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Sample records for binding protein subunits

  1. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  2. Hepatitis B virus X protein interacts with β5 subunit of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein

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    Chen Wei

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To isolate cellular proteins interacting with hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX, from HepG2 cells infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV. Results HBV particles were produced in culture medium of HepG2 cells transfected with the mammalian expression vector containing the linear HBV genome, as assessed by commercially available ELISA assay. A cDNA library was made from these cells exposed to HBV. From yeast two hybrid screening with HBX as bait, human guanine nucleotide binding protein β subunit 5L (GNβ5 was isolated from the cDNA library constructed in this study as a new HBX-interacting protein. The HBX-GNβ5 interaction was further supported by mammalian two hybrid assay. Conclusion The use of a cDNA library constructed from HBV-transfected HepG2 cells has resulted in the isolation of new cellular proteins interacting with HBX.

  3. Electron microscopy of the complexes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) and Rubisco subunit-binding protein from pea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuprun, V.L.; Boekema, E.J.; Samsonidze, T.G.; Pushkin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) subunit-binding protein and its interaction with pea leaf chloroplast Rubisco were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis. Electron-microscopic evidence for the association of Rubisco subunit-binding protein, consisting of 1

  4. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen.

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    Anne Gründel

    Full Text Available The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen.

  5. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

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    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  7. Novel RNA-binding properties of Pop3p support a role for eukaryotic RNase P protein subunits in substrate recognition.

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    Brusca, E M; True, H L; Celander, D W

    2001-11-09

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the 5'-end maturation of transfer RNA molecules. Recent evidence suggests that the eukaryotic protein subunits may provide substrate-binding functions (True, H. L., and Celander, D. W. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 7193-7196). We now report that Pop3p, an essential protein subunit of the holoenzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, displays novel RNA-binding properties. A recombinant form of Pop3p (H6Pop3p) displays a 3-fold greater affinity for binding pre-tRNA substrates relative to tRNA products. The recognition sequence for the H6Pop3p-substrate interaction in vitro was mapped to a 39-nucleotide long sequence that extends from position -21 to +18 surrounding the natural processing site in pre-tRNA substrates. H6Pop3p binds a variety of RNA molecules with high affinity (K(d) = 16-25 nm) and displays a preference for single-stranded RNAs. Removal or modification of basic C-terminal residues attenuates the RNA-binding properties displayed by the protein specifically for a pre-tRNA substrate. These studies support the model that eukaryotic RNase P proteins bind simultaneously to the RNA subunit and RNA substrate.

  8. MAP1B binds to the NMDA receptor subunit NR3A and affects NR3A protein concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Samuelsson, Helena; Björklund, Stefan;

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit NR3A into functional NMDARs results in reduced channel conductance and Ca(2+) permeability. To further investigate the function of NR3A, we have set out to characterize its intracellular binding partners. Here, we report a novel p...

  9. Assembly of the central domain of the 30S ribosomal subunit: roles for the primary binding ribosomal proteins S15 and S8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2003-07-01

    Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit occurs in a highly ordered and sequential manner. The ordered addition of ribosomal proteins to the growing ribonucleoprotein particle is initiated by the association of primary binding proteins. These proteins bind specifically and independently to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Two primary binding proteins, S8 and S15, interact exclusively with the central domain of 16S rRNA. Binding of S15 to the central domain results in a conformational change in the RNA and is followed by the ordered assembly of the S6/S18 dimer, S11 and finally S21 to form the platform of the 30S subunit. In contrast, S8 is not part of this major platform assembly branch. Of the remaining central domain binding proteins, only S21 association is slightly dependent on S8. Thus, although S8 is a primary binding protein that extensively contacts the central domain, its role in assembly of this domain remains unclear. Here, we used directed hydroxyl radical probing from four unique positions on S15 to assess organization of the central domain of 16S rRNA as a consequence of S8 association. Hydroxyl radical probing of Fe(II)-S15/16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S15/S8/16S rRNA ribonucleoprotein particles reveal changes in the 16S rRNA environment of S15 upon addition of S8. These changes occur predominantly in helices 24 and 26 near previously identified S8 binding sites. These S8-dependent conformational changes are consistent with 16S rRNA folding in complete 30S subunits. Thus, while S8 binding is not absolutely required for assembly of the platform, it appears to affect significantly the 16S rRNA environment of S15 by influencing central domain organization.

  10. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  11. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

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    Polekhina, Galina, E-mail: gpolekhina@svi.edu.au; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); O’Donnell, Paul [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W. [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  12. Structure- and modeling-based identification of the adenovirus E4orf4 binding site in the protein phosphatase 2A B55α subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Ben; Sharf, Rakefet; Avital-Shacham, Meirav; Pechkovsky, Antonina; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2013-05-10

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein must bind protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) for its functions. The E4orf4 binding site in PP2A was mapped to the α1,α2 helices of the B55α subunit. The E4orf4 binding site in PP2A-B55α lies above the substrate binding site and does not overlap it. A novel functional significance was assigned to the α1,α2 helices of the PP2A-B55α subunit. The adenovirus E4orf4 protein regulates the progression of viral infection and when expressed outside the context of the virus it induces nonclassical, cancer cell-specific apoptosis. All E4orf4 functions known to date require an interaction between E4orf4 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which is mediated through PP2A regulatory B subunits. Specifically, an interaction with the B55α subunit is required for induction of cell death by E4orf4. To gain a better insight into the E4orf4-PP2A interaction, mapping of the E4orf4 interaction site in PP2A-B55α has been undertaken. To this end we used a combination of bioinformatics analyses of PP2A-B55α and of E4orf4, which led to the prediction of E4orf4 binding sites on the surface of PP2A-B55α. Mutation analysis, immunoprecipitation, and GST pulldown assays based on the theoretical predictions revealed that the E4orf4 binding site included the α1 and α2 helices described in the B55α structure and involved at least three residues located in these helices facing each other. Loss of E4orf4 binding was accompanied by reduced contribution of the B55α mutants to E4orf4-induced cell death. The identified E4orf4 binding domain lies above the previously described substrate binding site and does not overlap it, although its location could be consistent with direct or indirect effects on substrate binding. This work assigns for the first time a functional significance to the α1,α2 helices of B55α, and we suggest that the binding site defined by these helices could also contribute to interactions between PP2A and some of its cellular regulators.

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cAMP-binding sites of the recombinant type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, T; Shuntoh, H; Sakaue, M; Saijoh, K; Takeda, T; Fukuda, K; Tanaka, C

    1988-06-30

    The type I regulatory subunit (R-I) of rat brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase was expressed in E. coli and site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute amino acids in the putative cAMP-binding sites. The wild-type recombinant R-I bound 2 mol of cAMP/mol subunit, while two mutant R-Is with a single amino acid substitution in one of the two intrachain cAMP-binding sites (clone N153:a glutamate for Gly-200, and clone C254:an aspartate for Gly-324) bound 1 mol of cAMP/mol subunit. When these two substitutions were made in one mutant, cAMP did not bind to this mutant, indicating that binding of cAMP to N153 or C254 was to their nonmutated sites. Competition experiments with site-selective analogs and dissociation of bound cAMP from mutant R-Is provided evidence for strong intrachain interactions between the two classes of cAMP-binding sites in R-I.

  14. NMR insight into myosin-binding subunit coiled-coil structure reveals binding interface with protein kinase G-Iα leucine zipper in vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-04-28

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth-muscle cells in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or the leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-1α has remained limited. Here, we report the 3D NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which amino acids 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. (15)N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement- and CSP-NMR-guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the heterotetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS·LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow reevaluation of the role(s) of myosin light-chain phosphatase partner polypeptides in regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell contractility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. A conserved phenylalanine as a relay between the α5 helix and the GDP binding region of heterotrimeric Gi protein α subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, Tina M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2014-08-29

    G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptors is one of the critical steps for many cellular signal transduction pathways. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix in the G protein α subunit plays a major role during this activation process. However, the precise signaling pathway between the α5 helix and the guanosine diphosphate (GDP) binding pocket remains elusive. Here, using structural, biochemical, and computational techniques, we probed different residues around the α5 helix for their role in signaling. Our data showed that perturbing the Phe-336 residue disturbs hydrophobic interactions with the β2-β3 strands and α1 helix, leading to high basal nucleotide exchange. However, mutations in β strands β5 and β6 do not perturb G protein activation. We have highlighted critical residues that leverage Phe-336 as a relay. Conformational changes are transmitted starting from Phe-336 via β2-β3/α1 to Switch I and the phosphate binding loop, decreasing the stability of the GDP binding pocket and triggering nucleotide release. When the α1 and α5 helices were cross-linked, inhibiting the receptor-mediated displacement of the C-terminal α5 helix, mutation of Phe-336 still leads to high basal exchange rates. This suggests that unlike receptor-mediated activation, helix 5 rotation and translocation are not necessary for GDP release from the α subunit. Rather, destabilization of the backdoor region of the Gα subunit is sufficient for triggering the activation process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Structure- and Modeling-based Identification of the Adenovirus E4orf4 Binding Site in the Protein Phosphatase 2A B55α Subunit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Ben; Sharf, Rakefet; Avital-Shacham, Meirav; Pechkovsky, Antonina; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein regulates the progression of viral infection and when expressed outside the context of the virus it induces nonclassical, cancer cell-specific apoptosis. All E4orf4 functions known to date require an interaction between E4orf4 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which is mediated through PP2A regulatory B subunits. Specifically, an interaction with the B55α subunit is required for induction of cell death by E4orf4. To gain a better insight into the E4orf4-PP2A interaction, mapping of the E4orf4 interaction site in PP2A-B55α has been undertaken. To this end we used a combination of bioinformatics analyses of PP2A-B55α and of E4orf4, which led to the prediction of E4orf4 binding sites on the surface of PP2A-B55α. Mutation analysis, immunoprecipitation, and GST pulldown assays based on the theoretical predictions revealed that the E4orf4 binding site included the α1 and α2 helices described in the B55α structure and involved at least three residues located in these helices facing each other. Loss of E4orf4 binding was accompanied by reduced contribution of the B55α mutants to E4orf4-induced cell death. The identified E4orf4 binding domain lies above the previously described substrate binding site and does not overlap it, although its location could be consistent with direct or indirect effects on substrate binding. This work assigns for the first time a functional significance to the α1,α2 helices of B55α, and we suggest that the binding site defined by these helices could also contribute to interactions between PP2A and some of its cellular regulators. PMID:23530045

  17. Purification and subunit structure of a putative K+-channel protein identified by its binding properties for dendrotoxin I.

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, H; Lazdunski, M

    1988-01-01

    The binding protein for the K+-channel toxin dendrotoxin I was purified from a detergent extract of rat brain membranes. The purification procedure utilized chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, affinity chromatography on a dendrotoxin-I-Aca 22 column, and wheat germ agglutinin-Affigel 10 with a final 3800- to 4600-fold enrichment and a recovery of 8-16%. The high affinity (Kd, 40-100 pM) and specificity of the binding site are retained throughout the purification procedure. Analysis of the purif...

  18. Competitive binding of postsynaptic density 95 and Ca2+-calmodulin dependent protein kinase Ⅱ to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan-jie MENG; Jun GUO; Bo SONG; Xue-bo YAN; Guang-yi ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interactions among postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95), Ca2+-calmodulin dependent protein kinase Ⅱα (CaMKⅡα), and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) during ischemia and reperfusion in hippocampus of rats. METHODS: Brain ischemia was induced by four-vessel occlusion procedure in rats. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were performed to study the interactions and phosphorylation of proteins. The association-dissociation of PSD-95 and CaMKⅡα to and from N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor induced by ischemia and reperfusion and the effects of 1-[N,O-bis-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4-phenyl-piperazine (KN-62, a selective inhibitor of CaMKⅡ) on these protein interactions were investigated. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were performed for the studies of interactions among proteins. RESULTS: The alternations of the binding level of PSD-95 and CaMKⅡα to NR2B during ischemia and reperfusion demonstrated the negative correlation to each other. Pre-administration of KN62 through both cerebral ventricles inhibited the 10 min ischemia-induced increase of the binding of PSD-95 to NR2B and, on the contrary, promoted the binding of CaMKⅡα to NR2B. CONCLUSION: PSD-95 competes with CaMKⅡ to bind to NR2B during ischemia and reperfusion in rat hippocampus.

  19. Interaction of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M₂ subtype with G protein Gα(i/o) isotypes and Gβγ subunits as studied with the maltose-binding protein-M₂-Gα(i/o) fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Nemoto, Reiko; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Haga, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    We expressed the fusion proteins of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2 receptor) with a maltose-binding protein (MBP) and various G protein α subunits (Gα(i1-i3/o)) at its N- and C-terminals, respectively (MBP-M2-Gα(i/o)), in Escherichia coli, and examined the effect of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) on the receptor-Gα interaction as assessed by agonist- and GDP-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding of the fusion proteins. We found that (i) Gβγ promoted both the agonist-dependent and -independent [(35)S]GTPγS binding with little effect on the guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, (ii) the specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding activity was much greater for MBP-M2-Gα(oA) than for MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) in the absence of Gβγ, whereas Gβγ preferentially promoted the agonist-dependent decrease in the affinity for GDP of MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) rather than of MBP-M2-Gα(oA), and (iii) the proportion of agonist-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding was roughly 50% irrespective of species of Gα and the presence or absence of Gβγ. These results demonstrate that receptor-Gα fusion proteins expressed in E. coli could be useful for studies of receptor-G interaction.

  20. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  1. Characterization of lysosomal membrane proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. A complex population of acidic integral membrane glycoproteins, Rab GTP-binding proteins and vacuolar ATPase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesvari, L; Rodriguez-Paris, J; Bush, J; Steck, T L; Cardelli, J

    1994-10-14

    Highly purified lysosomes, prepared by magnetic fractionation of homogenates from Dictyostelium discoideum cells fed colloidal iron, were lysed under hypoosmotic conditions, and the membrane-associated proteins were subjected to gel electrophoresis. Thirteen major membrane polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 25,000 to 100,000 were identified. The isoelectric points of these proteins ranged from below 3.8 to greater than 7.0. Most of these proteins were stripped from membranes exposed to a chaotropic agent, 3,5-diodo-2-hydroxybenzoic acid lithium salt, and were therefore classified as peripheral membrane proteins. Twenty five glycoprotein species were detected by lectin blot analysis; 19 were classified as integral membrane proteins, and were, in general, larger than 45 kDa and negatively charged due in part to the presence of mannose 6-sulfate. Western blot analysis also demonstrated that a Rab 4-like GTPase, a Rab 7-like GTPase, and at least three subunits of the vacuolar ATPase were associated with the lysosomal membrane; the ATPase subunits appeared to be major proteins in lysosomal membranes. Finally, based on N-terminal sequence analysis of a major 41-kDa lysosome-associated membrane protein, we cloned a cDNA that encodes a protein (DVA41) highly homologous to a yeast and a bovine vacuolar ATPase subunit of approximately 41 kDa. The D. discoideum DVA41 gene was apparently a single copy gene, expressed at constant levels during growth and development.

  2. Fimbrial subunit protein FaeG expressed in transgenic tobacco inhibits the binding of F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to porcine enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Jussi J; Kotiaho, Mirkka; Riipi, Tero; Snoeck, Veerle; Palva, E Tapio; Teeri, Teemu H; Lång, Hannu; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Niklander-Teeri, Viola

    2004-06-01

    Plants offer a promising alternative for the production of foreign proteins for pharmaceutical purposes in tissues that are consumed as food and/or feed. Our long-term strategy is to develop edible vaccines against piglet diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4 ETEC) in feed plants. In this work, we isolated a gene, faeG, encoding for a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein. Our goal was to test whether the FaeG protein, when isolated from its fimbrial background and produced in a plant cell, would retain the key properties of an oral vaccine, that is, stability in gastrointestinal conditions, binding to intestinal receptors and inhibition of the F4 ETEC attachment. For this purpose, tobacco was first transformed with a faeG construct that included a transit peptide encoding sequence to target the FaeG protein to the chloroplast. The best transgenic lines produced FaeG protein in amounts of 1% total soluble protein. The stability of the plant-produced FaeG was tested in fluids simulating piglet gastric (SGF) and intestinal (SIF) conditions. Plant-produced FaeG proved to be stable up to 2 h under these conditions. The binding and inhibition properties were tested with isolated piglet villi. These results showed that the plant-produced FaeG could bind to the receptors on the villi and subsequently inhibit F4 ETEC binding in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the first two prerequisites for the development of an oral vaccine have been met.

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  4. An MHC-I cytoplasmic domain/HIV-1 Nef fusion protein binds directly to the mu subunit of the AP-1 endosomal coat complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I from the surface of infected cells by the Nef proteins of primate immunodeficiency viruses likely contributes to pathogenesis by providing evasion of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 Nef-induced down-regulation involves endosomal trafficking and a cooperative interaction between the cytoplasmic domain (CD of MHC-I, Nef, and the clathrin adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1. The CD of MHC-I contains a key tyrosine within the sequence YSQA that is required for down-regulation by Nef, but this sequence does not conform to the canonical AP-binding tyrosine-based motif Yxxphi, which mediates binding to the medium (micro subunits of AP complexes. We previously proposed that Nef allows the MHC-I CD to bind the mu subunit of AP-1 (micro1 as if it contained a Yxxphimotif. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that a direct interaction between the MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 plays a primary role in the down-regulation of MHC-I: GST pulldown assays using recombinant proteins indicated that most of the MHC-I CD and Nef residues that are required for the down-regulation in human cells contribute to direct interactions with a truncated version of micro1. Specifically, the tyrosine residue of the YSQA sequence in the MHC-I CD as well as Nef residues E62-65 and P78 each contributed to the interaction between MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 in vitro, whereas Nef M20 had little to no role. Conversely, residues F172/D174 and V392/L395 of the binding pocket on micro1 for Yxxphi motifs were required for a robust interaction. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain, Nef, and the C-terminal two thirds of the mu subunit of AP-1 are sufficient to constitute a biologically relevant interaction. The data also reveal an unexpected role for a hydrophobic pocket in micro1 for interaction with MHC-I CD/Nef.

  5. Acetylcholine-binding protein in the hemolymph of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata is a pentagonal dodecahedron (60 subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saur

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play important neurophysiological roles and are of considerable medical relevance. They have been studied extensively, greatly facilitated by the gastropod acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBP which represent soluble structural and functional homologues of the ligand-binding domain of nAChR. All these proteins are ring-like pentamers. Here we report that AChBP exists in the hemolymph of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata (vector of the schistosomiasis parasite as a regular pentagonal dodecahedron, 22 nm in diameter (12 pentamers, 60 active sites. We sequenced and recombinantly expressed two ∼25 kDa polypeptides (BgAChBP1 and BgAChBP2 with a specific active site, N-glycan site and disulfide bridge variation. We also provide the exon/intron structures. Recombinant BgAChBP1 formed pentamers and dodecahedra, recombinant BgAChBP2 formed pentamers and probably disulfide-bridged di-pentamers, but not dodecahedra. Three-dimensional electron cryo-microscopy (3D-EM yielded a 3D reconstruction of the dodecahedron with a resolution of 6 Å. Homology models of the pentamers docked to the 6 Å structure revealed opportunities for chemical bonding at the inter-pentamer interfaces. Definition of the ligand-binding pocket and the gating C-loop in the 6 Å structure suggests that 3D-EM might lead to the identification of functional states in the BgAChBP dodecahedron.

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  7. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. (Burroughs Wellcome Co., Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  8. Long-term effects of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I on serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3 and acid labile subunit in Laron syndrome patients with normal growth hormone binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanety, H; Silbergeld, A; Klinger, B; Karasik, A; Baxter, R C; Laron, Z

    1997-12-01

    A minority of patients with Laron syndrome have normal serum GH binding protein (GHBP), indicating that the defect is elsewhere than in the extracellular domain of the GH receptor. We have evaluated the effect of long-term IGF-I treatment on serum IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and the acid-labile subunit (ALS) in three sibling with Laron syndrome caused by a GH post-receptor defect and with normal GHBP. The children (a boy aged 3 years, a girl aged 4 years and a boy aged 10 years) were treated by daily s.c. injection of IGF-I in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg. IGFBP-3 was measured by RIA and Western ligand blotting, ALS by RIA. Based values of IGFBP-3 and ALS were low. During IGF-I treatment, the IGFBP-3 concentrations in the girl gradually increased, whereas in the boys there was a 60% decrease during the first week, followed by gradual increase towards baseline. The ALS concentrations followed a similar pattern. We conclude that IGF-I treatment induces and initial suppression and then an increase in the IGFBP-3 and ALS concentrations, confirming data from animal experiments that IGFBP-3 synthesis is not solely under GH control. The differences in responsiveness between the female and male siblings may reflect genetic differences, or lower circulating concentrations of IGF-I in the boys compared with the girl.

  9. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M

    2001-01-01

    the inactive and the active groups, we found that positive and negative predictive values (PV(pos), PV(neg)) for clinical disease activity of total and free insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were 0.59, 0.90 and 1.00, 0.82 respectively. Acid-labile subunit (ALS) showed diagnostic merit similar to insulin......-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease activity...

  10. Evolution of the ABPA subunit of androgen-binding protein expressed in the submaxillary glands in New and Old World rodent taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewege, Michael W; Phillips, Carleton J; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2013-05-01

    The salivary androgen-binding proteins (ABPs) are members of the secretoglobin gene family present in mammals. Each ABP is a heterodimer assembled as an ABPA subunit encoded by an Abpa gene and linked by disulfide bridges to an ABPBG subunit encoded by an Abpbg gene. The ABP dimers are secreted into the saliva of mice and then transferred to the pelage after grooming and subsequently to the environment allowing an animal to mark territory with a biochemical signal. The putative role of the mouse salivary ABPs is that of pheromones mediating mate selection resulting in assortative mating in the Mus musculus species complex. We focused on comparing patterns of molecular evolution between the Abpa genes expressed in the submaxillary glands of species of New World and Old World muroids. We found that in both sets of rodents the Abpa genes expressed in the submaxillary glands appear to be evolving under a similar evolutionary regime, with relatively high nonsynonymous substitution rates, suggesting that ABP might play a similar biological role in both systems. Thus, ABP could be involved with mate recognition and species isolation in New World as well as Old World muroids.

  11. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  12. The second extracellular loop of pore-forming subunits of ATP-binding cassette transporters for basic amino acids plays a crucial role in interaction with the cognate solute binding protein(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-04-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)(2) complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP(2) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P(2) variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM.

  13. Differential binding of neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to native-like soluble HIV-1 Env trimers, uncleaved Env proteins, and monomeric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Anila; Ringe, Rajesh; Derking, Ronald; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2014-05-29

    The trimeric envelope glycoproteins (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 virions are the targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). No candidate HIV-1 immunogen has yet induced potent, broadly active NAbs (bNAbs). Part of the explanation may be that previously tested Env proteins inadequately mimic the functional, native Env complex. Trimerization and the proteolytic processing of Env precursors into gp120 and gp41 profoundly alter antigenicity, but soluble cleaved trimers are too unstable to serve as immunogens. By introducing stabilizing mutations (SOSIP), we constructed soluble, cleaved Env trimers derived from the HIV-1 subtype A isolate BG505 that resemble native Env spikes on virions both structurally and antigenically. We used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to quantify antibody binding to different forms of BG505 Env: the proteolytically cleaved SOSIP.664 trimers, cleaved gp120-gp41ECTO protomers, and gp120 monomers. Non-NAbs to the CD4-binding site bound only marginally to the trimers but equally well to gp120-gp41ECTO protomers and gp120 monomers, whereas the bNAb VRC01, directed to the CD4bs, bound to all three forms. In contrast, bNAbs to V1V2 glycan-dependent epitopes bound preferentially (PG9 and PG16) or exclusively (PGT145) to trimers. We also explored the antigenic consequences of three different features of SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers: the engineered inter-subunit disulfide bond, the trimer-stabilizing I559P change in gp41ECTO, and proteolytic cleavage at the gp120-gp41ECTO junction. Each of these three features incrementally promoted native-like trimer antigenicity. We compared Fab and IgG versions of bNAbs and validated a bivalent model of IgG binding. The NAbs showed widely divergent binding kinetics and degrees of binding to native-like BG505 SOSIP.664. High off-rate constants and low stoichiometric estimates of NAb binding were associated with large amounts of residual infectivity after NAb neutralization of the corresponding BG505.T332N pseudovirus

  14. Novel RNA-binding protein P311 binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit b (eIF3b) to promote translation of transforming growth factor β1-3 (TGF-β1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Michael M; Lv, Kaosheng; Meredith, Stephen C; Martindale, Jennifer L; Gorospe, Myriam; Schuger, Lucia

    2014-12-05

    P311, a conserved 8-kDa intracellular protein expressed in brain, smooth muscle, regenerating tissues, and malignant glioblastomas, represents the first documented stimulator of TGF-β1-3 translation in vitro and in vivo. Here we initiated efforts to define the mechanism underlying P311 function. PONDR® (Predictor Of Naturally Disordered Regions) analysis suggested and CD confirmed that P311 is an intrinsically disordered protein, therefore requiring an interacting partner to acquire tertiary structure and function. Immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectroscopy identified eIF3 subunit b (eIF3b) as a novel P311 binding partner. Immunohistochemical colocalization, GST pulldown, and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that P311-eIF3b interaction is direct and has a Kd of 1.26 μm. Binding sites were mapped to the non-canonical RNA recognition motif of eIF3b and a central 11-amino acid-long region of P311, here referred to as eIF3b binding motif. Disruption of P311-eIF3b binding inhibited translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3, as indicated by luciferase reporter assays, polysome fractionation studies, and Western blot analysis. RNA precipitation assays after UV cross-linking and RNA-protein EMSA demonstrated that P311 binds directly to TGF-β 5'UTRs mRNAs through a previously unidentified RNA recognition motif-like motif. Our results demonstrate that P311 is a novel RNA-binding protein that, by interacting with TGF-βs 5'UTRs and eIF3b, stimulates the translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3.

  15. Differential expression of G protein alpha and ß subunit genes during development of Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laxalt, A.M.; Latijnhouwers, M.; Hulten, van M.; Govers, F.

    2002-01-01

    A G protein subunit gene (pigpa1) and a G protein subunit gene (pigpb1) were isolated from the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight. Heterotrimeric G proteins are evolutionary conserved GTP-binding proteins that are composed of ,, and subunits and participate in di

  16. Structural analysis of ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034) binding to protein kinase A catalytic subunit and rational design of bisubstrate analogue inhibitors of basophilic protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavogina, Darja; Lust, Marje; Viil, Indrek; König, Norbert; Raidaru, Gerda; Rogozina, Jevgenia; Enkvist, Erki; Uri, Asko; Bossemeyer, Dirk

    2009-01-22

    The crystal structure of a complex of the catalytic subunit (type alpha) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C alpha) with ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034), the presumed lead scaffold of previously reported adenosine-oligo-arginine conjugate-based (ARC-type) inhibitors, was solved. Structural elements important for interaction with the kinase were established with specifically modified derivatives of the lead compound. On the basis of this knowledge, a new generation of inhibitors, conjugates of adenosine-4'-dehydroxymethyl-4'-carboxylic acid moiety and oligo(D-arginine), was developed with inhibitory constants well into the subnanomolar range. The structural determinants of selectivity of the new compounds were established in assays with ROCK-II and PKBgamma.

  17. Evolution of the B-Block Binding Subunit of TFIIIC That Binds to the Internal Promoter for RNA Polymerase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Matsutani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic RNA polymerase III transcribes tRNA genes, and this requires the transcription factor TFIIIC. Promoters are within genes, with which the B-block binding subunit of TFIIIC associates to initiate transcription. The binding subunits are more than 1000 amino acids in length in various eukaryotic species. There are four regions with conserved sequence similarities in the subunits. The helix-turn-helix motif is included in one of these regions and has been characterized as the B-block_TFIIIC family in the Pfam database. In the NCBI and EMBL translated protein databases, there are archaeal proteins (approximately 100 amino acids in length referred to as B-block binding subunits. Most of them contain a B-block_TFIIIC motif. DELTA-BLAST searches using these archaeal proteins as queries showed significant multiple blast hits for many eukaryotic B-block binding subunits on the same proteins. This result suggests that eukaryotic B-block binding subunits were constituted by repeating a small unit of B-block_TFIIIC over a long evolutionary period. Bacterial proteins have also been annotated as B-block binding subunits in the databases. Here, some of them were confirmed to have significant similarities to B-block_TFIIIC. These results may imply that part of the RNAP III transcription machinery existed in the common ancestry of prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  18. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF...

  19. The Second Extracellular Loop of Pore-Forming Subunits of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters for Basic Amino Acids Plays a Crucial Role in Interaction with the Cognate Solute Binding Protein(s)▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)2 complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P2 variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  20. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα-encoding (GNAS genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486 were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646 was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656 was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646 is associated (P ≤ 0.05 with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01 with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size was also observed at the rs

  1. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα)-encoding (GNAS) genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS) domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486) were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646) was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656) was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646) is associated (P ≤ 0.05) with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf) and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01) with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size) and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size) was also observed at the rs43101491 SNP. Following

  2. Structural dynamics and ssDNA binding activity of the three N-terminal domains of the large subunit of Replication Protein A from small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Tsutakawa, Susan; Brosey, Chris A.; Castillo, Amalchi; Chagot, Marie-Eve; Smith, Jarrod A.; Tainer, John A.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-03-11

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein utilized in diverse DNA transactions in the cell. RPA is a heterotrimeric protein with seven globular domains connected by flexible linkers, which enable substantial inter-domain motion that is essential to its function. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments on two multi-domain constructs from the N-terminus of the large subunit (RPA70) were used to examine the structural dynamics of these domains and their response to the binding of ssDNA. The SAXS data combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal substantial interdomain flexibility for both RPA70AB (the tandem high affinity ssDNA binding domains A and B connected by a 10-residue linker) and RPA70NAB (RPA70AB extended by a 70-residue linker to the RPA70N protein interaction domain). Binding of ssDNA to RPA70NAB reduces the interdomain flexibility between the A and B domains, but has no effect on RPA70N. These studies provide the first direct measurements of changes in orientation of these three RPA domains upon binding ssDNA. The results support a model in which RPA70N remains structurally independent of RPA70AB in the DNA bound state and therefore freely available to serve as a protein recruitment module.

  3. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposite...

  4. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  5. Crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Pampa, K J; Kumar, S M; Mukherjee, S; Kunishima, N; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2015-03-27

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, represent one of the largest superfamilies of primary transporters, which are very essential for various biological functions. The crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined at 1.77 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the protomer has two thick arms, (arm I and II), which resemble 'L' shape. The ATP-binding pocket is located close to the end of arm I. ATP molecule is docked into the active site of the protein. The dimeric crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been compared with the previously reported crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from Salmonella typhimurium.

  6. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  7. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate, markers of disease activity in acromegaly in relation to perceived disease activity. Thirty-seven consecutively treated, acromegalic patients, classified by clinical symptoms as inactive (n=16), slightly active (n=10) and active (n=11), entered the study. When evaluating......-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease activity...

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi H Torkkeli

    Full Text Available Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about

  9. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  10. The 73 kDa subunit of the CPSF complex binds to the HIV-1 LTR promoter and functions as a negative regulatory factor that is inhibited by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Laureano; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Fresno, Manuel; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A

    2007-09-14

    Gene expression in eukaryotes requires the post-transcriptional cleavage of mRNA precursors into mature mRNAs. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is critical for this process and its 73 kDa subunit (CPSF-73) mediates cleavage coupled to polyadenylation and histone pre-mRNA processing. Using CPSF-73 over-expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments, this study identifies CPSF-73 as an important regulatory protein that represses the basal transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Similar results were found with over-expression of the CPSF-73 homologue RC-68, but not with CPSF 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100) and RC-74. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the physical interaction of CPSF-73 with the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Further experiments revealed indirect CPSF-73 binding to the region between -275 to -110 within the 5' upstream region. Functional assays revealed the importance for the 5' upstream region (-454 to -110) of the LTR for CPSF-73-mediated transcription repression. We also show that HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with CPSF-73 and counteracts its repressive activity on the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Our results clearly show a novel function for CPSF-73 and add another candidate protein for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency.

  11. In vivo affinity label of a protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Coenzyme A occupied the AT(D)P binding site of the mutant F1-ATPase beta subunit (Y307C) through a disulfide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, M; Kiribuchi, K; Allison, W S; Yoshida, M

    1993-12-27

    When Tyr-307 of the beta subunit of F1-ATPase from a thermophilic Bacillus strain PS3 is replaced by cysteine and expressed in Escherichia coli cells, about a half population of the mutant beta subunit are labeled by Coenzyme A at Cys-307 through a disulfide bond which is cleavable by reducing treatment. The mutant beta subunit can be reconstituted into the alpha 3 beta 3 complex of which ATPase activity is stimulated two-fold by reducing treatment either prior or after reconstitution. Since Tyr-307 has been supposed to be located at one of subdomains which form the ATP binding site of the beta subunit, Coenzyme A binds to the mutant beta subunit as an AT(D)P analogue in E. coli cells and then covalently attaches to Cys-307.

  12. Interleukin 1β Regulation of the System xc- Substrate-specific Subunit, xCT, in Primary Mouse Astrocytes Involves the RNA-binding Protein HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingxue; He, Yan; Hewett, Sandra J; Hewett, James A

    2016-01-22

    System xc(-) is a heteromeric amino acid cystine/glutamate antiporter that is constitutively expressed by cells of the CNS, where it functions in the maintenance of intracellular glutathione and extracellular glutamate levels. We recently determined that the cytokine, IL-1β, increases the activity of system xc(-) in CNS astrocytes secondary to an up-regulation of its substrate-specific light chain, xCT, and that this occurs, in part, at the level of transcription. However, an in silico analysis of the murine xCT 3'-UTR identified numerous copies of adenine- and uridine-rich elements, raising the possibility that undefined trans-acting factors governing mRNA stability and translation may also contribute to xCT expression. Here we show that IL-1β increases the level of mRNA encoding xCT in primary cultures of astrocytes isolated from mouse cortex in association with an increase in xCT mRNA half-life. Additionally, IL-1β induces HuR translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. RNA immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that HuR binds directly to the 3'-UTR of xCT in an IL-1β-dependent manner. Knockdown of endogenous HuR protein abrogates the IL-1β-mediated increase in xCT mRNA half-life, whereas overexpression of HuR in unstimulated primary mouse astrocytes doubles the half-life of constitutive xCT mRNA. This latter effect is accompanied by an increase in xCT protein levels, as well as a functional increase in system xc(-) activity. Altogether, these data support a critical role for HuR in mediating the IL-1β-induced stabilization of astrocyte xCT mRNA.

  13. Allostery between two binding sites in the ion channel subunit TRIP8b confers binding specificity to HCN channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Kyle A; Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J; Cheng, Xiangying; Kurz, Jonathan E; Lyman, Reagan E; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Chetkovich, Dane M

    2017-09-08

    Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are ubiquitous structural motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions. For example, the TPR domains in the peroxisomal import receptor PEX5 enable binding to a range of type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) motifs. A homolog of PEX5, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), binds to and functions as an auxiliary subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Given the similarity between TRIP8b and PEX5, this difference in function raises the question of what mechanism accounts for their binding specificity. In this report, we found that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) and the C-terminus of the HCN channel are critical for conferring specificity to TRIP8b binding. We show that TRIP8b binds the HCN CNBD through a 37-residue domain and the HCN C-terminus through the TPR domains. Using a combination of fluorescence polarization and co-immunoprecipitation based assays, we establish that binding at either site increases affinity at the other. Thus, allosteric coupling of the TRIP8b TPR domains both promotes binding to HCN channels and limits binding to PTS1 substrates. These results raise the possibility that other TPR domains may similarly be influenced by allosteric mechanisms as a general feature of protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  15. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  16. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    from ribosomes. Particles reconstituted from the recombinant proteins sediment at 30S in sucrose gradients, bind tRNA in a template-dependent manner, and associate with 50S subunits to form 70S ribosomes that are active in poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis. Both the protein composition and the dimethyl sulfate modification pattern of 16S ribosomal RNA are similar for 30S subunits reconstituted with either recombinant proteins or proteins isolated as a mixture from ribosomal subunits as well as for natural 30S subunits.

  18. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Linkage of subunit interactions, structural changes, and energetics of coenzyme binding in tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, H; Hinz, H J

    1984-10-09

    The energetics of binding of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) to both the apo beta 2 subunit and the apo alpha 2 beta 2 complex of tryptophan synthase from Escherichia coli has been investigated as a function of pH and temperature by direct microcalorimetric methods. At 25 degrees C, pH 7.5, the binding process proceeds in the time range of minutes and shows a biphasic heat output which permits resolution of the overall reaction into different reaction steps. Binding studies on the coenzyme analogues pyridoxal (PAL), pyridoxine 5'-phosphate (PNP), and pyridoxine (POL) to the protein as well as a comparison of these results with data from studies on PLP binding to epsilon-aminocaproic acid have led to a deconvolution of the complex heat vs. time curves into fast endothermic contributions from electrostatic interaction and Schiff base formation and slow exothermic contributions from the interactions between PLP and the binding domain. The pH-independent, large negative change in heat capacity of about -9.1 kJ/(mol of beta 2 X K) when binding PLP to beta 2 is indicative of major structural changes resulting from complex formation. The much smaller value of delta Cp = -1.7 kJ/(mol of beta 2 X K) for binding of PLP to alpha 2 beta 2 clearly demonstrates the energetic linkage of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Calorimetric titrations of the apo beta 2 subunit with PLP at 35 degrees C have shown that also at this temperature positive cooperativity between the two binding sites occurs. On the basis of these measurements a complete set of site-specific thermodynamic parameters has been established.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. NMR analysis of G-protein betagamma subunit complexes reveals a dynamic G(alpha)-Gbetagamma subunit interface and multiple protein recognition modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrcka, Alan V; Kichik, Nessim; Tarragó, Teresa; Burroughs, Michael; Park, Min-Sun; Itoga, Nathan K; Stern, Harry A; Willardson, Barry M; Giralt, Ernest

    2010-01-12

    G-protein betagamma (Gbetagamma) subunits interact with a wide range of molecular partners including: G(alpha) subunits, effectors, peptides, and small molecule inhibitors. The molecular mechanisms underlying the ability to accommodate this wide range of structurally distinct binding partners are not well understood. To uncover the role of protein flexibility and alterations in protein conformation in molecular recognition by Gbetagamma, a method for site-specific (15)N-labeling of Gbeta-Trp residue backbone and indole amines in insect cells was developed. Transverse Relaxation Optimized Spectroscopy-Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Coherence Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TROSY-HSQC NMR) analysis of (15)N-Trp Gbetagamma identified well-dispersed signals for the individual Trp residue side chain and amide positions. Surprisingly, a wide range of signal intensities was observed in the spectrum, likely representing a range of backbone and side chain mobilities. The signal for GbetaW99 indole was very intense, suggesting a high level of mobility on the protein surface and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that GbetaW99 is highly mobile on the nanosecond timescale in comparison with other Gbeta tryptophans. Binding of peptides and phosducin dramatically altered the mobility of GbetaW99 and GbetaW332 in the binding site and the chemical shifts at sites distant from the direct binding surface in distinct ways. In contrast, binding of G(alpha)(i1)-GDP to Gbetagamma had relatively little effect on the spectrum and, most surprisingly, did not significantly alter Trp mobility at the subunit interface. This suggests the inactive heterotrimer in solution adopts a conformation with an open subunit interface a large percentage of the time. Overall, these data show that Gbetagamma subunits explore a range of conformations that can be exploited during molecular recognition by diverse binding partners.

  1. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trusov Yuri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX. According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species.

  2. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  3. Lipid Binding Proteins from Parasitic Platyhelmithes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela eAlvite

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs. Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesise their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms.HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates.Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organisation, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localisation, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  4. Ligand binding mechanics of maltose binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Morten; Rief, Matthias

    2009-11-13

    In the past decade, single-molecule force spectroscopy has provided new insights into the key interactions stabilizing folded proteins. A few recent studies probing the effects of ligand binding on mechanical protein stability have come to quite different conclusions. While some proteins seem to be stabilized considerably by a bound ligand, others appear to be unaffected. Since force acts as a vector in space, it is conceivable that mechanical stabilization by ligand binding is dependent on the direction of force application. In this study, we vary the direction of the force to investigate the effect of ligand binding on the stability of maltose binding protein (MBP). MBP consists of two lobes connected by a hinge region that move from an open to a closed conformation when the ligand maltose binds. Previous mechanical experiments, where load was applied to the N and C termini, have demonstrated that MBP is built up of four building blocks (unfoldons) that sequentially detach from the folded structure. In this study, we design the pulling direction so that force application moves the two MBP lobes apart along the hinge axis. Mechanical unfolding in this geometry proceeds via an intermediate state whose boundaries coincide with previously reported MBP unfoldons. We find that in contrast to N-C-terminal pulling experiments, the mechanical stability of MBP is increased by ligand binding when load is applied to the two lobes and force breaks the protein-ligand interactions directly. Contour length measurements indicate that MBP is forced into an open conformation before unfolding even if ligand is bound. Using mutagenesis experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanical stabilization effect is due to only a few key interactions of the protein with its ligand. This work illustrates how varying the direction of the applied force allows revealing important details about the ligand binding mechanics of a large protein.

  5. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-02-26

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required.

  6. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  7. Structure of the human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit CK2α' and interaction thermodynamics with the regulatory subunit CK2β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Nils; Olsen, Birgitte; Raaf, Jennifer;

    2011-01-01

    the limited biochemical knowledge about the second paralog (CK2α'), we developed a well-soluble catalytically active full-length mutant of human CK2α', characterized it by Michaelis-Menten kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry, and determined its crystal structure to a resolution of 2 Å. The affinity......Protein kinase CK2 (formerly "casein kinase 2") is composed of a central dimer of noncatalytic subunits (CK2β) binding two catalytic subunits. In humans, there are two isoforms of the catalytic subunit (and an additional splicing variant), one of which (CK2α) is well characterized. To supplement...

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG SpaC pilin subunit binds to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Ueno, Shintaro; Sugiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is a well-established probiotic strain. The beneficial properties of this strain are partially dependent on its prolonged residence in the gastrointestinal tract, and are likely influenced by its adhesion to the intestinal mucosa. The pilin SpaC subunit, located within the Spa pili structure, is the most well studied LGG adhesion factor. However, the binding epitopes of SpaC remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the binding properties of SpaC to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates using a recombinant SpaC protein. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, SpaC binding was markedly reduced by addition of purified mucin and the mucin oligosaccharide fraction. Histochemical staining revealed that the binding of SpaC was drastically reduced by periodic acid treatment. Moreover, in the surface plasmon resonance-based Biacore assay, SpaC bound strongly to the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing terminus of glycolipids. We here provide the first demonstration that SpaC binds to the oligosaccharide chains of mucins, and that the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing termini of glycoconjugates play a crucial role in this binding. Our results demonstrate the importance of carbohydrates of SpaC for mucus interactions.

  9. COP9 signalosome subunit 6 binds and inhibits avian leukosis virus integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanxin; Xu, Aotian; Hou, Xinhui; Chen, Fuyong; Cao, Weisheng; Yu, Jieshi; Liao, Ming; Tang, Jun

    2014-10-24

    The retroviral integrase plays an essential role in the integration of reverse-transcribed retroviral cDNA into the host cell genome, and serves as an important target for anti-viral therapeutics. In this study, we identified the COP9 signalosome subunit 6 (CSN6) as a novel avian leukosis virus (ALV) integrase binding protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed that CSN6 bound to ALV integrase likely through direct interaction of CSN6 to the catalytic core of the integrase. We further demonstrated CSN6 inhibited integrase activity in vitro; knockdown of CSN6 in DF-1 promoted ALV production. These results indicated that CSN6 may be a negative regulator of ALV replication by binding to and inhibiting integrase. Our findings provided the insight into the integrase-based host defense system and may have implications in the development of integrase-based anti-viral strategies.

  10. Shared Subunits of Tetrahymena Telomerase Holoenzyme and Replication Protein A Have Different Functions in Different Cellular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Heather E; Chan, Henry; Feigon, Juli; Collins, Kathleen

    2017-01-06

    In most eukaryotes, telomere maintenance relies on telomeric repeat synthesis by a reverse transcriptase named telomerase. To synthesize telomeric repeats, the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) uses the RNA subunit (TER) as a template. In the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, the telomerase holoenzyme consists of TER, TERT, and eight additional proteins, including the telomeric repeat single-stranded DNA-binding protein Teb1 and its heterotrimer partners Teb2 and Teb3. Teb1 is paralogous to the large subunit of the general single-stranded DNA binding heterotrimer replication protein A (RPA). Little is known about the function of Teb2 and Teb3, which are structurally homologous to the RPA middle and small subunits, respectively. Here, epitope-tagging Teb2 and Teb3 expressed at their endogenous gene loci enabled affinity purifications that revealed that, unlike other Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme subunits, Teb2 and Teb3 are not telomerase-specific. Teb2 and Teb3 assembled into other heterotrimer complexes, which when recombinantly expressed had the general single-stranded DNA binding activity of RPA complexes, unlike the telomere-specific DNA binding of Teb1 or the TEB heterotrimer of Teb1, Teb2, and Teb3. TEB had no more DNA binding affinity than Teb1 alone. In contrast, heterotrimers reconstituted with Teb2 and Teb3 and two other Tetrahymena RPA large subunit paralogs had higher DNA binding affinity than their large subunit alone. Teb1 and TEB, but not RPA, increased telomerase processivity. We conclude that in the telomerase holoenzyme, instead of binding DNA, Teb2 and Teb3 are Teb1 assembly factors. These findings demonstrate that Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme and RPA complexes share subunits and that RPA subunits have distinct functions in different heterotrimer assemblies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Similarities in transcription factor IIIC subunits that bind to the posterior regions of internal promoters for RNA polymerase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsutani Sachiko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase III (RNAP III transcribes the genes for small RNAs like tRNAs, 5S rRNA, and several viral RNAs, and short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs. The genes for these RNAs and SINEs have internal promoters that consist of two regions. These two regions are called the A and B blocks. The multisubunit transcription factor TFIIIC is required for transcription initiation of RNAP III; in transcription of tRNAs, the B-block binding subunit of TFIIIC recognizes a promoter. Although internal promoter sequences are conserved in eukaryotes, no evidence of homology between the B-block binding subunits of vertebrates and yeasts has been reported previously. Results Here, I reported the results of PSI-BLAST searches using the B-block binding subunits of human and Shizosacchromyces pombe as queries, showing that the same Arabidopsis proteins were hit with low E-values in both searches. Comparison of the convergent iterative alignments obtained by these PSI-BLAST searches revealed that the vertebrate, yeast, and Arabidopsis proteins have similarities in their N-terminal one-third regions. In these regions, there were three domains with conserved sequence similarities, one located in the N-terminal end region. The N-terminal end region of the B-block binding subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tentatively identified as a HMG box, which is the DNA binding motif. Although I compared the alignment of the N-terminal end regions of the B-block binding subunits, and their homologs, with that of the HMG boxes, it is not clear whether they are related. Conclusion Molecular phylogenetic analyses using the small subunit rRNA and ubiquitous proteins like actin and α-tubulin, show that fungi are more closely related to animals than either is to plants. Interestingly, the results obtained in this study show that, with respect to the B-block binding subunits of TFIIICs, animals appear to be evolutionarily closer to plants

  12. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  13. Effect of neomycin and protein S1 on the binding of streptomycin to the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisé-Miron, L; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1982-04-01

    The binding of [3H]dihydrostreptomycin to the 70-S ribosome or to the 30-S subunit has been investigated in the presence of neomycin by the Millipore filtration or the equilibrium dialysis procedure. It was observed that dihydrostreptomycin binds equally well to the 30-S subunit and the 70-S ribosome, and that neomycin stimulates the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome by increasing the association constant and not by creating new binding sites. Specific removal of protein S1 from the 30-S subunit neither affected the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome nor the stimulation of dihydrostreptomycin binding by neomycin.

  14. Formation of fluorescent proteins by the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to R-phycoerythrin alpha and beta apo-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Dragan; Sultana, Ishrat; Phillips, Gregory J; Yeung, Edward S

    2006-11-01

    Formation of fluorescent proteins was explored after incubation of recombinant apo-subunits of phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin with phycoerythrobilin chromophore. Alpha and beta apo-subunit genes of R-phycoerythrin from red algae Polisiphonia boldii were cloned in plasmid pET-21d(+). Hexahistidine-tagged alpha and beta apo-subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were constituted after incubation of E. coli cells with phycoerythrobilin. Holo-subunits contained both phycoerythrobilin and urobilin chromophores. Fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in bacterial cells. Cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits were several times brighter than control cells as found by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The addition of phycoerythrobilin to cells did not show cytotoxic effects, in contrast to expression of proteins in inclusion bodies. In an attempt to improve solubility, R-phycoerythrin apo-subunits were fused to maltose-binding protein and incubated with phycoerythrobilin both in vitro and in vivo. Highly fluorescent soluble fusion proteins containing phycoerythrobilin as the sole chromophore were formed. Fusion proteins were localized by fluorescence microscopy either throughout E. coli cells or at cell poles. Flow cytometry showed that cells containing fluorescent fusion proteins were up to 10 times brighter than control cells. Results indicate that fluorescent proteins formed by attachment of phycoerythrobilin to expressed apo-subunits of phycobiliproteins can be used as fluorescent probes for analysis of cells by microscopy and flow cytometry. A unique property of these fluorescent reporters is their utility in both properly folded (soluble) subunits and subunits aggregated in inclusion bodies.

  15. Effects of short-term caloric restriction on circulating free IGF-I, acid-labile subunit, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs)-1-4, and IGFBPs-1-3 protease activity in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Juul, Anders; Kjems, Lise Lund

    2006-01-01

    Decreased levels of GH and total IGF-I have been reported in obesity. It has been hypothesized that increased free (biologically active) IGF-I levels generated from IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) protease activity could be the mechanism for the low GH release in dieting obese subjects. However, no p...... a short-term very low-calorie diet (VLCD)....

  16. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  17. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  18. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  19. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction.

  20. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  1. 126Gln is the residue of human IL-2 binding to IL-2R γ subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志勇; 郑仲承; 孙兰英; 刘新垣

    1997-01-01

    The 126Gln of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a conserved amino acid residue. After substitution of 126Gln with Asp, the binding abilities of this mutant to different composites of IL-2 receptor (R) subunits have been determined. Results show that 126Asp-IL-2 has higher affinity to IL-2R α βγ complex and normal affinity to IL-2R α β complex, but loses its binding ability to IL-2R β γ complex, demonstrating that the 126Gln is the residue of human IL-2 which binds to IL-2R 7 subunit.

  2. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Structural Analysis of the Dihydropyridine Receptor α1S Subunit Reveals Conformational Differences Induced by Binding of the β1a Subunit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Mohana; Perez, Claudio F.; Fessenden, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor α1S subunit plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling by sensing membrane voltage changes and then triggering intracellular calcium release. The cytoplasmic loops connecting four homologous α1S structural domains have diverse functions, but their structural arrangement is poorly understood. Here, we used a novel FRET-based method to characterize the relative proximity of these intracellular loops in α1S subunits expressed in intact cells. In dysgenic myotubes, energy transfer was observed from an N-terminal-fused YFP to a FRET acceptor, ReAsH (resorufin arsenical hairpin binder), targeted to each α1S intracellular loop, with the highest FRET efficiencies measured to the α1S II-III loop and C-terminal tail. However, in HEK-293T cells, FRET efficiencies from the α1S N terminus to the II-III and III-IV loops and the C-terminal tail were significantly lower, thus suggesting that these loop structures are influenced by the cellular microenvironment. The addition of the β1a dihydropyridine receptor subunit enhanced FRET to the II-III loop, thus indicating that β1a binding directly affects II-III loop conformation. This specific structural change required the C-terminal 36 amino acids of β1a, which are essential to support EC coupling. Direct FRET measurements between α1S and β1a confirmed that both wild type and truncated β1a bind similarly to α1S. These results provide new insights into the role of muscle-specific proteins on the structural arrangement of α1S intracellular loops and point to a new conformational effect of the β1a subunit in supporting skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:27129199

  3. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Structural Analysis of the Dihydropyridine Receptor α1S Subunit Reveals Conformational Differences Induced by Binding of the β1a Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Mohana; Perez, Claudio F; Fessenden, James D

    2016-06-24

    The skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor α1S subunit plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling by sensing membrane voltage changes and then triggering intracellular calcium release. The cytoplasmic loops connecting four homologous α1S structural domains have diverse functions, but their structural arrangement is poorly understood. Here, we used a novel FRET-based method to characterize the relative proximity of these intracellular loops in α1S subunits expressed in intact cells. In dysgenic myotubes, energy transfer was observed from an N-terminal-fused YFP to a FRET acceptor, ReAsH (resorufin arsenical hairpin binder), targeted to each α1S intracellular loop, with the highest FRET efficiencies measured to the α1S II-III loop and C-terminal tail. However, in HEK-293T cells, FRET efficiencies from the α1S N terminus to the II-III and III-IV loops and the C-terminal tail were significantly lower, thus suggesting that these loop structures are influenced by the cellular microenvironment. The addition of the β1a dihydropyridine receptor subunit enhanced FRET to the II-III loop, thus indicating that β1a binding directly affects II-III loop conformation. This specific structural change required the C-terminal 36 amino acids of β1a, which are essential to support EC coupling. Direct FRET measurements between α1S and β1a confirmed that both wild type and truncated β1a bind similarly to α1S These results provide new insights into the role of muscle-specific proteins on the structural arrangement of α1S intracellular loops and point to a new conformational effect of the β1a subunit in supporting skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Interaction of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and proteasome protein complexes with multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Michael; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wilkinson, Caroline R M

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast Rhp23 and Pus1 represent two families of multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins that associate with the proteasome. We show that both proteins bind to different regions of the proteasome subunit Mts4. The binding site for Pus1 was mapped to a cluster of repetitive sequences also found...... in the proteasome subunit SpRpn2 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunit Cut4. The putative role of Pus1 as a factor involved in allocation of ubiquitinylated substrates for the proteasome is discussed....

  5. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  6. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Irina Moater

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ion-selective electrode method and surface tension. High affinity isotherms which are typical of an anionic surfactant - protein bonding, exhibit an initial increase steep followed by a slow growth region and then a vertical growth above a certain concentration. This isotherm is typical of ionic surfactant to protein binding. Often the high affinity initial bond appears at very low concentrations of surfactant and therefore in some protein-surfactant systems, the exact shape of the isotherm in this region may be missing. The surfactant - protein binding is influenced by a number of variables such as the nature and chain length of surfactant, pH, ionic strength, temperature, nature of this protein and additives.

  7. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... around the phosphorylated residue are important for the binding affinity of ILKAP. We conclude that solid-phase affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures can be applied in phosphoproteomics and systems biology....

  8. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  9. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. G protein β1γ2 subunits purification and their interaction with adenylyl cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Julian; (陈巨莲); NI; Hanxiang; (倪汉祥); SUN; Jingrui; (孙京瑞); WENG; Gezhi

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study on the interaction of G protein (guanine triphosphate binding pro- tein) β1γ2 subunits and their coupled components in cell signal transduction was conducted in vitro. The insect cell lines, Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) and H5 (Trichoplusia ni) were used to express the recombinant protein Gβ1γ2. The cell membrane containing Gβ1γ2 was isolated through affinity chromatography column with Ni-NTA agarose by FPLC method, and the highly purified protein was obtained. The adenylyl cyclase 2 (AC2) activity assay showed that the purified Gβ1γ2 could significantly stimulate AC2 activity. The interaction of β1γ2 subunits of G protein with the cytoplasmic tail of various mammalian adenylyl cyclases was monitored by BIAcore technology using NTA sensor chip, which relies on the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The experiments showed the direct binding of Gβ1γ2 to the cytoplasmic tail C2 domain of AC2. The specific binding domain of AC2 with Gβ1γ2 was the same as AC2 activity domain which was stimulated by β1γ2.

  11. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  12. A protein inventory of human ribosome biogenesis reveals an essential function of exportin 5 in 60S subunit export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Thomas; Horvath, Peter; Wyler, Emanuel; Widmann, Barbara; Badertscher, Lukas; Zemp, Ivo; Kozak, Karol; Csucs, Gabor; Lund, Elsebet; Kutay, Ulrike

    2010-10-26

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process so far mostly studied in yeast. In S. cerevisiae, more than 200 factors including ribosomal proteins and trans-acting factors are required for the ordered assembly of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. To date, only few human homologs of these yeast ribosome synthesis factors have been characterized. Here, we used a systematic RNA interference (RNAi) approach to analyze the contribution of 464 candidate factors to ribosomal subunit biogenesis in human cells. The screen was based on visual readouts, using inducible, fluorescent ribosomal proteins as reporters. By performing computer-based image analysis utilizing supervised machine-learning techniques, we obtained evidence for a functional link of 153 human proteins to ribosome synthesis. Our data show that core features of ribosome assembly are conserved from yeast to human, but differences exist for instance with respect to 60S subunit export. Unexpectedly, our RNAi screen uncovered a requirement for the export receptor Exportin 5 (Exp5) in nuclear export of 60S subunits in human cells. We show that Exp5, like the known 60S exportin Crm1, binds to pre-60S particles in a RanGTP-dependent manner. Interference with either Exp5 or Crm1 function blocks 60S export in both human cells and frog oocytes, whereas 40S export is compromised only upon inhibition of Crm1. Thus, 60S subunit export is dependent on at least two RanGTP-binding exportins in vertebrate cells.

  13. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  14. Bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, V

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins, which form part of the oligopeptide transport system belonging to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters. Depending on the bacterial species, these binding proteins (OppA) capture peptides ranging in size from 2 to 18 amino acids from the environment and pass them on to the other components of the oligopeptide transport system for internalisation. Bacteria have developed several strategies to produce these binding proteins, which are periplasmic in Gram- bacteria and membrane-anchored in Gram+, with a higher stoichiometry (probably necessary for efficient transport) than the other components in the transport system. The expression of OppA-encoding genes is clearly modulated by external factors, especially nitrogen compounds, but the mechanisms of regulation are not always clear. The best-understood roles played by OppAs are internalisation of peptides for nutrition and recycling of muropeptides. It has, however, recently become clear that OppAs are also involved in sensing the external medium via specific or non-specific peptides.

  15. Dynamic Coupling and Allosteric Networks in the α Subunit of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Malik, Rabia U.; Griggs, Nicholas W.; Skjærven, Lars; Traynor, John R.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Grant, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    G protein α subunits cycle between active and inactive conformations to regulate a multitude of intracellular signaling cascades. Important structural transitions occurring during this cycle have been characterized from extensive crystallographic studies. However, the link between observed conformations and the allosteric regulation of binding events at distal sites critical for signaling through G proteins remain unclear. Here we describe molecular dynamics simulations, bioinformatics analysis, and experimental mutagenesis that identifies residues involved in mediating the allosteric coupling of receptor, nucleotide, and helical domain interfaces of Gαi. Most notably, we predict and characterize novel allosteric decoupling mutants, which display enhanced helical domain opening, increased rates of nucleotide exchange, and constitutive activity in the absence of receptor activation. Collectively, our results provide a framework for explaining how binding events and mutations can alter internal dynamic couplings critical for G protein function. PMID:26703464

  16. Trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds human interleukin-1β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamari Paino

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms resist host defenses and antibiotics partly because of their decreased metabolism. Some bacteria use proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β, as cues to promote biofilm formation and to alter virulence. Although one potential bacterial IL-1β receptor has been identified, current knowledge of the bacterial IL-1β sensing mechanism is limited. In chronic biofilm infection, periodontitis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans requires tight adherence (tad-locus to form biofilms, and tissue destroying active lesions contain more IL-1β than inactive ones. The effect of IL-1β on the metabolic activity of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was tested using alamarBlue™. The binding of IL-1β to A. actinomycetemcomitans cells was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To identify the proteins which interacted with IL-1β, different protein fractions from A. actinomycetemcomitans were run in native-PAGE and blotted using biotinylated IL-1β and avidin-HRP, and identified using mass spectroscopy. We show that although IL-1β slightly increases the biofilm formation of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it reduces the metabolic activity of the biofilm. A similar reduction was observed with all tad-locus mutants except the secretin mutant, although all tested mutant strains as well as wild type strains bound IL-1β. Our results suggest that IL-1β might be transported into the A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, and the trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β interacted with IL-1β, possibly explaining the decreased metabolic activity. Because ATP synthase is highly conserved, it might universally enhance biofilm resistance to host defense by binding IL-1β during inflammation.

  17. Differential regulation of glycogenolysis by mutant protein phosphatase-1 glycogen-targeting subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Arpad M; Osmanovic, Senad; Brady, Matthew J

    2009-07-17

    PTG and G(L) are hepatic protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) glycogen-targeting subunits, which direct PP1 activity against glycogen synthase (GS) and/or phosphorylase (GP). The C-terminal 16 amino residues of G(L) comprise a high affinity binding site for GP that regulates bound PP1 activity against GS. In this study, a truncated G(L) construct lacking the GP-binding site (G(L)tr) and a chimeric PTG molecule containing the C-terminal site (PTG-G(L)) were generated. As expected, GP binding to glutathione S-transferase (GST)-G(L)tr was reduced, whereas GP binding to GST-PTG-G(L) was increased 2- to 3-fold versus GST-PTG. In contrast, PP1 binding to all proteins was equivalent. Primary mouse hepatocytes were infected with adenoviral constructs for each subunit, and their effects on glycogen metabolism were investigated. G(L)tr expression was more effective at promoting GP inactivation, GS activation, and glycogen accumulation than G(L). Removal of the regulatory GP-binding site from G(L)tr completely blocked the inactivation of GS seen in G(L)-expressing cells following a drop in extracellular glucose. As a result, G(L)tr expression prevented glycogen mobilization under 5 mm glucose conditions. In contrast, equivalent overexpression of PTG or PTG-G(L) caused a similar increase in glycogen-targeted PP1 levels and GS dephosphorylation. Surprisingly, GP dephosphorylation was significantly reduced in PTG-G(L)-overexpressing cells. As a result, PTG-G(L) expression permitted glycogenolysis under 5 mm glucose conditions that was prevented in PTG-expressing cells. Thus, expression of constructs that contained the high affinity GP-binding site (G(L) and PTG-G(L)) displayed reduced glycogen accumulation and enhanced glycogenolysis compared with their respective controls, albeit via different mechanisms.

  18. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  19. Yeast sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage requires Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing subunit of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Emerson V; Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Burg, John S; Nwosu, Christine C; Lintner, Robert E; Daza, Riza; Russ, Carsten; Ponchner, Karen; Nusbaum, Chad; Espenshade, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sre1 is a membrane-bound transcription factor that controls adaptation to hypoxia. Like its mammalian homolog, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), Sre1 activation requires release from the membrane. However, in fission yeast, this release occurs through a strikingly different mechanism that requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasome. The mechanistic details of Sre1 cleavage, including the link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and proteasome, are not well understood. Here, we present results of a genetic selection designed to identify additional components required for Sre1 cleavage. From the selection, we identified two new components of the fission yeast SREBP pathway: Dsc5 and Cdc48. The AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein, interact with known Dsc complex components and are required for SREBP cleavage. These findings provide a mechanistic link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and the proteasome in SREBP cleavage and add to a growing list of similarities between the Dsc E3 ligase and membrane E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

  20. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  1. GTP binding to the. beta. -subunit of tubulin is greatly reduced in Alzheimers disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatoon, S.; Slevin, J.T.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-05-01

    A decrease occurs (80-100%) in the (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into a cytosolic protein (55K M/sub r/) of Alzheimer's (AD) brain, tentatively identified as the ..beta..-subunit of tubulin (co-migration with purified tubulin, concentration dependence of interaction with GTP, ATP and their 8-azido photoprobes, and similar effects of Ca/sup 2 +/ and EDTA on photoinsertion). This agrees with prior observations of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP interactions with brain tubulin and a recent report on faulty microtubular assembly in AD brain. The decrease in (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into the 55K M/sub r/ protein of AD brain was in contrast with other photolabeled proteins, which remained at equal levels in AD and age-matched normal brain tissues. The 55K and 45K M/sub r/ were the two major (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion species in non-AD brain. Of 5 AD brains, the photoinsertion of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP into the 55K M/sub r/ region was low or absent in 4 (55K/45K=0.1); one was 75% below normals (55K/45K=0.24). Total protein migrating at 55K M/sub r/ was similar in AD and controls. AD brain tubulin, while present, has its exchangeable GTP binding site on ..beta..-tubulin blocked/modified such that (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP cannot interact normally with this site.

  2. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  3. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were formed after incubation of E. coli cells with PEB. Spectroscopic characterization of holo-subunits confirmed that the attachment of PEB chromophore to apo-subunits yielded holo-subunits containing both PEB and urobilin (UB). Fluorescence and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in E. coli cells. In another example, R-PE apo-subunits were genetically fused to cytoplasmic and periplasmic versions of E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP). Fluorescent proteins formed after attachment of PEB to MBP-subunit fusions in vitro and in vivo contained PEB as the sole chromophore, were soluble, and displayed high orange fluorescence. Fluorescence microscopy showed that fusions are located either throughout cells or at cell poles. In addition, cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits or MBP-subunit fusions were up to ten times brighter than control cells as measured by flow cytometry. Results show that the fluorescent proteins formed after non-enzymatic attachment of PEB to R-PE subunit fusions could be used as reporters of gene expression and protein localization in cells as well as fluorescence labels in flow cytometry. Finally, we demonstrated a high-throughput method able to record emission fluorescence spectra of individual cells containing fluorescent proteins. Upon excitation with a 488 mn argon-ion laser many bacterial cells were imaged by a 20X microscope objective while they moved through a capillary tube. Fluorescence was dispersed by a transmission diffraction grating, and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera simultaneously recorded the zero and the first orders of the fluorescence from each cell. Single-cell fluorescence spectra were reconstructed from the distance between zero-order and first-order maxima as well as the length and the pixel intensity distribution of the first-order images. By using this approach, the emission spectrum of E. coli

  4. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  5. Functional Subunits of Eukaryotic Chaperonin CCT/TRiC in Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anaul Kabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are a class of proteins responsible for proper folding of a large number of polypeptides in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Newly synthesized polypeptides are prone to nonspecific interactions, and many of them make toxic aggregates in absence of chaperones. The eukaryotic chaperonin CCT is a large, multisubunit, cylindrical structure having two identical rings stacked back to back. Each ring is composed of eight different but similar subunits and each subunit has three distinct domains. CCT assists folding of actin, tubulin, and numerous other cellular proteins in an ATP-dependent manner. The catalytic cooperativity of ATP binding/hydrolysis in CCT occurs in a sequential manner different from concerted cooperativity as shown for GroEL. Unlike GroEL, CCT does not have GroES-like cofactor, rather it has a built-in lid structure responsible for closing the central cavity. The CCT complex recognizes its substrates through diverse mechanisms involving hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions. Upstream factors like Hsp70 and Hsp90 also work in a concerted manner to transfer the substrate to CCT. Moreover, prefoldin, phosducin-like proteins, and Bag3 protein interact with CCT and modulate its function for the fine-tuning of protein folding process. Any misregulation of protein folding process leads to the formation of misfolded proteins or toxic aggregates which are linked to multiple pathological disorders.

  6. The protein composition of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits: the effects of single protein omission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, M A; Olah, T V; Perrault, A R; Cooperman, B S

    1991-06-01

    Using reverse phase HPLC, we have been able to quantify the protein compositions of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits, formed either with the full complement of 30S proteins in the reconstitution mix or with a single protein omitted. We denote particles formed in the latter case as SPORE (single protein omission reconstitution) particles. An important goal in 30S reconstitution studies is the formation of reconstituted subunits having uniform protein composition, preferably corresponding to one copy of each protein per reconstituted particle. Here we describe procedures involving variation of the protein:rRNA ratio that approach this goal. In SPORE particles the omission of one protein often results in the partial loss in uptake of other proteins. We also describe procedures to increase the uptake of such proteins into SPORE particles, thus enhancing the utility of the SPORE approach in defining the role of specific proteins in 30S structure and function. The losses of proteins other than the omitted protein provide a measure of protein:protein interaction within the 30S subunit. Most of these losses are predictable on the basis of other such measures. However, we do find evidence for several long-range protein:protein interactions (S6:S3, S6:S12, S10:S16, and S6:S4) that have not been described previously.

  7. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  8. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  9. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  10. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  11. Specific interaction of IP6 with human Ku70/80, the DNA-binding subunit of DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakahi, Les A; West, Stephen C

    2002-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA double-strand breaks can be repaired by non-homologous end-joining, a process dependent upon Ku70/80, XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV. In mammals, this process also requires DNA-PK(cs), the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PK. Previously, inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) was shown to be bound by DNA-PK and to stimulate DNA-PK-dependent end-joining in vitro. Here, we localize IP6 binding to the Ku70/80 subunits of DNA- PK, and show that DNA-PK(cs) alone exhibits no detectable affinity for IP6. Moreover, proteolysis mapping of Ku70/80 in the presence and absence of IP6 indicates that binding alters the conformation of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. The yeast homologue of Ku70/80, yKu70/80, fails to bind IP6, indicating that the function of IP6 in non-homologous end-joining, like that of DNA-PK(cs), is unique to the mammalian end-joining process.

  12. Characterization of the subunit structure of the maize tonoplast ATPase. Immunological and inhibitor binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, S; Taiz, L

    1986-09-25

    Gradient purified preparations of the maize 400-kDa tonoplast ATPase are enriched in two major polypeptides, 72 and 62 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against these two putative subunits after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel slices and against the solubilized native enzyme. Antibodies to both the 72- and 62-kDa polypeptides cross-reacted with similar bands on immunoblots of a tonoplast-enriched fraction from barley, while only the 72-kDa antibodies cross-reacted with tonoplast and tonoplast ATPase preparations from Neurospora. Antibodies to the 72-kDa polypeptide and the native enzyme both strongly inhibited enzyme activity, but the 62-kDa antibody was without effect. The identity and function of the subunits was further probed using radiolabeled covalent inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase, 7-chloro-4-nitro[14C]benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole ([14C]NBD-Cl) and N,N'-[14C]dicyclohexylcarbodiimide ([14C]DCCD). [14C]NBD-Cl preferentially labeled the 72-kDa polypeptide, and labeling was prevented by ATP. [14C]DCCD, an inhibitor of the proton channel portion of the mitochondrial ATPase, bound to a 16-kDa polypeptide. Venturicidin blocked binding to the mitochondrial 8-kDa polypeptide but did not affect binding to the tonoplast 16-kDa polypeptide. Taken together, the results implicate the 72-kDa polypeptide as the catalytic subunit of the tonoplast ATPase. The DCCD-binding 16-kDa polypeptide may comprise the proton channel. The presence of nucleotide-binding sites on the 62-kDa polypeptide suggests that it may function as a regulatory subunit.

  13. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-01-01

    The icosahedron and the dodecahedron are the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely utilized in biological systems for packaging and transport1,2. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures3–5, for example, virus-like particles for the targeted delivery and vaccine design. The ability to design proteins that self assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein 'containers' that could exhibit properties custom-made for various applications. In this manuscript, we describe the computational design of an icosahedral nano-cage that self-assembles from trimeric building blocks. Electron microscopy images of the designed protein expressed in E. coli reveals a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 M guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 °C, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 M and 2.25 M guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of superfolder GFP can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent standard candles for light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the center of each of the twenty pentameric faces to potentially gate macromolecule access to the nanocage interior. Such robust designed nanocages should have considerable utility for targeted drug delivery6, vaccine design7, and synthetic biology8. PMID:27309817

  14. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen,Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequenc...

  15. An Aromatic Cap Seals the Substrate Binding Site in an ECF-Type S Subunit for Riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jinmei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2016-06-13

    ECF transporters are a family of active membrane transporters for essential micronutrients, such as vitamins and trace metals. Found exclusively in archaea and bacteria, these transporters are composed of four subunits: an integral membrane substrate-binding subunit (EcfS), a transmembrane coupling subunit (EcfT), and two ATP-binding cassette ATPases (EcfA and EcfA'). We have characterized the structural basis of substrate binding by the EcfS subunit for riboflavin from Thermotoga maritima, TmRibU. TmRibU binds riboflavin with high affinity, and the protein–substrate complex is exceptionally stable in solution. The crystal structure of riboflavin-bound TmRibU reveals an electronegative binding pocket at the extracellular surface in which the substrate is completely buried. Analysis of the intermolecular contacts indicates that nearly every available substrate hydrogen bond is satisfied. A conserved aromatic residue at the extracellular end of TM5, Tyr130, caps the binding site to generate a substrate-bound, occluded state, and non-conservative mutation of Tyr130 reduces the stability of this conformation. Using a novel fluorescence binding assay, we find that an aromatic residue at this position is essential for high-affinity substrate binding. Comparison with other S subunit structures suggests that TM5 and Loop5-6 contain a dynamic, conserved motif that plays a key role in gating substrate entry and release by S subunits of ECF transporters.

  16. G protein signaling governing cell fate decisions involves opposing Gα subunits in Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Communication between cells and their environments is often mediated by G protein-coupled receptors and cognate G proteins. In fungi, one such signaling cascade is the mating pathway triggered by pheromone/pheromone receptor recognition. Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which expresses two Gα subunits, most filamentous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes have three Gα subunits. Previous studies have defined the Gα subunit acting upstream of the cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, but it has been unclea...

  17. Graded activation of CRAC channel by binding of different numbers of STIM1 to Orai1 subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengzheng Li; Lin Liu; Yongqiang Deng; Wei Ji; Wen Du; Pingyong Xu; Liangyi Chen; Tao Xu

    2011-01-01

    The Ca2+release-activated Ca2+(CRAC)channel pore is formed by Orail and gated by STIM1 after intracellular Ca2+store depletion.To resolve how many STIM1 molecules are required to open a CRAC channel,we fused different numbers of Orail subunits with functional two-tandem cytoplasmic domains of STIM1(residues 336-485,designated as S domain).Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of these chimeric molecules revealed that CRAC current reached maximum at a stoichiometry of four Orail and eight S domains.Further experiments indicate that two-tandem S domains specifically interact with the C-terminus of one Orail subunit,and CRAC current can be gradually increased as more Orail subunits can interact with S domains or STIM1 proteins.Our data suggest that maximal opening of one CRAC channel requires eight STIM1 molecules,and support a model that the CRAC channel activation is not in an"all-or-none"fashion but undergoes a graded process via binding of different numbers of STIM1.

  18. The carboxyl terminus of the Galpha-subunit is the latch for triggered activation of heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanoff, Christian; Koppensteiner, Romana; Yang, Qiong; Fuerst, Elisabeth; Ahorn, Horst; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The receptor-mimetic peptide D2N, derived from the cytoplasmic domain of the D(2) dopamine receptor, activates G protein alpha-subunits (G(i) and G(o)) directly. Using D2N, we tested the current hypotheses on the mechanism of receptor-mediated G protein activation, which differ by the role assigned to the Gbetagamma-subunit: 1) a receptor-prompted movement of Gbetagamma is needed to open up the nucleotide exit pathway ("gear-shift" and "lever-arm" model) or 2) the receptor first engages Gbetagamma and then triggers GDP release by interacting with the carboxyl (C) terminus of Galpha (the "sequential-fit" model). Our results with D2N were compatible with the latter hypothesis. D2N bound to the extreme C terminus of the alpha-subunit and caused a conformational change that was transmitted to the switch regions. Hence, D2N led to a decline in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, increased the guanine nucleotide exchange rate, and modulated the Mg(2+) control of nucleotide binding. A structural alteration in the outer portion of helix alpha5 (substitution of an isoleucine by proline) blunted the stimulatory action of D2N. This confirms that helix alpha5 links the guanine nucleotide binding pocket to the receptor contact site on the G protein. However, neither the alpha-subunit amino terminus (as a lever-arm) nor Gbetagamma was required for D2N-mediated activation; conversely, assembly of the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer stabilized the GDP-bound species and required an increased D2N concentration for activation. We propose that the receptor can engage the C terminus of the alpha-subunit to destabilize nucleotide binding from the "back side" of the nucleotide binding pocket.

  19. Interaction of the regulatory and catalytic subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Electrostatic sites on the type Ialpha regulatory subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R M; Ji-Buechler, Y; Taylor, S S

    1997-06-27

    Since a basic surface on the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is important for binding to the regulatory (R) subunit, acidic residues in R were sought that might contribute to R-C interaction. Using differential labeling by a water-soluble carbodiimide (Buechler, T. A., and Taylor, S. S. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 1937-1943), seven specific carboxylates in RIalpha were identified that were protected from chemical modification in the holoenzyme; each was then replaced with Ala. Of these, rRI(E15A/E106A/D107A)), rRI(E105A), rRI(D140A), rRI(E143A), and rRI(D258A) all were defective in holoenzyme formation and define negative electrostatic surfaces on RIalpha. An additional conserved carboxylate, Glu101 in RIalpha and the equivalent, Glu99 in RIIalpha were mutated to Ala. Replacement of Glu101 had no effect while rRII(E99A) was very defective. RIalpha and RIIalpha thus differ in the molecular details of how they recognize C. Unlike wild-type RI, two additional mutants, rRI(D170A) and rRI(K242A), inhibited C-subunit stoichiometrically in the presence of cAMP and show increases in both on- and off-rates. Asp170, which contributes directly to the hydrogen bonding network in cAMP-binding site A, thus contributes also to holoenzyme stability.

  20. Canine chondrodysplasia caused by a truncating mutation in collagen-binding integrin alpha subunit 10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Kyöstilä

    Full Text Available The skeletal dysplasias are disorders of the bone and cartilage tissues. Similarly to humans, several dog breeds have been reported to suffer from different types of genetic skeletal disorders. We have studied the molecular genetic background of an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia that affects the Norwegian Elkhound and Karelian Bear Dog breeds. The affected dogs suffer from disproportionate short stature dwarfism of varying severity. Through a genome-wide approach, we mapped the chondrodysplasia locus to a 2-Mb region on canine chromosome 17 in nine affected and nine healthy Elkhounds (praw = 7.42×10(-6, pgenome-wide = 0.013. The associated locus contained a promising candidate gene, cartilage specific integrin alpha 10 (ITGA10, and mutation screening of its 30 exons revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 16 (c.2083C>T; p.Arg695* that segregated fully with the disease in both breeds (p = 2.5×10(-23. A 24% mutation carrier frequency was indicated in NEs and an 8% frequency in KBDs. The ITGA10 gene product, integrin receptor α10-subunit combines into a collagen-binding α10β1 integrin receptor, which is expressed in cartilage chondrocytes and mediates chondrocyte-matrix interactions during endochondral ossification. As a consequence of the nonsense mutation, the α10-protein was not detected in the affected cartilage tissue. The canine phenotype highlights the importance of the α10β1 integrin in bone growth, and the large animal model could be utilized to further delineate its specific functions. Finally, this study revealed a candidate gene for human chondrodysplasias and enabled the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes to eradicate the disease from the two dog breeds.

  1. Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey C. Gonick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-binding proteins are a series of low molecular weight proteins, analogous to metallothionein, which segregate lead in a nontoxic form in several organs (kidney, brain, lung, liver, erythrocyte. Whether the lead-binding proteins in every organ are identical or different remains to be determined. In the erythrocyte, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD isoforms have commanded the greatest attention as proteins and enzymes that are both inhibitable and inducible by lead. ALAD-2, although it binds lead to a greater degree than ALAD-1, appears to bind lead in a less toxic form. What may be of greater significance is that a low molecular weight lead-binding protein, approximately 10 kDa, appears in the erythrocyte once blood lead exceeds 39 μg/dL and eventually surpasses the lead-binding capacity of ALAD. In brain and kidney of environmentally exposed humans and animals, a cytoplasmic lead-binding protein has been identified as thymosin β4, a 5 kDa protein. In kidney, but not brain, another lead-binding protein has been identified as acyl-CoA binding protein, a 9 kDa protein. Each of these proteins, when coincubated with liver ALAD and titrated with lead, diminishes the inhibition of ALAD by lead, verifying their ability to segregate lead in a nontoxic form.

  2. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  3. Structural determinants within residues 180-199 of the rodent. alpha. 5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit involved in. alpha. -bungarotoxin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, K.E.; Xiadong Wu; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1991-11-05

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequence segments of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits have been used to identify regions that contribute to formation of the binding sites for cholinergic ligands. The authors have previously defined {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) binding sequences between residues 180 and 199 of a putative rat neuronal nAChR {alpha} subunit, designated {alpha}5, and between residues 181 and 200 of the chick neuronal {alpha}7 and {alpha}8 subunits. These sequences are relatively divergent compared with the Torpedo and muscle nAChR {alpha}1 {alpha}-BTX binding sites, which indicates a serious limitation of predicting functional domains of proteins based on homology in general. Given the highly divergent nature of the {alpha}5 sequence, they were interested in determining the critical amino acid residues for {alpha}-BTX binding. In the present study, the effects of single amino acid substitutions of Gly or Ala for each residue of the rat {alpha}(180-199) sequence were tested, using a competition assay, in which peptides compete for {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX binding with native Torpedo nAChR. These results indicate that a disulfide bridge between the vicinal cysteines at positions 191 and 192 of the {alpha}5 sequence is not an absolute requirement for {alpha}-BTX binding activity.

  4. Protein-disulfide Isomerase Displaces the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit from the Holotoxin without Unfolding the A1 Subunit*

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Ray, Supriyo; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to exhibit an “unfoldase” activity against the catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CT). Unfolding of the CTA1 subunit is thought to displace it from the CT holotoxin and to prepare it for translocation to the cytosol. To date, the unfoldase activity of PDI has not been demonstrated for any substrate other than CTA1. An alternative explanation for the putative unfoldase activity of PDI has been suggested by recent structural studies demons...

  5. The E1 beta-subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase is surface-expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum and binds fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Valeria; Salzillo, Marzia; Siciliano, Rosa A; Muscariello, Lidia; Sacco, Margherita; Marasco, Rosangela

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is among the species with a probiotic activity. Adhesion of probiotic bacteria to host tissues is an important principle for strain selection, because it represents a crucial step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensals. Most bacterial adhesins are proteins, and a major target for them is fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that PDHB, a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is a factor contributing to fibronectin-binding in L. plantarum LM3. By means of fibronectin overlay immunoblotting assay, we identified a L. plantarum LM3 surface protein with apparent molecular mass of 35 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that this protein is the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta-subunit (PDHB). The corresponding pdhB gene is located in a 4-gene cluster encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase. In LM3-B1, carrying a null mutation in pdhB, the 35 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable by immunoblotting assay. Nevertheless, the pdhB null mutation did not abolish pdhA, pdhC, and pdhD transcription in LM3-B1. By adhesion assays, we show that LM3-B1 cells bind to immobilized fibronectin less efficiently than wild type cells. Moreover, we show that pdhB expression is negatively regulated by the CcpA protein and is induced by bile.

  6. Wheat and barley allergens associated with baker's asthma. Glycosylated subunits of the alpha-amylase-inhibitor family have enhanced IgE-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Barber, D; Lopez-Otin, C; Armentia, A; Salcedo, G

    1992-01-15

    A 16 kDa protein, designated CM16*, which strongly binds IgE from baker's-asthma patients has been identified as a glycosylated form of the previously reported WTAI-CM16, which is a subunit of the wheat tetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor. A glycosylated form (CMb*) of BTAI-CMb, the equivalent inhibitor subunit from barley, has been also found to have significantly enhanced IgE-binding capacity. In all, 14 purified members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family showed very different IgE-binding capacities when tested by a dot-blot assay. The glycosylated components CM16*, CMb* and the previously described non-glycosylated 14.5 kDa allergen from barley (renamed BMAI-1) were found to be the strongest allergens.

  7. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  8. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  9. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  10. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  11. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  12. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR70 interacts with pRb and mediates its dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenta, Alessandra; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Romani, Sveva; Di Stefano, Valeria; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with specific targets. While the role of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in the modulation of pRb phosphorylation has been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphate removal by phosphatases. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is constituted by a core dimer bearing catalytic activity and one variable B regulatory subunit conferring target specificity and subcellular localization. We previously demonstrated that PP2A core dimer binds pRb and dephosphorylates pRb upon oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified a specific PP2A-B subunit, PR70, that was associated with pRb both in vitro and in vivo. PR70 overexpression caused pRb dephosphorylation; conversely, PR70 knockdown prevented both pRb dephosphorylation and DNA synthesis inhibition induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization was necessary and sufficient to trigger pRb dephosphorylation and PP2A phosphatase activity of PR70 was Ca(2+) induced. These data underline the importance of PR70-Ca(2+) interaction in the signal transduction mechanisms triggered by redox imbalance and leading to pRb dephosphorylation.

  14. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  15. Stat2 binding to the interferon-alpha receptor 2 subunit is not required for interferon-alpha signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh-Phúc; Saleh, Abu Z M; Arch, Allison E; Yan, Hai; Piazza, Flavia; Kim, John; Krolewski, John J

    2002-03-22

    The interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) receptor consists of two subunits, the IFNalpha receptor 1 (IFNaR1) and 2 (IFNaR2) chains. Following ligand binding, IFNaR1 is phosphorylated on tyrosine 466, and this site recruits Stat2 via its SH2 domain. In contrast, IFNaR2 binds Stat2 constitutively. In this study we have characterized the Stat2-IFNaR2 interaction and examined its role in IFNalpha signaling. Stat2 binds the major IFNaR2 protein but not a variant containing a shorter cytoplasmic domain. The interaction does not require a STAT SH2 domain. Both tyrosine-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated Stat2 bind IFNaR2 in vitro; however, relatively little phosphorylated Stat2 associates with IFNaR2 in vivo. In vitro binding assays defined IFNaR2 residues 418-444 as the minimal interaction domain and site-specific mutation of conserved acidic residues within this domain disrupted in vitro and in vivo binding. An IFNaR2 construct carrying these mutations was either (i) overexpressed in 293T cells or (ii) used to complement IFNaR2-deficient U5A cells. Unexpectedly, the activity of an IFNalpha-dependent reporter gene was not reduced but, instead, was enhanced up to 2-fold. This suggests that this particular IFNaR2-Stat2 interaction is not required for IFNalpha signaling, but might act to negatively inhibit signaling. Finally, a doubly truncated recombinant fragment of Stat2, spanning residues 136-702, associated with IFNaR2 in vitro, indicating that the interaction with IFNaR2 is direct and occurs in a central region of Stat2 marked by a hydrophobic core.

  16. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism.

  17. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  18. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  19. Accessory NUMM (NDUFS6) subunit harbors a Zn-binding site and is essential for biogenesis of mitochondrial complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmita, Katarzyna; Wirth, Christophe; Warnau, Judith; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Hunte, Carola; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.; Zwicker, Klaus; Brandt, Ulrich; Zickermann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I) comprises more than 40 polypeptides and contains eight canonical FeS clusters. The integration of subunits and insertion of cofactors into the nascent complex is a complicated multistep process that is aided by assembly factors. We show that the accessory NUMM subunit of complex I (human NDUFS6) harbors a Zn-binding site and resolve its position by X-ray crystallography. Chromosomal deletion of the NUMM gene or mutation of Zn-binding residues blocked a late step of complex I assembly. An accumulating assembly intermediate lacked accessory subunit N7BM (NDUFA12), whereas a paralog of this subunit, the assembly factor N7BML (NDUFAF2), was found firmly bound instead. EPR spectroscopic analysis and metal content determination after chromatographic purification of the assembly intermediate showed that NUMM is required for insertion or stabilization of FeS cluster N4. PMID:25902503

  20. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Dovega

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A subunit, a catalytic (C subunit and various regulatory (B subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes.

  1. Antibody against recombinant heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (rLTB could block LT binding to ganglioside M1 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Moazzeni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is one of the most common agents of diarrhea among other bacterial agents. Designing and producing vaccine against these bacteria is one of the major purposes of World Health Organization (WHO. Due to presence of diverse clones of ETEC strains in the world, the use of global vaccines for ETEC infection is controversial. B subunit of heat labile toxin (LTB was introduced as a vaccine candidate molecule by several investigators. The expression of LTB gene isolated from a local bacterial strain and investigation of its immunological property was the objective of this study."nMaterials and Methods: LTB gene was isolated from a local isolated ETEC, cloned and expressed using pET28a expression vector. For LTB gene expression, the three main expression parameters (IPTG concentration, time and temperature of induction were investigated. The recombinant protein was purified ( > 95% with Ni-NTA column using 6XHis-tag and used as an antigen in ELISA test."nResults: The immunological analyses showed production of high titer of specific antibody in immunized mice. Anti LTB Antibody could bind to whole toxin and neutralize the toxin through inhibition of its binding to the Ganglioside M1 receptor."nConclusion: The recombinant LTB protein is a highly immunogenic molecule. Considering the LTB role in ETEC pathogenesis, it can be taken into account as one of the most important components of vaccines against local ETEC.

  2. GIV/Girdin binds Exocyst subunit-Exo70 and Regulates Exocytosis of GLUT4 Storage Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Ma, Gary S.; Pedram, Shabnam; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a metabolic disorder characterized by impaired glucose uptake in response to insulin. The current paradigm for insulin signaling centers upon the insulin receptor (InsR) and its substrate IRS1; the latter is believed to be the chief conduit for post-receptor signaling. We recently demonstrated that GIV, a Guanidine Exchange Factor (GEF) for the trimeric G protein, Gαi, is a major hierarchical conduit for the metabolic insulin response. By virtue of its ability to directly bind the InsR, IRS1 and PI3K, GIV enhances the InsR-IRS1-Akt-AS160 (RabGAP) signaling cascade and cellular glucose uptake via its GEF function. Phosphoinhibition of GIV-GEF by the fatty-acid/PKCθ pathway inhibits the cascade and impairs glucose uptake. Here we show that GIV directly and constitutively binds the exocyst complex subunit Exo-70 and also associates with GLUT4-storage vesicles (GSVs) exclusively upon insulin stimulation. Without GIV or its GEF function, membrane association of Exo-70 as well as exocytosis of GSVs in response to insulin are impaired. Thus, GIV is an essential upstream component within the insulin signaling cascade that couples components within the InsR and G-Protein signaling cascade to those within the exocytic pathway. These findings suggest a role of GIV in coordinating the signaling and trafficking events of metabolic insulin response. PMID:26514725

  3. The conserved Bud20 zinc finger protein is a new component of the ribosomal 60S subunit export machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Jochen; Klein, Isabella; Schmidt, Claudia; Kallas, Martina; Thomson, Emma; Wagner, Maria Anna; Bradatsch, Bettina; Rechberger, Gerald; Strohmaier, Heimo; Hurt, Ed; Bergler, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The nuclear export of the preribosomal 60S (pre-60S) subunit is coordinated with late steps in ribosome assembly. Here, we show that Bud20, a conserved C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger protein, is an unrecognized shuttling factor required for the efficient export of pre-60S subunits. Bud20 associates with late pre-60S particles in the nucleoplasm and accompanies them into the cytoplasm, where it is released through the action of the Drg1 AAA-ATPase. Cytoplasmic Bud20 is then reimported via a Kap123-dependent pathway. The deletion of Bud20 induces a strong pre-60S export defect and causes synthetic lethality when combined with mutant alleles of known pre-60S subunit export factors. The function of Bud20 in ribosome export depends on a short conserved N-terminal sequence, as we observed that mutations or the deletion of this motif impaired 60S subunit export and generated the genetic link to other pre-60S export factors. We suggest that the shuttling Bud20 is recruited to the nascent 60S subunit via its central zinc finger rRNA binding domain to facilitate the subsequent nuclear export of the preribosome employing its N-terminal extension.

  4. Kalirin Binds the NR2B Subunit of the NMDA Receptor, Altering Its Synaptic Localization and Function

    KAUST Repository

    Kiraly, D. D.

    2011-08-31

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins, including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6, and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7KO) exhibit deficient hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7KO mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7KO animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7KO mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity.

  5. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Amândio

    Full Text Available The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  6. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  7. Predicting where small molecules bind at protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Walter

    Full Text Available Small molecules that bind at protein-protein interfaces may either block or stabilize protein-protein interactions in cells. Thus, some of these binding interfaces may turn into prospective targets for drug design. Here, we collected 175 pairs of protein-protein (PP complexes and protein-ligand (PL complexes with known three-dimensional structures for which (1 one protein from the PP complex shares at least 40% sequence identity with the protein from the PL complex, and (2 the interface regions of these proteins overlap at least partially with each other. We found that those residues of the interfaces that may bind the other protein as well as the small molecule are evolutionary more conserved on average, have a higher tendency of being located in pockets and expose a smaller fraction of their surface area to the solvent than the remaining protein-protein interface region. Based on these findings we derived a statistical classifier that predicts patches at binding interfaces that have a higher tendency to bind small molecules. We applied this new prediction method to more than 10,000 interfaces from the protein data bank. For several complexes related to apoptosis the predicted binding patches were in direct contact to co-crystallized small molecules.

  8. Crystal structures of catalytic and regulatory subunits of rat protein kinase CK2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU WeiHong; SHEN YueQuan; QIN XiaoHong; YAN XiaoJie; XIE XingQiao; LI Liang; FANG ShaSha; LONG JiaFu; ADELMAN John; TANG Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 consists of two catalytic subunits (CK2α) and two regulatory subunits (CK2β). Here,we report the crystal structures of rat CK2α mutant (rCK2α-△C, 1-335) and CK2β(rCK2β). The overall topology of rCK2α-△C and rCK2βare very similar to the human enzyme, although large structural dif-ferences could be observed in the N-terminal domain of rCK2α-△C. Our reported structure of rCK2α-△C is in the close conformation state while the counterpart hCK2α is in the open conformation state, indi-cating the conformation of CK2α molecule has high plasticity. The structure of rCK2β represents the conformation of free CK2β. Upon CK2α binding, the C-terminal region undergoes a drastic conforma-tional change. The major region of interaction within the interface of CK2αCK2β may serve as a bridge to transmit the conformational change and thus regulate the activity of CK2α.

  9. Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms of Pertussis Toxin Subunit S2 (PtxB Affect Protein Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott H Millen

    Full Text Available Whooping cough due to Bordetella pertussis is increasing in incidence, in part due to accumulation of mutations which increase bacterial fitness in highly vaccinated populations. Polymorphisms in the pertussis toxin, ptxA and ptxB genes, and the pertactin, prn genes of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis collected in Cincinnati from 1989 through 2005 were examined. While the ptxA and prn genotypes were variable, all 48 strains had the ptxB2 genotype; ptxB1 encodes glycine at amino acid 18 of the S2 subunit of pertussis toxin, while ptxB2 encodes serine. We investigated antigenic and functional differences of PtxB1 and PtxB2. The S2 protein was not very immunogenic. Only a few vaccinated or individuals infected with B. pertussis developed antibody responses to the S2 subunit, and these sera recognized both polymorphic forms equally well. Amino acid 18 of S2 is in a glycan binding domain, and the PtxB forms displayed differences in receptor recognition and toxicity. PtxB1 bound better to the glycoprotein, fetuin, and Jurkat T cells in vitro, but the two forms were equally effective at promoting CHO cell clustering. To investigate in vivo activity of Ptx, one μg of Ptx was administered to DDY mice and blood was collected on 4 days after injection. PtxB2 was more effective at promoting lymphocytosis in mice.

  10. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits ( α and β) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Cek-Fyne [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring (3H)colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of (3H)leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the ..beta.. subunit. (ERB)

  11. Ribosomal protein S3: a KH domain subunit in NF-kappaB complexes that mediates selective gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fengyi; Anderson, D Eric; Barnitz, Robert A; Snow, Andrew; Bidere, Nicolas; Zheng, Lixin; Hegde, Vijay; Lam, Lloyd T; Staudt, Louis M; Levens, David; Deutsch, Walter A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2007-11-30

    NF-kappaB is a DNA-binding protein complex that transduces a variety of activating signals from the cytoplasm to specific sets of target genes. To understand the preferential recruitment of NF-kappaB to specific gene regulatory sites, we used NF-kappaB p65 in a tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry proteomic screen. We identified ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), a KH domain protein, as a non-Rel subunit of p65 homodimer and p65-p50 heterodimer DNA-binding complexes that synergistically enhances DNA binding. RPS3 knockdown impaired NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of selected p65 target genes but not nuclear shuttling or global protein translation. Rather, lymphocyte-activating stimuli caused nuclear translocation of RPS3, parallel to p65, to form part of NF-kappaB bound to specific regulatory sites in chromatin. Thus, RPS3 is an essential but previously unknown subunit of NF-kappaB involved in the regulation of key genes in rapid cellular activation responses. Our observations provide insight into how NF-kappaB selectively controls gene expression.

  12. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  13. Integration of F1 and the membrane sector of the proton-ATPase of Escherichia coli. Role of subunit "b" (uncF protein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, D S; Cox, D N; Senior, A E

    1983-08-25

    Membranes derived from the Escherichia coli strain AN1460 which carries the multicopy plasmid pAN45 (unc+) (Downie, J. A., Langman, L., Cox, G. B., Yanofsky, C., and Gibson, (1980) J. Bacteriol. 143, 8-17) were enriched 5- to 10-fold in proton-ATPase activity. Incubation of F1-depleted AN1460 membranes with trypsin abolished F1-binding ability but did not inhibit proton transport through the membrane sector (F0). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis indicated that subunit "b" (uncF protein) of F0 was cleaved by trypsin and prebound F1 protected against the trypsin effect. Subunits "a" (uncB protein) and "c" (uncE protein) were unaffected by the trypsin treatment. A water-soluble fragment (Mr = 14,800) was liberated after trypsin treatment and appeared to arise from subunit b. Studies of enzyme hybridization and of F1 binding to membranes derived from strains containing mutations in uncB, F, and E genes supported the suggestion that subunit b is involved in F1 binding to the F0. Also, extraction of membranes with KSCN increased the relative proportion of subunit b in the membrane and this coincided with a parallel increase in trypsin-sensitive F1-binding ability. It is proposed that subunit b is involved in binding of F1 to the F0; this agrees with the presumed role of the protein as deduced from predictions of its secondary and tertiary structure (Walker, J. E., Saraste, M., and Gay, N. J. (1982) Nature (Lond.) 298, 867-869; Senior, A. E. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in press).

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Humaira; Zhang, Zhenbo; Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2-4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (protein misfolding diseases.

  15. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein, ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Knudsen, J.; Poulsen, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein...... and of the complex with palmitoyl-CoA using NMR spectroscopy. In the four a-helix bundle structure, a set of 21 highly conserved residues present in more that 90% of all known sequences of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins constitutes three separate mini-cores. These residues are predominantly located at the helix......-helix interfaces. From studies of a large set of mutant proteins the role of the conserved residues has been related to structure, function, folding and stability....

  16. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    and of the complex with palmitoyl-CoA using NMR spectroscopy. In the four alpha-helix bundle structure, a set of 21 highly conserved residues present in more that 90% of all known sequences of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins constitutes three separate mini-cores. These residues are predominantly located......Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein...... at the helix-helix interfaces. From studies of a large set of mutant proteins the role of the conserved residues has been related to structure, function, folding and stability....

  17. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were formed after incubation of E. coli cells with PEB. Spectroscopic characterization of holo-subunits confirmed that the attachment of PEB chromophore to apo-subunits yielded holo-subunits containing both PEB and urobilin (UB). Fluorescence and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in E. coli cells. In another example, R-PE apo-subunits were genetically fused to cytoplasmic and periplasmic versions of E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP). Fluorescent proteins formed after attachment of PEB to MBP-subunit fusions in vitro and in vivo contained PEB as the sole chromophore, were soluble, and displayed high orange fluorescence. Fluorescence microscopy showed that fusions are located either throughout cells or at cell poles. In addition, cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits or MBP-subunit fusions were up to ten times brighter than control cells as measured by flow cytometry. Results show that the fluorescent proteins formed after non-enzymatic attachment of PEB to R-PE subunit fusions could be used as reporters of gene expression and protein localization in cells as well as fluorescence labels in flow cytometry. Finally, we demonstrated a high-throughput method able to record emission fluorescence spectra of individual cells containing fluorescent proteins. Upon excitation with a 488 mn argon-ion laser many bacterial cells were imaged by a 20X microscope objective while they moved through a capillary tube. Fluorescence was dispersed by a transmission diffraction grating, and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera simultaneously recorded the zero and the first orders of the fluorescence from each cell. Single-cell fluorescence spectra were reconstructed from the distance between zero-order and first-order maxima as well as the length and the pixel intensity distribution of the first-order images. By using this approach, the emission spectrum of E. coli

  18. Periplasmic binding proteins: a versatile superfamily for protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Mary A; Hellinga, Homme W

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of biological function, ligand binding, conformational changes and structural adaptability of the periplasmic binding protein superfamily have been exploited to engineer biosensors, allosteric control elements, biologically active receptors and enzymes using a combination of techniques, including computational design. Extensively redesigned periplasmic binding proteins have been re-introduced into bacteria to function in synthetic signal transduction pathways that respond to extracellular ligands and as biologically active enzymes.

  19. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunits with a C2 cytoplasmic loop yellow fluorescent protein insertion form functional receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa A MURRAY; Qiang LIU; Paul WHITEAKER; Jie WU; Ronald J LUKAS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits have been engineered as fluorescent protein (FP) fusions and exploited to illuminate features of nAChRs. The aim of this work was to create a FP fusion in the nAChR a.7 subunit without compromising formation of functional receptors.Methods: A gene construct was generated to introduce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), in frame, into the otherwise unaltered, large, second cytoplamsic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains of the mouse nAChR al sub-unit (a7Y). SH-EP1 cells were transfected with mouse nAChR wild type a.7 subunits (a.7) or with a7Y subunits, alone or with the chaperone protein, hRJC-3. Receptor function was assessed using whole-cell current recording. Receptor expression was measured with 125I-labeled a-bungarotoxin (I-Bgt) binding, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.Results: Whole-cell currents revealed that a7Y nAChRs and al nAChRs were functional with comparable EC50 values for the a7 nAChR-selective agonist, choline, and IC50 values for the a.7 nAChR-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine. I-Bgt binding was detected only after co-expression with hRIC-3. Confocal microscopy revealed that a7Y had primarily intracel-lular rather than surface expression. TIRF microscopy confirmed that little a7Y localized to the plasma membrane, typical of a7 nAChRs.Conclusion: nAChRs composed as homooligomers of a7Y subunits containing cytoplasmic loop YFP have functional, ligand binding, and trafficking characteristics similar to those of a.7 nAChRs. a7Y nAChRs may be used to elucidate properties of a.7 nAChRs and to identify and develop novel probes for these receptors, perhaps in high-throughput fashion.

  20. Exploring the putative self-binding property of the human farnesyltransferase alpha-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Anna; Müller, Grit; Manthey, Iris; Bachmann, Hagen Sjard

    2017-09-26

    Farnesylation is an important post-translational protein modification in eukaryotes. Farnesylation is performed by protein farnesyltransferase, a heterodimer composed of an α- (FTα) and a β-subunit. Recently, homo-dimerization of truncated rat and yeast FTα has been detected, suggesting a new role for FTα homodimers in signal transduction. We investigated the putative dimerization behaviour of human and rat FTα. Different in vitro and in vivo approaches revealed no self-dimerization and a presumably artificial formation of homo-trimers and higher homo-oligomers in vitro. Our study contributes to the clarification of the physiological features of FTase in different species and may be important for the ongoing development of FTase inhibitors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability, subunit interactions and carbohydrate-binding of the seed lectin from Pterocarpus angolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echemendia-Blanco, Dannele; Van Driessche, Edilbert; Ncube, Ignatious; Read, John S; Beeckmans, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    From 1 kg of defatted Pterocarpus angolensis (mukwa tree) seed meal, 21.6 grams of an alpha,D-mannose/glucose-specific lectin can be purified on mannose-Sepharose. Relative affinities for several (oligo)saccharides and glycoproteins were studied by haemagglutination-inhibition. Gel filtration shows that the lectin exists as a dimer above pH 5 and as a monomer below pH 3.5. This is confirmed by studies on the release of lectin subunits that were adsorbed from solution to lectin monomers immobilized onto Eupergit-c. From the gel filtration patterns it is calculated that a residue with pK(a) of about 4.4 is involved in dimer dissociation. Titration of glutamic acids (E60, E209) is postulated to be involved. CD spectroscopy shows that the secondary structure of the lectin is unchanged between pH 1 and 12.5, and that the tertiary structure remains unchanged between pH 5 and 12. In the acid pH region, reversible spectral changes occur that may be due to the titration of one or more amino acids with a pK(a) value of 3.9-4.2, probably aspartic acid. These residues are implicated in sugar-binding but not in dimerization of the lectin. Only at pH 12.5, irreversible denaturation occurs. Mukwa lectin displays full carbohydrate-binding capacity between pH 4 and 12, as is concluded from ELLA (Enzyme Linked Lectin Assay) using ovalbumin and fetuin, and from binding of the same glycoproteins to immobilized lectin monomers. The lectin is rapidly and fully reversibly demetallized at pH 2.5 with 5 mM EDTA. The demetallized lectin is completely devoid of sugar-binding activity. Mukwa lectin is a very thermostable molecule (at least till 85 degrees C). However, addition of non-ionic detergents substantially lowers its thermostability.

  3. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  4. The MTA family proteins as novel histone H3 binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex (Mi2/NRD/NuRD/NURD has a broad role in regulation of transcription, DNA repair and cell cycle. Previous studies have revealed a specific interaction between NURD and histone H3N-terminal tail in vitro that is not observed for another HDAC1/2-containing complex, Sin3A. However, the subunit(s responsible for specific binding of H3 by NURD has not been defined. Results In this study, we show among several class I HDAC-containing corepressor complexes only NURD exhibits a substantial H3 tail-binding activity in vitro. We present the evidence that the MTA family proteins within the NURD complex interact directly with H3 tail. Extensive in vitro binding assays mapped the H3 tail-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MTA1 and MTA2. Significantly, although the MTA1 and MTA2 mutant proteins with deletion of the C-terminal H3 tail binding domain were assembled into the endogenous NURD complex when expressed in mammalian cells, the resulting NURD complexes were deficient in binding H3 tail in vitro, indicating that the MTA family proteins are required for the observed specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD in vitro. However, chromatin fractionation experiments show that the NURD complexes with impaired MTA1/2-H3 tail binding activity remained to be associated with chromatin in cells. Conclusions Together our study reveals a novel histone H3-binding activity for the MTA family proteins and provides evidence that the MTA family proteins mediate the in vitro specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD complex. However, multiple mechanisms are likely to contribute to the chromatin association of NURD complex in cells. Our finding also raises the possibility that the MTA family proteins may exert their diverse biological functions at least in part through their direct interaction with H3 tail.

  5. Functions of nucleotide binding subunits in the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Partial purification of NO/sub 3/ sensitive H/sup +/-ATPases from the vacuolar membranes of high plants reveal two prominent polypeptides of approximately 60 and 70 kDa. Both polypeptides appear to contain nucleotide binding sites. The photoactive affinity analog of ATP, BzATP, cannot be hydrolyzed by the tonoplast ATPase but is a potential inhibitor (apparent K/sub I/ = 11 ..mu..M). /sup 32/P-BzATP was shown to specifically photolabel the 60 kDa polypeptide. In contrast, Mandala and Taiz have shown the photoincorporation of /sup 32/P-azidoATP to the 70 kDa polypeptide. This sterically different photoaffinity probe can be hydrolyzed although with a low affinity. Azido and benzophenone derivatives of the product, ADP, are currently being examined with respect to their inhibition kinetics of, and their photoincorporation into, the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L. Kinetic data will be integrated with patterns of photoincorporation using analogs of both substrate and product, in order to illuminate the functions of the two nucleotide binding subunits.

  6. Proteomic analysis of Cry2Aa-binding proteins and their receptor function in Spodoptera exigua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Chen, Lizhen

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces Crystal (Cry) proteins that are toxic to a diverse range of insects. Transgenic crops that produce Bt Cry proteins are grown worldwide because of their improved resistance to insect pests. Although Bt “pyramid” cotton that produces both Cry1A and Cry2A is predicted to be more resistant to several lepidopteran pests, including Spodoptera exigua, than plants that produce Cry1Ac alone, the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of Cry2Aa in S. exigua are not well understood. We identified several proteins that bind Cry2Aa (polycalin, V-ATPase subunits A and B, actin, 4-hydroxybutyrate CoA-transferase [4-HB-CoAT]), and a receptor for activated protein kinase C (Rack), in S. exigua. Recombinant, expressed versions of these proteins were able to bind the Cry2Aa toxin in vitro assays. RNA interference gene knockdown of the Se-V-ATPase subunit B significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. exigua larvae to Cry2Aa, whereas knockdown of the other putative binding proteins did not. Moreover, an in vitro homologous competition assay demonstrated that the Se-V-ATPase subunit B binds specifically to the Cry2Aa toxin, suggesting that this protein acts as a functional receptor of Cry2Aa in S. exigua. This the first Cry2Aa toxin receptor identified in S. exigua brush-border membrane vesicles. PMID:28067269

  7. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  8. E6-Associated Protein Dependent Estrogen Receptor Regulation of Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit R2A Expression in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Jean-Pierre; Zeidan, Youssef H; Zafar, Nawal; El Hokayem, Jimmy

    2017-02-18

    E6ap is a known transcriptional coregulator for estrogen receptor alpha (Er, Erα) in the presence of estrogen. Protein kinase A (PKA) contains two regulatory subunits derived from four genes. Recent evidence demonstrates that PKA regulates E6ap activity. Data generated in our lab indicated estrogen dependent regulation of Pkar2a levels. Our project sets to investigate a possible feedback mechanism constituting of Erα and E6ap transcriptional regulation of Pkar2a expression. Western blot evaluated protein regulation correlations with E2 in mouse neuroblastoma lines. Bioinformatics detected estrogen response element (ERE) sequences. quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the western blot results. ERE oligonucleotides were synthesized. Reporter gene transcriptional activity was evaluated via Luciferase assay output. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) assessed direct binding between Erα relevant sequences. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Re-ChIP were conducted in quantifying protein complex recruitment levels. Pkar2a protein expression directly correlated with E2, and four putative ERE sequences were identified. Pkar2a mRNA expression reverted to baseline with either E2 or E6ap absent. In the presence of E2, ERE-1 and ERE-4 possessed Luciferase reporter gene transcriptional capabilities. ERE-1 portrayed band shifts, representing direct binding to Erα with E2 supplementation. With E2, ERE-1 significantly enhanced Erα and E6ap recruitment levels to the Pkar2a promoter. Pkar2a is directly regulated by Erα and E6ap in the presence of estrogen stimulus. This work indicates a feedback mechanism in the interplay between PKA and E6ap, which may prove crucial for the role of both proteins in cancers and neurogenetic diseases like Angelman syndrome.

  9. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  10. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  11. A bifunctional archaeal protein that is a component of 30S ribosomal subunits and interacts with C/D box small RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ciammaruconi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a novel archaeal protein that apparently plays two distinct roles in ribosome metabolism. It is a polypeptide of about 18 kDa (termed Rbp18 that binds free cytosolic C/D box sRNAs in vivo and in vitro and behaves as a structural ribosomal protein, specifically a component of the 30S ribosomal subunit. As Rbp18 is selectively present in Crenarcheota and highly thermophilic Euryarchaeota, we propose that it serves to protect C/D box sRNAs from degradation and perhaps to stabilize thermophilic 30S subunits.

  12. Molecular basis of the γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor α3 subunit interaction with the clustering protein gephyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Verena; Kerschner, Bernd; Milenkovic, Ivan; Ramsden, Sarah L; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Saiepour, Leila; Maric, Hans-Michael; Moss, Stephen J; Schindelin, Hermann; Harvey, Robert J; Sieghart, Werner; Harvey, Kirsten

    2011-10-28

    The multifunctional scaffolding protein gephyrin is a key player in the formation of the postsynaptic scaffold at inhibitory synapses, clustering both inhibitory glycine receptors (GlyRs) and selected GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes. We report a direct interaction between the GABA(A)R α3 subunit and gephyrin, mapping reciprocal binding sites using mutagenesis, overlay, and yeast two-hybrid assays. This analysis reveals that critical determinants of this interaction are located in the motif FNIVGTTYPI in the GABA(A)R α3 M3-M4 domain and the motif SMDKAFITVL at the N terminus of the gephyrin E domain. GABA(A)R α3 gephyrin binding-site mutants were unable to co-localize with endogenous gephyrin in transfected hippocampal neurons, despite being able to traffic to the cell membrane and form functional benzodiazepine-responsive GABA(A)Rs in recombinant systems. Interestingly, motifs responsible for interactions with GABA(A)R α2, GABA(A)R α3, and collybistin on gephyrin overlap. Curiously, two key residues (Asp-327 and Phe-330) in the GABA(A)R α2 and α3 binding sites on gephyrin also contribute to GlyR β subunit-E domain interactions. However, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals a 27-fold difference in the interaction strength between GABA(A)R α3 and GlyR β subunits with gephyrin with dissociation constants of 5.3 μm and 0.2 μm, respectively. Taken together, these observations suggest that clustering of GABA(A)R α2, α3, and GlyRs by gephyrin is mediated by distinct mechanisms at mixed glycinergic/GABAergic synapses.

  13. Interactions of protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins in relation to tofu gel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew T; Yang, Aijun

    2016-03-01

    The content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins are known to affect tofu quality and food-grade soybeans usually have higher levels of proteins. We studied the tofu quality of soybeans with high (44.8%) or low (39.1%) protein content and with or without the 11S globulin polypeptide, 11SA4. Both protein content and 11SA4 significantly affected tofu gel properties. Soybeans containing more protein had smaller seeds which produced significantly firmer (0.663 vs.0.557 N, pprotein subunits, which may have contributed to the improvement in tofu gel properties. These results suggest that, in combination with higher protein content, certain protein subunits or their polypeptides can also be targeted in selecting soybeans to further improve soy food quality.

  14. The NMDAR subunit NR3A interacts with microtubule-associated protein 1S in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Samuelsson, Helena; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt;

    2007-01-01

    -proximal part of the NR3A C-terminus. MAP1S belongs to the same family as MAP1A and MAP1B, and was found to be abundant in both postnatal and adult rat brain. In hippocampal neurons the distribution-pattern of MAP1S resembled that of beta-tubulin III, but a fraction of the protein colocalized with synaptic......When screening a brain cDNA library, we found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR3A binds to microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 1S/chromosome 19 open reading frame 5 (C19ORF5). The interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and binding of MAP1S was localized to the membrane...

  15. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  16. Rat Mannose-Binding Protein A Binds CD14

    OpenAIRE

    Chiba, Hirofumi; Sano, Hitomi; Iwaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Seiji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Toru; Konishi, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiroki; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been known to induce inflammation by interacting with CD14, which serves as a receptor for LPS. Mannose-binding protein (MBP) belongs to the collectin subgroup of the C-type lectin superfamily, along with surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D. We have recently demonstrated that SP-A modulates LPS-induced cellular responses by interaction with CD14 (H. Sano, H. Sohma, T. Muta, S. Nomura, D. R. Voelker, and Y. Kuroki, J. Immunol. 163:387–395, 2000) and that SP-D also in...

  17. Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1 interacts with the Ku70 subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Jensik

    Full Text Available Deformed Epidermal Autoregulatory Factor 1 (DEAF1 is a transcription factor linked to suicide, cancer, autoimmune disorders and neural tube defects. To better understand the role of DEAF1 in protein interaction networks, a GST-DEAF1 fusion protein was used to isolate interacting proteins in mammalian cell lysates, and the XRCC6 (Ku70 and the XRCC5 (Ku80 subunits of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK complex were identified by mass spectrometry, and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit was identified by immunoblotting. Interaction of DEAF1 with Ku70 and Ku80 was confirmed to occur within cells by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins, and was mediated through interaction with the Ku70 subunit. Using in vitro GST-pulldowns, interaction between DEAF1 and the Ku70 subunit was mapped to the DEAF1 DNA binding domain and the C-terminal Bax-binding region of Ku70. In transfected cells, DEAF1 and Ku70 colocalized to the nucleus, but Ku70 could not relocalize a mutant cytoplasmic form of DEAF1 to the nucleus. Using an in vitro kinase assay, DEAF1 was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DEAF1 or Ku70/Ku80 did not interfere with the DNA binding of each other, but DNA containing DEAF1 binding sites inhibited the DEAF1-Ku70 interaction. The data demonstrates that DEAF1 can interact with the DNA-PK complex through interactions of its DNA binding domain with the carboxy-terminal region of Ku70 that contains the Bax binding domain, and that DEAF1 is a potential substrate for DNA-PK.

  18. DNA and heparin chaperone the refolding of purified recombinant replication protein A subunit 1 from Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, C B B; Gui, K E; Perez, A M; da Silveira, R C V; Gava, L M; Ramos, C H I; Cano, M I N

    2009-02-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has been implicated in DNA metabolism and telomere maintenance. Subunit 1 of RPA from Leishmania amazonensis (LaRPA-1) has previously been affinity-purified on a column containing a G-rich telomeric DNA. LaRPA-1 binds and co-localizes with parasite telomeres in vivo. Here we describe the purification and characterization of native recombinant LaRPA-1 (rLaRPA-1). The protein was initially re-solubilized from inclusion bodies by using urea. After dialysis, rLaRPA-1 was soluble but contaminated with DNA, which was removed by an anion-exchange chromatography of the protein solubilized in urea. However, rLaRPA-1 precipitated after dialysis to remove urea. To investigate whether the contaminating DNA was involved in chaperoning the refolding of rLaRPA-1, salmon sperm DNA or heparin was added to the solution before dialysis. The addition of either of these substances prevented the precipitation of rLaRPA-1. The resulting rLaRPA-1 was soluble, correctly folded, and able to bind telomeric DNA. This is the first report showing the characterization of rLaRPA1 and of the importance of additives in chaperoning the refolding of this protein. The availability of rLaRPA-1 should be helpful in assessing the importance of this protein as a potential drug target.

  19. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunits in skeletal muscle mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy-sensing protein in skeletal muscle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates translation initiation and protein synthesis through ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). AMPK...... activation reduces muscle protein synthesis by down-regulating mTOR signaling, whereas insulin mediates mTOR signaling via Akt activation. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated inhibitory effects on mTOR signaling depend on catalytic alpha2 and regulatory gamma3 subunits. Extensor digitorum longus muscle from...... in extensor digitorum longus muscle from either alpha2 or gamma3 AMPK KO mice, indicating functional alpha2 and gamma3 subunits of AMPK are required for the reduction in mTOR signaling. AICAR alone was without effect on basal phosphorylation of S6K1 (Thr389), ribosomal protein S6 (Ser235/236), and 4E-BP1 (Thr...

  20. Proteins Directly Interacting with Mammalian 20S Proteasomal Subunits and Ubiquitin-Independent Proteasomal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Sánchez-Lanzas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian 20S proteasome is a heterodimeric cylindrical complex (α7β7β7α7, composed of four rings each composed of seven different α or β subunits with broad proteolytic activity. We review the mammalian proteins shown to directly interact with specific 20S proteasomal subunits and those subjected to ubiquitin-independent proteasomal degradation (UIPD. The published reports of proteins that interact with specific proteasomal subunits, and others found on interactome databases and those that are degraded by a UIPD mechanism, overlap by only a few protein members. Therefore, systematic studies of the specificity of the interactions, the elucidation of the protein regions implicated in the interactions (that may or may not be followed by degradation and competition experiments between proteins known to interact with the same proteasomal subunit, are needed. Those studies should provide a coherent picture of the molecular mechanisms governing the interactions of cellular proteins with proteasomal subunits, and their relevance to cell proteostasis and cell functioning.

  1. Influence of Conformation of M. tuberculosis RNase P Protein Subunit on Its Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Singh

    Full Text Available RNase P is an essential enzyme that processes 5' end leader sequence of pre-tRNA to generate mature tRNA. The bacterial RNase Ps contain a RNA subunit and one protein subunit, where the RNA subunit contains the catalytic activity. The protein subunit which lacks any catalytic activity, relaxes the ionic requirements for holoenzyme reaction and is indispensable for pre-tRNA cleavage in vivo. In the current study, we reconstituted the M. tuberculosis RNase P holoenzyme in vitro. We prepared the RNase P protein through two different strategies that differ in the conditions under which the recombinant M. tuberculosis protein, expressed in E. coli was purified. The mycobacterial RNase P protein which was purified under native conditions subsequent to isolation from inclusion bodies and in vitro renaturation, was capable of cleaving pre-tRNA specifically without the requirement of RNase P RNA. However, the preparation that was purified under denaturing conditions and refolded subsequently lacked any inherent pre-tRNA processing activity and cleaved the substrate only as a component of the holoenzyme with the RNA subunit. We found that the two RNase P protein preparations attained alternative conformations and differed with respect to their stability as well.

  2. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  3. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  4. The Role of Disordered Ribosomal Protein Extensions in the Early Steps of Eubacterial 50 S Ribosomal Subunit Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although during the past decade research has shown the functional importance of disorder in proteins, many of the structural and dynamics properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs remain to be elucidated. This review is focused on the role of the extensions of the ribosomal proteins in the early steps of the assembly of the eubacterial 50 S subunit. The recent crystallographic structures of the ribosomal particles have revealed the picture of a complex assembly pathway that condenses the rRNA and the ribosomal proteins into active ribosomes. However, little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this process. It is thought that the long basic r-protein extensions that penetrate deeply into the subunit cores play a key role through disorder-order transitions and/or co-folding mechanisms. A current view is that such structural transitions may facilitate the proper rRNA folding. In this paper, the structures of the proteins L3, L4, L13, L20, L22 and L24 that have been experimentally found to be essential for the first steps of ribosome assembly have been compared. On the basis of their structural and dynamics properties, three categories of extensions have been identified. Each of them seems to play a distinct function. Among them, only the coil-helix transition that occurs in a phylogenetically conserved cluster of basic residues of the L20 extension appears to be strictly required for the large subunit assembly in eubacteria. The role of a helix-coil transitions in 23 S RNA folding is discussed in the light of the calcium binding protein calmodulin that shares many structural and dynamics properties with L20.

  5. Suppressor of MEK null (SMEK)/protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit (PP4C) is a key regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-Sil; Lee, Min-Woo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Jeong Ho; MA, Hui; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Lee, Chul Ho; Hunter, Tony; Choi, Cheol Soo; Montminy, Marc R.; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Fasting promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis to maintain glucose homeostasis. The cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2) is responsible for transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes and is critical for conveying the opposing hormonal signals of glucagon and insulin in the liver. Here, we show that suppressor of MEK null 1 (SMEK1) and SMEK2 [protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunits 3a and 3b, respectively] are directly involved i...

  6. Differential distribution of G-protein beta-subunits in brain: an immunocytochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunk, I; Pahner, I; Maier, U; Jenner, B; Veh, R W; Nürnberg, B; Ahnert-Hilger, G

    1999-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play central roles in signal transduction of neurons and other cells. The variety of their alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits allows numerous combinations thereby confering specificity to receptor-G-protein-effector interactions. Using antisera against individual G-protein beta-subunits we here present a regional and subcellular distribution of Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 in rat brain. Immunocytochemical specificity of the subtype-specific antisera is revealed in Sf9 cells infected with various G-protein beta-subunits. Since Gbeta-subunits together with a G-protein gamma-subunit affect signal cascades we include a distribution of the neuron-specific Ggamma2- and Ggamma3-subunits in selected brain areas. Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 are preferentially distributed in the neuropil of hippocampus, cerebellum and spinal cord. Gbeta2 is highly concentrated in the mossy fibres of dentate gyrus neurons ending in the stratum lucidum of hippocampal CA3-area. High amounts of Gbeta2 also occur in interneurons innervating spinal cord alpha-motoneurons. Gbeta5 is differentially distributed in all brain areas studied. It is found in the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA1-CA3 as well as in the granule cell layer of dentate gyrus and in some interneurons. In the spinal cord Gbeta5 in contrast to Gbeta2 concentrates around alpha-motoneurons. In cultivated mouse hippocampal and hypothalamic neurons Gbeta2 and Gbeta5 are found in different subcellular compartments. Whereas Gbeta5 is restricted to the perikarya, Gbeta2 is also found in processes and synaptic contacts where it partially colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin. An antiserum recognizing Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 reveals that these subunits are less expressed in hippocampus and cerebellum. Presumably this antiserum specifically recognizes Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 in combinations with certain G alphas and/or Gbetas. The widespread but regionally and cellularly rather different distribution of

  7. Rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing a7 subunit: pharmacological properties of ligand binding and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxian XIAO; Galya R ABDRAKHMANOVA; Maryna BAYDYUK; Susan HERNANDEZ; Kenneth J KELLAR

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (a.7 nAChRs) with those of native nAChRs containing a.7 subunit (a.7* nAChRs) in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Methods: We established a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line that expresses homomeric rat a7 nAChRs. We studies ligand binding profiles and functional properties of nAChRs expressed in this cell line and native rat a.7* nAChRs in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. We used [125IJ-a-bungarotoxin to compare ligand binding profiles in these cells with those in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The functional properties of the a.7 nAChRs expressed in this cell line were studied using whole-cell current recording.Results: The newly established cell line, KXa7Rl, expresses homomeric a7 nAChRs that bind [125I]-a-bungarotoxin with a Kd value of 0.38±0.06 nmol/L, similar to Kj values of native rat a.7* nAChRs from hippocampus (Kd=0.28±0.03 nmol/L) and cerebral cortex (Kd=0.33±0.05 nmol/L). Using whole-cell current recording, the homomeric a7 nAChRs expressed in the cells were activated by acetylcholine and (-)-nicotine with EC50 values of 280±19 nmol/L and 180±40 nmol/L, respectively. The acetylcholine activated currents were potently blocked by two selective antagonists of a.7 nAChRs, a-bungarotoxin (IC5o=19±2 nmol/L) and methyllycaconitine (IC50=100±10 pmol/L). A comparative study of ligand binding profiles, using 13 nicotinic ligands, showed many similarities between the homomeric a.7 nAChRs and native a.7* receptors in rat brain, but it also revealed several notable differences.Conclusion: This newly established stable cell line should be very useful for studying the properties of homomeric a7 nAChRs and comparing these properties to native a.7* nAChRs.

  8. The catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabowol, K T; Fink, J S; Gilman, M Z; Walsh, D A; Goodman, R H; Feramisco, J R

    1988-11-03

    Transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genes by cyclic AMP requires a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A kinase). Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the holoenzyme of the A kinase induces transcription. The regulatory subunits of the A kinase, which bind cAMP and DNA, and have amino-acid homology with the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein could directly stimulate gene expression. Alternatively, phosphorylation by the catalytic subunits could induce transcription by activating proteins involved in gene transcription. To distinguish between these models, we microinjected purified preparations of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of A kinase into tissue culture cells and monitored expression of a stably integrated fusion gene containing a cAMP-responsive human promoter fused to a bacterial reporter gene, or of the endogenous c-fos gene. The catalytic subunit stimulated expression of these genes, whereas the regulatory subunit did not. These results indicate that the catalytic subunit of A kinase is sufficient to induce expression of two cAMP-responsive genes, without increasing levels of cAMP.

  9. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  10. Information flow through calcium binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous mode of biological communication, which regulates a great variety of vital processes in living systems. Such a signal typically begins with an elementary event, in which calcium ions bind to a protein, inducing a change in the protein's structure. Information can only be lost, from what was conveyed through this initial event, as the signal is further transduced through the downstream networks. In the present work we analyze and optimize the information flow in the calcium binding process. We explicitly calculate the mutual information between the calcium concentration and the states of the protein, using a simple model for allosteric regulation in a dimeric protein. The optimal solution depends on the dynamic range of the input as well as on the timescale of signal integration. According to our result, the optimizing strategy involves allowing the calcium-binding protein to be ``activated'' by a partial occupation of its sites, and tuning independently the strengths of cooperative interactions in the binding and unbinding processes.

  11. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameter...

  12. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini...... to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human...

  13. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor function by its binding proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, Norimichi; Saito, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane receptors with an N-terminus in the extracellular region and C-terminus in the intracellular region. When an agonist binds to a GPCR, a signal is transduced into a cell through the activation of trimeric G proteins. Recently, it has been shown that the activities of GPCRs are regulated by multiple mechanisms. One of the mechanisms is regulation through the binding proteins to the carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. In the present study, the binding partners for the C-terminus of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) and thromboxane A(2) receptor (TP) were searched for using yeast two-hybrid screening, and the functions of these proteins were investigated. We identified t-complex testis expressed-1 (Tctex-1) and 4.1G as associated proteins for the PTHR. Tctex-1 is one of the light chains of cytoplasmic dynein, which is a motor protein across microtubles. We found that Tctex-1 was involved in agonist-induced internalization of the PTHR. 4.1G, a cytoskeletal protein, facilitated the cell surface localization of the PTHR and augmented PHTR-mediated signal transduction. TPs consists of two splicing variants, TPalpha and TPbeta. As a result of yeast two-hybrid screening, two proteasomal proteins, proteasome activator PA28gamma and proteasome subunit alpha7, were identified as direct interacting proteins for TPbeta. TPbeta has a tendency to be retained in the intracellular compartment, probably due to its binding to proteasomes. We also demonstrated that TPalpha and TPbeta formed heterodimers, and the signal transduction through TPalpha was reduced by the formation of heterodimers. In conclusion, the proteins bound to GPCRs may regulate the intracellular traffic of GPCRs.

  14. Human SLX4 is a Holliday junction resolvase subunit that binds multiple DNA repair/recombination endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekairi, Samira; Scaglione, Sarah; Chahwan, Charly; Taylor, Ewan R; Tissier, Agnès; Coulon, Stéphane; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ruse, Cristian; Yates, John R; Russell, Paul; Fuchs, Robert P; McGowan, Clare H; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L

    2009-07-10

    Structure-specific endonucleases resolve DNA secondary structures generated during DNA repair and recombination. The yeast 5' flap endonuclease Slx1-Slx4 has received particular attention with the finding that Slx4 has Slx1-independent key functions in genome maintenance. Although Slx1 is a highly conserved protein in eukaryotes, no orthologs of Slx4 were reported other than in fungi. Here we report the identification of Slx4 orthologs in metazoa, including fly MUS312, essential for meiotic recombination, and human BTBD12, an ATM/ATR checkpoint kinase substrate. Human SLX1-SLX4 displays robust Holliday junction resolvase activity in addition to 5' flap endonuclease activity. Depletion of SLX1 and SLX4 results in 53BP1 foci accumulation and H2AX phosphorylation as well as cellular hypersensitivity to MMS. Furthermore, we show that SLX4 binds the XPF(ERCC4) and MUS81 subunits of the XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1 endonucleases and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair. We propose that SLX4 acts as a docking platform for multiple structure-specific endonucleases.

  15. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  16. ABP: a novel AMPA receptor binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Ziff, E B

    1999-04-30

    We review the cloning of a novel AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) that interacts with GluR2/3 and is homologous to GRIP. ABP is enriched in the PSD with GluR2 and is localized to the PSD by EM. ABP binds GluR2 via the C-terminal VXI motif through a Class I PDZ interaction. ABP and GRIP can also homo- and heteromultimerize. Thus, ABP and GRIP may be involved in AMPA receptor regulation and localization, by linking it to other cytoskeletal or signaling molecules. We suggest that the ABP/GRIP and PSD-95 families form distinct scaffolds that anchor, respectively, AMPA and NMDA receptors. We are currently investigating proteins that bind ABP and that may regulate the AMPA receptor.

  17. Shuttling of G protein subunits between the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Mariangela; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2007-08-17

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (alphabetagamma) mediate the majority of signaling pathways in mammalian cells. It is long held that G protein function is localized to the plasma membrane. Here we examined the spatiotemporal dynamics of G protein localization using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence loss in photobleaching, and a photoswitchable fluorescent protein, Dronpa. Unexpectedly, G protein subunits shuttle rapidly (t1/2 bromopalmitate. Thus, contrary to present thought, G proteins do not reside permanently on the plasma membrane but are constantly testing the cytoplasmic surfaces of the plasma membrane and endomembranes to maintain G protein pools in intracellular membranes to establish direct communication between receptors and endomembranes.

  18. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  19. Development of a glucose binding protein biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, M.; Milanick, M.; Grant, S.

    2007-09-01

    Glucose binding protein (GBP) is a monomeric periplasmic protein. It is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli which functions as a receptor for transport D-glucose. GBP binds glucose with high affinity. The binding mechanism is based on a hinge motion due to the protein conformational change. This change was utilized as an optical sensing mechanism by applying Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The wild-type GBP lacks cysteine in its structure, but by introducing a single cysteine at a specific site by site-directed mutagenesis, this ensured single-label attachment at specific sites with a fluorescent probe. The other sites were amino sites, which were labeled with second fluorophore. The near IR FRET pair, Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680) and Alexa Fluor 750(AF750), was utilized. The AF680 targeted the amine sites, which was the donor fluorophore, while the AF750 labeled the single cysteine site, which was the acceptor fluorophore. The sensing system strategy was based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change upon binding. This biosensor had the ability to detect down to 10 uM concentrations of glucose. Next the probes were uploaded into red blood cells via hypo osmotic dialysis. The sensor responded to glucose while encapsulated with the red cells. These results showed the feasibility of an intracellular glucose biosensor.

  20. Measuring Positive Cooperativity Using the Direct ESI-MS Assay. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Homopentamer Binding to GM1 Pentasaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay was used to investigate the stepwise binding of the GM1 pentasaccharide β- D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p (GM1os) to the cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer (CTB5) and to establish conclusively whether GM1os binding is cooperative. Apparent association constants were measured for the stepwise addition of one to five GM1os to CTB5 at pH 6.9 and 22 °C. The intrinsic association constant, which was established from the apparent association constant for the addition of a single GM1os to CTB5, was found to be (3.2 ± 0.2) × 106 M-1. This is in reasonable agreement with the reported value of (6.4 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1, which was measured at pH 7.4 and 25 °C using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Analysis of the apparent association constants provides direct and unambiguous evidence that GM1os binding exhibits small positive cooperativity. Binding was found to be sensitive to the number of ligand-bound nearest neighbor subunits, with the affinities enhanced by a factor of 1.7 and 2.9 when binding occurs next to one or two ligand-bound subunits, respectively. These findings, which provide quantitative support for the binding model proposed by Homans and coworkers [14], highlight the unique strengths of the direct ESI-MS assay for measuring cooperative ligand binding.

  1. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Borshchevskiy

    Full Text Available Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium.

  2. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium.

  3. Structure-function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure-function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not.

  4. Molecular basis of the γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor α3 subunit interaction with the clustering protein gephyrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tretter, Verena; Kerschner, Bernd; Milenkovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    subunit and gephyrin, mapping reciprocal binding sites using mutagenesis, overlay, and yeast two-hybrid assays. This analysis reveals that critical determinants of this interaction are located in the motif FNIVGTTYPI in the GABA(A)R α3 M3-M4 domain and the motif SMDKAFITVL at the N terminus......The multifunctional scaffolding protein gephyrin is a key player in the formation of the postsynaptic scaffold at inhibitory synapses, clustering both inhibitory glycine receptors (GlyRs) and selected GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes. We report a direct interaction between the GABA(A)R α3...... of the gephyrin E domain. GABA(A)R α3 gephyrin binding-site mutants were unable to co-localize with endogenous gephyrin in transfected hippocampal neurons, despite being able to traffic to the cell membrane and form functional benzodiazepine-responsive GABA(A)Rs in recombinant systems. Interestingly, motifs...

  5. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  6. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  7. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  8. Assessment of Sulf hydryl Group in Individual Rat Lens Protein Subunits During Galactose Cataract Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaroldI.Calvin; S.C.JosephFu

    1994-01-01

    A specific reagent DACM [N-( 7-Dimethylamino-4-methyl-3-coumarinyl) maleimide] is used to study the -SH groups in lens proteins of normal and galactose cataractous rats. DACM when reacts readily with -SH groups form strong fluorescent adducts. The two -dimensional electrophoresis with DACM pre-labeled proteins is a simple and sensitive method for detecting -SH groups of protein subunit. In the present study, based on IEF/SDS-PAGE electrophoretically characterized soluble crystallins, describes specific ...

  9. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  10. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  11. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Karen K.; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the α4 and α5 subunits are expressed in α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind...

  12. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  13. Cloning and characterization of genes encoding alpha and beta subunits of glutamate-gated chloride channel protein in Cylicocyclus nassatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Ritesh; LePage, Keith T; Kaplan, Ray M

    2006-11-01

    The invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are receptor molecules and targets for the avermectin-milbemycin (AM) group of anthelmintics. Mutations in GluCls are associated with ivermectin resistance in the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Cooperia oncophora. In this study, full-length cDNAs encoding alpha and beta subunits of GluCl were cloned and sequenced in Cylicocyclus nassatus, a common and important cyathostomin nematode parasite of horses. Both genes possess the sequence characteristics typical of GluCls, and phylogenetic analysis confirms that these genes are evolutionarily closely related to GluCls of other nematodes and flies. Complete coding sequences of C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta were subcloned into pTL1 mammalian expression vector, and proteins were expressed in COS-7 cells. Ivermectin-binding characteristics were determined by incubating COS-7 cell membranes expressing C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta proteins with [(3)H]ivermectin. In competitive binding experiments, fitting the data to a one site competition model, C. nassatus GluCl-alpha was found to bind [(3)H]ivermectin with a high amount of displaceable binding (IC(50)=208 pM). Compared to the mock-transfected COS-7 cells, the means of [(3)H]ivermectin binding were significantly different for C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and the Haemonchus contortus GluCl (HcGluCla) (p=0.018 and 0.023, respectively) but not for C. nassatus GluCl-beta (p=0.370). This is the first report of orthologs of GluCl genes and in vitro expression of an ivermectin-binding protein in a cyathostomin species. These data suggest the likelihood of a similar mechanism of action of AM drugs in these parasites, and suggest that mechanisms of resistance may also be similar.

  14. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  15. The F13 residue is critical for interaction among the coat protein subunits of papaya mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté Gagné, M E; Lecours, K; Gagné, S; Leclerc, D

    2008-04-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) coat protein (CP) in Escherichia coli was previously showed to self-assemble in nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) that were similar in shape and appearance to the native virus. We have also shown that a truncated CP missing the N-terminal 26 amino acids is monomeric and loses its ability to bind RNA. It is likely that the N-terminus of the CP is important for the interaction between the subunits in self-assembly into NLPs. In this work, through deletion and mutation analysis, we have shown that the deletion of 13 amino acids is sufficient to generate the monomeric form of the CP. Furthermore, we have shown that residue F13 is critical for self-assembly of the CP subunits into NLPs. The replacement of F13 with hydrophobic residues (L or Y) generated mutated forms of the CP that were able to self-assemble into NLPs. However, the replacement of F13 by A, G, R, E or S was detrimental to the self-assembly of the protein into NLPs. We concluded that a hydrophobic interaction at the N-terminus is important to ensure self-assembly of the protein into NLPs. We also discuss the importance of F13 for assembly of other members of the potexvirus family.

  16. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The mouse protein kinase CK2 beta subunit gene (Csnk2b) is composed of seven exons contained within 7874 bp. The exon and intron lengths extend from 76 to 321 and 111 to 1272 bp, respectively. The lengths of the murine coding exons correspond exactly to the lengths of the exons in the human CK2...

  17. Structure of protein kinase CK2: dimerization of the human beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Mietens, U; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been shown to be elevated in all so far investigated solid tumors and its catalytic subunit has been shown to serve as an oncogene product. CK2 is a heterotetrameric serine-threonine kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta...

  18. The G Protein β Subunit Is Essential for Multiple Responses to Chemoattractants in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Lijun; Valkema, Romi; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the beta gamma-subunit dimers of heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in transducing extracellular signals. The recent construction of G beta null mutants (g beta(-)) in Dictyostelium provides a unique opportunity to study the role of beta gamma dimers in s

  19. Reduction of mouse egg surface integrin alpha9 subunit (ITGA9) reduces the egg's ability to support sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J; Evans, Janice P

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha(4)/alpha(9) (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha(9) integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9's likely beta partner, beta(1) (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions.

  20. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  1. Homologous and unique G protein alpha subunits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochrie, M A; Mendel, J E; Sternberg, P W; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a known G protein alpha subunit, the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha), was isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of C. elegans Go alpha is 80-87% identical to other Go alpha sequences. An mRNA that hybridizes to the C. elegans Go alpha cDNA can be detected on Northern blots. A C. elegans protein that crossreacts with antibovine Go alpha antibody can be detected on immunoblots. A cosmid clone containing the C. elegans Go alpha gene (goa-1) was isolated and mapped to chromosome I. The genomic fragments of three other C. elegans G protein alpha subunit genes (gpa-1, gpa-2, and gpa-3) have been isolated using the polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding cosmid clones were isolated and mapped to disperse locations on chromosome V. The sequences of two of the genes, gpa-1 and gpa-3, were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences of gpa-1 and gpa-3 are only 48% identical to each other. Therefore, they are likely to have distinct functions. In addition they are not homologous enough to G protein alpha subunits in other organisms to be classified. Thus C. elegans has G proteins that are identifiable homologues of mammalian G proteins as well as G proteins that appear to be unique to C. elegans. Study of identifiable G proteins in C. elegans may result in a further understanding of their function in other organisms, whereas study of the novel G proteins may provide an understanding of unique aspects of nematode physiology. Images PMID:1907494

  2. Protein kinase A type I activates a CRE-element more efficiently than protein kinase A type II regardless of C subunit isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvissel Anne-Katrine

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase A type I (PKAI and PKAII are expressed in most of the eukaryotic cells examined. PKA is a major receptor for cAMP and specificity is achieved partly through tissue-dependent expression and subcellular localization of subunits with different biochemical properties. In addition posttranslational modifications help fine tune PKA activity, distribution and interaction in the cell. In spite of this the functional significance of two forms of PKA in one cell has not been fully determined. Here we have tested the ability of PKAI and PKAII formed by expression of the regulatory (R subunits RIα or RIIα in conjunction with Cα1 or Cβ2 to activate a co-transfected luciferace reporter gene, controlled by the cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB in vivo. Results We show that PKAI when expressed at equal levels as PKAII was significantly (p Conclusion We suggest that differential effects of PKAI and PKAII in inducing Cre-luciferace activity depend on R and not C subunit identity.

  3. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  4. Long polar fimbriae of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 bind to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-09-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Structure–function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure–function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein–RNA and protein–protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not. PMID:27417296

  6. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  7. Specific subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins play important roles during nodulation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling.

  8. First inactive conformation of CK2 alpha, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    (EPKs). To function as regulatory key components, EPKs normally exist in inactive ground states and are activated only upon specific signals. Typically, this activation is accompanied by large conformational changes in helix alpha C and in the activation segment, leading to a characteristic arrangement......The Ser/Thr kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha, catalytic subunit of CK2) attached to a dimer of two noncatalytic subunits (CK2beta, noncatalytic subunit of CK2). CK2alpha belongs to the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases...... of catalytic key elements. For CK2alpha, however, no strict physiological control of activity is known. Accordingly, CK2alpha was found so far exclusively in the characteristic conformation of active EPKs, which is, in this case, additionally stabilized by a unique intramolecular contact between the N...

  9. A novel RNA binding protein that interacts with NMDA R1 mRNA: regulation by ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2006-05-01

    Excitatory NMDA receptors are an important target of ethanol. Chronic ethanol exposure, in vivo and in vitro, increases polypeptide levels of NR1 subunit, the key subunit of functional NMDA receptors. In vitro, chronic ethanol treatment increases the half-life of NR1 mRNA and this observation is dependent on new protein synthesis. The present study was undertaken to locate cis-acting region(s) within the NR1 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and identify NR1 3'-UTR binding trans-acting proteins expressed in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Utilizing RNA gel shift assays we identified a 156-nt cis-acting region that binds to polysomal trans-acting proteins. This binding was highly specific as inclusion of cyclophilin RNA or tRNA did not interfere with cis-trans interactions. Importantly, the 3'-UTR binding activity was significantly up-regulated in the presence of ethanol. UV cross-link analysis detected three NR1 3'-UTR binding proteins and their molecular mass calculated by Northwestern analysis was approximately 88, 60 and 47 kDa, respectively. Northwestern analysis showed a significant up-regulation of the 88-kDa protein after chronic ethanol treatment. The 88-kDa protein was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry as the beta subunit of alpha glucosidase II (GIIbeta). That GIIbeta is indeed a trans-acting protein and binds specifically to 3'-UTR of NR1 mRNA was confirmed by RNA gel mobility supershift assays and immuno RT-PCR. Western blotting data established a significant increase of GIIbeta polypeptide in chronic ethanol-exposed fetal cortical neurons. We hypothesize that the identified cis-acting region and the associated RNA-binding proteins are important regulators of NR1 subunit gene expression.

  10. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini remained unaffected even after increased oxidation. Staining with the subunit was also reduced significantly by adding galactose to the incubation medium. Binding of CTB to cell surfaces apparently requires intact sialic groups on most, but not all, cell surfaces. Oxidation of the sialic acid residues may influence the structure of the sialylated GM1 molecules on the cell surface in different ways. It is possible that both the sialic acid residue and the terminal galactose are oxidized. Alternatively, the sialic acid may be resistant to acid hydrolysis in gangliosides in which the sialic acid is attached to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human milk contains high levels of sialic acid glycoconjugates that may provide defense mechanisms.

  11. Comparison of label-free quantification methods for the determination of protein complexes subunits stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Fabre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are the main molecular machines that support all major cellular pathways and their in-depth characterization are essential to understand their functions. Determining the stoichiometry of the different subunits of a protein complex still remains challenging. Recently, many label-free quantitative proteomic approaches have been developed to study the composition of protein complexes. It is therefore of great interest to evaluate these different methods in a stoichiometry oriented objective. Here we compare the ability of four absolute quantitative label-free methods currently used in proteomic studies to determine the stoichiometry of a well-characterized protein complex, the 26S proteasome.

  12. Replication protein A and more: single-stranded DNA-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Liu; Jun Huang

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play essential roles in DNA replication,recombinational repair,and maintenance of genome stability.In human,the major SSB,replication protein A (RPA),is a stable heterotrimer composed of subunits of RPA1,RPA2,and RPA3,each df which is conserved not only in mammals but also in all other eukaryotic species.In addition to RPA,other SSBs have also been identified in the human genome,including sensor of single-stranded DNA complexes 1 and 2 (SOSS1/2).In this review,we summarize our current understanding of how these SSBs contribute to the maintenance of genome stability.

  13. The Alpha Catalytic Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2 Is Required for Mouse Embryonic Development▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, David Y.; Dominguez, Isabel; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; O'Brien, Conor; Seldin, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II) is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that is composed of two catalytic subunits (CK2α and/or CK2α′) and two CK2β regulatory subunits. CK2 has many substrates in cells, and key roles in yeast cell physiology have been uncovered by introducing subunit mutations. Gene-targeting experiments have demonstrated that in mice, the CK2β gene is required for early embryonic development, while the CK2α′ subunit appears to be essential only for normal spermatogenesis. We have used homologous recombination to disrupt the CK2α gene in the mouse germ line. Embryos lacking CK2α have a marked reduction in CK2 activity in spite of the presence of the CK2α′ subunit. CK2α−/− embryos die in mid-gestation, with abnormalities including open neural tubes and reductions in the branchial arches. Defects in the formation of the heart lead to hydrops fetalis and are likely the cause of embryonic lethality. Thus, CK2α appears to play an essential and uncompensated role in mammalian development. PMID:17954558

  14. Mass-spectrometric identification of binding proteins of Mr 25,000 protein, a part of vitellogenin B1, detected in particulate fraction of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Isamu; Li, Zhijun; Yoshitome, Satoshi; Ito, Susumu; Hashimoto, Eikichi

    2004-10-01

    A phosphorylated protein with molecular mass of 25,000 (pp25) is a component of Xenopus laevis vitellogenin B1. Our previous report showed the existence of several binding proteins of pp25 in the particulate fraction of Xenopus oocytes. In an attempt to elucidate the function of pp25, two of these binding proteins were purified, analyzed by mass-spectrometry, and identified as ribosomal proteins S13 and S14. Other binding proteins in the particulate fraction mostly corresponded to those derived from purified 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, as shown by the overlay assay method. However, pp25 did not show any effect on protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. A model in which pp25 connects a type of serpin (serine protease inhibitor), the only pp25-binding protein detected in the cytoplasm, to the endoplasmic reticulum through two serine clusters is proposed to explain a possible function of this protein.

  15. Proliferation of transformed somatotroph cells related to low or absent expression of protein kinase a regulatory subunit 1A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lania, Andrea G; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano; Pellegrini, Caterina; Bondioni, Sara; Peverelli, Erika; Braidotti, Paola; Locatelli, Marco; Zavanone, Mario L; Ferrante, Emanuela; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2004-12-15

    The two regulatory subunits (R1 and R2) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in cancer cell lines and exert diverse roles in growth control. Recently, mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit 1A gene (PRKAR1A) have been identified in patients with Carney complex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the PKA regulatory subunits R1A, R2A, and R2B in a series of 30 pituitary adenomas and the effects of subunit activation on cell proliferation. In these tumors, neither mutation of PRKAR1A nor loss of heterozygosity was identified. By real-time PCR, mRNA of the three subunits was detected in all of the tumors, R1A being the most represented in the majority of samples. By contrast, immunohistochemistry documented low or absent R1A levels in all tumors, whereas R2A and R2B were highly expressed, thus resulting in an unbalanced R1/R2 ratio. The low levels of R1A were, at least in part, due to proteasome-mediated degradation. The effect of the R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in GH3 cells, which showed a similar unbalanced pattern of R subunits expression, and in growth hormone-secreting adenomas. The R2-selective cAMP analog 8-Cl cAMP and R1A RNA silencing, stimulated cell proliferation and increased Cyclin D1 expression, respectively, in human and rat adenomatous somatotrophs. These data show that a low R1/R2 ratio promoted proliferation of transformed somatotrophs and are consistent with the Carney complex model in which R1A inactivating mutations further unbalance this ratio in favor of R2 subunits. These results suggest that low expression of R1A protein may favor cAMP-dependent proliferation of transformed somatotrophs.

  16. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  17. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...

  18. Rice G-protein subunits qPE9-1 and RGB1 play distinct roles in abscisic acid responses and drought adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Jian-Feng; Yan, Xue-Jiao; Lin, Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Baluška, František; Wang, Yi-Ping; Xia, Yi-Ji; Liang, Guo-hua; Liang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-mediated abscisic acid (ABA) and drought-stress responses have been documented in numerous plant species. However, our understanding of the function of rice G-protein subunits in ABA signalling and drought tolerance is limited. In this study, the function of G-protein subunits in ABA response and drought resistance in rice plants was explored. It was found that the transcription level of qPE9-1 (rice Gγ subunit) gradually decreased with increasing ABA concentration and the lack of qPE9-1 showed an enhanced drought tolerance in rice plants. In contrast, mRNA levels of RGB1 (rice Gβ subunit) were significantly upregulated by ABA treatment and the lack of RGB1 led to reduced drought tolerance. Furthermore, the results suggested that qPE9-1 negatively regulates the ABA response by suppressing the expression of key transcription factors involved in ABA and stress responses, while RGB1 positively regulates ABA biosynthesis by upregulating NCED gene expression under both normal and drought stress conditions. Taken together, it is proposed that RGB1 is a positive regulator of the ABA response and drought adaption in rice plants, whereas qPE9-1 is modulated by RGB1 and functions as a negative regulator in the ABA-dependent drought-stress responses.

  19. Reactions of a fluorescent ATP analog, 2'-(5-dimethyl-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino-2'-deoxyATP, with E. coli F1-ATPase and its subunits: the roles of the high affinity binding site in the alpha subunit and the low affinity binding site in the beta subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, I; Takeda, K; Futai, M; Tonomura, Y

    1982-11-01

    We performed kinetic studies on the reactions of a fluorescent ATP analog, 2'-(5-dimethyl-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino-2'-deoxyATP (DNS-ATP), with E. coli F1-ATPase (EF1) and its subunits, to clarify the role of each subunit in the ATPase reaction. The following results were obtained. 1. One mol of EF1, which contains nonexchangeable 2 mol ATP and 0.5 mol ADP, binds 3 mol of DNS-ATP. The apparent dissociation constant, in the presence of Mg2+, was 0.23 microM. Upon binding, the fluorescence intensity of DNS-ATP at 520 nm increased exponentially with t1/2 of 35 s, and reached 3.5 times the original fluorescence level. Following the fluorescence increase, DNS-ATP was hydrolyzed, and the fluorescence intensity maintained its enhanced level. 2. The addition of an excess of ATP over the EF1-DNS-nucleotide complex, in the presence of Mg2+, decreased the fluorescence intensity rapidly, indicating the acceleration of DNS-nucleotide release from EF1. ADP and GTP also decreased the fluorescence intensity. 3. DCCD markedly inhibited the accelerating effect of ATP on DNS-nucleotide release from EF1 and the EF1-DNS-ATPase or -ATPase activity in a steady state. On the other hand, DCCD only slightly inhibited the fluorescence increase of DNS-ATP, due to its binding to EF1, and the rate of single cleavage of 1 mol of DNS-ATP per mol of alpha subunit of EF1. 4. In the presence of Mg2+, 0.65-0.82 mol of DNS-ATP binds to 1 mol of the isolated alpha subunit of EF1 with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.06-0.07 microM. Upon binding, the fluorescence intensity of DNS-ATP at 520 nm increased 1.55 fold very rapidly (t1/2 less than 1 s). No hydrolysis of DNS-ATP was observed upon the addition of the isolated alpha subunit. The fluorescence intensity of DNS-ATP was unaffected by the addition of the isolated beta subunit. DNS-ATP was also unhydrolyzed by the isolated beta subunit. 5. EF1-ATPase was reconstituted from alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP

  20. Cobalamin and its binding protein in rat milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1989-01-01

    Cobalamin and its binding protein, haptocorrin, are present in rat milk throughout the lactation period. The concentration of cobalamin is approximately 0.3-times the concentration of the unsaturated binding protein. The concentration of the unsaturated cobalamin-binding protein varies between 18...... nmol l-1 and 16 nmol l-1. The binding protein has a Stokes radius of 2.49 nm when saturated with cobalamin and 2.61 nm when unsaturated. It binds cobalamin over a broad range of pH and is able to bind cobinamide also. With immunohistochemistry, we find haptocorrin immunoreactivity in the mammary glands...

  1. Mechanical unfolding of ribose binding protein and its comparison with other periplasmic binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Narayan, Satya; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2014-10-01

    Folding and unfolding studies on large, multidomain proteins are still rare despite their high abundance in genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the unfolding properties of a 271 residue, two-domain ribose binding protein (RBP) from the bacterial periplasm using single-molecule force spectroscopy. We observe that RBP predominately unfolds via a two-state pathway with an unfolding force of ∼80 pN and an unfolding contour length of ∼95 nm. Only a small population (∼15%) of RBP follows three-state pathways. The ligand binding neither increases the mechanical stability nor influences the unfolding flux of RBP through different pathways. The kinetic partitioning between two-state and three-state pathways, which has been reported earlier for other periplasmic proteins, is also observed in RBP, albeit to a lesser extent. These results provide important insights into the mechanical stability and unfolding processes of large two-domain proteins and highlight the contrasting features upon ligand binding. Protein structural topology diagrams are used to explain the differences in the mechanical unfolding behavior of RBP with other periplasmic binding proteins.

  2. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-02

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  3. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gα) endocytosis by a cascade of ubiquitin binding domain proteins is required for sustained morphogenesis and proper mating in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gauri; Baker, Rachael; Sacks, Carly M; Torres, Matthew P; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2014-05-23

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known to transmit signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector proteins. There is growing appreciation that G proteins are also present at endomembrane compartments, where they can potentially interact with a distinct set of signaling proteins. Here, we examine the cellular trafficking function of the G protein α subunit in yeast, Gpa1. Gpa1 contains a unique 109-amino acid insert within the α-helical domain that undergoes a variety of posttranslational modifications. Among these is monoubiquitination, catalyzed by the NEDD4 family ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. Using a newly optimized method for G protein purification together with biophysical measures of structure and function, we show that the ubiquitination domain does not influence enzyme activity. By screening a panel of 39 gene deletion mutants, each lacking a different ubiquitin binding domain protein, we identify seven that are necessary to deliver Gpa1 to the vacuole compartment including four proteins (Ede1, Bul1, Ddi1, and Rup1) previously not known to be involved in this process. Finally, we show that proper endocytosis of the G protein is needed for sustained cellular morphogenesis and mating in response to pheromone stimulation. We conclude that a cascade of ubiquitin-binding proteins serves to deliver the G protein to its final destination within the cell. In this instance and in contrast to the previously characterized visual system, endocytosis from the plasma membrane is needed for proper signal transduction rather than for signal desensitization.

  4. Purification of biotin-binding protein from chicken egg yolk and comparison with avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, C V; Adiga, P R

    1984-05-17

    A simple alternative procedure for the purification in higher yields of the biotin-binding protein from the chicken egg yolk in a ligand-free form is described. The isolated protein was homogeneous by the criteria of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography, immuno-double diffusion and immuno-electrophoresis. The protein had an Mr of 72 000 +/- 2000 and was a homotetramer of subunit Mr of 18 000 +/- 1000. It bound [14C]biotin in the molar ratio of 1:4 with an association constant (Ka) of 0.58 X 10(12) M-1. The yolk biotin-binding protein and avidin exhibited qualitatively similar spectral changes on interaction with biotin and p- hydroxyazobenzoic acid, but quantitatively these changes were more pronounced with avidin. Despite the lack of gross immunological cross-reactivity between the two biotin-binders, evidence based on immunological techniques for some degree of common conformational characteristics restricted to or around the ligand-binding sites of the two proteins was adduced. The mixed subunits of the two proteins failed to form hetero-oligomers on reconstitution.

  5. Shared protein complex subunits contribute to explaining disrupted co-occurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Schneider

    Full Text Available The gene composition of present-day genomes has been shaped by a complicated evolutionary history, resulting in diverse distributions of genes across genomes. The pattern of presence and absence of a gene in different genomes is called its phylogenetic profile. It has been shown that proteins whose encoding genes have highly similar profiles tend to be functionally related: As these genes were gained and lost together, their encoded proteins can probably only perform their full function if both are present. However, a large proportion of genes encoding interacting proteins do not have matching profiles. In this study, we analysed one possible reason for this, namely that phylogenetic profiles can be affected by multi-functional proteins such as shared subunits of two or more protein complexes. We found that by considering triplets of proteins, of which one protein is multi-functional, a large fraction of disturbed co-occurrence patterns can be explained.

  6. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  7. A c subunit with four transmembrane helices and one ion (Na+)-binding site in an archaeal ATP synthase: implications for c ring function and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Florian; Leone, Vanessa; Langer, Julian D; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Müller, Volker

    2012-11-16

    The ion-driven membrane rotors of ATP synthases consist of multiple copies of subunit c, forming a closed ring. Subunit c typically comprises two transmembrane helices, and the c ring features an ion-binding site in between each pair of adjacent subunits. Here, we use experimental and computational methods to study the structure and specificity of an archaeal c subunit more akin to those of V-type ATPases, namely that from Pyrococcus furiosus. The c subunit was purified by chloroform/methanol extraction and determined to be 15.8 kDa with four predicted transmembrane helices. However, labeling with DCCD as well as Na(+)-DCCD competition experiments revealed only one binding site for DCCD and Na(+), indicating that the mature c subunit of this A(1)A(O) ATP synthase is indeed of the V-type. A structural model generated computationally revealed one Na(+)-binding site within each of the c subunits, mediated by a conserved glutamate side chain alongside other coordinating groups. An intriguing second glutamate located in-between adjacent c subunits was ruled out as a functional Na(+)-binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the c ring of P. furiosus is highly Na(+)-specific under in vivo conditions, comparable with the Na(+)-dependent V(1)V(O) ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Interestingly, the same holds true for the c ring from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, whose c subunits also feature a V-type architecture but carry two Na(+)-binding sites instead. These findings are discussed in light of their physiological relevance and with respect to the mode of ion coupling in A(1)A(O) ATP synthases.

  8. Core-binding factor subunit beta is not required for non-primate lentiviral Vif-mediated APOBEC3 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Youwei; Zhu, Dantong; Wang, Cuihui; Su, Chao; Ma, Jian; Ma, Jianzhang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-10-01

    Viral infectivity factor (Vif) is required for lentivirus fitness and pathogenicity, except in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Vif enhances viral infectivity by a Cullin5-Elongin B/C E3 complex to inactivate the host restriction factor APOBEC3. Core-binding factor subunit beta (CBF-β) is a cell factor that was recently shown to be important for the primate lentiviral Vif function. Non-primate lentiviral Vif also degrades APOBEC3 through the proteasome pathway. However, it is unclear whether CBF-β is required for the non-primate lentiviral Vif function. In this study, we demonstrated that the Vifs of non-primate lentiviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), and maedi-visna virus (MVV), do not interact with CBF-β. In addition, CBF-β did not promote the stability of FIV, BIV, CAEV, and MVV Vifs. Furthermore, CBF-β silencing or overexpression did not affect non-primate lentiviral Vif-mediated APOBEC3 degradation. Our results suggest that non-primate lentiviral Vif induces APOBEC3 degradation through a different mechanism than primate lentiviral Vif. Importance: The APOBEC3 protein family members are host restriction factors that block retrovirus replication. Vif, an accessory protein of lentivirus, degrades APOBEC3 to rescue viral infectivity by forming Cullin5-Elongin B/C-based E3 complex. CBF-β was proved to be a novel regulator of primate lentiviral Vif function. In this study, we found that CBF-β knockdown or overexpression did not affect FIV Vif's function, which induced polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 by recruiting the E3 complex in a manner similar to that of HIV-1 Vif. We also showed that other non-primate lentiviral Vifs did not require CBF-β to degrade APOBEC3. CBF-β did not interact with non-primate lentiviral Vifs or promote their stability. These results suggest that a different mechanism exists for the Vif-APOBEC interaction and

  9. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  10. The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Wu, Sau-Ching; Tjia, Wai-Mui; Wong, Sui-Lam; Ng, Kenneth K. S., E-mail: ngk@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2013-05-01

    The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel mode of peptide recognition in which a single peptide binds simultaneously to biotin-binding pockets from adjacent subunits of streptavidin. The molecular details of peptide recognition suggest how the SBP-Tag can be further modified to become an even more useful tag for a wider range of biotechnological applications. The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K{sub d} ≃ 2.5–4.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 Å resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 12–14) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 31–33) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 17–28) adopts a regular α-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 1–10 and 35–38 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 11–34 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of β-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.

  11. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  12. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12B revealed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Kimberly

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 is one of the major phosphatases responsible for protein dephosphorylation in eukaryotes. Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12B (PPP1R12B, one of the regulatory subunits of PP1, can bind to PP1cδ, one of the catalytic subunits of PP1, and modulate the specificity and activity of PP1cδ against its substrates. Phosphorylation of PPP1R12B on threonine 646 by Rho kinase inhibits the activity of the PP1c-PPP1R12B complex. However, it is not currently known whether PPP1R12B phosphorylation at threonine 646 and other sites is regulated by insulin. We set out to identify phosphorylation sites in PPP1R12B and to quantify the effect of insulin on PPP1R12B phosphorylation by using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Results 14 PPP1R12B phosphorylation sites were identified, 7 of which were previously unreported. Potential kinases were predicted for these sites. Furthermore, relative quantification of PPP1R12B phosphorylation sites for basal and insulin-treated samples was obtained by using peak area-based label-free mass spectrometry of fragment ions. The results indicate that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of PPP1R12B significantly at serine 29 (3.02 ± 0.94 fold, serine 504 (11.67 ± 3.33 fold, and serine 645/threonine 646 (2.34 ± 0.58 fold. Conclusion PPP1R12B was identified as a phosphatase subunit that undergoes insulin-stimulated phosphorylation, suggesting that PPP1R12B might play a role in insulin signaling. This study also identified novel targets for future investigation of the regulation of PPP1R12B not only in insulin signaling in cell models, animal models, and in humans, but also in other signaling pathways.

  13. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  14. Molecular recognition of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by an acetylcholine binding protein reveals determinants of binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe A Olsen

    Full Text Available Despite extensive studies on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and homologues, details of acetylcholine binding are not completely resolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of acetylcholine bound to the receptor homologue acetylcholine binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis. This is the first structure of acetylcholine in a binding pocket containing all five aromatic residues conserved in all mammalian nAChRs. The ligand-protein interactions are characterized by contacts to the aromatic box formed primarily by residues on the principal side of the intersubunit binding interface (residues Tyr89, Trp143 and Tyr185. Besides these interactions on the principal side, we observe a cation-π interaction between acetylcholine and Trp53 on the complementary side and a water-mediated hydrogen bond from acetylcholine to backbone atoms of Leu102 and Met114, both of importance for anchoring acetylcholine to the complementary side. To further study the role of Trp53, we mutated the corresponding tryptophan in the two different acetylcholine-binding interfaces of the widespread α4β2 nAChR, i.e. the interfaces α4(+β2(- and α4(+α4(-. Mutation to alanine (W82A on the β2 subunit or W88A on the α4 subunit significantly altered the response to acetylcholine measured by oocyte voltage-clamp electrophysiology in both interfaces. This shows that the conserved tryptophan residue is important for the effects of ACh at α4β2 nAChRs, as also indicated by the crystal structure. The results add important details to the understanding of how this neurotransmitter exerts its action and improves the foundation for rational drug design targeting these receptors.

  15. Regulation of Structural Dynamics within a Signal Recognition Particle Promotes Binding of Protein Targeting Substrates*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kight, Alicia D.; Henderson, Rory; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Patel, Parth; Murchison, Marissa; Sharma, Priyanka; Goforth, Robyn L.; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Henry, Ralph L.; Heyes, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein targeting is critical in all living organisms and involves a signal recognition particle (SRP), an SRP receptor, and a translocase. In co-translational targeting, interactions among these proteins are mediated by the ribosome. In chloroplasts, the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP) in the thylakoid membrane is targeted post-translationally without a ribosome. A multidomain chloroplast-specific subunit of the SRP, cpSRP43, is proposed to take on the role of coordinating the sequence of targeting events. Here, we demonstrate that cpSRP43 exhibits significant interdomain dynamics that are reduced upon binding its SRP binding partner, cpSRP54. We showed that the affinity of cpSRP43 for the binding motif of LHCP (L18) increases when cpSRP43 is complexed to the binding motif of cpSRP54 (cpSRP54pep). These results support the conclusion that substrate binding to the chloroplast SRP is modulated by protein structural dynamics in which a major role of cpSRP54 is to improve substrate binding efficiency to the cpSRP. PMID:25918165

  16. The pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein, GP2, binds Escherichia coli type 1 Fimbriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe Anson W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GP2 is the major membrane protein present in the pancreatic zymogen granule, and is cleaved and released into the pancreatic duct along with exocrine secretions. The function of GP2 is unknown. GP2's amino acid sequence is most similar to that of uromodulin, which is secreted by the kidney. Recent studies have demonstrated uromodulin binding to bacterial Type 1 fimbria. The fimbriae serve as adhesins to host receptors. The present study examines whether GP2 also shares similar binding properties to bacteria with Type 1 fimbria. Commensal and pathogenic bacteria, including E. coli and Salmonella, express type 1 fimbria. Methods An in vitro binding assay was used to assay the binding of recombinant GP2 to defined strains of E. coli that differ in their expression of Type 1 fimbria or its subunit protein, FimH. Studies were also performed to determine whether GP2 binding is dependent on the presence of mannose residues, which is a known determinant for FimH binding. Results GP2 binds E. coli that express Type 1 fimbria. Binding is dependent on GP2 glycosylation, and specifically the presence of mannose residues. Conclusion GP2 binds to Type 1 fimbria, a bacterial adhesin that is commonly expressed by members of the Enterobacteriacae family.

  17. Down-regulation of MicroRNAs 222/221 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Deranged Core-Binding Factor Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brioschi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-binding factor leukemia (CBFL is a subgroup of acutemyeloid leukemia (AML characterized by genetic mutations involving the subunits of the core-binding factor (CBF. The leukemogenesis model for CBFL posits that one, or more, gene mutations inducing increased cell proliferation and/or inhibition of apoptosis cooperate with CBF mutations for leukemia development. One of the most commonmutations associated with CBF mutations involves the KIT receptor. A high expression of KIT is a hallmark of a high proportion of CBFL. Previous studies indicate that microRNA (MIR 222/221 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the KIT messenger RNA and our observation that AML1 can bind the MIR-222/221 promoter, we hypothesized that MIR-222/221 represents the link between CBF and KIT. Here, we show that MIR-222/221 expression is upregulated after myeloid differentiation of normal bone marrow AC133+ stem progenitor cells. CBFL blasts with either t(8;21 or inv(16 CBF rearrangements with high expression levels of KIT (CD117 display a significantly lower level of MIR-222/221 expression than non-CBFL blasts. Consistently, we found that the t(8;21 AML1-MTG8 fusion protein binds the MIR-222/221 promoter and induces transcriptional repression of a MIR-222/221-LUC reporter. Because of the highly conserved sequence homology, we demonstrated concomitant MIR-222/221 down-regulation and KIT up-regulation in the 32D/WT1 mouse cell model carrying the AML1-MTG16 fusion protein. This study provides the first hint that CBFL-associated fusion proteins may lead to up-regulation of the KIT receptor by down-regulating MIR-222/221, thus explaining the concomitant occurrence of CBF genetic rearrangements and overexpression of wild type or mutant KIT in AML.

  18. Structural dynamics of the yeast Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein (Sdo1) on the ribosome and its implication in the 60S subunit maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengying; Yan, Kaige; Tan, Dan; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2016-03-01

    The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in a highly conserved ribosome assembly factor SBDS. The functional role of SBDS is to cooperate with another assembly factor, elongation factor 1-like (Efl1), to promote the release of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) from the late-stage cytoplasmic 60S precursors. In the present work, we characterized, both biochemically and structurally, the interaction between the 60S subunit and SBDS protein (Sdo1p) from yeast. Our data show that Sdo1p interacts tightly with the mature 60S subunit in vitro through its domain I and II, and is capable of bridging two 60S subunits to form a stable 2:2 dimer. Structural analysis indicates that Sdo1p bind to the ribosomal P-site, in the proximity of uL16 and uL5, and with direct contact to H69 and H38. The dynamic nature of Sdo1p on the 60S subunit, together with its strategic binding position, suggests a surveillance role of Sdo1p in monitoring the conformational maturation of the ribosomal P-site. Altogether, our data support a conformational signal-relay cascade during late-stage 60S maturation, involving uL16, Sdo1p, and Efl1p, which interrogates the functional P-site to control the departure of the anti-association factor eIF6.

  19. Structural dynamics of the yeast Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein (Sdo1 on the ribosome and its implication in the 60S subunit maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengying Ma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in a highly conserved ribosome assembly factor SBDS. The functional role of SBDS is to cooperate with another assembly factor, elongation factor 1-like (Efl1, to promote the release of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6 from the late-stage cytoplasmic 60S precursors. In the present work, we characterized, both biochemically and structurally, the interaction between the 60S subunit and SBDS protein (Sdo1p from yeast. Our data show that Sdo1p interacts tightly with the mature 60S subunit in vitro through its domain I and II, and is capable of bridging two 60S subunits to form a stable 2:2 dimer. Structural analysis indicates that Sdo1p bind to the ribosomal P-site, in the proximity of uL16 and uL5, and with direct contact to H69 and H38. The dynamic nature of Sdo1p on the 60S subunit, together with its strategic binding position, suggests a surveillance role of Sdo1p in monitoring the conformational maturation of the ribosomal P-site. Altogether, our data support a conformational signal-relay cascade during late-stage 60S maturation, involving uL16, Sdo1p, and Efl1p, which interrogates the functional P-site to control the departure of the anti-association factor eIF6.

  20. Dopamine D1 receptors of the calf parathyroid gland: Identification of a ligand binding subunit with lower apparent molecular weight but similar primary structure to neuronal D1 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niznik, H.B.; Jarvie, K.R.; Brown, E.M. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-22

    The ligand binding subunit of the calf parathyroid D1 dopamine receptor was visualized by autoradiography following photoaffinity labeling with ({plus minus})-7-({sup 125}I)iodo-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-(4{prime}-azidophenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzazepine (({sup 125}I)IMAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein comprising the D1 binding subunit migrated with an apparent M{sub r} {congruent} 62,000. Photoincorporation of ({sup 125}I)IMAB into the M{sub r} {congruent} 62,000 polypeptide required the presence of protease inhibitors and was stereoselectively antagonized by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with an appropriate pharmacological specificity for D1 receptors. The electrophoretic mobility of the ({sup 125}I)IMAB-labeled receptor was not altered by the absence or presence of urea or thiol-reducing/oxidizing reagents. These data suggest that, despite tissue-specific differences in overall molecular weight, both parathyroid and neuronal D1 dopamine binding subunits appear to be pharmacologically and structurally homologous and that the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for the apparent lack of a one to one correspondence in the subunit composition of the D1 receptor in these tissues probably reflect(s) tissue-specific posttranslational modifications.

  1. Dual interaction of scaffold protein Tim44 of mitochondrial import motor with channel-forming translocase subunit Tim23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, See-Yeun; Yan, Nicholas L; Schilke, Brenda A; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-25

    Proteins destined for the mitochondrial matrix are targeted to the inner membrane Tim17/23 translocon by their presequences. Inward movement is driven by the matrix-localized, Hsp70-based motor. The scaffold Tim44, interacting with the matrix face of the translocon, recruits other motor subunits and binds incoming presequence. The basis of these interactions and their functional relationships remains unclear. Using site-specific in vivo crosslinking and genetic approaches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that both domains of Tim44 interact with the major matrix-exposed loop of Tim23, with the C-terminal domain (CTD) binding Tim17 as well. Results of in vitro experiments showed that the N-terminal domain (NTD) is intrinsically disordered and binds presequence near a region important for interaction with Hsp70 and Tim23. Our data suggest a model in which the CTD serves primarily to anchor Tim44 to the translocon, whereas the NTD is a dynamic arm, interacting with multiple components to drive efficient translocation.

  2. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  3. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  4. Inhibition of dopamine transporter activity by G protein βγ subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Garcia-Olivares

    Full Text Available Uptake through the Dopamine Transporter (DAT is the primary mechanism of terminating dopamine signaling within the brain, thus playing an essential role in neuronal homeostasis. Deregulation of DAT function has been linked to several neurological and psychiatric disorders including ADHD, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and drug addiction. Over the last 15 years, several studies have revealed a plethora of mechanisms influencing the activity and cellular distribution of DAT; suggesting that fine-tuning of dopamine homeostasis occurs via an elaborate interplay of multiple pathways. Here, we show for the first time that the βγ subunits of G proteins regulate DAT activity. In heterologous cells and brain tissue, a physical association between Gβγ subunits and DAT was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, in vitro pull-down assays using purified proteins established that this association occurs via a direct interaction between the intracellular carboxy-terminus of DAT and Gβγ. Functional assays performed in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog GTP-γ-S, Gβγ subunit overexpression, or the Gβγ activator mSIRK all resulted in rapid inhibition of DAT activity in heterologous systems. Gβγ activation by mSIRK also inhibited dopamine uptake in brain synaptosomes and dopamine clearance from mouse striatum as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry in vivo. Gβγ subunits are intracellular signaling molecules that regulate a multitude of physiological processes through interactions with enzymes and ion channels. Our findings add neurotransmitter transporters to the growing list of molecules regulated by G-proteins and suggest a novel role for Gβγ signaling in the control of dopamine homeostasis.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2–4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD–exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27935997

  6. Proteins containing the UBA domain are able to bind to multi-ubiquitin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkinson, C R; Seeger, M; Hartmann-Petersen, R

    2001-01-01

    The UBA domain is a motif found in a variety of proteins, some of which are associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We describe the isolation of a fission-yeast gene, mud1+, which encodes a UBA domain containing protein that is able to bind multi-ubiquitin chains. We show that the UBA...... domain is responsible for this activity. Two other proteins containing this motif, the fission-yeast homologues of Rad23 and Dsk2, are also shown to bind multi-ubiquitin chains via their UBA domains. These two proteins are implicated, along with the fission-yeast Pus1(S5a/Rpn10) subunit of the 26 S...

  7. [Nonstructural protein 1 of tick-borne encephalitis virus activates the expression of immunoproteasome subunits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Y V; Starodubova, E S; Karganova, G G; Timofeev, A V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of viral proteins with host cell components plays an important role in antiviral immune response. One of the key steps of antiviral defense is the formation of immunoproteasomes. The effect of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of tick-borne encephalitis virus on the immunoproteasome formation was studied. It was shown that cell expression of NS1 does not reduce the efficacy of the immunoproteasome generation in response to interferon-γ stimulation and even increases the content of the immunoproteasome subunits without the interferon-γ treatment. Thus, NS1 of tick-borne encephalitis virus activates, rather than blocks the mechanisms of immune defense in the cell.

  8. Vitamin D Binding Protein and Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishir Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D binding protein (DBP is the major carrier protein of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH D in the circulation, where it may serve roles in maintaining stable levels during times of decreased 25(OH availability and in regulating delivery of 25(OH D to target tissues. Several genetic polymorphisms of DBP have been described that lead to phenotypic changes in the protein that may affect affinity, activity, and concentration. These polymorphisms have been linked with alterations in bone density in several populations. One of the mechanisms by which DBP may alter bone health involves regulating vitamin D bioavailability. DBP-bound vitamin is thought to be relatively unavailable to target tissues, and thus alterations in DBP levels or affinity could lead to changes in vitamin D bioactivity. As a result, functional vitamin D status may differ greatly between individuals with similar total 25(OH D levels. Additionally, DBP may have independent roles on macrophage and osteoclast activation. This review will summarize recent findings about DBP with respect to measures of bone density and health.

  9. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, D W; McGrath, J J; Reynolds, G P

    2002-09-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) such as calbindin, parvalbumin and calretinin are used as immunohistochemical markers for discrete neuronal subpopulations. They are particularly useful in identifying the various subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons that control output from prefrontal and cingulate cortices as well as from the hippocampus. The strategic role these interneurons play in regulating output from these three crucial brain regions has made them a focus for neuropathological investigation in schizophrenia. The number of pathological reports detailing subtle changes in these CBP-containing interneurons in patients with schizophrenia is rapidly growing. These proteins however are more than convenient neuronal markers. They confer survival advantages to neurons and can increase the neuron's ability to sustain firing. These properties may be important in the subtle pathophysiology of nondegenerative phenomena such as schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to introduce the reader to the functional properties of CBPs and to examine the emerging literature reporting alterations in these proteins in schizophrenia as well as draw some conclusions about the significance of these findings.

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  11. Oral administration of a cholera toxin B subunit-insulin fusion protein produced in silkworm protects against autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhaohui; Jin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2005-09-22

    The oral administration of disease-specific autoantigens can induce oral immune tolerance and prevent or delay the onset of autoimmune disease symptoms. Here, we describe the construction of an edible vaccine consisting of a fusion protein composed of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and insulin that is produced in silkworm larvae at levels of up to 0.3 mg/ml of hemolymph. The silkworm bioreactor produced this fusion protein vaccine as the pentameric CTB-insulin form, which retained the GM1-ganglioside binding affinity and the native antigenicity of CTB and insulin. Non-obese diabetic mice fed hemolymph containing microgram quantities of the CTB-insulin fusion protein showed a prominent reduction in pancreatic islet inflammation and a delay in the development of symptoms of clinical diabetes. These results demonstrate that the silkworm bioreactor is a feasible production and delivery system for an oral protein vaccine designed to develop immunological tolerance against T-cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by regulatory T-cell induction.

  12. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Marie E., E-mail: frasm@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Cherney, Maia M. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Marcato, Paola [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D. [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 4N1 (Canada); James, Michael N. G. [Group in Protein Structure and Function, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 (Canada); Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  13. The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 gamma regulates thrombin-induced murine platelet alpha(IIbbeta(3 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C Gushiken

    Full Text Available Hemostasis and thrombosis are regulated by agonist-induced activation of platelet integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3. Integrin activation, in turn is mediated by cellular signaling via protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Although the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c interacts with alpha(IIbbeta(3, the role of PP1c in platelet reactivity is unclear.Using gamma isoform of PP1c deficient mice (PP1cgamma(-/-, we show that the platelets have moderately decreased soluble fibrinogen binding and aggregation to low concentrations of thrombin or protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4-activating peptide but not to adenosine diphosphate (ADP, collagen or collagen-related peptide (CRP. Thrombin-stimulated PP1cgamma(-/- platelets showed decreased alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation despite comparable levels of alpha(IIbbeta(3, PAR3, PAR4 expression and normal granule secretion. Functions regulated by outside-in integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 signaling like adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and clot retraction were not altered in PP1cgamma(-/- platelets. Thrombus formation induced by a light/dye injury in the cremaster muscle venules was significantly delayed in PP1cgamma(-/- mice. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta-serine 9 that promotes platelet function, was reduced in thrombin-stimulated PP1cgamma(-/- platelets by an AKT independent mechanism. Inhibition of GSK3beta partially abolished the difference in fibrinogen binding between thrombin-stimulated wild type and PP1cgamma(-/- platelets.These studies illustrate a role for PP1cgamma in maintaining GSK3beta-serine9 phosphorylation downstream of thrombin signaling and promoting thrombus formation via fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation.

  14. Characterization of Sac10a, a hyperthermophile DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Stephen P; Kahsai, Mebrahtu A; Gupta, Ramesh; Shriver, John W

    2004-10-19

    Sac10a is a member of a group of basic DNA-binding proteins thought to be important in chromatin structure and regulation in the archaeon Sulfolobus. We describe here the isolation, gene identification, and biophysical characterization of native Sac10a. The protein exists as a 23.8 kDa homodimer at pH 7 and unfolds with a T degrees of 122 degrees C. Dissociation of the dimer into folded globular subunits is promoted by decreased pH and salt concentration. Thermal unfolding of the monomeric subunits occurred with two transitions, indicating two independent domains. The dimer demonstrated a high affinity for duplex poly(dAdT) with a K(D) of 5 x 10(-)(10) M and a site size of 17 bp (in 0.15 M KCl, pH 7), with only weak binding (K(D) > 5 x 10(-)(6) M) to poly(dA)-poly(dT), poly(dGdC), poly(dG)-poly(dC), and Escherichia coli DNA under similar conditions. Binding to poly(dAdT) resulted in distortions in the DNA duplex that were consistent with overwinding as indicated by inversion of the CD spectrum of the DNA. The monomeric subunits are predicted to adopt a winged helix DNA-binding motif which dimerizes through formation of a two-stranded coiled coil involving an extended C-terminal helix with more than four heptad repeats (about 45 A in length). This is the first example of the conserved archaeal transcription regulator domain COG3432 to be characterized. Sequences for homologous proteins containing both COG3432 and predicted coiled coil domains occur in the genomes of both crenarchaeota (Sulfolobus, Pyrobaculum, Aeropyrum) and euryarchaeota (Methanosarcina, Methanococcus, Archaeoglobus, Thermoplasma), with multiple genes in some species. Sac10a shows no sequence similarity to the other Sulfolobus chromatin proteins Sac7d, Sac8, Sso10b2, and Alba.

  15. Elg1, the major subunit of an alternative RFC complex, interacts with SUMO-processing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Oren; Amishay, Rona; Liefshitz, Batia; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-09-01

    PCNA is a homotrimeric ring with important roles in DNA replication and repair. PCNA is loaded and unloaded by the RFC complex, which is composed of five subunits (Rfc1-5). Three additional complexes that share with RFC the small subunits (Rfc2-5) and contain alternative large subunits were found in yeast and other eukaryotes. We have recently reported that one of these, the Elg1-RFC complex, interacts with SUMOylated PCNA and may play a role in its unloading during DNA repair. Here we report that a yeast-two-hybrid screen with the N terminus of Elg1(which interacts with SUMOylated PCNA) uncovered interactions with proteins that belong to the SUMO pathway, including Slx5 and Slx8, which form an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates SUMOylated proteins. Mutations in SLX5 result in a genomic instability phenotype similar to that of elg1 mutants. The physical interaction between the N terminus of Elg1 and Slx5 is mediated by poly-SUMO chains but not by PCNA modifications, and requires Siz2, but not Siz1, activity. Thus our results highlight the many important roles played by Elg1, some of which are PCNA-dependent and some PCNA-independent.

  16. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  17. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  18. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  19. The Plasminogen-Binding Group A Streptococcal M Protein-Related Protein Prp Binds Plasminogen via Arginine and Histidine Residues▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martina L. Sanderson-Smith; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The migration of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) from localized to deep tissue sites may result in severe invasive disease, and sequestration of the host zymogen plasminogen appears crucial for virulence. Here, we describe a novel plasminogen-binding M protein, the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM)-related protein (Prp). Prp is phylogenetically distinct from previously described plasminogen-binding M proteins of group A, C, and G strep...

  20. Methyl-CpG binding proteins in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping FAN; Leah HUTNICK

    2005-01-01

    Classical methyl-CpG binding proteins contain the conserved DNA binding motif methyl-cytosine binding domain (MBD), which preferentially binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides. These proteins serve as transcriptional repressors,mediating gene silencing via DNA cytosine methylation. Mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) have been linked to the human mental retardation disorder Rett syndrome, suggesting an important role for methyl-CpG binding proteins in brain development and function. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in studying the diverse functions of MeCP2 as a prototype for other methyl-CpG binding proteins in the development and function of the vertebrate nervous system.

  1. A Protein-Based Pentavalent Inhibitor of the Cholera Toxin B-Subunit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branson, T.R.; McAllister, T.E.; Garcia Hartjes, J.; Fascione, M.A.; Ross, J.F.; Warriner, S.L.; Wennekes, T.; Zuilhof, H.; Turnbull, W.B.

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins produced by bacteria are the cause of many life-threatening diarrheal diseases. Many of these toxins, including cholera toxin (CT), enter the cell by first binding to glycolipids in the cell membrane. Inhibiting these multivalent protein/carbohydrate interactions would prevent the

  2. ANDROGEN REGULATION OF PROSTATIC STEROID BINDING PROTEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYong-Lian; ZHOUZong-Xun; ZHANGYou-Duan; PARKERMalcolmG

    1989-01-01

    Prostatic steroid binding protein (PSBP) is a major protein secreted in the rat ventral prostate (V.P.) and also one of the components in seminal fluid, The potential importance of this protein in male fertility emerged from its ability of binding cholesterol which might modulate the proportion of phospholipids and cholesterol in sperm making it suitable

  3. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  4. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  5. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes c...

  6. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2A(Cdc55) We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2A(Cdc55) plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2A(Cdc55) complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2A(Cdc55) is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2A(Cdc55) by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  8. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Nanoparticle self-assembly by a highly stable recombinant spider wrapping silk protein subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Orrell, Kathleen E; Leclerc, Jérémie; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2013-10-01

    Artificial spider silk proteins may form fibers with exceptional strength and elasticity. Wrapping silk, or aciniform silk, is the toughest of the spider silks, and has a very different protein composition than other spider silks. Here, we present the characterization of an aciniform protein (AcSp1) subunit named W1, consisting of one AcSp1 199 residue repeat unit from Argiope trifasciata. The structural integrity of recombinant W1 is demonstrated in a variety of buffer conditions and time points. Furthermore, we show that W1 has a high thermal stability with reversible denaturation at ∼71°C and forms self-assembled nanoparticle in near-physiological conditions. W1 therefore represents a highly stable and structurally robust module for protein-based nanoparticle formation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  11. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  12. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  13. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...... was validated by the identification of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins, and its use provided evidence that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase exhibits DNA sequence-specific binding to DNA....

  14. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  15. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  16. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  17. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  18. Definition of the nuclear encoded protein composition of bovine heart mitochondrial complex I. Identification of two new subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joe; Shannon, Richard J; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E; Hirst, Judy

    2002-12-27

    Mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from bovine heart is a complicated multisubunit, membrane-bound assembly. Seven subunits are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, and the sequences of 36 nuclear encoded subunits have been described. The subunits of complex I and two subcomplexes (Ialpha and Ibeta) were resolved on one- and two-dimensional gels and by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed two previously unknown subunits in complex I, named B14.7 and ESSS, one in each subcomplex. Coding sequences for each protein were identified in data bases and were confirmed by cDNA cloning and sequencing. Subunit B14.7 has an acetylated N terminus, no presequence, and contains four potential transmembrane helices. It is homologous to subunit 21.3b from complex I in Neurospora crassa and is related to Tim17, Tim22, and Tim23, which are involved in protein translocation across the inner membrane. Subunit ESSS has a cleaved mitochondrial import sequence and one potential transmembrane helix. A total of 45 different subunits of bovine complex I have now been characterized.

  19. Modulation of cell adhesion and migration by the histone methyltransferase subunit mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xia

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that a subset of mDpy-30, an accessory subunit of the nuclear histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase (H3K4MT complex, also localizes at the trans-Golgi network (TGN, where its recruitment is mediated by the TGN-localized ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ArfGEF BIG1. Depletion of mDpy-30 inhibits the endosome-to-TGN transport of internalized CIMPR receptors and concurrently promotes their accumulation at the cell protrusion. These observations suggest mDpy-30 may play a novel role at the crossroads of endosomal trafficking, nuclear transcription and adhesion/migration. Here we provide novel mechanistic and functional insight into this association. First, we demonstrate a direct interaction between mDpy-30 and BIG1 and locate the binding region in the N-terminus of BIG1. Second, we provide evidence that the depletion or overexpression of mDpy-30 enhances or inhibits cellular adhesion/migration of glioma cells in vitro, respectively. A similar increase in cell adhesion/migration is observed in cells with reduced levels of BIG1 or other H3K4MT subunits. Third, knockdown of mDpy-30, BIG1, or the RbBP5 H3K4MT subunit increases the targeting of beta1 integrin to cell protrusions, and suppression of H3K4MT activity by depleting mDpy-30 or RbBP5 leads to increased protein and mRNA levels of beta1 integrin. Moreover, stimulation of cell adhesion/migration via mDpy-30 knockdown is abolished after treating cells with a function-blocking antibody to beta1 integrin. Taken together, these data indicate that mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins function as a novel class of cellular adhesion/migration modulators partially by affecting the subcellular distribution of endosomal compartments as well as the expression of key adhesion/migration proteins such as beta1 integrin.

  20. Protein binding prodrugs : Synthesis and protein binding studies of didanonsine derivates

    OpenAIRE

    Olberg, Dag Erlend

    2004-01-01

    A novel series of 5 -O-ester prodrugs of the anti-HIV drug 2 ,3 -dideoxyinosine (ddI,didanosine) were synthesized for the purpose of increasing protein binding. Hope was that these derivates would exhibit superior pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties against HIV-infection than the parent drug, didanosine. Ten compounds were synthesized, five fatty acid derivates and five dicarboxylic acid monoester derivates. The fatty acid- and dicarboxylic acid derivates had the sam...

  1. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80, is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM, high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM. The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  2. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  3. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Sophie Berthon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic-AMP (cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD. PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH. More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα, were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA’s role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway.

  4. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  5. Multiple growth hormone-binding proteins are expressed on insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, A; Billestrup, N; Thorn, N A

    1989-01-01

    as disulfide-linked multimers of Mr 270-350K (300K). In addition, a minor Mr 180K GH-binding protein is identified which does not appear to be associated with other proteins by disulfide bridges. A plasma membrane-enriched fraction accounts for 86% of the RIN-cell GH-binding activity while cytosol......-solubilized membranes as well as hGH-affinity purified protein reveals labeled proteins of Mr 180K and Mr 285-350K. In contrast to the cross-linked Mr 300K complexes of intact cells those of disintegrated cellular material are resistant to reduction with dithiothreitol, and it is speculated that this is due...... to intersubunit cross-linking of the disulfide-linked Mr 110K GH-binding subunits. The GH-binding proteins are purified approximately 100-fold by one cycle of hGH-affinity chromatography and five major proteins of Mr 180K, 94K, 86K, 64K, and 54K are identified by silver staining in the purified fraction...

  6. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  7. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  8. Influence of magnesium and polyamines on the reactivity of individual ribosomal subunit proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, C J; Boyle, S M; Sells, B H

    1979-03-01

    30S and 50S subunits, in the presence of either 20 mM Mg2+ or 6 mM Mg2+ and 5mM spermidine plus 25 mM putrescine, were observed to completely associate to form 70S monosomes as monitored by sucrose gradient sedimentation. Subunits maintained under the above ionic conditions were compared with 30S and 50S particles at low (6 mM) magnesium concentration with respect to the reactivity of individual ribosomal proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Altered reactivity to enzymatic iodination of ribosomal proteins S4, S9, S10, S14, S17, S19, and S20 in the small subunit of ribosomal proteins, L2, L9, L11, L27, and L30 in the large subunit following incubation with high magnesium or magnesium and polyamines suggests that a conformation change in both subunits accompanies the formation of 70S monosomes. The results further demonstrate that the effect of Mg2+ on subunit conformation is mimicked when polyamines are substituted for magnesium necessary for subunit association.

  9. An SMC-like protein binds and regulates Caenorhabditis elegans condensins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lucy Fang-I; Singh, Meha; Thompson, James

    2017-01-01

    Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) family proteins participate in multisubunit complexes that govern chromosome structure and dynamics. SMC-containing condensin complexes create chromosome topologies essential for mitosis/meiosis, gene expression, recombination, and repair. Many eukaryotes have two condensin complexes (I and II); C. elegans has three (I, II, and the X-chromosome specialized condensin IDC) and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we identify a novel SMC-like protein, SMCL-1, that binds to C. elegans condensin SMC subunits, and modulates condensin functions. Consistent with a possible role as a negative regulator, loss of SMCL-1 partially rescued the lethal and sterile phenotypes of a hypomorphic condensin mutant, while over-expression of SMCL-1 caused lethality, chromosome mis-segregation, and disruption of condensin IDC localization on X chromosomes. Unlike canonical SMC proteins, SMCL-1 lacks hinge and coil domains, and its ATPase domain lacks conserved amino acids required for ATP hydrolysis, leading to the speculation that it may inhibit condensin ATPase activity. SMCL-1 homologs are apparent only in the subset of Caenorhabditis species in which the condensin I and II subunit SMC-4 duplicated to create the condensin IDC- specific subunit DPY-27, suggesting that SMCL-1 helps this lineage cope with the regulatory challenges imposed by evolution of a third condensin complex. Our findings uncover a new regulator of condensins and highlight how the duplication and divergence of SMC complex components in various lineages has created new proteins with diverse functions in chromosome dynamics. PMID:28301465

  10. An SMC-like protein binds and regulates Caenorhabditis elegans condensins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Fang-I Chao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC family proteins participate in multisubunit complexes that govern chromosome structure and dynamics. SMC-containing condensin complexes create chromosome topologies essential for mitosis/meiosis, gene expression, recombination, and repair. Many eukaryotes have two condensin complexes (I and II; C. elegans has three (I, II, and the X-chromosome specialized condensin IDC and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we identify a novel SMC-like protein, SMCL-1, that binds to C. elegans condensin SMC subunits, and modulates condensin functions. Consistent with a possible role as a negative regulator, loss of SMCL-1 partially rescued the lethal and sterile phenotypes of a hypomorphic condensin mutant, while over-expression of SMCL-1 caused lethality, chromosome mis-segregation, and disruption of condensin IDC localization on X chromosomes. Unlike canonical SMC proteins, SMCL-1 lacks hinge and coil domains, and its ATPase domain lacks conserved amino acids required for ATP hydrolysis, leading to the speculation that it may inhibit condensin ATPase activity. SMCL-1 homologs are apparent only in the subset of Caenorhabditis species in which the condensin I and II subunit SMC-4 duplicated to create the condensin IDC- specific subunit DPY-27, suggesting that SMCL-1 helps this lineage cope with the regulatory challenges imposed by evolution of a third condensin complex. Our findings uncover a new regulator of condensins and highlight how the duplication and divergence of SMC complex components in various lineages has created new proteins with diverse functions in chromosome dynamics.

  11. Ferritin acts as the most abundant binding protein for snowdrop lectin in the midgut of rice brown planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Foissac, X; Carss, A; Gatehouse, A M; Gatehouse, J A

    2000-04-01

    The mannose-specific snowdrop lectin [Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)] displays toxicity to the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. A 26kDa GNA-binding polypeptide from N. lugens midgut was identified by lectin blotting and affinity chromatography, and characterized by N-terminal sequencing. This polypeptide is the most abundant binding protein for GNA in the N. lugens midgut. A cDNA (fersub2) encoding this protein was isolated from an N. lugens cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to ferritin subunits from Manduca sexta and other arthropods, plants and vertebrates, and contains a putative N-glycosylation site. Native ferritin was purified from whole insects as a protein of more than 400kDa in size and characterized biochemically. Three subunits of 20, 26 and 27kDa were released from the native complex. The 26kDa subunit binds GNA, and its N-terminal sequence was identical to that of fersub2. A second cDNA (fersub1), exhibiting strong homology with dipteran ferritin, was identified as an abundant cDNA in an N. lugens midgut-specific cDNA library, and could encode the larger ferritin subunit. The fersub1 cDNA carries a stem-loop structure (iron-responsive element) upstream from the start codon, similar to structures that have been shown to play a role in the control of ferritin synthesis in other insects.

  12. Nitrate binding to Limulus polyphemus subunit type II hemocyanin and its functional implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazes, B; Magnus, KA; Kalk, KH; Bonaventura, C; Hol, WGJ

    1996-01-01

    The horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, employs hemocyanin as an oxygen carrier in its hemolymph. This hemocyanin displays cooperative oxygen binding and heterotropic allosteric regulation by protons, chloride ions and divalent cations. Here, we report the crystal structure of Limulus polyphemus sub

  13. Crystal structure of truncated human coatomer protein complex subunit ζ1 (Copζ1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunev, Sergey; Semmelink, Marije F W; Xian, Jia Ling; Ma, Kai Yu; Leenders, Anna J A; Dömling, Alexander S S; Shtutman, Michael; Groves, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    The majority of modern anticancer approaches target DNA/protein targets involved in tumour-cell proliferation. Such approaches have a major drawback, as nonproliferating cancer cells remain unaffected and may cause relapse or remission. Human coatomer protein complex I (COPI) subunit ζ (Copζ), a component of the coat protein involved in cell apoptosis and intracellular trafficking, has recently been proposed as a potential anticancer drug target. Previous studies have shown that two different isoforms of the Copζ subunit exist in mammalian cells. While normal cells express both Copζ1 and Copζ2 isoforms, various types of tumour cells display a loss of Copζ2 expression and rely solely on Copζ1 for growth and survival. Subsequent knockdown of Copζ1 results in specific inhibition of both proliferating and dormant tumour-cell populations, with no adverse growth effects on normal cells. Therefore, a Copζ1-targeting therapy was proposed to bypass the problem of dormant cancer cells that are resistant to conventional antiproliferative drugs, which is the major cause of tumour relapse. In order to aid in structure-based inhibitor design, a crystal structure is required. In this article, the recombinant expression, purification, crystallization and crystal structure of Copζ1, as well as the expression and purification of Copζ2, are reported.

  14. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion.

  15. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  16. Interaction between CK2α and CK2β, the Subunits of Protein Kinase CK2: Thermodynamic Contributions of Key Residues on the CK2α Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, J; Bischoff, N; Kloppfleisch, K

    2011-01-01

    The protein Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase II) exists predominantly as a heterotetrameric holoenzyme composed of two catalytic subunits (CK2α) bound to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits (CK2β). We undertook a study to further understand how these subunits interact to form the tetra......The protein Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase II) exists predominantly as a heterotetrameric holoenzyme composed of two catalytic subunits (CK2α) bound to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits (CK2β). We undertook a study to further understand how these subunits interact to form...

  17. Inhibition of CK2 Activity by TCDD via Binding to ATP-competitive Binding Site of Catalytic Subunit:Insight from Computational Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xian-jin; CANNISTRARO Salvatore; BIZZARRI Anna-rita; ZENG Yi; CHEN Wei-zu; WANG Cun-xin

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mechanisms of toxic effects induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin(TCDD),instead of the binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor(AhR),have been taken into consideration.It has been recently shown that TCDD reduces rapidly the activity of CK2(casein kinase Ⅱ) both in vivo and in vitro.It is found that TCDD has high molecular similarities to the known inhibitors of CK2 catalytic subunit(CK2α).This suggests that TCDD could also be an ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2α.In this work,docking TCDD to CK2 was carried out based on the two structures of CK2α from maize and human,respectively.The binding free energies of the predicted CK2α-TCDD complexes estimated by the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area(MM/PBSA) method are from -85.1 kJ/mol to-114.3 kJ/mol for maize and are from-96.1 kJ/mol to-118.2 kJ/mol for human,which are comparable to those estimated for the known inhibitor and also ATP with CK2α.The energetic analysis also reveals that the van der Waals interaction is the dominant contribution to the binding free energy.These results are also useful for designing new drugs for a target of overexpressing CK2 in cancers.

  18. What is the functional role of the thalidomide binding protein cereblon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiu-Bao; Stewart, A Keith

    2011-01-01

    It has been found that nonsense mutation R419X of cereblon (CRBN) is associated with autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation. Further experiments showed that CRBN binds to the cytosolic C-terminus of large-conductance Ca(++) activated potassium channel (BK(Ca)) α-subunit and the cytosolic C-terminus of a voltage-gated chloride channel-2 (ClC-2), suggesting that CRBN may play a role in memory and learning via regulating the assembly and surface expression of BK(Ca) and ClC-2 channels. In addition, it has also been found that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and prevents formation of a functional holoenzyme with regulatory subunits β and γ. Since AMPK is a master sensor of energy balance that inhibits ATP-consuming anabolic pathways and increases ATP-producing catabolic pathways, binding of CRBN with α1 subunit of AMPK may play a role in these pathways by regulating the function of AMPK. Furthermore, CRBN interacts with damaged DNA binding protein 1 and forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with Cullin 4 where it functions as a substrate receptor in which the proteins recognized by CRBN might be ubiquitinated and degraded by proteasomes. Proteasome-mediated degradation of unneeded or damaged proteins plays a very important role in maintaining regular function of a cell, such as cell survival, dividing, proliferation and growth. Intriguingly, a new role for CRBN has been identified, i.e, the binding of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), e.g. thalidomide, to CRBN has now been associated with teratogenicity and also the cytotoxicity of IMiDs, including lenalidomide, which are widely used to treat multiple myeloma patients. CRBN likely plays an important role in binding, ubiquitination and degradation of factors involved in maintaining function of myeloma cells. These new findings regarding the role of CRBN in IMiD action will stimulate intense investigation of CRBN's downstream factors involved in

  19. Biotin-binding proteins and biotin transport to oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, H B

    1985-01-01

    The eggs of chickens and other birds contain two proteins that bind biotin. Both are homotetrameric proteins of similar size. In contrast to the well-characterized egg white avidin, egg yolk biotin-binding protein has a very acidic isoelectric point, binds biotin with lower affinity, and is usually saturated with biotin. Like other egg yolk proteins, biotin-binding protein appears to be synthesized in the liver, transported by the blood stream to the ovary and deposited in the developing oocyte. Since the yolk of a chicken egg contains over 90% of the biotin in an egg and all of the biotin is bound to biotin-binding protein, the function of biotin-binding protein is undoubtedly to transport biotin to the egg for future use by the developing embryo. Avidin is produced by the oviduct and in the egg it is presumed to deter microbial growth around the oocyte by sequestering biotin. Among the eggs examined, those from turkeys have the lowest amount of biotin-binding protein and the highest amount of avidin. Furthermore, the majority of the biotin in turkey eggs can be bound to avidin in the egg white, suggesting a nutritional role for avidin in turkeys. An assay has been developed to conveniently measure apo- and holobiotin-binding proteins.

  20. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  1. The Plasminogen-Binding Group A Streptococcal M Protein-Related Protein Prp Binds Plasminogen via Arginine and Histidine Residues▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The migration of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) from localized to deep tissue sites may result in severe invasive disease, and sequestration of the host zymogen plasminogen appears crucial for virulence. Here, we describe a novel plasminogen-binding M protein, the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM)-related protein (Prp). Prp is phylogenetically distinct from previously described plasminogen-binding M proteins of group A, C, and G streptococci. While competition experiments indicate that Prp binds plasminogen with a lower affinity than PAM (50% effective concentration = 0.34 μM), Prp nonetheless binds plasminogen with high affinity and at physiologically relevant concentrations of plasminogen (Kd = 7.8 nM). Site-directed mutagenesis of the putative plasminogen binding site indicates that unlike the majority of plasminogen receptors, Prp does not interact with plasminogen exclusively via lysine residues. Mutagenesis to alanine of lysine residues Lys96 and Lys101 reduced but did not abrogate plasminogen binding by Prp. Plasminogen binding was abolished only with the additional mutagenesis of Arg107 and His108 to alanine. Furthermore, mutagenesis of Arg107 and His108 abolished plasminogen binding by Prp despite the presence of Lys96 and Lys101 in the binding site. Thus, binding to plasminogen via arginine and histidine residues appears to be a conserved mechanism among plasminogen-binding M proteins. PMID:17012384

  2. The plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein-related protein Prp binds plasminogen via arginine and histidine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson-Smith, Martina L; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J

    2007-02-01

    The migration of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) from localized to deep tissue sites may result in severe invasive disease, and sequestration of the host zymogen plasminogen appears crucial for virulence. Here, we describe a novel plasminogen-binding M protein, the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM)-related protein (Prp). Prp is phylogenetically distinct from previously described plasminogen-binding M proteins of group A, C, and G streptococci. While competition experiments indicate that Prp binds plasminogen with a lower affinity than PAM (50% effective concentration = 0.34 microM), Prp nonetheless binds plasminogen with high affinity and at physiologically relevant concentrations of plasminogen (K(d) = 7.8 nM). Site-directed mutagenesis of the putative plasminogen binding site indicates that unlike the majority of plasminogen receptors, Prp does not interact with plasminogen exclusively via lysine residues. Mutagenesis to alanine of lysine residues Lys(96) and Lys(101) reduced but did not abrogate plasminogen binding by Prp. Plasminogen binding was abolished only with the additional mutagenesis of Arg(107) and His(108) to alanine. Furthermore, mutagenesis of Arg(107) and His(108) abolished plasminogen binding by Prp despite the presence of Lys(96) and Lys(101) in the binding site. Thus, binding to plasminogen via arginine and histidine residues appears to be a conserved mechanism among plasminogen-binding M proteins.

  3. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S...... stearothermophilus 5S RNA. Several protein-induced changes in the RNA structures were identified; some are possibly allosteric in nature. The two prokaryotic 5S RNAs were also incubated with total 50S subunit proteins from E. coli and B. stearothermophilus ribosomes. Homologous and heterologous reconstitution....... stearothermophilus 5S RNA, which may have been due to a third ribosomal protein L5....

  4. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins.

  5. Binding of the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b to HCN channels shifts the mode of action of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Santoro, Bina; Saponaro, Andrea; Liu, Haiying; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated cation (HCN) channels generate the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in many neurons. These channels are directly regulated by the binding of cAMP, which both shifts the voltage dependence of HCN channel opening to more positive potentials and increases maximal Ih at extreme negative voltages where voltage gating is complete. Here we report that the HCN channel brain-specific auxiliary subunit TRIP8b produces opposing actions on these two effects of cAMP. In the first action, TRIP8b inhibits the effect of cAMP to shift voltage gating, decreasing both the sensitivity of the channel to cAMP (K1/2) and the efficacy of cAMP (maximal voltage shift); conversely, cAMP binding inhibits these actions of TRIP8b. These mutually antagonistic actions are well described by a cyclic allosteric mechanism in which TRIP8b binding reduces the affinity of the channel for cAMP, with the affinity of the open state for cAMP being reduced to a greater extent than the cAMP affinity of the closed state. In a second apparently independent action, TRIP8b enhances the action of cAMP to increase maximal Ih. This latter effect cannot be explained by the cyclic allosteric model but results from a previously uncharacterized action of TRIP8b to reduce maximal current through the channel in the absence of cAMP. Because the binding of cAMP also antagonizes this second effect of TRIP8b, application of cAMP produces a larger increase in maximal Ih in the presence of TRIP8b than in its absence. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the wide variability in the effects of modulatory transmitters on the voltage gating and maximal amplitude of Ih reported for different neurons in the brain.

  6. Pathological reorganization of NMDA receptors subunits and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 distribution in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuba, Genevieve; Vernay, Andre; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Tardif, Eric; Riederer, Beat Michel; Savioz, Armand

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), synaptic alterations play a major role and are often correlated with cognitive changes. In order to better understand synaptic modifications, we compared alterations in NMDA receptors and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 expression in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and frontal cortex (FC; area 9) of AD and control brains. We combined immunohistochemical and image analysis methods to quantify on consecutive sections the distribution of PSD-95 and NMDA receptors GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B in EC and FC from 25 AD and control cases. The density of stained receptors was analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to assess the effect of neurodegeneration. In both regions, the number of neuronal profiles immunostained for GluN1 receptors subunit and PSD-95 protein was significantly increased in AD compared to controls (3-6 fold), while the number of neuronal profiles stained for GluN2A and GluN2B receptors subunits was on the contrary decreased (3-4 fold). The increase in marked neuronal profiles was more prominent in a cortical band corresponding to layers 3 to 5 with large pyramidal cells. Neurons positive for GluN1 or PSD-95 staining were often found in the same localization on consecutive sections and they were also reactive for the anti-tau antibody AD2, indicating a neurodegenerative process. Differences in the density of immunoreactive puncta representing neuropile were not statistically significant. Altogether these data indicate that GluN1 and PSD-95 accumulate in the neuronal perikarya, but this is not the case for GluN2A and GluN2B, while the neuropile compartment is less subject to modifications. Thus, important variations in the pattern of distribution of the NMDA receptors subunits and PSD-95 represent a marker in AD and by impairing the neuronal network, contribute to functional deterioration.

  7. Isolation of an iron-binding protein from the hemolymph of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyhemus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topham, R.; Cooper, B.; Tesh, S.; Bonaventura, C.

    1987-05-01

    The presence of an iron-binding protein in the hemolymph of Limulus was detected by gel-filtration of /sup 59/Fe-labeled hemolymph. This protein was easily separated from hemocyanin, the oxygen transport protein that constitutes greater than 90% of the protein of Limulus hemolymph. The amount of the Limulus iron-binding protein (LIBP) in hemolymph samples prepared under sterile and non-sterile conditions was identical. LIBP was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of purified LIBP was estimated by gel-filtration to be 282,000 + 10,000. SDS-electrophoresis demonstrated that LIBP was an oligomeric protein composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 28,000 +/- 2000. The isoelectric point of LIBP was 6.5 as determined by electrofocusing. No /sup 49/Fe was removed from purified LIBP by extensive dialysis with EDTA or 2,2'-dipyridyl. Purified, unlabeled LIBP efficiently sequestered /sup 59/Fe in the absence of hemolymph indicating that no other hemolymph factors are required for the incorporation of iron into LIBP. The isolation of LIBP would support the proposal that the development of specific iron-binding and transport proteins was not necessarily coupled to the development of hemoglobin as a means to accomplish oxygen transport.

  8. A β-hairpin-binding protein for three different disease-related amyloidogenic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Mirecka, Ewa A; Gauhar, Aziz; Grüning, Clara S R; Willbold, Dieter; Härd, Torleif; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins share a propensity to convert to the β-structure-rich amyloid state that is associated with the progression of several protein-misfolding disorders. Here we show that a single engineered β-hairpin-binding protein, the β-wrapin AS10, binds monomers of three different amyloidogenic proteins, that is, amyloid-β peptide, α-synuclein, and islet amyloid polypeptide, with sub-micromolar affinity. AS10 binding inhibits the aggregation and toxicity of all three proteins. The results demonstrate common conformational preferences and related binding sites in a subset of the amyloidogenic proteins. These commonalities enable the generation of multispecific monomer-binding agents.

  9. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  10. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; D González; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-p...

  11. Ionizing radiation-dependent and independent phosphorylation of the 32-kDa subunit of replication protein A during mitosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stephan, Holger

    2009-10-01

    The human single-stranded DNA-binding protein, replication protein A (RPA), is regulated by the N-terminal phosphorylation of its 32-kDa subunit, RPA2. RPA2 is hyperphosphorylated in response to various DNA-damaging agents and also phosphorylated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner during S- and M-phase, primarily at two CDK consensus sites, S23 and S29. Here we generated two monoclonal phospho-specific antibodies directed against these CDK sites. These phospho-specific RPA2-(P)-S23 and RPA2-(P)-S29 antibodies recognized mitotically phosphorylated RPA2 with high specificity. In addition, the RPA2-(P)-S23 antibody recognized the S-phase-specific phosphorylation of RPA2, suggesting that during S-phase only S23 is phosphorylated, whereas during M-phase both CDK sites, S23 and S29, are phosphorylated. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the mitotic phosphorylation of RPA2 starts at the onset of mitosis, and dephosphorylation occurs during late cytokinesis. In mitotic cells treated with ionizing radiation (IR), we observed a rapid hyperphosphorylation of RPA2 in addition to its mitotic phosphorylation at S23 and S29, associated with a significant change in the subcellular localization of RPA. Our data also indicate that the RPA2 hyperphosphorylation in response to IR is facilitated by the activity of both ATM and DNA-PK, and is associated with activation of the Chk2 pathway.

  12. Expression and purification of recombinant type IV fimbrial subunit protein of Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivachandra, Sathish B; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Ahuja, Anuj; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa

    2012-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2, a causative agent of haemorrhagic secpticaemia (HS) in cattle and buffalo especially in tropical regions of Asia and African countries, is known to possess a type IV fimbriae (pili) as one of the virulent factors. In the present study, ptfA gene encoding for type IV fimbrial subunit of P. multocida serogroup B:2 (strain p52), an Indian HS vaccine strain, has been cloned and over-expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli. The recombinant type IV fimbrial subunit protein (∼31 kDa) including N-terminus histidine tag was purified under denaturing condition and confirmed by western blotting. A homology model of HS causing P. multocida serogroup B:2 fimbrial subunit has also been discussed. The study indicated the potential possibilities to use the recombinant fimbrial protein in developing HS subunit vaccine along with suitable adjuvant.

  13. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François (Ottawa Hosp.); (Ottawa); (NWU)

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  14. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  15. Molecular basis for the binding and modulation of V-ATPase by a bacterial effector protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogenic bacteria evade the immune response by replicating within host cells. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' Disease, makes use of numerous effector proteins to construct a niche supportive of its replication within phagocytic cells. The L. pneumophila effector SidK was identified in a screen for proteins that reduce the activity of the proton pumping vacuolar-type ATPases (V-ATPases when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. SidK is secreted by L. pneumophila in the early stages of infection and by binding to and inhibiting the V-ATPase, SidK reduces phagosomal acidification and promotes survival of the bacterium inside macrophages. We determined crystal structures of the N-terminal region of SidK at 2.3 Å resolution and used single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM to determine structures of V-ATPase:SidK complexes at ~6.8 Å resolution. SidK is a flexible and elongated protein composed of an α-helical region that interacts with subunit A of the V-ATPase and a second region of unknown function that is flexibly-tethered to the first. SidK binds V-ATPase strongly by interacting via two α-helical bundles at its N terminus with subunit A. In vitro activity assays show that SidK does not inhibit the V-ATPase completely, but reduces its activity by ~40%, consistent with the partial V-ATPase deficiency phenotype its expression causes in yeast. The cryo-EM analysis shows that SidK reduces the flexibility of the A-subunit that is in the 'open' conformation. Fluorescence experiments indicate that SidK binding decreases the affinity of V-ATPase for a fluorescent analogue of ATP. Together, these results reveal the structural basis for the fine-tuning of V-ATPase activity by SidK.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Chitosan-Binding Protein from Non-Heading Chinese Cabbage Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Ping CHEN; Lang-Lai XU

    2005-01-01

    To know the mechanism of ammonia assimilation in non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Makino) leaves regulated by chitosan (CTS), a CTS-binding protein was isolated from non-heading Chinese cabbage leaves using the chitosan affinity chromatography approach and this CTS-binding protein was partially characterized. The profile of the 53.1 kDa purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was compared with the native molecular weight of 106.5 kDa, which indicated that the purified protein was a dimer with identical subunits. After isoelectric focusing, a band was obtained at pH 8.25. The agglutination test and periodic acid-Schiff staining further revealed that the protein was a glycoprotein with lectin activity. Moreover, the purified protein contained 17.4 % (w/w) neutral carbohydrate and 82.56% (w/w) protein. The comparison of this protein and the 67 kDa CTS-binding protein isolated previously from Rubus culture tissue exhibited some differences in characterization. According to results of peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, the protein purified in the present study does not show any similarity with any protein in the protein data bank. Thus, it was deduced that the protein purified in the present study is a novel CTS-binding protein.

  17. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    a = 142.6, b = 61.3, c = 45.6 A, beta = 103.3 degrees and diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. The calculated crystal packing parameter is Vm = 2.47 A3 Da-1 suggesting that one CK2alpha molecule is contained in the asymmetric unit and that the solvent content of the unit cell is 50%.......The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameters...

  19. Identification of the Chloramphenicol-Binding Protein in Escherichia coli Ribosomes by Partial Reconstitution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierhaus, Dagmar; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    1973-01-01

    50S-derived cores were prepared by treatment of 50S subunits with 0.4 M Licl (0.4c core) and 0.8 M Licl (0.8c core), respectively. 0.4c cores bind chloramphenicol whereas 0.8c cores do not. The split proteins obtained during the transitions 0.4c → 0.8c were separated by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. Reconstitution experiments with the fractionated proteins demonstrated that protein L16 is involved in chloramphenicol binding. In contrast to chloramphenicol, the CACCA-(N-acetyl-leucyl) fragment is bound by the 0.8c core, i.e., this core contains the intact p-site moiety of the peptidyltransferase center. Puromycin can inhibit chloramphenicol binding completely. In the concentration range tested (up to 20 mM) the trinucleotide CCA inhibits chloramphenicol binding as effectively as puromycin, whereas an aminoacid mixture shows no inhibition. It is concluded that chloramphenicol acts exclusively on the a-site part of the peptidyltransferase center interfering with the binding of the last two or three nucleotides (3′ end) of aminoacyl-tRNA. Images PMID:4365366

  20. Identification of the chloramphenicol-binding protein in Escherichia coli ribosomes by partial reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierhaus, D; Nierhaus, K H

    1973-08-01

    50S-derived cores were prepared by treatment of 50S subunits with 0.4 M Licl (0.4c core) and 0.8 M Licl (0.8c core), respectively. 0.4c cores bind chloramphenicol whereas 0.8c cores do not. The split proteins obtained during the transitions 0.4c --> 0.8c were separated by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. Reconstitution experiments with the fractionated proteins demonstrated that protein L16 is involved in chloramphenicol binding. In contrast to chloramphenicol, the CACCA-(N-acetyl-leucyl) fragment is bound by the 0.8c core, i.e., this core contains the intact p-site moiety of the peptidyltransferase center. Puromycin can inhibit chloramphenicol binding completely. In the concentration range tested (up to 20 mM) the trinucleotide CCA inhibits chloramphenicol binding as effectively as puromycin, whereas an aminoacid mixture shows no inhibition. It is concluded that chloramphenicol acts exclusively on the a-site part of the peptidyltransferase center interfering with the binding of the last two or three nucleotides (3' end) of aminoacyl-tRNA.

  1. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-06-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4. Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was weakly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelet-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/.

  2. Identification of a novel Leucine-rich repeat protein and candidate PP1 regulatory subunit expressed in developing spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperry Ann O

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is comprised of a series of highly regulated developmental changes that transform the precursor germ cell into a highly specialized spermatozoon. The last phase of spermatogenesis, termed spermiogenesis, involves dramatic morphological change including formation of the acrosome, elongation and condensation of the nucleus, formation of the flagella, and disposal of unnecessary cytoplasm. A prominent cytoskeletal component of the developing spermatid is the manchette, a unique microtubular structure that surrounds the nucleus of the developing spermatid and is thought to assist in both the reshaping of the nucleus and redistribution of spermatid cytoplasm. Although the molecular motor KIFC1 has been shown to associate with the manchette, its precise role in function of the manchette and the identity of its testis specific protein partners are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins in the testis that interact with KIFC1 using a yeast 2 hybrid screen of a testis cDNA library. Results Thirty percent of the interacting clones identified in our screen contain an identical cDNA encoding a 40 kD protein. This interacting protein has 4 leucine-rich repeats in its amino terminal half and is expressed primarily in the testis; therefore we have named this protein testis leucine-rich repeat protein or TLRR. TLRR was also found to associate tightly with the KIFC1 targeting domain using affinity chromatography. In addition to the leucine-rich repeats, TLRR contains a consensus-binding site for protein phosphatase-1 (PP1. Immunocytochemistry using a TLRR specific antibody demonstrates that this protein is found near the manchette of developing spermatids. Conclusion We have identified a previously uncharacterized leucine-rich repeat protein that is expressed abundantly in the testis and associates with the manchette of developing spermatids, possibly through its interaction with the KIFC1 molecular motor

  3. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  4. Characterization of two forms of mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP): implications for evolutionary relationships and ligand-binding function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2003-06-17

    Mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) is a member of the secretoglobin family produced in the submaxillary glands of house mice (Mus musculus). We report the cDNA sequences and amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of ABP from a mouse cDNA library, identifying the two subunits by their pIs and molecular weights. An anomalously high molecular weight of the alpha subunit is likely due to glycosylation at a single site. A phylogenetic comparison of the three subunits of ABP with the chains of other mammalian secretoglobins shows that ABP is most closely related to mouse lachrymal protein and to the major cat allergen Fel dI. An evaluation of the most conserved residues in ABP and the other secretoglobins, in light of structural data reported by others [Callebaut, I., Poupon, A., Bally, R., Demaret, J.-P., Housset, D., Delettre, J., Hossenlopp, P., and Mornon, J.-P. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 90-112; Pattabiraman, N., Matthews, J., Ward, K., Mantile-Selvaggi, G., Miele, L., and Mukherjee, A. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 113-127], allows us to draw conclusions about the critical residues important in ligand binding by the two different ABP dimers and to assess the importance of ligand binding in the function of the molecule. In addition to the cDNAs, which represent those of the musculus subspecies of Mus musculus, we also report the coding regions of the beta and gamma subunit cDNAs from two other mouse inbred strains which represent the other two subspecies: M. musculus domesticus and M. musculus castaneus. The high nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratios (K(a)/K(s)) for both the beta and gamma subunits suggest that these two proteins are evolving under strong directional selection, as has been reported for the alpha subunit [Hwang, J., Hofstetter, J., Bonhomme, F., and Karn, R. (1997) J. Hered. 88, 93-97; Karn, R., and Clements, M. (1999) Biochem. Genet. 37, 187-199].

  5. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  6. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  7. Affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed t...

  8. The Cobalamin-binding Protein in Zebrafish is an Intermediate Between the Three Cobalamin-binding Proteins in Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Eva Holm; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish) and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish) associated with a single protein. The protein showed resistance toward degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin...

  9. Lack of ability of trypsin-treated mitochondrial F1-ATPase to bind the oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundal, T; Norling, B; Ernster, L

    1983-10-03

    Soluble beef-heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase modified in its alpha-subunit by mild trypsin treatment (alpha'-F1) can no longer bind oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP) but is still capable of binding to F1-depleted submitochondrial particles, giving rise to a maximally oligomycin-sensitive ATPase, provided the particles contain their native complement of OSCP. When OSCP is removed from the particles, alpha'-F1 can still bind to the particles, but added OSCP induces only a low degree of oligomycin sensitivity. The possible role of OSCP in the functional coupling of the catalytic (F1) and H+-translocating (Fo) moieties of mitochondrial ATPase is discussed. The results suggest a functional similarity between the OSCP component of mitochondrial ATPase and the delta-subunit of E. coli ATPase, which is in accordance with the structural homology recently found to exist between the two polypeptides.

  10. Exposing the subunit diversity and modularity of protein complexes by structural mass spectrometry approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorev, Dror S; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Sharon, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Although the number of protein-encoding genes in the human genome is only about 20 000 not far from the amount found in the nematode worm genome, the number of proteins that are translated from these sequences is larger by several orders of magnitude. A number of mechanisms have evolved to enable this diversity. For example, genes can be alternatively spliced to create multiple transcripts; they may also be translated from different alternative initiation sites. After translation, hundreds of chemical modifications can be introduced in proteins, altering their chemical properties, folding, stability, and activity. The complexity is then further enhanced by the various combinations that are generated from the assembly of different subunit variants into protein complexes. This, in turn, confers structural and functional flexibility, and endows the cell with the ability to adapt to various environmental conditions. Therefore, exposing the variability of protein complexes is an important step toward understanding their biological functions. Revealing this enormous diversity, however, is not a simple task. In this review, we will focus on the array of MS-based strategies that are capable of performing this mission. We will also discuss the challenges that lie ahead, and the future directions toward which the field might be heading.

  11. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi SHEN; Lu WANG; Hui ZHOU; Hui-di JIANG; Lu-shan YU; Su ZENG

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body.The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity,which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles.In this review,the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA),α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)and lipoprotein,three most important proteins in human plasma,are detailed.Furthermore,the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed.Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding,enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described.Additionally,the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed.

  12. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca(2+) -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the g...

  14. Constitutively active signaling by the G protein βγ-subunit mediates intrinsically increased phosphodiesterase-4 activity in human asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hu

    Full Text Available Signaling by the Gβγ subunit of Gi protein, leading to downstream c-Src-induced activation of the Ras/c-Raf1/MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway and its upregulation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4 activity, was recently shown to mediate the heightened contractility in proasthmatic sensitized isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM, as well as allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in an in vivo animal model of allergic asthma. This study investigated whether cultured human ASM (HASM cells derived from asthmatic donor lungs exhibit constitutively increased PDE activity that is attributed to intrinsically upregulated Gβγ signaling coupled to c-Src activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK1/2 cascade. We show that, relative to normal cells, asthmatic HASM cells constitutively exhibit markedly increased intrinsic PDE4 activity coupled to heightened Gβγ-regulated phosphorylation of c-Src and ERK1/2, and direct co-localization of the latter with the PDE4D isoform. These signaling events and their induction of heightened PDE activity are acutely suppressed by treating asthmatic HASM cells with a Gβγ inhibitor. Importantly, along with increased Gβγ activation, asthmatic HASM cells also exhibit constitutively increased direct binding of the small Rap1 GTPase-activating protein, Rap1GAP, to the α-subunit of Gi protein, which serves to cooperatively facilitate Ras activation and, thereby, enable enhanced Gβγ-regulated ERK1/2-stimulated PDE activity. Collectively, these data are the first to identify that intrinsically increased signaling via the Gβγ subunit, facilitated by Rap1GAP recruitment to the α-subunit, mediates the constitutively increased PDE4 activity detected in asthmatic HASM cells. These new findings support the notion that interventions targeted at suppressing Gβγ signaling may lead to novel approaches to treat asthma.

  15. Mutational analysis of the prohead binding domain of the large subunit of terminase, the bacteriophage lambda DNA packaging enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, A; Feiss, M

    1995-01-13

    Terminase, the DNA packaging enzyme of bacteriophage lambda, is made up of two subunits, gpNul and gpA, the products of the Nu1 and A genes. The activities of terminase include DNA binding, cos cleavage and prohead binding. Specificity domains within the structure of terminase have previously been defined by genetic studies of lambda-21 hybrids. The prohead binding domain of terminase is localized to the last 32 amino acid residues of gpA. Mutations in the prohead binding domain of gpA were constructed by introducing the corresponding amino acids from gp2, the gpA analog of bacteriophage 21. The last five residues of gpA can be replaced with little effect on the burst size of lambda. A phage with a replacement of the last six residues of gpA with the corresponding residues of gp2 was unable to form plaques, indicating that the sixth-to-last residues of gpA is crucial for prohead binding. Site-specific mutagenesis of the sixth-to-last position of gpA indicated that the sixth-to-last residue of gpA must be hydrophobic, of the seven amino acids tested, only isoleucine and valine can substitute for leucine at this position. Although the last five residues of gp2 were functional when they replaced the last five residues of gpA, two results indicated that the last five residues of gpA functioned better than the corresponding residues of gp2. First, the presence of a valine residue at the sixth-to-last position of gpA allowed plaque formation, whereas replacement of the last six residues of gpA with those of gp2, which substitutes a valine residue at the sixth-to-last position, was lethal. The second set of results indicating that the last five residues of gpA function better than the gp2 residues were obtained by study of revertants of lethal substitution mutations. In constructing the replacement mutations, a short linker was inserted into the C terminus of the A gene; this insertion created a short duplication of the end of the A gene, so that the normal C

  16. Lipids and lipid binding proteins: a perfect match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Jan F C

    2015-02-01

    Lipids serve a great variety of functions, ranging from structural components of biological membranes to signaling molecules affecting various cellular functions. Several of these functions are related to the unique physico-chemical properties shared by all lipid species, i.e., their hydrophobicity. The latter, however, is accompanied by a poor solubility in an aqueous environment and thus a severe limitation in the transport of lipids in aqueous compartments such as blood plasma and the cellular soluble cytoplasm. Specific proteins which can reversibly and non-covalently associate with lipids, designated as lipid binding proteins or lipid chaperones, greatly enhance the aqueous solubility of lipids and facilitate their transport between tissues and within tissue cells. Importantly, transport of lipids across biological membranes also is facilitated by specific (membrane-associated) lipid binding proteins. Together, these lipid binding proteins determine the bio-availability of their ligands, and thereby markedly influence the subsequent processing, utilization, or signaling effect of lipids. The bio-availability of specific lipid species thus is governed by the presence of specific lipid binding proteins, the affinity of these proteins for distinct lipid species, and the presence of competing ligands (including pharmaceutical compounds). Recent studies suggest that post-translational modifications of lipid binding proteins may have great impact on lipid-protein interactions. As a result, several levels of regulation exist that together determine the bio-availability of lipid species. This short review discusses the significance of lipid binding proteins and their potential application as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Characterization of a Low-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunit Gene from Bread Wheat and the Corresponding Protein That Represents a Major Subunit of the Glutenin Polymer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masci, Stefania; D'Ovidio, Renato; Lafiandra, Domenico; Kasarda, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    Both high- and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) play the major role in determining the viscoelastic properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour. To date there has been no clear correspondence between the amino acid sequences of LMW-GS derived from DNA sequencing and those of actual LMW-GS present in the endosperm. We have characterized a particular LMW-GS from hexaploid bread wheat, a major component of the glutenin polymer, which we call the 42K LMW-GS, and have isolated and sequenced the putative corresponding gene. Extensive amino acid sequences obtained directly for this 42K LMW-GS indicate correspondence between this protein and the putative corresponding gene. This subunit did not show a cysteine (Cys) at position 5, in contrast to what has frequently been reported for nucleotide-based sequences of LMW-GS. This Cys has been replaced by one occurring in the repeated-sequence domain, leaving the total number of Cys residues in the molecule the same as in various other LMW-GS. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence and literature-based assignment of disulfide linkages, a computer-generated molecular model of the 42K subunit was constructed. PMID:9847089

  18. Proteomic screening method for phosphopeptide motif binding proteins using peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofk, Heather R; Wu, Ning; Cantley, Lewis C; Asara, John M

    2011-09-02

    Phosphopeptide binding domains mediate the directed and localized assembly of protein complexes essential to intracellular kinase signaling. To identify phosphopeptide binding proteins, we developed a proteomic screening method using immobilized partially degenerate phosphopeptide mixtures combined with SILAC and microcapillary LC-MS/MS. The method was used to identify proteins that specifically bound to phosphorylated peptide library affinity matrices, including pTyr, and the motifs pSer/pThr-Pro, pSer/pThr-X-X-X-pSer/pThr, pSer/pThr-Glu/Asp, or pSer/pThr-pSer/pThr in degenerate sequence contexts. Heavy and light SILAC lysates were applied to columns containing these phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated (control) peptide libraries respectively, and bound proteins were eluted, combined, digested, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS using a hybrid quadrupole-TOF mass spectrometer. Heavy/light peptide ion ratios were calculated, and peptides that yielded ratios greater than ∼3:1 were considered as being from potential phosphopeptide binding proteins since this ratio represents the lowest ratio from a known positive control. Many of those identified were known phosphopeptide-binding proteins, including the SH2 domain containing p85 subunit of PI3K bound to pTyr, 14-3-3 bound to pSer/pThr-Asp/Glu, polo-box domain containing PLK1 and Pin1 bound to pSer/pThr-Pro, and pyruvate kinase M2 binding to pTyr. Approximately half of the hits identified by the peptide library screens were novel. Protein domain enrichment analysis revealed that most pTyr hits contain SH2 domains, as expected, and to a lesser extent SH3, C1, STAT, Tyr phosphatase, Pkinase, C2, and PH domains; however, pSer/pThr motifs did not reveal enriched domains across hits.

  19. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  20. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  1. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    residues, H142, Q150, and T152, were demonstrated to be involved in the distinct pharmacology of the α4-α4 versus α4-β2 binding sites. To obtain insight into the three-dimensional structure of the α4-α4 binding site, a surrogate protein reproducing α4-α4 binding characteristics was constructed...... structure of the mutated Ls-AChBP with the high-efficacy ligand NS3920, the corresponding histidine forms an intersubunit bridge that reinforces the ligand-mediated interactions between subunits. The structures further reveal that the binding site residues gain different and ligand-dependent interactions...... that could not be predicted based on wild-type Ls-AChBP structures in complex with the same agonists. The results show that an unprecedented correlation between binding in engineered AChBPs and functional receptors can be obtained and provide new opportunities for structure-based design of drugs targeting...

  2. Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Beardslee, T; Zeece, M; Sarath, G; Markwell, J

    2001-11-01

    Soy lecithin is widely used as an emulsifier in processed foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Soy lecithin is composed principally of phospholipids; however, it has also been shown to contain IgE-binding proteins, albeit at a low level. A few clinical cases involving allergic reactions to soy lecithin have been reported. The purpose of this investigation is to better characterize the IgE-binding proteins typically found in lecithin. Soy lecithin proteins were isolated following solvent extraction of lipid components and then separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separated lecithin proteins were immunoblotted with sera from soy-sensitive individuals to determine the pattern of IgE-binding proteins. The identity of IgE-reactive bands was determined from their N-terminal sequence. The level of protein in six lecithin samples obtained from commercial suppliers ranged from 100 to 1,400 ppm. Lecithin samples showed similar protein patterns when examined by SDS-PAGE. Immunoblotting with sera from soy-sensitive individuals showed IgE binding to bands corresponding to 7, 12, 20, 39 and 57 kD. N-terminal analysis of these IgE-binding bands resulted in sequences for 3 components. The 12-kD band was identified as a methionine-rich protein (MRP) and a member of the 2S albumin class of soy proteins. The 20-kD band was found to be soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The 39-kD band was matched to a soy protein with unknown function. Soy lecithin contains a number of IgE-binding proteins; thus, it might represent a source of hidden allergens. These allergens are a more significant concern for soy-allergic individuals consuming lecithin products as a health supplement. In addition, the MRP and the 39-kD protein identified in this study represent newly identified IgE-binding proteins. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. The AMP-activated protein kinase α2 catalytic subunit controls whole-body insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Jørgensen, Sebastian B.; Perrin, Christophe; Geloen, Alain; Flamez, Daisy; Mu, James; Lenzner, Claudia; Baud, Olivier; Bennoun, Myriam; Gomas, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Gaël; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F.P.; Kahn, Axel; Carling, David; Schuit, Frans C.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Richter, Erik A.; Burcelin, Rémy; Vaulont, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is viewed as a fuel sensor for glucose and lipid metabolism. To better understand the physiological role of AMPK, we generated a knockout mouse model in which the AMPKα2 catalytic subunit gene was inactivated. AMPKα2–/– mice presented high glucose levels in the fed period and during an oral glucose challenge associated with low insulin plasma levels. However, in isolated AMPKα2–/– pancreatic islets, glucose- and L-arginine–stimulated insulin secretion were not affected. AMPKα2–/– mice have reduced insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose utilization and muscle glycogen synthesis rates assessed in vivo by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Surprisingly, both parameters were not altered in mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of AMPK in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, glucose transport was normal in incubated isolated AMPKα2–/– muscles. These data indicate that AMPKα2 in tissues other than skeletal muscles regulates insulin action. Concordantly, we found an increased daily urinary catecholamine excretion in AMPKα2–/– mice, suggesting altered function of the autonomic nervous system that could explain both the impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity observed in vivo. Therefore, extramuscular AMPKα2 catalytic subunit is important for whole-body insulin action in vivo, probably through modulation of sympathetic nervous activity. PMID:12511592

  4. The AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 catalytic subunit controls whole-body insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Jørgensen, Sebastian B; Perrin, Christophe; Geloen, Alain; Flamez, Daisy; Mu, James; Lenzner, Claudia; Baud, Olivier; Bennoun, Myriam; Gomas, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Gaël; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Kahn, Axel; Carling, David; Schuit, Frans C; Birnbaum, Morris J; Richter, Erik A; Burcelin, Rémy; Vaulont, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is viewed as a fuel sensor for glucose and lipid metabolism. To better understand the physiological role of AMPK, we generated a knockout mouse model in which the AMPKalpha2 catalytic subunit gene was inactivated. AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice presented high glucose levels in the fed period and during an oral glucose challenge associated with low insulin plasma levels. However, in isolated AMPKalpha2(-/-) pancreatic islets, glucose- and L-arginine-stimulated insulin secretion were not affected. AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice have reduced insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose utilization and muscle glycogen synthesis rates assessed in vivo by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Surprisingly, both parameters were not altered in mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of AMPK in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, glucose transport was normal in incubated isolated AMPKalpha2(-/-) muscles. These data indicate that AMPKalpha2 in tissues other than skeletal muscles regulates insulin action. Concordantly, we found an increased daily urinary catecholamine excretion in AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice, suggesting altered function of the autonomic nervous system that could explain both the impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity observed in vivo. Therefore, extramuscular AMPKalpha2 catalytic subunit is important for whole-body insulin action in vivo, probably through modulation of sympathetic nervous activity.

  5. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  6. Evidence for TLR4 and FcRγ-CARD9 activation by cholera toxin B subunit and its direct bindings to TREM2 and LMIR5 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Hara, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Cholera toxin (CTX) is a virulent factor of Vibrio cholerae that causes life-threatening diarrheal disease. Its non-toxic subunit CTB has been extensively studied for vaccine delivery. In immune cells, CTB induces a number of signaling molecules related to cellular activation and cytokine production. The mechanisms by which CTB exerts its immunological effects are not understood. We report here the immunological targets of CTB. The unexpected finding that GM1 ganglioside inhibited NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated with CTX and agonists of Toll-like receptors (TLR) suggests the possibility of CTX-TLR interaction. Indeed, CTX-induced IL-6 production was substantially reduced in MyD88(-/-) or TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Ectopic expression of TLR4 was required for CTX-induced NF-κB activation in HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, the inflammatory capacity of CTB was lost in the absence of TLR4, adaptor protein FcRγ, or its downstream signaling molecule CARD9. Attempts have been made to identify CTB-binding targets from various C-type lectin and immunoglobulin-like receptors. CTB targeted not only GM1 and TLR4 but also TREM2 and LMIR5/CD300b. CTB-TREM2 interaction initiated signal transduction through adaptor protein DAP12. The binding of CTB inhibited LMIR5 activation induced by its endogenous ligand 3-O-sulfo-β-d-galactosylceramide C24:1. In summary, CTB targets TLR4, FcRγ-CARD9, TREM2, and LMIR5. These findings provide new insights into the immunobiology of cholera toxin.

  7. Comparative serum protein binding of anthracycline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1996-01-01

    The binding of doxorubicin, iododoxorubicin, daunorubicin, epirubicin, pirarubicin, zorubicin, aclarubicin, and mitoxantrone to 600 microM human serum albumin and 50 microM alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was studied by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection. Binding to albumin (600 microM) varied from 61% (daunorubicin) to 94% (iododoxorubicin). The binding to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (50 microM) was more variable, ranging from 31% (epirubicin) to 64% (zorubicin), and was essentially related to the hydrophobicity of the derivatives. Simulations showed that the total serum binding varied over a broad range from 71% (doxorubicin) to 96% (iododoxorubicin). We recently reported that the binding to lipoproteins of a series of eight anthracycline analogues could be ascribed to chemicophysical determinants of lipophilicity [2]. The present study was conducted to evaluate in vitro the contribution of albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein to the total serum binding of these drugs.

  8. Cloning and purification of protein kinase CK2 recombinant alpha and beta subunits from the Mediterranean fly Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyanou-Koutsoukou, Sophia; Baier, Andrea; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Maniatopoulou, Evanthia; Thanopoulou, Konstantina; Szyszka, Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata is an insect capable of wreaking extensive damage to a wide range of fruit crops. Protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr kinase that is highly conserved among eukaryotes; it is a heterotetramer composed of two catalytic (α) and a dimer of regulatory (β) subunits. We present here the construction of the cDNA molecules of the CK2α and CK2β subunits from the medfly C. capitata by the 5'/3' RACE and RT-PCR methods, respectively. CcCK2α catalytic subunit presents the characteristic and conserved features of a typical protein kinase, similar to the regulatory CcCK2β subunit, that also possess the conserved features of regulatory CK2β subunits, as revealed by comparison of their predicted amino acid sequences with other eukaryotic species. The recombinant CcCK2α and CcCK2β proteins were purified by affinity chromatography to homogeneity, after overexpression in Escherichia coli. CcCK2α is capable to utilize GTP and its activity and is inhibited by polyanions and stimulated by polycations in phosphorylation assays, using purified acidic ribosomal protein P1 as a substrate.

  9. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the β-subunit gene in 7S globulin protein in soybean using RNAi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, J; Liu, S Y; Wang, P W; Guan, S Y; Fan, Y G; Yao, D; Zhang, L; Dai, J L

    2016-04-26

    The objective of this study was to use RNA interference (RNAi) to improve protein quality and decrease anti-nutritional effects in soybean. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was conducted using RNAi and an expression vector containing the 7S globulin β-subunit gene. The BAR gene was used as the selective marker and cotyledonary nodes of soybean genotype Jinong 27 were chosen as explant material. Regenerated plants were detected by molecular biology techniques. Transformation of the β-subunit gene in the 7S protein was detected by PCR, Southern blot, and q-PCR. Positive plants (10 T0, and 6 T1, and 13 T2) were tested by PCR. Hybridization bands were detected by Southern blot analysis in two of the T1 transgenic plants. RNAi expression vectors containing the soybean 7S protein β-subunit gene were successfully integrated into the genome of transgenic plants. qRT-PCR analysis in soybean seeds showed a clear decrease in expression of the soybean β-subunit gene. The level of 7S protein β-subunit expression in transgenic plants decreased by 77.5% as compared to that of the wild-type plants. This study has established a basis for the application of RNAi to improve the anti-nutritional effects of soybean.

  10. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  11. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  12. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes.

  13. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Identification of AOSC-binding proteins in neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; NIE Qin; XIN Xianliang; GENG Meiyu

    2008-01-01

    Acidic oligosaccharide sugar chain (AOSC), a D-mannuronic acid oligosaccharide, derived from brown algae polysaccharide, has been completed Phase I clinical trial in China as an anti-Alzheimer's Disease (AD) drug candidate. The identification of AOSC-binding protein(s) in neurons is very important for understanding its action mechanism. To determine the binding protein(s) of AOSC in neurons mediating its anti-AD activities, confocal microscopy, affinity chromatography, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis were used. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that AOSC binds to SH-SY5Y cells in concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashions. The AOSC binding proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. The results showed that there are 349 proteins binding AOSC, including clathrin, adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). These results suggest that the binding/entrance of AOSC to neurons is probably responsible for anti-AD activities.

  15. Binomial distribution for quantification of protein subunits in biological nanoassemblies and functional nanomachines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaming; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Lisa P; Zhao, Zhengyi; Pi, Fengmei; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-10-01

    Living systems produce ordered structures and nanomachines that inspire the development of biomimetic nanodevices such as chips, MEMS, actuators, sensors, sorters, and apparatuses for single-pore DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, drug or therapeutic RNA delivery. Determination of the copy numbers of subunits that build these machines is challenging due to small size. Here we report a simple mathematical method to determine the stoichiometry, using phi29 DNA-packaging nanomotor as a model to elucidate the application of a formula ∑M=0(Z)((Z)M)p(Z-M)q(M), where p and q are the percentage of wild-type and inactive mutant in the empirical assay; M is the copy numbers of mutant and Z is the stoichiometry in question. Variable ratios of mutants and wild-type were mixed to inhibit motor function. Empirical data were plotted over the theoretical curves to determine the stoichiometry and the value of K, which is the number of mutant needed in each machine to block the function, all based on the condition that wild-type and mutant are equal in binding affinity. Both Z and K from 1-12 were investigated. The data precisely confirmed that phi29 motor contains six copies (Z) of the motor ATPase gp16, and K=1. From the clinical editor: To determine copy numbers of subunits that form nanomachines in living organisms is a daunting task due to the complexities and the inherently small sizes associated with such systems. In this paper, a simple mathematical method is described how to determine the stoichiometry of copies in biomimetic nanodevices, using phi29 DNA-packaging nanomotor as a model.

  16. Identification of the binding subunit of the D/sub 1/-dopamine receptor by photoaffinity crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amlaiky, N.; Berger, J.G.; Chang, W.; McQuade, R.D.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-03-01

    A derivative of the potent D/sub 1/ antagonist SCH-23390 has been synthesized. This compound, (R,S)-1-(m-aminophenyl)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH-38548), has been radioiodinated by a chloramine T procedure yielding 3 radioiodinated products. One of these separated isomers (R/sub f/ = 0.35; CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/:MEOH:TEA; 82.5:17.5:0.1 on TLC) binds reversibly to rat striatal membranes with high affinity (K/sub D/ approx. 80 pM) appropriate stereoselectivity and D/sub 1/-dopaminergic specificity. (/sup 125/I)SCH-38548 can be covalently incorporated into a peptide of M/sub r/ approx. 72,000 using the heterobifunctional crosslinking reagent N-succinimidyl-6-(4'-azido-2'-nitro-phenylamino) hexanoate. Covalent incorporation of (/sup 125/I) SCH-38548 into the M/sub r/ approx. 72,000 peptide can be blocked by dopaminergic agents with D/sub 1/-dopaminergic specificity (for agonists: SKF 38393 > apomorphine > dopamine; for antagonists: SCH-23390 > cis-flupentixol >>> trans-flupentixol). The D/sub 1/-dopaminergic selectivity and specificity of the labeling was further demonstrated by the fact that other antagonists such as domperidone, ketanserin, phentolamine and alprenolol did not compete for the covalent labeling of the M/sub r/ approx. 72,000 peptide. This new radioligand should be useful in the molecular characterization of the D/sub 1/-dopaminergic receptor from various sources.

  17. Altering the ribosomal subunit ratio in yeast maximizes recombinant protein yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyner David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of high yields of recombinant proteins is an enduring bottleneck in the post-genomic sciences that has yet to be addressed in a truly rational manner. Typically eukaryotic protein production experiments have relied on varying expression construct cassettes such as promoters and tags, or culture process parameters such as pH, temperature and aeration to enhance yields. These approaches require repeated rounds of trial-and-error optimization and cannot provide a mechanistic insight into the biology of recombinant protein production. We published an early transcriptome analysis that identified genes implicated in successful membrane protein production experiments in yeast. While there has been a subsequent explosion in such analyses in a range of production organisms, no one has yet exploited the genes identified. The aim of this study was to use the results of our previous comparative transcriptome analysis to engineer improved yeast strains and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in high-yielding protein production hosts. Results We show that tuning BMS1 transcript levels in a doxycycline-dependent manner resulted in optimized yields of functional membrane and soluble protein targets. Online flow microcalorimetry demonstrated that there had been a substantial metabolic change to cells cultured under high-yielding conditions, and in particular that high yielding cells were more metabolically efficient. Polysome profiling showed that the key molecular event contributing to this metabolically efficient, high-yielding phenotype is a perturbation of the ratio of 60S to 40S ribosomal subunits from approximately 1:1 to 2:1, and correspondingly of 25S:18S ratios from 2:1 to 3:1. This result is consistent with the role of the gene product of BMS1 in ribosome biogenesis. Conclusion This work demonstrates the power of a rational approach to recombinant protein production by using the results of

  18. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains' interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP.

  19. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssens Veerle

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice.

  20. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Sun; Neal F Lue; Ming Lei; Yuting Yang; Ke Wan; Ninghui Mao; Tai-Yuan Yu; Yi-Chien Lin; Diane C DeZwaan; Brian C Freeman; Jing-Jer Lin

    2011-01-01

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stnl-Tenl (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB ' fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase a (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  1. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase [alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jia; Yang, Yuting; Wan, Ke; Mao, Ninghui; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chien; DeZwaan, Diane C.; Freeman, Brian C.; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lue, Neal F.; Lei, Ming

    2011-08-24

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase {alpha} (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  2. Real-time tracking of CO migration and binding in the α and β subunits of human hemoglobin via 150-ps time-resolved Laue crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schotte, Friedrich; Cho, Hyun Sun [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 (United States); Soman, Jayashree [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and W.M. Keck Center for Computational Biology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Wulff, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Olson, John S. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and W.M. Keck Center for Computational Biology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Anfinrud, Philip A., E-mail: anfinrud@nih.gov [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► 150-ps Time-resolved Laue crystallography has unveiled ligand dynamics in hemoglobin. ► Significant kinetic differences are observed in the α and β subunits of hemoglobin. ► The B-site lifetime is ∼1.6 ns in β, and ∼18 ns in α. ► The B-site location in β is ∼0.25 Å closer to the binding site than in α. ► The correlation between CO position and rebinding rate suggests distal control. - Abstract: We have developed the method of picosecond Laue crystallography and used this capability to probe ligand dynamics in tetrameric R-state hemoglobin (Hb). Time-resolved, 2 Å-resolution electron density maps of photolyzed HbCO reveal the time-dependent population of CO in the binding (A) and primary docking (B) sites of both α and β subunits from 100 ps to 10 μs. The proximity of the B site in the β subunit is about 0.25 Å closer to its A binding site, and its k{sub BA} rebinding rate (∼300 μs{sup −1}) is six times faster, suggesting distal control of the rebinding dynamics. Geminate rebinding in the β subunit exhibits both prompt and delayed geminate phases. We developed a microscopic model to quantitatively explain the observed kinetics, with three states for the α subunit and four states for the β subunit. This model provides a consistent framework for interpreting rebinding kinetics reported in prior studies of both HbCO and HbO{sub 2}.

  3. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...

  4. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  5. [High-efficiency expression of a receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein in tobacco chloroplasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xue; Qi, Guangxun; Yang, Jing; Xing, Guojie; Liu, Jianfeng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Chloroplast-based expression system is promising for the hyper-expression of plant-derived recombinant therapeutic proteins and vaccines. To verify the feasibility of obtaining high-level expression of the SARS subunit vaccine and to provide a suitable plant-derived vaccine production platform against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a 193-amino acid fragment of SARS CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), fused with the peptide vector cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), was expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. Codon-optimized CTB-RBD sequence was integrated into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy was obtained, as confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Western blot showed expression of the recombinant fusion protein mostly in soluble monomeric form. Quantification of the recombinant fusion protein CTB-RBD was conducted by ELISA analysis from the transplastomic leaves at different developmental stages, attachment positions and time points in a day and the different expression levels of the CTB-RBD were observed with the highest expression of 10.2% total soluble protein obtained from mature transplastomic leaves. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of highly expressing SARS subunit vaccine RBD, indicating its potential in subsequent development of a plant-derived recombinant subunit vaccine and reagents production for antibody detection in SARS serological tests.

  6. Aspartic Acid 397 in Subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae Forms Part of a Sodium-binding Site, Is Involved in Cation Selectivity, and Affects Cation-binding Site Cooperativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Michael E.; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC). PMID:24030824

  7. Clusters of basic amino acids contribute to RNA binding and nucleolar localization of ribosomal protein L22.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Houmani

    Full Text Available The ribosomal protein L22 is a component of the 60S eukaryotic ribosomal subunit. As an RNA-binding protein, it has been shown to interact with both cellular and viral RNAs including 28S rRNA and the Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA, EBER-1. L22 is localized to the cell nucleus where it accumulates in nucleoli. Although previous studies demonstrated that a specific amino acid sequence is required for nucleolar localization, the RNA-binding domain has not been identified. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the nucleolar accumulation of L22 is linked to its ability to bind RNA. To address this hypothesis, mutated L22 proteins were generated to assess the contribution of specific amino acids to RNA binding and protein localization. Using RNA-protein binding assays, we demonstrate that basic amino acids 80-93 are required for high affinity binding of 28S rRNA and EBER-1 by L22. Fluorescence localization studies using GFP-tagged mutated L22 proteins further reveal that basic amino acids 80-93 are critical for nucleolar accumulation and for incorporation into ribosomes. Our data support the growing consensus that the nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins may not be mediated by a defined localization signal, but rather by specific interaction with established nucleolar components such as rRNA.

  8. The mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) gene cluster on chromosomes 7: characterization and evolutionary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Dlouhy, Stephen R; Karn, Robert C

    2003-10-01

    Mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) is a pair of dimers, composed of an alpha subunit disulfide bridged to either a beta or a gamma subunit. It has been proposed that each subunit is encoded by a distinct gene: Abpa, Abpb, and Abpg for the alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, respectively. We report here the structures and sequences of the genes that encode these three subunits. Each gene has three exons separated by two introns. Mouse salivary ABP is a member of the secretoglobin family, and we compare the structure of the three ABP subunit genes to those of 18 other mammalian secretoglobins. We map the three genes as a gene cluster located 10 cM from the centromere of Chromosome (Chr) 7 and show that Abpa is the closest of the three to the gene for glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) and that Abpg is the closest to the centromere, with Abpb mapping between them. Abpa is oriented in the opposite direction to Abpb and Abpg, with its 5' end directed toward their 5' ends. We compare the location of these genes with other secretoglobin genes in the mouse genome and with the known locations of secretoglobin genes in the human genome and present evidence that strong positive selection has driven the divergence of the coding regions of Abpb and Abpg since the putative duplication event that created them.

  9. Type IV fimbrial subunit protein ApfA contributes to protection against porcine pleuropneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadilkova Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porcine pleuropneumonia caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae accounts for serious economic losses in the pig farming industry worldwide. We examined here the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant type IV fimbrial subunit protein ApfA as a single antigen vaccine against pleuropneumonia, or as a component of a multi-antigen preparation comprising five other recombinant antigens derived from key virulence factors of A. pleuropneumoniae (ApxIA, ApxIIA, ApxIIIA, ApxIVA and TbpB. Immunization of pigs with recombinant ApfA alone induced high levels of specific serum antibodies and provided partial protection against challenge with the heterologous A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 strain. This protection was higher than that engendered by vaccination with rApxIVA or rTbpB alone and similar to that observed after immunization with the tri-antigen combination of rApxIA, rApxIIA and rApxIIIA. In addition, rApfA improved the vaccination potential of the penta-antigen mixture of rApxIA, rApxIIA, rApxIIIA, rApxIVA and rTbpB proteins, where the hexa-antigen vaccine containing rApfA conferred a high level of protection on pigs against the disease. Moreover, when rApfA was used for vaccination alone or in combination with other antigens, such immunization reduced the number of pigs colonized with the challenge strain. These results indicate that ApfA could be a valuable component of an efficient subunit vaccine for the prevention of porcine pleuropneumonia.

  10. Type IV fimbrial subunit protein ApfA contributes to protection against porcine pleuropneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Porcine pleuropneumonia caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae accounts for serious economic losses in the pig farming industry worldwide. We examined here the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant type IV fimbrial subunit protein ApfA as a single antigen vaccine against pleuropneumonia, or as a component of a multi-antigen preparation comprising five other recombinant antigens derived from key virulence factors of A. pleuropneumoniae (ApxIA, ApxIIA, ApxIIIA, ApxIVA and TbpB). Immunization of pigs with recombinant ApfA alone induced high levels of specific serum antibodies and provided partial protection against challenge with the heterologous A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 strain. This protection was higher than that engendered by vaccination with rApxIVA or rTbpB alone and similar to that observed after immunization with the tri-antigen combination of rApxIA, rApxIIA and rApxIIIA. In addition, rApfA improved the vaccination potential of the penta-antigen mixture of rApxIA, rApxIIA, rApxIIIA, rApxIVA and rTbpB proteins, where the hexa-antigen vaccine containing rApfA conferred a high level of protection on pigs against the disease. Moreover, when rApfA was used for vaccination alone or in combination with other antigens, such immunization reduced the number of pigs colonized with the challenge strain. These results indicate that ApfA could be a valuable component of an efficient subunit vaccine for the prevention of porcine pleuropneumonia. PMID:22240397

  11. The helical domain of a G protein alpha subunit is a regulator of its effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Northup, J K

    1998-10-27

    The alpha subunit (Galpha) of heterotrimeric G proteins is a major determinant of signaling selectivity. The Galpha structure essentially comprises a GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). We used the vertebrate phototransduction model to test for potential functions of HD and found that the HD of the retinal transducin Galpha (Galphat) and the closely related gustducin (Galphag), but not Galphai1, Galphas, or Galphaq synergistically enhance guanosine 5'-gamma[-thio]triphosphate bound Galphat (GalphatGTPgammaS) activation of bovine rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). In addition, both HDt and HDg, but not HDi1, HDs, or HDq attenuate the trypsin-activated PDE. GalphatGDP and HDt attenuation of trypsin-activated PDE saturate with similar affinities and to an identical 38% of initial activity. These data suggest that interaction of intact Galphat with the PDE catalytic core may be caused by the HD moiety, and they indicate an independent site(s) for the HD moiety of Galphat within the PDE catalytic core in addition to the sites for the inhibitory Pgamma subunits. The HD moiety of GalphatGDP is an attenuator of the activated catalytic core, whereas in the presence of activated GalphatGTPgammaS the independently expressed HDt is a potent synergist. Rhodopsin catalysis of Galphat activation enhances the PDE activation produced by subsaturating levels of Galphat, suggesting a HD-moiety synergism from a transient conformation of Galphat. These results establish HD-selective regulations of vertebrate retinal PDE, and they provide evidence demonstrating that the HD is a modulatory domain. We suggest that the HD works in concert with the RasD, enhancing the efficiency of G protein signaling.

  12. Evolutionary and physical linkage between calpains and penta-EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Masatoshi; Maemoto, Yuki; Osako, Yohei; Shibata, Hideki

    2012-04-01

    The name calpain was historically given to a protease that is activated by Ca(2+) and whose primary structure contains a Ca(2+)-binding penta-EF-hand (PEF) as well as a calpain cysteine protease (CysPc) domain and a C2-domain-like (C2L) domain. In the human genome, CysPc domains are found in 15 genes, but only nine of them encode PEF domains. Fungi and budding yeasts have calpain-like sequences that lack the PEF domain, and each protein (designated PalB and Rim13, respectively) is orthologous to human calpain-7, indicating that the calpain-7 orthologs are evolutionarily more conserved than classical calpains possessing PEF domains. An N-terminal region of calpain-7 has a tandem repeat of microtubule-interacting and transport domains that interact with a subset of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) III proteins. In addition to calpains, PEF domains are found in other Ca(2+)-binding proteins including ALG-2 that associates with ALIX (an ESCRT-III accessory protein) and TSG101 (an ESCRT-I subunit). Phylogenetic comparison of dissected domain structures of calpains and experimentally confirmed protein-protein interaction networks imply that there is an evolutionary and physical linkage between mammalian calpains and PEF proteins involving the ESCRT system.

  13. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  14. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology...

  16. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activatio...

  17. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple

  18. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovir

  19. Conformational thermodynamics of metal-ion binding to a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-08-01

    Conformational changes in proteins induced by metal-ions play extremely important role in various cellular processes and technological applications. Dihedral angles are suitable conformational variables to describe microscopic conformations of a biomacromolecule. Here, we use the histograms of the dihedral angles to study the thermodynamics of conformational changes of a protein upon metal-ion binding. Our method applied to Ca2+ ion binding to an important metalloprotein, Calmodulin, reveals different thermodynamic changes in different metal-binding sites. The ligands coordinating to Ca2+ ions also play different roles in stabilizing the metal-ion coordinated protein-structure. Metal-ion binding induce remarkable thermodynamic changes in distant part of the protein via modification of secondary structural elements.

  20. Chromodomain helicase binding protein 8 (Chd8 is a novel A-kinase anchoring protein expressed during rat cardiac development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen O Shanks

    Full Text Available A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs bind the regulatory subunits of protein kinase A (PKA and localize the holoenzyme to discrete signaling microdomains in multiple subcellular compartments. Despite emerging evidence for a nuclear pool of PKA that rapidly responds to activation of the PKA signaling cascade, only a few AKAPs have been identified that localize to the nucleus. Here we show a PKA-binding domain in the amino terminus of Chd8, and demonstrate subcellular colocalization of Chd8 with RII. RII overlay and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate binding between Chd8-S and RIIα. Binding is abrogated upon dephosphorylation of RIIα. By immunofluorescence, we identified nuclear and perinuclear pools of Chd8 in HeLa cells and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We also show high levels of Chd8 mRNA in RNA extracted from post-natal rat hearts. These data add Chd8 to the short list of known nuclear AKAPs, and implicate a function for Chd8 in post-natal rat cardiac development.

  1. Replication protein A subunit 3 and the iron efficiency response in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Sarah E; O'Rourke, Jamie A; Peiffer, Gregory A; Yin, Tengfei; Majumder, Mahbubul; Zhang, Chunquan; Cianzio, Silvia R; Hill, John H; Cook, Dianne; Whitham, Steven A; Shoemaker, Randy C; Graham, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], iron deficiency results in interveinal chlorosis and decreased photosynthetic capacity, leading to stunting and yield loss. In this study, gene expression analyses investigated the role of soybean replication protein A (RPA) subunits during iron stress. Nine RPA homologs were significantly differentially expressed in response to iron stress in the near isogenic lines (NILs) Clark (iron efficient) and Isoclark (iron inefficient). RPA homologs exhibited opposing expression patterns in the two NILs, with RPA expression significantly repressed during iron deficiency in Clark but induced in Isoclark. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to repress GmRPA3 expression in the iron inefficient line Isoclark and mirror expression in Clark. GmRPA3-silenced plants had improved IDC symptoms and chlorophyll content under iron deficient conditions and also displayed stunted growth regardless of iron availability. RNA-Seq comparing gene expression between GmRPA3-silenced and empty vector plants revealed massive transcriptional reprogramming with differential expression of genes associated with defense, immunity, aging, death, protein modification, protein synthesis, photosynthesis and iron uptake and transport genes. Our findings suggest the iron efficient genotype Clark is able to induce energy controlling pathways, possibly regulated by SnRK1/TOR, to promote nutrient recycling and stress responses in iron deficient conditions.

  2. Regulation of Cop9 signalosome activity by the EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein tescalcin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2014-06-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein tescalcin is known to be involved in hematopoietic cell differentiation; however, this mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we identify CSN4 (subunit 4 of the COP9 signalosome) as a novel binding partner of tescalcin. The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a multiprotein complex that is essential for development in all eukaryotes. This interaction is selective, Ca(2+)-dependent and involves the PCI domain of CSN4 subunit. We then investigated tescalcin and CSN activity in human erythroleukemia HEL and promyelocytic leukemia K562 cells and find that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced differentiation, resulting in the upregulation of tescalcin, coincides with reduced deneddylation of cullin-1 (Cul1) and stabilization of p27(Kip1) - molecular events that are associated with CSN activity. The knockdown of tescalcin led to an increase in Cul1 deneddylation, expression of F-box protein Skp2 and the transcription factor c-Jun, whereas the levels of cell cycle regulators p27(Kip1) and p53 decreased. These effects are consistent with the hypothesis that tescalcin might play a role as a negative regulator of CSN activity towards Cul1 in the process of induced cell differentiation.

  3. Fibronectin binding to protein A-containing staphylococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Doran, J E; Raynor, R H

    1981-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) was found to bind to protein A-containing isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, but not to mutant strains devoid of this protein nor to clinical isolates of S. epidermidis. Fn was purified from human plasma by affinity chromatography on gelatin-Sepharose. After elution with 4 M urea, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified material detected no immunoglobulin contamination. This purified Fn was radiolabeled with 125I and used in binding assays. Quant...

  4. A subunit vaccine against the adenovirus egg-drop syndrome using part of its fiber protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerut, E; Gutter, B; Gallili, G; Michael, A; Pitcovski, J

    2003-06-20

    In this study, the effectiveness of antibodies against the hexon, fiber or a fiber fragment of an avian adenovirus egg-drop syndrome (EDS), in neutralizing the virus was tested. The fiber protein is responsible for binding the virus to the target cell. The fiber fragment knob-s comprises the carboxy-terminal knob domain and 34 amino acids of the immediately adjacent shaft domain of the adenovirus fiber protein. The hexon, fiber capsid protein and knob-s were produced in E. coli and injected into chickens. Antibodies that were produced against the whole fiber protein showed some hemagglutination inhibition (HI) activity. Antibodies produced against the knob-s protein showed HI activity and serum neutralization (SN) activity similar to the positive control-whole virus vaccine. We assume that production of only part of the fiber enables the protein produced in E. coli to fold correctly. Antibodies produced against the hexon protein showed no SN activity. In summary, knob-s induced SN and HI antibodies against EDS virus at a rate similar to the whole virus and were significantly more efficient than the full-length fiber. The recombinant knob-s protein may be used as a vaccine against pathogenic adenovirus infections.

  5. A P-loop Mutation in G[alpha] Subunits Prevents Transition to the Active State: Implications for G-protein Signaling in Fungal Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Willard, Francis S.; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Melinda D.; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Siderovski, David P. (UNC); (Singapore)

    2012-10-23

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches integral to a panoply of different physiological responses that many organisms make to environmental cues. The switch from inactive to active G{alpha}{beta}{gamma} heterotrimer relies on nucleotide cycling by the G{alpha} subunit: exchange of GTP for GDP activates G{alpha}, whereas its intrinsic enzymatic activity catalyzes GTP hydrolysis to GDP and inorganic phosphate, thereby reverting G{alpha} to its inactive state. In several genetic studies of filamentous fungi, such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, a G42R mutation in the phosphate-binding loop of G{alpha} subunits is assumed to be GTPase-deficient and thus constitutively active. Here, we demonstrate that G{alpha}(G42R) mutants are not GTPase deficient, but rather incapable of achieving the activated conformation. Two crystal structure models suggest that Arg-42 prevents a typical switch region conformational change upon G{alpha}{sub i1}(G42R) binding to GDP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -} or GTP, but rotameric flexibility at this locus allows for unperturbed GTP hydrolysis. G{alpha}(G42R) mutants do not engage the active state-selective peptide KB-1753 nor RGS domains with high affinity, but instead favor interaction with G{beta}{gamma} and GoLoco motifs in any nucleotide state. The corresponding G{alpha}{sub q}(G48R) mutant is not constitutively active in cells and responds poorly to aluminum tetrafluoride activation. Comparative analyses of M. oryzae strains harboring either G42R or GTPase-deficient Q/L mutations in the G{alpha} subunits MagA or MagB illustrate functional differences in environmental cue processing and intracellular signaling outcomes between these two G{alpha} mutants, thus demonstrating the in vivo functional divergence of G42R and activating G-protein mutants.

  6. Theoretical studies of protein-protein and protein-DNA binding rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A.

    Proteins are folded chains of amino acids. Some of the amino acids (e.g. Lys, Arg, His, Asp, and Glu) carry charges under physiological conditions. Proteins almost always function through binding to other proteins or ligands, for example barnase is a ribonuclease protein, found in the bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaceus. Barnase degrades RNA by hydrolysis. For the bacterium to inhibit the potentially lethal action of Barnase within its own cell it co-produces another protein called barstar which binds quickly, and tightly, to barnase. The biological function of this binding is to block the active site of barnase. The speeds (rates) at which proteins associate are vital to many biological processes. They span a wide range (from less than 103 to 108 M-1s-1 ). Rates greater than ˜ 106 M -1s-1 are typically found to be manifestations of enhancements by long-range electrostatic interactions between the associating proteins. A different paradigm appears in the case of protein binding to DNA. The rate in this case is enhanced through attractive surface potential that effectively reduces the dimensionality of the available search space for the diffusing protein. This thesis presents computational and theoretical models on the rate of association of ligands/proteins to other proteins or DNA. For protein-protein association we present a general strategy for computing protein-protein rates of association. The main achievements of this strategy is the ability to obtain a stringent reaction criteria based on the landscape of short-range interactions between the associating proteins, and the ability to compute the effect of the electrostatic interactions on the rates of association accurately using the best known solvers for Poisson-Boltzmann equation presently available. For protein-DNA association we present a mathematical model for proteins targeting specific sites on a circular DNA topology. The main achievements are the realization that a linear DNA with reflecting ends

  7. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  8. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  9. Exploring Protein-Peptide Binding Specificity through Computational Peptide Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Bhattacherjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The binding of short disordered peptide stretches to globular protein domains is important for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein transport, and immune response. The often promiscuous nature of these interactions and the conformational flexibility of the peptide chain, sometimes even when bound, make the binding specificity of this type of protein interaction a challenge to understand. Here we develop and test a Monte Carlo-based procedure for calculating protein-peptide binding thermodynamics for many sequences in a single run. The method explores both peptide sequence and conformational space simultaneously by simulating a joint probability distribution which, in particular, makes searching through peptide sequence space computationally efficient. To test our method, we apply it to 3 different peptide-binding protein domains and test its ability to capture the experimentally determined specificity profiles. Insight into the molecular underpinnings of the observed specificities is obtained by analyzing the peptide conformational ensembles of a large number of binding-competent sequences. We also explore the possibility of using our method to discover new peptide-binding pockets on protein structures.

  10. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  11. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for C4b-bindin

  12. A comparative analysis of the heterotrimeric G-protein Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits in the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gummer Joel P A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been well established that the Gα subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein in the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum is required for a variety of phenotypes including pathogenicity, melanisation and asexual differentiation. The roles though of the Gγ and Gβ subunits though were unclear. The objective of this study was to identify and understand the role of these subunits and assess their requirement for pathogenicity and development. Results G-protein Gγ and Gβ subunits, named Gga1 and Gba1 respectively, were identified in the Stagonospora nodorum genome by comparative analysis with known fungal orthologues. A reverse genetics technique was used to study the role of these and revealed that the mutant strains displayed altered in vitro growth including a differential response to a variety of exogenous carbon sources. Pathogenicity assays showed that Stagonospora nodorum strains lacking Gba1 were essentially non-pathogenic whilst Gga1-impaired strains displayed significantly slower growth in planta. Subsequent sporulation assays showed that like the previously described Gα subunit mutants, both Gba1 and Gga1 were required for asexual sporulation with neither mutant strain being able to differentiate either pycnidia nor pycnidiospores under normal growth conditions. Continued incubation at 4°C was found to complement the mutation in each of the G-protein subunits with nearly wild-type levels of pycnidia recovered. Conclusion This study provides further evidence on the significance of cAMP-dependent signal transduction for many aspects of fungal development and pathogenicity. The observation that cold temperatures can complement the G-protein sporulation defect now provides an ideal tool by which asexual differentiation can now be dissected.

  13. Proteome-wide search reveals unexpected RNA-binding proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta G Tsvetanova

    Full Text Available The vast landscape of RNA-protein interactions at the heart of post-transcriptional regulation remains largely unexplored. Indeed it is likely that, even in yeast, a substantial fraction of the regulatory RNA-binding proteins (RBPs remain to be discovered. Systematic experimental methods can play a key role in discovering these RBPs--most of the known yeast RBPs lack RNA-binding domains that might enable this activity to be predicted. We describe here a proteome-wide approach to identify RNA-protein interactions based on in vitro binding of RNA samples to yeast protein microarrays that represent over 80% of the yeast proteome. We used this procedure to screen for novel RBPs and RNA-protein interactions. A complementary mass spectrometry technique also identified proteins that associate with yeast mRNAs. Both the protein microarray and mass spectrometry methods successfully identify previously annotated RBPs, suggesting that other proteins identified in these assays might be novel RBPs. Of 35 putative novel RBPs identified by either or both of these methods, 12, including 75% of the eight most highly-ranked candidates, reproducibly associated with specific cellular RNAs. Surprisingly, most of the 12 newly discovered RBPs were enzymes. Functional characteristics of the RNA targets of some of the novel RBPs suggest coordinated post-transcriptional regulation of subunits of protein complexes and a possible link between mRNA trafficking and vesicle transport. Our results suggest that many more RBPs still remain to be identified and provide a set of candidates for further investigation.

  14. Binding site for Xenopus ribosomal protein L5 and accompanying structural changes in 5S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripture, J Benjamin; Huber, Paul W

    2011-05-10

    The structure of the eukaryotic L5-5S rRNA complex was investigated in protection and interference experiments and is compared with the corresponding structure (L18-5S rRNA) in the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. In close correspondence with the archaeal structure, the contact sites for the eukaryotic ribosomal protein are located primarily in helix III and loop C and secondarily in loop A and helix V. While the former is unique to L5, the latter is also a critical contact site for transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), accounting for the mutually exclusive binding of these two proteins to 5S RNA. The binding of L5 causes structural changes in loops B and C that expose nucleotides that contact the Xenopus L11 ortholog in H. marismortui. This induced change in the structure of the RNA reveals the origins of the cooperative binding to 5S rRNA that has been observed for the bacterial counterparts of these proteins. The native structure of helix IV and loop D antagonizes binding of L5, indicating that this region of the RNA is dynamic and also influenced by the protein. Examination of the crystal structures of Thermus thermophilus ribosomes in the pre- and post-translocation states identified changes in loop D and in the surrounding region of 23S rRNA that support the proposal that 5S rRNA acts to transmit information between different functional domains of the large subunit.

  15. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  16. High-Fidelity DNA Sensing by Protein Binding Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.258103

    2010-01-01

    One of the major functions of RecA protein in the cell is to bind single-stranded DNA exposed upon damage, thereby triggering the SOS repair response.We present fluorescence anisotropy measurements at the binding onset, showing enhanced DNA length discrimination induced by adenosine triphosphate consumption. Our model explains the observed DNA length sensing as an outcome of out-of equilibrium binding fluctuations, reminiscent of microtubule dynamic instability. The cascade architecture of the binding fluctuations is a generalization of the kinetic proofreading mechanism. Enhancement of precision by an irreversible multistage pathway is a possible design principle in the noisy biological environment.

  17. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF EXTRACTABLE PROTEIN BINDING USING MALEIC ANHYDRIDE COPOLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thirawan Nipithakul; Ladawan Watthanachote; Nanticha Kalapat

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study of using maleic anhydride copolymer for protein binding has been carried out.The polymeric films were prepared by compression of the purified resin and annealing the film to induce efficient back formation of the anhydride groups.The properties of the film surface were analyzed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements.The protein content was determined by Bradford assay.To obtain optimum conditions,immersion time for protein binding was examined.Results revealed that proteins can be successfully immobilized onto the film surface via covalent linkage.The efficiency of the covalent binding of the extractable protein to maleic anhydride-polyethylene film was estimated at 69.87 μtg/cm2,although the film had low anhydride content (3%) on the surface.

  18. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  19. Mapping of the human NMDA receptor subunit (NMDAR1) and the proposed NMDA receptor glutamate-binding subunit (NMDARA1) to chromosomes 9q34.3 and chromosome 8, respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C; Duff, C; Duncan, A M;

    1993-01-01

    A role for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the molecular pathology underlying Huntington disease (HD) has been proposed on the basis of neurochemical studies in HD and the ability of the NMDA receptor to mediate neuronal cell death. The molecular cloning of the human NMDA receptor...... subunit (NMDAR1) and a proposed glutamate-binding subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDARA1) have provided an opportunity to test the hypothesis that either of these genes might be directly involved in the causation of HD. We have mapped NMDAR1 to 9q34.3 using in situ hybridization studies and NMDARA1...... that the gene for torsion dystonia has also been localized by genetic studies to 9q34.3, the same regional map location as NMDAR1....

  20. Identification of a system required for the functional surface localization of sugar binding proteins with class III signal peptides in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zolghadr, Behnam; Weber, Stefan; Szabo, Zalan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2007-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains an unusual large number of sugar binding proteins that are synthesized as precursors with a class III signal peptide. Such signal peptides are commonly used to direct archaeal flagellin subunits or bacterial (pseudo)pilins into extracel

  1. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  2. Mapping of ligand-binding cavities in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C David; Chen, Brian Y; Linusson, Anna

    2010-05-01

    The complex interactions between proteins and small organic molecules (ligands) are intensively studied because they play key roles in biological processes and drug activities. Here, we present a novel approach to characterize and map the ligand-binding cavities of proteins without direct geometric comparison of structures, based on Principal Component Analysis of cavity properties (related mainly to size, polarity, and charge). This approach can provide valuable information on the similarities and dissimilarities, of binding cavities due to mutations, between-species differences and flexibility upon ligand-binding. The presented results show that information on ligand-binding cavity variations can complement information on protein similarity obtained from sequence comparisons. The predictive aspect of the method is exemplified by successful predictions of serine proteases that were not included in the model construction. The presented strategy to compare ligand-binding cavities of related and unrelated proteins has many potential applications within protein and medicinal chemistry, for example in the characterization and mapping of "orphan structures", selection of protein structures for docking studies in structure-based design, and identification of proteins for selectivity screens in drug design programs.

  3. Binding mechanisms of intrinsically disordered proteins: theory, simulation, and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mollica

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed e.g. in the fly-casting hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit, are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  4. The G-protein gamma subunit gpc-1 of the nematode C.elegans is involved in taste adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Jansen (Gert); D. Weinkove (David); R.A. Plasterk (Ronald)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCaenorhabditis elegans has two heterotrimeric G-protein gamma subunits, gpc-1 and gpc-2. Although GPC-1 is specifically expressed in sensory neurons, it is not essential for the detection of odorants or salts. To test whether GPC-1 is involved in sensory plasticity, we

  5. Positions of proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, V; Capel, M; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1984-04-01

    A map of the 30 S ribosomal subunit is presented giving the positions of 15 of its 21 proteins. The components located in the map are S1, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S18 and S20.

  6. Basic domains target protein subunits of the RNase MRP complex to the nucleolus independently of complex association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Heijden, A.G. van der; Janssen, R.J.T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The RNase MRP and RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles both function as endoribonucleases, have a similar RNA component, and share several protein subunits. RNase MRP has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing and mitochondrial DNA replication, whereas RNase P functions in pre-tRNA processing. Both R

  7. Structure of a C-terminal fragment of its Vps53 subunit suggests similarity of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex to a family of tethering complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasan, Neil; Hutagalung, Alex; Novick, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M. (Yale); (UCLJ)

    2010-08-13

    The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is a membrane-tethering complex that functions in traffic from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Here we present the structure of a C-terminal fragment of the Vps53 subunit, important for binding endosome-derived vesicles, at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. We show that the C terminus consists of two {alpha}-helical bundles arranged in tandem, and we identify a highly conserved surface patch, which may play a role in vesicle recognition. Mutations of the surface result in defects in membrane traffic. The fold of the Vps53 C terminus is strongly reminiscent of proteins that belong to three other tethering complexes - Dsl1, conserved oligomeric Golgi, and the exocyst - thought to share a common evolutionary origin. Thus, the structure of the Vps53 C terminus suggests that GARP belongs to this family of complexes.

  8. Competing binding of metal ions with protein studied by microdialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Ming(郭明); KONG; Liang(孔亮); MAO; Xiqin(毛希琴); LI; Xin(历欣); ZOU; Hanfa(邹汉法)

    2002-01-01

    A method has been established to study the competing binding of metal ions with protein by a combined technique of microdialysis with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ni2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Cu2+ and human serum albumin (HSA) were chosen as model metal ions and protein. The experimental results show that Ni2+ and Cu2+ share a common primary binding site on HSA, and Zn2+ and Cd2+ share a different common primary binding site from them, but there is a common multi-metal binding site for all of those four metal ions. This method show advantages of fast sampling, easily to be operated and especially to be useful when ideal spectroscopic probes are not available for the study of interaction between protein and metal ions.

  9. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex.

  10. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  11. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  12. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  13. TALE proteins bind to both active and inactive chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James N F; Kupinski, Adam P; Kirkham, Christopher M; Tuma, Roman; Boyes, Joan

    2014-02-15

    TALE (transcription activator-like effector) proteins can be tailored to bind to any DNA sequence of choice and thus are of immense utility for genome editing and the specific delivery of transcription activators. However, to perform these functions, they need to occupy their sites in chromatin. In the present study, we have systematically assessed TALE binding to chromatin substrates and find that in vitro TALEs bind to their target site on nucleosomes at the more accessible entry/exit sites, but not at the nucleosome dyad. We show further that in vivo TALEs bind to transcriptionally repressed chromatin and that transcription increases binding by only 2-fold. These data therefore imply that TALEs are likely to bind to their target in vivo even at inactive loci.

  14. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  15. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  16. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  17. AKAP3 synthesis is mediated by RNA binding proteins and PKA signaling during mouse spermiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaibiao; Yang, Lele; Zhao, Danyun; Wu, Yaoyao; Qi, Huayu

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is regulated by coordinated gene expression in a spatiotemporal manner. The spatiotemporal regulation of major sperm proteins plays important roles during normal development of the male gamete, of which the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. A-kinase anchoring protein 3 (AKAP3) is one of the major components of the fibrous sheath of the sperm tail that is formed during spermiogenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of sperm-specific Akap3 and the potential regulatory factors of its protein synthesis during mouse spermiogenesis. Results showed that the transcription of Akap3 precedes its protein synthesis by about 2 wk. Nascent AKAP3 was found to form protein complex with PKA and RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO, as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation and protein mass spectrometry. RNA electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay showed that these RBPs bind sperm-specific mRNAs, of which proteins are synthesized during the elongating stage of spermiogenesis. Biochemical and cell biological experiments demonstrated that PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO interact with each other and colocalize in spermatids' RNA granule, the chromatoid body. In addition, NONO was found in extracytoplasmic granules in round spermatids, whereas PIWIL1 and PABPC1 were diffusely localized in cytoplasm of elongating spermatids, indicating their participation at different steps of mRNA metabolism during spermatogenesis. Interestingly, type I PKA subunits colocalize with PIWIL1 and PABPC1 in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids and cosediment with the RBPs in polysomal fractions on sucrose gradients. Further biochemical analyses revealed that activation of PKA positively regulates AKAP3 protein synthesis without changing its mRNA level in elongating spermatids. Taken together, these results indicate that PKA signaling directly participates in the regulation of protein translation in postmeiotic male germ cells

  18. Characterization of EhCaBP, a calcium-binding protein of Entamoeba histolytica and its binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, N; Chandok, M R; Prasad, J; Bhattacharya, S; Sopory, S K; Bhattacharya, A

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein (EhCaBP) has been recently identified and characterized from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In order to decipher the function of this protein, a few basic properties were investigated and compared with the ubiquitous Ca(2+)-signal transducing protein calmodulin (CaM). Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analyses using specific antibodies against EhCaBP suggest that it is a soluble cytoplasmic protein with no major post-translational modification. EhCaBP did not stimulate cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, differentiating it from all known CaMs. Affinity chromatography of [35S]methionine-labelled proteins of E. histolytica trophozoites using EhCaBP-sepharose column showed Ca(2+)-dependent binding of a group of proteins. Radiolabelled proteins from the same extract also bound to CaM-sepharose. However, the proteins bound to the two columns were different as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least one of the EhCaBP-binding proteins became phosphorylated as revealed by in vivo phosphorylation analysis. The binding-proteins could not be detected in E. invadens (a species that is pathogenic in reptiles) and E. moshkovskii (which is found in the human gut but is not pathogenic), two species in which EhCaBP-like protein has not been found. Two distinct Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, which get activated by EhCaBP and CaM respectively, were detected in E. histolytica. These kinases require different levels of Ca2+ for their maximal activities. Affinity chromatography also showed the binding of protein kinase(s) to EhCaBP in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Our data suggest that there may be novel Ca(2+)-signal transduction pathway in E. histolytica mediated by EhCaBP.

  19. Selectivity determinants of GPCR-G-protein binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flock, Tilman; Hauser, Alexander S; Lund, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The selective coupling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to specific G proteins is critical to trigger the appropriate physiological response. However, the determinants of selective binding have remained elusive. Here we reveal the existence of a selectivity barcode (that is, patterns of ami...

  20. Determination of multivalent protein-ligand binding kinetics by second-harmonic correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2014-11-18

    Binding kinetics of the multivalent proteins peanut agglutinin (PnA) and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) to a GM1-doped 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were investigated by both second-harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) and a traditional equilibrium binding isotherm. Adsorption and desorption rates, as well as binding affinity and binding free energy, for three bulk protein concentrations were determined by SHCS. For PnA binding to GM1, the measured adsorption rate decreased with increasing bulk PnA concentration from (3.7 ± 0.3) × 10(6) M(-1)·s(-1) at 0.43 μM PnA to (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(5) M(-1)·s(-1) at 12 μM PnA. CTB-GM1 exhibited a similar trend, decreasing from (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(9) M(-1)·s(-1) at 0.5 nM CTB to (3.5 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1)·s(-1) at 240 nM CTB. The measured desorption rates in both studies did not exhibit any dependence on initial protein concentration. As such, 0.43 μM PnA and 0.5 nM CTB had the strongest measured binding affinities, (3.7 ± 0.8) × 10(9) M(-1) and (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10(13) M(-1), respectively. Analysis of the binding isotherm data suggests there is electrostatic repulsion between protein molecules when PnA binds GM1, while CTB-GM1 demonstrates positive ligand-ligand cooperativity. This study provides additional insight into the complex interactions between multivalent proteins and their ligands and showcases SHCS for examining these complex yet technologically important protein-ligand complexes used in biosensors, immunoassays, and other biomedical diagnostics.

  1. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1982-01-01

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with ..beta..-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to ..beta..-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants (lipids/detergents).

  2. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  3. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  4. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  5. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B.A.; Eberwine, J.; Spencer, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington`s disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to >37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and LJV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Serotype-specific epitope(s) present on the VP8 subunit of rotavirus VP4 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, G; Li, B G; Kapikian, A Z; Gorziglia, M

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones representing the VP8 and VP5 subunits of VP4 of symptomatic human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype 1 and VP4 serotype 1A) or DS-1 (VP7 serotype 2 and VP4 serotype 1B) or asymptomatic human rotavirus strain 1076 (VP7 serotype 2 and VP4 serotype 2) were constructed and inserted into the pGEMEX-1 plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. Immunization of guinea pigs with the VP8 or VP5 protein of each strain induced antibodies that neutralized the rotavirus from which the VP4 subunits were derived. In a previous study (M. Gorziglia, G. Larralde, A.Z. Kapikian, and R. M. Chanock, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:7155-7159, 1990), three distinct serotypes and one subtype of VP4 outer capsid protein were identified among 17 human rotavirus strains that had previously been assigned to five distinct VP7 serotypes. The results obtained by cross-immunoprecipitation and by neutralization assay with antisera to the VP8- and VP5-expressed proteins suggest that the VP8 subunit of VP4 contains the major antigenic site(s) responsible for serotype-specific neutralization of rotavirus via VP4, whereas the VP5 subunit of VP4 is responsible for much of the cross-reactivity observed among strains that belong to different VP4 serotypes. Images PMID:1709699

  7. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  8. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Timmers, H.T.M.; Rustgi, A.K.; Billaud, Marc; Veer, L.J. Van 't; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-teminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact di y with a key component of the basal p tdon factor TFID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentialy the same region of the c-Myc protein alo binds the product of the retinoblatoma gene,

  9. Identification of salivary mucin MUC7 binding proteins from Streptococcus gordonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton David J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salivary mucin MUC7 (previously known as MG2 can adhere to various strains of streptococci that are primary colonizers and predominant microorganisms of the oral cavity. Although there is a growing interest in interaction between oral pathogens and salivary mucins, studies reporting the specific binding sites on the bacteria are rather limited. Identification and characterization of the specific interacting proteins on the bacterial cell surface, termed adhesins, are crucial to further understand host-pathogen interactions. Results We demonstrate here, using purified MUC7 to overlay blots of SDS-extracts of Streptococcus gordonii cell surface proteins, 4 MUC7-binding bands, with apparent molecular masses of 62, 78, 84 and 133 kDa from the Streptococcus gordonii strain, PK488. Putative adhesins were identified by in-gel digestion and subsequent nanoLC-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of resultant peptides. The 62 kDa and 84 kDa bands were identified as elongation factor (EF Tu and EF-G respectively. The 78 kDa band was a hppA gene product; the 74 kDa oligopeptide-binding lipoprotein. The 133 kDa band contained two proteins; alpha enolase and DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta' subunit. Some of these proteins, for example alpha enolase are expected to be intracellular, however, flow cytometric analysis confirmed its location on the bacterial surface. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that S. gordonii expressed a number of putative MUC7 recognizing proteins and these contribute to MUC7 mucin binding of this streptococcal strain.

  10. Natural history of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushegian Arcady R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S-adenosylmethionine is a source of diverse chemical groups used in biosynthesis and modification of virtually every class of biomolecules. The most notable reaction requiring S-adenosylmethionine, transfer of methyl group, is performed by a large class of enzymes, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, which have been the focus of considerable structure-function studies. Evolutionary trajectories of these enzymes, and especially of other classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins, nevertheless, remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by computational comparison of sequences and structures of various S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Results Two widespread folds, Rossmann fold and TIM barrel, have been repeatedly used in evolution for diverse types of S-adenosylmethionine conversion. There were also cases of recruitment of other relatively common folds for S-adenosylmethionine binding. Several classes of proteins have unique unrelated folds, specialized for just one type of chemistry and unified by the theme of internal domain duplications. In several cases, functional divergence is evident, when evolutionarily related enzymes have changed the mode of binding and the type of chemical transformation of S-adenosylmethionine. There are also instances of functional convergence, when biochemically similar processes are performed by drastically different classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Comparison of remote sequence similarities and analysis of phyletic patterns suggests that the last universal common ancestor of cellular life had between 10 and 20 S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins from at least 5 fold classes, providing for S-adenosylmethionine formation, polyamine biosynthesis, and methylation of several substrates, including nucleic acids and peptide chain release factor. Conclusion We have observed several novel relationships between families that were not known to be

  11. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding protein (CPEB)1 and 2 bind to the HIF-1alpha mRNA 3'-UTR and modulate HIF-1alpha protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägele, Sonja; Kühn, Uwe; Böning, Melanie; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2009-01-01

    The heterodimeric HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor)-1 is a transcriptional master regulator of several genes involved in mammalian oxygen homoeostasis. Besides the well described regulation of the HIF-1alpha subunit via hydroxylation-mediated protein stability in hypoxia, there are several indications of an additional translational control of the HIF-1alpha mRNA, especially after growth factor stimulation. We identified an interaction of CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding protein) 1 and CPEB2 with the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of HIF-1alpha mRNA. Overexpression of CPEB1 and CPEB2 affected HIF-1alpha protein levels mediated by the 3'-UTR of HIF-1alpha mRNA. Stimulation of neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells with insulin and thus activation of endogenous CPEBs increased the expression of a luciferase reporter gene fused to the 3'-UTR of HIF-1alpha as well as endogenous HIF-1alpha protein levels. This could be abrogated by treating the cells with CPEB1 or CPEB2 siRNAs (short interfering RNAs). Injection of HIF-1alpha cRNA into Xenopus oocytes verified the elongation of the poly(A)+ (polyadenylated) tail by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Thus CPEB1 and CPEB2 are involved in the regulation of HIF-1alpha following insulin stimulation.

  12. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  13. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation. PMID:28223697

  14. PRBP: Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins Using a Random Forest Algorithm Combined with an RNA-Binding Residue Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Xiao, Ke; Sun, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of RNA-binding proteins is an incredibly challenging problem in computational biology. Although great progress has been made using various machine learning approaches with numerous features, the problem is still far from being solved. In this study, we attempt to predict RNA-binding proteins directly from amino acid sequences. A novel approach, PRBP predicts RNA-binding proteins using the information of predicted RNA-binding residues in conjunction with a random forest based method. For a given protein, we first predict its RNA-binding residues and then judge whether the protein binds RNA or not based on information from that prediction. If the protein cannot be identified by the information associated with its predicted RNA-binding residues, then a novel random forest predictor is used to determine if the query protein is a RNA-binding protein. We incorporated features of evolutionary information combined with physicochemical features (EIPP) and amino acid composition feature to establish the random forest predictor. Feature analysis showed that EIPP contributed the most to the prediction of RNA-binding proteins. The results also showed that the information from the RNA-binding residue prediction improved the overall performance of our RNA-binding protein prediction. It is anticipated that the PRBP method will become a useful tool for identifying RNA-binding proteins. A PRBP Web server implementation is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/PRBP/.

  15. Regulatory subunit B'gamma of protein phosphatase 2A prevents unnecessary defense reactions under low light in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Andrea; Wrzaczek, Michael; Scharte, Judith; Tikkanen, Mikko; Konert, Grzegorz; Rahikainen, Moona; Holmström, Maija; Hiltunen, Hanna-Maija; Rips, Stephan; Sipari, Nina; Mulo, Paula; Weis, Engelbert; von Schaewen, Antje; Aro, Eva-Mari; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2011-07-01

    Light is an important environmental factor that modulates acclimation strategies and defense responses in plants. We explored the functional role of the regulatory subunit B'γ (B'γ) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in light-dependent stress responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The predominant form of PP2A consists of catalytic subunit C, scaffold subunit A, and highly variable regulatory subunit B, which determines the substrate specificity of PP2A holoenzymes. Mutant leaves of knockdown pp2a-b'γ plants show disintegration of chloroplasts and premature yellowing conditionally under moderate light intensity. The cell-death phenotype is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide through a pathway that requires CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSION OF PR GENES5 (CPR5). Moreover, the pp2a-b'γ cpr5 double mutant additionally displays growth suppression and malformed trichomes. Similar to cpr5, the pp2a-b'γ mutant shows constitutive activation of both salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent defense pathways. In contrast to cpr5, however, pp2a-b'γ leaves do not contain increased levels of salicylic acid or jasmonic acid. Rather, the constitutive defense response associates with hypomethylation of DNA and increased levels of methionine-salvage pathway components in pp2a-b'γ leaves. We suggest that the specific B'γ subunit of PP2A is functionally connected to CPR5 and operates in the basal repression of defense responses under low irradiance.

  16. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  17. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  18. Receptor-binding domain of SARS-Cov spike protein: Soluble expression in purification and functional characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Chen; Lin Miao; Jia-Ming Li; Yan-Ying Li; Qing-Yu Zhu; Chang-Lin Zhou; Hong-Qing Fang; Hui-Peng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find a soluble and functional recombinant receptor-binding domain of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-Cov), and to analyze its receptor binding ability.METHODS: Three fusion tags (glutathione S-transferase,GST; thioredoxin, Trx; maltose-binding protein, MBP),which preferably contributes to increasing solubility and to facilitating the proper folding of heteroprotein, were used to acquire the soluble and functional expression of RBD protein in Escherichia coli( BL21( DE3 ) and Rosetta-gamiB(DE3) strains). The receptor binding ability of the purified soluble RBD protein was then detected by ELISA and flow cytometry assay.RESULTS: RBD of SARS-Cov spike protein was expressed as inclusion body when fused as TrxA tag form in both BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta-gamiB (DE3) under many different cultures and induction conditions. And there was no visible expression band on SDS-PAGE when RBD was expressed as MBP tagged form. Only GST tagged RBD was soluble expressed in BL21(DE3), and the protein was purified by AKTA Prime Chromatography system. The ELISA data anti-RBD mouse monoclonal antibody 1A5. Further flow cytometry assay demonstrated the high efficiency of RBD's binding ability to ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2)positive Vero E6 cell. And ACE2 was proved as a cellular receptor that meditated an initial-affinity interaction with SARS-Cov spike protein. The geometrical mean of GST and respectively.CONCLUSION: In this paper, we get sufficient soluble N terminal GST tagged RBD protein expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3); data from ELISA and flow cytometry assay demonstrate that the recombinant protein is functional and binding to ACE2 positive Vero E6 cell efficiently. And the recombinant RBD derived from E. coli can be used to developing subunit vaccine to block S protein binding with receptor and to neutralizing SARS-Cov infection.

  19. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  20. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the be