in the absence of calcium. Bound /sup 3/H-heparin was displaced by several orders of magnitude greater concentrations of chondroitin sulfate. Scatchard plot analysis suggested multiple binding affinities for /sup 3/H-heparin to spermatozoa. /sup 3/H-heparin was shown to bind to sperm heads and flagella. Fluorescein-labeled heparin bound to acrosomal, postacrosomal, and flagellar membranes. It was concluded that the specific binding of heparin involved a proteinaceous component on, or intercalated with, spermatozoal membranes. Thus, glycosaminoglycans present in the female reproductive tract may contribute to sperm capacitation and enhance the likelihood of successful fertilization in mammals.

  4. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  5. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptors along the nephron: [3H]aldosterone binding in rabbit tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, A.; Katz, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    To identify the site of mineralocorticoid action along the nephron, we measured the specific binding of [ 3 H]aldosterone to nephron segments microdissected from aldosterone-deficient rabbits. Specific binding was defined as the difference between binding measured in the absence or in the presence of 2,000-fold excess of unlabeled hormone (in 10 -18 mol.cm tubule length -1 +/- SE). High specific binding capacity was found in the branched collecting tubule (108 +/- 4), the cortical collecting tubule (119 +/- 9), and the outer medullary collecting tubule (115 +/- 16), whereas specific binding was negligible in the proximal convoluted tubule (8 +/- 9), pars recta (2 +/- 6), medullary thick ascending limb (4 +/- 6), cortical thick ascending limb (6 +/- 2), and distal convoluted tubule (6 +/- 6). In cortical collecting tubules, Scatchard analysis of the specific [ 3 H]aldosterone binding indicated a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 2.2 X 10 -9 and a maximum number of binding sites of 157 X 10 -18 mol.cm tubule length -1 . The steroid specificity was assessed from the competition of various steroids for [ 3 H]aldosterone binding sites. Receptors from the cortical collecting tubule revealed the following sequence of affinities: aldosterone > DOCA > spironolactone > dexamethasone > 5α-dihydrotestosterone = progesterone = 17β-estradiol, indicating that the binding sites in the collecting tubule are mineralocorticoid receptors. These results demonstrate significant [ 3 H]aldosterone binding to receptors of high affinity and mineralocorticoid specificity only in the collecting tubule and suggest that this nephron segment is the target site of mineralocorticoid action in the rabbit kidney

  7. Insulin stimulation of [3H]-ouabain binding to cerebrovascular (Na+ + K+)-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspers, M.L.; Grammas, P.

    1986-01-01

    Brain microvessels were isolated from rat cerebral cortices. The binding of [ 3 H]-ouabain to microvascular (Na + + K + )-ATPase increased with microvessel protein (37-110μg) and was time dependent with maximum binding observed at 15 min at 37 0 C. Non-specific binding, measured in the presence of 50μM ouabain, was less than 2% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of preliminary [ 3 H]-ouabain binding data yielded a K/sub D/ of 44nM and a B/sub max/ of 12pmol/mg. Since the high affinity (α+) form of the enzyme is purportedly hormonally regulated, the effect of insulin on [ 3 H]-ouabain binding to microvessels was studied. Insulin (0.001-10μM) stimulation of [ 3 H]-ouabain binding was dose dependent. To assess whether this was a specific or a peptide-protective effect, assays were performed in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Addition of BSA (10μM) enhanced the amount of [ 3 H]-ouabain bound 4-fold. Further increases in the BSA concentration (20μM) did not increase binding. Addition of 10μM insulin evoked a 20% increase in [ 3 H]-ouabain binding above BSA-treated controls. In summary, the data suggest that the (α+) form of the (Na + + K + )-ATPase is present in cerebral endothelium and [ 3 H]-ouabain binding is significantly elevated by insulin in a dose dependent manner. Therefore, insulin may regulate microvascular (Na + + K + )-ATPase and thus be a modulator of blood-brain permeability to ions

  8. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analysis of (3H) Kainic acid binding with rat and Frog brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper analyzes the binding of (H 3)-KA with membrances in vitro and the effect of various neuroactive amino acids, suggested as endogenous ligands for binding sites of (H 3)-KA, on binding. Experiments were carried out on male albino rats and on winter frogs. Choice of the frog's brain was determined by the high density of high-affinity binding sites of (H 3)-KA. The concentrations of substances inhibiting binding (H 3)-KA by 50% were calculated by logit-probit analysis, and inhibition constants were also calculated. It is shown that although L-glutamate and folic acid inhibit binding of (H 3)-KA, they do not satisfy the criteria to be met by endogenous ligands, and this inhibition of binding is noncompetitive in character. This suggests that KA binding sites and glutamate receptors are not identical, although they may perhaps be subunits of a single complex

  10. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  11. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Fierro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation.

  12. Displacement of DL-[3H]-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid ( [3H]APB) binding with methyl-substituted APB analogues and glutamate agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.B.; Crooks, S.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Koerner, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of the excitatory amino acid antagonist DL-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (DL-APB) to rat brain synaptic plasma membranes was characterized. As determined by Scatchard analysis, the binding was saturable and homogeneous with a Kd = 6.0 microM and Bmax = 380 pmol/mg of protein. The binding was dependent on the presence of Ca 2+ and Cl - ions and was diminished upon freezing. The association rate constant was 6.8 X 10(-3) microM -1 min -1 , and the dissociation rate constant was 2.0 X 10(-2) min -1 . The L isomers of APB, glutamate, and aspartate were more potent as displacers of APB binding than the D isomers. With the exception of kynurenic acid, all compounds examined in both systems were more potent as displacers of APB binding than as inhibitors of synaptic transmission. This difference in potency was most pronounced for agonists at dentate granule cells. L-Glutamate, D-glutamate, and L-glutamate tetrazole were between 140- and 7500-fold more potent as displacers of DL-APB binding than as inhibitors of synaptic transmission. D-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and alpha-methyl-APB were between 10- and 20-fold more potent as displacers of binding

  13. Nonlinear regression analysis for evaluating tracer binding parameters using the programmable K1003 desk computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrach, D.; Strohner, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Gauss-Newton algorithm has been used to evaluate tracer binding parameters of RIA by nonlinear regression analysis. The calculations were carried out on the K1003 desk computer. Equations for simple binding models and its derivatives are presented. The advantages of nonlinear regression analysis over linear regression are demonstrated

  14. Competitive protein binding analysis for thyroxine using Sephadex column (Tetralute)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyai, Kiyoshi; Katayama, Yoshiaki; Sawazaki, Norio; Ishibashi, Kaichiro; Kawashima, Minoru.

    1975-01-01

    The method of competitive protein binding analysis of thyroxine (T 4 ) using Tetralute kit was evaluated. The net retention was decreased when the procedure of competition and separation was performed at a higher temperature but the final T 4 -I values were constant when the standard and test sera were treated identically. Coefficient of variation (C.V.) was 4% (within-assay) and 6% (between-assay) respectively. However, the T 4 -I values of pooled serum for quality control were slightly lower in earlier experiments in which correction factors (1.03--1.62 in 18 out of 21 assays) were necessary. T 4 -I values were determined by the Tetralute in 155 cases. They were as follows: 4.9+-0.8 μg/dl (euthyroid subjects), 6.4+-1.2 μg/dl (cord serum), 7.1+-1.1 μg/dl (pregnant women). 9.0+-3.6 μg/dl (trophoblastic disease), 13.3+-4.8 μg/dl (Graves' disease), 6.3+-1.6 μg/dl (Plummer's disease), 4 -I values determined by Tetralute and Res-O-Mat T 4 (r=0.96). Following oral administration of Telepaque the serum protein-bound iodine was markedly elevated, while the T 4 -I determined by Tetralute did not change. In vitro addition of diphenylhydantoin (500 μg/ml), salicylate (4 mg/ml) and phenobarbital (1 mg/ml) had no or little effect on T 4 determination by Tetralute. A high concentration of benzbromarone (0.1 mg/ml) caused a higher value of T 4 -I determined by Tetralute when added to a TBG solution but there was only a slight increase when it was added to serum. (auth.)

  15. The effect of hyperthyroidism on opiate receptor binding and pain sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, E.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Bonnet, K.A.; Friedhoff, A.J. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of thyroid hormone on opiate receptor ligand-binding and pain sensitivity. Specific opiate receptor-binding was performed on brain homogenates of Swiss-Webster mice. There was a significant increase in {sup 3}H-naloxone-binding in thyroxine-fed subjects (hyperthyroid). Scatchard analysis revealed that the number of opiate receptors was increased in hyperthyroid mice (Bmax = 0.238 nM for hyperthyroid samples vs. 0.174 nM for controls). Binding affinity was unaffected (Kd = 1.54 nM for hyperthyroid and 1.58 nM for control samples). When mice were subjected to hotplate stimulation, the hyperthyroid mice were noted to be more sensitive as judged by pain aversion response latencies which were half that of control animals. After morphine administration, the hyperthyroid animals demonstrated a shorter duration of analgesia. These findings demonstrate that thyroxine increases opiate receptor number and native pain sensitivity but decreases the duration of analgesia from morphine.

  16. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  17. Coexistence of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in the rabbit heart: quantitative analysis of the regional distribution by (-)-/sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodde, O.E.; Leifert, F.J.; Krehl, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    We determined the amount of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in right and left atria and ventricles of rabbits. For this purpose inhibition of specific (-)-/sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol ((-)-/sup 3/H-DHA) binding (5 nM) by beta 1-selective (practolol, metoprolol) and beta 2-selective (zinterol, IPS 339) adrenergic drugs was determined and analyzed by pseudo-Scatchard (Hofstee) plots. For both atria, inhibition of binding by the four selective beta-adrenergic drugs resulted in non-linear Hofstee plots, suggesting the coexistence of both beta-adrenoceptor subtypes. From these plots we calculated a beta 1:beta 2-adrenoceptor ratio of 72:28 for the right atrium and of 82:18 for the left. In contrast, only a very small amount of beta 2-adrenoceptors (approximately 5-7% of the total beta-adrenoceptor population) could be detected in the ventricles. For comparison we analyzed the inhibition of specific (-)-/sup 3/H-DHA binding in tissues with homogeneous population of beta-adrenoceptors (beta 1:guinea pig left ventricle; beta 2: cerebellum of mature rats). For both tissues the four selective beta-adrenergic drugs showed linear Hofstee plots, demonstrating that in tissues with homogeneous beta-receptor population interaction of each drug with the receptor followed simple mass-action kinetics. We conclude that beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors coexist in rabbit atria while the ventricles are predominantly endowed the beta 1-adrenoceptors.

  18. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  19. [3H]aniracetam binds to specific recognition sites in brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, F; Genazzani, A A; Silla, S; L'Episcopo, M R; Camici, O; Corazzi, L; Nicoletti, F; Fioretti, M C

    1995-08-01

    [3H]Aniracetam bound to specific and saturable recognition sites in membranes prepared from discrete regions of rat brain. In crude membrane preparation from rat cerebral cortex, specific binding was Na+ independent, was still largely detectable at low temperature (4 degrees C), and underwent rapid dissociation. Scatchard analysis of [3H]aniracetam binding revealed a single population of sites with an apparent KD value of approximately 70 nM and a maximal density of 3.5 pmol/mg of protein. Specifically bound [3H]aniracetam was not displaced by various metabolites of aniracetam, nor by other pyrrolidinone-containing nootropic drugs such as piracetam or oxiracetam. Subcellular distribution studies showed that a high percentage of specific [3H]aniracetam binding was present in purified synaptosomes or mitochondria, whereas specific binding was low in the myelin fraction. The possibility that at least some [3H]aniracetam binding sites are associated with glutamate receptors is supported by the evidence that specific binding was abolished when membranes were preincubated at 37 degrees C under fast shaking (a procedure that substantially reduced the amount of glutamate trapped in the membranes) and could be restored after addition of either glutamate or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) but not kainate. The action of AMPA was antagonized by DNQX, which also reduced specific [3H]aniracetam binding in unwashed membranes. High levels of [3H]aniracetam binding were detected in hippocampal, cortical, or cerebellar membranes, which contain a high density of excitatory amino acid receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Characterization of little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) recombinant transthyretin: Zinc-dependent 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kasai, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) diverged from an ancestral 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase (HIUHase) by gene duplication at some early stage of chordate evolution. To clarify how TTR had participated in the thyroid system as an extracellular thyroid hormone (TH) binding protein, TH binding properties of recombinant little skate Leucoraja erinacea TTR was investigated. At the amino acid level, skate TTR showed 37-46% identities with the other vertebrate TTRs. Because the skate TTR had a unique histidine-rich segment in the N-terminal region, it could be purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The skate TTR was a 46-kDa homotetramer of 14.5kDa subunits, and had one order of magnitude higher affinity for 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and some halogenated phenols than for l-thyroxine. However, the skate TTR had no HIUHase activity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment inhibited [(125)I]T3 binding activity whereas the addition of Zn(2+) to the EDTA-treated TTR recovered [(125)I]T3 binding activity in a Zn(2+) concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of two classes of binding site for T3, with dissociation constants of 0.24 and 17nM. However, the high-affinity sites were completely abolished with 1mM EDTA, whereas the remaining low-affinity sites decreased binding capacity. The number of zinc per TTR was quantified to be 4.5-6.3. Our results suggest that skate TTR has tight Zn(2+)-binding sites, which are essential for T3 binding to at least the high-affinity sites. Zn(2+) binding to the N-terminal histidine-rich segment may play an important role in acquisition or reinforcement of TH binding ability during early evolution of TTR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of a mannose-binding lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) (Sun et al. 1995). The nature of the lectin correlates with its mannose- binding active site. 3.3 Southern blot analysis. The presence of multiple copies of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the genome has been reported in many plant species, particularly those belonging to the ...

  2. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In supplementary table 1, all the results of the lipid binding region analysis for SecA from a number of different organisms are shown. Supplementary table 1. Data belonging to the lipid binding region search of a number of examples of amphitropic proteins involved in ..... Concentration of monovalent salts: 0.1 M. Number of ...

  3. Growth hormone binding to specific receptors stimulates growth and function of cloned insulin-producing rat insulinoma RIN-5AH cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Martin, J M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human GH (hGH) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line RIN-5AH in monolayer culture was studied along with some physiological effects of the hormone on these cells. Binding was time and temperature dependent, and steady state binding was observed in 60 min at 37 C...... in the presence of 3.0 X 10(-10) M unlabeled hGH. Rat GH as well as human placental lactogen were able to compete for binding sites, but with less affinity. Other non-GH peptides at 6.7 micrograms/ml did not affect [125I]hGH binding. Scatchard analysis revealed curvilinear plots, and approximately 2700 high...... affinity binding sites were calculated. Culture of RIN-5AH in the presence of 1 microgram/ml hGH for 4 days resulted in an 80% increase in insulin content as well as an 18% increase in cell number and DNA and protein content compared to those in cells cultured in the absence of hGH. The dose dependence...

  4. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  5. Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Hae Young; Atlasevich, Natalya; Granzotto, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks.......Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks....

  6. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  7. Stoichiometry of maltodextrin-binding sites in LamB, an outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Gehring, K; Cheng, C H; Nikaido, H; Jap, B K

    1991-01-01

    We have directly measured the stoichiometry of maltodextrin-binding sites in LamB. Scatchard plots and computer fitting of flow dialysis (rate-of-dialysis) experiments clearly establish three independent binding sites per LamB trimer, with a dissociation constant of approximately 60 microM for maltoheptaose. The current model for LamB's function as a specific pore is discussed with respect to the symmetry in LamB's kinetic properties and the implications of our results.

  8. Stimulation of [3H]ouabain binding to rat synaptosomal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase by aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspers, M.L.; Dow, M.J.; Kwaiser, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aluminum on the (Na + + K + )-ATPase. Synaptosomes were prepared from the cerebral cortices of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation of [ 3 H]ouabain binding to the high affinity isoform of the (Na + + K + )-ATPase produced by AlCl 3 developed slowly, with a maximum effect observed after a 40 min preincubation. AlCl 3 produced a 26.5% stimulation in [ 3 H]ouabain binding to the synaptosomal (Na + + K + )-ATPase and this stimulation increased to 33.3% at 100 μM. Scatchard analysis of [ 3 H]ouabain binding data in the presence of 100 μM AlCl 3 yielded a B max of 79.4 ± 3.5 pmol/mg protein, significantly elevated from the B max value obtained in the absence of aluminum. The K D values were similar in the presence or absence of aluminum. In summary, aluminum affects the functioning of the synaptosomal (Na + + K + )-ATPase. This may contribute, at least in part, to the disruption of neuronal function associated with disorders where elevated aluminum content in the CNS is noted

  9. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P 2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  10. Assessment of the binding performance of histamine-imprinted microspheres by frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Edwin F; Quirino, Joselito P; Holdsworth, John L; So, Regina C; Holdsworth, Clovia I

    2017-05-01

    Frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis was used to evaluate the binding performance of molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIM) toward its template histamine and analogs at pH 7, and compared to the high performance liquid chromatographic method. In both methods, batch binding was employed and the binding parameters were calculated from the measured concentration of unbound amine analytes and afforded comparable histamine equilibrium dissociation constants (K d ∼ 0.4 mM). FACE was easily carried out at shorter binding equilibration time (i.e. 30 min) and without the need to separate the microspheres, circumventing laborious and, in the case of the system under study, inefficient sample filtration. It also allowed for competitive binding studies by virtue of its ability to distinctly separate intact microspheres and all tested amines which could not be resolved in HPLC. K d 's for nonimprinted (control) microspheres (NIM) from FACE and HPLC were also comparable (∼ 0.6 mM) but at higher histamine concentrations, HPLC gave lower histamine binding. This discrepancy was attributed to inefficient filtration of the batch binding samples prior to HPLC analysis resulting in an over-estimation of the concentration of free histamine brought about by the presence of unfiltered histamine-bound microspheres. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  12. Dilazep inhibits binding of batrachotoxin to sodium channels in canine sarcolemmal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, K; Hashizume, H; Inagaki, S I; Abiko, Y

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of dilazep on the binding of [3H]- batrachotoxinin A 20 alpha-benzoate ([3H]BTXB), which binds to and stabilizes the activated state of the Na+ channel, and compared it with that of lidocaine in canine cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles. Dilazep inhibited the specific [3H]BTXB binding in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 0.37 microM, while lidocaine inhibited it with an IC50 value of 92 microM. Scatchard analysis of [3H]BTXB binding demonstrated that both dilazep and lidocaine reduced the amax without a marked effect on the K(D). The inhibition of [3H]BTXB induced by dilazep was reversible. Both dilazep (4 microM) and lidocaine (100 microM) increased the dissociation rate constant of [3H]BTXB only in concentrations which are about a 10-fold greater than their IC50, indicating the low affinity of both drugs for the [3H]BTXB-bound Na+ channel. However, dilazep (0.5 microM) and lidocaine (100 microM) decreased significantly the association rate constant of the [3H]BTXB binding at concentrations near their IC50, indicating that the affinity of both drugs for the [3H]BTXB-unbound Na+ channel is relatively high. These results suggest that, in canine cardiac membrane vesicles, the effect of dilazep in inhibiting the binding of [3H]BTXB and stabilizing the Na+ channel is similar to that of lidocaine, but the potency of dilazep is greater than that of lidocaine.

  13. Antibody binding constants from Farr test and other radioimmunoassays. A theoretical and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Schalch, W.

    1980-01-01

    For the reaction of monovalently reacting antibody (116-700pIEF) with its antigen (streptococcal group A-variant polysaccharide), an apparent binding constant Ksub(a) was derived by the ammonium sulfate precipitation technique (Farr assay) which was 40 times larger than the true binding constant K = 10 6 M -1 determined by fluorescence titration and equilibrium dialysis. For monovalently reacting antibodies the time needed for re-equilibration of the binding reaction is short as compared to the time of ammonium sulfate incubation. A thermodynamic analysis was therefore performed for the case of complete equilibration of all components in solution and in the ammonium sulfate precipitate. It was found that in this limiting case Ksub(a)/K is equal to the ratio of the solubilities of the antibody and the antibody complex corrected by the activity coefficients of the components in the precipitate. For other antibody-antigen reactions in which the antibody reacts with both binding sites to the same antigen molecule, re-equilibration of the binding reaction in solution is much slower. For such systems a disturbance of the binding reaction by the precipitation is less likely and correct binding constants may be obtained by the Farr technique or other radioimmunoassays involving precipitation. (author)

  14. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  15. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  16. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-01

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  17. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  18. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  19. Mimicking of Estradiol Binding by Flame Retardants and Their Metabolites: A Crystallographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), used in many types of consumer goods, are being studied because of concerns about possible health effects related to endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used BFR, and human metabolites of certain congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ether (e.g., 3-OH-BDE-47) have been suggested to inhibit estrogen sulfotransferase, potentially affecting estrogen metabolism. Objectives: Our primary goal was to understand the structural mechanism for inhibition of the hormone-metabolizing enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase by certain BFRs. We also sought to understand various factors that facilitate the binding of flame retardants in the enzyme binding pocket. Methods: We used X-ray crystallography to obtain atomic detail of the binding modes of TBBPA and 3-OH-BDE-47 to estrogen sulfotransferase for comparison with binding of the endogenous substrate estradiol. Results: The crystal structures reveal how BFRs mimic estradiol binding as well as the various interactions between the compounds and protein residues that facilitate its binding. In addition, the structures provide insights into the ability of the sulfotransferase substrate binding pocket to accommodate a range of halogenated compounds that satisfy minimal structural criteria. Conclusions: Our results show how BFRs or their metabolites can bind to and inhibit a key hormone-metabolizing enzyme, potentially causing endocrine disruption. Citation: Gosavi RA, Knudsen GA, Birnbaum LS, Pedersen LC. 2013. Mimicking of estradiol binding by flame retardants and their metabolites: a crystallographic analysis. Environ Health Perspect 121:1194–1199; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306902 PMID:23959441

  20. Stimulation of ( sup 3 H)ouabain binding to rat synaptosomal (Na sup + + K sup + )-ATPase by aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspers, M.L.; Dow, M.J.; Kwaiser, T.M. (Univ. of Detroit, MI (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aluminum on the (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase. Synaptosomes were prepared from the cerebral cortices of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation of ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to the high affinity isoform of the (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase produced by AlCl{sub 3} developed slowly, with a maximum effect observed after a 40 min preincubation. AlCl{sub 3} produced a 26.5% stimulation in ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to the synaptosomal (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase and this stimulation increased to 33.3% at 100 {mu}M. Scatchard analysis of ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding data in the presence of 100 {mu}M AlCl{sub 3} yielded a B{sub max} of 79.4 {plus minus} 3.5 pmol/mg protein, significantly elevated from the B{sub max} value obtained in the absence of aluminum. The K{sub D}values were similar in the presence or absence of aluminum. In summary, aluminum affects the functioning of the synaptosomal (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase. This may contribute, at least in part, to the disruption of neuronal function associated with disorders where elevated aluminum content in the CNS is noted.

  1. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  2. Photolabeling and radioligand binding of human erythrocyte NaK-ATPase with 125I-derivatives of cymarin and digitoxigenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    NaK-ATPase is an enzyme which maintains Na + and K + gradients across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, and is specifically inhibited by cardiac glycosides. The cardiac glycoside binding site is located primarily on the catalytic α subunit but the glycoprotein β and proteolipid-γ subunits may also contribute to the structure of the site. In order to label the cardiac glycoside binding site of human erythrocytes, four photoaffinity ligands with very high specific radioactivity were synthesized. The compounds, which are abbreviated [ 125 I]AISC, [ 125 I]AIPP-GluD, [ 125 I]AIPP-GalD and [ 125 I]IA-GalD, were all effective photolabels for NaK-ATPase as shown by ouabain-protectable, covalent labeling of the α, β, and proteolipid-γ subunits. In order to study the possible existence of a very high affinity binding site in erythrocyte NaK-ATPase, a carrier-free radioligand, [ 125 I]I-TASC, was synthesized; this compound had the same structure as [ 125 I]AISC except that a light-sensitive azide group was replaced with a hydroxyl group. Competitive binding assays with cymarin against 0.2 nM [ 125 I]I-TASC suggested two classes of erythrocyte binding sites. Scatchard analysis of direct [ 125 I]I-TASC binding indicated that the very high affinity, low capacity class of erythrocyte bindings sites had a K D of 54 pM and a B max of 23 fmol/mg protein

  3. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  4. Analysis of leukocyte binding to depletion filters: role of passive binding, interaction with platelets, and plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschler, R; Rüster, B; Steimle, A; Hansmann, H L; Walker, W; Montag, T; Seifried, E

    2005-08-01

    Since limited knowledge exists on the mechanisms which regulate cell binding to leukocyte removal filter surfaces, we investigated the binding patterns of leukocytes to individual layers of leukocyte depletion filters. After passage of 1 unit of whole blood, blotting of isolated filter layers on glass slides or elution of cells from filter layers revealed that most leukocytes were located within the first 10 of a total of 28 filter layers, peaking at layers 6 to 8, with granulocytes binding on average to earlier filter layers than lymphocytes. Leukocytes preincubated with inhibitors of actin activation showed unchanged distribution between filter layers, suggesting that cytoskeletal activation does not significantly contribute to their binding. When leukocytes were directly incubated with single filter layers, binding of up to 30% of input cells was recorded in the absence of Ca(2+). Immunohistological analyses showed colocalization of platelets and leukocytes, with co-clustering of platelets and leukocytes. Monocytes and to some degree lymphocytes but not granulocytes competed with platelets for filter binding. Precoating of filter layers with individual plasma components showed that hyaluronic acid, plasma type fibronectin, and fibrinogen all increased the binding of leukocytes compared with albumin coating. In conclusion, leukocytes can bind passively to filters in a process which does not require Ca(2+), which is independent of cytoskeletal activation and which may depend on individual plasma components. These results are of importance when new selective cell enrichment or depletion strategies through specific filters are envisaged.

  5. Identification of novel amelogenin-binding proteins by proteomics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Fukuda

    Full Text Available Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD is well recognized in periodontology. It is used in periodontal surgery to regenerate cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying periodontal regeneration are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the proteins bound to amelogenin, which are suggested to play a pivotal role in promoting periodontal tissue regeneration. To identify new molecules that interact with amelogenin and are involved in osteoblast activation, we employed coupling affinity chromatography with proteomic analysis in fractionated SaOS-2 osteoblastic cell lysate. In SaOS-2 cells, many of the amelogenin-interacting proteins in the cytoplasm were mainly cytoskeletal proteins and several chaperone molecules of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family. On the other hand, the proteomic profiles of amelogenin-interacting proteins in the membrane fraction of the cell extracts were quite different from those of the cytosolic-fraction. They were mainly endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated proteins, with lesser quantities of mitochondrial proteins and nucleoprotein. Among the identified amelogenin-interacting proteins, we validated the biological interaction of amelogenin with glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78/Bip, which was identified in both cytosolic and membrane-enriched fractions. Confocal co-localization experiment strongly suggested that Grp78/Bip could be an amelogenin receptor candidate. Further biological evaluations were examined by Grp78/Bip knockdown analysis with and without amelogenin. Within the limits of the present study, the interaction of amelogenin with Grp78/Bip contributed to cell proliferation, rather than correlate with the osteogenic differentiation in SaOS-2 cells. Although the biological significance of other interactions are not yet explored, these findings suggest that the differential effects of amelogenin-derived osteoblast activation could be of

  6. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  7. L-[3H]glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, Deborah; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of L-[ 3 H]glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-[ 3 H]glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of Ca 2+ , Cl - and Na + ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-[ 3 H]2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-[ 3 H]AP5), [ 3 H]kainate ([ 3 H]KA) and [ 3 H]α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ([ 3 H]AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.)

  8. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  9. Concentrations of thyroid hormones and iodothyronine binding proteins in serum of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, V J; Curtis, A J; Michelangeli, V P; Stockigt, J R; Carrick, F N; Barlow, J W

    1996-07-01

    To examine circulating total and free thyroid hormone (T3 and T4) concentrations, determine serum iodothyronine binding characteristics and estimate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) activity in sera of coastal and inland koalas. A prospective study. Koala serum T3 and T4 were measured by radioimmunoassay. T4 binding parameters were determined by radioligand binding and electrophoresis. Koala TSH values were determined by bioassay. Mean total T4 concentrations were 3.2 +/- 2.1 nM although values were significantly higher in inland-dwelling females in comparison to coastal-dwelling males. Free T4 was 3.3 +/- 2.1 pM. Total and free T3 were 0.4 +/- 0.2 nM and 1.4 +/- 0.9 pM respectively, although these values were at the lower end of the assay detection limit and should be viewed with reservation. Electrophoresis of [125I]-T4-labelled serum revealed only two proteins of electrophoretic mobility similar to human transthyretin (TTR) and albumin. Scatchard analysis of T4 binding to serum gave a curvilinear plot, which could be resolved into two binding sites with affinities identical to that of TTR and albumin but both of low concentration. The bioactivity of the TSH present in the sera was measured using a cell line (JP09) transfected with the human TSH receptor. The mean level of stimulation found in the sera corresponded to a bovine TSH activity of less than 10 mU/L. These results suggest that the serum concentrations of free and total thyroid hormones in koalas are low compared to other marsupials and very low compared to eutherian mammals. The mechanism of maintenance of euthyroidism in this species remains to be determined.

  10. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the bacteriophage P1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nilsson, A.S.; Lehnherr, H.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage P1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB-P1), which shows 66% amino acid sequence identity to the SSB protein of the host bacterium Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the P1 ssb gene coexists with its E. coli counterpart as an independent unit...

  11. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,l-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2 (1 H)one (TIBO) is a noncompetitive non nucleotide antiretroviral drug with a specific allosteric binding site of HIV-1 RT. The conformational analysis shows that the effect of the drug depends on the potential energy which varied due to the beta rotatable dihedral angles (N6 ...

  12. An analysis of the binding characteristics of a panel of recently selected ICAM-1 binding Plasmodium falciparum patient isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madkhali, Aymen M; Alkurbi, Mohammed O; Szestak, Tadge

    2014-01-01

    patterns of lab-adapted patient isolates after selecting on ICAM-1. We investigated the binding phenotypes using variant ICAM-1 proteins including ICAM-1Ref, ICAM-1Kilifi, ICAM-1S22/A, ICAM-1L42/A and ICAM-1L44/A using static assays. The study also examined ICAM-1 blocking by four anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal...... antibodies (mAb) under static conditions. We also characterised the binding phenotypes using Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HDMEC) under flow conditions. The results show that different isolates have variant-specific binding phenotypes under both static and flow conditions, extending our...

  13. Stepwise binding of tylosin and erythromycin to Escherichia coli ribosomes, characterized by kinetic and footprinting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Alexandros D; Kouvela, Ekaterini C; Dinos, George P; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2008-02-22

    Erythromycin and tylosin are 14- and 16-membered lactone ring macrolides, respectively. The current work shows by means of kinetic and chemical footprinting analysis that both antibiotics bind to Escherichia coli ribosomes in a two-step process. The first step established rapidly, involves a low-affinity binding site placed at the entrance of the exit tunnel in the large ribosomal subunit, where macrolides bind primarily through their hydrophobic portions. Subsequently, slow conformational changes mediated by the antibiotic hydrophilic portion push the drugs deeper into the tunnel, in a high-affinity site. Compared with erythromycin, tylosin shifts to the high-affinity site more rapidly, due to the interaction of the mycinose sugar of the drug with the loop of H35 in domain II of 23 S rRNA. Consistently, mutations of nucleosides U2609 and U754 implicated in the high-affinity site reduce the shift of tylosin to this site and destabilize, respectively, the final drug-ribosome complex. The weak interaction between tylosin and the ribosome is Mg2+ independent, unlike the tight binding. In contrast, both interactions between erythromycin and the ribosome are reduced by increasing concentrations of Mg2+ ions. Polyamines attenuate erythromycin affinity for the ribosome at both sequential steps of binding. In contrast, polyamines facilitate the initial binding of tylosin, but exert a detrimental, more pronounced, effect on the drug accommodation at its final position. Our results emphasize the role of the particular interactions that side chains of tylosin and erythromycin establish with 23 S rRNA, which govern the exact binding process of each drug and its response to the ionic environment.

  14. Second-generation method for analysis of chromatin binding with formaldehyde-cross-linking kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hussain; Hoffman, Elizabeth A; Shetty, Savera J; Bekiranov, Stefan; Auble, David T

    2017-11-24

    Formaldehyde-cross-linking underpins many of the most commonly used experimental approaches in the chromatin field, especially in capturing site-specific protein-DNA interactions. Extending such assays to assess the stability and binding kinetics of protein-DNA interactions is more challenging, requiring absolute measurements with a relatively high degree of physical precision. We previously described an experimental framework called the cross-linking kinetics (CLK) assay, which uses time-dependent formaldehyde-cross-linking data to extract kinetic parameters of chromatin binding. Many aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells are unknown or undocumented, however, and could potentially affect CLK data analyses. Here, we report biochemical results that better define the properties of formaldehyde-cross-linking in budding yeast cells. These results have the potential to inform interpretations of "standard" chromatin assays, including chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the chemical complexity we uncovered resulted in the development of an improved method for measuring binding kinetics with the CLK approach. Optimum conditions included an increased formaldehyde concentration and more robust glycine-quench conditions. Notably, we observed that formaldehyde-cross-linking rates can vary dramatically for different protein-DNA interactions in vivo Some interactions were cross-linked much faster than the in vivo macromolecular interactions, making them suitable for kinetic analysis. For other interactions, we found the cross-linking reaction occurred on the same time scale or slower than binding dynamics; for these interactions, it was sometimes possible to compute the in vivo equilibrium-binding constant but not binding on- and off-rates. This improved method yields more accurate in vivo binding kinetics estimates on the minute time scale. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Analysis of functional importance of binding sites in the Drosophila gap gene network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Gursky, Vitaly V; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Dymova, Arina; Samsonova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The statistical thermodynamics based approach provides a promising framework for construction of the genotype-phenotype map in many biological systems. Among important aspects of a good model connecting the DNA sequence information with that of a molecular phenotype (gene expression) is the selection of regulatory interactions and relevant transcription factor bindings sites. As the model may predict different levels of the functional importance of specific binding sites in different genomic and regulatory contexts, it is essential to formulate and study such models under different modeling assumptions. We elaborate a two-layer model for the Drosophila gap gene network and include in the model a combined set of transcription factor binding sites and concentration dependent regulatory interaction between gap genes hunchback and Kruppel. We show that the new variants of the model are more consistent in terms of gene expression predictions for various genetic constructs in comparison to previous work. We quantify the functional importance of binding sites by calculating their impact on gene expression in the model and calculate how these impacts correlate across all sites under different modeling assumptions. The assumption about the dual interaction between hb and Kr leads to the most consistent modeling results, but, on the other hand, may obscure existence of indirect interactions between binding sites in regulatory regions of distinct genes. The analysis confirms the previously formulated regulation concept of many weak binding sites working in concert. The model predicts a more or less uniform distribution of functionally important binding sites over the sets of experimentally characterized regulatory modules and other open chromatin domains.

  16. Integration of Visual Information in Auditory Cortex Promotes Auditory Scene Analysis through Multisensory Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilgan, Huriye; Town, Stephen M; Wood, Katherine C; Jones, Gareth P; Maddox, Ross K; Lee, Adrian K C; Bizley, Jennifer K

    2018-02-07

    How and where in the brain audio-visual signals are bound to create multimodal objects remains unknown. One hypothesis is that temporal coherence between dynamic multisensory signals provides a mechanism for binding stimulus features across sensory modalities. Here, we report that when the luminance of a visual stimulus is temporally coherent with the amplitude fluctuations of one sound in a mixture, the representation of that sound is enhanced in auditory cortex. Critically, this enhancement extends to include both binding and non-binding features of the sound. We demonstrate that visual information conveyed from visual cortex via the phase of the local field potential is combined with auditory information within auditory cortex. These data provide evidence that early cross-sensory binding provides a bottom-up mechanism for the formation of cross-sensory objects and that one role for multisensory binding in auditory cortex is to support auditory scene analysis. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  18. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  19. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  20. The fine specificity of mannose-binding and galactose-binding lectins revealed using outlier motif analysis of glycan array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Kevin A; Liden, Daniel; Haab, Brian B

    2012-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are commonly used as analytical reagents to detect the levels of specific glycan structures in biological samples. A detailed knowledge of the specificities of glycan-binding proteins is required for properly interpreting their binding data. A powerful technology for characterizing glycan-binding specificity is the glycan array. However, the interpretation of glycan-array data can be difficult due to the complex fine specificities of certain glycan-binding proteins. We developed a systematic approach, called outlier-motif analysis, for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data, and we applied the method to the study of four commonly used lectins: two mannose binders (concanavalin A and Lens culinaris) and two galactose binders (Bauhinia purpurea and peanut agglutinin). The study confirmed the known, primary specificity of each lectin and also revealed new insights into their binding preferences. Lens culinaris's main specificity may be non-terminal, α-linked mannose with a single linkage at its 2' carbon, which is more restricted than previous definitions. We found broader specificity for bauhinea purpurea (BPL) than previously reported, showing that BPL can bind terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and penultimate β-linked galactose under certain limitations. Peanut agglutinin may bind terminal Galβ1,3Gal, a glycolipid motif, in addition to terminal Galβ1,3GalNAc, a common O-linked glycoprotein motif. These results could be used to more accurately interpret data obtained using these well-studied lectins. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a systematic and general approach for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data.

  1. Insulin binding characteristics in canine muscle tissue: effects of the estrous cycle phases

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    Álan G. Pöppl

    Full Text Available Abstract: Hormonal fluctuations during the different estrous cycle are a well-recognized cause of insulin resistance in bitches, and little is known about insulin receptor binding or post-binding defects associated with insulin resistance in dogs. To evaluate insulin binding characteristics in muscle tissue of bitches during the estrous cycle, 17 owned bitches were used in the study (six in anestrus, five in estrus, and six in diestrus. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT was performed in all patients by means of injection of 1mL/kg of a glucose 50% solution (500mg/kg, with blood sample collection for glucose determination at 0, 3, 5, 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after glucose infusion. Muscle samples, taken after spaying surgery, were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -80 ºC until the membranes were prepared by sequential centrifugation after being homogenized. For binding studies, membranes were incubated in the presence of 20,000cpm of human 125I-insulin and in increasing concentrations of unlabeled human regular insulin for cold saturation. The IVGTT showed no differences among bitches during the estrous cycle regarding baseline glycemia or glycemic response after glucose infusion. Two insulin binding sites - high-affinity and low-affinity ones - were detected by Scatchard analysis, and significant statistical differences were observed in the dissociation constant (Kd1 and maximum binding capacity (Bmax1 of the high-affinity binding sites. The Kd1 for the anestrus group (6.54±2.77nM/mg of protein was smaller (P<0.001 than for the estrus (28.54±6.94nM/mg of protein and diestrus (15.56±3.88nM/mg of protein groups. Bmax1 in the estrus (0.83±0.42nM/mg of protein and diestrus (1.24±0.24nM/mg of protein groups were also higher (P<0.001 than the values observed in anestrus (0.35±0.06nM/mg of protein. These results indicate modulation of insulin binding characteristics during different phases of the estrous

  2. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine binding with DNA.

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    Irudayam Maria Johnson

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+ and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3 M(-1, DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3 M(-1, and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3 M(-1. On the other hand T(m/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+, methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+. The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  3. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) binding with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irudayam Maria; Prakash, Halan; Prathiba, Jeyaguru; Raghunathan, Raghavachary; Malathi, Raghunathan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+) and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m)) or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3) M(-1), DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3) M(-1), and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3) M(-1). On the other hand T(m)/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C) and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond) interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+), methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+). The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  4. Receptors for corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pituitary: Binding characteristics and autoradiographic localization to immunocytochemically defined proopiomelanocortin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G.; Moons, L.; Smitz, J.; Kloeppel, G. (Department of Experimental Pathology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium))

    1991-08-01

    Using autoradiography combined with immunocytochemistry, the authors demonstrated that the target cells of CRH in the human pituitary were proopiomelanocortin cells. Scatchard analysis of (125I)Tyr0-oCRH saturation binding revealed the presence of one class of saturable, high affinity sites on pituitary tissue homogenate. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (125I)Tyr0-oCRH ranged from 1.1-1.6 nM, and the receptor density was between 200-350 fmol/mg protein. Fixation of cryostat sections with 4% paraformaldehyde before tracer incubation improved both tissue preservation and localization of the CRH receptor at the cellular level. Additional postfixation with 1% glutaraldehyde inhibited tracer diffusion during subsequent immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. (125I)Tyr0-oCRH was found in cytoplasmic inclusions or at the cell periphery of ACTH/beta-endorphin cells in the anterior pituitary. Single cells of the posterior pituitary were also CRH receptor positive. Cells staining for PRL or GH were CRH receptor negative. They conclude that CRH binds only to high affinity receptors on ACTH/{beta}-endorphin cells in the human pituitary.

  5. Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) - a blood-brain barrier model for studying the binding and internalization of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, B.T.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) have previously been reported by their laboratory as a working model for studying nutrient and drug transport and metabolism at the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, they have utilized this culture system to investigate the binding and internalization of [ 125 I]-labelled insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) by BBCEC. After 2 hrs at 23 0 C, the specific binding of INS and IGF-1 was 1.6% and 13.6%, respectively. At 37 0 C, the maximum specific binding was 0.9% for INS and 5.8% for IGF-1. Using an acid-wash technique to assess peptide internalization, it was observed that, at 37 0 C, approximately 60% of the bound INS rapidly became resistant to acid treatment, a value which was constant over 2 hr. With IGF-1, a similar proportion of the bound material, 62%, became resistant by 30 min, but subsequently decreased to 45% by 2 hr. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated the presence of two binding sites for each protein, having K/sub d/'s of 0.82 nM and 19.2 nM for INS and 0.39 nM and 3.66 nM for IGF-1. Little change in the amount of INS binding was observed over a four-day interval as the cultures became a confluent monolayer. The present report of binding and internalization of these proteins suggests that the BBCEC may utilize a receptor-mediated process to internalize and/or transport (transcytosis) INS and IGF-1 from the circulation

  6. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

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    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  7. Cooperativity in RNA-Protein Interactions: Global Analysis of RNA Binding Specificity

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    Zachary T. Campbell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The control and function of RNA are governed by the specificity of RNA binding proteins. Here, we describe a method for global unbiased analysis of RNA-protein interactions that uses in vitro selection, high-throughput sequencing, and sequence-specificity landscapes. The method yields affinities for a vast array of RNAs in a single experiment, including both low- and high-affinity sites. It is reproducible and accurate. Using this approach, we analyzed members of the PUF (Pumilio and FBF family of eukaryotic mRNA regulators. Our data identify effects of a specific protein partner on PUF-RNA interactions, reveal subsets of target sites not previously detected, and demonstrate that designer PUF proteins can precisely alter specificity. The approach described here is, in principle, broadly applicable for analysis of any molecule that binds RNA, including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules.

  8. Analysis of genomic sequence motifs for deciphering transcription factor binding and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells

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    Valentina eBoeva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation.

  9. Characteristics of binding of a low affinity, noncooperative insulin [(LeuB25]insulin) to IM-9 lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.; Frank, B.H.; Rubenstein, A.; Tager, H.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    [Leu-B25]insulin is a low affinity insulin analog which does not increase the rate of dissociation of 125 I-insulin from insulin receptors (i.e. does not display negative cooperativity). We have studied the characteristics of binding of this analog to IM-9 cultured lymphocytes, in order to determine the contribution of negative cooperativity to the curvilinear nature of Scatchard plots typical of insulin binding data. The affinity of [LeuB25]insulin for receptors was approximately 1% that of insulin, as determined by its ability to inhibit 125 I-insulin binding. Monoiodinated preparations of insulin and of [LeuB25]insulin were produced, labeled in the tyrosine at position 14 of the A chain. These 125 I-TyrA14-labeled species were used in all studies. Both native insulin and a serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibodies were equally potent at inhibiting binding of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and 125 I-native insulin, suggesting that they bind to the same population of receptors. Native insulin (100 ng/ml) increased the rate of dissociation of both 125 I-insulin and 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin. However, [LeuB25]insulin (2.5 micrograms/ml) did not increase the rates of dissociation of either 125 I-insulin or 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin (i.e. it did not display negative cooperativity). Competition curves and Scatchard plots were constructed using 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and unlabeled analog. Half-maximal inhibition of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin binding was seen at a [LeuB25]insulin concentration of approximately 500 ng/ml. More importantly, the Scatchard plot of these binding data was markedly curvilinear, as is typical of insulin binding data

  10. Decreased insulin binding to mononuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes from dogs after S-Nitroso-N-Acetypenicillamine administration

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    Ragoobirsingh Dalip

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO and oxygen free-radicals play an important part in the destruction of beta-cells in auto- immune diabetes although the precise mechanism of interaction is still not known. This study was designed to examine any possible diabetogenic effect of NO by investigating any differences in cellular binding of insulin to its receptor on the cell membranes of erythrocytes and mononuclear leucocytes of dogs treated with the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP and controls treated with captopril. Results The result obtained showed decreased binding of insulin to its receptor on the cell membranes of erythrocytes and mononuclear leucocytes. Mononuclear leucocytes from SNAP-treated dogs had decreased ability to bind insulin (16.30 ± 1.24 % when compared to mononuclear leucocytes from captopril-treated controls (20.30 ± 1.93 %. Similar results were obtained for erythrocytes from dogs treated with SNAP (27.20 ± 1.33 % compared with dogs treated with captopril (34.70 ± 3.58 %. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that this decrease in insulin binding was accounted for by a decrease in insulin receptor sites per cell, with mononuclear leucocytes of SNAP-treated dogs having 55 % less insulin receptor sites per cell compared with those of captopril-treated controls (P -8 M-1 compared with 9.64 ± 0.11 × 10-8 M-1 in SNAP-treated dogs (P Conclusion These results suggest that acute alteration of the insulin receptor on the membranes of mononuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes occurred in dogs treated with S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. These findings suggest the first evidence of the novel role of NO as a modulator of insulin binding and the involvement of NO in the aetiology of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Binding kinetics of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B to intestinal brush border membranes from infant and adult hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, R.D. (Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, Lubbock (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the relative resistance of neonates and infants to Clostridium difficile-associated intestinal disease can be related to age-dependent differences in intestinal receptors for C. difficile toxins A and B. Brush border membranes (BBMs) from the small intestines of adult and infant hamsters were examined for their ability to bind radiolabeled toxins A and B. (125I)toxin A bound to both infant and adult hamster BBMs at physiological temperature, whereas (125I)toxin B did not bind to the BBMs under any of the conditions examined. The number of (125I)toxin A molecules bound at saturation was approximately 4 x 10(10) per micrograms of membrane protein for adult BBMs and 1 x 10(11) per micrograms of membrane protein for infant BBMs. Scatchard plot analysis suggested the presence of a single class of toxin A binding sites on both infant and adult hamster BBMs. Maximal binding capacity and Kd values were 0.63 pmol/mg of protein and 66.7 nM, respectively, for the infant BBMs, and 0.24 pmol/mg of protein and 27 nM, respectively, for the adult BBMs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analyses of extracted BBM proteins revealed differences in the proteins of infant and adult BBMs. However, there were not any detectable differences in the protein bands which bound (125I)toxin A between infant and adult hamsters. The results from these investigations indicate that differences in the binding kinetics of toxins A and/or B to infant and adult hamster BBMs do not account for the observed differences in their susceptibility to C. difficile-associated intestinal disease.

  12. Comprehensive review and empirical analysis of hallmarks of DNA-, RNA- and protein-binding residues in protein chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ma, Zhiqiang; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2017-12-15

    Proteins interact with a variety of molecules including proteins and nucleic acids. We review a comprehensive collection of over 50 studies that analyze and/or predict these interactions. While majority of these studies address either solely protein-DNA or protein-RNA binding, only a few have a wider scope that covers both protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid binding. Our analysis reveals that binding residues are typically characterized with three hallmarks: relative solvent accessibility (RSA), evolutionary conservation and propensity of amino acids (AAs) for binding. Motivated by drawbacks of the prior studies, we perform a large-scale analysis to quantify and contrast the three hallmarks for residues that bind DNA-, RNA-, protein- and (for the first time) multi-ligand-binding residues that interact with DNA and proteins, and with RNA and proteins. Results generated on a well-annotated data set of over 23 000 proteins show that conservation of binding residues is higher for nucleic acid- than protein-binding residues. Multi-ligand-binding residues are more conserved and have higher RSA than single-ligand-binding residues. We empirically show that each hallmark discriminates between binding and nonbinding residues, even predicted RSA, and that combining them improves discriminatory power for each of the five types of interactions. Linear scoring functions that combine these hallmarks offer good predictive performance of residue-level propensity for binding and provide intuitive interpretation of predictions. Better understanding of these residue-level interactions will facilitate development of methods that accurately predict binding in the exponentially growing databases of protein sequences. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  14. Change in Allosteric Network Affects Binding Affinities of PDZ Domains: Analysis through Perturbation Response Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerek, Z. Nevin; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2011-01-01

    The allosteric mechanism plays a key role in cellular functions of several PDZ domain proteins (PDZs) and is directly linked to pharmaceutical applications; however, it is a challenge to elaborate the nature and extent of these allosteric interactions. One solution to this problem is to explore the dynamics of PDZs, which may provide insights about how intramolecular communication occurs within a single domain. Here, we develop an advancement of perturbation response scanning (PRS) that couples elastic network models with linear response theory (LRT) to predict key residues in allosteric transitions of the two most studied PDZs (PSD-95 PDZ3 domain and hPTP1E PDZ2 domain). With PRS, we first identify the residues that give the highest mean square fluctuation response upon perturbing the binding sites. Strikingly, we observe that the residues with the highest mean square fluctuation response agree with experimentally determined residues involved in allosteric transitions. Second, we construct the allosteric pathways by linking the residues giving the same directional response upon perturbation of the binding sites. The predicted intramolecular communication pathways reveal that PSD-95 and hPTP1E have different pathways through the dynamic coupling of different residue pairs. Moreover, our analysis provides a molecular understanding of experimentally observed hidden allostery of PSD-95. We show that removing the distal third alpha helix from the binding site alters the allosteric pathway and decreases the binding affinity. Overall, these results indicate that (i) dynamics plays a key role in allosteric regulations of PDZs, (ii) the local changes in the residue interactions can lead to significant changes in the dynamics of allosteric regulations, and (iii) this might be the mechanism that each PDZ uses to tailor their binding specificities regulation. PMID:21998559

  15. BSSF: a fingerprint based ultrafast binding site similarity search and function analysis server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hualiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and post-genomics projects such as structural genomics are extending the frontier of the study of sequence-structure-function relationship of genes and their products. Although many sequence/structure-based methods have been devised with the aim of deciphering this delicate relationship, there still remain large gaps in this fundamental problem, which continuously drives researchers to develop novel methods to extract relevant information from sequences and structures and to infer the functions of newly identified genes by genomics technology. Results Here we present an ultrafast method, named BSSF(Binding Site Similarity & Function, which enables researchers to conduct similarity searches in a comprehensive three-dimensional binding site database extracted from PDB structures. This method utilizes a fingerprint representation of the binding site and a validated statistical Z-score function scheme to judge the similarity between the query and database items, even if their similarities are only constrained in a sub-pocket. This fingerprint based similarity measurement was also validated on a known binding site dataset by comparing with geometric hashing, which is a standard 3D similarity method. The comparison clearly demonstrated the utility of this ultrafast method. After conducting the database searching, the hit list is further analyzed to provide basic statistical information about the occurrences of Gene Ontology terms and Enzyme Commission numbers, which may benefit researchers by helping them to design further experiments to study the query proteins. Conclusions This ultrafast web-based system will not only help researchers interested in drug design and structural genomics to identify similar binding sites, but also assist them by providing further analysis of hit list from database searching.

  16. Homology modeling of NR2B modulatory domain of NMDA receptor and analysis of ifenprodil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Limongelli, Vittorio; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Case, David A

    2007-10-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels (iGluRs) that are involved in several important physiological functions such as neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Among iGluRs, NMDA receptors have been perhaps the most actively investigated for their role in chronic neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Recent studies have shown that the NTD of subunit NR2B modulates ion channel gating through the binding of allosteric modulators such as the prototypical compound ifenprodil. In the present paper, the construction of a three-dimensional model for the NR2B modulatory domain is described and docking calculations allow, for the first time, definition of the ifenprodil binding pose at an atomic level and fully explain all the available structure-activity relationships. Moreover, in an attempt to add further insight into the ifenprodil mechanism of action, as it is not completely clear if it binds and stabilizes an open or a closed conformation of the NR2B modulatory domain, a matter, which is fundamental for the rational design of NMDA antagonists, MD simulations followed by an MM-PBSA analysis were performed. These calculations reveal that the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain, rather than the open, constitutes the high affinity binding site for ifenprodil and that a profound stabilization of the closed conformation upon ifenprodil binding occurs. Thus, for a rational design and/or for virtual screening experiments, the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain should be taken into account and our 3D model can provide valuable hints for the design of NR2B-selective antagonists.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...... upon azide complexation. Application of this method allows for rapid analysis of ligand binding in metalloproteins in dilute aqueous solution and could in the future, when combined with theoretical studies, increase the obtainable structural resolution of proteins beyond that of X-ray analysis....

  18. Signatures of van der Waals binding: A coupling-constant scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Schröder, Elsebeth; Hyldgaard, Per

    2018-02-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) density functional (vdW-DF) method [Rep. Prog. Phys. 78, 066501 (2015), 10.1088/0034-4885/78/6/066501] describes dispersion or vdW binding by tracking the effects of an electrodynamic coupling among pairs of electrons and their associated exchange-correlation holes. This is done in a nonlocal-correlation energy term Ecnl, which permits density functional theory calculation in the Kohn-Sham scheme. However, to map the nature of vdW forces in a fully interacting materials system, it is necessary to also account for associated kinetic-correlation energy effects. Here, we present a coupling-constant scaling analysis, which permits us to compute the kinetic-correlation energy Tcnl that is specific to the vdW-DF account of nonlocal correlations. We thus provide a more complete spatially resolved analysis of the electrodynamical-coupling nature of nonlocal-correlation binding, including vdW attraction, in both covalently and noncovalently bonded systems. We find that kinetic-correlation energy effects play a significant role in the account of vdW or dispersion interactions among molecules. Furthermore, our mapping shows that the total nonlocal-correlation binding is concentrated to pockets in the sparse electron distribution located between the material fragments.

  19. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  20. Analysis of binding centers in nicotinic receptors with the aid of synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasheverov, I E; Kryukova, E V; Kudryavtsev, D S; Ivanov, I A; Egorova, N V; Zhmak, M N; Spirova, E N; Shelukhina, I V; Odinokov, A V; Alfimov, M V; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-09-01

    We studies the receptor-binding specificity of the synthetic peptide HAP (High Affinity Peptide) and its analogues, which are regarded as a model of the orthosteric site nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using radioligand analysis, electrophysiology tests, and calcium imaging, we assessed the ability of HAP to interact with nAChR antagonists: long α-neurotoxins and α-conotoxins. A high affinity of HAP for α-bungarotoxin and the absence of its interaction with α-cobratoxin and α-conotoxins was found. The synthesized analogues of HAP in general retained the properties of the original peptide. Thus, HAP cannot be a model of a ligand-binding site.

  1. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawakoli, Pune Nina; Neu, Thomas R; Busck, Mette Marie

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled...... of sucrose. For five lectins that proved particularly suitable, stained biovolumes were quantified and correlated to the bacterial composition of the biofilms. Additionally, combinations of up to three differently labeled lectins were tested. Of the 10 lectins, five bound particularly well in 48-h......-biofilms: Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Calystega sepiem (Calsepa), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA), Morniga-G (MNA-G) and Helix pomatia (HPA). No significant correlation between the binding of specific lectins and bacterial composition was found. Fluorescently labeled lectins enable the visualization of glycoconjugates...

  2. Should developing countries take on binding commitments in a climate agreement? A cost-benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallbekken, Steffen; Westskog, Hege

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the costs and benefits for all parties to a future climate agreement of developing countries taking on binding commitments. Such commitments would allow developing countries to participate in emissions trading, which has significantly lower transaction costs than the present Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). Thus we analyse whether the efficiency gains obtained by participating in emissions trading can offset the economic risk (due to the fact that future emissions cannot be known) incurred by taking on binding commitments. We use a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to carry out the analysis. We find that the efficiency gains that can be obtained by developing countries might not be very large compared to the risks they incur. Developing countries might therefore have good reasons not to embrace ''cap and trade'' emissions trading. (author)

  3. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.R. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  4. Substance P: binding properties and studies on cellular responses in guinea pig macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, H.P.; Wolters, K.; Toyka, K.V.

    1986-05-15

    The neuropeptide Substance P (SP) has been recognized to modulate functional activities of inflammatory cells. The authors have previously shown that it mediates macrophage activation. In this study they examined binding characteristics of SP and searched for additional evidence of heightened metabolic activity of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages upon challenge with this peptide. Radioligand studies indicated the existence of a homogeneous class of specific binding sites with high affinity for SP on macrophages. Scatchard analysis yielded an apparent K/sub D/ of 1.9 +/- 0.4 x 10/sup -8/ M (range: 1.4 to 2.4 x 10/sup -8/ M), which was confirmed by kinetic studies. Binding was dose related, saturable, reversible, and could be inhibited by the SP antagonist (D-Pro/sup 2/, D-Phe/sup 7/, D-Trp/sup 9/)-SP. Examination of peptide structural requirements revealed that both the COOH- and NH/sub 2/-terminus contribute to receptor-ligand interaction. Other members of the tachykinin group of peptides were devoid of stimulatory action on macrophages. Cellular responses after engagement of the receptor sites by SP included downregulation of the membrane-associated enzyme 5'-nucleotidase and stimulation of synthesis and release of arachidonic acid metabolites, as well as of the lysosomal enzyme ADGase. These actions were specific as evidenced by immunoabsorption experiments. The findings demonstrate that macrophage activation afforded by SP is effected through a receptor-mediated mechanism. Liberation of proinflammatory and immunomodulating substances in response to SP may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disease.

  5. Characterization and Functional Analysis of the Calmodulin-Binding Domain of Rac1 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Chelikani, Prashen; Bhullar, Rajinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s) in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151–164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151–164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A) demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A), activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration. PMID:22905193

  6. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  7. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawakoli, Pune N; Neu, Thomas R; Busck, Mette M; Kuhlicke, Ute; Schramm, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled lectins to visualize and quantify extracellular glycoconjugates in dental biofilms. Lectin binding was screened on pooled supragingival biofilm samples collected from 76 subjects using confocal microscopy. FLBA was then performed with 10 selected lectins on biofilms grown in situ for 48 h in the absence of sucrose. For five lectins that proved particularly suitable, stained biovolumes were quantified and correlated to the bacterial composition of the biofilms. Additionally, combinations of up to three differently labeled lectins were tested. Of the 10 lectins, five bound particularly well in 48-h-biofilms: Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Calystega sepiem (Calsepa), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA), Morniga-G (MNA-G) and Helix pomatia (HPA). No significant correlation between the binding of specific lectins and bacterial composition was found. Fluorescently labeled lectins enable the visualization of glycoconjugates in the dental biofilm matrix. The characterization and quantification of glycoconjugates in dental biofilms require a combination of several lectins. For 48-h-biofilms grown in absence of sucrose, AAL, Calsepa, HPA, LEA, and MNA-G are recommendable.

  8. Identification and analysis of key residues involved in folding and binding of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, Michael; Shanmugam, N R Siva; Selvin, J Fermin Angelo; Veluraja, K

    2018-02-21

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play vital roles in several biological processes in living organisms. The comparative analysis of binding site residues along with stabilizing residues in protein-carbohydrate complexes provides ample insights to understand the structure, function and recognition mechanism. In this work, we have identified 2.45% binding site residues in a non-redundant dataset of 1130 complexes using distance-based criteria and 7.07% stabilizing residues using the concepts of hydrophobicity, long-range interactions and conservation of residues. Further, 5.9% of binding and 2.04% of stabilizing residues are common to each other, which are termed as key residues. The key residues have been analyzed based on protein classes, carbohydrate types, gene ontology functional classifications, amino acid preference and structure-based parameters. We found that all-β, α+β and α/β have more key residues than other protein classes and most of the KRs are present in β-strands, which shows their importance in stability and binding of complexes. On the ligand side, L-saccharide has the highest number of key residues and it has a high percentage of KRs in SRs and BRs than other carbohydrate types. Further, polar and charged residues have a high tendency to serve as key residues. Classifications based on gene ontology terms revealed that Lys is preferred in all the three groups: molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. Key residues have 6 to 9 contacts within the protein and make only one contact with the carbohydrate ligand. These contacts are dominant to form polar-nonpolar contacts followed by the contacts between charged atoms. Further, the influence of sequence and structural parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, solvent accessibility, secondary structure, long-range order and conservation score has been discussed. This analysis helps in understanding the interplay between stability and binding in protein

  9. Analysis of subcomponents of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor macromolecular complex in mammalian central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Since the presence of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may affect benzodiazepine binding to tissue sections in autoradiographic studies, a protocol designed to check for this influence has been investigated. [ 3 H]Flunitrazepam (1 nM) was used to label benzodiazepine receptors for autoradiographic localization. Bicuculline was added to the incubation medium of an additional set of tissue sections to antagonize any potential effect of endogenous GABA. Binding in these sections was compared to that occurring in another set in which excess GABA was added to create further GABA enhancement. Binding was also compared to adjacent sections which were treated similarly but also preincubated in distilled-deionized water to burst the cells by osmotic shock and eliminate endogenous GABA, thereby preventing any effect on benzodiazepine binding. The results indicated that endogenous GABA is indeed present in the slide-mounted tissue sections and is affecting benzodiazepine receptor binding differentially in various regions of the brain depending on the density of GABAergic innervation. Scatchard analysis of saturation data demonstrated that the alteration in BZ binding due to GABA was a result of a change in the affinity rather than number of receptors present

  10. The conserved potassium channel filter can have distinct ion binding profiles: structural analysis of rubidium, cesium, and barium binding in NaK2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yee Ling; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David Bryant; Jiang, Youxing

    2014-08-01

    Potassium channels are highly selective for K(+) over the smaller Na(+). Intriguingly, they are permeable to larger monovalent cations such as Rb(+) and Cs(+) but are specifically blocked by the similarly sized Ba(2+). In this study, we used structural analysis to determine the binding profiles for these permeant and blocking ions in the selectivity filter of the potassium-selective NaK channel mutant NaK2K and also performed permeation experiments using single-channel recordings. Our data revealed that some ion binding properties of NaK2K are distinct from those of the canonical K(+) channels KcsA and MthK. Rb(+) bound at sites 1, 3, and 4 in NaK2K, as it does in KcsA. Cs(+), however, bound predominantly at sites 1 and 3 in NaK2K, whereas it binds at sites 1, 3, and 4 in KcsA. Moreover, Ba(2+) binding in NaK2K was distinct from that which has been observed in KcsA and MthK, even though all of these channels show similar Ba(2+) block. In the presence of K(+), Ba(2+) bound to the NaK2K channel at site 3 in conjunction with a K(+) at site 1; this led to a prolonged block of the channel (the external K(+)-dependent Ba(2+) lock-in state). In the absence of K(+), however, Ba(2+) acts as a permeating blocker. We found that, under these conditions, Ba(2+) bound at sites 1 or 0 as well as site 3, allowing it to enter the filter from the intracellular side and exit from the extracellular side. The difference in the Ba(2+) binding profile in the presence and absence of K(+) thus provides a structural explanation for the short and prolonged Ba(2+) block observed in NaK2K. © 2014 Lam et al.

  11. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine 125-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine 125 -labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. 125 I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two 125 I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D

  12. Interpretation of Ocular Melanin Drug Binding Assays. Alternatives to the Model of Multiple Classes of Independent Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, José A; Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa; Urtti, Arto

    2016-04-04

    Melanin has a high binding affinity for a wide range of drugs. The determination of the melanin binding capacity and its binding affinity are important, e.g., in the determination of the ocular drug distribution, the prediction of drug effects in the eye, and the trans-scleral drug delivery. The binding parameters estimated from a given data set vary significantly when using different isotherms or different nonlinear fitting methods. In this work, the commonly used bi-Langmuir isotherm, which assumes two classes of independent sites, is confronted with the Sips isotherm. Direct, log-log, and Scatchard plots are used, and the interpretation of the binding curves in the latter is critically analyzed. In addition to the goodness of fit, the emphasis is placed on the physical meaning of the binding parameters. The bi-Langmuir model imposes a bimodal distribution of binding energies for the sites on the melanin granules, but the actual distribution is most likely continuous and unimodal, as assumed by the Sips isotherm. Hence, the latter describes more accurately the distribution of binding energies and also the experimental results of melanin binding to drugs and metal ions. Simulations are used to show that the existence of two classes of sites cannot be confirmed on the sole basis of the shape of the binding curve in the Scatchard plot, and that serious doubts may appear on the meaning of the binding parameters of the bi-Langmuir model. Experimental results of melanin binding to chloroquine and metoprolol are used to illustrate the importance of the choice of the binding isotherm and of the method used to evaluate the binding parameters.

  13. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  14. Enhanced insulin binding to blood-brain barrier in vivo and to brain microvessels in vitro in newborn rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.J.; Jankovic-Vokes, T.; Pardridge, W.M.; Morris, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Insulin is a known growth factor in nonneural tissue, and recent studies have shown that there are insulin receptors throughout the adult and fetal central nervous system. Since insulin has only limited access to the adult brain, this study was undertaken to determine if insulin has increased availability to the newborn brain where it may act as a neonatal brain growth promoter. In vivo brain uptake of 125 I-insulin after a single-pass carotid injection was measured in newborn, 3-wk-old and 11-wk-old (adult) rabbits. The brain uptake index (BUI) relative to a 3 HOH reference was 22.0 +/- 1.1% (mean +/- SEM) for newborn, 12.8 +/- 0.6% for 3-wk-old, and 6.5 +/- 0.1% for adults. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to isolated cerebral microvessels was similarly increased in the newborn compared with the 3-wk-old and adult animals. Scatchard analysis revealed that the difference was due to an increase in receptor number with only minimal changes in the affinity. The increased availability of circulating insulin to the newborn brain was further corroborated by elevated CSF/serum and brain/serum insulin ratios in the newborn versus adult. These results suggest that insulin has increased access to the newborn brain where it may function as a growth factor

  15. A kinetic analysis of kappa-opioid agonist binding using the selective radioligand (/sup 3/H)U69593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Hunter, J.C.; Hill, R.G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-07-01

    The interaction of the nonselective opioid ligand (3H)bremazocine and of the kappa-opioid (3H)U69593 with the kappa-receptor was investigated in guinea-pig cortical membranes. Each radioligand bound to a single population of high-affinity sites, although (3H)U69593 apparently recognised only 70% of those sites labelled by (3H)bremazocine. Naloxone and the kappa-selective ligands U69593 and PD117302 exhibited full inhibition of the binding of both radioligands. Kinetic analysis demonstrated biphasic rates of association and dissociation for both (3H)bremazocine and (3H)U69593. Detailed analysis of the binding of (3H)U69593 revealed that the fast rate of association was dependent on radioligand concentration, in contrast to the slow rate, which was independent of ligand concentration. Guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited binding of (3H)U69593; saturation analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of GppNHp resulted in a decrease in affinity without any significant change in binding capacity. GppNHp attenuated the formation of the slow component of (3H)U69593 binding, while accelerating the fast component. The data are consistent with the formation of a high-affinity complex between the kappa-receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. Guanine nucleotides promote the dissociation of this ternary complex and the stabilisation of a lower-affinity state of the receptor.

  16. Quantitative analysis of rat Ig (sub)classes binding to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, R.; Brodin, T.; Sjoegren, H.-O.

    1982-01-01

    An indirect 125 I-labeled protein A assay for detection of cell surface-bound rat immunoglobulins is presented. The assay is quantitative and rapid and detects as little as 1 ng of cell surface-bound Ig. It discriminates between antibodies belonging to different IgG subclasses, IgM and IgA. The authors describe the production and specificity control of the reagents used and show that the test can be used for quantitative analysis. A large number of sera from untreated rats are tested to evaluate the frequency of falsely positive responses and variation due to age, sex and strain of rat. With this test it is relatively easy to quantitate the binding of classes and subclasses of rat immunoglobulins in a small volume (6 μl) of untreated serum. (Auth.)

  17. Inventory and comparative analysis of rice and Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Olivier; Bouige, Philippe; Forestier, Cyrille; Dassa, Elie

    2004-10-08

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins constitute a large superfamily found in all kingdoms of living organisms. The recent completion of two draft sequences of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome allowed us to analyze and classify its ABC proteins and to compare to those in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a similar number of ABC proteins in rice and Arabidopsis (121 versus 120), despite the rice genome being more than three times the size of Arabidopsis. Both Arabidopsis and rice have representative members in all seven major subfamilies of ABC ATPases (A to G) commonly found in eukaryotes. This comparative analysis allowed the detection of 29 potential orthologous sequences in Arabidopsis and rice. However, plant share with prokaryotes a specific set of ABC systems that is not detected in animals. These ABC systems might be inherited from the cyanobacterial ancestor of chloroplasts. The present work provides the first complete inventory of rice ABC proteins and an updated inventory of those proteins in Arabidopsis.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of Pax8 binding provides new insights into thyroid functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Llorente Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax8 is essential for the differentiation of thyroid cells. However, there are few data on genes transcriptionally regulated by Pax8 other than thyroid-related genes. To better understand the role of Pax8 in the biology of thyroid cells, we obtained transcriptional profiles of Pax8-silenced PCCl3 thyroid cells using whole genome expression arrays and integrated these signals with global cis-regulatory sequencing studies performed by ChIP-Seq analysis Results Exhaustive analysis of Pax8 immunoprecipitated peaks demonstrated preferential binding to intragenic regions and CpG-enriched islands, which suggests a role of Pax8 in transcriptional regulation of orphan CpG regions. In addition, ChIP-Seq allowed us to identify Pax8 partners, including proteins involved in tertiary DNA structure (CTCF and chromatin remodeling (Sp1, and these direct transcriptional interactions were confirmed in vivo. Moreover, both factors modulate Pax8-dependent transcriptional activation of the sodium iodide symporter (Nis gene promoter. We ultimately combined putative and novel Pax8 binding sites with actual target gene expression regulation to define Pax8-dependent genes. Functional classification suggests that Pax8-regulated genes may be directly involved in important processes of thyroid cell function such as cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, cell polarity, motion and adhesion, and a plethora of DNA/protein-related processes. Conclusion Our study provides novel insights into the role of Pax8 in thyroid biology, exerted through transcriptional regulation of important genes involved in critical thyrocyte processes. In addition, we found new transcriptional partners of Pax8, which functionally cooperate with Pax8 in the regulation of thyroid gene transcription. Besides, our data demonstrate preferential location of Pax8 in non-promoter CpG regions. These data point to an orphan CpG island-mediated mechanism

  19. Capillary electrophoretic analysis reveals subcellular binding between individual mitochondria and cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria are essential for normal cellular function. An assessment of such interactions is commonly based on bulk analysis of mitochondrial and cytoskeletal markers present in a given sample, which assumes complete binding between these two organelle types. Such measurements are biased because they rarely account for non-bound ‘free’ subcellular species. Here we report on the use of capillary electrophoresis with dual laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to identify, classify, count and quantify properties of individual binding events of mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2 while F-actin, a major cytoskeletal component, was fluorescently labeled with Alexa488-phalloidin. In a typical subcellular fraction of L6 myoblasts, 79% of mitochondrial events did not have detectable levels of F-actin, while the rest had on average ~2 zeptomole F-actin, which theoretically represents a ~ 2.5-μm long network of actin filaments per event. Trypsin treatment of L6 subcellular fractions prior to analysis decreased the fraction of mitochondrial events with detectable levels of F-actin, which is expected from digestion of cytoskeletal proteins on the surface of mitochondria. The electrophoretic mobility distributions of the individual events were also used to further distinguish between cytoskeleton-bound from cytoskeleton-free mitochondrial events. The CE-LIF approach described here could be further developed to explore cytoskeleton interactions with other subcellular structures, the effects of cytoskeleton destabilizing drugs, and the progression of viral infections. PMID:21309532

  20. Autoradiographic analysis of tritiated imipramine binding in the human brain post mortem: effects of suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Israeli, M.; Biegon, A.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of high-affinity tritiated imipramine binding sites was performed on brains of 12 suicide victims and 12 matched controls. Region-specific differences in imipramine binding were found between the two groups. Thus, the pyramidal and molecular layers of the cornu ammoni hippocampal fields and the hilus of the dentate gyrus exhibited 80%, 60%, and 90% increases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. The postcentral cortical gyrus, insular cortex, and claustrum had 45%, 28%, and 75% decreases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. No difference in imipramine binding was observed in prefrontal cortical regions, in the basal ganglia, and in mesencephalic nuclei. No sex and postmortem delay effects on imipramine binding were found. Imipramine binding was positively correlated with age, the effect of age being most pronounced in portions of the basal ganglia and temporal cortex

  1. Clinical benefit using sperm hyaluronic acid binding technique in ICSI cycles: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Fruchter, Ronit; Shalev, Eliezer; Weiss, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The human oocyte is surrounded by hyaluronic acid, which acts as a natural selector of spermatozoa. Human sperm that express hyaluronic acid receptors and bind to hyaluronic acid have normal shape, minimal DNA fragmentation and low frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies. Use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles to improve clinical outcomes has been studied, although none of these studies had sufficient statistical power. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, electronic databases were searched up to June 2015 to identify studies of ICSI cycles in which spermatozoa able to bind hyaluronic acid was selected. The main outcomes were fertilization rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes included cleavage rate, embryo quality, implantation rate, spontaneous abortion and live birth rate. Seven studies and 1437 cycles were included. Use of hyaluronic acid binding sperm selection technique yielded no improvement in fertilization and pregnancy rates. A meta-analysis of all available studies showed an improvement in embryo quality and implantation rate; an analysis of prospective studies only showed an improvement in embryo quality. Evidence does not support routine use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in all ICSI cycles. Identification of patients that might benefit from this technique needs further study. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR radiation and ultraviolet (UV-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high- and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF and different selectivity index (SI for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR, and mercury analyzer (MA. Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%, higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively.

  3. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Bai, Lian-Yang; Liu, Kun-Feng; Liu, Run-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR) radiation and ultraviolet (UV)-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high-and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF) and different selectivity index (SI) for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), and mercury analyzer (MA). Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%), higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively. PMID:24398982

  4. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  5. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Lopez, Tatiana E; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-08-29

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Analysis of sequencing data for probing RNA secondary structures and protein-RNA binding in studying posttranscriptional regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xihao; Wu, Yang; Lu, Zhi John; Yip, Kevin Y

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been used to study posttranscriptional regulations, where the identification of protein-RNA binding is a major and fast-developing sub-area, which is in turn benefited by the sequencing methods for whole-transcriptome probing of RNA secondary structures. In the study of RNA secondary structures using high-throughput sequencing, bases are modified or cleaved according to their structural features, which alter the resulting composition of sequencing reads. In the study of protein-RNA binding, methods have been proposed to immuno-precipitate (IP) protein-bound RNA transcripts in vitro or in vivo By sequencing these transcripts, the protein-RNA interactions and the binding locations can be identified. For both types of data, read counts are affected by a combination of confounding factors, including expression levels of transcripts, sequence biases, mapping errors and the probing or IP efficiency of the experimental protocols. Careful processing of the sequencing data and proper extraction of important features are fundamentally important to a successful analysis. Here we review and compare different experimental methods for probing RNA secondary structures and binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the computational methods proposed for analyzing the corresponding sequencing data. We suggest how these two types of data should be integrated to study the structural properties of RBP binding sites as a systematic way to better understand posttranscriptional regulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Ali Gadahi

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis.

  9. Quantitative pharmacological analysis of 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in discrete areas of the chicken brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siuciak, J.A.; Krause, D.N.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have localized and characterized 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in the chicken brain using in vitro quantitative autoradiography. Binding sites were widely distributed throughout the chicken brain, predominantly in regions associated with the visual system. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin to discrete chicken brain areas was found to be saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin (75 pm) was quantitated for 40 identifiable brain regions. Eight brain regions were chosen for binding characterization and pharmacological analysis: optic tectum, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, nucleus rotundus, ventral supraoptic decussation, ventrolateral geniculate nucleus, neostriatum, and ectostriatum. These regions showed no rostral-caudal gradient in 2-125I-iodomelatonin specific binding, and saturation analysis revealed a single class of high-affinity sites with KD values in the range of 33-48 pM and receptor site density (Bmax) ranging from 31 to 58 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments carried out with various indoles revealed a similar order of pharmacological affinities in these areas: melatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than methoxyluzindole greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than luzindole much greater than 5-HT greater than 5-methoxytryptamine. The affinity constants determined by quantitative autoradiography for these compounds to compete for 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding in the optic tectum correlated well with the affinities in chicken brain membranes at 25 degrees C (r = 0.966; slope = 0.845; n = 7) and 0 degree C (r = 0.946; slope = 0.379; n = 7), chicken retinal membranes (r = 0.973; slope = 0.759; n = 7), and the potency or affinity of these compounds to affect the calcium-dependent release of 3H-dopamine from the rabbit retina (r = 0.902; slope = 0.506; n = 6)

  10. Analysis of in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor to promoter DNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Cooperative binding of Drosophila heat shock factor to arrays of a conserved 5 bp unit. Cell. 64: 585-593. Yamamoto A, Mizukami Y, Sakurai H (2005). Identification of a Novel. Class of Target Genes and a Novel Type of Binding Sequence of. Heat Shock Transcription Factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J.

  11. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  12. Analysis of single particle diffusion with transient binding using particle filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jason; Fricks, John

    2016-07-21

    Diffusion with transient binding occurs in a variety of biophysical processes, including movement of transmembrane proteins, T cell adhesion, and caging in colloidal fluids. We model diffusion with transient binding as a Brownian particle undergoing Markovian switching between free diffusion when unbound and diffusion in a quadratic potential centered around a binding site when bound. Assuming the binding site is the last position of the particle in the unbound state and Gaussian observational error obscures the true position of the particle, we use particle filtering to predict when the particle is bound and to locate the binding sites. Maximum likelihood estimators of diffusion coefficients, state transition probabilities, and the spring constant in the bound state are computed with a stochastic Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microarray Meta-Analysis of RNA-Binding Protein Functions in Alternative Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Yuting; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate diverse mRNA transcripts with different 3′UTRs from the same gene. In this study, we systematically searched for the APA events with differential expression in public mouse microarray data. Hundreds of genes with over-represented differential APA events and the corresponding experiments were identified. We further revealed that global APA differential expression occurred prevalently in tissues such as brain comparing to peripheral tissues, and biological processes such as development, differentiation and immune responses. Interestingly, we also observed widespread differential APA events in RNA-binding protein (RBP) genes such as Rbm3, Eif4e2 and Elavl1. Given the fact that RBPs are considered as the main regulators of differential APA expression, we constructed a co-expression network between APAs and RBPs using the microarray data. Further incorporation of CLIP-seq data of selected RBPs showed that Nova2 represses and Mbnl1 promotes the polyadenylation of closest poly(A) sites respectively. Altogether, our study is the first microarray meta-analysis in a mammal on the regulation of APA by RBPs that integrated massive mRNA expression data under a wide-range of biological conditions. Finally, we present our results as a comprehensive resource in an online website for the research community. PMID:24622240

  14. Neutron activation analysis of heavy metal binding by fungal cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crusberg, T.C.; Mayer, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Aqueous effluents are produced during nuclear power and nuclear weapons development activities which frequently contain low levels of dissolved radioactive nuclides. A number of laboratories are now focusing attention to renewable biological materials to provide traps for low concentrations of dissolved radioactive metal ions in wastewater effluents. The term BIOTRAP can be used to describe such materials, and in this laboratory cell wall preparations of the fungus Penicillium ochro-chloron have been employed to demonstrate their capacity and affinity to reversibly bind and remove copper(2). Since neutron activation analysis (NAA) was readily available, that method was one of several applied to this problem as a suitable analytical methodology to study heavy metal-to-BIOTRAP interactions. Copper and mercury provide good examples of metals which are capable of undergoing activation by thermal neutrons. In NAA, 63 Cu (69.1% natural abundance) is converted to 64 Cu which has a half live of 12.7 hr, and 202 Hg (29.7 % natural abundance) is converted to 203 Hg which has a half life of 46.,6 d

  15. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  16. A genomic analysis of disease-resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding sites in Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large set of candidate nucleotide-binding site (NBS-encoding genes related to disease resistance was identified in the sorghum (Sorghum bicolor genome. These resistance (R genes were characterized based on their structural diversity, physical chromosomal location and phylogenetic relationships. Based on their N-terminal motifs and leucine-rich repeats (LRR, 50 non-regular NBS genes and 224 regular NBS genes were identified in 274 candidate NBS genes. The regular NBS genes were classified into ten types: CNL, CN, CNLX, CNX, CNXL, CXN, NX, N, NL and NLX. The vast majority (97% of NBS genes occurred in gene clusters, indicating extensive gene duplication in the evolution of S. bicolor NBS genes. Analysis of the S. bicolor NBS phylogenetic tree revealed two major clades. Most NBS genes were located at the distal tip of the long arms of the ten sorghum chromosomes, a pattern significantly different from rice and Arabidopsis, the NBS genes of which have a random chromosomal distribution.

  17. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of pheromone binding protein 1 from Cydia pomonella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-12-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 1 (CpomPBP1) was cloned and characterized. CpomPBP1, possessing the typical characteristics of lepidopteran odorant binding proteins, was detected to be specifically expressed in the antennae of male and female moths at the mRNA and protein level. Soluble recombinant CpomPBP1 was subjected to in vitro binding to analyse its binding properties and to search for potentially active semiochemicals. A competitive binding assay showed that three 12-carbon ligands, codlemone, 1-dodecanol and E,E-2,4-dodecadienal, were able to bind to CpomPBP1 in decreasing order of affinity. Moreover, unlike the wild-type CpomPBP1, the C-terminus truncated CpomPBP1 exhibited high affinity to ligands even in an acidic environment, suggesting that the C-terminus plays a role in preventing ligands from binding to CpomPBP1 in a lower pH environment. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2010-04-20

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription factors by phosphorylating and promoting cytoplasmic retention of YAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of human TEAD2. TEAD2 YBD adopts an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich fold with two extra helix-turn-helix inserts. NMR studies reveal that the TEAD-binding domain of YAP is natively unfolded and that TEAD binding causes localized conformational changes in YAP. In vitro binding and in vivo functional assays define an extensive conserved surface of TEAD2 YBD as the YAP-binding site. Therefore, our studies suggest that a short segment of YAP adopts an extended conformation and forms extensive contacts with a rigid surface of TEAD. Targeting a surface-exposed pocket of TEAD might be an effective strategy to disrupt the YAP-TEAD interaction and to reduce the oncogenic potential of YAP.

  20. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  1. DNA Binding Peptide Directed Synthesis of Continuous DNA Nanowires for Analysis of Large DNA Molecules by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Lee, Seonghyun; Jin, Xuelin; Kim, Su Ji; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of smooth and continuous DNA nanowires, preserving the original structure of native DNA, and allowing its analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM), is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles densely assembled on the DNA backbone via thiol-tagged DNA binding peptides work as seeds for metallization of DNA. This method allows whole analysis of DNA molecules with entangled 3D features. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [Romanowsky dyes and the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect. 4. Binding of azure B to DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Walz, R; Zimmermann, H W

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the binding of azure B to DNA (calf thymus) over a wide range of concentrations of the dye (CF) and the nucleic acid (CN) using absorption spectroscopy [CF and CN represent the total concentrations of the ye (F) and the mononucleotide units (N) of the DNA, respectively]. The binding isotherms of the dye to DNA in aqueous solutions were determined. In addition, we analysed the composition of insoluble DNA/azure B precipitates that are formed in presence of an excess of azure B. These precipitates are of particular interest, because Giemsa staining is usually performed using high dye concentrations. Azure B easily forms dimers in aqueous solutions. When determining the binding isotherms, the equilibrium between free monomers and dimers must be taken into account. Therefore, we determined the dimerisation constant (Kd) of azure B from the concentration dependency of its absorption spectra in water at the standard temperature T = 298 K (25 degrees C), Kd = 6.5 X 10(3) M-1 (experimental conditions: tris buffer, pH 7.2; concentration of Na ions, CNa = 0.002 M). As the CNa value increases, the dimerisation constant rises rapidly. When the azure B concentration is very low and there is an excess of DNA, ordinary Scatchard and Langmuir isotherms are observed. Monomer dye cations are bound to DNA, these cations being in equilibrium with free monomers in the solution. In order to obtain the Scatchard binding constant (Ks) and the binding parameter (n) spectroscopically, it is necessary to determine the extinction coefficient (epsilon Fb) of the monomer bound (b) dye molecules (F) at one analytical wave number (upsilon a). The three constants can be determined simultaneously using an iterative technique that combines Scatchard isotherms and the Benesi-Hildebrand extrapolation, CN----infinity. We obtained Ks = 1.8 X 10(5) M-1 and n = 0.18 (25 degrees C; tris buffer, pH 7.2; CNa = 0.002 M). At very low dye (CF) and competitor (CNa) concentrations, only 18% of the

  3. Fluorescence analysis of competition of phenylbutazone and methotrexate in binding to serum albumin in combination treatment in rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Combination of several drugs is often necessary especially during long-them therapy. The competition between drugs can cause a decrease of the amount of a drug bound to albumin. This results in an increase of the free, biological active fraction of the drug. The aim of the presented study was to describe the competition between phenylbutazone (Phe) and methotrexate (MTX), two drugs recommended for the treatment of rheumatology in binding to bovine (BSA) and human (HSA) serum albumin in the high affinity binding site. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of drugs on the protein fluorescence and to define the binding and quenching properties of drugs-serum albumin complexes. The effect of the displacement of one drug from the complex of the other with serum albumin has been described on the basis of the comparison of the quenching curves and binding constants for the binary and ternary systems. The conclusion that both Phe and MTX form a binding site in the same subdomain (IIA) points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of the uncontrolled toxic effects.

  4. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentian Chen

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  5. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentian; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs) are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA) on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA) receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  6. Mutational analysis of a CBM family 5 chitin-binding domain of an alkaline chitinase from Bacillus sp. J813.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uni, Fumiya; Lee, Sunmi; Yatsunami, Rie; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Chitinase J from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. J813 comprises a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 18 catalytic domain (CatD), a fibronectin type III like domain, and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) family 5 chitin-binding domain (ChBD). It has been suggested that the ChBD binds to insoluble chitin and enhances its degradation by the CatD. To investigate the roles of two aromatic residues (Trp541 and Trp542), which are exposed on the surface of the ChBD, mutational analysis was performed. Single and double mutations of the two aromatic residues decreased binding and hydrolyzing abilities toward insoluble chitin. This result suggests that the ChBD binds to chitin by hydrophobic interactions via two surface-exposed aromatic residues. However, the double mutant, which has no such aromatic residue, bound to chitin at pH 5.2, probably by electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the ChBD bound to insoluble chitosan by electrostatic interactions.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farde, Lars; Hall, Hakan; Ehrin, Erling; Sedvall, Goran

    1986-01-01

    D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to 17 picomoles per cubic centimeter and dissociation constants from 3.4 to 4.7 nanomolar. Maximum binding for human putamen at autopsy was 15 picomoles per cubic centimeter. Studies of [11C]raclopride binding indicate that clinically effective doses of chemically distinct neuroleptic drugs result in 85 to 90 percent occupancy of D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of schizophrenic patients.

  8. Evaluation of a Solid Phase DNA Binding Matrix for Downstream PCR Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bader, Douglas E; Fisher, Glen R; Stratilo, Chad W

    2005-01-01

    A commercially available solid-phase DNA binding matrix (FTA cards) was evaluated for its ability to capture and release DNA for downstream gene amplification and detection assays using polymerase chain reaction (PCR...

  9. Structural analysis of peptides capable of binding to more than one Ia antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1989-01-01

    The Ia binding regions were analyzed for three unrelated peptide Ag (sperm whale myoglobin 106-118, influenza hemagglutinin 130-142, and lambda repressor protein 12-26) for which binding to more than one Ia molecule has previously been demonstrated. By determining the binding profile of three...... separate series of truncated synthetic peptides, it was found that in all three cases the different Ia reactivities mapped to largely overlapping regions of the peptides; although, for two of the peptides, the regions involved in binding the different Ia specificities were distinct. Moreover, subtle...... differences were found to dramatically influence some, but not other, Ia reactivities. Using a large panel of synthetic peptides it was found that a significant correlation exists between the capacity of peptides to interact with different alleles of the same molecule (i.e., IAd and IAk), but no correlation...

  10. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2010-01-01

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription ...

  11. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  12. IBiSA_Tools: A Computational Toolkit for Ion-Binding State Analysis in Molecular Dynamics Trajectories of Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels are a long-standing conundrum. Although the molecular dynamics (MD) method has been extensively used to simulate ion conduction dynamics at the atomic level, analysis and interpretation of MD results are not straightforward due to complexity of the dynamics. In our previous reports, we proposed an analytical method called ion-binding state analysis to scrutinize and summarize ion conduction mechanisms by taking advantage of a variety of analytical protocols, e.g., the complex network analysis, sequence alignment, and hierarchical clustering. This approach effectively revealed the ion conduction mechanisms and their dependence on the conditions, i.e., ion concentration and membrane voltage. Here, we present an easy-to-use computational toolkit for ion-binding state analysis, called IBiSA_tools. This toolkit consists of a C++ program and a series of Python and R scripts. From the trajectory file of MD simulations and a structure file, users can generate several images and statistics of ion conduction processes. A complex network named ion-binding state graph is generated in a standard graph format (graph modeling language; GML), which can be visualized by standard network analyzers such as Cytoscape. As a tutorial, a trajectory of a 50 ns MD simulation of the Kv1.2 channel is also distributed with the toolkit. Users can trace the entire process of ion-binding state analysis step by step. The novel method for analysis of ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels can be easily used by means of IBiSA_tools. This software is distributed under an open source license at the following URL: http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~ktkshr/ibisa_tools/.

  13. Analysis of zinc oxide nanoparticles binding proteins in rat blood and brain homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim KH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyu Hwan Shim,1 John Hulme,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Seong Soo A An1 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 2Department of Analysis, KTR, Kimpo, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and electronic products. Nevertheless, limited safety information is available for many NPs, especially in terms of their interactions with various binding proteins, leading to potential toxic effects. Zinc oxide (ZnO NPs are included in the formulation of new products, such as adhesives, batteries, ceramics, cosmetics, cement, glass, ointments, paints, pigments, and supplementary foods, resulting in increased human exposures to ZnO. Hence, we investigated the potential ZnO nanotoxic pathways by analyzing the adsorbed proteins, called protein corona, from blood and brain from four ZnO NPs, ZnOSM20(-, ZnOSM20(+, ZnOAE100(-, and ZnOAE100(+, in order to understand their potential mechanisms in vivo. Through this study, liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy technology was employed to identify all bound proteins. Totals of 52 and 58 plasma proteins were identified as being bound to ZnOSM20(- and ZnOSM20(+, respectively. For ZnOAE100(- and ZnOAE100(+, 58 and 44 proteins were bound, respectively. Similar numbers of proteins were adsorbed onto ZnO irrespective of size or surface charge of the nanoparticle. These proteins were further analyzed with ClueGO, a Cytoscape plugin, which provided gene ontology and the biological interaction processes of identified proteins. Interactions between diverse proteins and ZnO nanoparticles could result in an alteration of their functions, conformation, and clearance, eventually affecting many biological processes. Keywords: brain

  14. Characterization and functional analysis of fatty acid binding protein from the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripa, Jittiyawadee; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, the cDNA encoding FABP (Ov-FABP) was isolated from the adult stage of Opisthorchis viverrini and characterized. The Ov-FABP protein sequence (107 amino acids) was predicted to have a molecular mass of 12.26kDa and an isoelectric point (PI) of 6.82. This sequence had a high identity and similarity to Cs-FABP of the related opisthorchid Clonorchis sinensis. Multiple sequence alignment with FABPs from other parasitic flatworms and mammals showed a number of conserved amino acids including Phe 34 , Gly 37 , Glu 38 , Glu 39 ,Val 50 , Iso 62 , Gly 81 , Ile 84 , Ser 87 and Arg 101 . In addition, the structure of Ov-FABP was predicted to have eleven β-sheets and one α-helix based on the known structures for FABPs from human (hL-FABP), rat and a schistosome. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequence data revealed a close relationship of Ov-FABP with Cs-FABP and hL-FABP. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that Ov-FABP was transcribed in the egg, metacercaria, juvenile and adult stages. The soluble form of recombinant Ov-FABP (rOv-FABP) was shown to specifically bind fatty acids, including oleic acid, palmitic acid and linoleic acid, as shown for other animals. Anti-serum against rOv-FABP (produced in mice) located the protein to parenchyma, egg, sucker musculature, testes and tegument of adult O. viverrini. Taken together, the findings suggest key functional roles for Ov-FABP in development, reproduction and/or host-parasite interactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural analysis of dihydrofolate reductases enables rationalization of antifolate binding affinities and suggests repurposing possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosle, Amrisha; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-03-01

    Antifolates are competitive inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a conserved enzyme that is central to metabolism and widely targeted in pathogenic diseases, cancer and autoimmune disorders. Although most clinically used antifolates are known to be target specific, some display a fair degree of cross-reactivity with DHFRs from other species. A method that enables identification of determinants of affinity and specificity in target DHFRs from different species and provides guidelines for the design of antifolates is currently lacking. To address this, we first captured the potential druggable space of a DHFR in a substructure called the 'supersite' and classified supersites of DHFRs from 56 species into 16 'site-types' based on pairwise structural similarity. Analysis of supersites across these site-types revealed that DHFRs exhibit varying extents of dissimilarity at structurally equivalent positions in and around the binding site. We were able to explain the pattern of affinities towards chemically diverse antifolates exhibited by DHFRs of different site-types based on these structural differences. We then generated an antifolate-DHFR network by mapping known high-affinity antifolates to their respective supersites and used this to identify antifolates that can be repurposed based on similarity between supersites or antifolates. Thus, we identified 177 human-specific and 458 pathogen-specific antifolates, a large number of which are supported by available experimental data. Thus, in the light of the clinical importance of DHFR, we present a novel approach to identifying differences in the druggable space of DHFRs that can be utilized for rational design of antifolates. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD agent infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE, and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25 nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic, and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Grain Surface Chemistry to Binding Energies of Ice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, E. M.; Walsh, C.; Cuppen, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced telescopes, such as ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, are likely to show that the chemical universe may be even more complex than currently observed, requiring astrochemical modelers to improve their models to account for the impact of new data. However, essential input information for gas-grain models, such as binding energies of molecules to the surface, have been derived experimentally only for a handful of species, leaving hundreds of species with highly uncertain estimates. We present in this paper a systematic study of the effect of uncertainties in the binding energies on an astrochemical two-phase model of a dark molecular cloud, using the rate equations approach. A list of recommended binding energy values based on a literature search of published data is presented. Thousands of simulations of dark cloud models were run, and in each simulation a value for the binding energy of hundreds of species was randomly chosen from a normal distribution. Our results show that the binding energy of H2 is critical for the surface chemistry. For high binding energies, H2 freezes out on the grain forming an H2 ice. This is not physically realistic, and we suggest a change in the rate equations. The abundance ranges found are in reasonable agreement with astronomical ice observations. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that the binding energy of HCO, HNO, CH2, and C correlate most strongly with the abundance of dominant ice species. Finally, the formation route of complex organic molecules was found to be sensitive to the branching ratios of H2CO hydrogenation.

  18. SPM analysis of parametric (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding images: plasma input versus reference tissue parametric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitemaker, Alie; van Berckel, Bart N M; Kropholler, Marc A; Veltman, Dick J; Scheltens, Philip; Jonker, Cees; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2007-05-01

    (R)-[11C]PK11195 has been used for quantifying cerebral microglial activation in vivo. In previous studies, both plasma input and reference tissue methods have been used, usually in combination with a region of interest (ROI) approach. Definition of ROIs, however, can be labourious and prone to interobserver variation. In addition, results are only obtained for predefined areas and (unexpected) signals in undefined areas may be missed. On the other hand, standard pharmacokinetic models are too sensitive to noise to calculate (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Linearised versions of both plasma input and reference tissue models have been described, and these are more suitable for parametric imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of these plasma input and reference tissue parametric methods on the outcome of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding. Dynamic (R)-[11C]PK11195 PET scans with arterial blood sampling were performed in 7 younger and 11 elderly healthy subjects. Parametric images of volume of distribution (Vd) and binding potential (BP) were generated using linearised versions of plasma input (Logan) and reference tissue (Reference Parametric Mapping) models. Images were compared at the group level using SPM with a two-sample t-test per voxel, both with and without proportional scaling. Parametric BP images without scaling provided the most sensitive framework for determining differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding between younger and elderly subjects. Vd images could only demonstrate differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding when analysed with proportional scaling due to intersubject variation in K1/k2 (blood-brain barrier transport and non-specific binding).

  19. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids

  20. Analysis of angiotensin II binding to human platelets: Differences in young and old subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, M.J.; Goodfriend, T.L.; Ball, D.; Elliott, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the binding of radiolabeled angiotensin II (AII) to human platelets to characterize the apparent increase in AII receptors observed in older subjects. At 22 degrees C, the amount of radioactivity associated with platelets from older subjects increased continuously for more than 2 hours. The same amount of radioactivity was displaced by addition of unlabeled AII at 30 min and 60 min. In the presence of phenylarsine oxide, in the cold, or when labeled antagonist was the ligand, binding came to equilibrium by 30 min. High pressure liquid chromatography demonstrated that 125 I-AII was the major radioactive compound in the supernatant and platelets after incubation, but the platelets also contained radiolabeled AII fragments. Thus, some degradation accompanied interaction of AII and platelets. Phenylarsine oxide did not prevent degradation of bound AII, suggesting that degradation precedes internalization. On average, maximum binding was greater in older subjects whether platelets were incubated with 125 I-AII alone, with 125 I-AII and phenylarsine oxide to prevent internalization, or when the competitive inhibitor 125 I-sar1,ile8-AII was the radioligand. Variability of binding among subjects also increased with age. Thus, platelets bind, degrade, and internalize AII, and the three processes occur to a greater extent in platelets from some, but not all older subjects

  1. Feature binding in visual short term memory: A General Recognition Theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitousi, Daniel

    2017-05-23

    Creating and maintaining accurate bindings of elementary features (e.g., color and shape) in visual short-term memory (VSTM) is fundamental for veridical perception. How are low-level features bound in memory? The present work harnessed a multivariate model of perception - the General Recognition Theory (GRT) - to unravel the internal representations underlying feature binding in VSTM. On each trial, preview and target colored shapes were presented in succession, appearing in either repeated or altered spatial locations. Participants gave two same/different responses: one with respect to color and one with respect to shape. Converging GRT analyses on the accuracy confusion matrices provided substantial evidence for binding in the form of violations of perceptual independence at the level of the individual stimulus, such that positive correlations were obtained when both features repeated or alternated together, while negative correlations were obtained when one feature repeated and the other alternated. This "cloverleaf" GRT pattern of binding was similar whether the spatial location of the preview and target repeated or altered. The current results are consistent with: (a) the discrete memory "slots" model of VSTM, and (b) the notion that spatial location is not necessary for the formation of "object files." The GRT approach presented here offers a viable quantitative model for testing various questions regarding feature binding in VSTM.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of the fibronectin-binding protein FNE from Streptococcus equi spp. equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiouajni, Mounira; Durand, Dominique; Blondeau, Karine; Graille, Marc; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marielle; Guellouz, Asma; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Minard, Philippe; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus equi is a horse pathogen belonging to Lancefield group C. Infection by S. equi ssp. equi causes strangles, a serious and highly contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract. S. equi ssp. equi secretes a fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein, FNE, that does not contain cell wall-anchoring motifs. FNE binds to the gelatin-binding domain (GBD) of Fn, composed of the motifs (6) FI (12) FII (789) FI . FNE lacks the canonical Fn-binding peptide repeats observed in many microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules. We found that the interaction between FNE and the human GBD is mediated by the binding of the disordered C-terminal region (residues 208-262) of FNE to the (789) FI GBD subfragment. The crystal structure of FNE showed that it is similar to the minor pilus protein Spy0125 of Streptococcus pyogenes, found at the end of pilus polymers and responsible for adhesion. FNE and Spy0125 both have a superimposable internal thioester bond between highly conserved Cys and Gln residues. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the FNE-(789) FI complex provided a model that aligns the C-terminal peptide of FNE with the E-strands of the FI domains, adopting the β-zipper extension model observed in previous structures of microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule adhesion peptides bound to FI domains. © 2014 FEBS.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Carpentier, Philippe; Morales, Renaud [Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Renault, Frédérique [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure [Laboratoire de Cristallographie Macromoléculaire, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Rochu, Daniel; Masson, Patrick [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos [Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France)

    2006-01-01

    The purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported. HPBP is a new human apoprotein that is absent from the genomic database and is the first phosphate transporter characterized in human plasma. Human phosphate-binding protein (HPBP) was serendipitously discovered by crystallization and X-ray crystallography. HPBP belongs to a eukaryotic protein family named DING that is systematically absent from the genomic database. This apoprotein of 38 kDa copurifies with the HDL-associated apoprotein paraoxonase (PON1) and binds inorganic phosphate. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus, it may be regarded as a predictor of phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. In addition, HPBP may be a potential therapeutic protein for the treatment of such diseases. Here, the purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant immunoglobulin G-binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul Hamid; Chu, Fuliang; Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Qinagmin [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Qi, Jianxun [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao, George Fu, E-mail: gaof@im.ac.cn [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method is described. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å. Streptococcus suis, an important zoonotic pathogen, expresses immunoglobulin G-binding protein, which is thought to be helpful to the organism in eluding the host defence system. Recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-01-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution

  8. Interaction between the Natural Components in Danhong Injection (DHI) with Serum Albumin (SA) and the Influence of the Coexisting Multi-Components on the SaB-BSA Binding System: Fluorescence and Molecular Docking Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jia; Zhang, Yingyue; Wang, Xingrui; Yan, Huo; Liu, Erwei; Gao, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Danhong injection (DHI) is a widely used Chinese Materia Medica standardized product for the clinical treatment of ischemic encephalopathy and coronary heart disease. The bindings of eight natural components in DHI between bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy technology and molecular docking. According to the results, the quenching process of salvianolic acid B and hydroxysafflor yellow A was a static quenching procedure through the analysis of quenching data by the Stern-Volmer equation, the modified Stern-Volmer equation, and the modified Scatchard equation. Meanwhile, syringin (Syr) enhanced the fluorescence of BSA, and the data were analyzed using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Molecular docking suggested that all of these natural components bind to serum albumin at the site I location. Further competitive experiments of SaB confirmed the result of molecular docking studies duo to the displacement of warfarin by SaB. Base on these studies, we selected SaB as a research target because it presented the strongest binding ability to BSA and investigated the influence of the multi-components coexisting in DHI on the interaction between the components of the SaB-BSA binding system. The participation of these natural components in DHI affected the interaction between the components of the SaB-BSA system. Therefore, when DHI is used in mammals, SaB is released from serum albumin more quickly than it is used alone. This work would provide a new experiment basis for revealing the scientific principle of compatibility for Traditional Chinese Medicine. PMID:26035712

  9. Analysis of the interactions between GMF and Arp2/3 complex in two binding sites by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popinako, A; Antonov, M; Dibrova, D; Chemeris, A; Sokolova, O S

    2018-02-05

    The Arp2/3 complex plays a key role in nucleating actin filaments branching. The glia maturation factor (GMF) competes with activators for interacting with the Arp2/3 complex and initiates the debranching of actin filaments. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of interactions between GMF and the Arp2/3 complex and identified new amino acid residues involved in GMF binding to the Arp2/3 complex at two separate sites, revealed by X-ray and single particle EM techniques. Using molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrated the quantitative and qualitative changes in hydrogen bonds upon binding with GMF. We identified the specific amino acid residues in GMF and Arp2/3 complex that stabilize the interactions and estimated the mean force profile for the GMF using umbrella sampling. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of the recently defined GMF binding site on the Arp3 subunit indicate a new mechanism for Arp2/3 complex inactivation that involves interactions between the Arp2/3 complex and GMF at two binding sites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radioreceptor assay for analysis of fentanyl and its analogs in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alburges, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The assay is based on the competition of these drugs with ({sup 3}H) fentanyl for opioid receptors in membrane preparations of rat forebrain in vitro. The binding in stereospecific, reversible and saturable. Scatchard plots of saturation suggest the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. Morphine and hydromorphone complete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptor, but other morphine-like compounds were relatively weak displacers of ({sup 3}H)fentanyl. Many other commonly abused drugs do not compete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptors. Urine samples from animals injected with fentanyl, ({plus minus})-cis-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, butyrylfentanyl and benzylfentanyl were analyzed by radioreceptor assay, radioimmunoassay, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urinary analysis of fentanyl showed a good correlation with these three methods; however, discrepancies were observed in the analysis of fentanyl analogs. This radioreceptor assay is well-suited as an initial assay for the detection of active analogs of fentanyl in urine with good correlation with other techniques in the analysis of fentanyl; however, there is substantial disagreement between techniques in the quantitation of fentanyl analogs. The implications of these discrepancies are discussed.

  11. Radioreceptor assay for analysis of fentanyl and its analogs in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburges, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The assay is based on the competition of these drugs with [ 3 H] fentanyl for opioid receptors in membrane preparations of rat forebrain in vitro. The binding in stereospecific, reversible and saturable. Scatchard plots of saturation suggest the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. Morphine and hydromorphone complete with [ 3 H]fentanyl for the opioid receptor, but other morphine-like compounds were relatively weak displacers of [ 3 H]fentanyl. Many other commonly abused drugs do not compete with [ 3 H]fentanyl for the opioid receptors. Urine samples from animals injected with fentanyl, (±)-cis-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, butyrylfentanyl and benzylfentanyl were analyzed by radioreceptor assay, radioimmunoassay, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urinary analysis of fentanyl showed a good correlation with these three methods; however, discrepancies were observed in the analysis of fentanyl analogs. This radioreceptor assay is well-suited as an initial assay for the detection of active analogs of fentanyl in urine with good correlation with other techniques in the analysis of fentanyl; however, there is substantial disagreement between techniques in the quantitation of fentanyl analogs. The implications of these discrepancies are discussed

  12. Photoactivation mechanisms of flavin-binding photoreceptors revealed through ultrafast spectroscopy and global analysis methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathes, T.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-binding photoreceptor proteins use the isoalloxazine moiety of flavin cofactors to absorb light in the blue/UV-A wavelength region and subsequently translate it into biological information. The underlying photochemical reactions and protein structural dynamics are delicately tuned by the

  13. In-silico analysis of amotosalen hydrochloride binding to CD-61 of platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, H.T.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the docking of Amotosalen hydrochloride (AH) at CD-61 of platelets, and to suggest the cause of bleeding in AH treated platelets transfusion. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical College, Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia, from October 2014 to May 2015. Methodology: The study was carried out in-silico. PDB (protein data bank) code of Tirofiban bound to CD-61 was 2vdm. CD-61 was docked with Tirofiban using online docking tools, i.e. Patchdock and Firedock. Then, Amotosalen hydrochloride and CD-61 were also docked. Best docking poses to active sites of 2vdm were found. Ligplot of interactions of ligands and CD-61 were obtained. Then comparison of hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bond lengths, and hydrophobic bonds of 2vdm molecule and best poses of docking results were done. Patchdock and Firedock results of best poses were also analysed using SPSS version 16. Results: More amino acids were involved in hydrogen and hydrophobic bonds in Patchdock and Firedock docking of Amotosalen hydrochloride with CD-61 than Patchdock and Firedock docking of CD-61 with Tirofiban. The binding energy was more in latter than former. Conclusion: Amotosalen hydrochloride binds to the active site of CD-61 with weaker binding force. Haemorrhage seen in Amotosalen hydrochloride-treated platelets might be due to binding of Amotosalen hydrochloride to CD-61. (author)

  14. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned

  15. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... 2003) and lipid rafts (Lingwood et al. 2009; Simons and. Sampaio 2011). One interesting recent development is the bioinformatics approach which enables the identification of lipid binding helical regions in proteins (Gautier et al. 2008). A recent demonstration of this approach was shown for protein trans-.

  16. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEN

    2007-02-05

    Feb 5, 2007 ... the structure of TIBO-HIV-RT complex (Ren et al., 1995,. 1999). In this theoretical research, the energy change corresponding to the conformational change within TIBO was investigated. It was observed that change in the beta dihedral angle conformation critically affects the binding energy. Decreased ...

  17. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In supplementary figure 1 the complete alignment results are depicted. In grey the full sequence homology is indicated, in red the predicted lipid binding regions are highlighted. In some cases a particular region is found in a remarkably high number of organisms (like region 616-632 in E.coli) while it seems absent in one or ...

  18. Transcriptome-wide analysis of regulatory interactions of the RNA-binding protein HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Svetlana; Jens, Marvin; Theil, Kathrin; Schwanhäusser, Björn; Selbach, Matthias; Landthaler, Markus; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2011-08-05

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation relies on hundreds of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the function of most RBPs is unknown. The human RBP HuR/ELAVL1 is a conserved mRNA stability regulator. We used PAR-CLIP, a recently developed method based on RNA-protein crosslinking, to identify transcriptome-wide ∼26,000 HuR binding sites. These sites were on average highly conserved, enriched for HuR binding motifs and mainly located in 3' untranslated regions. Surprisingly, many sites were intronic, implicating HuR in mRNA processing. Upon HuR knockdown, mRNA levels and protein synthesis of thousands of target genes were downregulated, validating functionality. HuR and miRNA binding sites tended to reside nearby but generally did not overlap. Additionally, HuR knockdown triggered strong and specific upregulation of miR-7. In summary, we identified thousands of direct and functional HuR targets, found a human miRNA controlled by HuR, and propose a role for HuR in splicing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding ...

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Allosteric and Operator Binding for Cyclic-AMP Receptor Protein Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Tal; Duque, Julia; Phillips, Rob

    2018-02-01

    Allosteric transcription factors undergo binding events both at their inducer binding sites as well as at distinct DNA binding domains, and it is often difficult to disentangle the structural and functional consequences of these two classes of interactions. In this work, we compare the ability of two statistical mechanical models - the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) and the Koshland-N\\'emethy-Filmer (KNF) models of protein conformational change - to characterize the multi-step activation mechanism of the broadly acting cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP). We first consider the allosteric transition resulting from cyclic-AMP binding to CRP, then analyze how CRP binds to its operator, and finally investigate the ability of CRP to activate gene expression. In light of these models, we examine data from a beautiful recent experiment that created a single-chain version of the CRP homodimer, thereby enabling each subunit to be mutated separately. Using this construct, six mutants were created using all possible combinations of the wild type subunit, a D53H mutant subunit, and an S62F mutant subunit. We demonstrate that both the MWC and KNF models can explain the behavior of all six mutants using a small, self-consistent set of parameters. In comparing the results, we find that the MWC model slightly outperforms the KNF model in the quality of its fits, but more importantly the parameters inferred by the MWC model are more in line with structural knowledge of CRP. In addition, we discuss how the conceptual framework developed here for CRP enables us to not merely analyze data retrospectively, but has the predictive power to determine how combinations of mutations will interact, how double mutants will behave, and how each construct would regulate gene expression.

  1. Spectroscopic analysis on the binding interaction of biologically active pyrimidine derivative with bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas D. Suryawanshi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A biologically active antibacterial reagent, 2–amino-6-hydroxy–4–(4-N, N-dimethylaminophenyl-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (AHDMAPPC, was synthesized. It was employed to investigate the binding interaction with the bovine serum albumin (BSA in detail using different spectroscopic methods. It exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus which are common food poisoning bacteria. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of model carrier protein BSA by AHDMAPPC was due to static quenching. The site binding constants and number of binding sites (n≈1 were determined at three different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching results. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH, free energy (ΔG and entropy change (ΔS for the reaction were calculated to be 15.15 kJ/mol, –36.11 kJ/mol and 51.26 J/mol K according to van't Hoff equation, respectively. The results indicated that the reaction was an endothermic and spontaneous process, and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in the binding between drug and BSA. The distance between donor and acceptor is 2.79 nm according to Förster's theory. The alterations of the BSA secondary structure in the presence of AHDMAPPC were confirmed by UV–visible, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. All these results indicated that AHDMAPPC can bind to BSA and be effectively transported and eliminated in the body. It can be a useful guideline for further drug design.

  2. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphoinositide binding regulates α-actinin CH2 domain structure: Analysis by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, Stephen J.; Deinzer, Max L.; Ho, P. Shing; Greenwood, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    α-Actinin is an actin bundling protein that regulates cell adhesion by directly linking actin filaments to integrin adhesion receptors. Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-diphosphate (PtdIns (4,5)-P2) and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PtdIns (3,4,5)-P3) bind to the calponin homology 2 domain of α-actinin, regulating its interactions with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In this study, we examine the mechanism by which phosphoinositide binding regulates α-actinin function using mass spectrometry to monitor hydrogen–deuterium (H/D) exchange within the calponin homology 2 domain. The overall level of H/D exchange for the entire protein showed that PtdIns (3,4,5)-P3 binding alters the structure of the calponin homology 2 domain increasing deuterium incorporation, whereas PtdIns (4,5)-P2 induces changes in the structure decreasing deuterium incorporation. Analysis of peptic fragments from the calponin homology 2 domain showed decreased local H/D exchange within the loop region preceding helix F with both phosphoinositides. However, the binding of PtdIns (3,4,5)-P3 also induced increased exchange within helix E. This suggests that the phosphate groups on the fourth and fifth position of the inositol head group of the phosphoinositides constrict the calponin homology 2 domain, thereby altering the orientation of actin binding sequence 3 and decreasing the affinity of α-actinin for filamentous actin. In contrast, the phosphate group on the third position of the inositol head group of PtdIns (3,4,5)-P3 perturbs the calponin homology 2 domain, altering the interaction between the N and C terminus of the full-length α-actinin antiparallel homodimer, thereby disrupting bundling activity and interaction with integrin receptors. PMID:17965186

  4. Phosphoinositide binding regulates alpha-actinin CH2 domain structure: analysis by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, Stephen J; Deinzer, Max L; Ho, P Shing; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2007-12-01

    alpha-Actinin is an actin bundling protein that regulates cell adhesion by directly linking actin filaments to integrin adhesion receptors. Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-diphosphate (PtdIns (4,5)-P(2)) and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3)) bind to the calponin homology 2 domain of alpha-actinin, regulating its interactions with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In this study, we examine the mechanism by which phosphoinositide binding regulates alpha-actinin function using mass spectrometry to monitor hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange within the calponin homology 2 domain. The overall level of H/D exchange for the entire protein showed that PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3) binding alters the structure of the calponin homology 2 domain increasing deuterium incorporation, whereas PtdIns (4,5)-P(2) induces changes in the structure decreasing deuterium incorporation. Analysis of peptic fragments from the calponin homology 2 domain showed decreased local H/D exchange within the loop region preceding helix F with both phosphoinositides. However, the binding of PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3) also induced increased exchange within helix E. This suggests that the phosphate groups on the fourth and fifth position of the inositol head group of the phosphoinositides constrict the calponin homology 2 domain, thereby altering the orientation of actin binding sequence 3 and decreasing the affinity of alpha-actinin for filamentous actin. In contrast, the phosphate group on the third position of the inositol head group of PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3) perturbs the calponin homology 2 domain, altering the interaction between the N and C terminus of the full-length alpha-actinin antiparallel homodimer, thereby disrupting bundling activity and interaction with integrin receptors.

  5. Analysis of the DNA binding proteins interacting with specific upstream sequences of the S. purpuratus CyI actin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, R; Paul, H; Katula, K S

    1992-12-01

    The CyI actin gene of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is regulated temporally and spatially within the cells of the early embryo. In an effort to understand the molecular basis for the CyI actin pattern of expression, we have begun analyzing the protein-DNA interactions within regions previously shown to be of potential functional importance (Katula et al., 1987). Using DNase I footprinting, 10 protected regions were identified containing both conserved and apparently novel protein binding sites. Gel mobility shift competition assays confirmed the presence of multiple protein factors which specifically recognize CyI actin upstream sequences. Determination of a relative affinity constant value (Kr) indicated that most of the protein factors preferred their respective oligonucleotide sequences vs. a synthetic competitor DNA in a range of 10(4). The highest affinity binding was observed for proteins binding to the oligonucleotide probe containing the octamer element (Kr approximately 10(6)). Heterologous gel shift competition assays were carried out to investigate the interrelatedness of the protein factors. These studies, combined with other data, indicate there are both unique and redundant protein-DNA interactions in the region being examined. Possible alterations in CyI actin DNA binding proteins were investigated during the period of CyI transcriptional activation by gel mobility shift analysis. An increase in binding activity was observed for most of the factors, indicating that early transcriptional activity of CyI actin may involve a general increase in the amount or activity of specific transcription factors. In addition, qualitative changes, as seen by alterations in the shift patterns, were observed for some of the oligonucleotide probes.

  6. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  7. Ex vivo binding of t-( sup 35 S) butylbicyclophosphorothionate: A biochemical tool to study the pharmacology of ethanol at the gamma-aminobutyric acid-coupled chloride channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, E.; Concas, A.; Serra, M.; Santoro, G.; Biggio, G. (Univ. of Cagliari (Italy))

    1991-03-01

    The effects of acute administration of ethanol on t-(35S)Butylbiclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS) binding measured ex vivo in unwashed membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex were investigated. Ethanol, given i.g., decreased in a dose-related (0.5-4 g/kg) and time-dependent manner the binding of 35S-TBPS. This effect was similar to that induced by the administration of diazepam (0.5-4 mg/kg i.p.). Scatchard plot analysis of this radioligand binding revealed that ethanol, differently from diazepam, decreased the apparent affinity of 35S-TBPS recognition sites whereas it failed to change the density of these binding sites. The effect of ethanol on 35S-TBPS binding could not be reversed by the previous administration to rats of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (1,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Vice versa, the benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (4,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) (8 mg/kg i.p.), prevented completely ethanol-induced decrease of 35S-TBPS binding. The ability of Ro 15-4513 to prevent the action of ethanol was shared by the anxiogenic and proconvulsant beta-carboline derivatives, FG 7142 (N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide) (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) and ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (0.6 mg/kg i.v.), which, per se, enhanced this parameter. Moreover, ethanol (0.5-4 g/kg) was able to reverse the increase of 35S-TBPS binding elicited by the s.c. injection of isoniazid (350 mg/kg) and to clearly attenuate the severity of tonic-clonic seizures produced by this inhibitor of the GABAergic transmission.

  8. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni protein-DNA contacts in the fully wrapped complex

  9. Integrating in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide binding affinity to HLA-Cw*0102: a bioinformatic approach to the prediction of new epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Walshe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Predictive models of peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC binding affinity are important components of modern computational immunovaccinology. Here, we describe the development and deployment of a reliable peptide-binding prediction method for a previously poorly-characterized human MHC class I allele, HLA-Cw*0102.Using an in-house, flow cytometry-based MHC stabilization assay we generated novel peptide binding data, from which we derived a precise two-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D-QSAR binding model. This allowed us to explore the peptide specificity of HLA-Cw*0102 molecule in detail. We used this model to design peptides optimized for HLA-Cw*0102-binding. Experimental analysis showed these peptides to have high binding affinities for the HLA-Cw*0102 molecule. As a functional validation of our approach, we also predicted HLA-Cw*0102-binding peptides within the HIV-1 genome, identifying a set of potent binding peptides. The most affine of these binding peptides was subsequently determined to be an epitope recognized in a subset of HLA-Cw*0102-positive individuals chronically infected with HIV-1.A functionally-validated in silico-in vitro approach to the reliable and efficient prediction of peptide binding to a previously uncharacterized human MHC allele HLA-Cw*0102 was developed. This technique is generally applicable to all T cell epitope identification problems in immunology and vaccinology.

  10. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  11. Functional analysis of a potential regulatory K+-binding site in the Na+, K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase functions by actively transporting 3 Na+ ions out of and 2 K+ ions into the cell, thereby creating ion gradients crucial for many physiological processes. Recently, a combined structural and functional study of the closely related Ca2+-ATPase indicated the presence...... of a regulatory K+-binding site in the P-domain of the enzyme, identifying E732 as being of particular importance (Sorensen, Clausen et al. 2004). In addition, P709 is thought to play a significant role in the structural organization of this site. Both E732 and P709 are highly conserved among P-type ATPases (E732...... is present as either glutamic acid or aspartic acid), which supports their importance and additionally raises the question whether this site may play a general role among P-type ATPases. In Na+, K+-ATPase, K+ functions directly as a substrate for membrane binding sites, however, an additional regulatory...

  12. Binding analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 proteins in the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Camila C; Hernández-Martinez, Patricia; Crialesi-Legori, Paula C B; Desidério, Janete A; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar; Lemos, Manoel Victor F

    2015-05-01

    Sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis, F.) is an important corn pest in South America and United States. The aim of the present study was to analyze the susceptibility and binding interactions of three Cry1A proteins and Cry1Fa in a Brazilian D. saccharalis population. The results showed that Cry1Ab was the most active, followed by Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa and Cry1Aa. All Cry1-biotinylated proteins tested bound specifically to the D. saccharalis brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Heterologous competition assays showed shared binding sites for all Cry1A proteins and another one shared by Cry1Fa and Cry1Ab. Thus, pyramiding Cry1Aa/Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins would be a recommended strategy for managing this pest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR METAL BINDING CAPACITY OF CYSTEINE BY USING UV-VIS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    Shivendu Ranjan; Nandita Dasgupta; Gyanendra Gour; Rashmi Dubey; Kumari Amrita

    2012-01-01

    The metal binding capacity of cysteine with three different metals Nickel, Copper and Lead was studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer for which absorbance values were taken after interaction of cysteine with metal salt solutions (10ppm and 100ppm). Before taking above absorbance dilution factor was set using cysteine stock. The increase in peak intensity was observed when metal salt solution and metal saltcysteine solution were compared. Based on peak shift and peak intensity finally it can b...

  14. SCMHBP: prediction and analysis of heme binding proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Fan; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Srinivasulu, Yerukala; Vasylenko, Tamara; Lai, Shih-Chung; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chen, Yi-Hsiung; Huang, Hui-Ling; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Heme binding proteins (HBPs) are metalloproteins that contain a heme ligand (an iron-porphyrin complex) as the prosthetic group. Several computational methods have been proposed to predict heme binding residues and thereby to understand the interactions between heme and its host proteins. However, few in silico methods for identifying HBPs have been proposed. This work proposes a scoring card method (SCM) based method (named SCMHBP) for predicting and analyzing HBPs from sequences. A balanced dataset of 747 HBPs (selected using a Gene Ontology term GO:0020037) and 747 non-HBPs (selected from 91,414 putative non-HBPs) with an identity of 25% was firstly established. Consequently, a set of scores that quantified the propensity of amino acids and dipeptides to be HBPs is estimated using SCM to maximize the predictive accuracy of SCMHBP. Finally, the informative physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids are identified by utilizing the estimated propensity scores to be used to categorize HBPs. The training and mean test accuracies of SCMHBP applied to three independent test datasets are 85.90% and 71.57%, respectively. SCMHBP performs well relative to comparison with such methods as support vector machine (SVM), decision tree J48, and Bayes classifiers. The putative non-HBPs with high sequence propensity scores are potential HBPs, which can be further validated by experimental confirmation. The propensity scores of individual amino acids and dipeptides are examined to elucidate the interactions between heme and its host proteins. The following characteristics of HBPs are derived from the propensity scores: 1) aromatic side chains are important to the effectiveness of specific HBP functions; 2) a hydrophobic environment is important in the interaction between heme and binding sites; and 3) the whole HBP has low flexibility whereas the heme binding residues are relatively flexible. SCMHBP yields knowledge that improves our understanding of HBPs rather than merely

  15. Analysis of tumour suppressor p53 protein binding properties by new ELISA technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Jagelská, Eva; Pečinka, Petr; Karlovská, Lenka; Paleček, Emil

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 9 (2003), s. 965 ISSN 1535-9484. [HUPO Annual /2./ and IUBMB World Congress /19./. 08.10.2003-11.10.2003, Montreal] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/00/D001; GA AV ČR IAB5004203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : p53 * ELISA * DNA binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  16. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  17. Identification and functional analysis of a second RBF-2 binding site within the HIV-1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahabieh, Matthew S.; Ooms, Marcel; Malcolm, Tom; Simon, Viviana; Sadowski, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Transcription from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is mediated by numerous host transcription factors. In this study we characterized an E-box motif (RBE1) within the core promoter that was previously implicated in both transcriptional activation and repression. We show that RBE1 is a binding site for the RBF-2 transcription factor complex (USF1, USF2, and TFII-I), previously shown to bind an upstream viral element, RBE3. The RBE1 and RBE3 elements formed complexes of identical mobility and protein constituents in gel shift assays, both with Jurkat T-cell nuclear extracts and recombinant USF/TFII-I. Furthermore, both elements are regulators of HIV-1 expression; mutations in LTR-luciferase reporters and in HIV-1 molecular clones resulted in decreased transcription, virion production, and proviral expression in infected cells. Collectively, our data indicate that RBE1 is a bona fide RBF-2 binding site and that the RBE1 and RBE3 elements are necessary for mediating proper transcription from the HIV-1 LTR.

  18. Purification and binding analysis of the nitrogen fixation regulatory NifA protein from Azospirillum brasilense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M.P. Passaglia

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available NifA protein activates transcription of nitrogen fixation operons by the alternative sigma54 holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase. This protein binds to a well-defined upstream activator sequence (UAS located at the -200/-100 position of nif promoters with the consensus motif TGT-N10-ACA. NifA of Azospirillum brasilense was purified in the form of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST-NifA fusion protein and proteolytic release of GST yielded inactive and partially soluble NifA. However, the purified NifA was able to induce the production of specific anti-A. brasilense NifA-antiserum that recognized NifA from A. brasilense but not from K. pneumoniae. Both GST-NifA and NifA expressed from the E. coli tac promoter are able to activate transcription from the nifHDK promoter but only in an A. brasilense background. In order to investigate the mechanism that regulates NifA binding capacity we have used E. coli total protein extracts expressing A. brasilense nifA in mobility shift assays. DNA fragments carrying the two overlapping, wild-type or mutated UAS motifs present in the nifH promoter region revealed a retarded band of related size. These data show that the binding activity present in the C-terminal domain of A. brasilense NifA protein is still functional even in the presence of oxygen.

  19. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  20. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients' Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.

  1. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  2. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  3. Identification of HLA class I-binding peptides derived from unique cancer-associated proteins by mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yuko; Kuhara, Akiko; Iwamoto, Takeo; Hayashi, Kazumi; Koido, Shigeo; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin; Homma, Sadamu

    2013-05-01

    Since antigenic peptides of the cancer-associated antigens presented on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are recognized by specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, they have the potential to becoming effective peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. Peptides binding to HLA-A*0201 and HLA-A*2402 obtained from human prostate cancer cells by acid-elution were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and source proteins of the peptides were determined based on the HLA-binding capacity listed on the Syfpeithi. We identified TKLSA possibly derived from absent in melanoma 1-like protein (AIM1L), and RLRYT from trans-membrane protein-191C (TMEM 191C) or c20orf201. Messenger RNAs encoding these proteins were expressed in various cancer cell types but none or very few in non-cancerous tissues except for testis, cerebellum and ovary. HLA class I-binding peptides of unique cancer-associated proteins were identified by MS analysis, and might become a promising tool for the generation of novel cancer vaccines.

  4. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

  5. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E.; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  6. Autoradiographic characterization of L-[3H]glutamate binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed to study L-[ 3 H[glutamate binding in sections of central nervous system tissue. This technique circumvented some problems associated with conventional receptor binding methodologies and allowed direct assessment of regional distribution, numbers and affinities of glutamate binding sites. The sensitivity and high degree of anatomical resolution attainable by autoradiography obviated the need for pooled samples of microdissected specimens. Under assay conditions, [ 4 H]glutamate bound rapidly and reversibly to sections of rat brain and was not metabolized appreciably. The distribution of glutamate binding sites corresponded to the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. Thus, there was heavy glutamate binding in regions where there is evidence for glutamatergic innervation and little binding in nuclei which apparently do not receive glutamatergic input. Scatchard and Hill plots suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites; however, competition studies revealed binding site heterogeneity. Anatomical and pharmacological evidence suggested that the NMDA-, high affinity quisqualate-, and kainate-sensitive glutamate binding sites may correspond to physiologically-defined NMDA, quisqualate and kainate receptors

  7. Unveiling a novel transient druggable pocket in BACE-1 through molecular simulations: Conformational analysis and binding mode of multisite inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Ornella; Laughton, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The critical role of BACE-1 in the formation of neurotoxic ß-amyloid peptides in the brain makes it an attractive target for an efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the development of clinically useful BACE-1 inhibitors has proven to be extremely challenging. In this study we examine the binding mode of a novel potent inhibitor (compound 1, with IC50 80 nM) designed by synergistic combination of two fragments—huprine and rhein—that individually are endowed with very low activity against BACE-1. Examination of crystal structures reveals no appropriate binding site large enough to accommodate 1. Therefore we have examined the conformational flexibility of BACE-1 through extended molecular dynamics simulations, paying attention to the highly flexible region shaped by loops 8–14, 154–169 and 307–318. The analysis of the protein dynamics, together with studies of pocket druggability, has allowed us to detect the transient formation of a secondary binding site, which contains Arg307 as a key residue for the interaction with small molecules, at the edge of the catalytic cleft. The formation of this druggable “floppy” pocket would enable the binding of multisite inhibitors targeting both catalytic and secondary sites. Molecular dynamics simulations of BACE-1 bound to huprine-rhein hybrid compounds support the feasibility of this hypothesis. The results provide a basis to explain the high inhibitory potency of the two enantiomeric forms of 1, together with the large dependence on the length of the oligomethylenic linker. Furthermore, the multisite hypothesis has allowed us to rationalize the inhibitory potency of a series of tacrine-chromene hybrid compounds, specifically regarding the apparent lack of sensitivity of the inhibition constant to the chemical modifications introduced in the chromene unit. Overall, these findings pave the way for the exploration of novel functionalities in the design of optimized BACE-1 multisite inhibitors

  8. Heterodimer Binding Scaffolds Recognition via the Analysis of Kinetically Hot Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen

    2018-03-16

    Physical interactions between proteins are often difficult to decipher. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm that is designed to recognize binding patches and supporting structural scaffolds of interacting heterodimer proteins using the Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The recognition is based on the (self) adjustable identification of kinetically hot residues and their connection to possible binding scaffolds. The kinetically hot residues are residues with the lowest entropy, i.e., the highest contribution to the weighted sum of the fastest modes per chain extracted via GNM. The algorithm adjusts the number of fast modes in the GNM's weighted sum calculation using the ratio of predicted and expected numbers of target residues (contact and the neighboring first-layer residues). This approach produces very good results when applied to dimers with high protein sequence length ratios. The protocol's ability to recognize near native decoys was compared to the ability of the residue-level statistical potential of Lu and Skolnick using the Sternberg and Vakser decoy dimers sets. The statistical potential produced better overall results, but in a number of cases its predicting ability was comparable, or even inferior, to the prediction ability of the adjustable GNM approach. The results presented in this paper suggest that in heterodimers at least one protein has interacting scaffold determined by the immovable, kinetically hot residues. In many cases, interacting proteins (especially if being of noticeably different sizes) either behave as a rigid lock and key or, presumably, exhibit the opposite dynamic behavior. While the binding surface of one protein is rigid and stable, its partner's interacting scaffold is more flexible and adaptable.

  9. Homology Modelling of the GABA Transporter and Analysis of Tiagabine Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovstrup, S.; Taboureau, Olivier; Bräuner-Osborne, H.

    2010-01-01

    A homology model of the human GABA transporter (GAT-1) based on the recently reported crystal structures of the bacterial leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT) was developed. The stability of the resulting model embedded in a membrane environment was analyzed by extensive molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. Based on docking studies and subsequent MD simulations of three compounds, the endogenous ligand GABA and two potent inhibitors, (R)-nipecotic acid and the anti-epilepsy drug tiagabine, various binding modes were identified and are discussed. Whereas GABA and (R)-nipecotic acid...

  10. Evaluation of a Solid Phase DNA Binding Matrix for Downstream PCR Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    caus6s par les UV et pour inactiver rapidement des organismes emp~chant ainsi la croissance des bactdries et autres organismes dont les pathog~nes A...Defence Research and Recherche et d6veloppement Development Canada pour la defense Canada DEFENCE DEFENSE Evaluation of a Solid Phase DNA Binding...Document Revie,... 4 el © Her Majesty the Queen as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2005 © Sa majestW la reine, repr~sent~e par le

  11. Protein microarray analysis reveals BAFF-binding autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jordan V.; Haddon, David J.; Kemmer, Dodge; Delepine, Guillaume; Mandelbaum, Gil; Jarrell, Justin A.; Gupta, Rohit; Balboni, Imelda; Chakravarty, Eliza F.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Shum, Anthony K.; Anderson, Mark S.; Cheng, Mickie H.; Robinson, William H.; Browne, Sarah K.; Holland, Steven M.; Baechler, Emily C.; Utz, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors inhibit normal immunity and are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune disease and diseases of immune deficiency. In an effort to evaluate serum from autoimmune and immunodeficient patients for Abs against cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in a high-throughput and unbiased manner, we constructed a multiplex protein microarray for detection of serum factor–binding Abs and used the microarray to detect autoantibody targets in SLE. We designed a nitrocellulose-surface microarray containing human cytokines, chemokines, and other circulating proteins and demonstrated that the array permitted specific detection of serum factor–binding probes. We used the arrays to detect previously described autoantibodies against cytokines in samples from individuals with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and chronic mycobacterial infection. Serum profiling from individuals with SLE revealed that among several targets, elevated IgG autoantibody reactivity to B cell–activating factor (BAFF) was associated with SLE compared with control samples. BAFF reactivity correlated with the severity of disease-associated features, including IFN-α–driven SLE pathology. Our results showed that serum factor protein microarrays facilitate detection of autoantibody reactivity to serum factors in human samples and that BAFF-reactive autoantibodies may be associated with an elevated inflammatory disease state within the spectrum of SLE. PMID:24270423

  12. Pharmacophore modeling, comprehensive 3D-QSAR, and binding mode analysis of TGR5 agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Thangaraj; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2017-04-01

    Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) is emerging as an important and promising target for the development of anti-diabetic drugs. Pharmacophore modeling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out on a new series of 5-phenoxy-1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamides as highly potent agonists of TGR5. The generated best six featured pharmacophore model AAHHRR consists of two hydrogen bond acceptors (A): two hydrophobic groups (H) and two aromatic rings (R). The constructed 3D-QSAR model acquired excellent correlation coefficient value (R 2  =   0.9018), exhibited good predictive power (Q 2  =   0.8494) and high Fisher ratio (F = 61.2). The pharmacophore model was validated through Guner-Henry (GH) scoring method. The GH value of 0.5743 indicated that the AAHHRR model was statistically valuable and reliable in the identification of TGR5 agonists. Furthermore, the combined approach of molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were carried out for the 5-phenoxy-1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamides to explore the binding mode and interaction pattern. The generated contour maps revealed the important structural insights for the activity of the compounds. The results obtained from this study could be helpful in the development of novel and more potent agonists of TGR5.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor 1 binding activity and quantitative analysis of Cannabis sativa L. smoke and vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischedick, Justin; Van Der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (cannabis) extracts, vapor produced by the Volcano vaporizer and smoke made from burning cannabis joints were analyzed by GC-flame ionization detecter (FID), GC-MS and HPLC. Three different medicinal cannabis varieties were investigated Bedrocan, Bedrobinol and Bediol. Cannabinoids plus other components such as terpenoids and pyrolytic by-products were identified and quantified in all samples. Cannabis vapor and smoke was tested for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) binding activity and compared to pure Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). The top five major compounds in Bedrocan extracts were Delta(9)-THC, cannabigerol (CBG), terpinolene, myrcene, and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBG, cannabichromene (CBC), and camphene in Bediol cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC, and CBG. The major components in Bedrocan vapor (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, terpinolene, myrcene, CBG, cis-ocimene and CBD in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene and CBD in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. The major components in Bedrocan smoke (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, cannabinol (CBN), terpinolene, CBG, myrcene and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, CBN and myrcene in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, CBN, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. There was no statistically significant difference between CB1 binding of pure Delta(9)-THC compared to cannabis smoke and vapor at an equivalent concentration of Delta(9)-THC.

  14. Studies on the binding of fulvic acid with transferrin by spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-feng; Yang, Guang; Dong, Yu; Zhao, Yan-qin; Sun, Xiao-ran; Chen, Lei; Chen, Hong-bo

    2015-02-01

    Transferrin has shown potential in the delivery of anticancer drugs into primarily proliferating cancer cells that over-express transferrin receptors. Fulvic acid has a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities which caused widespread concerns, the interaction of fulvic acid with human serum transferrin (Tf) has great significance for gaining a deeper insight about anticancer activities of fulvic acid. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between fulvic acid and Tf, has been investigated by using fluorescence quenching, thermodynamics, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) under physiological condition. Our results have shown that fulvic acid binds to Tf and form a new complex, and the calculated apparent association constants are 5.04 × 108 M-1, 5.48 × 107 M-1, 7.38 × 106 M-1 from the fluorescence quenching at 288 K, 298 K, and 310 K. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals are involved in the interaction between fulvic acid and Tf. The binding of fulvic acid to Tf causes the α-helix structure content of the protein to reduce, and resulting that peptide chains of Tf become more stretched. Our results have indicated a mechanism of the interaction between fulvic acid and Tf, which may provide information for possible design of methods to deliver drug molecules via transferrin to target tissues and cells effectively.

  15. Impedance spectroscopy analysis of human odorant binding proteins immobilized on nanopore arrays for biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanli; Zhang, Diming; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Yixuan; Luo, Senbiao; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-05-15

    Human odorant-binding proteins (hOBPs) not only can bind and transport odorants in the surrounding environment for sensing smells, but also play important roles in transmitting lots of biomolecules in different organs. Utilizing the properties of hOBPs, an electrochemical biosensor with nanopore array was developed to detect specific biomolecular ligands, such as aldehydes and fatty acids. The highly ordered nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide with diameter of 20-40 nm were fabricated with two-step oxidation. Through 2-carboxyethyl phosphonic acid, hOBPs were self-assembled on nanopores as the sensing membrane. With nanopore arrays, the impedance spectra showed quite different electron transfer processes in the frequency spectra, which could be characterized by the electron transfer resistance and electrical resistance of the porous membrane. Under stimulation of biomolecular ligands, series resistance of nanopores and hOBPs increased and showed a concentration-dependence feature, while the electron transfer resistance hardly changed. The nanopore based biosensor could sensitively detect biological ligands of benzaldehyde, docosahexaenoic acid, and lauric acid, which were closely related to or were potential biomarkers for cancers and other serious diseases. Equipped with hOBPs, the sensor exhibited promising potentials both in odorant and biomolecule detection for olfactory biosensing and in disease diagnosis and evaluation for biochemical detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  17. A chemometric analysis of ligand-induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence of folate binding protein indicates a link between altered conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding alters the conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics of bovine folate binding protein (FBP). For the purpose of achieving further information we analyzed ligand (folate and methotrexate)-induced changes in the fluorescence landscape of FBP. Fluorescence excitation...... of folate accords fairly well with the disappearance of strongly hydrophobic tryptophan residues from the solvent-exposed surface of FBP. The PARAFAC has thus proven useful to establish a hitherto unexplained link between parallel changes in conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics...... of FBP induced by folate binding. Parameters for ligand binding derived from PARAFAC analysis of the fluorescence data were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those obtained from binding of radiofolate to FBP. Herein, methotrexate exhibited a higher affinity for FBP than in competition...

  18. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  19. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-05

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Slow- and fast-binding inhibitors of thermolysin display different modes of binding: crystallographic analysis of extended phosphonamidate transition-state analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, H M; Tronrud, D E; Monzingo, A F; Weaver, L H; Matthews, B W

    1987-12-29

    The modes of binding to thermolysin of two phosphonamidate peptide inhibitors, carbobenzoxy-GlyP-L-Leu-L-Leu (ZGPLL) and carbobenzoxy-L-PheP-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZFPLA), have been determined by X-ray crystallography and refined at high resolution to crystallographic R-values of 17.7% and 17.0%, respectively. (GlyP is used to indicate that the trigonal carbon of the peptide linkage is replaced by the tetrahedral phosphorus of a phosphonamidate group.). These inhibitors were designed to be structural analogues of the presumed catalytic transition state and are potent inhibitors of thermolysin (ZGPLL, Ki = 9.1 nM; ZFPLA, Ki = 0.068 nM) [Bartlett, P. A., & Marlowe, C. K. (1987) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)]. ZFPLA binds to thermolysin in the manner expected for the transition state and, for the first time, provides direct support for the presumed mode of binding of extended substrates in the S2 subsite. The mode of binding of ZFPLA displays all the interactions that are presumed to stabilize the transition state and supports the postulated mechanism of catalysis [Hangauer, D. G., Monzingo, A. F., & Matthews, B. W. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 5730-5741]. The two oxygens of the phosphonamidate moiety are liganded to the zinc to give overall pentacoordination of the metal. For the second inhibitor the situation is different. Although both ZFPLA and ZGPLL have similar modes of binding in the S1' and S2' subsites, the configurations of the carbobenzoxy-Phe and carbobenzoxy-Gly moieties are different. For ZFPLA the carbonyl group of the carbobenzoxy group is hydrogen bonded directly to the enzyme, whereas in ZGPLL the carbonyl group is rotated 117 degrees, and there is a water molecule interposed between the inhibitor and the enzyme. For ZGPLL only one of the phosphonamidate oxygens is liganded to the zinc. Correlated with the change in inhibitor-zinc ligation from monodentate in ZGPLL to bidentate in ZFPLA there is an increase in the phosphorus-nitrogen bond length of

  1. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...... effectively individualizes the immune response of each member of the species. We have recently developed efficient methods to generate recombinant human MHC-I (also known as human leukocyte antigen class I, HLA-I) molecules, accompanying peptide-binding assays and predictors, and HLA tetramers for specific...... CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...

  2. Analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine-binding proteins in germinating seeds from Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Valentina; Cramer, Rainer; Krynytskyy, Hryhoriy; Gout, Ivan; Gout, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in angiosperms has been implicated in various physiological processes, including seed development and germination. In conifers, the role of tyrosine phosphorylation and the mechanisms of its regulation are yet to be investigated. In this study, we examined the profile of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in Scots pine seeds at different stages of germination. We detected extensive protein tyrosine phosphorylation in extracts from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) dormant seeds. In addition, the pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was found to change significantly during seed germination, especially at earlier stages of post-imbibition which coincides with the initiation of cell division, and during the period of intensive elongation of hypocotyls. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of phosphotyrosine signaling, we employed affinity purification and mass spectrometry for the identification of pTyr-binding proteins from the extracts of Scots pine seedlings. Using this approach, we purified two proteins of 10 and 43 kDa, which interacted specifically with pTyr-Sepharose and were identified by mass spectrometry as P. sylvestris defensin 1 (PsDef1) and aldose 1-epimerase (EC:5.1.3.3), respectively. Additionally, we demonstrated that both endogenous and recombinant PsDef1 specifically interact with pTyr-Sepharose, but not Tyr-beads. As the affinity purification approach did not reveal the presence of proteins with known pTyr binding domains (SH2, PTB and C2), we suggest that plants may have evolved a different mode of pTyr recognition, which yet remains to be uncovered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Glutaraldehyde pretreatment blocks temperature-induced high-affinity [3H] tryptamine binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikyaku, S.; Ishitani, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of glutaraldehyde (and Azure A) on temperature-sensitive high-affinity [ 3 H] tryptamine binding was investigated in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes. In the 0.01-0.1 % concentration range, the glutaraldehyde pretreatment preferentially inhibited only the above-mentioned portion of the binding, whereas the posttreatment of this reagent had no effect. On the other hand, in cases of pretreatment or posttreatment, a concentration of glutaraldehyde as high as 0.1 % was inactive on the basal [ 3 H] ligand binding capacity of the membranes. Furthermore, it was revealed that the Scatchard plot of [ 3 H] tryptamine binding in membranes pretreated with glutaraldehyde conformed to a straight line, as did a similar plot of temperature-independent binding. And, it was interesting to find that the binding parameters (K/sub D/ and B/sub max/ values) of both samples corresponded closely to each other. On the contrary, in all concentrations, Azure A affected nonspecifically both the temperature-dependent and the independent [ 3 H] tryptamine binding to the same degree, regardless of whether or not there was pretreatment or posttreatment. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  4. Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E 1 methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and [ 3 H] MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. [ 3 H] MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10 -9 M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors [IC 50 , approx. 10 -8 M] of [ 3 H] MISO-FA binding. At 10 -5 M, the dinor and tetranor β-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE 1 and 16,16 dimethyl PGE 2 were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF 1 α (10 -6 M) and Hoe 892 (10 -5 M), a stable PGI 2 analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations

  5. Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 1/ methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10/sup -9/ M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors (IC/sub 50/, approx. 10/sup -8/M) of (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding. At 10/sup -5/ M, the dinor and tetranor ..beta..-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE/sub 1/ and 16,16 dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF/sub 1/..cap alpha.. (10/sup -6/ M) and Hoe 892 (10/sup -5/ M), a stable PGI/sub 2/ analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations.

  6. Quantitative autoradiographic distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.; Young, A.B.; Penney, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to determine the distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in the rat central nervous system. Autoradiography was carried out in the presence of Cl- and Ca2+ ions. Scatchard plots and Hill coefficients of glutamate binding suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites having a K-D of about 300 nM and a capacity of 14.5 pmol/mg of protein. In displacement studies, ibotenate also appeared to bind to a single class of non-interacting sites with a KI of 28 microM. However, quisqualate displacement of [3H]glutamate binding revealed two well-resolved sites with KIS of 12 nM and 114 microM in striatum. These sites were unevenly distributed, representing different proportions of specific glutamate binding in different brain regions. The distribution of glutamate-binding sites correlated very well with the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. This technique provides an extremely sensitive assay which can be used to gather detailed pharmacological and anatomical information about L-[3H]glutamate binding in the central nervous system

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation, binding free energy calculation and unbinding pathway analysis on selectivity difference between FKBP51 and FKBP52: Insight into the molecular mechanism of isoform selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Danfeng; Bai, Qifeng; Zhou, Shuangyan; Liu, Xuewei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    As co-chaperones of the 90-kDa heat shock protein(HSP90), FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) and FK506 binding protein 52 (FKBP52) modulate the maturation of steroid hormone receptor through their specific FK1 domains (FKBP12-like domain 1). The inhibitors targeting FK1 domains are potential therapies for endocrine-related physiological disorders. However, the structural conservation of the FK1 domains between FKBP51 and FKBP52 make it difficult to obtain satisfactory selectivity in FK506-based drug design. Fortunately, a series of iFit ligands synthesized by Hausch et al exhibited excellent selectivity for FKBP51, providing new opportunity for design selective inhibitors. We performed molecular dynamics simulation, binding free energy calculation and unbinding pathway analysis to reveal selective mechanism for the inhibitor iFit4 binding with FKBP51 and FKBP52. The conformational stability evaluation of the "Phe67-in" and "Phe67-out" states implies that FKBP51 and FKBP52 have different preferences for "Phe67-in" and "Phe67-out" states, which we suggest as the determinant factor for the selectivity for FKBP51. The binding free energy calculations demonstrate that nonpolar interaction is favorable for the inhibitors binding, while the polar interaction and entropy contribution are adverse for the inhibitors binding. According to the results from binding free energy decomposition, the electrostatic difference of residue 85 causes the most significant thermodynamics effects on the binding of iFit4 to FKBP51 and FKBP52. Furthermore, the importance of substructure units on iFit4 were further evaluated by unbinding pathway analysis and residue-residue contact analysis between iFit4 and the proteins. The results will provide new clues for the design of selective inhibitors for FKBP51. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  9. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  10. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    ) class I molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors which select and present endogenously derived peptides to circulating CTLs. Peptides that are recognized by CTLs in the context of MHC are epitopes, and represent a small sample of the pathogen proteome, making it possible for the immune...... fingerprint” of an individual can be identified by defining MHC alleles. This is classically called “tissue typing” and is done by analyzing the reactivity of peripheral blood cells with sera unique to MHC alleles. Such knowledge is paramount to analysis of the immune response regarding MHC restriction...... within a species makes immune escape almost impossible for any intruding pathogen. Characterization of the SLA class I and class II gene products and their peptide binding capacity defines the T cell epitopes of any given pathogen proteome. To date the analysis of MHC peptide interactions, strength...

  11. Phylogenetic analysis reveals dynamic evolution of the poly(A)-binding protein gene family in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Daniel R; Liu, Renyi

    2014-11-25

    The poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binds the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and functions to maintain the integrity of the mRNA while promoting protein synthesis through its interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G and eIF4B. PABP is encoded by a single gene in yeast and marine algae but during plant evolution the PABP gene family expanded substantially, underwent sequence divergence into three subclasses, and acquired tissue-specificity in gene family member expression. Although such changes suggest functional specialization, the size of the family and its sequence divergence have complicated an understanding of which gene family members may be foundational and which may represent more recent expansions of the family to meet the specific needs of speciation. Here, we examine the evolution of the plant PABP gene family to provide insight into these aspects of the family that may yield clues into the function of individual family members. The PABP gene family had expanded to two members by the appearance of fresh water algae and four members in non-vascular plants. In lycophytes, the first sequence divergence yielding a specific class member occurs. The earliest members of the gene family share greatest similarity to those modern members whose expression is confined to reproductive tissues, suggesting that supporting reproductive-associated gene expression is the most conserved function of this family. A family member sharing similarity to modern vegetative-associated members first appears in gymnosperms. Further elaboration of the reproductive-associated and vegetative-associated members occurred during the evolution of flowering plants. Expansion of the plant PABP gene family began prior to the colonization of land. By the evolution of lycophytes, the first class member whose expression is confined to reproductive tissues in higher plants had appeared. A second class member whose expression is vegetative-associated appeared in

  12. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium about 80% of the dUMP used for dTMP synthesis is derived from deamination of dCTP. The dCTP deaminase produces dUTP that subsequently is hydrolyzed by dUTPase to dUMP and diphosphate. The dCTP deaminase is regulated by dTTP that inhibits the enzyme...... by binding to the active site and induces an inactive conformation of the trimeric enzyme. We have analyzed the role of residues previously suggested to play a role in catalysis. The mutant enzymes R115Q, S111C, S111T and E138D were all purified and analyzed for activity. Only S111T and E138D displayed...... detectable activity with a 30- and 140-fold reduction in k(cat), respectively. Furthermore, S111T and E138D both showed altered dTTP inhibition compared to wild-type enzyme. S111T was almost insensitive to the presence of dTTP. With the E138D enzyme the dTTP dependent increase in cooperativity of d...

  14. Inventory and analysis of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems in Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelli, B F; Stitt, L E; Tompkins, J B

    2010-07-01

    ABC systems are one of the largest described protein superfamilies. These systems have a domain organization that may contain 1 or more transmembrane domains (ABC_TM1F) and 1 or 2 ATP-binding domains (ABC_2). The functions (e.g., import, export and DNA repair) of these proteins distinguish the 3 classes of ABC systems. Mining and PCR-based cloning were used to identify 33 putative ABC systems from the Brugia malayi genome. There were 31 class 2 genes, commonly called ABC transporters, and 2 class 3 genes. The ABC transporters were divided into subfamilies. Three belonged to subfamily A, 16 to subfamily B, 5 to subfamily C, 1 to subfamily E and 3 to subfamilies F and G, respectively. None were placed in subfamilies D and H. Similar to other ABC systems, the ABC_2 domain of B. malayi genes was conserved and contained the Walker A and B motifs, the signature sequence/linker region and the switch region with the conserved histidine. The ABC_TM1F domain was less conserved. The relative abundance of ABC systems was quantified using real-time reverse transcription PCR and was significantly higher in female adults of B. malayi than in males and microfilaria, particularly those in subfamilies B and C, which are associated with drug resistance.

  15. Localization and Spectroscopic Analysis of the Cu(I Binding Site in Wheat Metallothionein Ec-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsiaryna Tarasava

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The early cysteine-labeled metallothionein (MT from Triticum aestivum (common wheat, denoted Ec-1, features two structurally well-defined domains, γ and βE, coordinating two and four Zn(II ions, respectively. While the protein is currently assumed to function mainly in zinc homeostasis, a low amount of copper ions was also recently detected in a native Ec-1 sample. To evaluate the observed copper binding in more detail, the recombinant Zn6Ec-1 form was exposed to different amounts of Cu(I ions and the resulting species characterized with spectroscopic methods. Data reveal that the first Cu(I equivalent coordinates exclusively to the N-terminal γ-domain of the protein and replaces one Zn(II ion. To analyze the ability of the γ-domain for coordination of monovalent metal ions in more detail, the γ-Ec-1 peptide fragment was incubated with increasing amounts of Cu(I and the process monitored with UV–VIS, circular dichroism, and luminescence spectroscopy. Closely similar spectra are observed regardless if the apo- or the metal ion-loaded and, hence, pre-folded forms, were used for the titration experiments with Cu(I. The results indicate that low amounts of Cu(I ions displace the two metal ions subsequently and stoichiometrically, despite the different coordination geometry requirements of Cu(I and Zn(II.

  16. Comprehensive meta-analysis of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT genomic binding patterns discerns cell-specific cis-regulatory modules

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    Kang Keunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine-activated transcription factors from the STAT (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription family control common and context-specific genetic programs. It is not clear to what extent cell-specific features determine the binding capacity of seven STAT members and to what degree they share genetic targets. Molecular insight into the biology of STATs was gained from a meta-analysis of 29 available ChIP-seq data sets covering genome-wide occupancy of STATs 1, 3, 4, 5A, 5B and 6 in several cell types. Results We determined that the genomic binding capacity of STATs is primarily defined by the cell type and to a lesser extent by individual family members. For example, the overlap of shared binding sites between STATs 3 and 5 in T cells is greater than that between STAT5 in T cells and non-T cells. Even for the top 1,000 highly enriched STAT binding sites, ~15% of STAT5 binding sites in mouse female liver are shared by other STATs in different cell types while in T cells ~90% of STAT5 binding sites are co-occupied by STAT3, STAT4 and STAT6. In addition, we identified 116 cis-regulatory modules (CRM, which are recognized by all STAT members across cell types defining a common JAK-STAT signature. Lastly, in liver STAT5 binding significantly coincides with binding of the cell-specific transcription factors HNF4A, FOXA1 and FOXA2 and is associated with cell-type specific gene transcription. Conclusions Our results suggest that genomic binding of STATs is primarily determined by the cell type and further specificity is achieved in part by juxtaposed binding of cell-specific transcription factors.

  17. New insight on biological interaction analysis: new nanocrystalline mixed metal oxide SPME fiber for GC-FID analysis of BTEX and its application in human hemoglobin-benzene interaction studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hosseinzadeh

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline mixed metal oxides (MMO of various metal cations were synthesized and were used for coating a piece of copper wire as a new high sensitive solid phase micro extraction (SPME fiber in extraction and determination of BTEX compounds from the headspace of aqueous samples prior to GC-FID analysis. Under optimum extraction conditions, the proposed fiber exhibited low detection limits, and quantification limits, good reproducibility, simple and fast preparation method, high fiber capacity and high thermal and mechanical durability. These are some of the most important advantages of the new fiber. The proposed fiber was used for human hemoglobin upon interaction with benzene. Binding isotherm, Scatchard and Klotz logarithmic plots were constructed using HS-SPME-GC data, accurately. The obtained binding isotherm analyzed using Hill method. The Hill parameters have been obtained by calculating saturation parameter from the ratio of measured chromatographic peak areas in the presence and absence of hemoglobin. In this interaction, Hill coefficient and Hill constant determined as (nH = 6.14 and log KH = 6.47 respectively. These results reveal the cooperativity of hemoglobin upon interaction with benzene.

  18. Sequence, Structure, and Binding Analysis of Cyclodextrinase (TK1770 from T. kodakarensis (KOD1 Using an In Silico Approach

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    Ramzan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermostable cyclodextrinase (Tk1770 CDase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1 hydrolyzes cyclodextrins into linear dextrins. The sequence of Tk1770 CDase retrieved from UniProt was aligned with sequences of sixteen CD hydrolyzing enzymes and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using Bayesian inference. The homology model of Tk1770 CDase was constructed and optimized with Modeller v9.14 program. The model was validated with ProSA server and PROCHECK analysis. Four conserved regions and the catalytic triad consisting of Asp411, Glu437, and Asp502 of GH13 family were identified in catalytic site. Also an additional fifth conserved region downstream to the fourth region was also identified. The structure of Tk1770 CDase consists of an additional N′-domain and a helix-loop-helix motif that is conserved in all archaeal CD hydrolyzing enzymes. The N′-domain contains an extended loop region that forms a part of catalytic domain and plays an important role in stability and substrate binding. The docking of substrate into catalytic site revealed the interactions with different conserved residues involved in substrate binding and formation of enzyme-substrate complex.

  19. Proteomic analysis of pig (Sus scrofa olfactory soluble proteome reveals O-GlcNAcylation of secreted odorant-binding proteins

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    Patricia eNAGNAN-LE MEILLOUR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of olfactory binding proteins (OBPs is a key point to understand their role in molecular olfaction. Since only few different sequences were characterized in each mammalian species, they have been considered as passive carriers of odors and pheromones. We have explored the soluble proteome of pig nasal mucus, taking benefit of the powerful tools of proteomics. Combining two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and western-blot with specific antibodies, our analyses revealed for the first time that the pig nasal mucus is mainly composed of secreted OBP isoforms, some of them being potentially modified by O-GlcNAcylation. An ortholog gene of the glycosyltransferase responsible of the O-GlcNAc linking on extracellular proteins in Drosophila and Mouse (EOGT was amplified from tissues of pigs of different ages and sex. The sequence was used in a phylogenetic analysis, which evidenced conservation of EOGT in insect and mammalian models studied in molecular olfaction. Extracellular O-GlcNAcylation of secreted OBPs could finely modulate their binding specificities to odors and pheromones. This constitutes a new mechanism for extracellular signaling by OBPs, suggesting that they act as the first step of odor discrimination.

  20. Carbohydrate-Derived Amphiphilic Macromolecules: A Biophysical Structural Characterization and Analysis of Binding Behaviors to Model Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. T. Martin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The design and synthesis of enhanced membrane-intercalating biomaterials for drug delivery or vascular membrane targeting is currently challenged by the lack of screening and prediction tools. The present work demonstrates the generation of a Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship model (QSAR to make a priori predictions. Amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs “stealth lipids” built on aldaric and uronic acids frameworks attached to poly(ethylene glycol (PEG polymer tails were developed to form self-assembling micelles. In the present study, a defined set of novel AM structures were investigated in terms of their binding to lipid membrane bilayers using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D experiments coupled with computational coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG MD and all-atom MD (AA MD simulations. The CG MD simulations capture the insertion dynamics of the AM lipophilic backbones into the lipid bilayer with the PEGylated tail directed into bulk water. QCM-D measurements with Voigt viscoelastic model analysis enabled the quantitation of the mass gain and rate of interaction between the AM and the lipid bilayer surface. Thus, this study yielded insights about variations in the functional activity of AM materials with minute compositional or stereochemical differences based on membrane binding, which has translational potential for transplanting these materials in vivo. More broadly, it demonstrates an integrated computational-experimental approach, which can offer a promising strategy for the in silico design and screening of therapeutic candidate materials.

  1. Evaluation of IMAC and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Recovery and Analysis of Copper-Binding Ligands in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, R. L.; Ross, A.

    2016-02-01

    Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron, copper, and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores) have been identified in seawater and such compounds are known to mediate iron uptake by marine bacteria, thereby influencing biological productivity in the ocean. However, little is known about the origin, structure, or ecological role of marine Cu-binding ligands (chalcophores). Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) allows selective recovery of such compounds from seawater, while electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to identify marine siderophores and to characterise Cu ligands in coastal waters. Here, we use model compounds to evaluate a Cu(II)-IMAC/ESI-MS workflow for recovery and analysis of Cu-binding ligands in seawater. One-litre samples of artificial and natural filtered seawater were spiked with model Cu(II) ligands at realistic concentrations and fractionated by IMAC. Retained compounds were eluted by acidification and detected by UV absorption. Linear plots of concentration versus UV chromatographic peak area were obtained for model synthetic and natural organic ligands at concentrations ranging from 5 to 500 nM (r2=0.9988) and 50 and 750 nM (r2=0.9899), respectively, in artificial seawater. Variable though similar results were obtained for oceanic seawater spiked with 5 nM to 1 µM of ligand (r2=0.9893). Chromatographic peak data suggests that natural UV-absorbing Cu ligands are more concentrated in nearshore than in oceanic surface waters, and that these ligands are susceptible to photolysis by artificial sunlight. Eluted IMAC fractions corresponding to UV absorbance peaks were collected and different techniques evaluated for concentration and desalting of the recovered ligands prior to analysis by ESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS data

  2. Mutational analysis of the antagonist-binding site of the histamine H(1) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, K; Laak, A M; Smit, M J; Kühne, R; Timmerman, H; Leurs, R

    1999-10-15

    We combined in a previously derived three-dimensional model of the histamine H(1) receptor (Ter Laak, A. M., Timmerman, H., Leurs, H., Nederkoorn, P. H. J., Smit, M. J., and Donne-Op den Kelder, G. M. (1995) J. Comp. Aid. Mol. Design. 9, 319-330) a pharmacophore for the H(1) antagonist binding site (Ter Laak, A. M., Venhorst, J., Timmerman, H., and Donné-Op de Kelder, G. M. (1994) J. Med. Chem. 38, 3351-3360) with the known interacting amino acid residue Asp(116) (in transmembrane domain III) of the H(1) receptor and verified the predicted receptor-ligand interactions by site-directed mutagenesis. This resulted in the identification of the aromatic amino acids Trp(167), Phe(433), and Phe(436) in transmembrane domains IV and VI of the H(1) receptor as probable interaction points for the trans-aromatic ring of the H(1) antagonists. Subsequently, a specific interaction of carboxylate moieties of two therapeutically important, zwitterionic H(1) antagonists with Lys(200) in transmembrane domain V was predicted. A Lys(200) --> Ala mutation results in a 50- (acrivastine) to 8-fold (d-cetirizine) loss of affinity of these zwitterionic antagonists. In contrast, the affinities of structural analogs of acrivastine and cetirizine lacking the carboxylate group, triprolidine and meclozine, respectively, are unaffected by the Lys(200) --> Ala mutation. These data strongly suggest that Lys(200), unique for the H(1) receptor, acts as a specific anchor point for these "second generation" H(1) antagonists.

  3. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Hao Changchun; Feng Ying; Gao Feng; Lu Xiaolong; Li Junhua; Sun Runguang

    2016-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure–area ( π – A ) and pressure–time ( π – T ) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. (special topic)

  4. Identification and Expression Profile Analysis of Odorant Binding Proteins in the Oriental Fruit Fly Bactrocera dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is crucial in many insects for critical behaviors, including those regulating survival and reproduction. Insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs function in the first step of the olfactory system and play an essential role in the perception of odorants, such as pheromones and host chemicals. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive fruit-eating pest, due to its wide host range of up to 250 different types of fruits and vegetables, and this fly causes severe economic damage to the fruit and vegetable industry. However, OBP genes have not been largely identified in B. dorsalis. Based on our previously constructed B. dorsalis cDNA library, ten OBP genes were identified in B. dorsalis for the first time. A phylogenetic tree was generated to show the relationships among the 10 OBPs of B. dorsalis to OBP sequences of two other Dipteran species, including Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The expression profiles of the ten OBPs in different tissues (heads, thoraxes, abdomens, legs, wings, male antennae and female antenna of the mated adults were analyzed by real-time PCR. The results showed that nine of them are highly expressed in the antenna of both sexes, except BdorOBP7. Four OBPs (BdorOBP1, BdorOBP4, BdorOBP8, and BdorOBP10 are also enriched in the abdomen, and BdorOBP7 is specifically expressed in leg, indicating that it may function in other biological processes. This work will provide insight into the roles of OBPs in chemoreception and help develop new pest-control strategies.

  5. Application of capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis for comparative evaluation of the binding interaction of captopril with human serum albumin in the absence and presence of hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Xiang, Li-Li; Wang, Jian-Ling; Chen, Dong-Ying

    2015-11-10

    The application of capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis for comparative evaluation of the binding interaction between antihypertensive drug captopril and human serum albumin in the absence and presence of diuretic drug hydrochlorothiazide was presented in this work. At near-physiological conditions (67mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, I=0.17, 37°C), the individual solution of 100μM captopril and the co-binding solution with 60μM hydrochlorothiazide added were pre-equilibrated with series concentrations of HSA (10-475μM) respectively, introducing hydrodynamically into an uncoated fused silica capillary (35cm×50μm I.D. with 26.5cm effective length). The values of number of binding sites, the binding constant for captopril and hydrochlorothiazide binding to HSA were obtained, respectively. It can be found that both drugs exhibit moderate binding properties towards HSA and there does not exist significant competitive binding effects between them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the α subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K d of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site

  7. The binding of cellulase variants to dislocations: a semi-quantitative analysis based on CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi J.; Weisskopf, Carmen; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    or slip planes. Here we study whether cellulases bind to dislocations to a higher extent than to the surrounding cell wall. The binding of fluorescently labelled cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases to filter paper fibers was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and a ratiometric method...... was developed to assess and quantify the abundance of the binding of cellulases to dislocations as compared to the surrounding cell wall. Only Humicola insolens EGV was found to have stronger binding preference to dislocations than to the surrounding cell wall, while no difference in binding affinity was seen...

  8. Structural analysis of prolyl oligopeptidases using molecular docking and dynamics: insights into conformational changes and ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP is considered as an important pharmaceutical target for the treatment of numerous diseases. Despite enormous studies on various aspects of POPs structure and function still some of the questions are intriguing like conformational dynamics of the protein and interplay between ligand entry/egress. Here, we have used molecular modeling and docking based approaches to unravel questions like differences in ligand binding affinities in three POP species (porcine, human and A. thaliana. Despite high sequence and structural similarity, they possess different affinities for the ligands. Interestingly, human POP was found to be more specific, selective and incapable of binding to a few planar ligands which showed extrapolation of porcine POP in human context is more complicated. Possible routes for substrate entry and product egress were also investigated by detailed analyses of molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the three proteins. Trajectory analysis of bound and unbound forms of three species showed differences in conformational dynamics, especially variations in β-propeller pore size, which was found to be hidden by five lysine residues present on blades one and seven. During simulation, β-propeller pore size was increased by ∼2 Å in porcine ligand-bound form which might act as a passage for smaller product movement as free energy barrier was reduced, while there were no significant changes in human and A. thaliana POPs. We also suggest that these differences in pore size could lead to fundamental differences in mode of product egress among three species. This analysis also showed some functionally important residues which can be used further for in vitro mutagenesis and inhibitor design. This study can help us in better understanding of the etiology of POPs in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Sex hormone binding globulin - an important biomarker for predicting PCOS risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Ritu; Yadav, Arun; Dang, Amita Suneja

    2018-02-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein which regulates bioavailability of sex steroid hormones. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes type II. This meta-analysis was performed to examine the associations of SHBG with PCOS and to correlate serum SHBG levels with various PCOS associated endocrine and metabolic dysregulation as well as to determine the effects of various therapeutic agents on serum SHBG levels in PCOS patients in order to assess the true accuracy of SHBG in the prediction of PCOS. A literature search was performed using Pub-Med, Science direct, google scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. A total of 675 relevant records were identified, of which 62 articles were included. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed using STATA version 13 to calculate standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95 % CIs). SHBG levels in controls were significantly higher than that of PCOS patients (SMD= -0.83, 95%CI = -1.01, -0.64), with significant heterogeneity across studies (I 2 = 93.9% and p=0.000). Our results suggest that the lower serum SHBG levels are associated with the risk of PCOS. SHBG may also play an important role in various metabolic disturbances in PCOS patients. Therapeutic interventions improved SHBG levels in PCOS women which further reduced PCOS associated complications. Therefore, SHBG levels may prove to be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PCOS. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017057972 Abbreviations: PCOS: polycystic ovary syndrome; SHBG: sex hormone-binding globulin.

  10. Analysis of the relationship between interleukin polymorphisms within miRNA-binding regions and alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo-Veleiro, I; Cieza-Borrella, C; Pastor, I; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Laso, F-J; Marcos, M

    2018-03-19

    Alcohol consumption promotes inflammation through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, leading to organic damage. Some micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules modulate this inflammatory response by downregulating TLR4/NF-κB pathway mediators, like interleukins (ILs). Thus, polymorphisms within IL genes located near miRNA binding sites could modify the risk of ethanol-induced damage. The present study analyzed potential relationships between alcoholism or alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and IL12B 2124 G>T (rs1368439), IL16 5000 C>T (rs1131445), IL1R1 3114 C>T (rs3917328), and NFKB1 3400 A>G (rs4648143) polymorphisms. The study included 301 male alcoholic patients and 156 male healthy volunteers. Polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan ® PCR assays for allelic discrimination. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between groups. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the inheritance model. Analysis of the IL1R1 (rs3917328) polymorphism showed that the proportion of alleleT carriers (CT and TT genotypes) was higher in healthy controls (9.7%) than in alcoholic patients (6.5%; P=.042). However, multivariable logistic regression analyses did not yield a significant result. No differences between groups were found for other analyzed polymorphisms. Our study describes, for the first time, the expected frequencies of certain polymorphisms within miRNA-binding sites in alcoholic patients with and without ALD. Further studies should be developed to clarify the potential relevance of these polymorphisms in alcoholism and ALD development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  11. Binding and dissociation kinetics using fractals: an analysis of electrostatic effects and randomly coupled and oriented coupled receptors on biosensor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Harshala D; Sadana, Ajit

    2004-03-15

    A fractal analysis is used to analyze the influence of: (a) electrostatic interactions on binding and dissociation rate coefficients for antibodies HH8, HH10, and HH26 in solution to hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]; and (b) the binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Methods 20 (2000) 310]. Single- and dual-fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s) and the fractal dimensions were obtained from a regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited, Ottawa, Canada. 1997). The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. It is of interest to compare the results obtained by the fractal analysis with that of the original analysis [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]. For example, as one goes from the binding of 21 nM HH10/HEL to the binding of 640 nM HH10/HEL(K97A), Sinha et al. [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 29461 indicate that the enhancement of diffusional encounter rates may be due to 'electrostatic steering' (a long-range interaction). Our analysis indicates that there is an increase in the value of the fractal dimension, Df1 by a factor of 1.12 from a value of 2.133-2.385. This increase in the degree of heterogeneity on the surface leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient, k1 by a factor of 1.59 from 12.92 to 20.57. The fractal analysis of binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip [Methods 20 (2000) 310] surface are consistent with the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface for the random and the oriented case. As expected, the random case will exhibit a higher degree of heterogeneity than the oriented case

  12. Genome-wide identification, characterization and phylogenetic analysis of 50 catfish ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikai Liu

    Full Text Available Although a large set of full-length transcripts was recently assembled in catfish, annotation of large gene families, especially those with duplications, is still a great challenge. Most often, complexities in annotation cause mis-identification and thereby much confusion in the scientific literature. As such, detailed phylogenetic analysis and/or orthology analysis are required for annotation of genes involved in gene families. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene superfamily is a large gene family that encodes membrane proteins that transport a diverse set of substrates across membranes, playing important roles in protecting organisms from diverse environment.In this work, we identified a set of 50 ABC transporters in catfish genome. Phylogenetic analysis allowed their identification and annotation into seven subfamilies, including 9 ABCA genes, 12 ABCB genes, 12 ABCC genes, 5 ABCD genes, 2 ABCE genes, 4 ABCF genes and 6 ABCG genes. Most ABC transporters are conserved among vertebrates, though cases of recent gene duplications and gene losses do exist. Gene duplications in catfish were found for ABCA1, ABCB3, ABCB6, ABCC5, ABCD3, ABCE1, ABCF2 and ABCG2.The whole set of catfish ABC transporters provide the essential genomic resources for future biochemical, toxicological and physiological studies of ABC drug efflux transporters. The establishment of orthologies should allow functional inferences with the information from model species, though the function of lineage-specific genes can be distinct because of specific living environment with different selection pressure.

  13. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Meyer, Jennifer A; Bloom, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of a novel vanadium-binding protein by EST analysis on the most vanadium-rich ascidian, Ascidia gemmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samino, Setijono; Michibata, Hitoshi; Ueki, Tatsuya

    2012-04-01

    Ascidians are known to accumulate extremely high levels of vanadium in their blood cells (up to 350 mM). The branchial sac and the intestine are thought to be the first tissues to contact the outer environment and absorb vanadium ions. The concentration of vanadium in the branchial sac and the intestine of the most vanadium-rich ascidian Ascidia gemmata were determined to be 32.4 and 11.9 mM, respectively. Using an expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of a cDNA library from the intestine of A. gemmata, we determined 960 ESTs and found 55 clones of metal-related gene orthologs, 6 redox-related orthologs, and 18 membrane transporter orthologs. Among them, two genes, which exhibited significant similarity to the vanadium-binding proteins of other vanadium-rich ascidian species, were designated AgVanabin1 and AgVanabin2. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography revealed that recombinant AgVanabin1 bound to metal ions with an increasing affinity for Cu(II) > Zn(II) > Co(II) and AgVanabin2 bound to metal ions with an increasing affinity for Cu(II) > Fe(III) > V(IV). To examine the use of AgVanabins for a metal absorption system, we constructed Escherichia coli strains that expressed AgVanabin1 or AgVanabin2 fused to maltose-binding protein and secreted into the periplasmic space. We found that the strain expressing AgVanabin2 accumulated about 13.5 times more Cu(II) ions than the control TB1 strain. Significant accumulation of vanadium was also observed in the AgVanabin2-expressing strain as seen by a 1.5-fold increase.

  15. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  16. Analysis of expression and chitin-binding activity of the wing disc cuticle protein BmWCP4 in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui-Min; Li, Yong; Zhang, Jia-Ling; Liu, Lin; Feng, Qi-Li

    2016-12-01

    The insect exoskeleton is mainly composed of chitin filaments linked by cuticle proteins. When insects molt, the cuticle of the exoskeleton is renewed by degrading the old chitin and cuticle proteins and synthesizing new ones. In this study, chitin-binding activity of the wing disc cuticle protein BmWCP4 in Bombyx mori was studied. Sequence analysis showed that the protein had a conservative hydrophilic "R&R" chitin-binding domain (CBD). Western blotting showed that BmWCP4 was predominately expressed in the wing disc-containing epidermis during the late wandering and early pupal stages. The immunohistochemistry result showed that the BmWCP4 was mainly present in the wing disc tissues containing wing bud and trachea blast during day 2 of wandering stage. Recombinant full-length BmWCP4 protein, "R&R" CBD peptide (CBD), non-CBD peptide (BmWCP4-CBD - ), four single site-directed mutated peptides (M 1 , M 2 , M 3 and M 4 ) and four-sites-mutated peptide (M F ) were generated and purified, respectively, for in vitro chitin-binding assay. The results indicated that both the full-length protein and the "R&R" CBD peptide could bind with chitin, whereas the BmWCP4-CBD - could not bind with chitin. The single residue mutants M 1 , M 2 , M 3 and M 4 reduced but did not completely abolish the chitin-binding activity, while four-sites-mutated protein M F completely lost the chitin-binding activity. These data indicate that BmWCP4 protein plays a critical role by binding to the chitin filaments in the wing during larva-to-pupa transformation. The conserved aromatic amino acids are critical in the interaction between chitin and the cuticle protein. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Structural variants of glucocorticoid receptor binding sites and different versions of positive glucocorticoid responsive elements: Analysis of GR-TRRD database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulov, Vasily M; Merkulova, Tatyana I

    2009-05-01

    The GR-TRRD section of the TRRD database contains the presently largest sample of published nucleotide sequences with experimentally confirmed binding to the glucocorticoid hormone receptor (GR). This sample comprises 160 glucocorticoid receptor binding sites (GRbs) from 77 vertebrate glucocorticoid-regulated genes. Analysis of this sample has demonstrated that the structure of only half GRbs (54%) corresponds to the generally accepted organization of glucocorticoid response element (GRE) as an inverted repeat of the TGTTCT hexanucleotide. As many as 40% of GRbs contain only the hexanucleotide, and the majority of such "half-sites" belong to the glucocorticoid-inducible genes. An expansion of the sample allowed the consensus of GRbs organized as an inverted repeat to be determined more precisely. Several possible mechanisms underlying the role of the noncanonical receptor binding sites (hexanucleotide half-sites) in the glucocorticoid induction are proposed based on analysis of the literature data.

  18. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-12-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. In this study, we report a genome-wide search for Musa acuminata Dof (MaDof) genes and their expression profiles at different developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of the Dof gene family in bananas is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 74 full-length protein-coding MaDof genes unevenly distributed on 11 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that MaDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDof I, II, III, and IV). The detailed genomic information of the MaDof gene homologs in the present study provides opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the exact role of the genes in plant growth and development.

  20. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  1. Analysis of organic colouring and binding components in colour layer of art works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckova, S; Nemec, I; Hynek, R; Hradilova, J; Grygar, T

    2005-05-01

    Two methods of analysis of organic components of colour layers of art works have been tested: IR microspectroscopy of indigo, Cu-phthalocyanine, and Prussian blue, and MALDI-TOF-MS of proteinaceous binders and a protein-containing red dye. The IR spectra distortion common for smooth outer surfaces and polished cross sections of colour layer of art works is suppressed by reflectance measurement of microtome slices. The detection limit of the three blue pigments examined is approximately 0.3 wt% in reference colour layers in linseed oil binder with calcite as extender and lead white as a drying agent. The sensitivity has been sufficient to identify Prussian blue in repaints on a Gothic painting. MALDI-TOF-MS has been used to identify proteinaceous binders in two historical paintings, namely isinglass (fish glue) and rabbit glue. MALDI-TOF-MS has also been proposed for identification of an insect red dye, cochineal carmine, according to its specific protein component. The enzymatic cleavage with trypsin before MALDI-TOF-MS seems to be a very gentle and specific way of dissolution of the colour layers highly polymerised due to very long aging of old, e.g. medieval, samples.

  2. 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol; synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and BSA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Savithri; Basappa Chidananda, Vasantha Kumar; Hosakere Doddarevanna, Revanasiddappa; Hamse Kameshwar, Vivek; Kaur, Manpreet; Jasinski, Jerry P.

    2017-08-01

    A new imine-based molecule 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol (FBt) was synthesized by microwave and conventional method. It was structurally characterized by spectral techniques (NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS and electronic absorption), elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Hirshfeld surface analysis was employed to ensure the existence of intermolecular interactions in FBt structure. A preliminary in vitro susceptibility test against two pathogenic fungi with respect to standard has shown that the ligand is proved to be a potent antifungal agent. Since the carrying of a drug by BSA may effect on its structure and action, the investigation on the interaction between model protein BSA and FBt was carried out by employing UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characteristics of the binding, i.e., binding constant, number of binding sites, and nature of binding were determined. Besides, the Förster's parameters associated with the binding process were calculated. Molecular docking was also carried on interaction study of the FBt with BSA.

  3. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  4. Detailed kinetic analysis of the interaction between the FOXO4–DNA-binding domain and DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, P.; Zusková, Iva; Bumba, Ladislav; Večeř, J.; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 184, DEC 31 (2013), s. 68-78 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : binding kinetics * DNA-binding domain * FOXO4 forkhead transcription factor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CE - Biochemistry (MBU-M) Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2013

  5. Analysis of Perforin Assembly by Quartz Crystal Microbalance Reveals a Role for Cholesterol and Calcium-independent Membrane Binding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah E.; Bird, Catherina H.; Tabor, Rico F.; D'Angelo, Michael E.; Piantavigna, Stefania; Whisstock, James C.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Bird, Phillip I.

    2015-01-01

    Perforin is an essential component in the cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated cell death pathway. The traditional view holds that perforin monomers assemble into pores in the target cell membrane via a calcium-dependent process and facilitate translocation of cytotoxic proteases into the cytoplasm to induce apoptosis. Although many studies have examined the structure and role of perforin, the mechanics of pore assembly and granzyme delivery remain unclear. Here we have employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate binding and assembly of perforin on lipid membranes, and show that perforin monomers bind to the membrane in a cooperative manner. We also found that cholesterol influences perforin binding and activity on intact cells and model membranes. Finally, contrary to current thinking, perforin efficiently binds membranes in the absence of calcium. When calcium is added to perforin already on the membrane, the QCM-D response changes significantly, indicating that perforin becomes membranolytic only after calcium binding. PMID:26542805

  6. Analysis of the Global Changes in SH2 Binding Properties Using Mass Spectrometry Supported by Quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Radoslaw M

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics enables fast and reliable analysis of protein complexes. Its robustness and sensitivity effectively substitute traditional antibody-based approaches. Here, we describe the combination of mass spectrometry and Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) in characterization of the SH2 domain binding capacity.

  7. Analysis of Metal-Binding Features of the Wild Type and Two Domain-Truncated Mutant Variants of Littorina littorea Metallothionein Reveals Its Cd-Specific Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Palacios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After the resolution of the 3D structure of the Cd9-aggregate of the Littorina littorea metallothionein (MT, we report here a detailed analysis of the metal binding capabilities of the wild type MT, LlwtMT, and of two truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal domain, Lltr2MT, or both the N-terminal domain, plus four extra flanking residues (SSVF, Lltr1MT. The recombinant synthesis and in vitro studies of these three proteins revealed that LlwtMT forms unique M9-LlwtMT complexes with Zn(II and Cd(II, while yielding a complex mixture of heteronuclear Zn,Cu-LlwtMT species with Cu(I. As expected, the truncated mutants gave rise to unique M6-LltrMT complexes and Zn,Cu-LltrMT mixtures of lower stoichiometry with respect to LlwtMT, with the SSVF fragment having an influence on their metal binding performance. Our results also revealed a major specificity, and therefore a better metal-coordinating performance of the three proteins for Cd(II than for Zn(II, although the analysis of the Zn(II/Cd(II displacement reaction clearly demonstrates a lack of any type of cooperativity in Cd(II binding. Contrarily, the analysis of their Cu(I binding abilities revealed that every LlMT domain is prone to build Cu4-aggregates, the whole MT working by modules analogously to, as previously described, certain fungal MTs, like those of C. neoformans and T. mesenterica. It is concluded that the Littorina littorea MT is a Cd-specific protein that (beyond its extended binding capacity through an additional Cd-binding domain confers to Littorina littorea a particular adaptive advantage in its changeable marine habitat.

  8. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  9. Crystal structures of the DNA-binding domain of Escherichia coli proline utilization A flavoprotein and analysis of the role of Lys9 in DNA recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, John D.; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Zhou, Yuzhen; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    PutA (proline utilization A) from Escherichia coli is a 1320-amino-acid residue protein that is both a bifunctional proline catabolic enzyme and an autogenous transcriptional repressor. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a PutA DNA-binding domain along with functional analysis of a mutant PutA defective in DNA binding. Crystals were grown using a polypeptide corresponding to residues 1–52 of E. coli PutA (PutA52). The 2.1 Å resolution structure of PutA52 mutant Lys9Met was determi...

  10. Inventory and general analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Kaiyuan; Li, Yanjiao; Liu, Menghan; Meng, Zhaodong; Yu, Yanli

    2013-09-10

    The metabolic functions of ATP-binding cassette (or ABC) proteins, one of the largest families of proteins presented in all organisms, have been investigated in many protozoan, animal and plant species. To facilitate more systematic and complicated studies on maize ABC proteins in the future, we present the first complete inventory of these proteins, including 130 open reading frames (ORFs), and provide general descriptions of their classifications, basic structures, typical functions, evolution track analysis and expression profiles. The 130 ORFs were assigned to eight subfamilies based on their structures and homological features. Five of these subfamilies consist of 109 proteins, containing transmembrane domains (TM) performing as transporters. The rest three subfamilies contain 21 soluble proteins involved in various functions other than molecular transport. A comparison of ABC proteins among nine selected species revealed either convergence or divergence in each of the ABC subfamilies. Generally, plant genomes contain far more ABC genes than animal genomes. The expression profiles and evolution track of each maize ABC gene were further investigated, the results of which could provide clues for analyzing their functions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments (PCR) were conducted to detect induced expression in select ABC genes under several common stresses. This investigation provides valuable information for future research on stress tolerance in plants and potential strategies for enhancing maize production under stressful conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Computational Prediction and Analysis of Associations between Small Molecules and Binding-Associated S-Nitrosylation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guohua; Li, Jincheng; Zhao, Chenglin

    2018-04-19

    Interactions between drugs and proteins occupy a central position during the process of drug discovery and development. Numerous methods have recently been developed for identifying drug⁻target interactions, but few have been devoted to finding interactions between post-translationally modified proteins and drugs. We presented a machine learning-based method for identifying associations between small molecules and binding-associated S-nitrosylated (SNO-) proteins. Namely, small molecules were encoded by molecular fingerprint, SNO-proteins were encoded by the information entropy-based method, and the random forest was used to train a classifier. Ten-fold and leave-one-out cross validations achieved, respectively, 0.7235 and 0.7490 of the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve. Computational analysis of similarity suggested that SNO-proteins associated with the same drug shared statistically significant similarity, and vice versa. This method and finding are useful to identify drug⁻SNO associations and further facilitate the discovery and development of SNO-associated drugs.

  13. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  14. Non-enzymatic glycation enhances human serum albumin binding capacity to sodium fluorescein at room temperature: A spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Sadaf; Anwar, Tamanna; Ahmad, Nabeel; Islam, Asimul; Sen, Priyankar

    2017-06-01

    Sodium fluorescein (SF) is a fluorescent tracer dye used extensively in diagnostic tools in the field of Ophthalmology, particularly in intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA). The binding of SF to human serum albumin (HSA) has been predicted by molecular docking and investigated by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy with or without glycation at temperatures 296, 301, and 310K. The binding parameters were calculated by quenching of emission spectrum of a constant concentration of SF (2μmol/l) at 513nm against increasing concentrations of glycated or unmodified HSA as quencher starting from stoichiometry ratio of 1:1. The HSA-SF interaction found to be a static binding. The Stern-Volmer constants (Ksv) were in the range of ~10 4 M -1 and other thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (ΔH°), free energy (ΔG°) and entropy (ΔS°) are similar to albumin ligand bindings reported by previous workers. The interactions were found to be spontaneous, irrespective of temperature or glycation. Glycated HSA is clinically used to monitor unstable glycemic controls in diabetic patients. A 39% increase in binding affinity (log K) and free energy (ΔG°) is reported on glycation at 310K (room temperature), which may be important in the SF based angiographies. On glycation HSA-SF binding appears to change from an enthalpy-driven to an entropy-driven reaction. SF shows best binding to FA binding site III of HSA, which also overlaps with drug binding site II of subdomain IIIA. Leu430 seems to play a pivotal role in the interaction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Analysis of molecular forms of urine Retinol-Binding Protein in Fanconi Syndrome and design of an accurate immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burling, Keith A; Cutillas, Pedro R; Church, David; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G W

    2012-02-18

    Retinol-Binding Protein in urine (uRBP), a biomarker for the proximal renal tubular disease of congenital and acquired Fanconi Syndrome (FS) occurs in multiple forms. However these have not had quantitative mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, nor is there a validated assay for defined molecular species of uRBP with linearity on sample dilution. A 'Top-down' MS approach identified distinct forms of uRBP differing by only one amino acid. Based on this, we designed a dual-monoclonal antibody-based fluorescence immunoassay calibrated with intact plasma RBP4. LC-MS showed that uRBP in FS (one Dent disease urine) comprised intact plasma RBP4 and C-terminal-truncated RBP4, desL-RBP4 and desLL-RBP4 in molar ratio 2:2:1. DELFIA® assay calibrated with plasma RBP4, formulated with two monoclonal antibodies (HyTest, Finland), mAb48 for capture and biotinylated-mAb42 for detection, provided good sensitivity (1 μg/L), working range>500 μg/L and good linearity on sample dilution. The three predominant forms of uRBP were equipotent over the assay working range. uRBP reference range was <3 μg/mmol creatinine and FS patients had concentrations of 1000-5000 μg/mmol creatinine. Using 'Top-down' MS analysis of uRBP we devised an accurate, linear, fluorescence immunoassay with defined RBP molecular targets optimal for uRBP measurement. Discrimination of elevated uRBP from the upper limit of normal was some 10-fold greater than previous assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-resolution analysis of four efficient yeast replication origins reveals new insights into the ORC and putative MCM binding elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fujung; May, Caitlin D; Hoggard, Timothy; Miller, Jeremy; Fox, Catherine A; Weinreich, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In budding yeast, the eukaryotic initiator protein ORC (origin recognition complex) binds to a bipartite sequence consisting of an 11 bp ACS element and an adjacent B1 element. However, the genome contains many more matches to this consensus than actually bind ORC or function as origins in vivo. Although ORC-dependent loading of the replicative MCM helicase at origins is enhanced by a distal B2 element, less is known about this element. Here, we analyzed four highly active origins (ARS309, ARS319, ARS606 and ARS607) by linker scanning mutagenesis and found that sequences adjacent to the ACS contributed substantially to origin activity and ORC binding. Using the sequences of four additional B2 elements we generated a B2 multiple sequence alignment and identified a shared, degenerate 8 bp sequence that was enriched within 228 known origins. In addition, our high-resolution analysis revealed that not all origins exist within nucleosome free regions: a class of Sir2-regulated origins has a stably positioned nucleosome overlapping or near B2. This study illustrates the conserved yet flexible nature of yeast origin architecture to promote ORC binding and origin activity, and helps explain why a strong match to the ORC binding site is insufficient to identify origins within the genome.

  17. Negligible effects of nonesterified fatty acids on serum thyroxine analysis by competitive protein-binding radioassay on Sephadex and by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.M.; Nishimoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    Values for thyroxine by our competitive protein-binding assay on Sephadex (I) and by radioimmmunoassy (II) were identical for sera containing markedly increased concentrations of endogenous nonesterified fatty acids. Addition of as much as 5 mmol of long-chain saturated fatty acids per liter to normal serum had no significant effect on the thyroxine values by I; larger concentrations (10 mmol/liter) spuriously increased values by 20 to 30%. Added unsaturated fatty acids (1 mmol/liter) were without effect on procedure I, but spurious elevations in thyroxine appeared when concentrations were further increased up to 10 mmol/liter. The spurious effects by 2 to 5 mmol of added oleate and arachidonate (the most potent inhibitor of thyroxine binding to thyroxine-binding globulin) per liter could be reversed by washing the Sephadex columns with additional barbital buffer before binding with thyroxine-binding globulin (a step that is done on the gel). Three different II procedures were unaffected by as much as 5 mmol of added fatty acids per liter, but moderate spurious increases were noted with 10 mmol of oleate per liter. We conclude that method I is reliable for thyroxine analysis in nearly all sera from human subjects, because the concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids present either in vitro or in vivo are seldom large enough to interfere

  18. Site-directed mutational analysis of structural interactions of low molecule compounds binding to the N-terminal 8 kDa domain of DNA polymerase β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shizuka; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takata, Kei-ichi; Kasai, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Seisuke; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Keisuke; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the mode of inhibition of DNA polymerase β (pol. β) by long chain fatty acids and a bile acid, involving binding analyses to the N-terminal 8-kDa DNA binding domain. Here we describe a site-directed mutational analysis in which the key amino acids (L11, K35, H51, K60, L77, and T79), which are direct interaction sites in the domain, were substituted with K, A, A, A, K, and A, respectively. And their pol. β interactions with a C24-long chain fatty acid, nervonic acid (NA), and a bile acid, lithocholic acid (LCA), were investigated by gel mobility shift assay and NMR spectroscopy. In the case of K35A, there was complete loss of DNA binding activity while K60A hardly has any activity. In contrast the other mutations had no appreciable effects. Thus, K35 and K60 are key amino acid sites for binding to template DNA. The DNA binding activities of L11K, H51A, and T79A as well as the wild type were inhibited by NA to the same extent. T79A demonstrated a disturbed interaction with LCA. 1 H- 15 N HSQC NMR analysis indicated that despite their many similarities, the wild-type and the mutant proteins displayed some significant chemical shift differences. Not only were the substituted amino acid residues three-dimensionally shifted, but some amino acids which are positioned far distant from the key amino acids showed a shift. These results suggest that the interaction surface was significantly distorted with the result that LCA could not bind to the domain. These findings confirm our previous biochemical and 3D structural proposals concerning inhibition by NA and LCA

  19. Crystallographic analysis of TPP riboswitch binding by small-molecule ligands discovered through fragment-based drug discovery approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are structured mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to metabolite or second-messenger binding and are promising targets for drug discovery. Fragment-based drug discovery methods have identified weakly binding small molecule "fragments" that bind a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch. However, these fragments require substantial chemical elaboration into more potent, drug-like molecules. Structure determination of the fragments bound to the riboswitch is the necessary next step. In this chapter, we describe the methods for co-crystallization and structure determination of fragment-bound TPP riboswitch structures. We focus on considerations for screening crystallization conditions across multiple crystal forms and provide guidance for building the fragment into the refined crystallographic model. These methods are broadly applicable for crystallographic analyses of any small molecules that bind structured RNAs.

  20. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together...

  1. Binding of the 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs to tRNA(phe..

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    Anirban Basu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three new analogs of berberine with aryl/ arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituent at the 9-position of the isoquinoline chromophore along with berberrubine were studied for their binding to tRNA(phe by wide variety of biophysical techniques like spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism, thermal melting, viscosity and isothermal titration calorimetry. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Scatchard binding isotherms revealed that the cooperative binding mode of berberine was propagated in the analogs also. Thermal melting studies showed that all the 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs stabilized the tRNA(phe more in comparison to berberine. Circular dichroism studies showed that these analogs perturbed the structure of tRNA(phe more in comparison to berberine. Ferrocyanide quenching studies and viscosity results proved the intercalative binding mode of these analogs into the helical organization of tRNA(phe. The binding was entropy driven for the analogs in sharp contrast to the enthalpy driven binding of berberine. The introduction of the aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituent at the 9-position thus switched the enthalpy driven binding of berberine to entropy dominated binding. Salt and temperature dependent calorimetric studies established the involvement of multiple weak noncovalent interactions in the binding process. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: The results showed that 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs exhibited almost ten folds higher binding affinity to tRNA(phe compared to berberine whereas the binding of berberrubine was dramatically reduced by about twenty fold in comparison to berberine. The spacer length of the substitution at the 9-position of the isoquinoline chromophore appears to be critical in modulating the binding affinities towards tRNA(phe.

  2. Functional analysis of the citrate activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis implicates a divalent metal in ligand binding

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    Victor S. Blancato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD= 1.2±0.2 µM, while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation.

  3. Effect of diet on insulin binding and glucose transport in rat sarcolemmal vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimditch, G.K.; Barnard, R.J.; Sternlicht, E.; Whitson, R.H.; Kaplan, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFS) and a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet (LFC) on glucose tolerance, insulin binding, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle. During the intravenous glucose tolerance test, peak glucose values at 5 min were significantly higher in the HFS group; 0-, 20-, and 60-min values were similar. Insulin values were significantly higher in the HFS group at all time points (except 60 min), indicating whole-body insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle was responsible, in part, for this insulin resistance, because specific D-glucose transport in isolated sarcolemmal (SL) vesicles under basal conditions was similar between LFC and HFS rats, despite the higher plasma insulin levels. Scatchard analyses of insulin binding curves to sarcolemmal vesicles revealed that the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity binding sites was significantly reduced by the HFS diet; no other binding changes were noted. Specific D-glucose transport in SL vesicles after maximum insulin stimulation (1 U/kg) was significantly depressed in the HFS group, indicating that HFS feeding also caused a postbinding defect. These results indicate that the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle associated with a HFS diet is due to both a decrease in the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity insulin receptors and a postbinding defect

  4. Analysis of long-chain fatty acid binding activity in vesicles of the outer membrane generated from Escherchia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli transports long-chain fatty acids across the dual membrane by a high affinity, saturable, energy-dependent process. The fadL gene codes for an outer membrane protein which appears to act specifically as a long-chain fatty acid binding protein when fatty acid utilization is blocked by mutation. In an effort to understand the function of the fadL gene product, FLP, membranes have been isolated from fadL + and fadL - strains following osmotic lysis. Following isolation, total membranes were separated into inner and outer membrane fractions and assayed for long-chain fatty acid binding activity. Outer membrane vesicles were incubated 2-5 min at 37 0 C with 3 H oleate (C/sub 18:1/), cooled to 0 0 C, and centrifuged through a Lipidex 100 column for 3 min to remove the unbound fatty acid. The level of fatty acid binding was quantitated by scintillation counting of the eluate. Outer membrane vesicles generated from a fadL + strain bind 325 pmol fatty acid/mg protein whereas vesicles generated for a mutant strain bind 175 pmol fatty acid/mg protein. These data suggest that FLP acts at least as a long-chain fatty acid binding protein on the surface of the cell

  5. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

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    Natasja Wulff Pedersen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8+ T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK, Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT, and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (<0.1% of live, single lymphocytes, SWIFT outperformed the other tools. As used in this study, none of the algorithms offered a completely automated pipeline for identification of MHC multimer populations, as varying degrees of human interventions were needed to complete the analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss

  6. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Chandran, P Anoop; Qian, Yu; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Hoff, Mathilde Dalsgaard; White, Scott; Lee, Alexandra J; Stanton, Rick; Halgreen, Charlotte; Jakobsen, Kivin; Mosmann, Tim; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Scheuermann, Richard H; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-01-01

    Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8 + T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK), Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT), and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss the main properties, differences, and advantages of the different methods tested.

  7. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn AL; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST) representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA) treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH), a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for alternative splicing

  8. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  9. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn A L; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-10-23

    Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. We analyzed the expression patterns of approximately 170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST) representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA) treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH), a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for alternative splicing was

  10. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

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    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  11. Systematic Analysis and Comparison of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in a Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengling; Li, Wei; Sun, Xiwei; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plant disease resistance genes are a key component of defending plants from a range of pathogens. The majority of these resistance genes belong to the super-family that harbors a Nucleotide-binding site (NBS). A number of studies have focused on NBS-encoding genes in disease resistant breeding programs for diverse plants. However, little information has been reported with an emphasis on systematic analysis and comparison of NBS-encoding genes in cotton. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we identified and investigated the NBS-encoding resistance genes in cotton using the whole genome sequence information of Gossypium raimondii. Totally, 355 NBS-encoding resistance genes were identified. Analyses of the conserved motifs and structural diversity showed that the most two distinct features for these genes are the high proportion of non-regular NBS genes and the high diversity of N-termini domains. Analyses of the physical locations and duplications of NBS-encoding genes showed that gene duplication of disease resistance genes could play an important role in cotton by leading to an increase in the functional diversity of the cotton NBS-encoding genes. Analyses of phylogenetic comparisons indicated that, in cotton, the NBS-encoding genes with TIR domain not only have their own evolution pattern different from those of genes without TIR domain, but also have their own species-specific pattern that differs from those of TIR genes in other plants. Analyses of the correlation between disease resistance QTL and NBS-encoding resistance genes showed that there could be more than half of the disease resistance QTL associated to the NBS-encoding genes in cotton, which agrees with previous studies establishing that more than half of plant resistance genes are NBS-encoding genes. PMID:23936305

  12. Affinities and densities of high-affinity [3H]muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-01-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using [ 3 H]muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using [ 3 H]flunitrazepam and [ 3 H]Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of [ 3 H]muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

  13. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  14. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of ( sup 3 H)(-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    (3H)Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using (18F)CF and positron emission tomography.

  15. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of [3H](-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    [3H]Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using [18F]CF and positron emission tomography

  16. Development of radiochemical method of analysis of binding of tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride with human blood serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Shukurov, B.V.; Mavlyanov, I.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The albumin, being a basic functional linkage of numerous endogenous and exogenous substances is the most important protein of blood plasma. At the diseases connected to liver disfunction, collected in blood metabolite reduce connecting ability of albumino. The aim of the present research was a development of radiochemical method of determination of ability of albumin to bind the tritium labeled preparation drotaverine hydrochloride (no - spa). We had developed a micromethod of definition of connecting ability of albumin, allowing to analyse 20 mkl of blood serum. The method consists in incubation of tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride with blood serum in vitro, the following fractionation of serum proteins by gel - filtration on a microcolumn with Sephadex G-25, and direct measurement of the radioactivity connected to fraction of proteins of blood serum. The method has been tested on a series of blood serum of control group of healthy people and on a series of blood serum of patients with hepatitis B. We received quantitative characteristics of binding of drotaverine hydrochloride with albumin of patients with hepatitis B. It was preliminary established that binding ability of serum albumin of children with various forms of acute virus hepatitis tends to decrease in comparison with group of the control. Advantage of the developed radiochemical method is high precision and the high sensitivity of detection of infringement of binding ability of albumin. Application of tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride allows to measure directly levels of binding of a preparation with albumin

  17. Computational analysis of a novel mutation in ETFDH gene highlights its long-range effects on the FAD-binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jan-Gowth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the defects in the mitochondrial electron transfer system and the metabolism of fatty acids. Recently, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH gene, encoding electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO have been reported to be the major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. To date, no studies have been performed to explore the functional impact of these mutations or their mechanism of disrupting enzyme activity. Results High resolution melting (HRM analysis and sequencing of the entire ETFDH gene revealed a novel mutation (p.Phe128Ser and the hotspot mutation (p.Ala84Thr from a patient with MADD. According to the predicted 3D structure of ETF:QO, the two mutations are located within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding domain; however, the two residues do not have direct interactions with the FAD ligand. Using molecular dynamics (MD simulations and normal mode analysis (NMA, we found that the p.Ala84Thr and p.Phe128Ser mutations are most likely to alter the protein structure near the FAD binding site as well as disrupt the stability of the FAD binding required for the activation of ETF:QO. Intriguingly, NMA revealed that several reported disease-causing mutations in the ETF:QO protein show highly correlated motions with the FAD-binding site. Conclusions Based on the present findings, we conclude that the changes made to the amino acids in ETF:QO are likely to influence the FAD-binding stability.

  18. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  19. Analysis on Binding Energy and Auger Parameter for Estimating Size and Stoichiometry of ZnO Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Bera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanorods prepared through chemical vapor deposition technique are characterized by microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS techniques to correlate the effects of size on the binding energy of Zn 2p3/2 photoelectrons. A positive shift in Zn 2p3/2-binding energy as compared to that in bulk ZnO is assumed to be the effect of size of ZnO tips. The shift in binding energy has been explained in terms of relaxation energy in the photoemission process. Simultaneously, Auger parameter of the nanorods is evaluated for stoichiometric composition. The extra peak in O1s spectrum of nanorods is explained as adsorbed O-bearing species or surface contaminants.

  20. Cofactor-binding sites in proteins of deviating sequence: comparative analysis and clustering in torsion angle, cavity, and fold space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Björn; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    Small molecules are recognized in protein-binding pockets through surface-exposed physicochemical properties. To optimize binding, they have to adopt a conformation corresponding to a local energy minimum within the formed protein-ligand complex. However, their conformational flexibility makes them competent to bind not only to homologous proteins of the same family but also to proteins of remote similarity with respect to the shape of the binding pockets and folding pattern. Considering drug action, such observations can give rise to unexpected and undesired cross reactivity. In this study, datasets of six different cofactors (ADP, ATP, NAD(P)(H), FAD, and acetyl CoA, sharing an adenosine diphosphate moiety as common substructure), observed in multiple crystal structures of protein-cofactor complexes exhibiting sequence identity below 25%, have been analyzed for the conformational properties of the bound ligands, the distribution of physicochemical properties in the accommodating protein-binding pockets, and the local folding patterns next to the cofactor-binding site. State-of-the-art clustering techniques have been applied to group the different protein-cofactor complexes in the different spaces. Interestingly, clustering in cavity (Cavbase) and fold space (DALI) reveals virtually the same data structuring. Remarkable relationships can be found among the different spaces. They provide information on how conformations are conserved across the host proteins and which distinct local cavity and fold motifs recognize the different portions of the cofactors. In those cases, where different cofactors are found to be accommodated in a similar fashion to the same fold motifs, only a commonly shared substructure of the cofactors is used for the recognition process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Disruption and formation of surface salt bridges are coupled to DNA binding by integration host factor: a computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, L.; Sundlass, N. K.; Raines, R. T.; Cui, Q.

    2010-01-01

    Revealing the thermodynamic driving force of protein/DNA interactions is crucial to the understanding of factors that dictate the properties and function of protein-DNA complexes. For the binding of DNA to DNA-wrapping proteins, such as the integration host factor (IHF), Record and co-workers have proposed that the disruption of a large number of pre-existing salt-bridges is coupled with the binding process (J. Mol. Biol., 310, 2001, 379). To test this proposal, we have carried out explicit s...

  2. Impact of Stereochemistry on Ligand Binding: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Epoxide-Based HIV Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Campaner, Pietro; Fanfoni, Lidia; Demitri, Nicola; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; De March, Matteo; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-09-11

    A new pseudopeptide epoxide inhibitor, designed for irreversible binding to HIV protease (HIV-PR), has been synthesized and characterized in solution and in the solid state. However, the crystal structure of the complex obtained by inhibitor-enzyme cocrystallization revealed that a minor isomer, with inverted configuration of the epoxide carbons, has been selected by HIV-PR during crystallization. The structural characterization of the well-ordered pseudopeptide, inserted in the catalytic channel with its epoxide group intact, provides deeper insights into inhibitor binding and HIV-PR stereoselectivity, which aids development of future epoxide-based HIV inhibitors.

  3. Application of a fluorescent cobalamin analogue for analysis of the binding kinetics. A study employing recombinant human transcobalamin and intrinsic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Grissom, Charles B; Fedosova, Natalya U

    2006-01-01

    facilitated detailed kinetic analysis of Cbl binding. We found that TC had the same affinity for CBC and Cbl (K(d) = 5 x 10(-15) m), whereas interaction of CBC with the highly specific protein IF was more complex. For instance, CBC behaved normally in the partial reactions CBC + IF(30) and CBC + IF(20) when...... in the kinetic studies, moreover, it seems to be applicable for imaging purposes in vivo....

  4. Analysis of a predicted nuclear localization signal: implications for the intracellular localization and function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA-binding protein Scp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykailo, Melissa A; McLane, Laura M; Fridovich-Keil, Judith; Corbett, Anita H

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by RNA-binding proteins that modulate the synthesis, processing, transport and stability of various classes of RNA. Some RNA-binding proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and are thought to bind to RNA transcripts in the nucleus and remain bound during translocation to the cytoplasm. One RNA-binding protein that has been hypothesized to function in this manner is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scp160 protein. Although the steady-state localization of Scp160 is cytoplasmic, previous studies have identified putative nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that Scp160 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. We exploited a variety of yeast export mutants to capture any potential nuclear accumulation of Scp160 and found no evidence that Scp160 enters the nucleus. These localization studies were complemented by a mutational analysis of the predicted NLS. Results indicate that key basic residues within the predicted NLS of Scp160 can be altered without severely affecting Scp160 function. This finding has important implications for understanding the function of Scp160, which is likely limited to the cytoplasm. Additionally, our results provide strong evidence that the presence of a predicted nuclear localization signal within the sequence of a protein should not lead to the assumption that the protein enters the nucleus in the absence of additional experimental evidence.

  5. pocketZebra: a web-server for automated selection and classification of subfamily-specific binding sites by bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Eugeny; Arbatsky, Mikhail; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-07-01

    The new web-server pocketZebra implements the power of bioinformatics and geometry-based structural approaches to identify and rank subfamily-specific binding sites in proteins by functional significance, and select particular positions in the structure that determine selective accommodation of ligands. A new scoring function has been developed to annotate binding sites by the presence of the subfamily-specific positions in diverse protein families. pocketZebra web-server has multiple input modes to meet the needs of users with different experience in bioinformatics. The server provides on-site visualization of the results as well as off-line version of the output in annotated text format and as PyMol sessions ready for structural analysis. pocketZebra can be used to study structure-function relationship and regulation in large protein superfamilies, classify functionally important binding sites and annotate proteins with unknown function. The server can be used to engineer ligand-binding sites and allosteric regulation of enzymes, or implemented in a drug discovery process to search for potential molecular targets and novel selective inhibitors/effectors. The server, documentation and examples are freely available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/pocketzebra and there are no login requirements. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Computational identification and binding analysis of orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1 enzyme with substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-17

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are important heme-containing proteins, well known for their monooxygenase reaction. The human cytochrome P450 4X1 (CYP4X1) is categorized as "orphan" CYP because of its unknown function. In recent studies it is found that this enzyme is expressed in neurovascular functions of the brain. Also, various studies have found the expression and activity of orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1 in cancer. It is found to be a potential drug target for cancer therapy. However, three-dimensional structure, the active site topology and substrate specificity of CYP4X1 remain unclear. In the present study, the three-dimensional structure of orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1 was generated by homology modeling using Modeller 9v8. The generated structure was accessed for geometrical errors and energy stability using PROCHECK, VERFIY 3D and PROSA. A molecular docking analysis was carried out against substrates arachidonic acid and anandamide and the docked substrates were predicted for drug-likeness, ADME-Tox parameters and biological spectrum activity. The three-dimensional model of orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1 was generated and assessed with various structural validation programmes. Docking of orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1 with arachidonic acid revealed that TYR 112, ALA 126, ILE 222, ILE 223, THR 312, LEU 315, ALA 316, ASP 319, THR 320, PHE 491 and ILE 492 residues were actively participating in the interaction, while docking of CYP4X1 with anandamide showed that TYR 112, GLN 114, PRO 118, ALA 126, ILE 222, ILE 223, SER 251, LEU 315, ALA 316 and PHE 491 key residues were involved in strong interaction. From this study, several key residues were identified to be responsible for the binding of arachidonic acid and anandamide with orphan human cytochrome P450 4X1. Both substrates obeyed Lipinski rule of five in drug-likeness test and biological spectrum prediction showed anticarcinogenic activity. Compared to anandamide, arachidonic acid showed strong

  7. Single-molecule kinetic analysis of HP1-chromatin binding reveals a dynamic network of histone modification and DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Louise C; Weilandt, Daniel R; Bachmann, Andreas L; Kilic, Sinan; Lechner, Carolin C; Odermatt, Pascal D; Fantner, Georg E; Georgeon, Sandrine; Hantschel, Oliver; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Fierz, Beat

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin recruitment of effector proteins involved in gene regulation depends on multivalent interaction with histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and structural features of the chromatin fiber. Due to the complex interactions involved, it is currently not understood how effectors dynamically sample the chromatin landscape. Here, we dissect the dynamic chromatin interactions of a family of multivalent effectors, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and computational modeling. We show that the three human HP1 isoforms are recruited and retained on chromatin by a dynamic exchange between histone PTM and DNA bound states. These interactions depend on local chromatin structure, the HP1 isoforms as well as on PTMs on HP1 itself. Of the HP1 isoforms, HP1α exhibits the longest residence times and fastest binding rates due to DNA interactions in addition to PTM binding. HP1α phosphorylation further increases chromatin retention through strengthening of multivalency while reducing DNA binding. As DNA binding in combination with specific PTM recognition is found in many chromatin effectors, we propose a general dynamic capture mechanism for effector recruitment. Multiple weak protein and DNA interactions result in a multivalent interaction network that targets effectors to a specific chromatin modification state, where their activity is required. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Structural modeling and DNA binding autoinhibition analysis of Ergp55, a critical transcription factor in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti P Gangwar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ergp55 protein belongs to Ets family of transcription factor. The Ets proteins are highly conserved in their DNA binding domain and involved in various development processes and regulation of cancer metabolism. To study the structure and DNA binding autoinhibition mechanism of Ergp55 protein, we have produced full length and smaller polypeptides of Ergp55 protein in E. coli and characterized using various biophysical techniques. RESULTS: The Ergp55 polypeptides contain large amount of α-helix and random coil structures as measured by circular dichorism spectroscopy. The full length Ergp55 forms a flexible and elongated molecule as revealed by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and structural prediction algorithms. The binding analyses of Ergp55 polypeptides with target DNA sequences of E74 and cfos promoters indicate that longer fragments of Ergp55 (beyond the Ets domain showed the evidence of auto-inhibition. This study also revealed the parts of Ergp55 protein that mediate auto-inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE: The current study will aid in designing the compounds that stabilize the inhibited form of Ergp55 and inhibit its binding to promoter DNA. It will contribute in the development of drugs targeting Ergp55 for the prostate cancer treatment.

  9. csaw: a Bioconductor package for differential binding analysis of ChIP-seq data using sliding windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Aaron T.L.; Smyth, Gordon K.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is widely used to identify binding sites for a target protein in the genome. An important scientific application is to identify changes in protein binding between different treatment conditions, i.e. to detect differential binding. This can reveal potential mechanisms through which changes in binding may contribute to the treatment effect. The csaw package provides a framework for the de novo detection of differentially bound genomic regions. It uses a window-based strategy to summarize read counts across the genome. It exploits existing statistical software to test for significant differences in each window. Finally, it clusters windows into regions for output and controls the false discovery rate properly over all detected regions. The csaw package can handle arbitrarily complex experimental designs involving biological replicates. It can be applied to both transcription factor and histone mark datasets, and, more generally, to any type of sequencing data measuring genomic coverage. csaw performs favorably against existing methods for de novo DB analyses on both simulated and real data. csaw is implemented as a R software package and is freely available from the open-source Bioconductor project. PMID:26578583

  10. Binding assay and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ACTIBIND, a protein with anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, Marina de; Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded; Almog, Orna

    2007-01-01

    Native ACTIBIND was successfully crystallized and it was shown that the interaction between ACTIBIND and actin is in a molar ratio of 1:2, with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10 4 M −1 . ACTIBIND is a T2 RNase extracellular glycoprotein produced by the mould Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324626) that possesses anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities. ACTIBIND was found to be an actin-binding protein that interacts with rabbit muscle actin in a 1:2 molar ratio (ACTIBIND:actin) with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10 4 M −1 . Autoclave-treated ACTIBIND (EI-ACTIBIND) lost its RNase activity, but its actin-binding ability was conserved. ACTIBIND crystals were grown using 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution at room temperature (293 K). One to four single crystals appeared in each droplet within a few days and grew to approximate dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm after about two weeks. Diffraction studies of these crystals at low temperature (100 K) indicated that they belong to the P3 1 21 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 78, c = 104 Å

  11. Binding analysis of ferritin with heme using α-casein and biotinylated-hemin: detection of heme-binding capacity of Dpr derived from heme synthesis-deficient Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieno, Ayako; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Mukai, Takao; Orino, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian ferritins are known to bind heme. The use of α-casein and biotinylated hemin could be applicable to detection of protein-bound heme and of proteins with heme-binding capacity, respectively. Although commercial horse spleen ferritin and purified horse spleen ferritin (L:H subunit ratio=4) bound to an α-casein-coated plate, and this binding could be inhibited by hemin, recombinant iron-binding protein (rDpr), derived from heme-deficient Streptococcus mutans and expressed in Escherichia coli, did not bind to an α-casein-coated plate. Both horse spleen ferritins bound to α-casein-immobilized beads. Commercial horse spleen ferritin and rDpr showed direct binding to hemin-agarose beads. After preincubation of commercial horse spleen ferritin or rDpr with biotinylated hemin, they showed indirect binding to avidin-immobilized beads through biotinylated hemin. These results demonstrate that α-casein is useful for detection of heme-binding ferritin and that both hemin-agarose and the combination of biotinylated hemin and avidin-beads are useful for detection of the heme-binding capacity of ferritin. In addition, this study also revealed that Dpr, a decameric iron-binding protein, from heme-deficient cells binds heme.

  12. Molecular cloning, characterization and analysis of the intracellular localization of a water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) from Virginia pepperweed (Lepidium virginicum), a unique WSCP that preferentially binds chlorophyll b in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Yanai, Haruna; Oka-Takayama, Yuko; Zanma-Sohtome, Aya; Fujiyama, Kosaku; Uchida, Akira; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Various plants possess non-photosynthetic, hydrophilic chlorophyll (Chl) proteins called water-soluble Chl-binding proteins (WSCPs). WSCPs are categorized into two classes; Class I (photoconvertible type) and Class II (non-photoconvertible type). Among Class II WSCPs, only Lepidium virginicum WSCP (LvWSCP) exhibits a low Chl a/b ratio compared with that found in the leaf. Although the physicochemical properties of LvWSCP have been characterized, its molecular properties have not yet been documented. Here, we report the characteristics of the LvWSCP gene, the biochemical properties of a recombinant LvWSCP, and the intracellular localization of LvWSCP. The cloned LvWSCP gene possesses a 669-bp open reading frame. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the precursor of LvWSCP contains both N- and C-terminal extension peptides. RT-PCR analysis revealed that LvWSCP was transcribed in various tissues, with the levels being higher in developing tissues. A recombinant LvWSCP and hexa-histidine fusion protein (LvWSCP-His) could remove Chls from the thylakoid in aqueous solution and showed an absorption spectrum identical to that of native LvWSCP. Although LvWSCP-His could bind both Chl a and Chl b, it bound almost exclusively to Chl b when reconstituted in 40 % methanol. To clarify the intracellular targeting functions of the N- and C-terminal extension peptides, we constructed transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing the Venus protein fused with the LvWSCP N- and/or C-terminal peptides, as well as Venus fused at the C-terminus of LvWSCP. The results showed that the N-terminal peptide functioned in ER body targeting, while the C-terminal sequence did not act as a trailer peptide.

  13. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kelemen

    Full Text Available The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs. Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences.

  14. Functional analysis of multiple single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Methanosarcina acetivorans and their effects on DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase BI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Justin B; Murphy, Mary C; White, Bryan A; Mackie, Roderick I; Ha, Taekjip; Cann, Isaac K O

    2004-02-20

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and their functional homologs, replication protein A, are essential components of cellular DNA replication, repair and recombination. We describe here the isolation and characterization of multiple replication protein A homologs, RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3, from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. RPA1 comprises four single-stranded DNA-binding domains, while RPA2 and RPA3 are each composed of two such domains and a zinc finger domain. Gel filtration analysis suggested that RPA1 exists as homotetramers and homodimers in solution, while RPA2 and RPA3 form only homodimers. Unlike the multiple RPA proteins found in other Archaea and eukaryotes, each of the M. acetivorans RPAs can act as a distinct single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence polarization anisotropy studies revealed that the M. acetivorans RPAs bind to as few as 10 single-stranded DNA bases. However, more stable binding is achieved with single-stranded DNA of 18-23 bases, and for such substrates the estimated Kd was 3.82 +/- 0.28 nM, 173.6 +/- 105.17 nM, and 5.92 +/- 0.23 nM, for RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3, respectively. The architectures of the M. acetivorans RPAs are different from those of hitherto reported homologs. Thus, these proteins may represent novel forms of replication protein A. Most importantly, our results show that the three RPAs and their combinations highly stimulate the primer extension capacity of M. acetivorans DNA polymerase BI. Although bacterial SSB and eukaryotic RPA have been shown to stimulate DNA synthesis by their cognate DNA polymerases, our findings provide the first in vitro biochemical evidence for the conservation of this property in an archaeon.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement.

  16. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso

    2006-01-01

    of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic...... observed in both tumor and lymphocyte DNA from two patients, and at a high frequency in the control group (29 out of 64 informative controls). Additionally, we found that the C/T transition detected by HhaI RFLP suppressed one dinucleotide CpG in critical CTCF binding site 6, of a mutation showing...... polymorphic frequencies. Although a heterogeneous methylation pattern was observed after DNA sequencing modified by sodium bisulfite, the biallelic methylation pattern was confirmed in 9 out of 10 HNSCCs. These findings are likely to be relevant in the epigenetic regulation of the DMR, especially...

  17. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  18. Structural analysis and binding properties of isoforms of tarin, the GNA-related lectin from Colocasia esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia R; Winter, Harry C; Verícimo, Mauricio A; Meagher, Jennifer L; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T

    2015-01-01

    The lectins, a class of proteins that occur widely in animals, plants, fungi, lichens and microorganisms, are known for their ability to specifically bind to carbohydrates. Plant lectins can be classified into 12 families including the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin superfamily, which is widespread among monocotyledonous plants and binds specifically to mannose, a behavior that confers remarkable anti-tumor, anti-viral and insecticidal properties on these proteins. The present study characterized a mitogenic lectin from this family, called tarin, which was purified from the crude extract from taro (Colocasia esculenta). The results showed that tarin is a glycoprotein with 2-3% carbohydrate content, composed of least 10 isoforms with pIs ranging from 5.5 to 9.5. The intact protein is a heterotetramer of 47kDa composed of two non-identical and non-covalently associated polypeptides, with small subunits of 11.9kDa and large subunits of 12.6kDa. The tarin structure is stable and recovers or maintains its functional structure following treatments at different temperatures and pH. Tarin showed a complex carbohydrate specificity, binding with high affinity to high-mannose and complex N-glycans. Many of these ligands can be found in viruses, tumor cells and insects, as well as in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Chemical modifications confirmed that both conserved and non-conserved amino acids participate in this interaction. This study determined the structural and ligand binding characteristics of a GNA-related lectin that can be exploited for several different purposes, particularly as a proliferative therapeutic molecule that is able to enhance the immunological response. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Differential Analysis of Protein Expression in RNA-Binding-Protein Transgenic and Parental Rice Seeds Cultivated under Salt Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Rika; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Adachi, Reiko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Yamada, Akiyo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in pr...

  20. Binding analysis for interaction of diacetylcurcumin with β-casein nanoparticles by using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranfar, Fahimeh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Fani, Najme; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of diacetylcurcumin (DAC), as a novel synthetic derivative of curcumin, with bovine β-casein (an abundant milk protein that is highly amphiphilic and self assembles into stable micellar nanoparticles in aqueous solution) was investigated using fluorescence quenching experiments, Forster energy transfer measurements and molecular docking calculations. The fluorescence quenching measurements revealed the presence of a single binding site on β-casein for DAC with the binding constant value equals to (4.40 ± 0.03) × 104 M-1. Forster energy transfer measurements suggested that the distance between bound DAC and Trp143 residue is higher than the respective critical distance, hence, the static quenching is more likely responsible for fluorescence quenching other than the mechanism of non-radiative energy transfer. Our results from molecular docking calculations indicated that binding of DAC to β-casein predominantly occurred through hydrophobic contacts in the hydrophobic core of protein. Additionally, in vitro investigation of the cytotoxicity of free DAC and DAC-β-casein complex in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 revealed the higher cytotoxic effect of DAC-β-casein complex.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the phosphate-binding protein PhoX from Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Balan, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri) is an important bacterium that causes citrus canker disease in plants in Brazil and around the world, leading to significant economic losses. Determination of the physiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis of this bacterium is an important step in the development of strategies for its containment. Phosphate is an essential ion in all microrganisms owing its importance during the synthesis of macromolecules and in gene and protein regulation. Interestingly, X. citri has been identified to present two periplasmic binding proteins that have not been further characterized: PstS, from an ATP-binding cassette for high-affinity uptake and transport of phosphate, and PhoX, which is encoded by an operon that also contains a putative porin for the transport of phosphate. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of the phosphate-binding protein PhoX and X-ray data collection at 3.0 Å resolution are described. Biochemical, biophysical and structural data for this protein will be helpful in the elucidation of its function in phosphate uptake and the physiology of the bacterium.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of an anchorless fibronectin-binding protein FBPS from Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoki, Abednego Moki; Shi, Zhongyu; Xuan, Chunling; Lu, Guangwen; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Beiwen; Zhang, Qiangmin; Li, Yan; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Cuihua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-11-29

    The anchorless fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) are a group of important virulence factors for which the structures are not available and the functions are not well defined. In this study we performed comprehensive studies on a prototypic member of this group: the fibronectin-/fibrinogen-binding protein from Streptococcus suis (FBPS). The structures of the N- and C-terminal halves (FBPS-N and FBPS-C), which together cover the full-length protein in sequence, were solved at a resolution of 2.1 and 2.6 Å, respectively, and each was found to be composed of two domains with unique folds. Furthermore, we have elucidated the organization of these domains by small-angle X-ray scattering. We further showed that the fibronectin-binding site is located in FBPS-C and that FBPS promotes the adherence of S suis to host cells by attaching the bacteria via FBPS-N. Finally, we demonstrated that FBPS functions both as an adhesin, promoting S suis attachment to host cells, and as a bacterial factor, activating signaling pathways via β1 integrin receptors to induce chemokine production.

  3. Analysis of binding properties and interaction of thiabendazole and its metabolite with human serum albumin via multiple spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiaomei; He, Jiawei; Yang, Hongqin; Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Ludan; Li, Hui

    2017-10-15

    Thiabendazole (TBZ), which is oxidized into 5-hydroxythiabendazole (5-OH-TBZ) in vivo, is a commonly used food preservative. Interactions of TBZ and 5-OH-TBZ with human serum albumin (HSA) were comprehensively studied via multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. This study focussed on the mechanistic and structural information on binding of TBZ and 5-OH-TBZ to HSA to evaluate the impact of the food additive on HSA. 1 H NMR spectra of the two ligands showed the binding exists. ITC and fluorescence spectroscopy results revealed that TBZ was a stronger ligand, with a binding constant of 10 5 l/mol and formed a more stable complex with HSA than did 5-OH-TBZ via electrostatic interaction. Spectroscopic results (UV-vis, FT-IR, and CD) showed that TBZ and 5-OH-TBZ caused conformational changes in HSA, in which α-helix and β-turn transformed into β-sheet, causing HSA structure to loosen. Docking programs showed that both TBZ and 5-OH-TBZ bound to HSA via IB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. /sup 3/H-neurokinin A labels a specific tachykinin-binding site in the rat duodenal smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, L.B.; Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Saffroy, M.; Glowinski, J.; Lavielle, S.; Chassaing, G.; Marquet, A.; D' Orleans-Juste, P.; Dion, S.

    1987-12-01

    /sup 3/H-Neurokinin A (/sup 3/H-NKA) with high specific activity (75 Ci/mmol) was synthesized to study NKA (NK-2)-binding sites on membrane preparations of various tissues in the rat, including brain, spinal cord, duodenum, vas deferens, and ileum. The binding capacity of /sup 3/H-NKA (0.9 nM) was very low in membrane preparations of different central nervous system regions and the ileum smooth muscle (0.2-2 fmol/mg of protein). In contrast, relatively high specific binding was found in membrane suspensions of the rat duodenal smooth muscle (18 fmol/mg of protein) and the vas deferens (8 fmol/mg of protein). /sup 3/H-NKA-binding sites were further characterized on the rat duodenal smooth muscle. The specific binding of /sup 3/H-NKA was shown to be temperature dependent, saturable, reversible, and increased in parallel with the protein concentration. Scatchard analyses and Hill plots of equilibrium binding studies in the concentration range of 0.40-30 nM revealed that /sup 3/H-NKA bound to a single class of noninteracting binding sites (Bmax = 270 fmol/mg of protein, KD = 13.3 nM). Displacement of /sup 3/H-NKA with different tachykinin-related peptides gave the following rank order of potencies: NKA greater than NKA (4-10) greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than NKB much greater than substance P greater than physalaemin, which suggests that the binding site labeled by /sup 3/H-NKA is different from substance P (NK-1)-and NKB (NK-3)-binding sites. The biological activities of tachykinins and related peptides were tested by measuring their contractile effects on the rat duodenum and rabbit pulmonary artery, two tissues known to be sensitive for NKA. Ki values were correlated with the EC50 obtained in biological assays.

  5. Insight on AV-45 binding in white and grey matter from histogram analysis: a study on early Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemmi, Federico; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Peran, Patrice [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Adel, Djilali; Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Payoux, Pierre [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Pole Imagerie, Toulouse (France); Pariente, Jeremie [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Toulouse (France); Barbeau, Emmanuel J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France)

    2014-07-15

    AV-45 amyloid biomarker is known to show uptake in white matter in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but also in the healthy population. This binding, thought to be of a non-specific lipophilic nature, has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the differential pattern of AV-45 binding in white matter in healthy and pathological populations. We recruited 24 patients presenting with AD at an early stage and 17 matched, healthy subjects. We used an optimized positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) registration method and an approach based on an intensity histogram using several indices. We compared the results of the intensity histogram analyses with a more canonical approach based on target-to-cerebellum Standard Uptake Value (SUVr) in white and grey matter using MANOVA and discriminant analyses. A cluster analysis on white and grey matter histograms was also performed. White matter histogram analysis revealed significant differences between AD and healthy subjects, which were not revealed by SUVr analysis. However, white matter histograms were not decisive to discriminate groups, and indices based on grey matter only showed better discriminative power than SUVr. The cluster analysis divided our sample into two clusters, showing different uptakes in grey, but also in white matter. These results demonstrate that AV-45 binding in white matter conveys subtle information not detectable using the SUVr approach. Although it is not more efficient than standard SUVr in discriminating AD patients from healthy subjects, this information could reveal white matter modifications. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis, characterization, in silico ADMET prediction, and protein binding analysis of a novel zinc(II) Schiff-base complex: Application of multi-spectroscopic and computational techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Somaye; Shiri, Fereshteh; Saeidifar, Maryam

    2017-06-22

    By reaction of 1,2-diaminocyclohexane with the 2,3-butanedione monoxime in the presence of ZnCl 2 , a new Schiff base complex was obtained. This complex was characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, 1 H NMR, UV-Vis, and conductivity measurements. The reactivity of this complex to human serum albumin (HSA) under simulative physiological conditions was studied by spectroscopic and molecular docking analysis. Experimental results at various temperatures indicated that the intrinsic fluorescence of protein was quenched through a static quenching mechanism. The negative value of enthalpy change and positive value of entropy change indicated that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces played a major role in the binding of Zn(II) complex to HSA. FT-IR, three-dimensional fluorescence, and UV-Vis absorption results showed that the secondary structure of HSA changed after Zn(II) complex bound to protein. The binding distance was calculated to be 4.96 nm, according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Molecular docking results confirmed the spectroscopic results and showed that above complex is embedded into subdomain IIA of protein. All these experimental and computational results clarified that Zn(II) complex could bind with HSA effectively, which could be a useful guideline for efficient Schiff-base drug design.

  7. Spectroscopic investigations on the binding of persimmon tannin to phospholipase A 2 from Chinese cobra ( Naja naja atra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhong, Li; Zou, Bo; Tian, Yan; Xu, Shu-fen; Yao, Ping; Li, Chun-mei

    2012-01-01

    To understand the anti-venom mechanism of persimmon tannin, the interaction between persimmon tannin (PT) and phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2) under physiological conditions was investigated by fluorescence quenching technique in combination with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra techniques. The results revealed that gradual fluorescence quenching was observed by titration of PLA 2 (2.0 μM) with increasing concentrations of PT (from 0 to 2.025 μM), and the type of quenching was found to be a static quenching process. Stern-Volmer plots were not linear but had an intersection at CPT ≈ 1.0 μM, indicating that PT binded to more than one class of sites on PLA 2. The binding sites calculated on basis of Scatchard plots were about 2, supporting this result. The enthalpy change (Δ H) and entropy change (Δ S) of the binding sites were -17.44 kJ/mol and 59.90 kJ/mol·, separately, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction played a main role in the binding. In addition, synchronous fluorescence, FT-IR and CD spectra showed that dramatic conformational changes in PLA 2 were induced by its interaction with PT.

  8. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Re-emergence of an orphan therapeutic target for the treatment of resistant prostate cancer - a thorough conformational and binding analysis for ROR-γ protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndagi, Umar; Mhlongo, Ndumiso N; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have linked a deadly form of prostate cancer known as metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer to retinoic acid-related orphan-receptor gamma (ROR-γ). Most of these studies continued to place ROR-γ as orphan because of unidentifiable inhibitor. Recently identified inhibitors of ROR-γ and their therapeutic potential were evaluated, among which inhibitor XY018 was the potent. However, molecular understanding of the conformational features of XY018-ROR-γ complex is still elusive. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted on HC9-ROR-γ and XY018-ROR-γ complexes to understand their conformational features at molecular level and the influence of XY018 binding on the dynamics of ROR-γ with the aid of post-dynamic analytical tools. These include; principal component analysis, radius of gyration, binding free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), per-residue fluctuation and hydrogen bond occupancy. Findings from this study revealed that (1) hydrophobic packing contributes significantly to binding free energy, (2) Ile136 and Leu60 exhibited high hydrogen-bond occupancy in XY018-ROR-γ and HC9-ROR-γ, respectively, (3) XY018-ROR-γ displayed a relatively high loop region residue fluctuation compared to HC9-ROR-γ, (4) electrostatic interactions are a potential binding force in XY018-ROR-γ complex compared to HC9-ROR-γ, (5) XY018-ROR-γ assumes a rigid conformation which is highlighted by a decrease in residual fluctuation, (6) XY018 could potentially induce pseudoporphyria, nephritis and interstitial nephritis but potentially safe in renal failure. This study could serve as a base line for the design of new potential ROR-γ inhibitors.

  10. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  11. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, M. B.; Streeter, S. D.; Thresh, S.-J.; Swiderska, A.; McGeehan, J. E.; Kneale, G. G., E-mail: geoff.kneale@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal.

  12. Characteristic vibration patterns of odor compounds from bread-baking volatiles upon protein binding: density functional and ONIOM study and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treesuwan, Witcha; Hirao, Hajime; Morokuma, Keiji; Hannongbua, Supa

    2012-05-01

    As the mechanism underlying the sense of smell is unclear, different models have been used to rationalize structure-odor relationships. To gain insight into odorant molecules from bread baking, binding energies and vibration spectra in the gas phase and in the protein environment [7-transmembrane helices (7TMHs) of rhodopsin] were calculated using density functional theory [B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)] and ONIOM [B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p):PM3] methods. It was found that acetaldehyde ("acid" category) binds strongly in the large cavity inside the receptor, whereas 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine ("roasted") binds weakly. Lys296, Tyr268, Thr118 and Ala117 were identified as key residues in the binding site. More emphasis was placed on how vibrational frequencies are shifted and intensities modified in the receptor protein environment. Principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that the frequency shifts of C-C stretching, CH(3) umbrella, C = O stretching and CH(3) stretching modes have a significant effect on odor quality. In fact, the frequency shifts of the C-C stretching and C = O stretching modes, as well as CH(3) umbrella and CH(3) symmetric stretching modes, exhibit different behaviors in the PCA loadings plot. A large frequency shift in the CH(3) symmetric stretching mode is associated with the sweet-roasted odor category and separates this from the acid odor category. A large frequency shift of the C-C stretching mode describes the roasted and oily-popcorn odor categories, and separates these from the buttery and acid odor categories.

  13. Construction and analysis of cDNA libraries from the antennae of Batocera horsfieldi and expression pattern of putative odorant binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Aijun; Chen, Li-Zhen; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Man-Qun

    2014-04-19

    A high-quality cDNA library was constructed from female and male antenna of the longhorned beetle, Batocera horsfieldi (Hope) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a serious pest of Populus (Salicales: Salicaceae). The titer was approximately 2.37 × 106 pfu/mL, and this complies with the test requirement. From the libraries, 692 clones were selected randomly, sequenced, and further analyzed, and the recombinational efficiency reached 93.85%. By alignment and cluster analysis, we identified four odorant binding proteins, two pheromone-binding proteins (have the characteristic six conserved cysteine residues), four Minus-C odorant binding proteins (lost two conserved cysteines), and three chemosensory proteins. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of four new cDNAs that encode Minus-C odorant binding proteins (Minus-C OBPs) from B. horsfieldi antennal cDNA libraries. Our investigation focused on the expression pattern of the Minus-C OBP genes in various tissues in both sexes at different developmental stages, using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and realtime PCR (qPCR) strategies. Minus-C OBP1, 2, and 3 were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of the head (without antenna, labial palps, and maxillary palps). Minus-C OBP4 was expressed in the antenna, legs, and abdomen, but not in the labial palps, maxillary palps, or head. The qPCR results revealed MinusC OBPs were expressed in the antenna throughout the adult life, and that the transcript levels of these genes depended on the sex, age, and mating status of adults. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of three odorant binding protein gene transcripts in Dendrolimus species (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-Fang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiang-Bo; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    Pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus spp. (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are serious economic pest of pines. Previously, phylogenetic analyses of Dendrolimus using different methods yielded inconsistent results. The chemosensory systems of insects may play fundamental roles in promoting speciation. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) participate in the first step of odor detection. Studying the evolution of OBPs in closely related species may help us to identify their role in speciation. We identified three OBPs - one pheromone-binding protein and two general odorant-binding proteins - from male antennae of four Dendrolimus species, D. superans (Butler), D. punctatus (Walker), D. kikuchii Matsumura, and D. houi Lajonquiere, the olfactory recognition systems of which had not been previously investigated. We analyzed their molecular characteristics and compared their sequences to those of OBPs in D. tabulaeformis Tsai et Liu. Ka/Ks ratio analyses among the five Dendrolimus species indicate that PBP1 genes experienced more evolutionary pressure than the GOBPs. Phylogenetic relationships of PBP1 and GOBP1 both indicated that D. houi was the basal species, then branched D. kikuchii, while D. tabulaeformis, D. punctatus, and D. superans evolved more recently. These relationships are consistent with the changes in sex pheromone components of these five species. Dendrolimus tabulaeformis and D. punctatus are closely related sister species. However, the distances among GOBP2 sequences in the five Dendrolimus were very short, and the relationships of D. houi and D. kikuchii could not be resolved. Integrating our results with those of previous studies, we hypothesized that D. kikuchii, D. punctatus and D. superans evolved from the basal ancestor because of sex pheromone mutations and environmental pressure. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Purification, characterization, cloning and structural analysis of Crocodylus siamensis ovotransferrin for insight into functions of iron binding and autocleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipayang, Sukanya; Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Chen, Chun-Jung; Palacios, Philip M; Pierce, Brad S; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2017-10-01

    Ovotransferrin (OTf), the major protein constituent of egg white, is of great interest due to its pivotal role in biological iron transport and storage processes and its spontaneous autocleavage into peptidic fragments with alternative biological properties, such as antibacterial and antioxidant activities. However, despite being well-investigated in avian, a detailed elucidation of the structure-function relationship of ovotransferrins in the closely related order of Crocodilia has not been reported to date. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) confirmed the presence of two spectroscopically distinct ferric iron binding sites in Crocodylus siamensis OTf (cOTf), but implied a five-fold lower quantity of bound iron than in hen OTf (hOTf). In addition, quantitative estimation of free sulfhydryl groups revealed slight differences to hOTf. To gain a better structural understanding of cOTf, we found a cOTf gene consisting of an open reading frame of 2040bp and encoding a protein of 679 amino acids. In silico prediction of the three-dimensional structure of cOTf and comparison with hOTf revealed four evolutionarily conserved iron-binding sites in both N- and C-lobes, as well as the presence of only 13 of the 15 disulfide bonds in hOTf. This evolutionary loss of disulfide linkages in conjunction with the lack of hydrogen bonding from a dilysine trigger in the C-lobe are presumed to affect the iron binding and autocleavage character of cOTf. As a result, cOTf may be capable of exerting a more diverse array of functions compared to its avian counterparts; for instance, ion buffering, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Albumin binding of anti-inflammatory drugs. Utility of a site-oriented versus a stoichiometric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1984-01-01

    Binding equilibria of 12 nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory substances, salicylic acid, diflunisal, phenylbutazone, azapropazone, fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid, naproxen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofin, diclofenac, indomethacin, and benoxaprofen, to defatted human serum albumin has been investigated at 37...... degrees, pH 7.4, in a sodium phosphate buffer, 66 mM, by means of equilibrium dialysis and, in case of salicylic acid, by dialysis rate determinations. Cobinding of each of these drugs with monoacetyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, warfarin, and diazepam has been studied by measuring dialysis rates...

  17. Effects of non-enzymatic glycation in human serum albumin. Spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, A.; Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Chudzik, M.; Równicka-Zubik, J.

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), transporting protein, is exposed during its life to numerous factors that cause its functions become impaired. One of the basic factors - glycation of HSA - occurs in diabetes and may affect HSA-drug binding. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) leads to diseases e.g. diabetic and non-diabetic cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer disease, renal disfunction and in normal aging. The aim of the present work was to estimate how non-enzymatic glycation of human serum albumin altered its tertiary structure using fluorescence technique. We compared glycated human serum albumin by glucose (gHSAGLC) with HSA glycated by fructose (gHSAFRC). We focused on presenting the differences between gHSAFRC and nonglycated (HSA) albumin used acrylamide (Ac), potassium iodide (KI) and 2-(p-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS). Changes of the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue (Trp-214) of non-glycated and glycated proteins was investigated by the red-edge excitation shift method. Effect of glycation on ligand binding was examined by the binding of phenylbutazone (PHB) and ketoprofen (KP), which a primary high affinity binding site in serum albumin is subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. At an excitation and an emission wavelength of λex 335 nm and λem 420 nm, respectively the increase of fluorescence intensity and the blue-shift of maximum fluorescence was observed. It indicates that the glycation products decreases the polarity microenvironment around the fluorophores. Analysis of red-edge excitation shift method showed that the red-shift for gHSAFRC is higher than for HSA. Non-enzymatic glycation also caused, that the Trp residue of gHSAFRC becomes less accessible for the negatively charged quencher (I-), KSV value is smaller for gHSAFRC than for HSA. TNS fluorescent measurement demonstrated the decrease of hydrophobicity in the glycated albumin. KSV constants for gHSA-PHB systems are higher than for the unmodified serum

  18. Effects of non-enzymatic glycation in human serum albumin. Spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, A; Sułkowska, A; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Chudzik, M; Równicka-Zubik, J

    2016-01-05

    Human serum albumin (HSA), transporting protein, is exposed during its life to numerous factors that cause its functions become impaired. One of the basic factors --glycation of HSA--occurs in diabetes and may affect HSA-drug binding. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) leads to diseases e.g. diabetic and non-diabetic cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer disease, renal disfunction and in normal aging. The aim of the present work was to estimate how non-enzymatic glycation of human serum albumin altered its tertiary structure using fluorescence technique. We compared glycated human serum albumin by glucose (gHSA(GLC)) with HSA glycated by fructose (gHSA(FRC)). We focused on presenting the differences between gHSA(FRC) and nonglycated (HSA) albumin used acrylamide (Ac), potassium iodide (KI) and 2-(p-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS). Changes of the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue (Trp-214) of non-glycated and glycated proteins was investigated by the red-edge excitation shift method. Effect of glycation on ligand binding was examined by the binding of phenylbutazone (PHB) and ketoprofen (KP), which a primary high affinity binding site in serum albumin is subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. At an excitation and an emission wavelength of λex 335nm and λem 420nm, respectively the increase of fluorescence intensity and the blue-shift of maximum fluorescence was observed. It indicates that the glycation products decreases the polarity microenvironment around the fluorophores. Analysis of red-edge excitation shift method showed that the red-shift for gHSA(FRC) is higher than for HSA. Non-enzymatic glycation also caused, that the Trp residue of gHSA(FRC) becomes less accessible for the negatively charged quencher (I(-)), KSV value is smaller for gHSA(FRC) than for HSA. TNS fluorescent measurement demonstrated the decrease of hydrophobicity in the glycated albumin. KSV constants for gHSA-PHB systems are higher than for the

  19. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of squamosa-promoter binding proteins (sbp) transcription factor family in gossypium raimondii and arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.A.; Alia, K.B.; Atif, R.M.; Rasulj, I.; Nadeem, H.U.; Shahid, A.; Azeem, F

    2017-01-01

    SQUAMOSA-Promoter Binding Proteins (SBP) are class of transcription factors that play vital role in regulation of plant tissue growth and development. The genes encoding these proteins have not yet been identified in diploid cotton. Thus here, a comprehensive genome wide analysis of SBP genes/proteins was carried out to identify the genes encoding SBP proteins in Gossypium raimondii and Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 17 SBP genes from Arabidopsis thaliana genome and 30 SBP genes from Gossypium raimondii. Chromosome localization studies revealed the uneven distribution of SBP encoding genes both in the genomes of A. thaliana and G. raimondii. In cotton, five SBP genes were located on chromosome no. 2, while no gene was found on chromosome 9. In A. thaliana, maximum seven SBP genes were identified on chromosome 9, while chromosome 4 did not have any SBP gene. Thus, the SBP gene family might have expanded as a result of segmental as well as tandem duplications in these species. The comparative phylogenetic analysis of Arabidopsis and cotton SBPs revealed the presence of eight groups. The gene structure analysis of SBP encoding genes revealed the presence of one to eleven inrons in both Arabidopsis and G. raimondii. The proteins sharing the same phyletic group mostly demonstrated the similar intron-exon occurrence pattern; and share the common conserved domains. The SBP DNA-binding domain shared 24 absolutely conserved residues in Arabidopsis. The present study can serve as a base for the functional characterization of SBP gene family in Gossypium raimondii. (author)

  20. HPC Analysis of Multiple Binding Sites Communication and Allosteric Modulations in Drug Design: The HSP Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappori, Federica; Milanesi, Luciano; Merelli, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a long-range macromolecular mechanism of internal regulation, in which the binding of a ligand in an allosteric site induces distant conformational changes in a distant portion of the protein, modifying its activity. From the drug design point of view, this mechanism can be exploited to achieve important therapeutic effects, since ligands able to bind allosteric sites may be designed to regulate target proteins. Computational tools are a valid support in this sense, since they allow the characterization of allosteric communications within proteins, which are essential to design modulator ligands. While considering long-range interactions in macromolecules, the principal drug design tool available to researcher is molecular dynamics, and related applications, since it allows the evaluation of conformational changes of a protein bound to a ligand. In particular, all-atoms molecular dynamics is suitable to verify the internal mechanisms that orchestrate allosteric communications, in order to identify key residues and internal pathways that modify the protein behaviour. The problem is that these techniques are heavily time-consuming and computationally intensive, thus high performance computing systems, including parallel computing and GPU-accelerated computations, are necessary to achieve results in a reasonable time. In this review, we will discuss how it is possible to exploit in silico approaches to characterize allosteric modulations and long-range interactions within proteins, describing the case study of the Heat Shock Proteins, a class of chaperons regulated by stress conditions, which is particularly important since it is involved in many cancers and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Plasma membrane proteome analysis identifies a role of barley Membrane Steroid Binding Protein in root architecture response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Katja; Matros, Andrea; Møller, Anders L B; Ramireddy, Eswarrayya; Finnie, Christine; Peukert, Manuela; Rutten, Twan; Herzog, Andreas; Kunze, Gotthard; Melzer, Michael; Kaspar-Schoenefeld, Stephanie; Schmülling, Thomas; Svensson, Birte; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2018-01-31

    Although physiological consequences of plant growth under saline conditions have been well described, understanding the core mechanisms conferring plant salt adaptation has only started. We target the root plasma membrane (PM) proteomes of two barley varieties, cvs. Steptoe and Morex, with contrasting salinity tolerance. In total, 588 PM proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, of which 182 were either cultivar- or salinity stress-responsive. Three candidate proteins with increased abundance in the tolerant cv. Morex were involved either in sterol-binding (a GTPase-activating protein for the ADP ribosylation factor, ZIGA2, and a membrane steroid binding protein, MSBP) or in phospholipid synthesis (phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, PEAMT). Overexpression of barley MSBP conferred salinity tolerance to yeast cells, while knock-out of the heterologous AtMSBP1 increased salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis. Atmsbp1 plants showed a reduced number of lateral roots under salinity and root tip-specific expression of barley MSBP in Atmsbp1 complemented this phenotype. In barley, an increased abundance of MSBP correlates with reduced root length and lateral root formation as well as increased levels of auxin under salinity being stronger in the tolerant cv. Morex. Hence, we concluded the involvement of MSBP in phytohormone-directed adaptation of root architecture in response to salinity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfosse, Vanessa [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (France); Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Institut des Cordeliers, Paris (France); Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine, E-mail: mayer@chups.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (France)

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry.

  3. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative analysis of hepatitis B virus polymerase sequences required for viral RNA binding, RNA packaging, and protein priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott A; Clark, Daniel N; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E; Hu, Jianming

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus replicates a DNA genome through reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) by using a multifunctional polymerase (HP). A critical function of HP is its specific association with a viral RNA signal, termed ε (Hε), located on pgRNA, which is required for specific packaging of pgRNA into viral nucleocapsids and initiation of viral reverse transcription. HP initiates reverse transcription by using itself as a protein primer (protein priming) and Hε as the obligatory template. HP is made up of four domains, including the terminal protein (TP), the spacer, the reverse transcriptase (RT), and the RNase H domains. A recently developed, Hε-dependent, in vitro protein priming assay was used in this study to demonstrate that almost the entire TP and RT domains and most of the RNase H domain were required for protein priming. Specific residues within TP, RT, and the spacer were identified as being critical for HP-Hε binding and/or protein priming. Comparison of HP sequence requirements for Hε binding, pgRNA packaging, and protein priming allowed the classification of the HP mutants into five groups, each with distinct effects on these complex and related processes. Detailed characterization of HP requirements for these related and essential functions of HP will further elucidate the mechanisms of its multiple functions and aid in the targeting of these functions for antiviral therapy.

  5. In Vitro Methods for Comparing Target Binding and CDC Induction Between Therapeutic Antibodies: Applications in Biosimilarity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemi; González-González, Edith; Vásquez-Bochm, Luz X; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A

    2017-05-04

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are relevant to the treatment of different pathologies, including cancers. The development of biosimilar mAbs by pharmaceutical companies is a market opportunity, but it is also a strategy to increase drug accessibility and reduce therapy-associated costs. The protocols detailed here describe the evaluation of target binding and CDC induction by rituximab in Daudi cells. These two functions require different structural regions of the antibody and are relevant to the clinical effect induced by rituximab. The protocols allow the side-to-side comparison of a reference rituximab and a marketed rituximab biosimilar. The evaluated products showed differences both in target binding and CDC induction, suggesting that there are underlying physicochemical differences and highlighting the need to analyze the impact of those differences in the clinical setting. The methods reported here constitute simple and inexpensive in vitro models for the evaluation of the activity of rituximab biosimilars. Thus, they can be useful during biosimilar development, as well as for quality control in biosimilar production. Furthermore, the presented methods can be extrapolated to other therapeutic mAbs.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of p63 binding sites identifies AP-2 factors as co-regulators of epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Simon S; Henry, Alexandra E; Pivato, Geraldine P; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Constantinos; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Orr, Nicholas; Lord, Christopher J; Patel, Daksha; Ashworth, Alan; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-08-01

    The p63 transcription factor (TP63) is critical in development, growth and differentiation of stratifying epithelia. This is highlighted by the severity of congenital abnormalities caused by TP63 mutations in humans, the dramatic phenotypes in knockout mice and de-regulation of TP63 expression in neoplasia altering the tumour suppressive roles of the TP53 family. In order to define the normal role played by TP63 and provide the basis for better understanding how this network is perturbed in disease, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify >7500 high-confidence TP63-binding regions across the entire genome, in primary human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Using integrative strategies, we demonstrate that only a subset of these sites are bound by TP53 in response to DNA damage. We identify a role for TP63 in transcriptional regulation of multiple genes genetically linked to cleft palate and identify AP-2alpha (TFAP2A) as a co-regulator of a subset of these genes. We further demonstrate that AP-2gamma (TFAP2C) can bind a subset of these regions and that acute depletion of either TFAP2A or TFAP2C alone is sufficient to reduce terminal differentiation of organotypic epidermal skin equivalents, indicating overlapping physiological functions with TP63.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo, E-mail: max.paoli@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding.

  9. 26kDa endochitinase from barley seeds: real-time monitoring of the enzymatic reaction and substrate binding experiments using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dennhart, Nicole; Weigang, Linda M M; Fujiwara, Maho

    2009-01-01

    A 26 kDa endochitinase from barley seeds was enzymatically characterized exclusively by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). At first, oligosaccharide hydrolysis catalyzed by the barley chitinase was monitored in real-time by ESI-MS. The reaction time-course obtained by ESI......-MS monitoring was found to be consistent with the data obtained earlier by HPLC, and the quantitative profile was successfully simulated by kinetic modeling of the enzymatic hydrolysis. It is obvious that the real-time monitoring method by ESI-MS allows a faster and cheaper determination of the chitinase...... of the enzymatic activity in E67Q is definitely caused by a point mutation of Glu67 but not due to partial unfolding of the mutated enzyme. Finally, association constants of enzyme-oligosaccharide complexes were calculated from Scatchard plots obtained by mass spectra. The binding free energy values obtained for E...

  10. Interaction of leukotriene C4 and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79A03 cells). 1. Characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, T A; Contois, D F; Liu, Y X; Watt, D S; Walden, T L

    1990-10-01

    A novel, specific, and potent biological action of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) was demonstrated in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line V79A03 (V79 cells), namely the confirment of protection against subsequent gamma-irradiation. Consequently, studies were conducted to determine whether LTC4-conferred radioprotection could be attributed to a receptor-mediated phenomenon. Specific binding sites for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were identified and characterized using intact V79 cells incubated at 4 degrees C in the presence of serine-borate, during which time conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 was undetectable. Binding was maximal in a broad region between pH 6.2 and 8.8. Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ were not required for binding, and binding was not altered by GTP, ATP, or cAMP, by leukotrienes B4, D4, or E4, or by the leukotriene end point antagonists LY 171883, FPL 55712, or Revlon 5901-5. Scatchard analyses and kinetic experiments indicated the presence of high-affinity [Kd = 2.5 +/- 0.63 nM, approximately 9.9 x 10(5) sites/cell] and low-affinity [Kd = 350 +/- 211 nM, approximately 2.7 x 10(6) sites/cell] binding sites. The observed binding characteristics of LTC4 to V79 cells are consistent with a receptor-mediated phenomenon. In a companion communication which follows this report, we report the subcellular distribution of LTC4 binding to V79 cells and demonstrate that this binding is unlikely to be attributed principally to interaction with glutathione-S-transferase.

  11. Crystal structures of the DNA-binding domain of Escherichia coli proline utilization A flavoprotein and analysis of the role of Lys9 in DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John D; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Zhou, Yuzhen; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2006-11-01

    PutA (proline utilization A) from Escherichia coli is a 1320-amino-acid residue protein that is both a bifunctional proline catabolic enzyme and an autogenous transcriptional repressor. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a PutA DNA-binding domain along with functional analysis of a mutant PutA defective in DNA binding. Crystals were grown using a polypeptide corresponding to residues 1-52 of E. coli PutA (PutA52). The 2.1 Angstrom resolution structure of PutA52 mutant Lys9Met was determined using Se-Met MAD phasing, and the structure of native PutA52 was solved at 1.9 Angstrom resolution using molecular replacement. Residues 3-46 form a ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) substructure, thus establishing PutA as the largest protein to contain an RHH domain. The PutA RHH domain forms the intertwined dimer with tightly packed hydrophobic core that is characteristic of the RHH family. The structures were used to examine the three-dimensional context of residues conserved in PutA RHH domains. Homology modeling suggests that Lys9 and Thr5 contact DNA bases through the major groove, while Arg15, Thr28, and His30 may interact with the phosphate backbone. Lys9 is shown to be essential for specific recognition of put control DNA using gel shift analysis of the Lys9Met mutant of full-length PutA. Lys9 is disordered in the PutA52 structure, which implies an induced-fit binding mechanism in which the side chain of Lys9 becomes ordered through interaction with DNA. These results provide new insights into the structural basis of DNA recognition by PutA and reveal three-dimensional structural details of the PutA dimer interface.

  12. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  13. Pomegranate Cultivars: Identification of the New IgE-Binding Protein Pommaclein and Analysis of Antioxidant Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppo, Lisa; Alessandri, Claudia; Pasquariello, Maria Silvia; Petriccione, Milena; Giangrieco, Ivana; Tamburrini, Maurizio; Mari, Adriano; Ciardiello, Maria Antonietta

    2017-04-05

    The consumption of pomegranate is increasing as it is considered a health-promoting food. Nevertheless, it can trigger allergic reactions, sometimes severe. The LTP Pun g 1 is the only pomegranate allergen so far reported. Based on preliminary clinical observations, the main aim of this study was the investigation of still unknown allergens contained in this fruit. Pommaclein, a homologue of peamaclein, the peach allergen Pru p 7, was isolated, identified by protein sequencing, and characterized as an IgE-binding protein by different test systems. RP-HPLC protein profiles revealed significant variations of LTP and pommaclein content in the red pulp of selected cultivars and accessions. Conversely, the mesocarp appeared free of proteins and much richer in antioxidants. In conclusion, a new allergen has been identified, and it could contribute to improving allergy diagnosis. The study highlights that pomegranate mesocarp could represent a rich and safe source of nutraceuticals also for allergic subjects.

  14. HPLC analysis and cell surface receptor binding activities of the crude aqueous and methanolic extract of Sesamum indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Repon Kumer; Dinar, Md Abu Monsur; Nabila, Kausain Akther; Roy, Priyanka

    2014-05-01

    To identify the possible functional molecules for therapeutic uses by screening the crude aqueous and methanolic extracts derived from sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) in vitro. High performance liquid chromatography was used to scan the functional molecules present in the extracts. The crude aqueous extracts showed the possibilities to present caffeine and cetirizine or its derivatives like molecules. On the other hand, the crude methanolic extract may contain Loratadine or its derivatives like molecules. Both type of extracts showed hemagglutination inhibition activities in all types of human blood samples tested. However, they showed stronger binding with AB+ blood group than those of A+ and B+ blood. Sesame seeds may be considered as a functional food.

  15. Detecting drug-target binding in cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting coupled with mass spectrometry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kris; Webster, Scott P.; Iredale, John P.; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Homer, Natalie Z.; Pham, Nhan T.; Auer, Manfred; Mole, Damian J.

    2018-01-01

    The assessment of drug-target engagement for determining the efficacy of a compound inside cells remains challenging, particularly for difficult target proteins. Existing techniques are more suited to soluble protein targets. Difficult target proteins include those with challenging in vitro solubility, stability or purification properties that preclude target isolation. Here, we report a novel technique that measures intracellular compound-target complex formation, as well as cellular permeability, specificity and cytotoxicity-the toxicity-affinity-permeability-selectivity (TAPS) technique. The TAPS assay is exemplified here using human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a challenging intracellular membrane protein target of significant current interest. TAPS confirmed target binding of known KMO inhibitors inside cells. We conclude that the TAPS assay can be used to facilitate intracellular hit validation on most, if not all intracellular drug targets.

  16. Pictorial binding: endeavor to classify

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the classification of bindings of the 1-19th centuries with a unique and untypical book binding decoration technique (encaustic, tempera and oil paintings. Analysis of design features, materials and techniques of art decoration made it possible to identify them as a separate type - pictorial bindings and divide them into four groups. The first group consists of Coptic bindings, decorated with icon-painting images in encaustic technique. The second group is made up of leather Western bindings of the 13-14th centuries, which have the decoration and technique of ornamentation close to iconography. The third group involves parchment bindings, ornamentation technique of which is closer to the miniature. The last group comprises bindings of East Slavic origin of the 15-19th centuries, decorated with icon-painting pictures made in the technique of tempera or oil painting. The proposed classification requires further basic research as several specific kinds of bindings have not yet been investigated

  17. Analysis of multi-site drug-protein interactions by high-performance affinity chromatography: Binding by glimepiride to normal or glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-08-21

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used in a variety of formats to examine multi-site interactions between glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea drug, and normal or in vitro glycated forms of the transport protein human serum albumin (HSA). Frontal analysis revealed that glimepiride interacts with normal HSA and glycated HSA at a group of high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, or Ka, 9.2-11.8×10(5)M(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and a group of lower affinity regions (Ka, 5.9-16×10(3)M(-1)). Zonal elution competition studies were designed and carried out in both normal- and reversed-role formats to investigate the binding by this drug at specific sites. These experiments indicated that glimepiride was interacting at both Sudlow sites I and II. Allosteric effects were also noted with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I and with tamoxifen at the tamoxifen site on HSA. The binding at Sudlow site I had a 2.1- to 2.3-fold increase in affinity in going from normal HSA to the glycated samples of HSA. There was no significant change in the affinity for glimepiride at Sudlow site II in going from normal HSA to a moderately glycated sample of HSA, but a slight decrease in affinity was seen in going to a more highly glycated HSA sample. These results demonstrated how various HPAC-based methods can be used to profile and characterize multi-site binding by a drug such as glimepiride to a protein and its modified forms. The information obtained from this study should be useful in providing a better understanding of how drug-protein binding may be affected by glycation and of how separation and analysis methods based on HPAC can be employed to study systems with complex interactions or that involve modified proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of naphthofuran moiety as potential dual inhibitor against BACE-1 and GSK-3β: molecular dynamics simulations, binding energy, and network analysis to identify first-in-class dual inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhil; Srivastava, Gaurava; Srivastava, Swati; Verma, Seema; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2017-08-01

    BACE-1 and GSK-3β are potential therapeutic drug targets for Alzheimer's disease. Recently, both the targets received attention for designing dual inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease. Until now, only two-scaffold triazinone and curcumin have been reported as BACE-1 and GSK-3β dual inhibitors. Docking, molecular dynamics, clustering, binding energy, and network analysis of triazinone derivatives with BACE-1 and GSK-3β was performed to get molecular insight into the first reported dual inhibitor. Further, we designed and evaluated a naphthofuran series for its ability to inhibit BACE-1 and GSK-3β with the computational approaches. Docking study of naphthofuran series showed a good binding affinity towards both the targets. Molecular dynamics, binding energy, and network analysis were performed to compare their binding with the targets and amino acids responsible for binding. Naphthofuran series derivatives showed good interaction within the active site residues of both of the targets. Hydrogen bond occupancy and binding energy suggested strong binding with the targets. Dual-inhibitor binding was mostly governed by the hydrophobic interactions for both of the targets. Per residue energy decomposition and network analysis identified the key residues involved in the binding and inhibiting BACE-1 and GSK-3β. The results indicated that naphthofuran series derivative 11 may be a promising first-in-class dual inhibitor against BACE-1 and GSK-3β. This naphthofuran series may be further explored to design better dual inhibitors. Graphical abstract Naphthofuran derivative as a dual inhibitor for BACE-1 and GSK-3β.

  19. Crystal structures and mutational analysis of the arginine-, lysine-, histidine-binding protein ArtJ from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Implications for interactions of ArtJ with its cognate ATP-binding cassette transporter, Art(MP)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Eckey, Viola; Scheffel, Frank; Alings, Claudia; Landmesser, Heidi; Schneider, Erwin; Saenger, Wolfram

    2008-01-11

    ArtJ is the substrate-binding component (receptor) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system ArtJ-(MP)(2) from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus that is specific for arginine, lysine, and histidine. The highest affinity is found for arginine (K(d)=0.039(+/-0.014) microM), while the affinities for lysine and histidine are about tenfold lower. We have determined the X-ray structures of ArtJ liganded with each of these substrates at resolutions of 1.79 A (arginine), 1.79 A (lysine), and 2.35 A (histidine), respectively. As found for other solute receptors, the polypeptide chain is folded into two distinct domains (lobes) connected by a hinge. The interface between the lobes forms the substrate-binding pocket whose geometry is well preserved in all three ArtJ/amino acid complexes. Structure-derived mutational analyses indicated the crucial role of a region in the carboxy-terminal lobe of ArtJ in contacting the transport pore Art(MP)(2) and revealed the functional importance of Gln132 and Trp68. While variant Gln132Leu exhibited lower binding affinity for arginine but no binding of lysine and histidine, the variant Trp68Leu had lost binding activity for all three substrates. The results are discussed in comparison with known structures of homologous proteins from mesophilic bacteria.

  20. (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine binding as a probe for the study of adenosine uptake sites in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marangos, P.J.; Patel, J.; Clark-Rosenberg, R.; Martino, A.M.

    1982-07-01

    The binding of the potent adenosine uptake inhibitor (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) to brain membrane fractions was investigated. Reversible, saturable, specific, high-affinity binding was demonstrated in both rat and human brain. The KD in both was 0.15 nM with Bmax values of 140-200 fmol/mg protein. Linear Scatchard plots were routinely obtained, indicating a homogeneous population of binding sites in brain. The highest density of binding sites was found in the caudate and hypothalamus in both species. The binding site was heat labile and trypsin sensitive. Binding was also decreased by incubation of the membranes in 0.05% Triton X-100 and by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Of the numerous salt and metal ions tested, only copper and zinc had significant effects on (/sup 3/H)NBI binding. The inhibitory potencies of copper and zinc were IC50 . 160 microM and 6 mM, respectively. Subcellular distribution studies revealed a high percentage of the (/sup 3/H)NBI binding sites on synaptosomes, indicating that these sites were present in the synaptic region. A study of the tissue distribution of the (/sup 3/H)NBI sites revealed very high densities of binding in erythrocyte, lung, and testis, with much lower binding densities in brain, kidney, liver, muscle, and heart. The binding affinity in the former group was approximately 1.5 nM, whereas that in the latter group was 0.15 nM, suggesting two types of binding sites. The pharmacologic profile of (/sup 3/H)NBI binding was consistent with its function as the adenosine transport site, distinct from the adenosine receptor, since thiopurines were very potent inhibitors of binding whereas adenosine receptor ligands, such as cyclohexyladenosine and 2-chloroadenosine, were three to four orders of magnitude less potent. (/sup 3/H)NBI binding in brain should provide a useful probe for the study of adenosine transport in the brain.

  1. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States); Michael Garavito, R., E-mail: garavito@msu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Crystal structure of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor (PRR-IC) as MBP fusion protein at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). {yields} MBP fusion protein is a dimer in crystals in the presence and absence of maltose. {yields} PRR-IC domain is responsible for the dimerization of the fusion protein. {yields} Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermolecular interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in PRR dimerization. -- Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain ({approx}310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain ({approx}20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain ({approx}19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain ({approx}30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V{sub 0} portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR

  2. Multicompartmental analysis of (/sup 11/C)-carfentanil binding to opiate receptors in humans measured by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Douglass, K.H.; Mayberg, H.S.; Dannals, R.F.; Links, J.M.; Wilson, A.A.; Ravert, H.T.; Crozier, W.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    (11C)-Carfentanil is a high affinity opiate agonist that can be used to localize mu opiate receptors in humans by positron emission tomography (PET). A four-compartment model was used to obtain quantitative estimates of rate constants for receptor association and dissociation. PET studies were performed in five normal subjects in the absence and presence of 1 mg/kg naloxone. Arterial plasma concentration of (11C)-carfentanil and its labeled metabolites were determined during each PET study. The value of k3/k4 = Bmax/kD was determined for each subject in the presence and absence of naloxone. There was a significant reduction in the value of k3/k4 from 3.4 +/- 0.92 to 0.26 +/- 0.13 in the thalamus (p less than 0.01) and from 1.8 +/- 0.33 to 0.16 +/- 0.065 in the frontal cortex (p less than 0.001). Mean values of frontal cortex/occipital cortex and thalamus/occipital cortex ratios were determined for the interval 35-70 min after injection when receptor binding is high relative to nonspecific binding. The relationship between the measured region/occipital cortex values and the corresponding values of k3/k4 in the presence and absence of naloxone was: regions/occipital cortex = 0.95 + 0.74 (k3/k4) with r = 0.98 (n = 20). Simulation studies also demonstrated a linear relationship between the thalamus/occipital cortex or frontal cortex/occipital cortex ratio and k3/k4 for less than twofold increases or decreases in k3/k4. Simulation studies in which thalamic blood flow was varied demonstrated no significant effect on the region/occipital cortex ratio at 35-70 min for a twofold increase or fourfold decrease in blood flow. Therefore, the region/occipital cortex ratio can be used to quantitate changes in k3/k4 when tracer kinetic modeling is not feasible.

  3. Binding Analysis of Some Classical Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Insights for a Rational Design Using Free Energy Perturbation Method Calculations with QM/MM MD Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Świderek, Katarzyna; Martins, João B L; Andrés, Juan

    2017-04-24

    In the present study, the binding free energy of some classical inhibitors (DMT, DNP, GNT, HUP, THA) with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation (FEP) method based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials. The results highlight the key role of the van der Waals interaction for the inhibition process, since the contribution of this term to the binding free energy is almost as decisive as the electrostatic one. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and the interaction energy per residue along the QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD) simulations highlights the most relevant interactions in the different AChE-ligand systems, showing that the charged residues with a more prominent contribution to the interaction energy are Asp72 and Glu199, although the relative importance depends on the molecular size of the ligand. A correlation between the binding free energy and the number of cation-π interactions present in the systems has been established, DMT being the most potent inhibitor, capable of forming four cation-π interactions. A layer of water molecules surrounding the inhibitors has been observed, which act as bridges along a network formed by the ligands and the residues of the gorge and also between different residues. Although several hydrogen bonds between ligands and AChE do appear, no significant values of BIEs have been recorded. This behavior can be accounted for by the special features of AChE, such as the presence of several subsites of different natures in the gorge or the existence of several water molecules that act as bridges in the electrostatic interactions.

  4. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 0 C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17β-[ 3 H]estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins

  5. Binding of heparin and compound Y to endothelial cells stimulates the synthesis of an antithrombotic heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, M A; Silva, I F; Lee, T C; Dietrich, C P; Nader, H B

    1994-09-01

    The mechanism by which heparin and antithrombotic agents, including a cyclic octaphenolsulfonic acid (compound Y), stimulate the synthesis of an antithrombotic heparan sulfate by endothelial cells in culture was investigated. Compound Y increases the amount of heparan sulfate from the cell surface and secreted to the medium by endothelial cells by three-fold. Binding experiments have shown saturation of the endothelial cell receptors at a concentration of 0.16 microM for heparin and 2.7 microM for compound Y. The kinetic binding constants (Ks) for compound Y and heparin were 1,333 nM and 42 nM, respectively. It was also shown that both compounds bind to the same receptors. The Scatchard plots indicated that 1,319 nmoles compound Y and 35 nmoles heparin bound per microgram cell protein, indicating that 40-fold more molecules of compound Y bound to the receptors when compared to heparin. No significant internalization of the compounds was observed.

  6. Binding Mode Prediction of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2C Receptor Ligands by Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Asif; Nagarajan, Shanthi; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Pae, Ae Nim

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 2C (5-HT 2C ) receptor belongs to class A amine subfamily of Gprotein- coupled receptor (GPCR) super family and its ligands has therapeutic promise as anti-depressant and -obesity agents. So far, bovine rhodopsin from class A opsin subfamily was the mostly used X-ray crystal template to model this receptor. Here, we explained homology model using beta 2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the model was energetically minimized and validated by flexible ligand docking with known agonists and antagonists. In the active site Asp134, Ser138 of transmembrane 3 (TM3), Arg195 of extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) and Tyr358 of TM7 were found as important residues to interact with agonists. In addition to these, V208 of ECL2 and N351 of TM7 was found to interact with antagonists. Several conserved residues including Trp324, Phe327 and Phe328 were also found to contribute hydrophobic interaction. The predicted ligand binding mode is in good agreement with published mutagenesis and homology model data. This new template derived homology model can be useful for further virtual screening based lead identification

  7. In silico binding analysis and SAR elucidations of newly designed benzopyrazine analogs as potent inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Rahim, Fazal; Wadood, Abdul; Al Muqarrabun, Laode Muhammad Ramadhan; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ghufran, Mehreen; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is up regulated in wide variety of solid tumors and therefore presents a remarkable target for drug discovery in cancer. A novel class of extremely potent TPase inhibitors based on benzopyrazine (1-28) has been developed and evaluated against thymidine phosphorylase enzyme. Out of these twenty-eight analogs eleven (11) compounds 1, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24 and 28 showed potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory potentials with IC50 values ranged between 3.20±0.30 and 37.60±1.15μM when compared with the standard 7-Deazaxanthine (IC50=38.68±4.42μM). Structure-activity relationship was established and molecular docking studies were performed to determine the binding interactions of these newly synthesized compounds. Current studies have revealed that these compounds established stronger hydrogen bonding networks with active site residues as compare to the standard compound 7DX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Analysis of Protein Expression in RNA-Binding-Protein Transgenic and Parental Rice Seeds Cultivated under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in protein expression under salt stress, NT and RBP rice were cultured with or without 200 mM sodium chloride. Only two protein spots differed between NT and RBP rice seeds cultured under normal conditions, one of which was identified as a putative abscisic acid-induced protein. In NT rice seeds, 91 spots significantly differed between normal and salt-stress conditions. Two allergenic proteins of NT rice seeds, RAG1 and RAG2, were induced by high salt. In contrast, RBP rice seeds yielded seven spots and no allergen spots with significant differences in protein expression between normal and salt-stress conditions. Therefore, expression of fewer proteins was altered in RBP rice seeds by high salt than those in NT rice seeds. PMID:24410502

  9. Binding Mode Prediction of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2C Receptor Ligands by Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Asif; Nagarajan, Shanthi; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Pae, Ae Nim [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 2C (5-HT{sub 2C}) receptor belongs to class A amine subfamily of Gprotein- coupled receptor (GPCR) super family and its ligands has therapeutic promise as anti-depressant and -obesity agents. So far, bovine rhodopsin from class A opsin subfamily was the mostly used X-ray crystal template to model this receptor. Here, we explained homology model using beta 2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the model was energetically minimized and validated by flexible ligand docking with known agonists and antagonists. In the active site Asp134, Ser138 of transmembrane 3 (TM3), Arg195 of extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) and Tyr358 of TM7 were found as important residues to interact with agonists. In addition to these, V208 of ECL2 and N351 of TM7 was found to interact with antagonists. Several conserved residues including Trp324, Phe327 and Phe328 were also found to contribute hydrophobic interaction. The predicted ligand binding mode is in good agreement with published mutagenesis and homology model data. This new template derived homology model can be useful for further virtual screening based lead identification.

  10. A Combined Genetic, Biochemical, and Biophysical Analysis of the A1 Phylloquinone Binding Site of Photosystem I from Green Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin E. Redding

    2011-12-17

    This project has resulted in the increase in our understanding of how proteins interact with and influence the properties of bound cofactors. This information is important for several reasons, including providing essential information for the re-engineering of biological molecules, such as proteins, for either improved function or entirely new ones. In particular, we have found that a molecule, such as the phylloquinone used in Photosystem I (PS1), can be made a stronger electron donor by placing it in a hydrophobic environment surrounded by negative charges. In addition, the protein is constrained in its interactions with the phylloqinone, in that it must bind the cofactor tightly, but not in such a way that would stabilize the reduced (negatively-charged) version of the molecule. We have used a combination of molecular genetics, in order to make specific mutations in the region of the phylloquinone, and an advanced form of spectroscopy capable of monitoring the transfer of electrons within PS1 using living cells as the material. This approach turned out to produce a significant savings in time and supplies, as it allowed us to focus quickly on the mutants that produced interesting effects, without having to go through laborious purification of the affected proteins. We followed up selected mutants using other spectroscopic techniques in order to gain more specialized information. In addition to the main project funded by this work, this grant supported several related side-projects that also increased our understanding about related issues.

  11. Differential analysis of protein expression in RNA-binding-protein transgenic and parental rice seeds cultivated under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rika; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Adachi, Reiko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Yamada, Akiyo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2014-02-07

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in protein expression under salt stress, NT and RBP rice were cultured with or without 200 mM sodium chloride. Only two protein spots differed between NT and RBP rice seeds cultured under normal conditions, one of which was identified as a putative abscisic acid-induced protein. In NT rice seeds, 91 spots significantly differed between normal and salt-stress conditions. Two allergenic proteins of NT rice seeds, RAG1 and RAG2, were induced by high salt. In contrast, RBP rice seeds yielded seven spots and no allergen spots with significant differences in protein expression between normal and salt-stress conditions. Therefore, expression of fewer proteins was altered in RBP rice seeds by high salt than those in NT rice seeds.

  12. Binding site asymmetry in human transthyretin: insights from a joint neutron and X-ray crystallographic analysis using perdeuterated protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Haupt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human transthyretin has an intrinsic tendency to form amyloid fibrils and is heavily implicated in senile systemic amyloidosis. Here, detailed neutron structural studies of perdeuterated transthyretin are described. The analyses, which fully exploit the enhanced visibility of isotopically replaced hydrogen atoms, yield new information on the stability of the protein and the possible mechanisms of amyloid formation. Residue Ser117 may play a pivotal role in that a single water molecule is closely associated with the γ-hydrogen atoms in one of the binding pockets, and could be important in determining which of the two sites is available to the substrate. The hydrogen-bond network at the monomer–monomer interface is more extensive than that at the dimer–dimer interface. Additionally, the edge strands of the primary dimer are seen to be favourable for continuation of the β-sheet and the formation of an extended cross-β structure through sequential dimer couplings. It is argued that the precursor to fibril formation is the dimeric form of the protein.

  13. A Combined Genetic, Biochemical, and Biophysical Analysis of the A1 Phylloquinone Binding Site of Photosystem I from Green Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin E. Redding

    2008-05-31

    This project has resulted in the increase in our understanding of how proteins interact with and influence the properties of bound cofactors. This information is important for several reasons, including providing essential information for the re-engineering of biological molecules, such as proteins, for either improved function or entirely new ones. In particular, we have found that a molecule, such as the phylloquinone used in Photosystem I (PS1), can be made a stronger electron donor by placing it in a hydrophobic (greasy) environment surrounded by negative charges. In addition, the protein is constrained in its interactions with the phylloqinone, in that it must bind the cofactor tightly, but not in such a way that would stabilize the reduced (natively-charged) version of the molecule. We have used a combination of molecular genetics, in order to make specific mutations in the region of the phylloquinone, and an advanced form of spectroscopy capable of monitoring the transfer of electrons within PS1 using living cells as the material. This approach turned out to produce a significant savings in time and supplies, as it allowed us to focus quickly on the mutants that produced interesting effects, without having to go through laborious purification of the affected proteins. We followed up selected mutants using other spectroscopic techniques in order to gain more specialized information.

  14. Evaluating the Immunogenicity of Protein Drugs by Applying In Vitro MHC Binding Data and the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinu Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has evolved to become highly specialized in recognizing and responding to pathogens and foreign molecules. Specifically, the function of HLA class II is to ensure that a sufficient sample of peptides derived from foreign molecules is presented to T cells. This leads to an important concern in human drug development as the possible immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals, especially those intended for chronic administration, can lead to reduced efficacy and an undesired safety profile for biological therapeutics. As part of this review, we will highlight the molecular basis of antigen presentation as a key step in the induction of T cell responses, emphasizing the events associated with peptide binding to polymorphic and polygenic HLA class II molecules. We will further review methodologies that predict HLA class II binding peptides and candidate epitopes. We will focus on tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, discussing the basic features of different prediction methods, the objective evaluation of prediction quality, and general guidelines for practical use of these tools. Finally the use, advantages, and limitations of the methodology will be demonstrated in a review of two previous studies investigating the immunogenicity of erythropoietin and timothy grass pollen.

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  16. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-01-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8* 64–223 ) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8* 64–223 structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3 2 21 and monoclinic P2 1 ) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8* 64–223 structure by molecular replacement

  17. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus-Angel; Sauri, Ana; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed

  18. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  20. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  1. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the

  2. Tight-binding analysis of current oscillation in nanoscale In0.53Ga0.47As Schottky MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangari, Zahra; Fathipour, Morteza

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive study of band structure effect on the quantum transport of nanoscale In0.53Ga0.47As Schottky MOSFET for the implementation of III-V MOSFET with low source/drain series resistance is presented. Rigorous treatment of the full band structure in ultra-thin body MOSFET is employed using sp3d5s* tight-binding approach. Strong transverse confinement increases the energy of subbands and, indeed, the effective Schottky barrier height. Due to enhanced Schottky barriers and at low drain voltages, a double barrier gate modulated potential well is created along the channel that results in source-to-drain confinement of states. As tunnelling is the main current component in this device, longitudinal confinement induces drain current oscillation at low temperatures. Important factors that may affect current oscillation are demonstrated. Current oscillation that alters the normal performance of the device is investigated in nanowire Schottky MOSFET, as well. Additional quantum confinement in nanowire Schottky MOSFET provides higher effective Schottky barrier height than the double gate structure. Accordingly, the drain current oscillation is more apparent in nanowire Schottky MOSFET than in the double gate device and is gradually smoothed out as the gate length shrinks down in ultra-scaled structure. Effect of diffusive scattering on the quantum transport of the device is investigated, too. What is prominent in our result is that the drain current oscillations degrade as the channel mobility is decreased. The results in this paper are paving a way to elucidate the feasibility of this device in the nanoscale regime.

  3. A general method of analysis of ligand binding to competing macromolecules using the spectroscopic signal originating from a reference macromolecule. Application to Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB protein nucleic acid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezewska, M J; Bujalowski, W

    1996-02-20

    Quantitative and accurate analyses of protein-nucleic acid interactions in solution are greatly facilitated if the formation of the complex is accompanied by a large change of the spectroscopic signal (e.g., fluorescence) originating from the protein or nucleic acid. However, there are many instances when protein-nucleic acid interactions do not induce adequate changes in spectroscopic properties of the interacting macromolecules. We describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of a general method to analyze such protein-nucleic acid interactions. The method is based on quantitative titrations of a reference nucleic acid with the protein in the presence of a competing nucleic acid whose interaction parameters with the protein are to be determined. The Macromolecule Competition Titration (MCT) method allows for the determination of the absolute average binding density and the free protein ligand concentration over a large binding density range, unavailable by other methods, and construction of a model-independent true binding isotherm. Moreover, the determination of the absolute binding density of the ligand on nonfluorescent nucleic acid is independent of a priori knowledge of the binding characteristics of the protein to the reference fluorescent nucleic acid. Although the MCT method is applicable to any type of physicochemical signal that can be used to monitor the binding, we discuss the details of the method as it applies to the analysis monitored by a change in the nucleic acid fluorescence intensity and anisotropy upon binding a ligand. Moreover, the interaction parameters for a given nucleic acid can be determined by using as a reference the long polymer nucleic acid as well as short oligomers. In particular, the analysis is greatly simplified if the short fluorescent nucleic acid fragment, spanning the exact site-size of the complex and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. We have illustrated the

  4. Functional analysis of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Aspergillus fumigatus by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2013-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the major filamentous fungal pathogen in humans. Although A. fumigatus can be treated with many of the available antifungal drugs, including azole compounds, drug resistant isolates are being recovered at an increasing rate. In other fungal pathogens such as the Candida species, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins play important roles in development of clinically-significant azole resistance phenotypes. Central among these ABC transporter proteins are homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 multidrug transporter. In this work, we test the two A. fumigatus genes encoding proteins sharing the highest degree of sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 for their ability to be function in a heterologous pdr5Δ strain of S. cerevisiae. Expression of full-length cDNAs for these two Afu proteins failed to suppress the drug sensitive phenotype of a pdr5Δ strain and no evidence could be obtained for their expression as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. To improve the expression of one of these Afu ABC transporters (XP_755847), we changed the sequence of the cDNA to use codons corresponding to the major tRNA species in S. cerevisiae. This codon-optimized (CO Afu abcA) cDNA was efficiently expressed in pdr5Δ cells and able to be detected as a GFP fusion protein. The CO Afu abcA did not correct the drug sensitivity of the pdr5Δ strain and exhibited a high degree of perinuclear fluorescence suggesting that this fusion protein was localized to the S. cerevisiae ER. Interestingly, when these experiments were repeated at 37 °C, the CO Afu abcA was able to complement the drug sensitive phenotype of pdr5Δ cells and exhibited less intracellular fluorescence. Additionally, we found that the CO Afu abcA was able to reduce resistance to drugs like phytosphingosine that act via causing mislocalization of amino acid permeases in fungi. These data suggest that the Afu abcA protein can carry out two different functions of Pdr5: drug

  5. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

  6. Flow-Induced Dispersion Analysis for Probing Anti-dsDNA Antibody Binding Heterogeneity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Pedersen, Morten E; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    , specificity, and accuracy with established assays. Also, existing methodologies for quantification of autoantibodies are challenging to transfer to a point-of-care setting. Here we present the use of flow-induced dispersion analysis (FIDA) for rapid (minutes) measurement of autoantibodies against ds......DNA. The assay is based on Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) and is fully automated with the use of standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) based equipment employing fluorescence detection. It is robust toward matrix effects as demonstrated by the direct analysis of samples composed of up to 85% plasma derived...... from human blood samples, and it allows for flexible exchange of the DNA sequences used to probe for the autoantibodies. Plasma samples from SLE positive patients were analyzed using the new FIDA methodology as well as by standard indirect immunofluorescence and solid-phase immunoassays. Interestingly...

  7. ChIP-seq analysis of genomic binding regions of five major transcription factors highlights a central role for ZIC2 in the mouse epiblast stem cell gene regulatory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazunari; Oki, Shinya; Iida, Hideaki; Andrabi, Munazah; Yamaguchi, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    To obtain insight into the transcription factor (TF)-dependent regulation of epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), we performed ChIP-seq analysis of the genomic binding regions of five major TFs. Analysis of in vivo biotinylated ZIC2, OTX2, SOX2, POU5F1 and POU3F1 binding in EpiSCs identified several new features. (1) Megabase-scale genomic domains rich in ZIC2 peaks and genes alternate with those rich in POU3F1 but sparse in genes, reflecting the clustering of regulatory regions that act at short and long-range, which involve binding of ZIC2 and POU3F1, respectively. (2) The enhancers bound by ZIC2 and OTX2 prominently regulate TF genes in EpiSCs. (3) The binding sites for SOX2 and POU5F1 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and EpiSCs are divergent, reflecting the shift in the major acting TFs from SOX2/POU5F1 in ESCs to OTX2/ZIC2 in EpiSCs. (4) This shift in the major acting TFs appears to be primed by binding of ZIC2 in ESCs at relevant genomic positions that later function as enhancers following the disengagement of SOX2/POU5F1 from major regulatory functions and subsequent binding by OTX2. These new insights into EpiSC gene regulatory networks gained from this study are highly relevant to early stage embryogenesis. PMID:28455373

  8. A Large-Scale Analysis of Genetic Variants within Putative miRNA Binding Sites in Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegeman, Shane; Amankwah, Ernest; Klein, Kerenaftali

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Prostate cancer is the second most common malignancy among men worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 100 risk variants for prostate cancer, which can explain approximately 33% of the familial risk of the disease. We hypothesized that a comprehensive analysis of ge...

  9. In silico and in vivo analysis of Toxoplasma gondii epitopes by correlating survival data with peptide-MHC-I binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Si-Yang; Jensen, Maria Risager; Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Petersen, Eskild; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Protein antigens comprising peptide motifs with high binding affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are expected to induce a stronger cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and thus provide better protection against infection with microorganisms where cytotoxic T-cells are the main effector arm of the immune system. Data on cyst formation and survival were extracted from past studies on the DNA immunization of mice with plasmids coding for Toxoplasma gondii antigens. From in silico analyses of the vaccine antigens, the correlation was tested between the predicted affinity for MHC-I molecules of the vaccine peptides and the survival of immunized mice after challenge with T. gondii. ELISPOT analysis was used for the experimental testing of peptide immunogenicity. Predictions for the Db MHC-I molecule produced a strong, negative correlation between survival and the dissociation constant of vaccine-derived peptides. The in silico analyses of nine T. gondii antigens identified peptides with a predicted dissociation constant in the interval from 10nM to 40μM. ELISPOT assays with splenocytes from T. gondii-infected mice further supported the importance of the peptide affinity for MHC-I. In silico analysis clearly helped the search for protective vaccine antigens. The ELISPOT analysis confirmed that the predicted T-cell epitopes were immunogenic by their ability to release interferon gamma in spleen cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective transcription factor binding site prediction using a combination of optimization, a genetic algorithm and discriminant analysis to capture distant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Victor G; Ignatieva, Elena V; Ananko, Elena A; Turnaev, Igor I; Merkulova, Tatyana I; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Hodgman, T C

    2007-12-19

    Reliable transcription factor binding site (TFBS) prediction methods are essential for computer annotation of large amount of genome sequence data. However, current methods to predict TFBSs are hampered by the high false-positive rates that occur when only sequence conservation at the core binding-sites is considered. To improve this situation, we have quantified the performance of several Position Weight Matrix (PWM) algorithms, using exhaustive approaches to find their optimal length and position. We applied these approaches to bio-medically important TFBSs involved in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation as well as in inflammatory, immune, and antiviral responses (NF-kappaB, ISGF3, IRF1, STAT1), obesity and lipid metabolism (PPAR, SREBP, HNF4), regulation of the steroidogenic (SF-1) and cell cycle (E2F) genes expression. We have also gained extra specificity using a method, entitled SiteGA, which takes into account structural interactions within TFBS core and flanking regions, using a genetic algorithm (GA) with a discriminant function of locally positioned dinucleotide (LPD) frequencies. To ensure a higher confidence in our approach, we applied resampling-jackknife and bootstrap tests for the comparison, it appears that, optimized PWM and SiteGA have shown similar recognition performances. Then we applied SiteGA and optimized PWMs (both separately and together) to sequences in the Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD). The resulting SiteGA recognition models can now be used to search sequences for BSs using the web tool, SiteGA. Analysis of dependencies between close and distant LPDs revealed by SiteGA models has shown that the most significant correlations are between close LPDs, and are generally located in the core (footprint) region. A greater number of less significant correlations are mainly between distant LPDs, which spanned both core and flanking regions. When SiteGA and optimized PWM models were applied together, this substantially reduced

  11. New insights into metal interactions with the prion protein: EXAFS analysis and structure calculations of copper binding to a single octarepeat from the prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Alex; Pushie, M Jake; Millhauser, Glenn L; George, Graham N

    2013-11-07

    Copper coordination to the prion protein (PrP) has garnered considerable interest for almost 20 years, due in part to the possibility that this interaction may be part of the normal function of PrP. The most characterized form of copper binding to PrP has been Cu(2+) interaction with the conserved tandem repeats in the N-terminal domain of PrP, termed the octarepeats, with many studies focusing on single and multiple repeats of PHGGGWGQ. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used in several previous instances to characterize the solution structure of Cu(2+) binding into the peptide backbone in the HGGG portion of the octarepeats. All previous EXAFS studies, however, have benefitted from crystallographic structure information for [Cu(II) (Ac-HGGGW-NH2)(-2H)] but have not conclusively demonstrated that the complex EXAFS spectrum represents the same coordination environment for Cu(2+) bound to the peptide backbone. Density functional structure calculations as well as full multiple scattering EXAFS curve fitting analysis are brought to bear on the predominant coordination mode for Cu(2+) with the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH2 peptide at physiological pH, under high Cu(2+) occupancy conditions. In addition to the structure calculations, which provide a thermodynamic link to structural information, methods are also presented for extensive deconvolution of the EXAFS spectrum. We demonstrate how the EXAFS data can be analyzed to extract the maximum structural information and arrive at a structural model that is significantly improved over previous EXAFS characterizations. The EXAFS spectrum for the chemically reduced form of copper binding to the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH2 peptide is presented, which is best modeled as a linear two-coordinate species with a single His imidazole ligand and a water molecule. The extent of in situ photoreduction of the copper center during standard data collection is also presented, and EXAFS curve fitting of the photoreduced species

  12. Development of affinity binding assay for isolation and analysis of microbial recognizing receptors for environmental signal substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Fujii, Takeshi; Ogawa, Naoto; Takahashi, Mami; Suzuki, Fumihiko [National Inst. of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    Aiming at isolation and analysis of recognizing receptors for environmental signaling substances, a development of effective labeling method was attempted for oligosaccharides having a role as inducer for exo-enzyme production, various signaling substances among plant and microbes as well as bacterial and viral proteins directly mediating the interaction between pathogenic microbes and plants. First, the optimum labeling conditions for those substances were investigated. To isolate oligosaccharide receptor, labeling of chitobiose was performed. Radio-labeled UDP-GlcNAc was used as the substrate for chitin synthesizing enzyme to produce labeled chitobiose using chitinase. Thin layer chromatography of silica gel was useful for isolation and purification of the labeled chitobiose. Thus, chitin of a highly specific activity able to use for isolation of its receptor was obtained. Then, an expression system for chlorocatechol dioxygenase gene was constructed aiming to produce chloromucoic acid, an inducer of catabolic genes for aromatic chlorides through conversion from chlorocatechol. In this study, clcA gene from P. putida AC866 strain was inserted in expression vector pGST/HisT1 after PCR amplification and the vector that could produce His-tagged chlorocatechol-dioxygenase was constructed. Next, for analysis of a protein able to interact with a protein related to pathogenicity of plant virus, a labeling method for the protein coded in rice stripe virus (RSV) was developed. By autoradiographic analysis of translation products for the virus RNA, two bands corresponding to 22.8 K and 20.5 K proteins were detected. Whereas the translation products of RNA from RSV-infected host presented 5 bands, neither of which was detectable in the products from un-infected hosts. The two bands of them were identified as the proteins of nucleoside capsid, 22.8 K and 20.5 K proteins. Isolation of these labeled proteins would be made in near future. (M.N.)

  13. Sampling and analysis validates acceptable knowledge on LANL transuranic, heterogeneous, debris waste, or ''Cutting the Gordian knot that binds WIPP''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.R.; Souza, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Through sampling and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) analyses, LANL and the DOE validated that a LANL transuranic (TRU) waste (TA-55-43, Lot No. 01) was not a Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) hazardous waste. This paper describes the sampling and analysis project as well as the statistical assessment of the analytical results. The analyses were conducted according to the requirements and procedures in the sampling and analysis plan approved by the New Mexico Environmental Department. The plan used a statistical approach that was consistent with the stratified, random sampling requirements of SW-846. LANL adhered to the plan during sampling and chemical analysis of randomly selected items of the five major types of materials in this heterogeneous, radioactive, debris waste. To generate portions of the plan, LANL analyzed a number of non-radioactive items that were representative of the mix of items present in the waste stream. Data from these cold surrogates were used to generate means and variances needed to optimize the design. Based on statistical arguments alone, only two samples from the entire waste stream were deemed necessary, however a decision was made to analyze at least two samples of each of the five major waste types. To obtain these samples, nine TRU waste drums were opened. Sixty-six radioactively contaminated and four non-radioactive grab samples were collected. Portions of the samples were composited for chemical analyses. In addition, a radioactively contaminated sample of rust-colored powder of interest to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) was collected and qualitatively identified as rust

  14. Positive expression of Y-box binding protein 1 and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Yuan, Gao-Le; Liang, Qi-Lian; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Huang, Jie; Cheng, Shao-Ang; Peng, Xiao-Xia

    2017-08-15

    Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) belongs to the cold shock domain protein family involved in transcription and translation. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between YB-1 expression and the survival and clinicopathological features in NSCLC. PubMed and Embase were searched to identify studies that evaluated the YB-1 expression (by immunohistochemistry) and overall survival (OS) in NSCLC. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of OS were pooled. Odds ratios (ORs) of clinicopathological features were computed. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Data on 692 NSCLC patients were collected from six eligible studies. Meta-analysis revealed that YB-1 was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.59, 95% CI [1.27, 2.00], P fixed effect), tumor stage (OR = 0.43, 95% CI [0.22-0.82], P = 0.01, random effect), and depth of invasion (OR = 0.37, 95%CI [0.22-0.63], P fixed effect). A subgroup was analyzed by IHC staining to determine the location of YB-1 positive expression. Poor OS was observed in nucleus staining (pooled HR = 1.86, 95% CI [1.41, 2.45], P < 0.001). However, no statistical significance was observed in combined cytoplasmic and nuclear staining (pooled HR = 1.14, 95% CI [0.76, 1.72], P = 0.536). Meta-analysis indicated that YB-1 overexpression is correlated with worse OS and clinicopathological features in NSCLC. Subgroup analysis revealed that the nucleus expression of YB-1 may be more closely associated with NSCLC prognosis than cytoplasmic expression.

  15. Lauric acid and myristic acid from Allium sativum inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra: in silico analysis reveals possible binding to protein kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Rajiniraja; Gurunathan, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    The bulb of Allium sativum Linn (Alliaceae) has numerous medicinal values. Though the petroleum ether extract of the bulb has shown to exhibit antimycobacterial activity, the phytochemical(s) responsible for this inhibitory activity is not known. To characterize the bioactive compounds in the petroleum ether extract of Allium sativum (garlic) that inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was employed to isolate the bioactive compounds. Antimycobacterial activity was evaluated by well-diffusion method and microplate alamar blue assay (MABA). Infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to characterize the bioactive compounds. Autodock was used to obtain information on molecular recognition, and molecular dynamics simulation was performed using GROMACS. The bioactive compounds that inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Ra were found to be lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA). The minimal inhibitory concentration of LA and MA was found to be 22.2 and 66.7 μg/mL, respectively. In silico analysis revealed that these fatty acids could bind at the cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the cytosolic domain of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PknB). The inhibition activity was dependent on the alkyl chain length of the fatty acid, and the amino acid residues involved in binding to fatty acid was found to be conserved across the Pkn family of proteins. The study indicates the possibility of using fatty acid derivatives, involving Pkn family of proteins, to inhibit the signal transduction processes in M. tuberculosis.

  16. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate-binding properties of two tandem repeat-type Jacalin-related lectins, Castanea crenata agglutinin and Cycas revoluta leaf lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Yagi, Fumio; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Lectins belonging to the jacalin-related lectin family are distributed widely in the plant kingdom. Recently, two mannose-specific lectins having tandem repeat-type structures were discovered in Castanea crenata (angiosperm) and Cycas revoluta (gymnosperm). The occurrence of such similar molecules in taxonomically less related plants suggests their importance in the plant body. To obtain clues to understand their physiological roles, we performed detailed analysis of their sugar-binding specificity. For this purpose, we compared the dissociation constants (K(d)) of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA) and Cycas revoluta leaf lectin (CRLL) by using 102 pyridylaminated and 13 p-nitrophenyl oligosaccharides with a recently developed automated system for frontal affinity chromatography. As a result, we found that the basic carbohydrate-binding properties of CCA and CRLL were similar, but differed in their preference for larger N-linked glycans (e.g. Man7-9 glycans). While the affinity of CCA decreased with an increase in the number of extended alpha1-2 mannose residues, CRLL could recognize these Man7-9 glycans with much enhanced affinity. Notably, both lectins also preserved considerable affinity for mono-antennary, complex type N-linked glycans, though the specificity was much broader for CCA. The information obtained here should be helpful for understanding their functions in vivo as well as for development of useful probes for animal cells. This is the first systematic approach to elucidate the fine specificities of plant lectins by means of high-throughput, automated frontal affinity chromatography.

  17. Analysis and functional characterization of sequence variations in ligand binding domain of thyroid hormone receptors in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalikiri, Mahesh Kumar; Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Rao, Ananth N; Rajesh, Vidya

    2017-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro developmental disorder, reported to be on a rise in the past two decades. Thyroid hormone-T3 plays an important role in early embryonic and central nervous system development. T3 mediates its function by binding to thyroid hormone receptors, TRα and TRβ. Alterations in T3 levels and thyroid receptor mutations have been earlier implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders and have been linked to environmental toxins. Limited reports from earlier studies have shown the effectiveness of T3 treatment with promising results in children with ASD and that the thyroid hormone levels in these children was also normal. This necessitates the need to explore the genetic variations in the components of the thyroid hormone pathway in ASD children. To achieve this objective, we performed genetic analysis of ligand binding domain of THRA and THRB receptor genes in 30 ASD subjects and in age matched controls from India. Our study for the first time reports novel single nucleotide polymorphisms in the THRA and THRB receptor genes of ASD individuals. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1919-1928. ©2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Thyroid hormone (T3) and thyroid receptors (TRα and TRβ) are the major components of the thyroid hormone pathway. The link between thyroid pathway and neuronal development is proven in clinical medicine. Since the thyroid hormone levels in Autistic children are normal, variations in their receptors needs to be explored. To achieve this objective, changes in THRA and THRB receptor genes was studied in 30 ASD and normal children from India. The impact of some of these mutations on receptor function was also studied. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Multi-species comparative analysis of the equine ACE gene identifies a highly conserved potential transcription factor binding site in intron 16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE is essential for control of blood pressure. The human ACE gene contains an intronic Alu indel (I/D polymorphism that has been associated with variation in serum enzyme levels, although the functional mechanism has not been identified. The polymorphism has also been associated with cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, renal disease and elite athleticism. We have characterized the ACE gene in horses of breeds selected for differing physical abilities. The equine gene has a similar structure to that of all known mammalian ACE genes. Nine common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered in pooled DNA were found to be inherited in nine haplotypes. Three of these SNPs were located in intron 16, homologous to that containing the Alu polymorphism in the human. A highly conserved 18 bp sequence, also within that intron, was identified as being a potential binding site for the transcription factors Oct-1, HFH-1 and HNF-3β, and lies within a larger area of higher than normal homology. This putative regulatory element may contribute to regulation of the documented inter-individual variation in human circulating enzyme levels, for which a functional mechanism is yet to be defined. Two equine SNPs occurred within the conserved area in intron 16, although neither of them disrupted the putative binding site. We propose a possible regulatory mechanism of the ACE gene in mammalian species which was previously unknown. This advance will allow further analysis leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the associations seen between the human Alu polymorphism and enzyme levels, cardiovascular disease states and elite athleticism.

  19. In silico analysis of different generation β lactams antibiotics with penicillin binding protein-2 of Neisseria meningitidis for curing meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Tripathi, Pooja; Srivastava, Navita; Gupta, Dwijendra

    2014-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a gram negative, diplococcic pathogen responsible for the meningococcal disease and fulminant septicemia. Penicillin-binding proteins-2 (PBPs) is crucial for the cell wall biosynthesis during cell proliferation of N. meningitidis and these are the target for β-lactam antibiotics. For many years penicillin has been recognized as the antibiotic for meningococcal disease but the meningococcus has seemed to be antibiotic resistance. In the present work we have verified the molecular interaction of Penicillin binding protein-2 N. meningitidis to different generation of β-lactam antibiotics and concluded that the third generation of β-lactam antibiotics shows efficient binding with Penicillin binding protein-2 of N. meningitidis. On the basis of binding efficiency and inhibition constant, ceftazidime emerged as the most efficient antibiotic amongst the other advanced β-lactam antibiotics against Penicillin-binding protein-2 of N. meningitidis.

  20. Analysis of Imatinib and Sorafenib Binding to p38 Compared with c-Abl and b-Raf Provides Structural Insights for Understanding the Selectivity of Inhibitors Targeting the DFG-Out Form of Protein Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, H.; Bukhtiyarova, M; Ramcharan, J; Karpusas, M; Lee, Y; Springman, E

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases c-Abl, b-Raf, and p38{alpha} are recognized as important targets for therapeutic intervention. c-Abl and b-Raf are major targets of marketed oncology drugs Imatinib (Gleevec) and Sorafenib (Nexavar), respectively, and BIRB-796 is a p38{alpha} inhibitor that reached Phase II clinical trials. A shared feature of these drugs is the fact that they bind to the DFG-out forms of their kinase targets. Although the discovery of this class of kinase inhibitors has increased the level of emphasis on the design of DFG-out inhibitors, the structural determinants for their binding and stabilization of the DFG-out conformation remain unclear. To improve our understanding of these determinants, we determined cocrystal structures of Imatinib and Sorafenib with p38{alpha}. We also conducted a detailed analysis of Imatinib and Sorafenib binding to p38{alpha} in comparison with BIRB-796, including binding kinetics, binding interactions, the solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the ligands, and stabilization of key structural elements of the protein upon ligand binding. Our results yield an improved understanding of the structural requirements for stabilizing the DFG-out form and a rationale for understanding the genesis of ligand selectivity among DFG-out inhibitors of protein kinases.

  1. Random mutagenesis MAPPIT analysis identifies binding sites for Vif and Gag in both cytidine deaminase domains of Apobec3G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Uyttendaele

    Full Text Available The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultaneously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization.

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of a GTP-binding protein (MiRab5) in Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-liang; Luo, Cong; Dong, Long; Van Toan, Can; Wei, Peng-xiao; He, Xin-hua

    2014-04-25

    The Rab family, the largest branch of Ras small GTPases, plays a crucial role in the vesicular transport in plants. The members of Rab family act as molecular switches that regulate the fusion of vesicles with target membranes through conformational changes. However, little is known about the Rab5 gene involved in fruit ripening and stress response. In this study, the MiRab5 gene was isolated from stress-induced Mangifera indica. The full-length cDNA sequence was 984bp and contained an open reading frame of 600bp, which encoded a 200 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 21.83kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 6.99. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high homology with tomato (91% similarity) and contains all five characteristic Rab motifs. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MiRab5 was ubiquitously expressed in various mango tree tissues at different levels. The expression of MiRab5 was up-regulated during later stages of fruit ripening. Moreover, MiRab5 was generally up-regulated in response to various abiotic stresses (cold, salinity, and PEG treatments). Recombinant MiRab5 protein was successfully expressed and purified. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis indicated that the expressed protein was recognized by the anti-6-His antibody. These results provide insights into the role of the MiRab5 gene family in fruit ripening and stress responses in the mango plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Shangqi; Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp.

  4. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SG); (Wellcome)

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  5. ReMap 2018: an updated atlas of regulatory regions from an integrative analysis of DNA-binding ChIP-seq experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chèneby, Jeanne; Gheorghe, Marius; Artufel, Marie; Mathelier, Anthony; Ballester, Benoit

    2018-01-04

    With this latest release of ReMap (http://remap.cisreg.eu), we present a unique collection of regulatory regions in human, as a result of a large-scale integrative analysis of ChIP-seq experiments for hundreds of transcriptional regulators (TRs) such as transcription factors, transcriptional co-activators and chromatin regulators. In 2015, we introduced the ReMap database to capture the genome regulatory space by integrating public ChIP-seq datasets, covering 237 TRs across 13 million (M) peaks. In this release, we have extended this catalog to constitute a unique collection of regulatory regions. Specifically, we have collected, analyzed and retained after quality control a total of 2829 ChIP-seq datasets available from public sources, covering a total of 485 TRs with a catalog of 80M peaks. Additionally, the updated database includes new search features for TR names as well as aliases, including cell line names and the ability to navigate the data directly within genome browsers via public track hubs. Finally, full access to this catalog is available online together with a TR binding enrichment analysis tool. ReMap 2018 provides a significant update of the ReMap database, providing an in depth view of the complexity of the regulatory landscape in human. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Analysis of the mitogenic pathway of the FLT3 receptor and characterization in its C terminal region of a specific binding site for the PI3' kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteran, N; Rottapel, R; Beslu, N; Lecocq, E; Birnbaum, D; Dubreuil, P

    1994-05-01

    The FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) belongs to the class III subfamily which includes PDGF, CSF1 and SLF receptors. The recent cloning of the FLT3 ligand suggesting its important role in the differentiation and proliferation of the hematopoietic stem cells, has confirmed the initial expression analysis showing restricted pattern of receptor expression within the primitive hematopoietic population. To better understand the function of the FLT3 receptor and its relationship with the other hematopoietic RTKs, we analyzed the mitogenic pathway and substrate specificity of this receptor. The construction of a chimeric receptor called FF3, between the extracellular region of the CSF1 receptor fused with the transmembrane and the cytoplasmic regions of FLT3, has allowed an analysis in the absence of FLT3 ligand. We have shown in previous studies that FF3 is able to transduce the signal induced by CSF1, to induce tyrosine phosphorylation and/or association of several cytoplasmic proteins. We show here that this new receptor is fully functional in Ba/F3 hematopoietic cells, inducing a CSF1 dependence when expressed at the surface of this IL3 dependent cell line. The PI3' Kinase interacts with the FF3 receptor through SH2 domains and its binding site is localized on the tyrosine residue 958 in the C terminal part of the receptor.

  7. Genome-wide identification and tissue-specific expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat gene family in Cicer arietinum (kabuli chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C G

    2017-12-01

    The nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins play an important role in the defense mechanisms against pathogens. Using bioinformatics approach, we identified and annotated 104 NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Phylogenetic analysis points to their diversification into two families namely TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR. Gene architecture revealed intron gain/loss events in this resistance gene family during their independent evolution into two families. Comparative genomics analysis elucidated its evolutionary relationship with other fabaceae species. Around 50% NBS-LRRs reside in macro-syntenic blocks underlining positional conservation along with sequence conservation of NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Transcriptome sequencing data provided evidence for their transcription and tissue-specific expression. Four cis -regulatory elements namely WBOX, DRE, CBF, and GCC boxes, that commonly occur in resistance genes, were present in the promoter regions of these genes. Further, the findings will provide a strong background to use candidate disease resistance NBS-encoding genes and identify their specific roles in chickpea.

  8. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  9. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  10. The effect of infectious brain edema on NMDA receptor binding in rat's brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guansheng; Chen Jianfang; Chen Xiang

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effect of the infectious brain edema (IBE) induced by Bordetella Pertussis (BP) on the specific binding of 3 H MK-801 in rat's brain in vivo was determined. METHODS: BP was injected via left internal carotid artery in rat model of infectious brain edema. Male SD rats were divided into three groups: 1) Group control (NS, n = 11); 2) Group IBF (BP, n = 12); 3) Group pretreatment of MK-801 + PB (MK-801, n = 4). Normal saline or BP 0.2 ml/kg was injected into left internal carotid artery in NS and BP group respectively. MK-801 0.5 mg/kg per day was injected i.p. two days before injection of BP in group MK-801. Rats were killed by decapitation at 24 hours after injection of BP. The specific binding of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor were measured with 3 H-MK-801 in the neuronal membrane of cerebral cortex. The Scatchard plots were performed. RESULTS: The B max values were 0.623 +- 0.082 and 0.606 +- 0.087 pmol/mg protein in group NS and BP respectively (t = 0.48, P>0.05). The Kd values were 43.1 +- 4.2 and 30.5 +- 3.0 nmol/L in group NS and BP respectively (t = 7.8, P<0.05). The specific binding of NMDA receptor was decreased by pretreatment of MK-801. CONCLUSIONS: The total number of NMDA receptor had not changed, whereas its affinity increased significantly in the model of brain edema induced by pertussis bacilli in rat. The increase of affinity of NMDA receptor can be blockaded by MK-801 pretreatment in vivo

  11. Genome-wide analysis of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lixia; Song, Tianxue; He, Rongjun; Zeng, Yang; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2017-04-26

    ABC transporter superfamily is one of the largest and ubiquitous groups of proteins. Because of their role in detoxification, insect ABC transporters have gained more attention in recent years. In this study, we annotated ABC transporters from a newly sequenced sweetpotato whitefly genome. Bemisia tabaci Q biotype is an emerging global invasive species that has caused extensive damages to field crops as well as ornamental plants. A total of 55 ABC transporters containing all eight described subfamilies (A to H) were identified in the B. tabaci Q genome, including 8 ABCAs, 3 ABCBs, 6 ABCCs, 2 ABCDs, 1 ABCE, 3 ABCFs, 23 ABCGs and 9 ABCHs. In comparison to other species, subfamilies G and H in both phloem- and blood-sucking arthropods are expanded. The temporal expression profiles of these 55 ABC transporters throughout B. tabaci developmental stages and their responses to imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, were investigated using RNA-seq analysis. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of 24 ABC transporters (44% of the total) representing all eight subfamilies was confirmed by the quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, mRNA expression levels estimated by RT-qPCR and RNA-seq analyses were significantly correlated (r = 0.684, p ABC transporters in B. tabaci. The identification of these ABC transporters, their temporal expression profiles during B. tabaci development, and their response to a neonicotinoid insecticide lay the foundation for functional genomic understanding of their contribution to the invasiveness of B. tabaci.

  12. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of its Binding Model towards its Applications as Detergent Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehak Baweja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10˚C -70˚C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50 ºC and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and ̴ 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50ºC and 4ºC with low supplementation (109 U/ml. Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash.

  13. Mutational analysis of divalent metal ion binding in the active site of class II α-mannosidase from sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis K.; Webb, Helen; Nielsen, Jonas Willum

    2015-01-01

    +). Some mutant enzyme forms displayed an altered preference for the metal ion compared to that of the wild type-enzyme. Furthermore, the H228Q, H533E, and H533Q enzymes were inhibited at increasing Zn2+ concentrations. The catalytic rate was reduced for all enzymes compared to that of the wild-type enzyme......Mutational analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus class II α-mannosidase was focused on side chains that interact with the hydroxyls of the-1 mannosyl of the substrate (Asp-534) or form ligands to the active site divalent metal ion (His-228 and His-533) judged from crystal structures of homologous...... enzymes. D534A and D534N appeared to be completely inactive. When compared to the wild-type enzyme, the mutant enzymes in general showed only small changes in KM for the substrate, p-nitrophenyl-α-mannoside, but elevated activation constants, KA, for the divalent metal ion (Co2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, or Cd2...

  14. A novel specimen-preparing method using epoxy resin as binding material for LIBS analysis of powder samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linli; Lin, Qingyu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-11-01

    In view of the inevitable preprocessing of powder samples for LIBS detection, epoxy resin glue was investigated for the first time as a binder of powder samples due to its superior property of improved performance in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique as a quantitative analytical tool. For comparative studies of the epoxy resin and traditional polyethylene (PE) pellets in soil, sample detection, the signal intensities of Fe (I) at 404.58 nm, Ca (I) at 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) at 453.52 nm, were studied and subsequently, the calibration curves for these elements were constructed using the standard samples with variable concentrations. The signal intensities of epoxy resin samples were, on average, about 2 times greater than those obtained with the traditional PE pellet samples. Meanwhile, the resin samples showed better R square values of 0.981, 0.985 and 0.979 for curves of Fe (I) 404.58 nm, Ca (I) 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) 453.52 nm, compared to the 0.974, 0.950 and 0.934, of the PE pellet samples. Furthermore, the former represented lower limits of detection (LOD) for Fe, Ca and Cr. These experimental results indicated that this proposed novel method based on epoxy resin can attach samples of properties of high homogeneity, cohesiveness, smoothness and hardness, which are conducive to system stability, testing accuracy and signal enhancement. This method can make LIBS more practical in powder sample analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-wide binding analysis of the transcription activator ideal plant architecture1 reveals a complex network regulating rice plant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-10-01

    Ideal plant architecture1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The Squamosa promoter binding protein-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter binding factor1 or promoter binding factor2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice teosinte branched1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate dense and erect panicle1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture.

  16. Genome-Wide Binding Analysis of the Transcription Activator IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 Reveals a Complex Network Regulating Rice Plant Architecture[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-01-01

    IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR1 or PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate DENSE AND ERECT PANICLE1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture. PMID:24170127

  17. HOCOMOCO: towards a complete collection of transcription factor binding models for human and mouse via large-scale ChIP-Seq analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2017-10-31

    We present a major update of the HOCOMOCO collection that consists of patterns describing DNA binding specificities for human and mouse transcription factors. In this release, we profited from a nearly doubled volume of published in vivo experiments on transcription factor (TF) binding to expand the repertoire of binding models, replace low-quality models previously based on in vitro data only and cover more than a hundred TFs with previously unknown binding specificities. This was achieved by systematic motif discovery from more than five thousand ChIP-Seq experiments uniformly processed within the BioUML framework with several ChIP-Seq peak calling tools and aggregated in the GTRD database. HOCOMOCO v11 contains binding models for 453 mouse and 680 human transcription factors and includes 1302 mononucleotide and 576 dinucleotide position weight matrices, which describe primary binding preferences of each transcription factor and reliable alternative binding specificities. An interactive interface and bulk downloads are available on the web: http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco11. In this release, we complement HOCOMOCO by MoLoTool (Motif Location Toolbox, http://molotool.autosome.ru) that applies HOCOMOCO models for visualization of binding sites in short DNA sequences.

  18. HOCOMOCO: towards a complete collection of transcription factor binding models for human and mouse via large-scale ChIP-Seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Yevshin, Ivan S; Sharipov, Ruslan N; Fedorova, Alla D; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Magana-Mora, Arturo; Bajic, Vladimir B; Papatsenko, Dmitry A; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2018-01-04

    We present a major update of the HOCOMOCO collection that consists of patterns describing DNA binding specificities for human and mouse transcription factors. In this release, we profited from a nearly doubled volume of published in vivo experiments on transcription factor (TF) binding to expand the repertoire of binding models, replace low-quality models previously based on in vitro data only and cover more than a hundred TFs with previously unknown binding specificities. This was achieved by systematic motif discovery from more than five thousand ChIP-Seq experiments uniformly processed within the BioUML framework with several ChIP-Seq peak calling tools and aggregated in the GTRD database. HOCOMOCO v11 contains binding models for 453 mouse and 680 human transcription factors and includes 1302 mononucleotide and 576 dinucleotide position weight matrices, which describe primary binding preferences of each transcription factor and reliable alternative binding specificities. An interactive interface and bulk downloads are available on the web: http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco11. In this release, we complement HOCOMOCO by MoLoTool (Motif Location Toolbox, http://molotool.autosome.ru) that applies HOCOMOCO models for visualization of binding sites in short DNA sequences. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  20. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Here, we report a genome-wide search for Solanum tuberosum Dof (StDof) genes and their expression profiles at various developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of Dof gene family in potato is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 35 full-length protein-coding StDof genes, unevenly distributed on 10 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that StDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDofI, II, III, and IV). qPCR expression analysis of StDof gene transcripts showed the distinct expression patterns of StDof genes in various potato organs, and tuber developmental stages analyzed. Many StDof genes were upregulated in response to drought, salinity, and ABA treatments. Overall, the StDof gene expression pattern and the number of over-represented cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the StDof genes indicate that most of the StDof genes have redundant functions. The detailed genomic information and expression profiles of the StDof gene homologs in the present study provide opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the genes' exact role in plant growth and development as well as in abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Triiodothyronine (T3)-associated upregulation and downregulation of nuclear T3 binding in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5)--stimulation of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase by insulin, but not by T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The specific nuclear binding of triiodothyronine (T3) (NBT3) and the activity of malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6PGD) were studied in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5). The overall apparent binding affinity (Ka) was 2.7 x 10(9) L...... and a low-affinity binding site with Ka2 2.9 +/- 1.1 x 10(8) L.mol-1 and MBC2 124.7 +/- 22.1 fmol/mg DNA (n = 6). Incubation of cells with 6 nmol/L T3 for 20 hours reduced NBT3 to 62.2% +/- 15.7% (P less than .01, n = 11). The Ka estimated from kinetic studies was reduced to 6.7 x 10(7) L.mol-1......, and the scatchard plots were linear, with Ka 4.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(8) L.mol-1 and MBC 137.0 +/- 44.6 fmol/mg DNA (n = 3) of the same magnitude as the low-affinity binding site in cells incubated without T3 (NS). The reduction in NBT3 was reversible and maximal at T3 concentrations saturating the high-affinity binding...

  2. Transcriptomic analysis suggests a key role for SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE, NAC and YUCCA genes in the heteroblastic development of the temperate rainforest tree Gevuina avellana (Proteaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostria-Gallardo, Enrique; Ranjan, Aashish; Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Townsley, Brad T; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Corcuera, Luis J; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-04-01

    Heteroblasty, the temporal development of the meristem, can produce diverse leaf shapes within a plant. Gevuina avellana, a tree from the South American temperate rainforest shows strong heteroblasty affecting leaf shape, transitioning from juvenile simple leaves to highly pinnate adult leaves. Light availability within the forest canopy also modulates its leaf size and complexity. Here we studied how the interaction between the light environment and the heteroblastic progression of leaves is coordinated in this species. We used RNA-seq on the Illumina platform to compare the range of transcriptional responses in leaf primordia of G. avellana at different heteroblastic stages and growing under different light environments. We found a steady up-regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL), NAC, YUCCA and AGAMOUS-LIKE genes associated with increases in age, leaf complexity, and light availability. In contrast, expression of TCP, TPR and KNOTTED1 homeobox genes showed a sustained down-regulation. Additionally, genes involved in auxin synthesis/transport and jasmonate activity were differentially expressed, indicating an active regulation of processes controlled by these hormones. Our large-scale transcriptional analysis of the leaf primordia of G. avellana sheds light on the integration of internal and external cues during heteroblastic development in this species. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in HVTN 505 identifies vaccine pressure targeting the CD4 binding site of Env-gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Paul T.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Hall, Breana; Magaret, Craig A.; Fiore-Gartland, Andrew J.; Juraska, Michal; Carpp, Lindsay N.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Bose, Meera; LePore, Steven; Miller, Shana; O'Sullivan, Annemarie; Poltavee, Kultida; Bai, Hongjun; Dommaraju, Kalpana; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Kim; Chen, Lennie; Ahmed, Hasan; Goodman, Derrick; Tay, Matthew Z.; Gottardo, Raphael; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Roederer, Mario; O’Connell, Robert J.; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Adams, Elizabeth; D’Souza, Patricia; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Geraghty, Daniel E.; Frahm, Nicole; Tomaras, Georgia D.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Frenkel, Lisa; Styrchak, Sheila; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Hammer, Scott M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Mullins, James I.; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    Although the HVTN 505 DNA/recombinant adenovirus type 5 vector HIV-1 vaccine trial showed no overall efficacy, analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in participants can help determine whether vaccine-induced immune responses impacted viruses that caused infection. We analyzed 480 HIV-1 genomes sampled from 27 vaccine and 20 placebo recipients and found that intra-host HIV-1 diversity was significantly lower in vaccine recipients (P ≤ 0.04, Q-values ≤ 0.09) in Gag, Pol, Vif and envelope glycoprotein gp120 (Env-gp120). Furthermore, Env-gp120 sequences from vaccine recipients were significantly more distant from the subtype B vaccine insert than sequences from placebo recipients (P = 0.01, Q-value = 0.12). These vaccine effects were associated with signatures mapping to CD4 binding site and CD4-induced monoclonal antibody footprints. These results suggest either (i) no vaccine efficacy to block acquisition of any viral genotype but vaccine-accelerated Env evolution post-acquisition; or (ii) vaccine efficacy against HIV-1s with Env sequences closest to the vaccine insert combined with increased acquisition due to other factors, potentially including the vaccine vector. PMID:29149197

  4. Sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in HVTN 505 identifies vaccine pressure targeting the CD4 binding site of Env-gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deCamp, Allan C; Rolland, Morgane; Edlefsen, Paul T; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Hall, Breana; Magaret, Craig A; Fiore-Gartland, Andrew J; Juraska, Michal; Carpp, Lindsay N; Karuna, Shelly T; Bose, Meera; LePore, Steven; Miller, Shana; O'Sullivan, Annemarie; Poltavee, Kultida; Bai, Hongjun; Dommaraju, Kalpana; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Kim; Chen, Lennie; Ahmed, Hasan; Goodman, Derrick; Tay, Matthew Z; Gottardo, Raphael; Koup, Richard A; Bailer, Robert; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Roederer, Mario; O'Connell, Robert J; Michael, Nelson L; Robb, Merlin L; Adams, Elizabeth; D'Souza, Patricia; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Geraghty, Daniel E; Frahm, Nicole; Tomaras, Georgia D; McElrath, M Juliana; Frenkel, Lisa; Styrchak, Sheila; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott M; Kim, Jerome H; Mullins, James I; Gilbert, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    Although the HVTN 505 DNA/recombinant adenovirus type 5 vector HIV-1 vaccine trial showed no overall efficacy, analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in participants can help determine whether vaccine-induced immune responses impacted viruses that caused infection. We analyzed 480 HIV-1 genomes sampled from 27 vaccine and 20 placebo recipients and found that intra-host HIV-1 diversity was significantly lower in vaccine recipients (P ≤ 0.04, Q-values ≤ 0.09) in Gag, Pol, Vif and envelope glycoprotein gp120 (Env-gp120). Furthermore, Env-gp120 sequences from vaccine recipients were significantly more distant from the subtype B vaccine insert than sequences from placebo recipients (P = 0.01, Q-value = 0.12). These vaccine effects were associated with signatures mapping to CD4 binding site and CD4-induced monoclonal antibody footprints. These results suggest either (i) no vaccine efficacy to block acquisition of any viral genotype but vaccine-accelerated Env evolution post-acquisition; or (ii) vaccine efficacy against HIV-1s with Env sequences closest to the vaccine insert combined with increased acquisition due to other factors, potentially including the vaccine vector.

  5. Integrated transcriptome and binding sites analysis implicates E2F in the regulation of self-renewal in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hock Chuan Yeo

    Full Text Available Rapid cellular growth and multiplication, limited replicative senescence, calibrated sensitivity to apoptosis, and a capacity to differentiate into almost any cell type are major properties that underline the self-renewal capabilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. We developed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline to understand the gene regulation and functions involved in maintaining such self-renewal properties of hPSCs compared to matched fibroblasts. An initial genome-wide screening of transcription factor activity using in silico binding-site and gene expression microarray data newly identified E2F as one of major candidate factors, revealing their significant regulation of the transcriptome. This is underscored by an elevated level of its transcription factor activity and expression in all tested pluripotent stem cell lines. Subsequent analysis of functional gene groups demonstrated the importance of the TFs to self-renewal in the pluripotency-coupled context; E2F directly targets the global signaling (e.g. self-renewal associated WNT and FGF pathways and metabolic network (e.g. energy generation pathways, molecular transports and fatty acid metabolism to promote its canonical functions that are driving the self-renewal of hPSCs. In addition, we proposed a core self-renewal module of regulatory interplay between E2F and, WNT and FGF pathways in these cells. Thus, we conclude that E2F plays a significant role in influencing the self-renewal capabilities of hPSCs.

  6. Serotonin storage pools in basophil leukemia and mast cells: characterization of two types of serotonin binding protein and radioautographic analysis of the intracellular distribution of [3H]serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamir, H.; Theoharides, T.C.; Gershon, M.D.; Askenase, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The binding of serotonin to protein(s) derived from rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells and mast cells was studied. Two types of serotonin binding protein in RBL cells was found. These proteins differed from one another in molecular weight and eluted in separate peaks from sephadex G-200 columns. Peak I protein (KD = 1.9 x 10 -6 M) was a glycoprotein that bound to concanavalin A (Con A); Peak II protein (KD 1 = 4.5 x 10 - 8 M; KD 2 = 3.9 x 10 -6 M) did not bind to Con A. Moreover, binding of [ 3 H]serotonin to protein of Peak I was sensitive to inhibition by reserpine, while binding of [ 3 H]serotonin to protein of Peak II resisted inhibition by that drug. Other differences between the two types of binding protein were found, the most significant of which was the far more vigorous conditions of homogenization required to extract Peak I than Peak II protein. Electron microscope radioautographic analysis of the intracellular distribution of [ 3 H] serotonin taken up in vitro by RBL cells or in vivo by murine mast cells indicated that essentially all of the labeled amine was located in cytoplasmic granules.No evidence for a pool in the cytosol was found and all granules were capable of becoming labeled. The presence of two types of intracellular serotonin binding proteins in these cells may indicate that there are two intracellular storage compartments for the amine. Both may be intragranular, but Peak I protein may be associated with the granular membrane while Peak II protein may be more free within the granular core. Different storage proteins may help to explain the differential release of amines from mast cell granules

  7. Analysis of a two-domain binding site for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex in low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O M; Petersen, H H; Jacobsen, C; Moestrup, S K; Etzerodt, M; Andreasen, P A; Thøgersen, H C

    2001-07-01

    The low-density-lipoprotein-receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) is composed of several classes of domains, including complement-type repeats (CR), which occur in clusters that contain binding sites for a multitude of different ligands. Each approximately 40-residue CR domain contains three conserved disulphide linkages and an octahedral Ca(2+) cage. LRP is a scavenging receptor for ligands from extracellular fluids, e.g. alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M)-proteinase complexes, lipoprotein-containing particles and serine proteinase-inhibitor complexes, like the complex between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In the present study we analysed the interaction of the uPA-PAI-1 complex with an ensemble of fragments representing a complete overlapping set of two-domain fragments accounting for the ligand-binding cluster II (CR3-CR10) of LRP. By ligand blotting, solid-state competition analysis and surface-plasmon-resonance analysis, we demonstrate binding to multiple CR domains, but show a preferential interaction between the uPA-PAI-1 complex and a two-domain fragment comprising CR domains 5 and 6 of LRP. We demonstrate that surface-exposed aspartic acid and tryptophan residues at identical positions in the two homologous domains, CR5 and CR6 (Asp(958,CR5), Asp(999,CR6), Trp(953,CR5) and Trp(994,CR6)), are critical for the binding of the complex as well as for the binding of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) - the folding chaperone/escort protein required for transport of LRP to the cell surface. Accordingly, the present work provides (1) an identification of a preferred binding site within LRP CR cluster II; (2) evidence that the uPA-PAI-1 binding site involves residues from two adjacent protein domains; and (3) direct evidence identifying specific residues as important for the binding of uPA-PAI-1 as well as for the binding of RAP.

  8. Crystallization, neutron data collection, initial structure refinement and analysis of a xyloglucan heptamer bound to an engineered carbohydrate-binding module from xylanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Mats; von Schantz, Laura; Schrader, Tobias E; Ostermann, Andreas; Logan, Derek T; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-08-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are discrete parts of carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that bind specific types of carbohydrates. Ultra high-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of CBMs have helped to decipher the basis for specificity in carbohydrate-protein interactions. However, additional studies are needed to better understand which structural determinants confer which carbohydrate-binding properties. To address these issues, neutron crystallographic studies were initiated on one experimentally engineered CBM derived from a xylanase, X-2 L110F, a protein that is able to bind several different plant carbohydrates such as xylan, β-glucan and xyloglucan. This protein evolved from a CBM present in xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus. The protein was complexed with a branched xyloglucan heptasaccharide. Large single crystals of hydrogenous protein (∼1.6 mm(3)) were grown at room temperature and subjected to H/D exchange. Both neutron and X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.6 Å resolution. Joint neutron and X-ray refinement using phenix.refine showed significant density for residues involved in carbohydrate binding and revealed the details of a hydrogen-bonded water network around the binding site. This is the first report of a neutron structure of a CBM and will add to the understanding of protein-carbohydrate binding interactions.

  9. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus E3 protein: the biological functions do not correlate with its biochemical capacity to bind double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, Kevin J; Hu, YuanShen Sandy; Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie; Cao, Jingxin

    2015-05-01

    Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they suppress the related

  10. Flow cytometry analysis of FITC-labeled concanavalin A binding to human blood cells as an indicator of radiation-induced membrane alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ET