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Sample records for binding adhesive matrix

  1. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  2. Fucan inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) adhesion to fibronectin by binding to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Hugo A; Franco, Célia R; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Veiga, Silvio S; Leite, Edda L; Nader, Helena B; Dietrich, Carl P

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, sulfated fucans have emerged as an important class of natural biopolymers. In this study, the anti-adhesive activity of a fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi was analyzed using tumorigenic cells: wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745). Fibronectin (FN) was used as substrate for cell attachment. For both cell types, this fucan has shown a dose-dependent anti-adhesive effect, reaching saturation at around 400 mug/mL. This effect was abolished by desulfation of the fucan. In addition, this polymer exhibited the highest inhibitory effect in comparison to other sulfated polysaccharides. The fucan was biotinylated and used as a probe to identify its action sites. Biotinylated fucan was detected in the extracellular matrix environment by confocal microscopy and flow cytometric analysis, but not at the cell surface. The results suggest that the fucan shows anti-adhesive activity by binding directly to FN, and blocking FN sites that are recognized by cell surface ligands, possibly the integrin family.

  3. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  4. The fibronectin-binding integrins alpha5beta1 and alphavbeta3 differentially modulate RhoA-GTP loading, organization of cell matrix adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danen, Erik H J; Sonneveld, Petra; Brakebusch, Cord

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels...... of RhoA activity at later stages of cell spreading, which are associated with a translocation of focal contacts to peripheral cell protrusions, recruitment of tensin into fibrillar adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Expression of an activated mutant of RhoA stimulates alphavbeta3-mediated...... fibrillogenesis. Despite the fact that alpha5beta1-mediated adhesion to the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin supports activation of RhoA, other regions of fibronectin are required for the development of alpha5beta1-mediated but not alphavbeta3-mediated focal contacts. Using chimeras of beta1 and beta3...

  5. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of th...

  6. Evaluation of binding strength depending on the adhesive binding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Pasanec Preprotić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A book with a personal value is worth remembering since it represents specific interests of an individual - author of the book. Therefore the original is the first issue of a book which is always bound manually. Due to cost-effectiveness, adhesive binding is most commonly used in author’s edition in paperback and hardback. Adhesive binding methods differ only if a paper leaf is a binding unit in adhesive binding form. The subject of the research is the quality of book block binding for two binding methods with/without mull fabric. The assumption is that double-fan adhesive binding method shows an extraordinary binding quality as compared to the rough spine method. For the needs of this research book block parameters remained unaltered: paper type, size and book volume. The results related to strength were obtained by using an experimental method of tensile strength for individual paper leaves. The rating of book block quality was conducted in accordance with FOGRA Nr.71006 guidelines for page pull-test. Furthermore, strength results for both methods were compared in order to evaluate the importance of changing the quality of adhesive binding. Statistical method ANOVA analysis of variance and Fisher’s F-test were used to evaluate the quality of book block binding.

  7. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......, we show that a 5.0 kb CD44 mRNA contained multiple IMP-binding sites in its 3'UTR, and following IMP depletion this species became unstable. Direct knockdown of the CD44 transcript mimicked the effect of IMPs on invadopodia, and we infer that CD44 mRNA stabilization may be involved in IMP...

  8. Adhesion protein networks reveal functions proximal and distal to cell-matrix contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Frame, Margaret C

    2016-04-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is generally mediated by integrin receptors, which bind to intracellular adhesion proteins that form multi-molecular scaffolding and signalling complexes. The networks of proteins, and their interactions, are dynamic, mechanosensitive and extremely complex. Recent efforts to characterise adhesions using a variety of technologies, including imaging, proteomics and bioinformatics, have provided new insights into their composition, organisation and how they are regulated, and have also begun to reveal unexpected roles for so-called adhesion proteins in other cellular compartments (for example, the nucleus or centrosomes) in diseases such as cancer. We believe this is opening a new chapter on understanding the wider functions of adhesion proteins, both proximal and distal to cell-matrix contacts.

  9. Mechanosensitivity and compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Herbert B.; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions and discusses the most prevalent functional domains in adhesome proteins. It also reviews the current literature and concepts about mechanosensing mechanisms that operate at the adhesion site.

  10. Characterization of canine platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Pero, Maria Elena; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Cestaro, Anna; Signoriello, Simona; Lombardi, Pietro; Avallone, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Canine platelets have been extensively studied but little is known about specific aspects such as adhesion. Platelet adhesion is a critical step during haemostasis and thrombosis as well as during inflammatory and immunopathogenic responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesive properties of canine platelets using fibrinogen and collagen as substrates immobilized on plates. Adhesion was monitored for 120 min and the effect of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was assayed. The results showed that canine platelets displayed good adhesion activity that was significantly time-dependent. Moreover, ADP was able to enhance platelet adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. The findings aid knowledge of the adhesion process and suggest a specific role of surface platelet receptors in mediating the interaction with extracellular matrix proteins.

  11. Mac-2 binding protein is a cell-adhesive protein of the extracellular matrix which self-assembles into ring-like structures and binds beta1 integrins, collagens and fibronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Brakebusch, C; Engel, J

    1998-01-01

    in solid-phase assays to collagens IV, V and VI, fibronectin and nidogen, but not to fibrillar collagens I and III or other basement membrane proteins. The protein also mediated adhesion of cell lines at comparable strength with laminin. Adhesion to M2BP was inhibited by antibodies to integrin beta1...

  12. Adhesion of the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.C. Lima

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis. This subcutaneous mycosis may disseminate in immunocompromised individuals and also affect several internal organs and tissues, most commonly the bone, joints and lung. Since adhesion is the first step involved with the dissemination of pathogens in the host, we have studied the interaction between S. schenckii and several extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. The binding of two morphological phases of S. schenckii, yeast cells and conidia, to immobilized type II collagen, laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen and thrombospondin was investigated. Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (poly-HEMA was used as the negative control. Cell adhesion was assessed by ELISA with a rabbit anti-S. schenckii antiserum. The results indicate that both morphological phases of this fungus can bind significantly to type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin in comparison to the binding observed with BSA (used as blocking agent. The adhesion rate observed with the ECM proteins (type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin was statistically significant (P<0.05 when compared to the adhesion obtained with BSA. No significant binding of conidia was observed to either fibrinogen or thrombospondin, but yeast cells did bind to the fibrinogen. Our results indicate that S. schenckii can bind to fibronectin, laminin and type II collagen and also show differences in binding capacity according to the morphological form of the fungus.

  13. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  14. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2012-02-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modifying Matrix Materials to Increase Wetting and Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Katie

    2011-01-01

    In an alternative approach to increasing the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fiber and matrix components of organic-fiber/polymer matrix composite materials, the matrix resins are modified. Heretofore, it has been common practice to modify the fibers rather than the matrices: The fibers are modified by chemical and/or physical surface treatments prior to combining the fibers with matrix resins - an approach that entails considerable expense and usually results in degradation (typically, weakening) of fibers. The alternative approach of modifying the matrix resins does not entail degradation of fibers, and affords opportunities for improving the mechanical properties of the fiber composites. The alternative approach is more cost-effective, not only because it eliminates expensive fiber-surface treatments but also because it does not entail changes in procedures for manufacturing conventional composite-material structures. The alternative approach is best described by citing an example of its application to a composite of ultra-high-molecular- weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers in an epoxy matrix. The epoxy matrix was modified to a chemically reactive, polarized epoxy nano-matrix to increase the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The modification was effected by incorporating a small proportion (0.3 weight percent) of reactive graphitic nanofibers produced from functionalized nanofibers into the epoxy matrix resin prior to combining the resin with the UHMWPE fibers. The resulting increase in fiber/matrix adhesion manifested itself in several test results, notably including an increase of 25 percent in the maximum fiber pullout force and an increase of 60-65 percent in fiber pullout energy. In addition, it was conjectured that the functionalized nanofibers became involved in the cross linking reaction of the epoxy resin, with resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties and lower viscosity of the matrix.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory properties of benzalkonium chloride stabilizes adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Patel, Shaival K

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different concentrations of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on the preservation of adhesive interfaces created with two etch-and-rinse adhesives and its inhibitory properties on dentin matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The following groups were tested with the adhesive systems Optibond Solo Plus and All-Bond 3: Group 1, adhesive without inhibitor (control); Group 2, topical 2.0% chlorhexidine (2.0% CHX); Group 3, phosphoric acid with 1.0%wt BAC (BAC-PA); Group 4, 0.25% BAC-adhesive (0.25% BAC); Group 5, 0.5% BAC-adhesive (0.5% BAC); Group 6, 1.0% BAC-adhesive (1.0% BAC); and Group 7, 2.0% BAC-adhesive (2.0% BAC). Composite cylinders were fabricated, and shear bond strength (SBS) was evaluated after 24 h, 6 months, and 18 months of storage. Extracts from concentrated demineralized human dentin powder were subjected to SDS-PAGE and incubated in the presence of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% BAC. Overall, stable bonds were maintained for 18 months. Improved bond strengths were seen for 0.5% BAC and 1.0% BAC when bonding with Optibond Solo Plus, and for 0.25% BAC and 0.5% BAC when bonding with All-Bond 3. Zymographic analysis revealed complete inhibition of gelatinolytic activity with BAC. Benzalkonium chloride, at all concentrations, inhibited dentin proteolytic activity, which seems to have contributed to the improved bond stability after 18 months for specific combinations of BAC concentration and adhesive.

  17. Adhesion of Pharmaceutical Binding Agents I-Adhesion to polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Orafai

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of three commonly used pharmaceutical binding agents, HPMC , PVP and Gelatin to five different polymeric sheet materials was studied. After conditioning, the bond strength of the specimens were measured by shear testing method using a suitablely designed apparatus. The results were correlated to the surface energies and the solubiiity parameters of the adherends. It is concluded that the thermodynamic properties and the solubility parameters are dominant when the mechanisms of adhesion are by adsorption and diffusion respectively.

  18. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A;

    1983-01-01

    Human embryonic skin fibroblasts have been shown to attach and spread on laminin substrates in the absence of protein synthesis and presence of fibronectin-depleted serum and anti-fibronectin antibodies. Rates of attachment and the type of spreading are virtually identical on fibronectin and lami......Human embryonic skin fibroblasts have been shown to attach and spread on laminin substrates in the absence of protein synthesis and presence of fibronectin-depleted serum and anti-fibronectin antibodies. Rates of attachment and the type of spreading are virtually identical on fibronectin...... and laminin-coated substrates with the development of microfilament bundles and focal adhesions. Antibodies to laminin, but not fibronectin, will prevent or reverse fibroblast adhesion to laminin, whereas antibodies to fibronectin but not laminin will give similar results on fibronectin-coated substrates....... These and other results indicate that fibroblasts possess distinct receptors for laminin and fibronectin which on contact with suitable substrates promote adhesion through interaction with common intermediates. This type of adhesion is compatible with subsequent growth and extracellular matrix production....

  19. Distinct biophysical mechanisms of focal adhesion kinase mechanoactivation by different extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Sun, Jie; Guan, Jun-Lin; Humphries, Martin J; Craig, Susan E; Shekaran, Asha; García, Andrés J; Lu, Shaoying; Lin, Michael Z; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-11-26

    Matrix mechanics controls cell fate by modulating the bonds between integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, it remains unclear how fibronectin (FN), type 1 collagen, and their receptor integrin subtypes distinctly control force transmission to regulate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, a crucial molecular signal governing cell adhesion/migration. Here we showed, using a genetically encoded FAK biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, that FN-mediated FAK activation is dependent on the mechanical tension, which may expose its otherwise hidden FN synergy site to integrin α5. In sharp contrast, the ligation between the constitutively exposed binding motif of type 1 collagen and its receptor integrin α2 was surprisingly tension-independent to induce sufficient FAK activation. Although integrin α subunit determines mechanosensitivity, the ligation between α subunit and the ECM proteins converges at the integrin β1 activation to induce FAK activation. We further discovered that the interaction of the N-terminal protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin basic patch with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate is crucial during cell adhesion to maintain the FAK activation from the inhibitory effect of nearby protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin acidic sites. Therefore, different ECM proteins either can transmit or can shield from mechanical forces to regulate cellular functions, with the accessibility of ECM binding motifs by their specific integrin α subunits determining the biophysical mechanisms of FAK activation during mechanotransduction.

  20. A new candidate substrate for cell-matrix adhesion study: the acellular human amniotic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianchen; Lu, Xuya; Xue, Yuan; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Xiaotao; Zhao, Huajian

    2012-01-01

    In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D) matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM) with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  1. A New Candidate Substrate for Cell-Matrix Adhesion Study: The Acellular Human Amniotic Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianchen Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  2. Role of matrix metalloproteases in the kinetics of leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in post-capillary venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowsky, Herbert H; Lescanic, Anne; Sah, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx serves as a barrier to leukocyte (WBC)-endothelium (EC) adhesion. Shedding of glycans, by matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) exposes EC integrin receptors to facilitate firm adhesion. However, the effect of shedding on the strength of the adhesive bond remains to be determined. Examine the effect of MMP inhibition on the kinetics of WBC-EC adhesion under normal and inflammatory conditions to delineate differences in the duration and number of adhesive bonds. WBC adhesion in post-capillary venules was observed in rat mesentery. Adhesion duration and off-rates (KOFF) were correlated with shear stress during adhesion in response to 1 µM fMLP or 0.5 µM doxycycline (doxy, to inhibit MMP activation). Doxy increased mean adhesion time significantly from 2.5 (control) to 5.6 s, whereas fMLP increased it 8-fold to 20 s, which was not affected by pre-treatment with doxy. Estimates of the number of adhesive bonds (simplified Bell-model) revealed a significantly greater increase with fMLP compared to doxy alone, with no effect on fMLP by pretreatment with doxy. With doxy alone, KOFF was significantly 4-fold greater compared to fMLP, suggesting a much weaker bond. Although the increased number of bonds by MMP inhibition with doxy alone and fMLP were similar, the bonds due to doxy appeared weaker as evidenced by their shorter duration, and lesser reduction in KOFF relative to control. Thus doxy limits the availability of integrin binding sites during fMLP stimulated adhesion, but has a pro-adhesive effect due to increased ligands for WBC binding that arises from inhibition of normal sheddase activity on the EC.

  3. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration.

  4. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  5. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  6. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  7. Critical role of heparin binding domains of ameloblastin for dental epithelium cell adhesion and ameloblastoma proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Akira; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Aya; Arakaki, Makiko; Harada, Hidemitsu; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2009-10-02

    AMBN (ameloblastin) is an enamel matrix protein that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of ameloblasts. In AMBN-deficient mice, ameloblasts are detached from the enamel matrix, continue to proliferate, and form a multiple cell layer; often, odontogenic tumors develop in the maxilla with age. However, the mechanism of AMBN functions in these biological processes remains unclear. By using recombinant AMBN proteins, we found that AMBN had heparin binding domains at the C-terminal half and that these domains were critical for AMBN binding to dental epithelial cells. Overexpression of full-length AMBN protein inhibited proliferation of human ameloblastoma AM-1 cells, but overexpression of heparin binding domain-deficient AMBN protein had no inhibitory effect. In full-length AMBN-overexpressing AM-1 cells, the expression of Msx2, which is involved in the dental epithelial progenitor phenotype, was decreased, whereas the expression of cell proliferation inhibitors p21 and p27 was increased. We also found that the expression of enamelin, a marker of differentiated ameloblasts, was induced, suggesting that AMBN promotes odontogenic tumor differentiation. Thus, our results suggest that AMBN promotes cell binding through the heparin binding sites and plays an important role in preventing odontogenic tumor development by suppressing cell proliferation and maintaining differentiation phenotype through Msx2, p21, and p27.

  8. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  9. Binding Strength Between Cell Adhesion Proteoglycans Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammer, Ulrich; Popescu, Octavian; Wagner, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario; Guntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Misevic, Gradimir N.

    1995-02-01

    Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to adhesion molecules is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans from a marine sponge. Under physiological conditions, the adhesive force between two cell adhesion molecules was found to be up to 400 piconewtons. Thus a single pair of molecules could hold the weight of 1600 cells. High intermolecular binding forces are likely to form the basis for the integrity of the multicellular sponge organism.

  10. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  11. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  12. Drug release and adhesive properties of crospovidone-containing matrix patches based on polyisobutene and acrylic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Martin; Fussnegger, Bernhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2010-12-23

    Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were insoluble in blends of high:medium:low molecular weight polyisobutene adhesives (ratio: 1:5:0, 1:5:2 and 1:5:4) but soluble in acrylic adhesives (Durotak 87-202A, Durotak 87-2074 and Durotak 87-2677). The incorporation of drug adsorbates onto crospovidone into the polyisobutene blends yielded crystal-free patches. The drug release from these patches was independent of polyisobutene's molecular weight distribution, probably because the drug release occurred mainly through fluid filled channels. By contrast, the drug release from acrylic adhesives was independent of whether the patches contained pure drugs or drug adsorbates onto crospovidone. A higher degree of saturation (or supersaturation) in these systems resulted in a higher thermodynamic activity of the drugs and hence a higher drug release. The crystal-free acrylic and polyisobutene patches did not show drug recrystallization after 3 months at 25°C/60 RH and 40°C/75 RH. The adhesive properties of polyisobutene patches were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The area under the curve of force-distance curves recorded with the texture analyzer correlated well with the in vivo skin adhesion. The elongation at detachment showed the same trend as the in vivo matrix creep. Crospovidone contents ≤ 30% had no detrimental effect on the adhesive properties of the patches.

  13. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  14. Automatic generation of matrix element derivatives for tight binding models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Alin M.; Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Tight binding (TB) models are one approach to the quantum mechanical many-particle problem. An important role in TB models is played by hopping and overlap matrix elements between the orbitals on two atoms, which of course depend on the relative positions of the atoms involved. This dependence can be expressed with the help of Slater-Koster parameters, which are usually taken from tables. Recently, a way to generate these tables automatically was published. If TB approaches are applied to simulations of the dynamics of a system, also derivatives of matrix elements can appear. In this work we give general expressions for first and second derivatives of such matrix elements. Implemented in a tight binding computer program, like, for instance, DINAMO, they obviate the need to type all the required derivatives of all occurring matrix elements by hand.

  15. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  16. Matrix binding of ochratoxin A during roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Andrea; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-12-26

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A is degraded during coffee roasting by up to 90%. During this process, the two known degradation products, 14R-ochratoxin A and 14-decarboxy-ochratoxin A are formed. However, there is still an unexplained loss of more than 50% ochratoxin A. Here, we describe the binding of ochratoxin A to coffee polysaccharides via esterification as a further thermal reaction. This ester formation was studied by heating ochratoxin A with methyl α-d-glucopyranoside, a model compound to mimic polysaccharides. From this experiment, (22 → 6') ochratoxin A-methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside ester was isolated and characterized as a reaction product, showing the general ability of ochratoxin A for esterification with carbohydrates at roasting temperatures. Subsequently, a sample preparation protocol for the detection of ochratoxin A saccharide esters based on an enzymatic cleavage and purification using immunoaffinity chromatography was developed and applied. The detection was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Using this method, it was possible to detect ochratoxin A polysaccharide esters formed during roasting of artificially contaminated coffee, confirming the results of the previous model experiments. Thus, the formation of ochratoxin A esters is a further explanation for the loss of ochratoxin A during coffee roasting.

  17. Dynamic interplay between adhesion surfaces in carcinomas:Cell-cell and cell-matrix crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvonne E Smith; Sri HariKrishna Vellanki; Ann M Hopkins

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and communication between adhesion sites involve mechanisms which are required for cellular functions during normal development and homeostasis; however these cellular functions and mechanisms are often deregulated in cancer. Aberrant signaling at cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites often involves downstream mediators including Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinases. This review discusses these molecules as putative mediators of cellular crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to their attractiveness as therapeutic targets in cancer. Interestingly, inter-junctional crosstalk mechanisms are frequently typified by the way in which bacterial and viral pathogens opportunistically infect or intoxicate mammalian cells. This review therefore also discusses the concept of learning from pathogen-host interaction studies to better understand coordinated communication between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to highlighting the potential therapeutic usefulness of exploiting pathogens or their products to tap into inter-junctional crosstalk. Taken together, we feel that increased knowledge around mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion site crosstalk and consequently a greater understanding of their therapeutic targeting offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the emerging molecular revolution in cancer biology.

  18. Phospholipids reduce gastric cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Petra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nidation of floating tumour cells initiates peritoneal carcinosis and limits prognosis of gastro-intestinal tumours. Adhesion of tumour cells to extracellular matrix components is a pivotal step in developing peritoneal dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Since phospholipids efficaciously prevented peritoneal adhesion formation in numerous animal studies we investigated their capacity to reduce adhesions of gastric cancer cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM. Methods Human gastric cancer cells (NUGC-4, Japanese Cancer Research Resources Bank, Tokyo, Japan were used in this study. Microtiter plates were coated with collagen IV (coll, laminin (ln and fibronectin (fn. Non-specific protein binding of the coated wells was blocked by adding 1% (w/v BSA (4°C, 12 h and rinsing the wells with Hepes buffer. 50.000 tumour cells in 100 μl medium were seeded into each well. Beside the controls, phospholipids were added in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0/100 μl medium. After an incubation interval of 30 min, attached cells were fixed and stained with 0.1% (w/v crystal violet. The dye was resuspended with 50 μl of 0.2% (v/v Triton X-100 per well and colour yields were then measured by an ELISA reader at 590 nm. Optical density (OD showed a linear relationship to the amount of cells and was corrected for dying of BSA/polystyrene without cells. Results The attachment of gastric cancer cells to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin could be significantly reduced up to 53% by phospholipid concentrations of 0.5 mg/100 μl and higher. Conclusion These results, within the scope of additional experimental studies on mice and rats which showed a significant reduction of peritoneal carcinosis, demonstrated the capacity of phospholipids in controlling abdominal nidation of tumour cells to ECM components. Lipid emulsions may be a beneficial adjunct in surgery of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  19. Three-dimensional matrix stiffness and adhesive ligands affect cancer cell response to toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustiak, Silviya Petrova; Dadhwal, Smritee; Medina, Carlos; Steczina, Sonette; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Ashraf, Anisa; Asuri, Prashanth

    2016-02-01

    There is an immediate need to develop highly predictive in vitro cell-based assays that provide reliable information on cancer drug efficacy and toxicity. Development of biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models as drug screening platforms has recently gained much scientific interest as 3D cultures of cancer cells have been shown to more adequately mimic the in vivo tumor conditions. Moreover, it has been recognized that the biophysical and biochemical properties of the 3D microenvironment can play key roles in regulating various cancer cell fates, including their response to chemicals. In this study, we employed alginate-based scaffolds of varying mechanical stiffness and adhesive ligand presentation to further explore the role of 3D microenvironmental cues on glioblastoma cell response to cytotoxic compounds. Our experiments suggested the ability of both matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions to strongly influence cell responses to toxins. Cells were found to be more susceptible to the toxins when cultured in softer matrices that emulated the stiffness of brain tissue. Furthermore, the effect of matrix stiffness on differential cell responses to toxins was negated by the presence of the adhesive ligand RGD, but regained when integrin-based cell-matrix interactions were inhibited. This study therefore indicates that both 3D matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions are important parameters in the design of more predictive in vitro platforms for drug development and toxicity screening.

  20. Fibrinogen matrix deposited on the surface of biomaterials acts as a natural anti-adhesive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullin, Roman; Christenson, Wayne; Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on the luminal surface of biomaterials is a critical early event during the interaction of blood with implanted vascular graft prostheses which determines their thrombogenicity. We have recently identified a nanoscale process by which fibrinogen modifies the adhesive properties of various surfaces for platelets and leukocytes. In particular, adsorption of fibrinogen at low density promotes cell adhesion while its adsorption at high density results in the formation of an extensible multilayer matrix, which dramatically reduces cell adhesion. It remains unknown whether deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of vascular graft materials produces this anti-adhesive effect. Using atomic force spectroscopy, single cell force spectroscopy, and standard adhesion assays with platelets and leukocytes, we have characterized the adhesive and physical properties of the contemporary biomaterials, before and after coating with fibrinogen. We found that uncoated PET, PTFE and ePTFE exhibited high adhesion forces developed between the AFM tip or cells and the surfaces. Adsorption of fibrinogen at the increasing concentrations progressively reduced adhesion forces, and at ≥2 μg/ml all surfaces were virtually nonadhesive. Standard adhesion assays performed with platelets and leukocytes confirmed this dependence. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying thrombogenicity of vascular grafts.

  1. Evidence for fumonisin-corn matrix binding during nixtamalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticilliodes. They are found in corn and corn-based foods. Nixtamalization (cooking in alkaline water) reduces detectable fumonisins; however, their concentrations in foods can be underestimated if fumonisin-matrix binding occurs. The purpose of this ...

  2. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  3. Adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix as drug targets for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ishida, Joji; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The formation of tumor vasculature and cell invasion along white matter tracts have pivotal roles in the development and progression of glioma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis and invasion in glioma will aid the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The processes of angiogenesis and invasion cause the production of an array of adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This review focuses on the role of adhesion molecules and the ECM in malignant glioma. The results of clinical trials using drugs targeted against adhesion molecules and the ECM for glioma are also discussed.

  4. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  5. Integrin-Matrix Clusters Form Podosome-like Adhesions in the Absence of Traction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-han Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-activated integrins can form different adhesion structures. We report that nontransformed fibroblasts develop podosome-like adhesions when spread on fluid Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD-lipid surfaces, whereas they habitually form focal adhesions on rigid RGD glass surfaces. Similar to classic macrophage podosomes, the podosome-like adhesions are protrusive and characterized by doughnut-shaped RGD rings that surround characteristic core components including F-actin, N-WASP, and Arp2/Arp3. Furthermore, there are 18 podosome markers in these adhesions, though they lack matrix metalloproteinases that characterize invadopodia and podosomes of Src-transformed cells. When nontransformed cells develop force on integrin-RGD clusters by pulling RGD lipids to prefabricated rigid barriers (metal lines spaced by 1–2 μm, these podosomes fail to form and instead form focal adhesions. The formation of podosomes on fluid surfaces is mediated by local activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the production of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3 in a FAK/PYK2-dependent manner. Enrichment of PIP3 precedes N-WASP activation and the recruitment of RhoA-GAP ARAP3. We propose that adhesion structures can be modulated by traction force development and that production of PIP3 stimulates podosome formation and subsequent RhoA downregulation in the absence of traction force.

  6. Strength scaling of adhesive joints in polymer–matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Goutianos, Stergios; Jacobsen, Torben K.

    2009-01-01

    The fracture of adhesive joints between two glass-fibre laminates was studied by testing double cantilever beam test specimens loaded by uneven bending moments. A large-scale fracture process zone, consisting of a crack tip and a fibre bridging zone, developed. The mixed mode fracture resistance...... increased with increasing crack length, eventually reaching a steady-state level (R-curve behaviour). The steady-state fracture resistance level increased with increasing amount of tangential crack opening displacement. Cohesive laws, obtained from fracture resistance data, were used for prediction the load...

  7. Fiber/matrix adhesion in graphite/PEKK composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, R. A.; Hinkley, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with poly ether ketone ketone (PEKK) resin and AS-4, IM-7, and G30-500 fibers showed excellent correlation between resin/fiber contact angle and composite transverse flexural strength as measures of resin/fiber interfacial strength. Both tests indicate the strongest interface for G30-500/PEKK followed by IM-7/PEKK and AS-4/PEKK. Also discussed are fiber effects on interlaminar fracture and on the in situ crystallization of the matrix during composite fabrication.

  8. Extracellular matrix heparin induces alteration of the cell adhesion during brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ushakova, GA; Nikonenko, IR; Nikonenko, AG; Skibo, GG

    2002-01-01

    The studies of neuronal cell-glycosaminoglycan interactions indicate an increasing interest in the question of how heparin can mediate adhesion properties of the cell. We have found that high levels of both N-CAM concentration and heparin-binding activity were noticed in the early stages of brain fo

  9. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  10. Effect of adhesive matrix composition and terpinolene on indomethacin bioavailability in rats from transdermal therapeutic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sznitowska, Malgorzata; Janicki, Stanislaw

    2008-10-01

    Drug-in-adhesive matrix-type transdermal therapeutic systems for indomethacin (IND) were formulated and evaluated. Silicone and two types of polyacrylates were used as the bases of matrices. Terpinolene was used as a penetration enhancer. The physicochemical properties of matrices were determined. The bioavailability study of IND was performed in rats. The presence of IND in blood was demonstrated for each system. The calculated pharmacokinetics parameters for IND mainly depend on the solubility of IND in the adhesive layer. The positive influence of a penetration enhancer on IND bioavailability was observed only for one type of polyacrylate matrices.

  11. Characterization of heparin-binding site of tissue transglutaminase: its importance in cell surface targeting, matrix deposition, and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-04-13

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 (202)KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR(222). We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed.

  12. Scattering matrix of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, C.; Medina-Amayo, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A novel efficient method to calculate the scattering matrix (SM) of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians is proposed, including cases with multiterminal structures. In particular, the SM of two kinds of fundamental structures is given, which can be used to obtain the SM of bigger systems iteratively. Also, a procedure to obtain the SM of layer-composed periodic leads is described. This method allows renormalization approaches, which permits computations over macroscopic length systems without introducing additional approximations. Finally, the transmission coefficient of a ring-shaped multiterminal system and the transmission function of a square-lattice nanoribbon with a reduced width region are calculated.

  13. The modulation of platelet adhesion and activation by chitosan through plasma and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Cheng, Bill; McCarthy, Simon J; Jung, MoonSun; Whitelock, John M

    2011-10-01

    Chitosan has been shown to promote initial wound closure events to prevent blood loss. Platelet adhesion and activation are crucial early events in these processes after traumatic bleeding leading to thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion to chitosan was found to be enhanced in the presence of adsorbed plasma and extracellular matrix proteins and was found to be primarily mediated by α(IIb)β(3) integrins, while α(2)β(1) integrins were found to be involved in platelet adhesion to collagen and perlecan. Platelets were found to be activated by chitosan, as shown by an increase in the expression of α(IIb)β(3) integrins and P-selectin, while the extent of activation was modulated by the presence of proteins including perlecan and fibrinogen. Collagen-coated chitosan was found to activate platelets to the same extent as either chitosan or collagen alone. These data support the role of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins in promoting chitosan mediated platelet adhesion and activation supporting the hypothesis that chitosan promotes wound healing via these interactions.

  14. Long polar fimbriae of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 bind to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-09-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Rolling adhesion of alphaL I domain mutants decorrelated from binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Lauren R; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2006-06-30

    Activated lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1, alphaLbeta2 integrin) found on leukocytes facilitates firm adhesion to endothelial cell layers by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation. Recent work has shown that LFA-1 in a pre-activation, low-affinity state may also be involved in the initial tethering and rolling phase of the adhesion cascade. The inserted (I) domain of LFA-1 contains the ligand-binding epitope of the molecule, and a conformational change in this region during activation increases ligand affinity. We have displayed wild-type I domain on the surface of yeast and validated expression using I domain specific antibodies and flow cytometry. Surface display of I domain supports yeast rolling on ICAM-1-coated surfaces under shear flow. Expression of a locked open, high-affinity I domain mutant supports firm adhesion of yeast, while yeast displaying intermediate-affinity I domain mutants exhibit a range of rolling phenotypes. We find that rolling behavior for these mutants fails to correlate with ligand binding affinity. These results indicate that unstressed binding affinity is not the only molecular property that determines adhesive behavior under shear flow.

  16. Biotin-Avidin Based Universal Cell-Matrix Interaction for Promoting Three-Dimensional Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jia; Feng, Chuanliang

    2015-09-23

    To promote cell adhesion in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for avoiding cell anoikis, which is one of the most important issues for fundamental cell biology. Herein, a biotin-avidin based universal cell-matrix interaction for different types of cells is developed in order to achieve the promoted adhesion in 3D ECM. For the purpose, biotinylated nanofibrous hydrogels are constructed by coassembling 1,4-benzyldicarboxamide (C2) based non-biotinylated and biotinylated supramolecular gelators. The used cells are modified by avidin (AV-cells) through biotinylating cells and then interacting with avidin. After in situ encapsulating AV-cells in the hydrogels, the adhered amount can be increased by tens of percent even with adding several percentages of the biotinylated C2 gelators in the coassembly due to the specific biotin-avidin interaction. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirms that AV-cells can proliferate without varying gene expression and denaturation. Compared with the interaction between RGD and cells, this avidin-biotin interaction should be much more universal and it is feasible to be employed to promote cell adhesion for most types of cells in 3D matrix.

  17. Matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-endothelial adhesion via Rho-mediated ICAM-1 clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Harry A; Quach, Boi; Yang, Xiao; Ardekani, Soroush; Cabrera, Andrea P; Wilson, Randall; Messaoudi-Powers, Ilhem; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-08-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is a critical early step in chronic vascular inflammation associated with diabetes, emphysema, and aging. Importantly, these conditions are also marked by abnormal subendothelial matrix crosslinking (stiffness). Yet, whether and how abnormal matrix stiffness contributes to leukocyte-endothelial adhesion remains poorly understood. Using a co-culture of human monocytic cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) grown on matrices of tunable stiffness, we demonstrate that matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-EC adhesion, with both matrix softening and stiffening eliciting a two-fold increase in this adhesive interaction. This preferential endothelial adhesivity on softer and stiffer matrices was consistent with a significant increase in α-actinin-4-associated endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, a key determinant of monocyte-EC adhesion. Further, the enhanced ICAM-1 clustering on soft and stiff matrices correlated strongly with an increase in Rho activity and ROCK2 expression. Importantly, inhibition of Rho/ROCK activity blocked the effects of abnormal matrix stiffness on ICAM-1 clustering and monocyte-EC adhesion. Thus, these findings implicate matrix stiffness-dependent ICAM-1 clustering as an important regulator of vascular inflammation and provide the rationale for closely examining mechanotransduction pathways as new molecular targets for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  18. ADHESION INDUCES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-9 GENE EXPRESSION IN OVARIAN CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田方; 颜春洪; 薛红; 肖凤君

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene in cancer cells induced by adhesion with fibronectin and the underlying mechanism of cell invasion. Methods: Following adhesion of ovarian cancer cells A2780 to fibronectin, MMP mRNA expression was assayed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MMP-9 promoter was cloned from genomic DNA of HT1080 cells with PCR. The MMP-9-pGL2 reporter gene vector was constructed and then transiently transfected into A2780 cells. Results: Adhesion could induce the expression of MMP-9 gene in A2780 cells, but did not affect longer theexpression of MMP-2 or TIMP-1 gene. The induction was enhanced with longer adhesion time. When the transfected cells were allowed to adhere and spread on FN-coated surface, the promoter activity of MMP-9 gene was also enhanced dramatically. Conclusion: adhesion of cells with ECM may stimulate the expression of MMP-9 gene through stimulating the promoter activity, thereby enhancing cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  19. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Ning; Gong Yingxue; Chan, Vincent; Liao Kin [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chian, Kerm Sin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: askliao@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10{sup -7} J m{sup -2}) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  20. Control and optimization of Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 adhesion into fibrous matrix in a fibrous bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Cai, Jin; Xu, Zhinan

    2011-09-01

    The great performance of a fibrous bed bioreactor (FBB) is mainly dependent on the cell adhesion and immobilization into the fibrous matrix. Therefore, understanding the mechanism and factors controling cell adhesion in the fibrous matrix is necessary to optimize the FBB setup and further improve the fermentability. The adhesion behavior of a strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum isolated from an FBB was studied, which was proven to be affected by the different environmental conditions, such as growth phase of cells, pH, ionic strength, ionic species, and composition of media. Our results also suggested that electrostatic interactions played an important role on bacteria adhesion into the fibrous matrix. This study demonstrated that the compositions of fermentation broth would have a significant effect on cell adhesion. Consequently, a two-stage glucose supply control strategy was developed to improve the performance of FBB with higher viable cell density in the operation of the FBB setup.

  1. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  2. Adhesion of pineapple-leaf fiber to epoxy matrix: The role of surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusran Payae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are considered to have potential use as reinforcing agents in polymer composite materials because of their principle benefits: moderate strength and stiffness, low cost, and be an environmental friendly, degradable, and renewablematerial. Due to their inherently hydrophilic nature, they are prone to absorb moisture, which can plasticise or weaken theadhesion of fibers to the surrounding matrix and by this affect the performance of composites used in atmospheric humidity,particularly at elevated temperatures. The surface treatments are often applied to the fiber to improve the bond strengthbetween the fibers and matrix. This work discussed the effect of sodium hydroxide (NaOH treatment and epoxy resin as acompatibilizing agent on interface properties of pineapple leaf fiber (PALF-epoxy composites. A single-fiber fragmentationtest coupled with data reduction technique was employed to assess interface quality in terms of apparent interfacial shearstrength (IFSS or a of untreated, NaOH, and epoxy resin treated PALFs-epoxy composites. Tensile properties of untreatedand treated PALFs were also examined. It was found that both treatments substantially increase a, corresponding to animproved level of adhesion. The improvement in the level of adhesion for the alkali and epoxy treated fiber composites wasdue to an increase in the physical bonding between the alkali treated fibers and the matrix, and due to a promoted compatibilitybetween the epoxy treated fibers and matrix, respectively.

  3. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  4. Adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to extracellular matrix proteins collagens and fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitsumoto, Yasuo; Morita, Naomi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Tagomori, Mika; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Katayama, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    The adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to collagens, gelatin, fibronectin (Fn), Fn-prebound collagens, and Fn-prebound gelatin were investigated. C. perfringens could bind to Fn-prebound collagen type II, type III, and gelatin, but not to gelatin or collagens except for collagen type I directly. Recombinant Fn-binding proteins of C. perfringens, rFbpA and rFbpB, were used to examine Fn-mediated bacterial adherence to collagen type I. In the presence of rFbps, C. perfringens adherence to Fn-prebound collagen type I was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Fn was not released from the coated collagen type I by the presence of rFbps, and rFbps did not bind to collagen type I. Thus, the inhibition of C. perfringens binding to Fn-prebound collagen type I by rFbps could not be explained by the removal of Fn from collagen or by the competitive binding of rFbps to collagen. Instead, both rFbps were found to bind to C. perfringens. These results suggest the possibility that rFbps may bind to the putative Fn receptor expressed on C. perfringens and competitively inhibit Fn binding to C. perfringens.

  5. Effects of matrix metallproteinases on dentin bonding and strategies to increase durability of dentin adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyun Lee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The limited durability of resin-dentin bonds severely compromises the longevity of composite resin restorations. Resin-dentin bond degradation might occur via degradation of water-rich and resin sparse collagen matrices by host-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. This review article provides overview of current knowledge of the role of MMPs in dentin matrix degradation and four experimental strategies for extending the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. They include: (1 the use of broad-spectrum inhibitors of MMPs, (2 the use of cross-linking agents for silencing the activities of MMPs, (3 ethanol wet-bonding with hydrophobic resin, (4 biomimetic remineralization of water-filled collagen matrix. A combination of these strategies will be able to overcome the limitations in resin-dentin adhesion.

  6. Design and characterization of an adhesive matrix based on a poly(ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilurzo, Francesco; Minghetti, Paola; Pagani, Stefania; Casiraghi, Antonella; Montanari, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    The main issue in the development of transdermal patches made of poly(ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate) (Eudragit NE 40D, PMM) is the shrinkage phenomenon during the spreading of the latex onto the release liner. To solve this problem, the latex is usually freeze-dried and then re-dissolved in an organic solvent (method 1). To simplify the production process, we prepared an adhesive matrix by adding to the commercial PMM latex a plasticizer and an additive (anti-shrinkage agent) that avoids the shrinkage of the water dispersion spread onto the release liner (method 2). In some cases the active ingredient itself, such as potassium diclofenac (DK) and nicotine (NT), works as anti-shrinkage agent. In this work, the effects of the preparation method, types and concentrations of the plasticizer (triacetin and tributyl citrate) on the adhesive properties of the transdermal patches were investigated. The adhesive properties of the prepared patch were determined by texture analysis, peel adhesion test and shear adhesion. The PMM/plasticizer interactions were evaluated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the in vitro skin permeation profiles of DK and NT released from the patch were determined by Franz cell method. Generally speaking, the variables that mainly modify the adhesive properties are the concentration and type of the plasticizer. The skin permeation profiles of DK and NT from the patch prepared by method 2 overlapped with those obtained with the commercial products. The results underline that the PMM latex can be used conveniently in the development of transdermal patches.

  7. Curcumin attenuates adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinase expression in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Min Young; Hwang, Kwang Hyun; Choi, Won Hee; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Ha, Tae Youl

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, the yellow substance found in turmeric, possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammation, anticancer, and lipid-lowering properties. Because we hypothesized that curcumin could ameliorate the development of atherosclerosis, the present study focused on the effects and potential mechanisms of curcumin consumption on high-cholesterol diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. During our study, New Zealand white rabbits were fed 1 of 3 experimental diets: a normal diet, a normal diet enriched with 1% cholesterol (HCD), or an HCD supplemented with 0.2% curcumin. At the end of 8 weeks, blood samples were collected to determine the levels of serum lipids, cytokines, and soluble adhesion molecule levels. Gene expression of adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in aortas were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Compared with the HCD group, rabbits fed an HCD supplemented with 0.2% curcumin had significantly less aortic lesion areas and neointima thickening. Curcumin reduced the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum by 30.7%, 41.3%, 30.4%, and 66.9% (all P cholesterol levels. In addition, curcumin attenuated HCD-induced CD36 expression, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and soluble adhesive molecule levels. Curcumin reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, P-selectin, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and it inhibited HCD-induced up-regulation of MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Our results demonstrate that curcumin exerts an antiatherosclerotic effect, which is mediated by multiple mechanisms that include lowering serum lipids and oxidized low-density lipoprotein, thus modulating the proinflammatory cytokine levels and altering adhesion molecules and MMP gene expression.

  8. Polymerized laminin-332 matrix supports rapid and tight adhesion of keratinocytes, suppressing cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Kariya

    Full Text Available Laminin-332 (α3ß3γ2 (Lm332 supports the stable anchoring of basal keratinocytes to the epidermal basement membrane, while it functions as a motility factor for wound healing and cancer invasion. To understand these contrasting activities of Lm332, we investigated Lm332 matrices deposited by normal human keratinocytes and other Lm332-expressing cell lines. All types of the cells efficiently deposited Lm332 on the culture plates in specific patterns. On the contrary, laminins containing laminin ß1 and/or γ1 chains, such as Lm511 and Lm311, were not deposited on the culture plates even if secreted into culture medium. The Lm332 deposition was not inhibited by function-blocking antibodies to the α3 and α6 integrins but was inhibited by sodium selenate, suggesting that sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cell surface, e.g. heparan sulfate proteoglycans, might be involved in the process. HEK293 cells overexpressing exogenous Lm332 (Lm332-HEK almost exclusively deposited Lm332 on the plates. The deposited Lm332 matrix showed a mesh-like network structure as analyzed by electron microscopy, suggesting that Lm332 was highly polymerized. When biological activity was analyzed, the Lm332 matrix rather suppressed the migration of keratinocytes as compared with purified Lm332, which highly promoted the cell migration. The Lm332 matrix supported adhesion of keratinocytes much more strongly and stably than purified Lm332. Integrin α3ß1 bound to the Lm332 matrix at a three times higher level than purified Lm332. Normal keratinocytes prominently showed integrin α6ß4-containing, hemidesmosome-like structures on the Lm332 matrix but not on the purified one. These results indicate that the polymerized Lm332 matrix supports stable cell adhesion by interacting with both integrin α6ß4 and α3ß1, whereas unassembled soluble Lm332 supports cell migration.

  9. Combination of Collagen Barrier Membrane with Enamel Matrix Derivative-Liquid Improves Osteoblast Adhesion and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Buser, Daniel; Zhang, Yufeng; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Sculean, Anton

    Collagen barrier membranes were first introduced to regenerative periodontal and oral surgery to prevent fast ingrowing soft tissues (ie, epithelium and connective tissue) into the defect space. More recent attempts have aimed at combining collagen membranes with various biologics/growth factors to speed up the healing process and improve the quality of regenerated tissues. Recently, a new formulation of enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier system (Osteogain) has demonstrated improved physico-chemical properties for the adsorption of enamel matrix derivative to facilitate protein adsorption to biomaterials. The aim of this pioneering study was to investigate the use of enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier system in combination with collagen barrier membranes for its ability to promote osteoblast cell behavior in vitro. Undifferentiated mouse ST2 stromal bone marrow cells were seeded onto porcine-derived collagen membranes alone (control) or porcine membranes + enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier system. Control and enamel matrix derivative-coated membranes were compared for cell recruitment and cell adhesion at 8 hours; cell proliferation at 1, 3, and 5 days; and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at 3 and 14 days for genes encoding Runx2, collagen1alpha2, alkaline phosphatase, and bone sialoprotein. Furthermore, alizarin red staining was used to investigate mineralization. A significant increase in cell adhesion was observed at 8 hours for barrier membranes coated with enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier system, whereas no significant difference could be observed for cell proliferation or cell recruitment. Enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier system significantly increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels 2.5-fold and collagen1alpha2 levels 1.7-fold at 3 days, as well as bone sialoprotein levels twofold at 14 days postseeding. Furthermore, collagen membranes coated with enamel matrix derivative in a liquid carrier

  10. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  11. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  12. Mechanical characterization of particulate aluminum foams. Strain-rate, density and matrix alloy versus adhesive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmhus, Dirk [ISIS Sensorial Materials Scientific Centre, University of Bremen (Germany); Baumeister, Joachim; Stutz, Lennart; Stoebener, Karsten [Fraunhofer IFAM Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Eduard [University of Bremen (Germany); Avalle, Massimiliano; Peroni, Lorenzo; Peroni, Marco [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Torino Vercelli (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The study evaluates mechanical properties of APM particulate aluminum foams built up from adhesively bonded Al foam spheres. Foams of matrix alloy AlSi10 are compared, with PM AlSi7 foams used as reference. The influence of density is studied both for quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading in a range from {proportional_to}0.35 to 0.71 g cm{sup -3}. The effect of varying the bonding agent is evaluated for a single density and both strain rate levels by replacing the standard, high-strength epoxy-based adhesive with a polyamide of greatly increased ductility. The result is a clear shift of fracture events to higher strain levels, as well as the introduction of a strain-rate dependency of strength. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Treatments of jute fibers aiming at improvement of fiber-phenolic matrix adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilce Aiko Tanaka Razera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on a thermoset phenolic matrix and jute fibers were prepared and characterized. The fibers were alternatively treated with ionized air or aqueous alkaline solution (mercerization with the aim of introducing changes in the morphology, dispersive component of surface free energy, γS D (estimated by Inverse Gas Chromatography, IGC and the acid/base character of their surfaces, shown by their ANs/DNs ratio (estimated by IGC, and their degree of crystallinity. The final objective was to investigate the influence of these modifications on the adhesion at the jute fiber/phenolic matrix interface in the composites. The untreated jute fiber showed 50% crystallinity, γS D=18 mJ m- 2 and ANs/DNs= 0.9 (amphoteric surface, tensile strength = 460 MPa and maximum elongation = 0.7%, while the respective composite had an impact strength of 72.6 J m- 1. The treatments positively modified the fibers and the adhesion at the interface was better in the composites reinforced with treated fibers than with untreated fibers. The best set of results was exhibited by the fiber treated with 10% NaOH [46% crystallinity, γS D = 26 J m- 2 (phenolic matrix γS D = 32 J m- 2, ANs/DNs = 1.8 (surface predominantly acidic, similar to phenolic matrix, ANs/DNs = 1.4, tensile strength approximately 900 MPa, maximum elongation = 2%, impact strength of respective composite approximately 95 J m- 1]. The fibers treated for 5 h with ionized air exhibited favorable properties [(45% crystallinity, γS D = 27 J m- 2, ANs/DNs = 2.1 (acidic surface] for further use as reinforcement of a phenolic matrix, but their partial degradation during the treatment decreased their tensile properties (395 MPa and 0.5% for tensile strength and maximum elongation, respectively and their action as reinforcement (impact strength of the respective composite approximately 73 J m- 1.

  14. Modulating cell adhesion dynamics on carbon nanotube monolayer engineered with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ning; Wong, Chee C; Gong, Ying X; Tan, Samuel C W; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2010-04-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have potentials for tissue engineering applications because of their unparalleled physical properties, little has been known on the cell adhesion mechanisms on model CNT monolayer pertaining to the design of novel cell therapeutics device. In this study, the adhesion dynamics of primary porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on CNT monolayer were elucidated with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy. Moreover, CNT monolayer (CNT-ML) was functionalized with two typical extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN) in order to promote its biocompatibility. First, it is shown by atomic force microscopy that the topographical features of CNT-ML were dependent on the types of immobilized ECM protein. Second, significant time lag in adhesion contact evolution (around 10 min) for PEFs was found on both CNT-ML and CNT-COL compared to the negligible time lag on CNT-FN. It was found that adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces reached steady state at 60 and 30 min after cell seeding compared to 70 min on CNT-ML surface. At steady state, the adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces was about twice as much than that on the CNT-ML surface. Moreover, immobilization of collagen or fibronectin on CNT monolayer led to an increase in seeding efficiency and proliferation rate of PEFs. Scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining together demonstrated that PEFs displayed an elongated morphology and highly polarized actin network on both CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces, whereas PEFs displayed nonuniform cell morphology and actin organization on the CNT-ML surface. Overall, our results demonstrated that the biophysical responses and biological behavior of PEFs on unmodified or functionalized CNT monolayer were different. Functionalization of CNT through extracellular matrix

  15. MARs Wars: heterogeneity and clustering of DNA-binding domains in the nuclear matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioudinkova E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. CO326 is a chicken nuclear scaffold/matrix attachment region (MAR associated with the nuclear matrix in several types of chicken cells. It contains a binding site for a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, F326. We have studied its interaction with the nuclear matrix. Methods. We have used an in vitro MAR assay with isolated matrices from chicken HD3 cells. Results. We have found that an oligonucleotide binding site for the F326 inhibits binding of the CO326 to the nuclear matrix. At the same time, the binding of heterologous MARs is enhanced. Conclusions. Taken together, these data suggest that there exist several classes of MARs and MAR-binding domains and that the MAR-binding proteins may be clustered in the nuclear matrix.

  16. Podoplanin-mediated cell adhesion through extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), one of the representative mucin-like type-I transmembrane glycoproteins specific to lymphatic endothelial cells, is expressed in various cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). On the basis of our previous studies, we have developed the hypothesis that PDPN functions in association with the extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell surface side. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration in oral SCC cells. Forty-four surgical specimens of oral SCC were used for immunohistochemistry for PDPN, and the expression profiles were correlated with their clinicopathological properties. Using ZK-1, a human oral SCC cell system, and five other cell systems, we examined PDPN expression levels by immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR. The effects of transient PDPN knockdown by siRNA in ZK-1 were determined for cellular functions in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in association with CD44 and hyaluronan. Cases without PDPN-positive cells were histopathologically classified as less-differentiated SCC, and SCC cells without PDPN more frequently invaded lymphatics. Adhesive properties of ZK-1 were significantly inhibited by siRNA, and PDPN was shown to collaborate with CD44 in cell adhesion to tether SCC cells with hyaluronan-rich ECM of the narrow intercellular space as well as with the stromal ECM. There was no siRNA effect in migration. We have demonstrated the primary function of PDPN in cell adhesion to ECM, which is to secondarily promote oral SCC cell proliferation.

  17. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  18. Bacteriocin-producing strains of Lactobacillus plantarum inhibit adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to extracellular matrix: quantitative insight and implications in antibacterial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; Ramesh, Aiyagari

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, the adhesion of bacteriocin-producing probiotic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum onto extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagen and mucin and their potential to prevent pathogen invasion onto the ECM was ascertained. Fluorescence-based in vitro assays indicated that L. plantarum strains CRA21, CRA38 and CRA52 displayed considerable adhesion to ECM molecules, which was comparable to the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Flow cytometry-based quantitative assessment of the adhesion potential suggested that L. plantarum CRA21 exhibited superior adhesion onto the ECM as compared with other lactic acid bacteria strains. Furthermore, fluorescence-based assays suggested that the highest inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion onto collagen and mucin by bacteriocin-producing L. plantarum strains was observed in the exclusion mode as compared with the competition and displacement modes. This observation was supported by the higher binding affinity (k(d)) for the ECM exhibited by the L. plantarum strains as compared with S. aureus. Interestingly, a crude plantaricin A extract from food isolates of L. plantarum displayed potent antibacterial activity on ECM-adhered S. aureus cells. It is envisaged that the L. plantarum isolates displaying bacteriocinogenic and ECM-adhering traits can perhaps be explored to develop safe antibacterial therapeutic agents.

  19. Disease-Specific Effects of Matrix and Growth Factors on Adhesion and Migration of Rheumatoid Synovial Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Stephanie; Schwarz, Maria; Meier, Florian M P; Zimmermann-Geller, Birgit; Tarner, Ingo H; Rickert, Markus; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Sauerbier, Michael; Rehart, Stefan; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2017-06-15

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), cartilage and bone matrix are degraded, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, acting as cellular activators, are liberated. Similar to ECM proteins, matrix-bound chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors (GFs) influence functional properties of key cells in RA, especially synovial fibroblasts. The role of these molecules on attachment, migration, and proinflammatory and prodestructive activation of RASFs was analyzed. Adhesion/migration of RASFs were examined under GF-enriched (GF(+)) or -reduced (GF(-)) conditions with or without addition of matrix-associated GFs, TGF-β, and platelet-derived GF to GF(-) or culture supernatants. Fibroblast adhesion and alterations in proinflammatory/prodestructive properties (e.g., IL-6/matrix metalloproteinase 3-release) in response to matrix-associated molecules were compared. Effects of GF(+), GF(-), and other ECM components on human RASF-mediated cartilage invasion were examined in the SCID mouse model. RASF adhesion under GF(-) conditions was significantly lower compared with GF(+) conditions (6.8- versus 8.3-fold). This effect was specific for RA because control cells showed opposite effects (e.g., osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts [SF]; GF(-) versus GF(+): 10.7- versus 8-fold). Addition of TGF-β to GF(-) increased RASF attachment (12.7-fold) compared with other matrices and components. RASF adhesion to GF(+) matrix resulted in the strongest IL-6 and matrix metalloproteinase-3 release, and was even more pronounced compared with supplementation of single GFs. In vivo, GF(-) matrix decreased RASF-mediated cartilage invasion compared with GF(+) matrix. ECM components and especially GFs when bound within ECM actively enhance RASF attraction and cartilage adhesion. This observation was specific for RASFs as a reverse behavior was observed for controls. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  1. Multifunctional Nanotube Polymer Nanocomposites for Aerospace Applications: Adhesion between SWCNT and Polymer Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Wise, Kristopher E.; Kang, Jin Ho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Lowther, Sharon E.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Smith, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional structural materials can enable a novel design space for advanced aerospace structures. A promising route to multifunctionality is the use of nanotubes possessing the desired combination of properties to enhance the characteristics of structural polymers. Recent nanotube-polymer nanocomposite studies have revealed that these materials have the potential to provide structural integrity as well as sensing and/or actuation capabilities. Judicious selection or modification of the polymer matrix to promote donor acceptor and/or dispersion interactions can improve adhesion at the interface between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix significantly. The effect of nanotube incorporation on the modulus and toughness of the polymer matrix will be presented. Very small loadings of single wall nanotubes in a polyimide matrix yield an effective sensor material that responds to strain, stress, pressure, and temperature. These materials also exhibit significant actuation in response to applied electric fields. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that physical properties of multifunctional material systems can be tailored for specific applications by controlling nanotube treatment (different types of nanotubes), concentration, and degree of alignment.

  2. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  3. N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-12-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment.

  4. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  5. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  6. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases, low density lipoprotein oxidisability and soluble adhesion molecules after a glucose load in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Jackie

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute hyperglycaemia is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in Type 2 diabetes which may be mediated through increased oxidative damage to plasma low density lipoprotein, and in vitro, high glucose concentrations promote proatherogenic adhesion molecule expression and matrix metalloproteinase expression. Methods We examined these atherogenic risk markers in 21 subjects with Type 2 diabetes and 20 controls during an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test. Plasma soluble adhesion molecule concentrations [E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1], plasma matrix metalloproteinases [MMP-3 and 9] and plasma LDL oxidisability were measured at 30 minute intervals. Results In the diabetes group, the concentrations of all plasma soluble adhesion molecules fell promptly [all p Conclusions A glucose load leads to a rapid fall in plasma soluble adhesion molecule concentrations in Type 2 diabetes and controls, perhaps reflecting reduced generation of soluble from membrane forms during enhanced leukocyte – endothelial adhesion or increased hepatic clearance, without changes in plasma matrix metalloproteinase concentrations or low density lipoprotein oxidisability. These in vivo findings are in contrast with in vitro data.

  7. Effect of residual solvent in polymer adhesive matrix on release and skin permeation of scopolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Kunst; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    The effects of varying level of residual solvent on the release and permeation of scopolamine from two different polyacrylate matrices through excised mouse skin has been determined. Matrices of the drug-in-adhesive type were prepared having different contents of residual ethyl acetate or heptane adjusted via the drying time at 30°C in a forced-convection oven. The neutral DuroTak 87-4098 showed no effects of residual ethyl acetate on either release or permeation, but was influenced by residual heptane. An increase in release rate from the matrix occurred with an enhancing effect on permeation. The self-curing DuroTak 87-2677 showed effects of residual heptane on both release and permeation. Both solvents were lost from the matrix on contact with an aqueous acceptor medium, although to different extents. Levels of residual ethyl acetate or heptane that fall below the ICH guideline (0.5% w/w) had, however, only a minor, yet measurable, effect on scopolamine release and skin uptake compared with higher solvent levels.

  8. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte adhesi

  9. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motta Dias, M.H.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Luinge, J.W.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of ‘as received’ and ‘surface modified’ carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45°

  10. The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of CF/PPS composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motta Dias, M.H.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Luinge, H.; Nayak, K.; Bersee, H.E.N.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of as received and surface modified carbon fiber (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45°

  11. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motta Dias, M.H.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Luinge, J.W.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of ‘as received’ and ‘surface modified’ carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° sp

  12. The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of CF/PPS composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motta Dias, M.H.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Luinge, H.; Nayak, K.; Bersee, H.E.N.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of as received and surface modified carbon fiber (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specime

  13. Functional roles of mannose-binding protein in the adhesion, cytotoxicity and phagocytosis of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Matin, Abdul; Shin, Ho-Joon; Park, Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; Yuan, Xi-Zhe; Kim, Kwang Sik; Jung, Suk-Yul

    2012-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a single-celled protozoan that is widely distributed in the environment and is a well-known of causing human keratitis, a vision-threatening infection. In this study, an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and a selection of saccharide were applied to A. castellanii by chemical mutagenesis. To understand the functional roles of a mannose-binding protein (MBP). A. castellanii were treated with methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside abbreviated Man, with and without the EMS pre-treatment, and their adhesion and cytotoxicity were analyzed, using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) as the target cell. Both EMS and Man mutants exhibited significantly decreased levels of MBP expression and cytotoxicity to HBMEC, but showed similar levels of binding to HBMEC, as compared with the wild type. Of interest was that the exogenous mannose inhibited amoebae (i.e., Man mutant) binding to the HBMEC by <20%. Only the mutant Man exhibited a significant decrease in bacterial uptake, as compared to the wild type, 0.020 vs 0.032 (p<0.05) and proteolytic activity. The results showed that MBP should be clearly provided as the pathogenic target candidate, to further target-based therapy, but EMS mutation should not be associated with initial adhesion and phagocytosis of A. castellanii.

  14. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kihara, Shinji, E-mail: skihara@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Background: Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results: In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Conclusion: Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. - Highlights: • E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 was identified as an adiponectin (APN)-binding protein. • ESL-1 bound to APN at its N-terminal 6th-10th amino acids. • shESL-1 reduced the suppressive effect of APN on adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. • Interaction with ESL may be involved in the anti-atherogenic effects of APN.

  15. Ovarian carcinoma cells synthesize both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate cell surface proteoglycans that mediate cell adhesion to interstitial matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokenyesi, R

    Metastatic ovarian carcinoma metastasizes by intra-peritoneal, non-hematogenous dissemination. The adhesion of the ovarian carcinoma cells to extracellular matrix components, such as types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, is essential for intra-peritoneal dissemination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cell surface proteoglycans (a class of matrix receptors) are produced by ovarian carcinoma cells, and whether these proteoglycans have a role in the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to types I and III collagen and fibronectin. Proteoglycans were metabolically labeled for biochemical studies. Both phosphatidylinositol-anchored and integral membrane-type cell surface proteoglycans were found to be present on the SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cell lines. Three proteoglycan populations of differing hydrodynamic size were detected in both SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. Digestions with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC showed that cell surface proteoglycans of SK-OV-3 cells had higher proportion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (75:25 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio), while NIH:OVCAR-3 cells had higher proportion of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (10:90 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio). RT-PCR indicated the synthesis of a unique assortment of syndecans, glypicans, and CD44 by the two cell lines. In adhesion assays performed on matrix-coated titer plates both cell lines adhered to types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, and cell adhesion was inhibited by preincubation of the matrix with heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, or chondroitin glycosaminoglycans. Treatment of the cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, or methylumbelliferyl xyloside also interfered with adhesion confirming the role of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface proteoglycans as matrix receptors on ovarian carcinoma cells.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus-fibronectin interactions with and without fibronectin-binding proteins and their role in adhesion and desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun; Boks, Niels P; de Vries, Jacob; Kaper, Harm; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Hendrik; van der Mei, Henderina

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn wi

  17. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn wi

  18. Sulfated polymannuroguluronate inhibits Tat-induced SLK cell adhesion via a novel binding site, a KKR spatial triad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-lin WU; Jing AI; Jing-ming ZHAO; Bing XIONG; Xiao-jie XIN; Mei-yu GENG; Xian-liang XIN; Han-dong JIANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Sulfated polymannuroguluronate (SPMG), a candidate anti-AIDS drug, inhibited HIV replication and interfered with HIV entry into host T lymphocytes. SPMG has high binding affinity for the transactivating factor of the HIV-1 virus (Tat) via its basic domain. However, deletion or substitution of the basic domain affected, but did not completely eliminated Tat-SPMG interactions. Here, we sought to identify other SPMG binding sites in addition to the basic domain.Methods: The potential SPMG binding sites were determined using molecular simulation and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based competitive inhibition assay. The effect of SPMG on Tat induced adhesion was evaluated using a cell adhesion assay. Results: The KKR domain, a novel high-affinity heparin binding site, was identified, which consisted of a triad of Lys12, Lys41, and Arg78. The KKR domain, spatially enclosed SPMG binding site on Tat, functions as another binding domain for SPMG. Further func- tional evaluation demonstrated that SPMG inhibits Tat-mediated SLK cell adhesion by directly binding to the KKR region.Conclusion: The KKR domain is a novel high-affinity binding domain for SPMG. Our findings provide important new insights into the molecular mechanisms of SPMG and a potential therapeutic intervention for Tat-induced cell adhesion.

  19. Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: composition of the extracellular matrix and expression of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoazec, J Y; Flejou, J F; D'Errico, A; Couvelard, A; Kozyraki, R; Fiorentino, M; Grigioni, W F; Feldmann, G

    1995-10-01

    We studied by immunohistochemistry 25 cases of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) to evaluate the composition of the extracellular matrix and the expression and distribution of endothelial cell-cell adhesion molecules and integrin receptors. The extracellular matrix of FNH retained the overall organization of that of normal liver. The matrix of central scars resembled that of portal tracts. The main difference was the presence of large vitronectin deposits, which might indicate the existence of local hemodynamic disturbances. The matrix lining the sinusoid-like vessels running in the hyperplastic parenchyma retained characteristic features of the normal perisinusoidal matrix, such as the presence of tenascin. In the zone surrounding the central scars, it contained large amounts of laminin, von Willebrand factor, and thrombospondin, suggesting the development of perisinusoidal fibrosis. Laminin deposition was accompanied by the induction of cell-cell adhesion molecules on adjacent endothelial cells and by the up-regulation of specific integrin receptors on both hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells. In conclusion, our study: (1) reinforces the hypothesis that FNH is merely a hyperplastic response of liver parenchyma to local vascular abnormalities, and (2) shows that the lesions of perisinusoidal fibrosis associated with FNH are accompanied by the induction of integrin receptors on hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells.

  20. S-matrix theory for transmission through billiards in tight-binding approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadreev, Almas F [Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Linkoeping University, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Rotter, Ingrid [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik Komplexer Systeme, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2003-11-14

    In the tight-binding approximation we consider multi-channel transmission through a billiard coupled to leads. Following Dittes we derive the coupling matrix, the scattering matrix and the effective Hamiltonian, but take into account the energy restriction of the conductance band. The complex eigenvalues of the effective Hamiltonian define the poles of the scattering matrix. For some simple cases, we present exact values for the poles. We derive also the condition for the appearance of double poles.

  1. Inactivation of a fibronectin-binding TonB-dependent protein increases adhesion properties of Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauer, Heidi; Cavalcanti, Soraia N V; Teixeira, Felipe L; Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Vommaro, Rossiane C; Oliveira, Ana Carolina S C; Ferreira, Eliane O; Domingues, Regina R M C P

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the Gram-negative strictly anaerobic bacterium most frequently isolated from clinical infections, including intra-abdominal abscess and bacteraemia. A number of factors can contribute to its virulence, including the expression of adhesins. Some of them are already characterized and can recognize and bind to extracellular matrix components, such as fibronectin. One of the molecules responsible for fibronectin-binding is an outer-membrane protein previously described by our group, which belongs to the TonB-dependent family. The aim of the present work was to characterize this protein. Initially, it was confirmed by fluorescence and electron microscopy that the fibronectin-binding molecules were located in the bacterial surface, but the distribution of these molecules on the surface was not uniform. To further evaluate the role of this protein, the gene bf1991, responsible for encoding this protein, was inactivated by a suicide vector and the mutant strains generated were used in several experiments to verify possible phenotypical alterations. In adherence assays with fibronectin immobilized on latex beads an increased adhesion was observed with the mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain. Western blot analysis in the mutant strain revealed the absence of the 120 kDa TonB-dependent outer-membrane protein and an alteration in the expression of an unknown 30 kDa protein. Killing assays using peritoneal macrophages were performed to evaluate the role of this protein as a virulence attribute and it was observed that the mutant strains were more efficiently internalized than the wild-type strains, with more internalization in the samples covered with fibronectin than in the samples not covered with it.

  2. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibition of monocyte binding by vascular endothelium is associated with sialylation of neural cell adhesion molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatola, Anna-Maria; Huang, Kui; Naftolin, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium is necessary for atheroma formation. This adhesion requires binding of endothelial neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) to monocyte NCAM. NCAM:NCAM binding is blocked by sialylation of NCAM (polysialylated NCAM; PSA-NCAM). Since estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced PSA-NCAM and decreased monocyte adhesion, in consideration of possible clinical applications we tested whether their prohormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has similar effects. (1) DHEA was administered to cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) from men and women. Monocyte binding was assessed using fluorescence-labeled monocytes. (2) HCEACs were incubated with E2, DHT, DHEA alone, or with trilostane, fulvestrant or flutamide. Expression of PSA-NCAM was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibited monocyte adhesion to HCAECs by ≥50% (P DHEA's inhibition of monocyte binding appeared to be gender dependent. The DHEA-induced expression of PSA-NCAM was completely blocked by trilostane. In these preliminary in vitro studies, DHEA increased PSA-NCAM expression and inhibited monocyte binding in an estrogen- and androgen receptor-dependent manner. Dehydroepiandrosteroneappears to act via its end metabolites, E2 and DHT. Dehydroepiandrosterone could furnish clinical prevention against atherogenesis and arteriosclerosis.

  3. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  4. Determination of carbon fiber adhesion to thermoplastic polymers using the single fiber/matrix tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, W. D.; Cordner, L. W.; Hinkley, J. L.; Johnston, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The single fiber adhesion shear test has been adapted to testing the adhesion between carbon fiber and thermoplastic polymers. Tests of three thermoplastics, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide and polyetherimide indicate the shear adhesion strength is significantly less than of an epoxy polymer to the same carbon fiber.

  5. PACAP Promotes Matrix-Driven Adhesion of Cultured Adult Murine Neural Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Waschek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are born throughout the life of mammals in germinal zones of the brain known as neurogenic niches: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These niches contain a subpopulation of cells known as adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs, which self-renew and give rise to new neurons and glia. aNPCs are regulated by many factors present in the niche, including the extracellular matrix (ECM. We show that the neuropeptide PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide affects subventricular zone-derived aNPCs by increasing their surface adhesion. Gene array and reconstitution assays indicate that this effect can be attributed to the regulation of ECM components and ECM-modifying enzymes in aNPCs by PACAP. Our work suggests that PACAP regulates a bidirectional interaction between the aNPCs and their niche: PACAP modifies ECM production and remodeling, in turn the ECM regulates progenitor cell adherence. We speculate that PACAP may in this manner help restrict adult neural progenitors to the stem cell niche in vivo, with potential significance for aNPC function in physiological and pathological states.

  6. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  7. Do matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors improve the bond durability of universal dental adhesives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Balci, Sibel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibitors on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and the adhesive-dentin interface of two universal dentin bonding agents, Single Bond Universal and All Bond Universal, after 12 months of water storage. Seventy extracted, caries-free, human third molars were used in this study. Of these, 50 were used for μTBS testing and 20 were used for scanning electron microscopy. The two bonding agents were applied to flat dentin surfaces in five different ways: self-etch mode, etch-and-rinse mode with 37% phosphoric acid, etch-and-rinse mode with phosphoric acid containing 1% benzalkonium chloride, etch-and-rinse mode with phosphoric acid and 2% chlorhexidine, and etch-and-rinse mode with 0.5 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (n = 5 for each bonding agent in each group; N = 50). Half the specimens were subjected to μTBS tests at 24 h, while half were subjected to the tests after 12 months of water storage. For each bonding agent, inhibition, storage, and their interaction effects were tested by two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests. For Single Bond Universal, the benzalkonium chloride (p = 0.024) and chlorhexidine groups (p = 0.033) exhibited significantly higher μTBS values at 24 h compared with the self-etch group. For All Bond Universal, all groups displayed similar bond strengths at 24 h (p > 0.05). After 12 months of water storage, the μTBS values decreased significantly in the benzalkonium chloride group for Single Bond Universal (p = 0.001) and the self-etch (p = 0.029), chlorhexidine (p = 0.046), and EDTA (p = 0.032) groups for All Bond Universal. These results suggest that the immediate dentin bond strength increases when universal bonding systems are applied in the etch-and-rinse mode, although the durability decreases. The use of chlorhexidine and EDTA can increase the bond durability of mild adhesives such as

  8. Cellular adhesion responses to the heparin-binding (HepII) domain of fibronectin require heparan sulfate with specific properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahalingam, Yashithra; Gallagher, John T; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region of fibron......Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region...... trap mutation in one of the two major glucosaminoglycan polymerases (EXT1). Several separate, specific properties of cell surface HS are therefore required in cell adhesion responses to the fibronectin HepII domain....

  9. A synthetic peptide from the COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin promotes focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; McCarthy, J B; Furcht, L T

    1993-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin involves complex transmembrane signaling processes. Attachment and spreading of primary fibroblasts can be promoted by interactions of cell surface integrins with RGD-containing fragments of fibronectin, but the further process o...

  10. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhuai; Xiang, Ru; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Yunxian

    2015-09-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix‑coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia.

  11. Endothelial nanoparticle binding kinetics are matrix and size dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Amber L; Clark, Brendan; Rinker, Kristina D

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly important in medical research for application to areas such as drug delivery and imaging. Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles with cells in physiologically relevant environments is vital for their acceptance, and cell-particle interactions likely vary based on the design of the particle including its size, shape, and surface chemistry. For this reason, the kinetic interactions of fluorescent nanoparticles of sizes 20, 100, 200, and 500 nm with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were determined by (1) measuring nanoparticles per cell at 37 and 4°C (to inhibit endocytosis) and (2) modeling experimental particle uptake data with equations describing particle attachment, detachment, and internalization. Additionally, the influence of cell substrate compliance on nanoparticle attachment and uptake was investigated. Results show that the number of binding sites per cell decreased with increasing nanoparticle size, while the attachment coefficient increased. By comparing HUVEC grown on either a thin coating of collagen or on top of three-dimensional collagen hydrogel, nanoparticle attachment and internalization were shown to be influenced significantly by the substrate on which the cells are cultured. This study concludes that both particle size and cell culture substrate compliance appreciably influence the binding of nanoparticles; important factors in translating in vitro studies of nanoparticle interactions to in vivo studies focused on therapeutic or diagnostic applications.

  12. Sevuparin binds to multiple adhesive ligands and reduces sickle red blood cell-induced vaso-occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telen, M.J.; Batchvarova, M.; Shan, S.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.; Zennadi, R.; Leitgeb, A.; Brock, R.E.; Lindgren, M.

    2016-01-01

    Sevuparin is a novel drug candidate in phase II development as a treatment for vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). As a heparin-derived polysaccharide, sevuparin has been designed to retain anti-adhesive properties, while the antithrombin-binding domains have been

  13. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  14. The relative roles of collagen adhesive receptor DDR2 activation and matrix stiffness on the downregulation of focal adhesion kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Chung, Koo-Hyun; Spurlin, Tighe A; Haynes, Ross J; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2009-12-01

    Cells within tissues derive mechanical anchorage and specific molecular signals from the insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds them. Understanding the role of different cues that extracellular matrices provide cells is critical for controlling and predicting cell response to scaffolding materials. Using an engineered extracellular matrix of Type I collagen we examined how the stiffness, supramolecular structure, and glycosylation of collagen matrices influence the protein levels of cellular FAK and the activation of myosin II. Our results show that (1) cellular FAK is downregulated on collagen fibrils, but not on a non-fibrillar monolayer of collagen, (2) the downregulation of FAK is independent of the stiffness of the collagen fibrils, and (3) FAK levels are correlated with levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the collagen adhesion receptor DDR2. Further, siRNA depletion of DDR2 blocks FAK downregulation. Our results suggest that the collagen receptor DDR2 is involved in the regulation of FAK levels in vSMC adhered to Type I collagen matrices, and that regulation of FAK levels in these cells appears to be independent of matrix stiffness.

  15. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of chondrocyte adhesion to scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Shen, Longxiang; Ruan, Yuhui; Dong, Jian; Guo, Changan; Chen, Zhengrong

    2014-04-01

    The clinical need for improved treatment options for patients with cartilage injuries has motivated tissue-engineering studies aimed at the in vitro generation of cell-based implants with functional properties. The success of tissue-engineered repair of cartilage may depend on the rapid and efficient adhesion of transplanted cells to the scaffold. In the present study, chondrocyte-scaffold constructs were engineered by planting porcine chondrocytes into nonporous chitosan membranes and 3D porous chitosan scaffolds that were treated with or without biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system and avidin-biotin binding system. The spreading area, cell exfoliation rates, cell proliferation rates, histological analysis, DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and mRNA expression were investigated to evaluate the efficiency of biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of cell adhesion to scaffolds in the cartilage tissue. The results showed that the biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system improved cell adhesion to scaffolds effectively. These studies suggest that this binding system has the potential to provide improved tissue-engineered cartilage for clinical applications.

  16. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  17. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which migh...

  18. Fibrolamellar carcinoma of the liver: composition of the extracellular matrix and expression of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoazec, J Y; Flejou, J F; D'Errico, A; Fiorentino, M; Zamparelli, A; Bringuier, A F; Feldmann, G; Grigioni, W F

    1996-11-01

    We have analyzed the composition of the tumor stroma and the expression of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules in 11 cases of fibrolamellar carcinoma of the liver (FLC), in comparison with 34 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 8 cases of focal nodular hyperplasia. Fibrolamellar carcinoma was characterized by the presence of large amounts of tenascin in tumor stroma and by the scarce expression of basement membrane components at the contact of neoplastic clusters. Like normal hepatocytes, neoplastic cells constantly expressed the alpha1 integrin chain, lacked the beta4 integrin chain, and coexpressed E-cadherin and the hepatocyte N-related cadherin. Abnormalities in the expression of cell adhesion molecules, including altered cadherin expression, alphaV integrin chain induction, and CD44 expression, were detected in the majority of cases. The composition of the tumor stroma and the pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in fibrolamellar carcinoma were reminiscent of those observed in grade III and grade IV hepatocellular carcinomas. Our results therefore show that, despite its slow local growth and good prognosis, fibrolamellar carcinoma expresses many characteristics usually associated with clinically aggressive malignancies. Further studies are needed to identify the factors responsible for the apparent dissociation between clinical behavior and biological characteristics in this tumor.

  19. Milk matrix effects on antibody binding analyzed by elisa and biolayer interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was employed to study the impact of the milk matrix on the binding of ricin to asialofetuin (ASF) and to antibodies. This optical sensing platform utilized ligands immobilized covalently or via biotin-streptavidin linkage, and the results were compared to those obtained...

  20. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  1. Cell adhesion-dependent membrane trafficking of a binding partner for the ebolavirus glycoprotein is a determinant of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Derek; Schornberg, Kathryn L; Shoemaker, Charles J; Delos, Sue E; Stantchev, Tzanko S; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C; White, Judith M

    2010-09-21

    Ebolavirus is a hemorrhagic fever virus associated with high mortality. Although much has been learned about the viral lifecycle and pathogenesis, many questions remain about virus entry. We recently showed that binding of the receptor binding region (RBR) of the ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) and infection by GP pseudovirions increase on cell adhesion independently of mRNA or protein synthesis. One model to explain these observations is that, on cell adhesion, an RBR binding partner translocates from an intracellular vesicle to the cell surface. Here, we provide evidence for this model by showing that suspension 293F cells contain an RBR binding site within a membrane-bound compartment associated with the trans-Golgi network and microtubule-organizing center. Consistently, trafficking of the RBR binding partner to the cell surface depends on microtubules, and the RBR binding partner is internalized when adherent cells are placed in suspension. Based on these observations, we reexamined the claim that lymphocytes, which are critical for ebolavirus pathogenesis, are refractory to infection because they lack an RBR binding partner. We found that both cultured and primary human lymphocytes (in suspension) contain an intracellular pool of an RBR binding partner. Moreover, we identified two adherent primate lymphocytic cell lines that bind RBR at their surface and strikingly, support GP-mediated entry and infection. In summary, our results reveal a mode of determining viral entry by a membrane-trafficking event that translocates an RBR binding partner to the cell surface, and they suggest that this process may be operative in cells important for ebolavirus pathogenesis (e.g., lymphocytes and macrophages).

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 silencing by RNA interference promotes the adhesive-invasive switch in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xishan; Tai, Weiping; Shi, Wei; Song, Yuguang; Zhang, Hongmei; An, Guangyu

    2012-01-01

    A high level of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is associated with human tumor invasion and/or metastasis. The HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line is highly invasive and metastatic which constitutively express MMP-9. HT1080 cells transfected with a double stranded RNA that targeted the MMP-9 mRNA and the cellular characteristics were examined before and after interference. The inhibition effects of MMP-9 interference on the tumor growth of HT1080 cells in nude mice was also tested by xenograft assay. MMP-9 extinction in HT1080 resulted in the following: (1) inhibited cell mobility; (2) increased cell adhesion, and (3) attenuated tumor cell migration. In addition, MMP-9 knockdown concomitantly resulted in decreased levels of soluble ICAM-1, leading to an adhesion defect and tumor metastasis. Moreover, in vivo assay further demonstrated MMP-9 interference affecting the tumorigenesis of HT1080 cells in mice as follows (1) inhibition of tumor growth; (2) reduced tumor volume, and (3) prolonged survival time. Our observations defined a novel critical role for MMP-9 in the progression of HT1080 fibrosarcoma by changing the inter-cellular adhesion molecular-1 from membrane-anchored state to a soluble one which provides a target for promising tumor therapy in clinics.

  3. Cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion are linked by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakideeri Karat, Sandeep Gopal; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell junctions that employ microfilaments are sites of tension. They are important for tissue repair, morphogenetic movements and can be emblematic of matrix contraction in fibrotic disease and the stroma of solid tumors. One cell surface receptor, syndeca...

  4. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder <3 µm and coarse powder of 180 µm was used as a reinforcement. Microstructural investigations included analyses using scanning electron microscopy with an integrated EDS microanalysis system and transmission microscopy. In order to measure the adhesion force (interface strength), we prepared the microwires made of the investigated materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  5. Osteoblast response (initial adhesion and alkaline phosphatase activity following exposure to a barrier membrane/enamel matrix derivative combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangakumaran S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The enamel matrix derivative (EMD has been used in combination with barrier membranes to optimize regeneration in vertical osseous defects. However, the osteoblast response when exposed to the EMD/barrier membrane combination has not yet been evaluated. The osteoblast behavior when exposed to a combination of regenerative materials must be evaluated to fully understand their effect on bone regeneration. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to estimate the initial adhesion and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity of an osteoblast cell line (SaOS-2 when exposed to four commercially available resorbable membranes and determine if the addition of EMD had any modulatory effect on osteoblast behavior. Materials and Methods: 5 x 104 SaOS-2 cells between passages 7-10 were cultured in two 24-well culture plates. Plate A was used for the adhesion assay and Plate B was used for the ALP assay. A MTT (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was done after 24 hours to determine the adhesion of the osteoblastic cells to four barrier membranes: 1 a non cross-linked porcine Type I and III collagen membrane (BG, 2 a weakly cross-linked Type I collagen membrane (HG, 3 a glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine Type I collagen (BM, and 4 a resorbable polymer membrane (CP. Osteoblast differentiation was studied using an ALP assay with p-nitro phenyl phosphate as the substrate at 24 hours, 72 hours, and 1 week. A total of 50 µg/ml of EMD dissolved in 10 mM acetic acid was added into each well and the entire experimental protocol outlined above was repeated. Results: The osteoblast adhesion to collagen barriers showed a statistically insignificant reduction following the addition of EMD. Adhesion to the polymer barrier, although significantly lower when compared with collagen barriers, was unaffected by the addition of EMD. ALP activity after 1 week among the various groups was as follows: EMD alone (75.59±2

  6. Cytosolic SYT/SS18 isoforms are actin-associated proteins that function in matrix-specific adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    Full Text Available SYT (SYnovial sarcoma Translocated gene or SS18 is widely produced as two isoforms, SYT/L and SYT/S, that are thought to function in the nucleus as transcriptional coactivators. Using isoform-specific antibodies, we detected a sizable pool of SYT isoforms in the cytosol where the proteins were organized into filamentous arrays. Actin and actin-associated proteins co-immunoprecipitated with SYT isoforms, which also co-sedimented and co-localized with the actin cytoskeleton in cultured cells and tissues. The association of SYT with actin bundles was extensive yet stopped short of the distal ends at focal adhesions. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton also led to a breakdown of the filamentous organization of SYT isoforms in the cytosol. RNAi ablation of SYT/L alone or both isoforms markedly impaired formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions but did not affect formation of cortical actin bundles. Furthermore, ablation of SYT led to markedly impaired adhesion and spreading on fibronectin and laminin-111 but not on collagen types I or IV. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic SYT isoforms interact with actin filaments and function in the ability cells to bind and react to specific extracellular matrices.

  7. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance...

  8. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  9. Structural and functional features of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the mussel byssus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Michael H; Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-26

    Blue mussels adhere to surfaces by the byssus, a holdfast structure composed of individual threads representing a collagen fibre reinforced composite. Here, we present the crystal structure and function of one of its matrix proteins, the proximal thread matrix protein 1, which is present in the proximal section of the byssus. The structure reveals two von Willebrand factor type A domains linked by a two-β-stranded linker yielding a novel structural arrangement. In vitro, the protein binds heterologous collagens with high affinity and affects collagen assembly, morphology and arrangement of its fibrils. By providing charged surface clusters as well as insufficiently coordinated metal ions, the proximal thread matrix protein 1 might interconnect other byssal proteins and thereby contribute to the integrity of the byssal threads in vivo. Moreover, the protein could be used for adjusting the mechanical properties of collagen materials, a function likely important in the natural byssus.

  10. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop...

  11. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  12. Amino Acid Derivatives as New Zinc Binding Groups for the Design of Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa Giustiniano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to cardiomyopathy, periodontal disease, liver cirrhosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer invasion and metastasis, where they showed to have a dual role, inhibiting or promoting important processes involved in the pathology. MMPs contain a zinc (II ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In an effort to devise new approaches to selective inhibitors, in this paper, we describe the synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of amino acid derivatives as new zinc binding groups (ZBGs. The incorporation of selected metal-binding functions in more complex biphenyl sulfonamide moieties allowed the identification of one compound able to interact selectively with different MMP enzymatic isoforms.

  13. The emerin-binding transcription factor Lmo7 is regulated by association with p130Cas at focal adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Wozniak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the nuclear inner membrane protein, emerin, cause X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD. X-EDMD is characterized by contractures of major tendons, skeletal muscle weakening and wasting, and cardiac conduction system defects. The transcription factor Lmo7 regulates muscle- and heart-relevant genes and is inhibited by binding to emerin, suggesting Lmo7 misregulation contributes to EDMD disease. Lmo7 associates with cell adhesions and shuttles between the plasma membrane and nucleus, but the regulation and biological consequences of this dual localization were unknown. We report endogenous Lmo7 also associates with focal adhesions in cells, and both co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with p130Cas, a key signaling component of focal adhesions. Lmo7 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity increased significantly in p130Cas-null MEFs, suggesting Lmo7 is negatively regulated by p130Cas-dependent association with focal adhesions. These results support EDMD models in which Lmo7 is a downstream mediator of integrin-dependent signaling that allows tendon cells and muscles to adapt to and withstand mechanical stress.

  14. Mutation of the conserved calcium-binding motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 impacts adhesion but not piliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D L; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C; Anderson, James E; Garrett, Christopher K; Redinbo, Matthew R; Thomas, Christopher E

    2013-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae.

  15. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.O. Rocha

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745. The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5(and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5 and 5 x 10(5 cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  16. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, H A; Franco, C R; Trindade, E S; Carvalho, L C; Veiga, S S; Leite, E L; Dietrich, C P; Nader, H B

    2001-05-01

    Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745). The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5)) and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(5)) cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  17. Identification of collagen binding domain residues that govern catalytic activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Margarita; Xu, Xiaoping; Robichaud, Trista K; Pal, Sanjay; Fields, Gregg B; Steffensen, Bjorn

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach to enhance the selectivity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors comprises targeting these inhibitors to catalytically required substrate binding sites (exosites) that are located outside the catalytic cleft. In MMP-2, positioning of collagen substrate molecules occurs via a unique fibronectin-like domain (CBD) that contains three distinct modular collagen binding sites. To characterize the contributions of these exosites to gelatinolysis by MMP-2, seven MMP-2 variants were generated with single, or concurrent double and triple alanine substitutions in the three fibronectin type II modules of the CBD. Circular dichroism spectroscopy verified that recombinant MMP-2 wild-type (WT) and variants had the same fold. Moreover, the MMP-2 WT and variants had the same activity on a short FRET peptide substrate that is hydrolyzed independently of CBD binding. Among single-point variants, substitution in the module 3 binding site had greatest impact on the affinity of MMP-2 for gelatin. Simultaneous substitutions in two or three CBD modules further reduced gelatin binding. The rates of gelatinolysis of MMP-2 variants were reduced by 20-40% following single-point substitutions, by 60-75% after double-point modifications, and by >90% for triple-point variants. Intriguingly, the three CBD modules contributed differentially to cleavage of dissociated α-1(I) and α-2(I) collagen chains. Importantly, kinetic analyses (k(cat)/K(m)) revealed that catalysis of a triple-helical FRET peptide substrate by MMP-2 relied primarily on the module 3 binding site. Thus, we have identified three collagen binding site residues that are essential for gelatinolysis and constitute promising targets for selective inhibition of MMP-2.

  18. Derivation of an amino acid similarity matrix for peptide:MHC binding and its application as a Bayesian prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in peptide:MHC binding studies are often able to estimate the impact of a single residue substitution based on a heuristic understanding of amino acid similarity in an experimental context. Our aim is to quantify this measure of similarity to improve peptide:MHC binding prediction methods. This should help compensate for holes and bias in the sequence space coverage of existing peptide binding datasets. Results Here, a novel amino acid similarity matrix (PMBEC is directly derived from the binding affinity data of combinatorial peptide mixtures. Like BLOSUM62, this matrix captures well-known physicochemical properties of amino acid residues. However, PMBEC differs markedly from existing matrices in cases where residue substitution involves a reversal of electrostatic charge. To demonstrate its usefulness, we have developed a new peptide:MHC class I binding prediction method, using the matrix as a Bayesian prior. We show that the new method can compensate for missing information on specific residues in the training data. We also carried out a large-scale benchmark, and its results indicate that prediction performance of the new method is comparable to that of the best neural network based approaches for peptide:MHC class I binding. Conclusion A novel amino acid similarity matrix has been derived for peptide:MHC binding interactions. One prominent feature of the matrix is that it disfavors substitution of residues with opposite charges. Given that the matrix was derived from experimentally determined peptide:MHC binding affinity measurements, this feature is likely shared by all peptide:protein interactions. In addition, we have demonstrated the usefulness of the matrix as a Bayesian prior in an improved scoring-matrix based peptide:MHC class I prediction method. A software implementation of the method is available at: http://www.mhc-pathway.net/smmpmbec.

  19. Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: high-alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cícero Bottino

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively demonstrate surface micro-morphological changes after the employment of different surface conditioning methods on high-alumina and glassy-matrix dental ceramics. Three disc-shaped high-alumina specimens (In-Ceram Alumina, INC and 4 glassy-matrix ceramic specimens (Vitadur Alpha, V (diameter: 5 mm and height: 5 mm were manufactured. INC specimens were submitted to 3 different surface conditioning methods: INC1 - Polishing with silicon carbide papers (SiC; INC2 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; INC3 - Chairside silica coating (CoJet; 30 µm SiOx. Vitadur Alpha (V specimens were subjected to 4 different surface conditioning methods: V1 - Polishing with SiC papers; V2 - HF acid etching; V3 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; V4 - Chairside silica coating (30 µm SiOx. Following completion of the surface conditioning methods, the specimens were analyzed using SEM. After polishing with SiC, the surfaces of V specimens remained relatively smooth while those of INC exhibited topographic irregularities. Chairside air-abrasion with either aluminum oxide or silica particles produced retentive patterns on both INC and V specimens, with smoother patterns observed after silica coating. V specimens etched with HF presented a highly porous surface. Chairside tribochemical silica coating resulted in smoother surfaces with particles embedded on the surface even after air-blasting. Surface conditioning using air-borne particle abrasion with either 50 µm alumina or 30 µm silica particles exhibited qualitatively comparable rough surfaces for both INC and V. HF acid gel created the most micro-retentive surface for the glassy-matrix ceramic tested.

  20. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  1. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  2. Characterization of carbon fibers and fiber-matrix adhesion in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, J. P.; Devilbiss, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of fiber/matrix interactions on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic carbon fiber composites was determined. The experimental approach was a multi-faceted one involving the following areas: characterization of the surface of carbon fibers using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and scanning transmission electron microcopy (STEM); determination of the functional groups on carbon fiber surfaces using an elemental tagging scheme - derivatization; determination of the polar and dispersion contribution to the surface energy of carbon fibers by measuring wetting forces in a series of liquids having known polar and dispersion components; and study of the interaction of thermoplastic polymers with carbon surfaces by solution adsorption, STEM and fiber critical length.

  3. PINCH1 regulates cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions, cell polarity and cell survival during the peri-implantation stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shaohua; Bordoy, Randi; Stanchi, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    PINCH1 is composed of 5 LIM domains, binds integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and locates to integrin-mediated adhesion sites. In order to investigate PINCH1 function we generated mice and embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) lacking the PINCH1 gene. Similar to mice lacking beta1...

  4. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  5. L1CAM Binds ErbB Receptors through Ig-Like Domains Coupling Cell Adhesion and Neuregulin Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Lakomá, Jarmila; Baars, Sigrid; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Cabedo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    During nervous system development different cell-to-cell communication mechanisms operate in parallel guiding migrating neurons and growing axons to generate complex arrays of neural circuits. How such a system works in coordination is not well understood. Cross-regulatory interactions between different signalling pathways and redundancy between them can increase precision and fidelity of guidance systems. Immunoglobulin superfamily proteins of the NCAM and L1 families couple specific substrate recognition and cell adhesion with the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Thus it has been shown that L1CAM-mediated cell adhesion promotes the activation of the EGFR (erbB1) from Drosophila to humans. Here we explore the specificity of the molecular interaction between L1CAM and the erbB receptor family. We show that L1CAM binds physically erbB receptors in both heterologous systems and the mammalian developing brain. Different Ig-like domains located in the extracellular part of L1CAM can support this interaction. Interestingly, binding of L1CAM to erbB enhances its response to neuregulins. During development this may synergize with the activation of erbB receptors through L1CAM homophilic interactions, conferring diffusible neuregulins specificity for cells or axons that interact with the substrate through L1CAM. PMID:22815787

  6. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Raisa; Greineder, Colin F; Villa, Carlos H; Hood, Elizabeth D; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications.

  7. Identification of calprotectin, a calcium binding leukocyte protein, in human dental calculus matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, J; Nishikawa, S; Ishida, H; Yamashita, K; Kitamura, S; Kohri, K; Nagata, T

    1997-05-01

    Calprotectin is a calcium binding protein produced by leukocytes, macrophages and epithelial cells, and its levels in several tissues increase during infections and in many inflamed areas, suggesting that it may be an indicator of inflammatory activity. Osteopontin is a prominent phosphorylated glycoprotein in bone matrix, having calcium binding capacity. Recently, it has been reported that calprotectin and osteopontin are present in urinary stones (pathological mineralized masses in the body), and that these proteins may be involved in their formation. Dental calculus formed by mineralization of dental plaque is an inflammatory factor which may contribute to periodontal disease. It contains many organic components involved in mineralization. We recently found osteopontin molecules in human dental calculus and suggested that the components of its matrix may be similar to those of urinary stones. In this study, we investigated the presence of calprotectin in human dental calculus by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses using a specific antibody for calprotectin. After fixation and demineralization of dental calculi adhered to tooth roots, sections embedded in paraffin were immunoreacted with the antibody for calprotectin and positive immunostaining for calprotectin was observed. Dental calculus proteins were then extracted with EDTA and separated by electrophoresis on 15% polyacrylamide gels. By immunoblotting analysis, 3 or 4 bands were observed at 11, 14.5, 22-25, 28 or 36.5 kDa and these patterns corresponded to those of calprotectin subunits. When non-immune rabbit serum was used instead of calprotectin-specific antibody as a negative control, no immunoreactivity was observed. These findings indicate that calprotectin is associated not only with antibacterial action but also with calcium binding capacity during dental calculus formation.

  8. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  9. Flanking p10 contribution and sequence bias in matrix based epitope prediction: revisiting the assumption of independent binding pockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Christian S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eluted natural peptides from major histocompatibility molecules show patterns of conserved residues. Crystallographic structures show that the bound peptide in class II major histocompatibility complex adopts a near uniform polyproline II-like conformation. This way allele-specific favoured residues are able to anchor into pockets in the binding groove leaving other peptide side chains exposed for recognition by T cells. The anchor residues form a motif. This sequence pattern can be used to screen large sequences for potential epitopes. Quantitative matrices extend the motif idea to include the contribution of non-anchor peptide residues. This report examines two new matrices that extend the binding register to incorporate the polymorphic p10 pocket of human leukocyte antigen DR1. Their performance is quantified against experimental binding measurements and against the canonical nine-residue register matrix. Results One new matrix shows significant improvement over the base matrix; the other does not. The new matrices differ in the sequence of the peptide library. Conclusion One of the extended quantitative matrices showed significant improvement in prediction over the original nine residue matrix and over the other extended matrix. Proline in the sequence of the peptide library of the better performing matrix presumably stabilizes the peptide conformation through neighbour interactions. Such interactions may influence epitope prediction in this test of quantitative matrices. This calls into question the assumption of the independent contribution of individual binding pockets.

  10. Adsorption of enamel matrix proteins to a bovine-derived bone grafting material and its regulation of cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Hedbom, Erik; Zhang, Yufeng; Haenni, Beat; Buser, Daniel; Sculean, Anton

    2012-07-01

    The use of various combinations of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and grafting materials has been shown to promote periodontal wound healing/regeneration. However, the downstream cellular behavior of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and osteoblasts has not yet been studied. Furthermore, it is unknown to what extent the bleeding during regenerative surgery may influence the adsorption of exogenous proteins to the surface of bone grafting materials and the subsequent cellular behavior. In the present study, the aim is to test EMD adsorption to the surface of natural bone mineral (NBM) particles in the presence of blood and determine the effect of EMD coating to NBM particles on downstream cellular pathways, such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of primary human osteoblasts and PDL cells. NBM particles were precoated in various settings with EMD or human blood and analyzed for protein adsorption patterns via fluorescent imaging and high-resolution immunocytochemistry with an anti-EMD antibody. Cell attachment and cell proliferation were quantified using fluorescent double-stranded DNA-binding dye. Cell differentiation was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction for genes encoding runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and collagen1α1 (COL1A1), and mineralization was assessed using red dye staining. Analysis of cell attachment and cell proliferation revealed significantly higher osteoblast and PDL cell attachment on EMD-coated surfaces when compared with control and blood-coated surfaces. EMD also stimulated release of growth factors and cytokines, including bone morphogenetic protein 2 and transforming growth factor β1. Moreover, there were significantly higher mRNA levels of osteoblast differentiation markers, including COL1A1, ALP, and OC, in osteoblasts and PDL cells cultured on EMD-coated NBM particles. The present results suggest that 1) EMD enhances osteoblast and PDL cell attachment

  11. Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metallo- proteinases (MMPs) in viable and degenerating stage of Taenia solium metacestode in swine neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K; Singh, Aloukick K; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Amrita; Singh, Avinash; Rai, Ravi P; Tripathi, Mukesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Nuzhat

    2015-11-30

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection of central nervous system (CNS). Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were investigated on brain tissues surrounding viable (n=15) and degenerating cysticerci (n=15) of Taenia solium in swine by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. Gelatin gel zymography was performed for MMPs activity. ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), E-selectin, MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α), Eotaxin-1 and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) were associated with degenerating cysticerci (cysts). However, VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), MMP-2 and MMP-9 were associated with both viable and degenerating cysts. In conclusion, viable and degenerating cysticerci have different immune molecule profiles and role of these molecules in disease pathogenesis needs to be investigated.

  12. Changes in serum cellular adhesion molecule and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in patients with cerebral infarction following hyperbaric oxygen therapy A case and intergroup control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renliang Zhao; Chunxia Wang; Yongjun Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies have confirmed that hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can reduce matrix metalloproteinase activity and blood brain barrier permeability, thereby exhibiting neuroprotective effects. However, at present, consensus does not exist in terms of its clinical efficacy. OBJECTIVE: To validate the significance of changes in serum cellular adhesion molecule and MMP-9 levels in patients with cerebral infarction following HBO therapy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, neurobiochemical study was performed at the Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College between December 2002 and March 2006. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 112 patients with acute cerebral infarction of internal carotid artery, comprising 64 males and 48 females, averaging (67 ± 11) years, were recruited and randomized to a HBO group (n = 50) and a routine treatment group (n = 62). An additional 30 gender- and age-matched normal subjects, consisting of 17 males and 13 females, averaging (63 ± 9) years, were enrolled as control subjects. METHODS: The routine treatment group received routine drug treatment and rehabilitation exercise. HBO treatment was additionally performed in the HBO group, once a day, for a total of 10 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble E-selectin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Upon admission, serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble E-selectin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were significantly increased in patients with cerebral infarction, compared with control subjects (P < 0.01). Following HBO and routine treatments, serum levels of the above-mentioned indices were significantly reduced in the HBO and routine treatment groups (P < 0.01). Moreover, greater efficacy was observed in the HBO

  13. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Du

    Full Text Available In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA, the protein-binding microarray (PBM and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq. The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  14. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenxin; Gao, Jing; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM) model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC) and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), the protein-binding microarray (PBM) and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq). The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC) model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA) model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  15. Long-term reduction of T-cell intracellular antigens reveals a transcriptome associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Núñez

    Full Text Available Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens TIA1 and TIAR contributes to a cellular phenotype characterised by uncontrolled proliferation and tumorigenesis. Massive-scale poly(A+ RNA sequencing of TIA1 or TIAR-knocked down HeLa cells reveals transcriptome signatures comprising genes and functional categories potentially able to modulate several aspects of membrane dynamics associated with extracellular matrix and focal/cell adhesion events. The transcriptomic heterogeneity is the result of differentially expressed genes and RNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing and/or promoter usage. These results suggest a role for TIA proteins in the regulation and/or modulation of cellular homeostasis related to focal/cell adhesion, extracellular matrix and membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics.

  16. Transmembrane neural cell-adhesion molecule (NCAM), but not glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored NCAM, down-regulates secretion of matrix metalloproteinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Chen, W; Rucklidge, G

    1993-01-01

    proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors all participate in the construction, maintenance, and remodeling of extracellular matrix by cells. The neural cell-adhesion molecule (NCAM)-negative rat glioma cell line BT4Cn secretes substantial amounts of metalloproteinases, as compared with its NCAM-positive mother...... cell line BT4C. We have transfected the BT4Cn cell line with cDNAs encoding the human NCAM-B and -C isoforms. We report here that the expression of transmembrane NCAM-B, but not of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked NCAM-C, induces a down-regulation of 92-kDa gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9......) and interstitial collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1), indicating that cellular expression of the recognition molecule NCAM regulates the metabolism of the surrounding matrix....

  17. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  18. Investigation of the binding of dioxin selective pentapeptides to a polyaniline matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Archibong, Edikan

    2012-08-01

    Polyaniline in form of emeraldine salt and emeraldine base was used as a matrix to attach several labeled and non-labeled dioxin selective pentapeptides both directly to the polymer and using glutaraldehyde as a linker. The peptides have been selected as a model to study the binding process due to their smaller size, lower sensitivity to the environment and potential application as solid state extraction reagents for chlorinated toxins. The composition and the properties of the compounds were investigated by means of elemental analysis, XPS, FTIR, UV/vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results have shown that 3.30-7.76% peptides were attached to the emeraldine base both with and without a linker. Glutaraldehyde and the peptides were connected to the matrix via chemical bond resulting in formation of compounds whit similar composition and stability in a broad pH range. The influence of the linker and the peptides on the electronic properties and composition of the polymer have been investigated by principal component analysis. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  20. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  1. Anchorless surface associated glycolytic enzymes from Lactobacillus plantarum 299v bind to epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenting, Jacob; Beck, Hans Christian; Vrang, Astrid; Riemann, Holger; Ravn, Peter; Hansen, Anne Maria; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv; Israelsen, Hans; Madsen, Søren

    2013-06-12

    An important criterion for the selection of a probiotic bacterial strain is its ability to adhere to the mucosal surface. Adhesion is usually mediated by proteins or other components located on the outer cell surface of the bacterium. In the present study we characterized the adhesive properties of two classical intracellular enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and enolase (ENO) isolated from the outer cell surface of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. None of the genes encoded signal peptides or cell surface anchoring motifs that could explain their extracellular location on the bacterial surface. The presence of the glycolytic enzymes on the outer surface was verified by western blotting using polyclonal antibodies raised against the specific enzymes. GAPDH and ENO showed a highly specific binding to plasminogen and fibronectin whereas GAPDH but not ENO showed weak binding to mucin. Furthermore, a pH dependent and specific binding of GAPDH and ENO to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells at pH 5 but not at pH 7 was demonstrated. The results showed that these glycolytic enzymes could play a role in the adhesion of the probiotic bacterium L. plantarum 299v to the gastrointestinal tract of the host. Finally, a number of probiotic as well non-probiotic Lactobacillus strains were analyzed for the presence of GAPDH and ENO on the outer surface, but no correlation between the extracellular location of these enzymes and the probiotic status of the applied strains was demonstrated.

  2. Surface-associated plasminogen binding of Cryptococcus neoformans promotes extracellular matrix invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Stie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of illness and death in persons with predisposing factors, including: malignancies, solid organ transplants, and corticosteroid use. C. neoformans is ubiquitous in the environment and enters into the lungs via inhalation, where it can disseminate through the bloodstream and penetrate the central nervous system (CNS, resulting in a difficult to treat and often-fatal infection of the brain, called meningoencephalitis. Plasminogen is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by cancer cells during metastasis and several pathogenic species of bacteria have been found to manipulate the host plasminogen system to facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of plasminogen at their surface. METHODOLOGY: The invasion of the brain and the central nervous system by penetration of the protective blood-brain barrier is a prerequisite to the establishment of meningoencephalitis by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. neoformans. In this study, we examined the ability of C. neoformans to subvert the host plasminogen system to facilitate tissue barrier invasion. Through a combination of biochemical, cell biology, and proteomic approaches, we have shown that C. neoformans utilizes the host plasminogen system to cross tissue barriers, providing support for the hypothesis that plasminogen-binding may contribute to the invasion of the blood-brain barrier by penetration of the brain endothelial cells and underlying matrix. In addition, we have identified the cell wall-associated proteins that serve as plasminogen receptors and characterized both the plasminogen-binding and plasmin-activation potential for this significant human pathogen. CONCLUSIONS: The results of

  3. Overexpression of Cell Surface Cytokeratin 8 in Multidrug-Resistant MCF-7/MX Cells Enhances Cell Adhesion to the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple complex mechanisms may be involved, simultaneously or complementarily, in the emergence and development of multidrug resistance (MDR in various cancers. Cell adhesion-mediated MDR is one such mechanism. In the present study, we initially observed increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins by the MDR human breast tumor cell line MCF-7/MX compared to its parental cells. We then used a strategy that combined antibody-based screening technique and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify membrane proteins that contribute to the enhanced adhesion of MCF-7/MX cells. Using MCF-7/MX cells as immunogen, we isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody, 9C6, that preferentially reacts with MCF-7/MX cells over the parental MCF-7 cells. The molecular target of 9C6 was identified as cytokeratin 8 (CK8, which was found to be overexpressed on the cell surface of MCF-7/MX cells. We further observed that down-regulation of cell surface levels of CK8 through siRNA transfection significantly inhibited MCF-7/MX cell adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin. In addition, anti-CK8 siRNA partially reversed the MDR phenotype of MCF-7/MX cells. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations in the expression level and cellular localization of CK8 may play a significant role in enhancing the cellular adhesion of MDR MCF-7/MX cells.

  4. Staphylococcal SSL5 binding to human leukemia cells inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells and platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; Boer, Ingrid G. J.; Kruizinga, Roeline; Verheul, Henk M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; de Haas, Carla J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5) was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share m

  5. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules in Fetal-Origin Amniotic Epithelial Cells of Preeclamptic Pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sun Kim

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a common disease that can occur during human pregnancy and is a leading cause of both maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Inadequate trophoblast invasion and deficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries are associated with preeclampsia (PE. The development of this syndrome is thought to be related to multiple factors. Recently, we isolated patient-specific human amniotic epithelial cells (AECs from the placentas of 3 women with normal pregnancy and 3 with preeclamptic pregnancy. Since the characteristics of human AECs in PE are different from those in normal pregnancy, we sought to confirm the genes differentially expressed between preeclamptic pregnancy and normal pregnancy. Therefore, we performed transcriptome analysis to investigate the candidate genes associated with the possible pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Pathway analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG online resource. In this study, we selected a total of 12 pathways and focused on extracellular matrix-related and biological adhesion molecules. Using RT-PCR array and real-time PCR, we confirmed that COL16A1, ITGB2, and LAMA3 were significantly up-regulated, but ITGA1, ITGA3, ITGA6, MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP11 were significantly down-regulated in preeclamptic fetal origin cells. Taken together, we suggest that the genes and pathways identified here may be responsible for the occurrence and development of PE, and controlling their expression may play a role in communication with fetal-maternal placenta to keep normal pregnancy.

  6. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules in Fetal-Origin Amniotic Epithelial Cells of Preeclamptic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Sun; Yu, Ji Hea; Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Ah Leum; Jo, Mi Hyun; Kim, MinGi; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Young-Han

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common disease that can occur during human pregnancy and is a leading cause of both maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Inadequate trophoblast invasion and deficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries are associated with preeclampsia (PE). The development of this syndrome is thought to be related to multiple factors. Recently, we isolated patient-specific human amniotic epithelial cells (AECs) from the placentas of 3 women with normal pregnancy and 3 with preeclamptic pregnancy. Since the characteristics of human AECs in PE are different from those in normal pregnancy, we sought to confirm the genes differentially expressed between preeclamptic pregnancy and normal pregnancy. Therefore, we performed transcriptome analysis to investigate the candidate genes associated with the possible pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Pathway analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) online resource. In this study, we selected a total of 12 pathways and focused on extracellular matrix-related and biological adhesion molecules. Using RT-PCR array and real-time PCR, we confirmed that COL16A1, ITGB2, and LAMA3 were significantly up-regulated, but ITGA1, ITGA3, ITGA6, MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP11 were significantly down-regulated in preeclamptic fetal origin cells. Taken together, we suggest that the genes and pathways identified here may be responsible for the occurrence and development of PE, and controlling their expression may play a role in communication with fetal-maternal placenta to keep normal pregnancy.

  7. Staphylococcal SSL5 Binding to Human Leukemia Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M. E. Walenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5 was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share many characteristics in migration and dissemination, we explored the potential of SSL5 as an antagonist of malignant cell behavior. Previously, it was demonstrated that rolling of human HL-60 leukemia cells on activated endothelial cells was mediated by P-selectin. In this study, we show that SSL5 targets HL-60 cells. Binding of SSL5 was rapid and without observed toxicity. Competition of SSL5 with the binding of three anti-PSGL-1 antibodies and P-selectin to HL-60 cells identified PSGL-1 as the ligand on HL-60 cells. Presence of sialyl Lewis x epitopes on PSGL-1 was crucial for its interaction with SSL5. Importantly, SSL5 not only inhibited the interaction of HL-60 cells with activated endothelial cells but also with platelets, which both play an important role in growth and metastasis of cancers. These data support the concept that SSL5 could be a lead in the search for novel strategies against hematological malignancies.

  8. Single-Nucleotide Mutation Matrix: A New Model for Predicting the NF-κB DNA Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Wenxin Du; Jing Gao; Tingting Wang; Jinke Wang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM) model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC) and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including t...

  9. Integrin-mediated traction force enhances paxillin molecular associations and adhesion dynamics that increase the invasiveness of tumor cells into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhdjian, Armen H; Kai, FuiBoon; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Prahl, Louis S; Przybyla, Laralynne M; McGregor, Alexandra L; Bell, Emily S; Barnes, J Matthew; DuFort, Christopher C; Ou, Guanqing; Chang, Alice C; Cassereau, Luke; Tan, Steven J; Pickup, Michael W; Lakins, Jonathan N; Ye, Xin; Davidson, Michael W; Lammerding, Jan; Odde, David J; Dunn, Alexander R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2017-06-01

    Metastasis requires tumor cells to navigate through a stiff stroma and squeeze through confined microenvironments. Whether tumors exploit unique biophysical properties to metastasize remains unclear. Data show that invading mammary tumor cells, when cultured in a stiffened three-dimensional extracellular matrix that recapitulates the primary tumor stroma, adopt a basal-like phenotype. Metastatic tumor cells and basal-like tumor cells exert higher integrin-mediated traction forces at the bulk and molecular levels, consistent with a motor-clutch model in which motors and clutches are both increased. Basal-like nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells also display an altered integrin adhesion molecular organization at the nanoscale and recruit a suite of paxillin-associated proteins implicated in invasion and metastasis. Phosphorylation of paxillin by Src family kinases, which regulates adhesion turnover, is similarly enhanced in the metastatic and basal-like tumor cells, fostered by a stiff matrix, and critical for tumor cell invasion in our assays. Bioinformatics reveals an unappreciated relationship between Src kinases, paxillin, and survival of breast cancer patients. Thus adoption of the basal-like adhesion phenotype may favor the recruitment of molecules that facilitate tumor metastasis to integrin-based adhesions. Analysis of the physical properties of tumor cells and integrin adhesion composition in biopsies may be predictive of patient outcome. © 2017 Mekhdjian, Kai, Rubashkin, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Dennexin peptides modeled after the homophilic binding sites of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) promote neuronal survival, modify cell adhesion and impair spatial learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Christensen, Claus; Rossetti, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated cell adhesion results in activation of intracellular signaling cascades that lead to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth, neuronal survival, and modulation of synaptic activity associated with cognitive processes. The crystal structure...... between Ig1 and Ig3 and between Ig2 and Ig2, respectively, observed in the crystal structure. Although the two dennexin peptides differed in amino acid sequence, they both modulated cell adhesion, reflected by inhibition of NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. Both dennexins also promoted neuronal survival...

  11. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  12. The ability of haemolysins expressed by atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to bind to extracellular matrix components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A Magalhães

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical and atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC are considered important bacterial causes of diarrhoea. Considering the repertoire of virulence genes, atypical EPEC (aEPEC is a heterogeneous group, harbouring genes that are found in other diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes, such as those encoding haemolysins. Haemolysins are cytolytic toxins that lyse host cells disrupting the function of the plasma membrane. In addition, these cytolysins mediate a connection to vascular tissue and/or blood components, such as plasma and cellular fibronectin. Therefore, we investigated the haemolytic activity of 72 aEPEC isolates and determined the correlation of this phenotype with the presence of genes encoding enterohaemolysins (Ehly and cytolysin A (ClyA. In addition, the correlation between the expression of haemolysins and the ability of these secreted proteins to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM components was also assessed in this study. Our findings demonstrate that a subset of aEPEC presents haemolytic activity due to the expression of Ehlys and/or ClyA and that this activity is closely related to the ability of these isolates to bind to ECM components.

  13. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies...... not require NCAM-mediated fibroblast growth factor receptor activation....... on axon guidance in Drosophila suggest that NCAM also regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 28, 2005, 141). A possible interaction between NCAM and EGFR in mammalian cells has not been investigated. The present study demonstrates for the first time...

  14. Vimentin Levels and Serine 71 Phosphorylation in the Control of Cell-Matrix Adhesions, Migration Speed, and Shape of Transformed Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriac, Emmanuel; Coceano, Giovanna; Mavajian, Zahra; Hageman, Tijmen A G; Christ, Andreas F; Testa, Ilaria; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Gad, Annica K B

    2017-01-22

    Metastasizing tumor cells show increased expression of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin, which has been used to diagnose invasive tumors for decades. Recent observations indicate that vimentin is not only a passive marker for carcinoma, but may also induce tumor cell invasion. To clarify how vimentin IFs control cell adhesions and migration, we analyzed the nanoscale (30-50 nm) spatial organization of vimentin IFs and cell-matrix adhesions in metastatic fibroblast cells, using three-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. We also studied whether wild-type and phospho-deficient or -mimicking mutants of vimentin changed the size and lifetime of focal adhesions (FAs), cell shape, and cell migration, using live-cell total internal reflection imaging and confocal microscopy. We observed that vimentin exists in fragments of different lengths. Short fragments were mostly the size of a unit-length filament and were mainly localized close to small cell-matrix adhesions. Long vimentin filaments were found in the proximity of large FAs. Vimentin expression in these cells caused a reduction in FAs size and an elongated cell shape, but did not affect FA lifetime, or the speed or directionality of cell migration. Expression of a phospho-mimicking mutant (S71D) of vimentin increased the speed of cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that in highly migratory, transformed mesenchymal cells, vimentin levels control the cell shape and FA size, but not cell migration, which instead is linked to the phosphorylation status of S71 vimentin. These observations are consistent with the possibility that not only levels, but also the assembly status of vimentin control cell migration.

  15. Impact of extracellular matrix derived from osteoarthritis subchondral bone osteoblasts on osteocytes: role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase signaling cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasadam, Indira; Farnaghi, Saba; Feng, Jian Q; Gu, Wenyi; Perry, Samuel; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2013-10-09

    Our recent study indicated that subchondral bone pathogenesis in osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with osteocyte morphology and phenotypic abnormalities. However, the mechanism underlying this abnormality needs to be identified. In this study we investigated the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced from normal and OA bone on osteocytic cells function. De-cellularized matrices, resembling the bone provisional ECM secreted from primary human subchondral bone osteoblasts (SBOs) of normal and OA patients were used as a model to study the effect on osteocytic cells. Osteocytic cells (MLOY4 osteocyte cell line) cultured on normal and OA derived ECMs were analyzed by confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cell attachment assays, zymography, apoptosis assays, qRT-PCR and western blotting. The role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways during these interactions were monitored using appropriate blocking antibodies. The ECM produced by OA SBOs contained less mineral content, showed altered organization of matrix proteins and matrix structure compared with the matrices produced by normal SBOs. Culture of osteocytic cells on these defective OA ECM resulted in a decrease of integrinβ1 expression and the de-activation of FAK cell signaling pathway, which subsequently affected the initial osteocytic cell's attachment and functions including morphological abnormalities of cytoskeletal structures, focal adhesions, increased apoptosis, altered osteocyte specific gene expression and increased Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2) and -9 expression. This study provides new insights in understanding how altered OA bone matrix can lead to the abnormal osteocyte phenotypic changes, which is typical in OA pathogenesis.

  16. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  17. The matrix-binding domain of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 targets active connective tissue growth factor to a fibroblast-produced extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbaum, Justin S; Tranquillo, Robert T; Mecham, Robert P

    2010-11-10

    It is advantageous to use biomaterials in tissue engineering that stimulate extracellular matrix (ECM) production by the cellular component. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) stimulates type I collagen (COL1A1) transcription, but is functionally limited as a free molecule. Using a matrix-binding domain (MBD) from microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1, the fusion protein MBD-CTGF was targeted to the ECM and tested for COL1A1 transcriptional activation. MBD-CTGF produced by the ECM-synthesizing fibroblasts, or provided exogenously, localized to the elastic fiber ECM. MBD-CTGF, but not CTGF alone, led to a two-fold enhancement of COL1A1 expression. This study introduces a targeting technology that can be used to elevate collagen transcription in engineered tissues and thereby improve tissue mechanics.

  18. Inositol phosphates compete with nucleic acids for binding to bovine leukemia virus matrix protein: implications for deltaretroviral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Lackey, Crystal M; Paterson, Justin P

    2013-08-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of retroviral Gag proteins plays a crucial role in virion assembly. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a lentivirus, the presence of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate triggers a conformational change allowing the MA domain to bind the plasma membrane (PM). In this study, the MA protein from bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was used to investigate the mechanism of viral Gag binding to the membrane during replication of a deltaretrovirus. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the binding affinity of MA for two RNA constructs derived from the BLV genome as well as for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The importance of electrostatic interactions and the ability of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) to compete with nucleic acids for binding to MA were also investigated. Our data show that IP6 effectively competes with RNA and DNA for BLV MA binding, while [NaCl] of greater than 100 mM is required to produce any observable effect on DNA-MA binding. These results suggest that BLV assembly may be highly dependent on the specific interaction of the MA domain with components of the PM, as observed previously with HIV-1. The mode of MA binding to nucleic acids and the implications for BLV assembly are discussed.

  19. Cell adhesion to fibrillin-1: identification of an Arg-Gly-Asp-dependent synergy region and a heparin-binding site that regulates focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bax, Daniel V; Mahalingam, Yashithra; Cain, Stuart;

    2007-01-01

    We have defined the molecular basis of cell adhesion to fibrillin-1, the major structural component of extracellular microfibrils that are associated with elastic fibres. Using human dermal fibroblasts, and recombinant domain swap fragments containing the Arg-Gly-Asp motif, we have demonstrated a...

  20. Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems - (CASTS). [graphite fiber/polyimide matrix composites and polyimide adhesives for the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The CASTS Project initiated to develop graphite fiber/polyimide matrix (GR/PI) composite structures with 589K operational capability for aerospace vehicles is described. Near term tasks include screening composites and adhesives for 589K service, developing fabrication procedures and specifications, developing design allowables test methods and data, design and test of structural elements, and construction of a full scale aft body flap for the space shuttle orbiter vehicle for ground testing. Far term tasks include research efforts directed at new materials, manufacturing procedures and design/analysis methodology. Specific results discussed include: (1) identification of four GR/PI composites and three PI adhesives with 589K service potential for periods ranging from 125 to 500 hours; (2) development of an adhesive formulation suitable for bonding reusable surface insulation (RSI) titles to 589K (GR/PI) substructure; (3) the capability to fabricate and nondestructively inspect laminates, hat section shaped stiffeners, honeycomb sandwich panels, and chopped fiber moldings; and (4) test methods for measuring design allowables at 117K.

  1. A peptide derived from a trans-homophilic binding site in neural cell adhesion molecule induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Soroka, Vladislav; Korshunova, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a key role in neural development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of a fragment of NCAM comprising the three N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules indicates that the first and second Ig modules bind to each other...... module. It promoted survival of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and also induced neurite extension in cultures of dopaminergic neurons and CGNs; the latter effect was shown to be dependent on NCAM expression, indicating that plannexin mimics the neuritogenic effect of homophilic NCAM binding....

  2. Expression of metastasis suppressor BRMS1 in breast cancer cells results in a marked delay in cellular adhesion to matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic dissemination is a multi-step process that depends on cancer cells’ ability to respond to microenvironmental cues by adapting adhesion abilities and undergoing cytoskeletal rearrangement. Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor 1 (BRMS1) affects several steps of the metastatic cascade: it dec...

  3. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-09-02

    The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant [Formula: see text] and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between [Formula: see text] and the binding constant [Formula: see text] of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D).

  4. Loss of miR-203 regulates cell shape and matrix adhesion through ROBO1/Rac/FAK in response to stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Lily Thao-Nhi; Cazares, Oscar; Mouw, Janna K; Chatterjee, Sharmila; Macias, Hector; Moran, Angel; Ramos, Jillian; Keely, Patricia J; Weaver, Valerie M; Hinck, Lindsay

    2016-03-14

    Breast tumor progression is accompanied by changes in the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) that increase stiffness of the microenvironment. Mammary epithelial cells engage regulatory pathways that permit dynamic responses to mechanical cues from the ECM. Here, we identify a SLIT2/ROBO1 signaling circuit as a key regulatory mechanism by which cells sense and respond to ECM stiffness to preserve tensional homeostasis. We observed that Robo1 ablation in the developing mammary gland compromised actin stress fiber assembly and inhibited cell contractility to perturb tissue morphogenesis, whereas SLIT2 treatment stimulated Rac and increased focal adhesion kinase activity to enhance cell tension by maintaining cell shape and matrix adhesion. Further investigation revealed that a stiff ECM increased Robo1 levels by down-regulating miR-203. Consistently, patients whose tumor expressed a low miR-203/high Robo1 expression pattern exhibited a better overall survival prognosis. These studies show that cells subjected to stiffened environments up-regulate Robo1 as a protective mechanism that maintains cell shape and facilitates ECM adherence.

  5. Loss of miR-203 regulates cell shape and matrix adhesion through ROBO1/Rac/FAK in response to stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Lily Thao-Nhi; Cazares, Oscar; Mouw, Janna K.; Chatterjee, Sharmila; Macias, Hector; Moran, Angel; Ramos, Jillian; Keely, Patricia J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumor progression is accompanied by changes in the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) that increase stiffness of the microenvironment. Mammary epithelial cells engage regulatory pathways that permit dynamic responses to mechanical cues from the ECM. Here, we identify a SLIT2/ROBO1 signaling circuit as a key regulatory mechanism by which cells sense and respond to ECM stiffness to preserve tensional homeostasis. We observed that Robo1 ablation in the developing mammary gland compromised actin stress fiber assembly and inhibited cell contractility to perturb tissue morphogenesis, whereas SLIT2 treatment stimulated Rac and increased focal adhesion kinase activity to enhance cell tension by maintaining cell shape and matrix adhesion. Further investigation revealed that a stiff ECM increased Robo1 levels by down-regulating miR-203. Consistently, patients whose tumor expressed a low miR-203/high Robo1 expression pattern exhibited a better overall survival prognosis. These studies show that cells subjected to stiffened environments up-regulate Robo1 as a protective mechanism that maintains cell shape and facilitates ECM adherence. PMID:26975850

  6. Screening of matrix metalloproteinases available from the protein data bank: insights into biological functions, domain organization, and zinc binding groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolotti, Orazio; Miscioscia, Teresa Fabiola; Leonetti, Francesco; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Carotti, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    A total of 142 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) X-ray crystallographic structures were retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and analyzed by an automated and efficient routine, developed in-house, with a series of bioinformatic tools. Highly informative heat maps and hierarchical clusterograms provided a reliable and comprehensive representation of the relationships existing among MMPs, enlarging and complementing the current knowledge in the field. Multiple sequence and structural alignments permitted better location and display of key MMP motifs and quantification of the residue consensus at each amino acid position in the most critical binding subsites of MMPs. The MMP active site consensus sequences, the C-alpha root-mean-square deviation (RMSd) analysis of diverse enzymatic subsites, and the examination of the chemical nature, binding topologies, and zinc binding groups (ZBGs) of ligands extracted from crystallographic complexes provided useful insights on the structural arrangements of the most potent MMP inhibitors.

  7. The 5‘—flanking cis—acting elements of the human ε—globin gene associates with the nuclear matrix and binds to the nuclear matrix proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANZHIJIANG; RUOLANQIAN

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear matrix attachment regions(MARs) and the binding nuclear matrix proteins in the 5'-flanking cisacting elements of the human ε-globin gene have been examined.Using in vitro DNA-matrix binding assay,it has been shown that the positive stage-specific regulatory element (ε-PREII,-446bp- -419bp) upstream of this gene could specifically associate with the nuclear matrix from K562 cells,indicating that ε-PREII may be an erythroidspecific facultative MAR.In gel mobility shift assay and Southwestern blotting assay,an erythroid-specific nuclear matrix protein (ε-NMPk) in K562 cells has been revealed to bind to this positive regulatory element (ε-PREII).Furthermore,we demonstrated that the silencer (-392bp- -177bp) upstream of the human ε-globin gene could associate with the nuclear matrices from K562,HEL and Raji cells.In addition,the nuclear matrix proteins prepared from these three cell lines could also bind to this silencer,suggesting that this silencer element might be a constitutive nuclear matrix attachment region(constitutive MAR).Our results demonstrated that the nuclear matrix and nuclear matrix proteins might play an important role in the regulation of the human ε-globin gene expression.

  8. Biomaterial arrays with defined adhesion ligand densities and matrix stiffness identify distinct phenotypes for tumorigenic and nontumorigenic human mesenchymal cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tyler D; Koepsel, Justin T; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Nguyen, Eric H; Zorn, Stefan; Parlato, Matthew; Loveland, Samuel G; Schwartz, Michael P; Murphy, William L

    2014-05-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate migration of a model tumor cell line (HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells, HT-1080s) using synthetic biomaterials to systematically vary peptide ligand density and substrate stiffness. A range of substrate elastic moduli were investigated by using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel arrays (0.34 - 17 kPa) and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays (~0.1-1 GPa), while cell adhesion was tuned by varying the presentation of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides. HT-1080 motility was insensitive to cell adhesion ligand density on RGD-SAMs, as they migrated with similar speed and directionality for a wide range of RGD densities (0.2-5% mol fraction RGD). Similarly, HT-1080 migration speed was weakly dependent on adhesion on 0.34 kPa PEG surfaces. On 13 kPa surfaces, a sharp initial increase in cell speed was observed at low RGD concentration, with no further changes observed as RGD concentration was increased further. An increase in cell speed ~ two-fold for the 13 kPa relative to the 0.34 kPa PEG surface suggested an important role for substrate stiffness in mediating motility, which was confirmed for HT-1080s migrating on variable modulus PEG hydrogels with constant RGD concentration. Notably, despite ~ two-fold changes in cell speed over a wide range of moduli, HT-1080s adopted rounded morphologies on all surfaces investigated, which contrasted with well spread primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Taken together, our results demonstrate that HT-1080s are morphologically distinct from primary mesenchymal cells (hMSCs) and migrate with minimal dependence on cell adhesion for surfaces within a wide range of moduli, whereas motility is strongly influenced by matrix mechanical properties.

  9. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  10. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  11. Detachment and successive re-attachment of multiple, reversibly-binding tethers result in irreversible bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; van der Mei, Henny C; Hall, Connie L; Peterson, Brandon W; de Vries, Joop; Song, Lei; Jong, Ed D de; Busscher, Henk J; Swartjes, Jan J T M

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to surfaces occurs ubiquitously and is initially reversible, though becoming more irreversible within minutes after first contact with a surface. We here demonstrate for eight bacterial strains comprising four species, that bacteria adhere irreversibly to surfaces through multiple

  12. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15 or the control group (ADM only. Histomorphometric measurements and histological analysis were recorded about 6 months after ridge preservation procedures in ten patients. The amount of newly formed bone, the most recently formed bone, fibrous tissue plus marrow spaces and remaining graft particles were measured and analyzed. Results: At 6 months, the new bone area parameter and the percentage of fibrous tissue plus marrow space areas showed higher values to the control group, and statistically significant differences when compared with the test group (p=0.03. Conclusion: The ADM acted as a membrane. The association of ABM/P-15 with ADM resulted in new bone formation within the alveoli, but the results were not considered relevant when used in this indication.

  13. Effect of the chemical nature of metal oxide on adhesion to the polyacrylate matrix in filled nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziyan, T. V.; Safronov, A. P.; Petrov, A. V.; Volodina, N. S.; Beketov, I. V.

    2014-08-01

    The morphology, particle size, and thermochemical properties of the surface of oxides Al2O3, NiO, TiO2, ZnO, and ZrO2 obtained by the wire electroexplosion method were studied. The nanoparticles are spherical, with a mean diameter of 54-86 nm depending on the nature of the oxide. The hydrophilicity of the surface of metal oxide nanopowders was found to change in the series NiO-ZrO2-TiO2-ZnO-Al2O3. Nanocomposites with widely varied compositions were obtained from butyl methacrylate copolymer with 5 wt % methacrylic acid and the oxides under study. The enthalpies of dissolution of the composites in chloroform were determined by Calvet calorimetry. The enthalpies of copolymer mixing with oxides were calculated using the thermochemical cycle. The limiting enthalpies of copolymer adhesion to the oxide surface were calculated from the thermochemical data. The limiting adhesion enthalpy was shown to be negative for all oxides under study; these values decreased in magnitude as the surface hydrophilicity increased. The results were analyzed from the viewpoint of balance between the specific and dispersion interactions at the interface.

  14. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  15. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (PDental Bonding.

  16. Binding to extracellular matrix proteins and formation of biogenic amines by food-associated coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitter, Marion; Geng, Bettina; Hertel, Christian

    2011-02-28

    In connection with a study on the DNA microarray based detection of genes involved in safety and technologically relevant properties (Seitter (née Resch) et al., 2011), food-associated coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were investigated phenotypically with regard to their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) and to produce biogenic amines. The properties have been shown to be involved in the colonization of injured tissue and invasion into host cells as well as in pharmacologic effects on humans, respectively. The CNS exhibited a low, but nevertheless clearly measurable ECM binding capacity, except for strains of Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus succinus, which show a comparable or even higher binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin than that of the control strain Staphylococcus aureus Cowan. Formation of biogenic amines could be often detected in S. carnosus, S. condimenti and S. strains, but rarely in S. equorum and not in S. succinus and S. xylosus strains. Mostly, 2-phenylethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine were formed by resting cells in amounts 100 mg/l) of 2-phenylethylamine and putrescine. This study confirmed the need of consideration of ECM binding and biogenic amine formation in the safety assessment of CNS used in the production of fermented foods.

  17. Role of the extracellular matrix-located Mac-2 binding protein as an interactor of the Wnt proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkarainen, Timo; Nurmi, Tuomas; Sasaki, Takako; Bergmann, Ulrich; Vainio, Seppo

    2017-09-30

    The Wnt proteins constitute a conserved family of secreted palmitoleate-containing signaling proteins that play important roles in development and tissue homeostasis. Their hydrophobic nature has raised the question of how the proteins are transported outside the cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that several different mechanisms, including transport by lipoprotein particles and exosomes, may contribute to this process. Here, we expressed epitope-tagged Wnt4 in HEK293 cells, and identified Mac-2 binding protein (Mac-2BP) as its binding partner in the serum-free conditioned medium. Serine-to-alanine substitution at the conserved fatty acid-conjugation site did not affect Mac-2BP binding. Subsequent studies showed that Mac-2BP may be a general Wnt interactor. It is found in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues, where it forms unusual oligomeric ring-like structures. Its functions appear to include interactions with cells and certain ECM components. Intriguingly, both Wnt signaling and Mac-2BP expression are upregulated in many types of cancer. Our studies on the four-domain Mac-2BP indicate a crucial role in Wnt binding for the C-terminal domain that bears no sequence similarity to any other protein. Mac-2BP may have a role in regulating the extracellular spreading and storage of the Wnts, thereby modulating their bioavailability and stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR, we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion

  19. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and CfaE-R181A mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Liaqat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/ CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2. Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3 and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF'lacIq/∆cotD (CS2 strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF'lacIq/pEU5881 showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili.

  20. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Cfae-R181A mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Iram; Sakellaris, Harry

    2012-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs) are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2). Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3) and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a) as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF'lacI (q)/∆cotD (CS2) strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A) mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF'lacI (q)/pEU5881) showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili.

  1. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  2. Extracellular matrix assembly in diatoms (Bacillariophyceae). Iii. Organization Of fucoglucuronogalactans within the adhesive stalks of achnanthes longipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman; Lind; Wetherbee; Gretz

    1998-04-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1-AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, >/= 20,000, 000 Mr; F2, congruent with100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The congruent with100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility.

  3. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  4. Effects of Arg-Gly-Asp-modified elastin-like polypeptide on pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in controlling the β-cell morphology, survival and insulin secretary functions. An RGD-modified elastin-like polypeptide (RGD-ELP), TGPG[VGRGD(VGVPG)(6)](20)WPC, has been reported previously as a bioactive matrix. In this study, to investigate whether RGD-ELP affects β-cell growth characteristics and insulin secretion, β-TC6 cells were cultured on the RGD-ELP coatings prepared via thermally induced phase transition. On RGD-ELP, β-TC6 cells clustered into an islet-like architecture with high cell viability. Throughout 7days' culture, the proliferation rate of the cells within a pseudoislet was similar to that of monolayer culture. Under high glucose (25mM), β-TC6 pseudoislets showed up-regulated insulin gene expression and exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the mRNA and protein abundances of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) E-cadherin and connexin-36 were much higher in pseudoislets than in monolayer cells. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin or connexin-36 expression severely limited pseudoislet formation. In addition, the mRNA levels of collagen types I and IV, fibronectin and laminin were significantly elevated in pseudoislets. The results suggest that RGD-ELP promotes pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of the CAM and ECM components. The functional roles of RGD-ELP are discussed in respect of its molecular composition.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Manganese Transport Protein C (MntC) Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Natália; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; de Castro, Íris Arantes; Monaris, Denize; Masuda, Hana Paula; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Arêas, Ana Paula Mattos

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus – particularly nosocomial infections - represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM). Manganese transport protein C (MntC), a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation. PMID:25409527

  6. A minimalist chemical model of matrix metalloproteinases--can small peptides mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árus, Dávid; Nagy, Nóra Veronika; Dancs, Ágnes; Jancsó, Attila; Berkecz, Róbert; Gajda, Tamás

    2013-09-01

    In order to mimic the active center of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), we synthesized a pentadecapeptide (Ac-KAHEFGHSLGLDHSK-NH2) corresponding to the catalytic zinc(II) binding site of human MMP-13. The multi-domain structural organization of MMPs fundamentally determines their metal binding affinity, catalytic activity and selectivity. Our potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR, NMR, mass spectrometric and kinetic studies are aimed to explore the usefulness of such flexible peptides to mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins, to examine the intrinsic metal binding properties of this naked sequence, as well as to contribute to the development of a minimalist, peptide-based chemical model of MMPs, including the catalytic properties. Since the multiimidazole environment is also characteristic for copper(II), and recently copper(II) containing variants of MMPs have been identified, we also studied the copper(II) complexes of the above peptide. Around pH 6-7 the peptide, similarly to MMPs, offers a {3Nim} coordination binding site for both zinc(II) and copper(II). In the case of copper(II), the formation of amide coordinated species at higher pH abolished the analogy with the copper(II) containing MMP variant. On the other hand, the zinc(II)-peptide system mimics some basic features of the MMP active sites: the main species around pH7 (ZnH2L) possesses a {3Nim,H2O} coordination environment, the deprotonation of the zinc-bound water takes place near the physiological pH, it forms relatively stable ternary complexes with hydroxamic acids, and the species ZnH2L(OH) and ZnH2L(OH)2 have notable hydrolytic activity between pH7 and 9.

  7. Probing the acidic residue within the integrin binding site of laminin-511 that interacts with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site of α6β1 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Li, Shaoliang; Takizawa, Mamoru; Oonishi, Eriko; Toga, Junko; Yagi, Emiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2017-06-03

    Laminins are major cell-adhesive proteins of basement membranes that interact with integrins in a divalent cation-dependent manner. Laminin-511 consists of α5, β1, and γ1 chains, of which three laminin globular domains of the α5 chain (α5/LG1-3) and a Glu residue in the C-terminal tail of chain γ1 (γ1-Glu1607) are required for binding to integrins. However, it remains unsettled whether the Glu residue in the γ1 tail is involved in integrin binding by coordinating the metal ion in the metal ion-dependent adhesion site of β1 integrin (β1-MIDAS), or by stabilizing the conformation of α5/LG1-3. To address this issue, we examined whether α5/LG1-3 contain an acidic residue required for integrin binding that is as critical as the Glu residue in the γ1 tail; to achieve this, we undertook exhaustive alanine substitutions of the 54 acidic residues present in α5/LG1-3 of the E8 fragment of laminin-511 (LM511E8). Most of the alanine mutants possessed α6β1 integrin binding activities comparable with wild-type LM511E8. Alanine substitution for α5-Asp3198 and Asp3219 caused mild reduction in integrin binding activity, and that for α5-Asp3218 caused severe reduction, possibly resulting from conformational perturbation of α5/LG1-3. When α5-Asp3218 was substituted with asparagine, the resulting mutant possessed significant binding activity to α6β1 integrin, indicating that α5-Asp3218 is not directly involved in integrin binding through coordination with the metal ion in β1-MIDAS. Given that substitution of γ1-Glu1607 with glutamine nullified the binding activity to α6β1 integrin, these results, taken together, support the possibility that the critical acidic residue coordinating the metal ion in β1-MIDAS is Glu1607 in the γ1 tail, but no such residue is present in α5/LG1-3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) suppresses attachment and spreading of breast cancer cells on 2D and 3D extracellular matrix components by altering focal adhesion-associated signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic dissemination of cancer cells from primary tumor to secondary sites is a multi-step process that depends heavily on the ability of cancer cells to respond to the microenvironmental cues, such as changes in composition of surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), by adapting their adhesion a...

  9. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  10. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  11. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  12. Direct binding of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain to the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) increases focal adhesion localization of PKC alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ssang-Taek; Longley, Robert L; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that acts as a coreceptor with integrins in focal adhesion formation. The central region of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (4V; LGKKPIYKK) binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and together they regulate protein kinase C alpha (PKC...... alpha) activity. Syndecan 4V peptide directly potentiates PKC alpha activity, leading to "superactivation" of the enzyme, apparently through an interaction with its catalytic domain. We now have performed yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays to determine the interaction sites between 4V and PKC...... alpha. Full-length PKC alpha weakly interacted with 4V by yeast two-hybrid assays, but PKC alpha constructs that lack the pseudosubstrate region or constructs of the whole catalytic domain interacted more strongly. A mutated 4V sequence (4V(YF): LGKKPIFKK) did not interact with PKC alpha, indicating...

  13. Carbohydrate-based anti-adhesive inhibition of Vibrio cholerae toxin binding to GM1-OS immobilized into artificial planar lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Haydn R; Kemp, Fred; Slegte, Jaap de; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2009-10-12

    We have studied 'food grade' sialyloligosaccharides (SOS) as anti-adhesive drugs or receptor analogues, since the terminal sialic acid residue has already been shown to contribute significantly to the adhesion and pathogenesis of the Vibrio cholerae toxin (Ctx). GM1-oligosaccharide (GM1-OS) was immobilized into a supporting POPC lipid bilayer onto a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip, and the interaction between uninhibited Ctx and GM1-OS-POPC was measured. SOS inhibited 94.7% of the Ctx binding to GM1-OS-POPC at 10mg/mL. The SOS EC(50) value of 5.521mg/mL is high compared with 0.2811microg/mL (182.5rhoM or 1.825x10(-10)M) for GM1-OS. The commercially available sialyloligosaccharide (SOS) mixture Sunsial E((R)) is impure, containing one monosialylated and two disialylated oligosaccharides in the ratio 9.6%, 6.5% and 17.5%, respectively, and 66.4% protein. However, these inexpensive food-grade molecules are derived from egg yolk and could be used to fortify conventional food additives, by way of emulsifiers, sweeteners and/or preservatives. The work further supports our hypothesis that SOS could be a promising natural anti-adhesive glycomimetic against Ctx and prevent subsequent onset of disease.

  14. Analysis of adhesive binding forces between laminin-1 and C2C12 muscle cell membranes measured via high resolution force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, George; Gilbert, Richard; Ortiz, Christine

    2002-03-01

    Laminins are a family of glycoproteins that regulate cell differentiation, shape, and motility through interactions with various cell surface receptors. Here, we have directly measured the biomolecular adhesive binding forces between a cantilever / probe tip that was covalently attached with laminin-1 and membrane receptors on C2C12 muscle cells using the technique of high-resolution force spectroscopy (HRFS). On retraction of the probe tip away from the membrane surface, discrete, long-range adhesive unbinding events were always observed. Statistical analysis of the data revealed an initial broad distribution of heterogeneous unbinding events (occurring at separation distances, D=0-2µm from the point of maximum compression) of magnitude 92.23±37.87pN followed by a narrow distribution of homogeneous unbinding events (occurring at D > 2µm) of magnitude 38.16±9.10pN, which is suggestive of an individual biomolecular adhesive interaction. On-going studies include loading rate dependence and effect of dystroglycan mutation.

  15. A novel role for fibronectin type I domain in the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness through binding to follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Forissier, Stéphanie; Bartholin, Laurent; Martel, Sylvie; Jeanpierre, Sandrine; Bachelard, Elodie; Rimokh, Ruth

    2006-02-15

    FLRG and follistatin belong to the family of follistatin proteins involved in the regulation of various biological effects, such as hematopoiesis, mediated by their binding to activin and BMP, both members of the TGFbeta family. To further characterize the function of FLRG, we searched for other possible functional partners using a yeast two-hybrid screen. We identified human fibronectin as a new partner for both FLRG and follistatin. We also demonstrated that their physical interaction is mediated by type I motifs of fibronectin and follistatin domains. We then analyzed the biological consequences of these protein interactions on the regulation of hematopoiesis. For the first time, we associated a biological effect with the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness of both the type I motifs of fibronectin and the follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin. Indeed, we observed a significant and specific dose-dependent increase of cell adhesion to fibronectin in the presence of FLRG or follistatin, using either a human hematopoietic cell line or primary cells. In particular, we observed a significantly increased adhesion of immature hematopoietic precursors (CFC, LTC-IC). Altogether these results highlight a new mechanism by which FLRG and follistatin regulate human hematopoiesis.

  16. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...... were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads...

  17. HIV gp120 binds to mannose receptor on vaginal epithelial cells and induces production of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashaina E Fanibunda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During sexual transmission of HIV in women, the virus breaches the multi-layered CD4 negative stratified squamous epithelial barrier of the vagina, to infect the sub-epithelial CD4 positive immune cells. However the mechanisms by which HIV gains entry into the sub-epithelial zone is hitherto unknown. We have previously reported human mannose receptor (hMR as a CD4 independent receptor playing a role in HIV transmission on human spermatozoa. The current study was undertaken to investigate the expression of hMR in vaginal epithelial cells, its HIV gp120 binding potential, affinity constants and the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs downstream of HIV gp120 binding to hMR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human vaginal epithelial cells and the immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line Vk2/E6E7 were used in this study. hMR mRNA and protein were expressed in vaginal epithelial cells and cell line, with a molecular weight of 155 kDa. HIV gp120 bound to vaginal proteins with high affinity, (Kd = 1.2±0.2 nM for vaginal cells, 1.4±0.2 nM for cell line and the hMR antagonist mannan dose dependently inhibited this binding. Both HIV gp120 binding and hMR exhibited identical patterns of localization in the epithelial cells by immunofluorescence. HIV gp120 bound to immunopurified hMR and affinity constants were 2.9±0.4 nM and 3.2±0.6 nM for vaginal cells and Vk2/E6E7 cell line respectively. HIV gp120 induced an increase in MMP-9 mRNA expression and activity by zymography, which could be inhibited by an anti-hMR antibody. CONCLUSION: hMR expressed by vaginal epithelial cells has high affinity for HIV gp120 and this binding induces production of MMPs. We propose that the induction of MMPs in response to HIV gp120 may lead to degradation of tight junction proteins and the extracellular matrix proteins in the vaginal epithelium and basement membrane, leading to weakening of the epithelial barrier; thereby facilitating transport of HIV across the

  18. Ammonoxidised lignins as slow nitrogen-releasing soil amendments and CO₂-binding matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Falk; Pour, Georg; de la Rosa Arranz, José Maria; Hilscher, André; Rosenau, Thomas; Knicker, Heike

    2011-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient element controlling the cycling of organic matter in the biosphere. Its availability in soils is closely related to biological productivity. In order to reduce the negative environmental impact, associated with the application of mineral N-fertilizers, the use of ammonoxidised technical lignins is suggested. They can act as potential slow N-release fertilisers which concomitantly may increase C sequestration of soils by its potential to bind CO₂. The idea of our study was to combine an improved chemical characterisation of ammonoxidised ligneous matter as well as their CO₂-binding potential, with laboratory pot experiments, performed to enable an evaluation of their behaviour and stability during the biochemical reworking occurring in active soils.

  19. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-04-01

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres’ mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials.

  20. Immobilization of a thermostable alpha-amylase by covalent binding to an alginate matrix increases high temperature usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Boon L; Kaletunç, Gönül

    2009-01-01

    Thermostable alpha-amylase was covalently bound to calcium alginate matrix to be used for starch hydrolysis at liquefaction temperature of 95 degrees C. 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDAC) was used as crosslinker. EDAC reacts with the carboxylate groups on the calcium alginate matrix and the amine groups of the enzyme. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment was applied to increase the number of available carboxylate groups on the calcium alginate matrix for EDAC binding. After the immobilization was completed, the beads were treated with 0.1 M calcium chloride solution to reinstate the bead mechanical strength. Enzyme loading efficiency, activity, and reusability of the immobilized alpha-amylase were investigated. Covalently bound thermostable alpha-amylase to calcium alginate produced a total of 53 g of starch degradation/mg of bound protein after seven consecutive starch hydrolysis cycles of 10 min each at 95 degrees C in a stirred batch reactor. The free and covalently bound alpha-amylase had maximum activity at pH 5.5 and 6.0, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) of the immobilized enzyme (0.98 mg/mL) was 2.5 times greater than that of the free enzyme (0.40 mg/mL). The maximum reaction rate (V(max)) of immobilized and free enzyme were determined to be 10.4-mg starch degraded/mL min mg bound protein and 25.7-mg starch degraded/mL min mg protein, respectively. The high cumulative activity and seven successive reuses obtained at liquefaction temperature make the covalently bound thermostable alpha-amylase to calcium alginate matrix, a promising candidate for use in industrial starch hydrolysis process.

  1. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Karen K.; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the α4 and α5 subunits are expressed in α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind...

  2. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The binding of Leishmania promastigotes to the midgut epithelium is regarded as an essential part of the life-cycle in the sand fly vector, enabling the parasites to persist beyond the initial blood meal phase and establish the infection. However, the precise nature of the promastigote stage(s that mediate binding is not fully understood.To address this issue we have developed an in vitro gut binding assay in which two promastigote populations are labelled with different fluorescent dyes and compete for binding to dissected sand fly midguts. Binding of procyclic, nectomonad, leptomonad and metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania infantum and L. mexicana to the midguts of blood-fed, female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated. The results show that procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes do not bind to the midgut epithelium in significant numbers, whereas nectomonad and leptomonad promastigotes both bind strongly and in similar numbers. The assay was then used to compare the binding of a range of different parasite species (L. infantum, L. mexicana, L. braziliensis, L. major, L. tropica to guts dissected from various sand flies (Lu. longipalpis, Phlebotomus papatasi, P. sergenti. The results of these comparisons were in many cases in line with expectations, the natural parasite binding most effectively to its natural vector, and no examples were found where a parasite was unable to bind to its natural vector. However, there were interesting exceptions: L. major and L. tropica being able to bind to Lu. longipalpis better than L. infantum; L. braziliensis was able to bind to P. papatasi as well as L. major; and significant binding of L. major to P. sergenti and L. tropica to P. papatasi was observed.The results demonstrate that Leishmania gut binding is strictly stage-dependent, is a property of those forms found in the middle phase of development (nectomonad and leptomonad forms, but is absent in the early blood meal and final stages (procyclic

  3. Bifunctional role of the Treponema pallidum extracellular matrix binding adhesin Tp0751.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Francescutti, Teresa; Hawkes, Aaron; Boulanger, Martin J; Cameron, Caroline E

    2011-03-01

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is a highly invasive pathogenic spirochete capable of attaching to host cells, invading the tissue barrier, and undergoing rapid widespread dissemination via the circulatory system. The T. pallidum adhesin Tp0751 was previously shown to bind laminin, the most abundant component of the basement membrane, suggesting a role for this adhesin in host tissue colonization and bacterial dissemination. We hypothesized that similar to that of other invasive pathogens, the interaction of T. pallidum with host coagulation proteins, such as fibrinogen, may also be crucial for dissemination via the circulatory system. To test this prediction, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methodology to demonstrate specific binding of soluble recombinant Tp0751 to human fibrinogen. Click-chemistry-based palmitoylation profiling of heterologously expressed Tp0751 confirmed the presence of a lipid attachment site within this adhesin. Analysis of the Tp0751 primary sequence revealed the presence of a C-terminal putative HEXXH metalloprotease motif, and in vitro degradation assays confirmed that recombinant Tp0751 purified from both insect and Escherichia coli expression systems degrades human fibrinogen and laminin. The proteolytic activity of Tp0751 was abolished by the presence of the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Further, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry showed that Tp0751 binds zinc and calcium. Collectively, these results indicate that Tp0751 is a zinc-dependent, membrane-associated protease that exhibits metalloprotease-like characteristics. However, site-directed mutagenesis of the HEXXH motif to HQXXH did not abolish the proteolytic activity of Tp0751, indicating that further mutagenesis studies are required to elucidate the critical active site residues associated with this protein. This study represents the first published description of a T. pallidum protease capable of degrading host

  4. Impairment of the cell-to-matrix adhesion and cytotoxicity induced by the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca venom and its fractions in cultured glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed Yosra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited source of new active substances in the field of the development of bioactive products. In our study, we have investigated the efficiency of the venom from the Mediterranean jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca and its fractions for anti-proliferative and anti-cell adhesion to cell–extracellular matrix activities. Results Our experiments have indicated that the separation of the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca crude venom extract by sephadex G-75 chromatography led to four fractions (F1, F2, F3, and F4. Among the four fractions F1 and F3 were cytotoxic against U87 cells with IC50 values of 125 and 179 μg/ml respectively. The venom, F1, F2 and F 3 showed significant anti-proliferative activity in time-dependent manner. Our results also suggest that these fractions and the venom are able to inhibit cell adhesion to fibrinogen in dose-dependent manner. This inhibition is reliant on its ability to interact with integrins. Conclusions To conclude, we have demonstrated for the first time that Pelagia noctiluca venom and its fractions especially (F1 and F2 display potent anti-tumoral properties. Separation by sephadex G-75 chromatography give rise to more active fractions than the crude venom extract. The purification and the determination of chemical structures of compounds of these active fractions are under investigation. Overall, Pelagia noctiluca venom may has the potential to serve as a template for future anticancer-drug development.

  5. A triad of lys12, lys41, arg78 spatial domain, a novel identified heparin binding site on tat protein, facilitates tat-driven cell adhesion.

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    Jing Ai

    Full Text Available Tat protein, released by HIV-infected cells, has a battery of important biological effects leading to distinct AIDS-associated pathologies. Cell surface heparan sulfate protoglycans (HSPGs have been accepted as endogenous Tat receptors, and the Tat basic domain has been identified as the heparin binding site. However, findings that deletion or substitution of the basic domain inhibits but does not completely eliminate Tat-heparin interactions suggest that the basic domain is not the sole Tat heparin binding site. In the current study, an approach integrating computational modeling, mutagenesis, biophysical and cell-based assays was used to elucidate a novel, high affinity heparin-binding site: a Lys12, Lys41, Arg78 (KKR spatial domain. This domain was also found to facilitate Tat-driven β1 integrin activation, producing subsequent SLK cell adhesion in an HSPG-dependent manner, but was not involved in Tat internalization. The identification of this new heparin binding site may foster further insight into the nature of Tat-heparin interactions and subsequent biological functions, facilitating the rational design of new therapeutics against Tat-mediated pathological events.

  6. A triad of lys12, lys41, arg78 spatial domain, a novel identified heparin binding site on tat protein, facilitates tat-driven cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jing; Xin, Xianliang; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Shuai; Peng, Shuying; Li, Jing; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Hualiang; Geng, Meiyu

    2008-01-01

    Tat protein, released by HIV-infected cells, has a battery of important biological effects leading to distinct AIDS-associated pathologies. Cell surface heparan sulfate protoglycans (HSPGs) have been accepted as endogenous Tat receptors, and the Tat basic domain has been identified as the heparin binding site. However, findings that deletion or substitution of the basic domain inhibits but does not completely eliminate Tat-heparin interactions suggest that the basic domain is not the sole Tat heparin binding site. In the current study, an approach integrating computational modeling, mutagenesis, biophysical and cell-based assays was used to elucidate a novel, high affinity heparin-binding site: a Lys12, Lys41, Arg78 (KKR) spatial domain. This domain was also found to facilitate Tat-driven β1 integrin activation, producing subsequent SLK cell adhesion in an HSPG-dependent manner, but was not involved in Tat internalization. The identification of this new heparin binding site may foster further insight into the nature of Tat-heparin interactions and subsequent biological functions, facilitating the rational design of new therapeutics against Tat-mediated pathological events.

  7. A matrix-focused structure-activity and binding site flexibility study of quinolinol inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William A; Vieira, Rebecca C; Ensel, Susan M; Montgomery, Vicki; Guernieri, Rebecca; Eccard, Vanessa S; Campbell, Yvette; Roxas-Duncan, Virginia; Cardellina, John H; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A

    2017-02-01

    Our initial discovery of 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibitors of BoNT/A and separation/testing of enantiomers of one of the more active leads indicated considerable flexibility in the binding site. We designed a limited study to investigate this flexibility and probe structure-activity relationships; utilizing the Betti reaction, a 36 compound matrix of quinolinol BoNT/A LC inhibitors was developed using three 8-hydroxyquinolines, three heteroaromatic amines, and four substituted benzaldehydes. This study has revealed some of the most effective quinolinol-based BoNT/A inhibitors to date, with 7 compounds displaying IC50 values ⩽1μM and 11 effective at ⩽2μM in an ex vivo assay.

  8. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  9. Focal adhesion kinase activation is required for TNF-α-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and proinflammatory cytokines in cultured human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Ya-jing; Guo, Liu-yun; Wang, Guo-fang; Lu, Ke; Yue, Er-li

    2015-08-01

    Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was proposed as a mediator of the inflammatory response, we have investigated the role of this molecule in the release of inflammatory cytokines by cultured human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs), cells that are thought to be important in the patient's response to periodontal infection. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and its effects on interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 release were measured by ELISA. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) protein was analysed by western blotting. The levels of IL6, IL8, and MMP2 mRNA were evaluated by real-time PCR. Tumor necrosis factor alpha dose-dependently induced the phosphorylation of FAK, whereas small interfering FAK (siFAK) inhibited TNF-α-induced FAK phosphorylation. Tumor necrosis factor alpha also stimulated the production of IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of FAK significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of IL6 and IL8 mRNA and release of IL-6 and IL-8 protein in HPDLFs. Similarly, MMP-2 down-regulation was significantly prevented by siFAK. Our results strongly suggest that knockdown of FAK can decrease the production of TNF-α-induced IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-2 in HPDLFs. These effects may help in understanding the mechanisms that control expression of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  10. Neomycin binding preserves extracellular matrix in bioprosthetic heart valves during in vitro cyclic fatigue and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Devanathan; Starcher, Barry C; Vyavahare, Naren R

    2009-05-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) cusps have a complex architecture consisting of an anisotropic arrangement of collagen, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and elastin. Glutaraldehyde (GLUT) is used as a fixative for all clinical BHV implants; however, it only stabilizes the collagen component of the tissue, and other components such as GAGs and elastin are lost from the tissue during processing, storage or after implantation. We have shown previously that the effectiveness of the chemical crosslinking can be increased by incorporating neomycin trisulfate, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, to prevent the enzyme-mediated GAG degradation. In the present study, we optimized carbodiimide-based GAG-targeted chemistry to incorporate neomycin into BHV cusps prior to conventional GLUT crosslinking. This crosslinking leads to enhanced preservation of GAGs during in vitro cyclic fatigue and storage. The neomycin group showed greater GAG retention after both 10 and 50 million accelerated fatigue cycles and after 1 year of storage in GLUT solution. Thus, additional binding of neomycin to the cusps prior to standard GLUT crosslinking could enhance tissue stability and thus heart valve durability.

  11. Both common and specialty mushrooms inhibit adhesion molecule expression and in vitro binding of monocytes to human aortic endothelial cells in a pro-inflammatory environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keith R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a leading cause of mortality in the United States as well as globally. Epidemiological studies show that regular fruit and vegetable consumption reduces CVD risk, in part, due to antioxidant activity and immunomodulation since oxidative stress and inflammation are features of atherogenesis. Accumulating evidence also shows that dietary fungi, viz., mushrooms, can protect against chronic disease by altering inflammatory environments such as those associated with CVD although most research has focused on specialty mushrooms. In this study, we tested the ability of both common and specialty mushrooms to inhibit cellular processes associated with CVD. Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC were incubated overnight with control media with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO vehicle (1% v/v or containing DMSO extracts of whole dehydrated mushrooms (0.1 mg/mL, which included Agaricus bisporus (white button and crimini, Lentinula edodes (shiitake, Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster, and Grifola frondosa (maitake. Monolayers were subsequently washed and incubated with medium alone or containing the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (5 ng/mL for 6 h to upregulate pro-atherosclerotic adhesion molecules (AM. AM expression was assayed by ELISA and binding of U937 human monocytes pre-loaded with fluorescent dye was determined. Results White button mushrooms consistently reduced (p Conclusion These data provide evidence that dietary mushrooms can inhibit cellular processes such as adhesion molecule expression and ultimate binding of monocytes to the endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions, which are associated with CVD. As a result, these findings support the notion that dietary mushrooms can be protective against CVD.

  12. The structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein and the role of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate in its membrane binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, Jan; Srb, Pavel; Hunter, Eric; Ruml, Tomáš; Hrabal, Richard

    2012-10-26

    We determined the solution structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein by NMR spectroscopy. The myristoyl group is buried inside the protein and causes a slight reorientation of the helices. This reorientation leads to the creation of a binding site for phosphatidylinositols. The interaction between the matrix protein and phosphatidylinositols carrying C(8) fatty acid chains was monitored by observation of concentration-dependent chemical shift changes of the affected amino acid residues, a saturation transfer difference experiment and changes in (31)P chemical shifts. No differences in the binding mode or affinity were observed with differently phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols. The structure of the matrix protein-phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] complex was then calculated with HADDOCK software based on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement contacts between the ligand and the matrix protein obtained from a (13)C-filtered/(13)C-edited nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiment. PI(4,5)P(2) binding was not strong enough for triggering of the myristoyl-switch. The structural changes of the myristoylated matrix protein were also found to result in a drop in the oligomerization capacity of the protein.

  13. Vesiculoviral matrix (M) protein occupies nucleic acid binding site at nucleoporin pair (Rae1∙Nup98)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Beili; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Blobel, Günter; Ren, Yi [Rockefeller

    2014-07-01

    mRNA export factor 1 (Rae1) and nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) are host cell targets for the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). How Rae1 functions in mRNA export and how M protein targets both Rae1 and Nup98 are not understood at the molecular level. To obtain structural insights, we assembled a 1:1:1 complex of M•Rae1•Nup98 and established a crystal structure at 3.15-Å resolution. We found that the M protein contacts the Rae1•Nup98 heterodimer principally by two protrusions projecting from the globular domain of M like a finger and thumb. Both projections clamp to the side of the β-propeller of Rae1, with the finger also contacting Nup98. The most prominent feature of the finger is highly conserved Methionine 51 (Met51) with upstream and downstream acidic residues. The complementary surface on Rae1 displays a deep hydrophobic pocket, into which Met51 fastens like a bolt, and a groove of basic residues on either side, which bond to the acidic residues of the finger. Notably, the M protein competed for in vitro binding of various oligonucleotides to Rae1•Nup98. We localized this competing activity of M to its finger using a synthetic peptide. Collectively, our data suggest that Rae1 serves as a binding protein for the phosphate backbone of any nucleic acid and that the finger of M mimics this ligand. In the context of mRNA export, we propose that a given mRNA segment, after having been deproteinated by helicase, is transiently reproteinated by Nup98-tethered Rae1. We suggest that such repetitive cycles provide cytoplasmic stopover sites required for ratcheting mRNA across the nuclear pore.

  14. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a continuous invader-host cell cross talk with participation of extracellular matrix and adhesion and chemoattractant molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino A.P.M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have shown that Trypanosoma cruzi interacts with host extracellular matrix (ECM components producing breakdown products that play an important role in parasite mobilization and infectivity. Parasite-released antigens also modulate ECM expression that could participate in cell-cell and/or cell-parasite interactions. Increased expression of ECM components has been described in the cardiac tissue of chronic chagasic patients and diverse target tissues including heart, thymus, central nervous system and skeletal muscle of experimentally T. cruzi-infected mice. ECM components may adsorb parasite antigens and cytokines that could contribute to the establishment and perpetuation of inflammation. Furthermore, T. cruzi-infected mammalian cells produce cytokines and chemokines that not only participate in the control of parasitism but also contribute to the establishment of chronic inflammatory lesions in several target tissues and most frequently lead to severe myocarditis. T. cruzi-driven cytokines and chemokines may also modulate VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 adhesion molecules on endothelial cells of target tissues and play a key role in cell recruitment, especially of activated VLA-4+LFA-1+CD8+ T lymphocytes, resulting in a predominance of this cell population in the inflamed heart, central nervous system and skeletal muscle. The VLA-4+-invading cells are surrounded by a fine network of fibronectin that could contribute to cell anchorage, activation and effector functions. Since persistent "danger signals" triggered by the parasite and its antigens are required for the establishment of inflammation and ECM alterations, therapeutic interventions that control parasitism and selectively modulate cell migration improve ECM abnormalities, paving the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies improving the prognosis of T. cruzi-infected individuals.

  16. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  17. Prion Fragment Peptides Are Digested with Membrane Type Matrix Metalloproteinases and Acquire Enzyme Resistance through Cu2+-Binding

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    Aya Kojima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the cause of neurodegenerative disease in humans and other mammals. The structural conversion of the prion protein (PrP from a normal cellular protein (PrPC to a protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc is thought to relate to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. In this study, we focused on the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs such as MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP, which are expressed in the brain as PrPC-degrading proteases. We synthesized 21 prion fragment peptides. Each purified peptide was individually incubated with recombinant MT1-MMP or MT3-MMP in the presence or absence of Cu2+ and the cleavage sites determined by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Recombinant MMP-7 and human serum (HS were also tested as control. hPrP61-90, from the octapeptide-repeat region, was cleaved by HS but not by the MMPs tested here. On the other hand, hPrP92-168 from the central region was cleaved by MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP at various sites. These cleavages were inhibited by treatment with Cu2+. The C-terminal peptides had higher resistance than the central region. The data obtained from this study suggest that MT-MMPs expressed in the brain might possess PrPC-degrading activity.

  18. TIM-1 glycoprotein binds the adhesion receptor P-selectin and mediates T cell trafficking during inflammation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiari, Stefano; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Rossi, Barbara; Dusi, Silvia; Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Toffali, Lara; Piacentino, Gennj; Budui, Simona; Rennert, Paul; Xiao, Sheng; Laudanna, Carlo; Casasnovas, Jose M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Constantin, Gabriela

    2014-04-17

    Selectins play a central role in leukocyte trafficking by mediating tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces. Here we have reported that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a P-selectin ligand. We have shown that human and murine TIM-1 binds to P-selectin, and that TIM-1 mediates tethering and rolling of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17, but not Th2 and regulatory T cells on P-selectin. Th1 and Th17 cells lacking the TIM-1 mucin domain showed reduced rolling in thrombin-activated mesenteric venules and inflamed brain microcirculation. Inhibition of TIM-1 had no effect on naive T cell homing, but it reduced T cell recruitment in a skin hypersensitivity model and blocked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Uniquely, the TIM-1 immunoglobulin variable domain was also required for P-selectin binding. Our data demonstrate that TIM-1 is a major P-selectin ligand with a specialized role in T cell trafficking during inflammatory responses and the induction of autoimmune disease.

  19. Dystroglycan versatility in cell adhesion: a tale of multiple motifs

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    Winder Steve J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dystroglycan is a ubiquitously expressed heterodimeric adhesion receptor. The extracellular α-subunit makes connections with a number of laminin G domain ligands including laminins, agrin and perlecan in the extracellular matrix and the transmembrane β-subunit makes connections to the actin filament network via cytoskeletal linkers including dystrophin, utrophin, ezrin and plectin, depending on context. Originally discovered as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex of skeletal muscle, dystroglycan is an important adhesion molecule and signalling scaffold in a multitude of cell types and tissues and is involved in several diseases. Dystroglycan has emerged as a multifunctional adhesion platform with many interacting partners associating with its short unstructured cytoplasmic domain. Two particular hotspots are the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region and at the very carboxy terminus of dystroglycan. Regions which between them have several overlapping functions: in the juxtamembrane region; a nuclear localisation signal, ezrin/radixin/moesin protein, rapsyn and ERK MAP Kinase binding function, and at the C terminus a regulatory tyrosine governing WW, SH2 and SH3 domain interactions. We will discuss the binding partners for these motifs and how their interactions and regulation can modulate the involvement of dystroglycan in a range of different adhesion structures and functions depending on context. Thus dystroglycan presents as a multifunctional scaffold involved in adhesion and adhesion-mediated signalling with its functions under exquisite spatio-temporal regulation.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein, Soluble-Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Procalcitonin, and Protein C Activity and Clinical Outcome in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS or Sepsis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Muliaty

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biochemical markers may be used in diagnosis, prognostic and monitoring treatment and therapy for sepsis patients. In this study we used Lipopolysacharide Binding Protein (LBP, serum-Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1, Procalcitonin (PCT and protein C activity. LBP is related to lipopolysachharide or gram-negative bacterial endotoxin which bound to LBP and induced inflammatory response. ICAM-1 is associated with endothelial dysfunction in response to systemic inflammatory and septic condition. PCT increased in bacterial infection and in severe systemic inflammatory. Role of Protein C is protecting the intravascular system to systemic inflammation, sepsis and the concomitant intravascular coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between levels of serum LBP, sICAM-1, PCT, and protein C activity with the clinical outcome of SIRS or sepsis patients. METHODS: We included 19 post surgery patients with SIRS criteria from intensive care unit (ICU and evaluated the level of LBP serum with Chemiliuminescent Enzyme Immunoassay (Diagnostic Product Co., ICAM-1 with ELISA (R&D System, PCT with immunochromatography (BRAHMS, protein C activity with chromogenic method (Dade Behring. We performed the samples serially at the first admission of patients and after 72 hours. Data were analysed by non-parametric with Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney test. Correlation study between biomarkers calculated by Kendall’s tau and Spearman’s rho. RESULTS: Of 19 patients, 9 (47,4% died and 10 (52,6% surviving. The level of LBP serum decreased after 72 hours in surviving-sepsis patients, and increased in nonsurviving sepsis patients with significant different levels at 72 hours examination (p0.05. In all patients were found high level of PCT serum since the first admission examination, decreasing levels were occurred significantly in surviving patients after 72 hours (p0.05 both in surviving and non-surviving patients. CONCLUSIONS

  1. Effects of altered gravity on the expression of Calcium -binding and matrix proteins in the inner ear of developing fish following ∆g-expositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Reinhard; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Weigele, Jochen

    The results of the Foton-M3 mission (OmegaHab) give evidence that the otoliths of the fish form OmegaHab were larger as compared to the ground control. Additionally the shape (raphe) and morphology especially the mode of crystallization of the otoliths were affected during growth in weightlessness. The reason for these changes is assumed to originate from changes in the composition of the otolith matrix and Ca-binding proteins (OMP). The OMPs play an important role in controlling the crystallization process and additionally the morphology of crystals, determining the crystallpolymorph and the strength of the crystals. The matrix of otoliths is a complex functional structure containing several calcium-binding proteins, structural proteins and protease inhibitors. Furthermore it is composed of otolith matrix protein-1, Otolin, Otoconin, SPARC and Neuroserpin, which is a specific expression in the otolth matrix for chichlid fish. During embryonic development of the fish inner ear, these proteins show a spacial and temporal expression pattern. The formation of the inner ear -including otoliths and sensory cells -starting from the otocyst-anlage -can be subdivided in several major developmental stages e.g. the forming of the otic cavity (stage 7/8), the tetha cell or seeding stage (stage 8, 9), the development of the semicircular channels (stage 12), the transition to further daily growth (post stage15) and the development of the third otolith, asteriscus (stage 23). These developmental phases contain different constitutions or involvements of matrix proteins. We investigated the matrixprotein composition of the chichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and found that the otolith matrix differentiate between other fishes. In this case some matrix proteins seem to be uniform in fishes, other known matrix proteins are lacking and we have also references to new candidates for matrix proteins chichlids. In this case we investigated the expression of the matrix proteins otolith

  2. Sub-inhibitory tigecycline concentrations induce extracellular matrix binding protein Embp dependent Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Julian; Henke, Hanae A; Hector, Nina; Both, Anna; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Kaplan, Jeffery B; Rohde, Holger

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infections are notoriously reluctant to antibiotic treatment. Here we studied the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tigecycline on S. epidermidis 1585 biofilm formation, expression of extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and potential implications for S. epidermidis - macrophage interactions. Penicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid had no biofilm augmenting effect at any of the concentrations tested. In contrast, at sub-inhibitory concentrations tigecycline and oxacillin exhibited significant biofilm inducing activity. In S. epidermidis 1585, SarA is a negative regulator of giant 1 MDa Embp, and down regulation of sarA induces Embp-dependent assembly of a multi-layered biofilm architecture. Dot blot immune assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and qPCR showed that under biofilm inducing conditions, tigecycline augmented embp expression compared to the control grown without antibiotics. Conversely, expression of regulator sarA was suppressed, suggesting that tigecycline exerts its effects on embp expression through SarA. Tigecycline failed to induce biofilm formation in embp transposon mutant 1585-M135, proving that under these conditions Embp up-regulation is necessary for biofilm accumulation. As a functional consequence, tigecycline induced biofilm formation significantly impaired the up-take of S. epidermidis by mouse macrophage-like cell line J774A.1. Our data provide novel evidence for the molecular basis of antibiotic induced biofilm formation, a phenotype associated with inherently increased antimicrobial tolerance. While this could explain failure of antimicrobial therapies, persistence of S. epidermidis infections in the presence of sub-inhibitory antimicrobials is additionally propelled by biofilm-related impairment of macrophage-mediated pathogen eradication.

  3. 树脂基体对导电胶体积电阻率的影响%Effect of resin matrix on volume resistivity of conductive adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    银锐明; 王刘功; 杨华荣; 刘飘; 侯清麟; 李静; 陈琳璋

    2013-01-01

    Taking epoxy resin and Aradur9506 as curing agent and flake silver powders, electrical conductive adhesives were prepared. The effects of the functional groups of epoxy resin and the addition of curing agent in isothermal cure on the resistivity of the ECA were investigated by FT-IR method, scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and other means. The results show that the volume resistivity decreases with the increase of the number of epoxy functional groups, and the biggest volume resistivity is 1.299×10-4 Ω·cm when four functional groups of the epoxy resin are chosen.The volume resistivity firstly decreases and then increases with the increase of curing agent, and reaches the lowest resistivity of 3.112×10-4 Ω·cm when the mass ratio of epoxy resin and curing agent is 25:5. The volume resistivity is proportional with the curing shrinkage.The higher the shrinkage of the matrix curing, the lower the resistivity.%以环氧树脂、胺类固化剂Aradur9506和片状银粉为原料制配导电胶,通过红外光谱(FT-IR)、扫描电镜(SEM)等方法进行测试,研究等温固化过程中环氧树脂的官能团数量以及固化剂添加量对导电胶体积电阻率的影响,并探讨其影响机理.研究结果表明:随着环氧树脂官能团数目的增加,体积电阻率逐渐降低,其中四官能团的环氧树脂时体积电阻率最低,为1.299×10-4Ω·cm;随着固化剂质量的增加,体积电阻率呈现先下降后上升的趋势,当环氧树脂与固化剂质量比为25∶5时,体积电阻率最低,为3.112×10-4 Ω·cm;体积电阻率与树脂基体的固化收缩率呈反比例关系,固化收缩率越大,体积电阻率越低.

  4. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  5. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  6. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (I. A Model of Adhesives Based on Chemical Characterization and Localization of Polysaccharides from the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes and Other Diatoms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, B. A.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    Extracellular adhesives from the diatoms Achnanthes longipes, Amphora coffeaeformis, Cymbella cistula, and Cymbella mexicana were characterized by monosaccharide and methylation analysis, lectin-fluorescein isothiocyanate localization, and cytochemical staining. Polysaccharide was the major component of adhesives formed during cell motility, synthesis of a basal pad, and/or production of a highly organized shaft. Hot water-insoluble/hot 0.5 M NaHCO3-soluble anionic polysaccharides from A. longipes and A. coffeaeformis adhesives were primarily composed of galactosyl (64-70%) and fucosyl (32-42%) residues. In A. longipes polymers, 2,3-, t-, 3-, and 4-linked/substituted galactosyl, t-, 3-, 4-, and 2-linked fucosyl, and t- and 2-linked glucuronic acid residues predominated. Adhesive polysaccharides from C. cistula were EDTA-soluble, sulfated, consisted of 83% galactosyl (4-, 4,6-, and 3,4-linked/substituted) and 13% xylosyl (t-, 4f/5p-, and 3p-linked/substituted) residues, and contained no uronosyl residues. Ulex europaeus agglutinin uniformly localized [alpha](1,2)-L-fucose units in C. cistula and Achnanthes adhesives formed during motility and in the pads of A. longipes. D-Galactose residues were localized throughout the shafts of C. cistula and capsules of A. coffeaeformis. D-Mannose and/or D-glucose, D-galactose, and [alpha](t)-L-fucose residues were uniformly localized in the outer layers of A. longipes shafts by Cancavalia ensiformis, Abrus precatorius, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin, respectively. A model for diatom cell adhesive structure was developed from chemical characterization, localization, and microscopic observation of extracellular adhesive components formed during the diatom cell-attachment process.

  7. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  8. Inhibition of Adhesion of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells by Binding of a Novel Peptide to EspB Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duoyun; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Pan, Wei-Guang; Yang, Wei-Zhi; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries. The translocator EspB is a key virulence factor in the process of the attaching and effacing effect of EPEC and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. In this study, we aimed to select the peptides binding to EspB protein by phage display library and further investigate whether these peptides can decrease the extent of invasion and virulence of EPEC on host cells by targeting to EspB protein. The expression and purification of EspB protein from E. coli was demonstrated by Western blotting. The Ph.D. 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen the candidate peptides binding specifically to EspB protein. Furthermore, the affinity of these candidate peptides bound to EspB was identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, we investigated whether these screened peptides could decrease the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells with increasing concentration. Successful purification of EspB protein from pET21b-EspB-transformed E. coli was identified by Western blotting. Then, the candidate peptides including phages 6, 7, 8, and 12 were screened by the Ph.D. 12-mer peptide phage display library and ELISA test demonstrated that their affinity binding to EspB protein was high compared with the control. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic peptide-6 (YFPYSHTSPRQP) significantly decreased the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells with increasing concentration (P < 0.01). Peptide-6 (100 µg/mL) could lead to a 40 % decrease in the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells compared with control (P < 0.01). However, the other three peptides at different concentrations showed only a slight ability to block the adherence of EPEC to host cells. Our data provided a potential strategy to inhibit the adhesion of EPEC to epithelial cells by a candidate peptide targeted toward EspB protein.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to human laminin α4 chain globular domain inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to α4-laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Virtanen, Ismo; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    α4-Laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, leukocytes and other normal cell types. These laminins are recognized by α6β1 and α6β4 integrins and MCAM (CD146), and promote adhesion and migration of the cells. α4-Laminins are also expressed and secreted by some tumor cells and strongly promote tumor cell migration. Moreover, the abluminal side of blood and/or lymphatic vessels and the nerve perineurium, common tracks of tumor cell dissemination, express α4-laminins, and these laminin isoforms, when expressed in the stroma, may contribute to tumor invasion. In the present study, we examined ten mAbs to human laminin α4 chain for their reactivity with the isolated laminin α4 globular domain, their ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and their effect on the binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to both α4-laminins. Most of the mAbs reacted with the laminin α4 globular domain, but only two, mAbs FC10 and 084, significantly inhibited tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411. When used in combination, these antibodies practically abolished the cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411 and significantly reduced the cellular responses on laminin-421. Accordingly, mAbs FC10 and 084 significantly inhibited the binding of purified α6β1 integrin and MCAM to laminins 411 and 421. These results indicate that mAbs to the laminin α4 globular domain are able to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and that α6β1 integrin and MCAM bind α4-laminins at very close sites on the globular domain. These reagents contribute to a better understanding of the biology of α4-laminins and may have a therapeutic potential in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Peptides from Pisum sativum L. enzymatic protein digest with anti-adhesive activity against Helicobacter pylori: structure-activity and inhibitory activity against BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehues, Michael; Euler, Marco; Georgi, Gilda; Mank, Marko; Stahl, Bernd; Hensel, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Identification of anti-adhesive peptides against Helicobacter pylori obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of seed proteins from Pisum sativum L. (Fabaceae). Bioassay-guided fractionation of protein tryptic digest by ultrafiltration, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and reversed phase chromatography (RPC) were used. Identification of bioactive peptides was achieved by MALDI-TOF-MS. Adhesion of H. pylori was monitored by two different assays, using a quantitative in vitro assay on human AGS cells with evaluation of bacterial binding by flow cytometry, beside a semi-quantitative in situ adhesion assay using FITC-labelled H. pylori on human stomach tissue sections. From two highly active fractions (F3, F3.3) two anti-adhesive peptides (S3, S5) were identified. Neither F3 nor S3 or S5 had any cytotoxic effect against H. pylori. By hemagglutination assay and semiquantitative dot blot overlay assay with immobilized ligands it was shown that F3 interacts specifically with H. pylori adhesins BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin, while S3 and S5 inhibit only BabA. It was demonstrated that BabA, usually interacting with carbohydrate motifs such as fucosylated blood group antigens, interacts with the peptide moieties. Bioactive peptides from pea protein could be applied as functional ingredients for protecting infants and children against infections such as H. pylori. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  12. Application of the Extrusion to Increase the Binding between the Ceramic Particles and the Metal Matrix: Enhancement of Mechanical and Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Mazahery; Mohsen Ostad Shabani

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum alloyed with magnesium and silicon has been used as the matrix material owing to its excellent mechanical properties coupled with good formability and its wide applications in industrial sector.An extrusion process was developed to consolidate Al 6061-SiCp composites from mixed powders.The results show that the composites were fully densified,with no sign of pores or oxide layers observable in the optical microscope.The SiC particles were distributed uniformly in the matrix.As compared with 6061 alloys,the composites demonstrated a smaller elongation,but exhibited a higher Young's modulus and a larger work hardening capacity.These composites possessed much higher elongation at the same strength level.The present study also addressed the dry wear behavior of the composites at different sliding speeds and applied loads.Values of the friction coefficient of the matrix alloy and composite materials were in expected range for light metals in dry sliding conditions.All of these improvements were attributed to the merits,including full densification of the bulk,uniform dispersion of the SiC particles in the matrix,and strong binding between the SiC particles and the matrix resulting from the extrusion.

  13. Hyperphosphorylated FAK Delocalizes from Focal Adhesions to Membrane Ruffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Hamadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion and migration are key determinants in tumor metastasis. Adherence of tumor cell to the extracellular matrix is mediated via integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs. Binding of integrins to ECM triggers phosphorylation of two major components of FAs, focal adhesion kinase (FAK and Src, activating downstream signaling pathway which leads to FA disassembly and cell migration. In this paper, we analyze how phosphorylation of FAK regulates its trafficking at FAs in living human astrocytoma cells. Upon pervanadate-induced FAK phosphorylation, phosphorylated FAK appeared highly expressed at newly formed membrane ruffles. This effect was abolished in presence of the specific Src inhibitor PP2. Our findings demonstrate that upon phosphorylation, FAK delocalizes from FAs to membrane ruffles.

  14. Heparin prevents intracellular hyaluronan synthesis and autophagy responses in hyperglycemic dividing mesangial cells and activates synthesis of an extensive extracellular monocyte-adhesive hyaluronan matrix after completing cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aimin; Ren, Juan; Wang, Christina P; Hascall, Vincent C

    2014-03-28

    Growth-arrested rat mesangial cells (RMCs) at a G0/G1 interphase stimulated to divide in hyperglycemic medium initiate intracellular hyaluronan synthesis that induces autophagy/cyclin D3-induced formation of a monocyte-adhesive extracellular hyaluronan matrix after completing cell division. This study shows that heparin inhibits the intracellular hyaluronan synthesis and autophagy responses, but at the end of cell division it induces synthesis of a much larger extracellular monocyte-adhesive hyaluronan matrix. Heparin bound to RMC surfaces by 1 h, internalizes into the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum region by 2 h, and was nearly gone by 4 h. Treatment by heparin for only the first 4 h was sufficient for its function. Streptozotocin diabetic rats treated daily with heparin showed similar results. Glomeruli in sections of diabetic kidneys showed extensive accumulation of autophagic RMCs, increased hyaluronan matrix, and influx of macrophages over 6 weeks. Hyaluronan staining in the glomeruli of heparin-treated diabetic rats was very high at week 1 and decreased to near control level by 6 weeks without any RMC autophagy. However, the influx of macrophages by 6 weeks was as pronounced as in diabetic glomeruli. The results are as follows: 1) heparin blocks synthesis of hyaluronan in intracellular compartments, which prevents the autophagy and cyclin D3 responses thereby allowing RMCs to complete cell division and sustain function; 2) interaction of heparin with RMCs in early G1 phase is sufficient to induce signaling pathway(s) for its functions; and 3) influxed macrophages effectively remove the hyaluronan matrix without inducing pro-fibrotic responses that lead to nephropathy and proteinurea in diabetic kidneys.

  15. Intracellular delivery of recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI) by heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion peptide restores sensitivity in rADI-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Ying-Luen; Chiu, Yu-Chin; Cheng, Ju-Chen; Wei, Ming-Feng; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2014-08-04

    Recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI) has been used in clinical trials for arginine-auxotrophic cancers. However, the emergence of rADI resistance, due to the overexpression of argininosuccinate synthetase (AS), has introduced an obstacle in its clinical application. Here, we have proposed a strategy for the intracellular delivery of rADI, which depletes both extracellular and intracellular arginine, to restore the sensitivity of rADI-resistant cancer cells. In this study, the C terminus of heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (HBHAc), which contains 23 amino acids, was used to deliver rADI into rADI-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7). Chemical conjugates (l- and d-HBHAc-SPDP-rADI) and a recombinant fusion protein (rHBHAc-ADI) were produced. l- and d-HBHAc-SPDP-rADI showed a significantly higher cellular uptake of rADI by MCF-7 cells compared to that of rADI alone. Cell viability was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner in response to l- and d-HBHAc-SPDP-rADI treatments. In addition, the ratio of intracellular concentration of citrulline to arginine in cells treated with l- and d-HBHAc-SPDP-rADI was significantly increased by 1.4- and 1.7-fold, respectively, compared with that obtained in cells treated with rADI alone (p < 0.001). Similar results were obtained with the recombinant fusion protein rHBHAc-ADI. Our study demonstrates that the increased cellular uptake of rADI by HBHAc modification can restore the sensitivity of rADI treatment in MCF-7 cells. rHBHAc-ADI may represent a novel class of antitumor enzyme with an intracellular mechanism that is independent of AS expression.

  16. Physiologically relevant binding affinity quantification of monoclonal antibody PF‐00547659 to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule for in vitro in vivo correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengmeng; Kussrow, Amanda K; Ocana, Mireia Fernandez; Chabot, Jeffrey R; Lepsy, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A monoclonal antibody (PF‐00547659) against mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM), expressed as both soluble (sMAdCAM) and trans‐membrane (mMAdCAM) target forms, showed over 30‐fold difference in antibody‐target KD between in vitro (Biacore) and clinically derived (KD,in‐vivo) values. Back‐scattering interferometry (BSI) was applied to acquire physiologically relevant KD values which were used to establish in vitro and in vivo correlation (IVIVC). Experimental Approach BSI was applied to obtain KD values between PF‐00547659 and recombinant human MAdCAM in buffer or CHO cells and endogenous MAdCAM in human serum or colon tissue. CHO cells and tissue were minimally processed to yield homogenate containing membrane vesicles and soluble proteins. A series of binding affinities in serum with various dilution factors was used to estimate both KD,in‐vivo and target concentrations; MAdCAM concentrations were also measured using LC–MS/MS. Key Results BSI measurements revealed low KD values (higher affinity) for sMAdCAM in buffer and serum, yet a 20‐fold higher KD value (lower affinity) for mMAdCAM in CHO, mMAdCAM and sMAdCAM in tissue. BSI predicted KD,in‐vivo in serum was similar to clinically derived KD,in‐vivo, and the BSI‐estimated serum sMAdCAM concentration also matched the measured concentration by LC–MS/MS. Conclusions and Implications Our results successfully demonstrated that BSI measurements of physiologically relevant KD values can be used to establish IVIVC, for PF‐00547659 to MAdCAM despite the lack of correlation when using Biacore measured KD and accurately estimates endogenous target concentrations. The application of BSI would greatly enhance successful basic pharmacological research and drug development. PMID:27760281

  17. In vitro colonization of the muscle extracellular matrix components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: the influence of growth medium, temperature and pH on initial adhesion and induction of biofilm formation by collagens I and III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chagnot

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-α2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed.

  18. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  19. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Boukpessi; S. Menashi; L. Camoin; J.M. ten Cate; M. Goldberg; C. Chaussain-Miller

    2008-01-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecule

  20. Role of dystrophins and utrophins in platelet adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Rendón, Alvaro

    2006-07-01

    Platelets are crucial at the site of vascular injury, adhering to the sub-endothelial matrix through receptors on their surface, leading to cell activation and aggregation to form a haemostatic plug. Platelets display focal adhesions as well as stress fibres to contract and facilitate expulsion of growth and pro-coagulant factors contained in the granules and to constrict the clot. The interaction of F-actin with different actin-binding proteins determines the properties and composition of the focal adhesions. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to short dystrophin isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71) and the uthophin gene family (Up400 and Up71), which promote shape change, adhesion, aggregation, and granule centralisation. To elucidate participation of both complexes during the platelet adhesion process, their potential association with integrin beta-1 fraction and the focal adhesion system (alpha-actinin, vinculin and talin) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays. It was shown that the short dystrophin-associated protein complex participated in stress fibre assembly and in centralisation of cytoplasmic granules, while the utrophin-associated protein complex assembled and regulated focal adhesions. The simultaneous presence of dystrophin and utrophin complexes indicates complementary structural and signalling mechanisms to the actin network, improving the platelet haemostatic role.

  1. Investigation on the Mechanics of Adhesion to the Selective Extracellular Matrix Coated Surfaces of Lung Cancer Cells%肺癌细胞与胞外基质选择裱衬表面粘附力学的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 屈谦; 薛亚梅; 吴泽志; 宋关斌; 蔡绍皙

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion properties of tumor cells with extracellular matrix(ECM) are closely associated with their invasion and metastasis.Our work reported here was intended reveal the relevant biomechanical and biorheological manifestations of human lung cancer. Using micropipette aspiration technique, we investigated quantitatively the adhesive mechanics properties of high metastatic human giant cell carcinoma(PG) cells as well as low metastatic adenocarcinoma(PAa) cells of lung based on cell culture in vitro. The results showed that the adhesion forces of PAa and PG cells to collagen Ⅳ were significantly higher than those to glass surfaces, but at the lower concentrations(1.00μg/ml and 2.00μg/ml) of collagen Ⅳ, the amplitude for the increase of adhesion forces of PG cells were less than the amplitude for that of PAa cells, and most of the adhesion force values of PAa cells to the coated surfaces of incorporation of laminin along with 2 μg/ml collagen Ⅳ were significantly greater than those of PG cells. At the lower concentrations(0.625μg/ml for PAa cells,and 0.625 μg/ml, 1. 25 μg/ml for PG cells) of laminin tested,the adhesion force values of PAa and PG cells all decreased, but the amplitude and level for the decreased values of adhesion forces of PG cells were greater than those for the PAa cells. In conclusion, the adhesive and proteolytic behaviour of cancer cells to extracellular matrix might be mediated mainly by tumor cell membrane receptors such as integrin receptors and laminin receptors, it might affect the biological characteristics and the metastasis of the tumor cells. The results may benefit to explain some questions in biomechanical views about how the highly metastatic PG cells are prone to migration and invasion.%肿瘤细胞与细胞外基质的粘附特性与肿瘤的侵袭转移密切相关,作者力图揭示人肺癌细胞相应的生物力学和生物流变学特征。采用微管吸吮技术定量测定体外培

  2. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and the...

  3. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  4. Homodimerization Controls the Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Subfamily's Receptor Binding and Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Diffusion in the Extracellular Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, J.; Byron, S; Makarenkova, H; Olsen, S; Eliseenkova, A; Larochelle, W; Dhanabal, M; Blais, S; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can lead to human diseases, necessitating multiple layers of self-regulatory control mechanisms to keep its activity in check. Herein, we demonstrate that FGF9 and FGF20 ligands undergo a reversible homodimerization, occluding their key receptor binding sites. To test the role of dimerization in ligand autoinhibition, we introduced structure-based mutations into the dimer interfaces of FGF9 and FGF20. The mutations weakened the ability of the ligands to dimerize, effectively increasing the concentrations of monomeric ligands capable of binding and activating their cognate FGF receptor in vitro and in living cells. Interestingly, the monomeric ligands exhibit reduced heparin binding, resulting in their increased radii of heparan sulfate-dependent diffusion and biologic action, as evidenced by the wider dilation area of ex vivo lung cultures in response to implanted mutant FGF9-loaded beads. Hence, our data demonstrate that homodimerization autoregulates FGF9 and FGF20's receptor binding and concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix. Our study is the first to implicate ligand dimerization as an autoregulatory mechanism for growth factor bioactivity and sets the stage for engineering modified FGF9 subfamily ligands, with desired activity for use in both basic and translational research.

  5. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an oligomeric collectin that recognizes lipid and carbohydrate moieties present on broad range of micro-organisms, and mediates microbial lysis and clearance. SP-A also modulates multiple immune-related functions including cytokine production and chemotaxis...... for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4...... with a molecular mass of 36 and 66 kDa in the reduced and unreduced states respectively. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical crosslinking showed that MFAP4 forms oligomers of four dimers. We demonstrated calcium-dependent binding between MFAP4 and human SP-A1 and SP-A2. No binding was seen to recombinant SP-A...

  6. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  7. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes to col...

  8. Burn injury reveals altered phenotype in mannan-binding lectin-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Kristensen, Mette; Hamblin, MR; Thiel, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    , thinned epidermis and dermis, upregulation of soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules, a growth factor-binding protein, and matrix metalloproteinases. Mice lacking C1q, C4, or C3 did not show the lack of eschar separation seen in MBL null-burn phenotype. These findings...

  9. Expression of an expansin carbohydrate-binding module affects xylem and phloem formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obembe, O.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vincken, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Expansins are believed to be involved in disrupting the non-covalent adhesion of cellulose to matrix polysaccharides, thereby promoting wall creep. We have targeted a putative potato expansin (EXPA) carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) to the cell walls of tobacco plants. Histological examinations and

  10. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  11. The DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a recently evolved prepeptide uniquely present in Hominidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayer Peter

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parvulin-type peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Par14 is highly conserved in all metazoans. The recently identified parvulin Par17 contains an additional N-terminal domain whose occurrence and function was the focus of the present study. Results Based on the observation that the human genome encodes Par17, but bovine and rodent genomes do not, Par17 exon sequences from 10 different primate species were cloned and sequenced. Par17 is encoded in the genomes of Hominidae species including humans, but is absent from other mammalian species. In contrast to Par14, endogenous Par17 was found in mitochondrial and membrane fractions of human cell lysates. Fluorescence of EGFP fusions of Par17, but not Par14, co-localized with mitochondrial staining. Par14 and Par17 associated with isolated human, rat and yeast mitochondria at low salt concentrations, but only the Par17 mitochondrial association was resistant to higher salt concentrations. Par17 was imported into mitochondria in a time and membrane potential-dependent manner, where it reached the mitochondrial matrix. Moreover, Par17 was shown to bind to double-stranded DNA under physiological salt conditions. Conclusion Taken together, the DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by the most recently evolved mitochondrial prepeptide known to date, thus adding a novel protein constituent to the mitochondrial proteome of Hominidae.

  12. The DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a recently evolved prepeptide uniquely present in Hominidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Daniel; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Stratmann, Tina; Dian, Elke Andrea; Hartmann-Fatu, Cristina; Rassow, Joachim; Bayer, Peter; Mueller, Jonathan Wolf

    2007-09-17

    The parvulin-type peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Par14 is highly conserved in all metazoans. The recently identified parvulin Par17 contains an additional N-terminal domain whose occurrence and function was the focus of the present study. Based on the observation that the human genome encodes Par17, but bovine and rodent genomes do not, Par17 exon sequences from 10 different primate species were cloned and sequenced. Par17 is encoded in the genomes of Hominidae species including humans, but is absent from other mammalian species. In contrast to Par14, endogenous Par17 was found in mitochondrial and membrane fractions of human cell lysates. Fluorescence of EGFP fusions of Par17, but not Par14, co-localized with mitochondrial staining. Par14 and Par17 associated with isolated human, rat and yeast mitochondria at low salt concentrations, but only the Par17 mitochondrial association was resistant to higher salt concentrations. Par17 was imported into mitochondria in a time and membrane potential-dependent manner, where it reached the mitochondrial matrix. Moreover, Par17 was shown to bind to double-stranded DNA under physiological salt conditions. Taken together, the DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by the most recently evolved mitochondrial prepeptide known to date, thus adding a novel protein constituent to the mitochondrial proteome of Hominidae.

  13. Biomaterial arrays with defined adhesion ligand densities and matrix stiffness identify distinct phenotypes for tumorigenic and nontumorigenic human mesenchymal cell types

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Tyler D.; Koepsel, Justin T.; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Nguyen, Eric H.; Zorn, Stefan; Parlato, Matthew; Loveland, Samuel G.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate migration of a model tumor cell line (HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells, HT-1080s) using synthetic biomaterials to systematically vary peptide ligand density and substrate stiffness. A range of substrate elastic moduli were investigated by using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel arrays (0.34 - 17 kPa) and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays (~0.1-1 GPa), while cell adhesion was tuned by varying the presentation of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides. HT-1080 moti...

  14. Structural diversity of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the byssus of blue mussels upon refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Michael H; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Blue mussels firmly adhere to a variety of different substrates by the byssus, an extracorporal structure consisting of several protein threads. These threads are mainly composed of fibrillar collagens called preCols which are embedded in a proteinaceous matrix. One of the two so far identified matrix proteins is the Proximal Thread Matrix Protein 1 (PTMP1). PTMP1 comprises two von Willebrand factor type A-like domains (A1 and A2) in a special arrangement. Here, we describe the refolding of recombinant PTMP1 from inclusion bodies. PTMP1 refolded into two distinct monomeric isoforms. Both isomers exhibited alternative intramolecular disulfide bonds. One of these isomers is thermodynamically favored and presumably represents the native form of PTMP1, while the other isoform is kinetically favored but is likely non-native. Oligomerization during refolding was influenced by, but not strictly dependent on disulfide formation. The conformational stability of PTMP1 indicates an influence of intramolecular disulfides on the native state, but not on unfolding intermediates. Monomeric PTMP1 exhibited a high thermal stability, dependent on the pH of the surrounding environment. Especially under acidic conditions the disulfide bonds were critically involved in thermal stability.

  15. Modulated Binding of SATB1, a Matrix Attachment Region Protein, to the AT-Rich Sequence Flanking the Major Breakpoint Region of BCL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Meera; Liu, Wen-Man; DiCroce, Patricia A.; Posner, Aleza; Zheng, Jian; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi; Krontiris, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    The t(14,18) chromosomal translocation that occurs in human follicular lymphoma constitutively activates the BCL2 gene and disrupts control of apoptosis. Interestingly, 70% of the t(14,18) translocations are confined to three 15-bp clusters positioned within a 150-bp region (major breakpoint region or [MBR]) in the untranslated portion of terminal exon 3. We analyzed DNA-protein interactions in the MBR, as these may play some role in targeting the translocation to this region. An 87-bp segment (87MBR) immediately 3′ to breakpoint cluster 3 was essential for DNA-protein interaction monitored with mobility shift assays. We further delineated a core binding region within 87MBR: a 33-bp, very AT-rich sequence highly conserved between the human and mouse BCL2 gene (37MBR). We have purified and identified one of the core factors as the matrix attachment region (MAR) binding protein, SATB1, which is known to bind to AT-rich sequences with a high propensity to unwind. Additional factors in nuclear extracts, which we have not yet characterized further, increased SATB1 affinity for the 37MBR target four- to fivefold. Specific binding activity within 37MBR displayed cell cycle regulation in Jurkat T cells, while levels of SATB1 remained constant throughout the cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo binding of SATB1 to the MBR, strongly suggesting the BCL2 major breakpoint region is a MAR. We discuss the potential consequences of our observations for both MBR fragility and regulatory function. PMID:10629043

  16. Synthesis of an imprinted hybrid organic-inorganic polymeric sol-gel matrix toward the specific binding and isotherm kinetics investigation of creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yong-Sheun; Ko, Ting-Hsien; Hsu, Ting-Jung; Syu, Mei-Jywan

    2009-03-15

    Hybrid organic-inorganic polymeric sol-gel materials imprinted with creatinine template molecules were synthesized for the specific binding of creatinine. Creatinine is a metabolite from creatine and is the final product from kidney metabolism. Therefore, creatinine can be an important index to estimate the function of the kidney. It was then chosen as the target molecule in this work. To achieve the specific binding toward creatinine, molecular imprinting was used to create a polymeric matrix for the regarding purpose. Sol-gel was further added to create a rigid network structure for the absorption of creatinine. An inorganic precursor, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), was mixed with an organic functional monomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane-sulfonic acid (AMPS), and the creatinine template to form a hybrid organic-inorganic imprinted polymer. The chemical functionality was achieved as well as a confined matrix via the polymerization and the hydrolysis-condensation of the sol-gel. The imprinting effect from the hybrid materials against the corresponding nonimprinted was investigated. BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) analysis was carried out for the imprinted and the nonimprinted materials. The specificity of the hybrid materials was further examined by capping the surface silanol groups with chloro-trimethylsilane (CTMS) and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), respectively. The capping effect was compared and discussed from the binding results. Selectivity of the materials toward creatinine was obtained using mixture solutions in the presence of creatinine and its analogues. Reutilization and storage stability of the hybrid organic-inorganic imprinted material were also studied. Additionally, the affinity distribution of the hybrid imprinted materials derived from the allosteric model was also analyzed from the adsorption isotherm data.

  17. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  18. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  19. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  20. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  1. Influence of ceramic-metal interface adhesion on crack growth resistance of ZrO{sub 2}-Nb ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, J.F.; Beltran, J.I.; Gutierrez-Gonzalez, C.F.; Pecharroman, C.; Munoz, M.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Moya, J.S. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es

    2008-08-15

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia strengthened with lamellar flaky-shape Nb metal particles was obtained by hot-pressing at 1500 deg. C for 1 h. The ZrO{sub 2}-Nb interface has been studied by atomistic, first-principles calculations and by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The influence of the ceramic-metal interface on the crack growth resistance has been investigated. Crack growth is shown to occur with a rising resistance, governed by intact metal ligaments in the crack wake. Crack extension occurs by a combination of plastic deformation on the metal particles and interface debonding. The connection between the interface adhesion and this microstructural toughening mechanism has been evaluated.

  2. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  3. Full-length recombinant Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA binds specifically to CSPG and induces potent parasite adhesion blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunrae, Pongsak; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Nielsen, Morten A

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the world's leading causes of human suffering and poverty. Each year, the disease takes 1-3 million lives, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The adhesion of parasite-infected erythrocytes to the vascular endothelium or the placenta is the key event...

  4. A peptide motif from the second fibronectin module of the neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, NLIKQDDGGSPIRHY, is a binding site for the FGF receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jacob Hedemand; Kiselyov, Vladislav; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is not well understood. A motif in the second NCAM fibronectin type III (FN3) module, termed FGL, has by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) a...

  5. Loss of Zona Pellucida Binding Proteins in the Acrosomal Matrix Disrupts Acrosome Biogenesis and Sperm Morphogenesis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Nan; Roy, Angshumoy; Yan, Wei; Burns, Kathleen H.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2007-01-01

    Zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1), a spermatid and spermatozoon protein that localizes to the acrosome, was originally identified in pigs and named for its binding to the oocyte zona pellucida. In an in silico search for germ cell-specific genes, Zpbp1 and its novel paralog, Zpbp2, were discovered and confirmed to be expressed only in the testes in both mice and humans. To study the in vivo functions of both ZPBP proteins, we disrupted Zpbp1 and Zpbp2 in mice. Males lacking ZPBP1 were sterile, with abnormal round-headed sperm morphology and no forward sperm motility. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated that absence of ZPBP1 prevents proper acrosome compaction, resulting in acrosome fragmentation and disruption of the Sertoli-spermatid junctions. Males null for ZPBP2 were subfertile, demonstrated aberrant acrosomal membrane invaginations, and produced dysmorphic sperm with reduced ability to penetrate zona pellucida. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ZPBPs from amphibians, birds, and mammals suggests that these paralogous genes coevolved to play cooperative roles during spermiogenesis. Whereas ZPBP1 was discovered for an in vitro role in sperm-egg interactions, we have shown that both ZPBP proteins play an earlier structural role during spermiogenesis. PMID:17664285

  6. A Solid Binding Matrix/Mimic Receptor-Based Sensor System for Trace Level Determination of Iron Using Potential Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman H. Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II-(1,10-phenanthroline complex imprinted membrane was prepared by ionic imprinting technology. In the first step, Fe(II established a coordination linkage with 1,10-phenanthroline and functional monomer 2-vinylpyridine (2-VP. Next, the complex was copolymerized with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as a crosslinker in the presence of benzoyl peroxide (BPO as an initiator. Potentiometric chemical sensors were designed by dispersing the iron(II-imprinted polymer particles in 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (o-NPOE plasticizer and then embedded in poly vinyl chloride (PVC matrix. The sensors showed a Nernstian response for [Fe(phen3]2+ with limit of detection 3.15 ng mL−1 and a Nernstian slope of 35.7 mV per decade.

  7. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to rewrit...

  8. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-02

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions.

  9. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria--multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Adam N; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R B; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50-160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens.

  10. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  11. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria - multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Adam N.; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K.; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R. B.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50–160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25013180

  12. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase cytoplasmic tail binding protein-1 (MTCBP-1) acts as an eukaryotic aci-reductone dioxygenase (ARD) in the methionine salvage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Wakako; Gotoh, Isamu; Uekita, Takamasa; Seiki, Motoharu

    2005-06-01

    MTCBP-1 was identified as a protein that binds the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14). Since MTCBP-1 has a putative beta-barrel structure, it is presumably a member of the recently proposed cupin superfamily that contains tremendously diverged functions of proteins in spite of their well-conserved beta-barrel structure. MTCBP-1 shows significant homology to the bacterial aci-reductone dioxygenase (ARD) in the cupin family, which is an enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway (MTA cycle). Since it is difficult to speculate the functions of cupin proteins simply based on their sequence homology, we examined whether the eukaryotic ARD homologs surely function in the methionine metabolism. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, yeast could grow when substrate of MTA cycle was provided. Disruption of the yeast ARD homolog, YMR009w gene, abolished ability of the cells to grow in this culture condition. Re-expression of either the YMR009w or MTCBP-1 gene restored the cell growth. Mutation analysis revealed that the glutamic acid residue in the beta-barrel fold and the N-terminal extension from the beta-barrel fold were found to be important for the activity to restore the growth. Thus, MTCBP-1 isolated as a binding protein for MT1-MMP was demonstrated to function as an ARD-like enzyme in the MTA cycle in yeast.

  13. Polysaccharide structural features that are critical for the binding of sulfated fucans to bindin, the adhesive protein from sea urchin sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1987-10-15

    We have investigated the structural features of sulfated fucose-containing polysaccharides which are responsible for their selective binding to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus bindin. The data presented demonstrate that the sulfate esters and a molecular weight in excess of approximately 15,000 are required for high affinity binding of the fucans to bindin. Desulfation destroys the binding activity of the fucans, which can be fully restored by chemical resulfation. Fucan fragments of an average molecular weight of 15,000 were nearly as active as the starting material (Mr 10(6)). The observed IC50 value for fragments of Mr congruent to 10,000 and Mr congruent to 5,000 were 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher, respectively. The binding of fucoidan to bindin is stable in high salt (50% at 1.2 M NaCl) whereas the binding of fucoidan to DEAE-cellulose or polylysine is inhibited by the concentrations of salt normally found in sea water (50% at 0.2 and 0.5 M NaCl, respectively). This result suggests that the binding mechanism is not a simple ionic interaction and that hydrogen bonding and cooperativity may also be important determinants of the binding mechanism. We also found that polyvinyl sulfate binds to bindin with high affinity and inhibits the bindin-mediated agglutination of sea urchin eggs. The results of these investigations suggest that the spatial orientation of the sulfate esters plays a critical role in determining the selectivity of sulfated polysaccharide binding and that the polysaccharide backbone does not play a direct role in the binding mechanism.

  14. ¹³C NMR-distance matrix descriptors: optimal abstract 3D space granularity for predicting estrogen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Geesaman, Elizabeth L; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Beger, Richard D

    2012-07-23

    An improved three-dimensional quantitative spectral data-activity relationship (3D-QSDAR) methodology was used to build and validate models relating the activity of 130 estrogen receptor binders to specific structural features. In 3D-QSDAR, each compound is represented by a unique fingerprint constructed from (13)C chemical shift pairs and associated interatomic distances. Grids of different granularity can be used to partition the abstract fingerprint space into congruent "bins" for which the optimal size was previously unexplored. For this purpose, the endocrine disruptor knowledge base data were used to generate 50 3D-QSDAR models with bins ranging in size from 2 ppm × 2 ppm × 0.5 Å to 20 ppm × 20 ppm × 2.5 Å, each of which was validated using 100 training/test set partitions. Best average predictivity in terms of R(2)test was achieved at 10 ppm ×10 ppm × Z Å (Z = 0.5, ..., 2.5 Å). It was hypothesized that this optimum depends on the chemical shifts' estimation error (±4.13 ppm) and the precision of the calculated interatomic distances. The highest ranked bins from partial least-squares weights were found to be associated with structural features known to be essential for binding to the estrogen receptor.

  15. Heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis%结核分枝杆菌肝素结合血凝黏附素与结核病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂理会; 李传友

    2008-01-01

    结核分枝杆菌肝素结合血凝黏附素是一种表面蛋白,有3个功能结构域,其C末端在翻译后进行甲基化修饰,与其免疫特性相关.可结合硫酸化糖,可通过补体C3介导与巨噬细胞的结合,与上皮细胞结合在肺外结核发病中有重要作用.通过对其细胞免疫及体液免疫作用的研究发现,其在诊断中有较好的作用,在免疫预防及免疫治疗中有广阔的应用前景.%The heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion(HBHA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)is a surface-expressed protein,which has three functional domains.It experiences post'translationally modification of lysine,proline and alanine residues at its carboxyl-terminal that is relative with its immune properties.HBHA can bind with sulfated glycoconj ugates such as heparin,and attach to mononuclear phagocytes by binding to human component C3. Its adhesion to epithelial cells is important to extrapulmonary tuberculosis.HBHA plays a provital role in diagnosis of tuberculosis by cellular immune combining humoral immune assay,and is a viable candidate for tuberculosis vaccine and immune therapy.

  16. The conveyor belt hypothesis for thymocyte migration: participation of adhesion and de-adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villa-Verde D.M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrow-derived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered pattern, as if they were moving on a conveyor belt. We have recently proposed that extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, among others, produced by non-lymphoid cells both in the cortex and in the medulla, would constitute a macromolecular arrangement allowing differentiating thymocytes to migrate. Here we discuss the participation of both molecules with adhesive and de-adhesive properties in the intrathymic T cell migration. Functional experiments demonstrated that galectin-3, a soluble ß-galactoside-binding lectin secreted by thymic microenvironmental cells, is a likely candidate for de-adhesion proteins by decreasing thymocyte interaction with the thymic microenvironment.

  17. Control of mesenchymal stem cell phenotype and differentiation depending on cell adhesion mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of cell-matrix adhesion has become an important issue in the regulation of stem cell function. In this study, a maltose-binding protein (MBP-linked basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2-immobilised polystyrene surface (PS-MBP-FGF2 was applied as an artificial matrix to regulate integrin-mediated signalling. We sought to characterise human mesenchymal-stem cell (hMSC behaviour in response to two different mechanisms of cell adhesion; (i FGF2-heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG-mediated adhesion vs. (ii fibronectin (FN-integrin-mediated adhesion. Heparin inhibited hMSC adhesion to PS-MBP-FGF2 but not to FN-coated surface. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal re-organisation, and cell proliferation were restricted in hMSCs adhering to PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to FN-coated surface. Expression of MSC markers, such as CD105, CD90 and CD166, decreased in hMSCs expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to expression in cells expanded on FN-coated surface. hMSCs that were expanded on FN-coated surface differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic cells more readily than those that were expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Furthermore, we characterised the N-linked glycan structures of hMSCs depending on the cell adhesion mechanism using mass spectrometry (MS-based quantitative techniques. MS analysis revealed that 2,3-sialylated glycans, a potential marker of stem cell function, were more abundant on hMSCs expanded on FN-coated surface than on those expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Thus, the differentiation potential of hMSCs is controlled by the type of adhesion substrate that might provide an idea for the design of biomaterials to control stem cell fate. Elucidation of the glycan structure on the cell membrane may help characterise hMSC function.

  18. Control of mesenchymal stem cell phenotype and differentiation depending on cell adhesion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Park, H M; Kim, Y W; Kim, Y H; Varghese, S; Seok, H K; Kim, Y G; Kim, S H

    2014-11-25

    Control of cell-matrix adhesion has become an important issue in the regulation of stem cell function. In this study, a maltose-binding protein (MBP)-linked basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2)-immobilised polystyrene surface (PS-MBP-FGF2) was applied as an artificial matrix to regulate integrin-mediated signalling. We sought to characterise human mesenchymal-stem cell (hMSC) behaviour in response to two different mechanisms of cell adhesion; (i) FGF2-heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated adhesion vs. (ii) fibronectin (FN)-integrin-mediated adhesion. Heparin inhibited hMSC adhesion to PS-MBP-FGF2 but not to FN-coated surface. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal re-organisation, and cell proliferation were restricted in hMSCs adhering to PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to FN-coated surface. Expression of MSC markers, such as CD105, CD90 and CD166, decreased in hMSCs expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to expression in cells expanded on FN-coated surface. hMSCs that were expanded on FN-coated surface differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic cells more readily than those that were expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Furthermore, we characterised the N-linked glycan structures of hMSCs depending on the cell adhesion mechanism using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative techniques. MS analysis revealed that 2,3-sialylated glycans, a potential marker of stem cell function, were more abundant on hMSCs expanded on FN-coated surface than on those expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Thus, the differentiation potential of hMSCs is controlled by the type of adhesion substrate that might provide an idea for the design of biomaterials to control stem cell fate. Elucidation of the glycan structure on the cell membrane may help characterise hMSC function.

  19. Molecular composition of the node of Ranvier: identification of ankyrin-binding cell adhesion molecules neurofascin (mucin+/third FNIII domain-) and NrCAM at nodal axon segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Q; Lambert, S; Bennett, V

    1996-12-01

    Neurofascin, NrCAM, L1, and NgCAM are a family of Ig/FNIII cell adhesion molecules that share ankyrin-binding activity in their cytoplasmic domains, and are candidates to form membrane-spanning complexes with members of the ankyrin family of spectrin-binding proteins in a variety of cellular contexts in the nervous system. Specialized forms of ankyrin, 270 kD and/or 480 kD ankyrinG are components of the membrane undercoat of axons at the node of Ranvier. This paper focuses on definition of the isoforms of ankyrin-binding cell adhesion molecules localized with ankyrinG at the nodal axon segment. The exon usage of two major forms of neurofascin was determined by isolation of full-length cDNAs and used to prepare isoform-specific antibodies. An isoform of neurofascin containing a mucin-like domain and lacking the third FNIII domain was concentrated at axon initial segments and colocalized at nodes of Ranvier with ankyrinG and the voltage-dependent sodium channel. An alternative form of neurofascin lacking the mucin-like domain and containing the third FNIII domain was present in unmyelinated axons. The antibody initially raised against neurofascin was used to screen a rat brain cDNA expression library. In addition to neurofascin, this screen yielded a clone with 80% sequence identity to NrCAM from chicken. The sequences of two full-length cDNAs are presented. NrCAM is most closely related to neurofascin among the other members of the L1/neurofascin/NgCAM family, with over 70% identity between cytoplasmic domains. NrCAM, visualized with antibodies specific for the ecto-domain, also was found to be coexpressed with neurofascin at nodes of Ranvier and at axon initial segments. This is the first characterization of defined neuronal cell adhesion molecules localized to axonal membranes at the node of Ranvier of myelinated axons.

  20. Measuring cell adhesion forces of primary gastrulating cells from zebrafish using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puech, Pierre-Henri; Taubenberger, Anna; Ulrich, Florian; Krieg, Michael; Muller, Daniel J; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2005-09-15

    During vertebrate gastrulation, progenitor cells of different germ layers acquire specific adhesive properties that contribute to germ layer formation and separation. Wnt signals have been suggested to function in this process by modulating the different levels of adhesion between the germ layers, however, direct evidence for this is still lacking. Here we show that Wnt11, a key signal regulating gastrulation movements, is needed for the adhesion of zebrafish mesendodermal progenitor cells to fibronectin, an abundant extracellular matrix component during gastrulation. To measure this effect, we developed an assay to quantify the adhesion of single zebrafish primary mesendodermal progenitors using atomic-force microscopy (AFM). We observed significant differences in detachment force and work between cultured mesendodermal progenitors from wild-type embryos and from slb/wnt11 mutant embryos, which carry a loss-of-function mutation in the wnt11 gene, when tested on fibronectin-coated substrates. These differences were probably due to reduced adhesion to the fibronectin substrate as neither the overall cell morphology nor the cell elasticity grossly differed between wild-type and mutant cells. Furthermore, in the presence of inhibitors of fibronectin-integrin binding, such as RGD peptides, the adhesion force and work were strongly decreased, indicating that integrins are involved in the binding of mesendodermal progenitors in our assay. These findings demonstrate that AFM can be used to quantitatively determine the substrate-adhesion of cultured primary gastrulating cells and provide insight into the role of Wnt11 signalling in modulating cell adhesion at the single cell scale.

  1. PUR热熔胶和装订涂布系统%PUR Hot-melt Adhesive and Glueing System in Book Binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季栋梁

    2011-01-01

    @@ PUR热熔胶(Poly Urethan Reactive Hotmelt Adhesive,聚氨酯反应型热熔胶)已经历了从第一代到第二、第三代的改进,现在正向UV热熔胶发展.为什么在书籍上要改用PUR热熔胶,它与EVA(乙烯一醋酸乙烯)热熔胶性能有何差异?如果对PUR热熔胶缺少正确的认识,装订出的书籍的质量与生产效率就会大打折扣.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) interaction with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-1 and TIMP-2: binding studies and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Robinson, Jessica; Soares, Alexei S; Fields, Alan P; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S

    2012-05-04

    Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10, stromelysin-2) is a secreted metalloproteinase with functions in skeletal development, wound healing, and vascular remodeling; its overexpression is also implicated in lung tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To understand the regulation of MMP-10 by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), we have assessed equilibrium inhibition constants (K(i)) of putative physiological inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 for the active catalytic domain of human MMP-10 (MMP-10cd) using multiple kinetic approaches. We find that TIMP-1 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 1.1 × 10(-9) M; this interaction is 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of the similar MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) catalytic domain (MMP-3cd) by TIMP-1. TIMP-2 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 5.8 × 10(-9) M, which is again 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of MMP-3cd by this inhibitor (K(i) = 5.5 × 10(-10) M). We solved the x-ray crystal structure of TIMP-1 bound to the MMP-10cd at 1.9 Å resolution; the structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined with an R-factor of 0.215 (R(free) = 0.266). Comparing our structure of MMP-10cd·TIMP-1 with the previously solved structure of MMP-3cd·TIMP-1 (Protein Data Bank entry 1UEA), we see substantial differences at the binding interface that provide insight into the differential binding of stromelysin family members to TIMP-1. This structural information may ultimately assist in the design of more selective TIMP-based inhibitors tailored for specificity toward individual members of the stromelysin family, with potential therapeutic applications.

  3. Presence of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins Correlates With Tumor-Promoting Effects of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyun Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The stroma of breast cancer can promote the disease’s progression, but whether its composition and functions are shared among different subtypes is poorly explored. We compared stromal components of a luminal [mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV–Neu] and a triple-negative/basal-like [C3(1–Simian virus 40 large T antigen (Tag] genetically engineered breast cancer mouse model. The types of cytokines and their expression levels were very different in the two models, as was the extent of innate immune cell infiltration; however, both models showed infiltration of innate immune cells that expressed matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, an extracellular protease linked to the progression of many types of cancer. By intercrossing with Mmp9 null mice, we found that the absence of MMP9 delayed tumor onset in the C3(1-Tag model but had no effect on tumor onset in the MMTV-Neu model. We discovered that protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, an MMP9 substrate, were increased in C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− compared to C3(1-Tag;Mmp9+/+ tumors. In contrast, IGFBP-1 protein expression was low in MMTV-Neu tumors regardless of Mmp9 status. IGFBP-1 binds and antagonizes IGFs, preventing them from activating their receptors to promote cell proliferation and survival. Tumors from C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− mice had reduced IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation, consistent with slower tumor onset. Finally, gene expression analysis of human breast tumors showed that high expression of IGFBP mRNA was strongly correlated with good prognosis but not when MMP9 mRNA was also highly expressed. In conclusion, MMP9 has different effects on breast cancer progression depending on whether IGFBPs are expressed.

  4. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  5. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  6. Green tea polyphenol tailors cell adhesivity of RGD displaying surfaces: multicomponent models monitored optically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beatrix; Farkas, Eniko; Forgacs, Eniko; Saftics, Andras; Kovacs, Boglarka; Kurunczi, Sandor; Szekacs, Inna; Csampai, Antal; Bosze, Szilvia; Horvath, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of the anti-adhesive coating, poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) and its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) functionalized form, PLL-g-PEG-RGD, with the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCg) was in situ monitored. After, the kinetics of cellular adhesion on the EGCg exposed coatings were recorded in real-time. The employed plate-based waveguide biosensor is applicable to monitor small molecule binding and sensitive to sub-nanometer scale changes in cell membrane position and cell mass distribution; while detecting the signals of thousands of adhering cells. The combination of this remarkable sensitivity and throughput opens up new avenues in testing complicated models of cell-surface interactions. The systematic studies revealed that, despite the reported excellent antifouling properties of the coatings, EGCg strongly interacted with them, and affected their cell adhesivity in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the differences between the effects of the fresh and oxidized EGCg solutions were first demonstrated. Using a semiempirical quantumchemical method we showed that EGCg binds to the PEG chains of PLL-g-PEG-RGD and effectively blocks the RGD sites by hydrogen bonds. The calculations supported the experimental finding that the binding is stronger for the oxidative products. Our work lead to a new model of polyphenol action on cell adhesion ligand accessibility and matrix rigidity.

  7. Green tea polyphenol tailors cell adhesivity of RGD displaying surfaces: multicomponent models monitored optically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beatrix; Farkas, Eniko; Forgacs, Eniko; Saftics, Andras; Kovacs, Boglarka; Kurunczi, Sandor; Szekacs, Inna; Csampai, Antal; Bosze, Szilvia; Horvath, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of the anti-adhesive coating, poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) and its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) functionalized form, PLL-g-PEG-RGD, with the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCg) was in situ monitored. After, the kinetics of cellular adhesion on the EGCg exposed coatings were recorded in real-time. The employed plate-based waveguide biosensor is applicable to monitor small molecule binding and sensitive to sub-nanometer scale changes in cell membrane position and cell mass distribution; while detecting the signals of thousands of adhering cells. The combination of this remarkable sensitivity and throughput opens up new avenues in testing complicated models of cell-surface interactions. The systematic studies revealed that, despite the reported excellent antifouling properties of the coatings, EGCg strongly interacted with them, and affected their cell adhesivity in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the differences between the effects of the fresh and oxidized EGCg solutions were first demonstrated. Using a semiempirical quantumchemical method we showed that EGCg binds to the PEG chains of PLL-g-PEG-RGD and effectively blocks the RGD sites by hydrogen bonds. The calculations supported the experimental finding that the binding is stronger for the oxidative products. Our work lead to a new model of polyphenol action on cell adhesion ligand accessibility and matrix rigidity. PMID:28186133

  8. Enhanced fibroblast cell adhesion on Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, O.C. [INM - Leibniz-Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Sander, M. [Saarland University, Biological Experimental Physics Department, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Miro, M.M.; Lee, J.; Akkan, C.K.; Smail, H. [INM - Leibniz-Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Ott, A. [Saarland University, Biological Experimental Physics Department, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Veith, M., E-mail: Michael.veith@inm-gmbh.de [INM - Leibniz-Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Saarland University, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Biological cells stick together via transmembrane proteins, which are linked to receptor molecules of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This specific biochemical adhesion plays a leading role in many cellular processes, among them cell differentiation, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Various medical applications require endogen cells to bind to an exogene substrate as in the case of an implant. Coatings with proteins that naturally belong to the ECM are known to enhance the cell adhesion. However, the choice of inorganic materials, which promote cell adhesion, is limited. Here, we report on a new engineered surface composed of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bi-phasic nanowires (NWs), which promotes the adhesion of fibroblast cells. Fibroblasts grow well on this inorganic layer and keep proliferating. Using the cell monolayer rheology (CMR) technique, we show that the adhesion of fibroblasts on Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NWs is comparable to fibronectin coated surfaces. To our knowledge, this is one of the strongest cell adhesions on an inorganic surface, which has been reported on so far, since it compares to bio-organic layers such as fibronectin.

  9. Enhanced fibroblast cell adhesion on Al/Al2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, O. C.; Sander, M.; Miró, M. M.; Lee, J.; Akkan, C. K.; Smail, H.; Ott, A.; Veith, M.

    2011-02-01

    Biological cells stick together via transmembrane proteins, which are linked to receptor molecules of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This specific biochemical adhesion plays a leading role in many cellular processes, among them cell differentiation, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Various medical applications require endogen cells to bind to an exogene substrate as in the case of an implant. Coatings with proteins that naturally belong to the ECM are known to enhance the cell adhesion. However, the choice of inorganic materials, which promote cell adhesion, is limited. Here, we report on a new engineered surface composed of Al/Al2O3 bi-phasic nanowires (NWs), which promotes the adhesion of fibroblast cells. Fibroblasts grow well on this inorganic layer and keep proliferating. Using the cell monolayer rheology (CMR) technique, we show that the adhesion of fibroblasts on Al/Al2O3 NWs is comparable to fibronectin coated surfaces. To our knowledge, this is one of the strongest cell adhesions on an inorganic surface, which has been reported on so far, since it compares to bio-organic layers such as fibronectin.

  10. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  11. Adhesion beyond the interface: Molecular adaptations of the mussel byssus to the intertidal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIller, Dusty Rose

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres robustly in the high-energy and oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa)-containing adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps). There are many supporting roles to mussel adhesion that are intimately linked and ultimately responsible for mussel byssus's durable and dynamic adhesion. This dissertation explores these supporting mechanisms, including delivery of materials underwater, iron binding, friction, and antioxidant activity. As the outermost covering of the byssus, the cuticle deserves particular attention for its supporting roles to adhesion including the high stiffness and extensibility of the M. californianus byssal cuticle, which make it one of the most energy tolerant materials known. The cuticle's matrix-granule composite structure contributes to its toughness by microcracking between its harder granules and softer matrix. We investigated delivery of cuticular material underwater, cohesion of cuticle proteins, and surface damage mitigation by cuticle protein-based coacervates. To investigate underwater material delivery, we made cuticle matrix mimics by coacervating a key cuticular protein, Mytilus californianus foot protein 1, mfp-1, with hyaluronic acid. These matrix mimics coacervated over a wide range of solution conditions, delivered concentrated material, settled on and coated surfaces underwater. Because the granules are composed of mfp-1 condensed with iron, we used the surface forces apparatus to investigate the effects of iron on the cohesion of mfp-1 from two different species of mussels and found that subtle sequence variations modulate cohesion. Using the coacervate matrix mimics and, modeling the granules as a hard surface (mica), we investigated the wear protection of coacervated mfp-1/HA to mica under frictional shear and found that preventing wear depends critically on the presence of Dopa groups. In addition to cuticle

  12. Syndecans in tumor cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapraeger Alan C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anchorage of cells to "heparin" – binding domains that are prevalent in extracellular matrix (ECM components is thought to occur primarily through the syndecans, a four-member family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans that communicate environmental cues from the ECM to the cytoskeleton and the signaling apparatus of the cell. Known activities of the syndecans trace to their highly conserved cytoplasmic domains and to their heparan sulfate chains, which can serve to regulate the signaling of growth factors and morphogens. However, several emerging studies point to critical roles for the syndecans' extracellular protein domains in tumor cell behavior to include cell adhesion and invasion. Although the mechanisms of these activities remain largely unknown, one possibility involves "co-receptor" interactions with integrins that may regulate integrin function and the cell adhesion-signaling phenotype. Thus, alterations in syndecan expression, leading to either overexpression or loss of expression, both of which take place in tumor cells, may have dramatic effects on tumor cell invasion.

  13. Soluble adhesion molecules in human cancers: sources and fates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Swart, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules endow tumor cells with the necessary cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. As such, adhesion molecules are involved in cell signalling, proliferation and tumor growth. Rearrangements in the adhesion repertoire allow tumor cells to migrate, invade and form metastases.

  14. Soluble adhesion molecules in human cancers: sources and fates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Swart, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules endow tumor cells with the necessary cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. As such, adhesion molecules are involved in cell signalling, proliferation and tumor growth. Rearrangements in the adhesion repertoire allow tumor cells to migrate, invade and form metastases. Be

  15. Peptide-Based Selective Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloproteinase-Mediated Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Ndinguri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs exhibit a broad array of activities, some catalytic and some non-catalytic in nature. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered small molecule, active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic in execution. Inhibitors that favor few or individual members of the MMP family often take advantage of interactions outside the enzyme active site. We presently focus on peptide-based MMP inhibitors and probes that do not incorporate conventional Zn2+ binding groups. In some cases, these inhibitors and probes function by binding only secondary binding sites (exosites, while others bind both exosites and the active site. A myriad of MMP mediated-activities beyond selective catalysis can be inhibited by peptides, particularly cell adhesion, proliferation, motility, and invasion. Selective MMP binding peptides comprise highly customizable, unique imaging agents. Areas of needed improvement for MMP targeting peptides include binding affinity and stability.

  16. Characterization of Heparin-binding Site of Tissue Transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J.; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L.; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca2+-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 202KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR222. We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed. PMID:22298777

  17. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  18. Application of the Blister Test in Study of Epoxy Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xiong; Ingegerd Annergren

    2000-01-01

    Shaft-loaded blister test technique is used as an effective quantitative tool to measure adhesion strength. Investigation on conductive adhesive was done by modified blister test. It is found that shaftloaded blister test can be a good solution for the debonding of thin film adhesion. The intrinsic stable interface debonding process has been proved an attractive alternative to the conventional adhesion measurement techniques. In our study, epoxy matrix adhesive was studied using blister test technique in comparison with the traditional test-lap shear test. Adhesion strength was studied as a function of surface treatment and the metallization of substrate. It was found that surface conditions of substrate have significant impact on adhesion behaviour. The oxidation of surface is responsible for the poor adhesion. Activating chemical treatment and Plasma cleaning on substrate surface has been found to be a way of dreamatically improving adhesion strength of electronic conductive adhesive.

  19. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  20. Role of fibronectin in the adhesion of Acinetobacter baumannii to host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Smani

    Full Text Available Adhesion to host cells is an initial and important step in Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. However, there is relatively little information on the mechanisms by which A. baumannii binds to and interacts with host cells. Adherence to extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin, affords pathogens with a mechanism to invade epithelial cells. Here, we found that A. baumannii adheres more avidly to immobilized fibronectin than to control protein. Free fibronectin used as a competitor resulted in dose-dependent decreased binding of A. baumannii to fibronectin. Three outer membrane preparations (OMPs were identified as fibronectin binding proteins (FBPs: OMPA, TonB-dependent copper receptor, and 34 kDa OMP. Moreover, we demonstrated that fibronectin inhibition and neutralization by specific antibody prevented significantly the adhesion of A. baumannii to human lung epithelial cells (A549 cells. Similarly, A. baumannii OMPA neutralization by specific antibody decreased significantly the adhesion of A. baumannii to A549 cells. These data indicate that FBPs are key adhesins that mediate binding of A. baumannii to human lung epithelial cells through interaction with fibronectin on the surface of these host cells.

  1. Synthesis, {sup 68}Ga labeling and preliminary evaluation of DOTA peptide binding vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential PET imaging agent for diagnosing osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujula, Tiina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Salomaeki, Satu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Virsu, Pauliina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lankinen, Petteri; Maekinen, Tatu J. [Orthopedic Research Unit, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Autio, Anu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Yegutkin, Gennady G. [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jalkanen, Sirpa [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); National Public Health Institute, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Turku Center for Disease Modeling, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)], E-mail: anne.roivainen@utu.fi

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an infection/inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein. Based on our previous studies, the most VAP-1-selective peptide (VAP-P1) was 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N'',N''',N,,,,-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated, {sup 68}gallium ({sup 68}Ga)-labeled (named [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1) and evaluated preliminarily. Methods: Targeting was evaluated by using VAP-1-transfected cells. Biodistribution of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 was studied by positron emission tomography imaging of healthy rats and rats with bone inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Uptake of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 in osteomyelitis was compared with negative control peptide and competition with an excess of unlabeled DOTAVAP-P1. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 bound more efficiently to VAP-1-transfected cells than to controls. In rats, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 cleared rapidly from blood circulation, excreted quickly in urine and showed an in vivo half-life of 26{+-}2.3 min. Imaging of osteomyelitis demonstrated modest target-to-background ratio. Studies with the negative control peptide and competitors revealed a significantly lower uptake at the infection site compared to [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1. Conclusions: The results represent a proof-of-concept that infection-induced VAP-1 can be targeted by [{sup 68}Ga]DOTA peptide. [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 is just the first candidate peptide and an essential opening for developing VAP-1-specific imaging agents.

  2. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  3. Molecular basis of Post-surgical Peritoneal adhesions - An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Vaze 1

    Full Text Available Post surgical adhesion development remains a frequent occurrence and is often unrecognized by surgeons. Peritoneal adhesions are the leading cause of pelvic pain, bowel obstruction and infertility. The prevention of adhesion till date is speculative due to lack of understanding of mechanisms involved in adhesion development. Adhesions are proposed to the disorder of wound healing and imbalance between fibrinogenesis and fibrinolysis. The unprecedented advancement in Molecular Biology has led us to identify molecules involved in both wound healing and adhesion development. The role of these molecules in peritoneal biological functions is not well understood. Hypoxia is proposed to be major contributing factor for the development of adhesions. The major mechanisms behind adhesion development are increased fibrinogenesis, reduced fibrinolysis, increased Extra Cellular Matrix deposition, increased cytokine production, increased angiogenesis and reduced apoptosis. Better understanding of these events will make efficient management of adhesions possible. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(12.000: 561-566

  4. Mixed Fibronectin-Derived Peptides Conjugated to a Chitosan Matrix Effectively Promotes Biological Activities through Integrins, α4β1, α5β1, αvβ3, and Syndecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hozumi Kentaro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mimicking the biological function of the extracellular matrix is an approach to developing cell adhesive biomaterials. The RGD peptide, derived from fibronectin (Fn, mainly binds to integrin αvβ3 and has been widely used as a cell adhesive peptide on various biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to Fn is thought to be mediated by several integrin subtypes and syndecans. In this study, we synthesized an RGD-containing peptide (FIB1 and four integrin α4β1-binding-related motif-containing peptides (LDV, IDAPS, KLDAPT, and PRARI and constructed peptide-chitosan matrices. The FIB1-chitosan matrix promoted human dermal fibroblast (HDF attachment, and the C-terminal elongated PRARI (ePRARI-C-conjugated chitosan matrix significantly promoted HDF attachment through integrin α4β1 and syndecan binding. Next, we constructed a mixed ePRARI-C- and FIB1-chitosan matrix to develop a Fn mimetic biomaterial. The mixed ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix promoted significantly better cell attachment and neurite outgrowth compared to those of either ePRARI-C- or FIB1-chitosan matrices. HDF adhesion to the ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix was mediated by integrin, α4β1, α5β1, and αvβ3, similar to HDF adhesion to Fn. These data suggest that an ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix can be used as a tool to analyze the multiple functions of Fn and can serve as a Fn-mimetic biomaterial.

  5. Roles of paxillin family members in adhesion and ECM degradation coupling at invadosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Christos; Oddou, Christiane; Emadali, Anouk; Hiriart-Bryant, Edwige; Boyault, Cyril; Faurobert, Eva; Vande Pol, Scott; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Kraut, Alexandra; Coute, Yohann; Block, Marc; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Invadosomes are acto-adhesive structures able to both bind the extracellular matrix (ECM) and digest it. Paxillin family members—paxillin, Hic-5, and leupaxin—are implicated in mechanosensing and turnover of adhesion sites, but the contribution of each paxillin family protein to invadosome activities is unclear. We use genetic approaches to show that paxillin and Hic-5 have both redundant and distinctive functions in invadosome formation. The essential function of paxillin-like activity is based on the coordinated activity of LD motifs and LIM domains, which support invadosome assembly and morphology, respectively. However, paxillin preferentially regulates invadosome assembly, whereas Hic-5 regulates the coupling between ECM degradation and acto-adhesive functions. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed new partners that are important for paxillin and Hic-5 specificities: paxillin regulates the acto-adhesive machinery through janus kinase 1 (JAK1), whereas Hic-5 controls ECM degradation via IQGAP1. Integrating the redundancy and specificities of paxillin and Hic-5 in a functional complex provides insights into the coupling between the acto-adhesive and ECM-degradative machineries in invadosomes. PMID:27269065

  6. Altering FAK-paxillin interactions reduces adhesion, migration and invasion processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse B Deramaudt

    Full Text Available Focal adhesion kinase (FAK plays an important role in signal transduction pathways initiated at sites of integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Thus, FAK is involved in many aspects of the metastatic process including adhesion, migration and invasion. Recently, several small molecule inhibitors which target FAK catalytic activity have been developed by pharmaceutical companies. The current study was aimed at addressing whether inhibiting FAK targeting to focal adhesions (FA represents an efficient alternative strategy to inhibit FAK downstream pathways. Using a mutagenesis approach to alter the targeting domain of FAK, we constructed a FAK mutant that fails to bind paxillin. Inhibiting FAK-paxillin interactions led to a complete loss of FAK localization at FAs together with reduced phosphorylation of FAK and FAK targets such as paxillin and p130Cas. This in turn resulted in altered FA dynamics and inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Moreover, the migration properties of cells expressing the FAK mutant were reduced as compared to FAK-/- cells. This was correlated with a decrease in both phospho-Src and phospho-p130Cas levels at FAs. We conclude that targeting FAK-paxillin interactions is an efficient strategy to reduce FAK signalling and thus may represent a target for the development of new FAK inhibitors.

  7. Altering FAK-paxillin interactions reduces adhesion, migration and invasion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deramaudt, Thérèse B; Dujardin, Denis; Noulet, Fanny; Martin, Sophie; Vauchelles, Romain; Takeda, Ken; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in signal transduction pathways initiated at sites of integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Thus, FAK is involved in many aspects of the metastatic process including adhesion, migration and invasion. Recently, several small molecule inhibitors which target FAK catalytic activity have been developed by pharmaceutical companies. The current study was aimed at addressing whether inhibiting FAK targeting to focal adhesions (FA) represents an efficient alternative strategy to inhibit FAK downstream pathways. Using a mutagenesis approach to alter the targeting domain of FAK, we constructed a FAK mutant that fails to bind paxillin. Inhibiting FAK-paxillin interactions led to a complete loss of FAK localization at FAs together with reduced phosphorylation of FAK and FAK targets such as paxillin and p130Cas. This in turn resulted in altered FA dynamics and inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Moreover, the migration properties of cells expressing the FAK mutant were reduced as compared to FAK-/- cells. This was correlated with a decrease in both phospho-Src and phospho-p130Cas levels at FAs. We conclude that targeting FAK-paxillin interactions is an efficient strategy to reduce FAK signalling and thus may represent a target for the development of new FAK inhibitors.

  8. Adhesion and cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  9. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  10. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  11. A helping hand: How vinculin contributes to cell-matrix and cell-cell force transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, David W; García, Andrés J

    2014-01-01

    Vinculin helps cells regulate and respond to mechanical forces. It is a scaffolding protein that tightly regulates its interactions with potential binding partners within adhesive structures-including focal adhesions that link the cell to the extracellular matrix and adherens junctions that link cells to each other-that physically connect the force-generating actin cytoskeleton (CSK) with the extracellular environment. This tight control of binding partner interaction-mediated by vinculin's autoinhibitory head-tail interaction-allows vinculin to rapidly interact and detach in response to changes in the dynamic forces applied through the cell. In doing so, vinculin modulates the structural composition of focal adhesions and the cell's ability to generate traction forces and adhesion strength. Recent evidence suggests that vinculin plays a similar role in regulating the fate and function of cell-cell junctions, further underscoring the importance of this protein. Using our lab's recent work as a starting point, this commentary explores several outstanding questions regarding the nature of vinculin activation and its function within focal adhesions and adherens junctions.

  12. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... in the formation of highly complex sessile communities, referred to as biofilms. Such microbial communities are often highly dynamic and heterogeneous in nature. Microbial biofilms are of great importance in a wide range of natural processes and industrial settings, from the commensal flora of the gastrointestinal...

  13. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  14. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Gary F., E-mail: clarkgf@health.missouri.edu

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.

  15. Glycopolymer functionalization of engineered spider silk protein-based materials for improved cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, John G; Pfaff, André; Leal-Egaña, Aldo; Müller, Axel H E; Scheibel, Thomas R

    2014-07-01

    Silk protein-based materials are promising biomaterials for application as tissue scaffolds, due to their processability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. The preparation of films composed of an engineered spider silk protein (eADF4(C16)) and their functionalization with glycopolymers are described. The glycopolymers bind proteins found in the extracellular matrix, providing a biomimetic coating on the films that improves cell adhesion to the surfaces of engineered spider silk films. Such silk-based materials have potential as coatings for degradable implantable devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  17. Staphylococcus intermedius binding to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin and cytokeratin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Nuttall, Tim; Fazakerley, Jennie; McEwan, Neil

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a key step in colonization of the skin. Staphylococcus intermedius adheres strongly to canine and feline corneocytes, and adhesion is greater to corneocytes from dogs affected with atopic dermatitis, but comparatively little is known about adhesion-receptor interaction compared to S. aureus. The aim of this study was to compare the binding of S. intermedius isolates from healthy (n = 21) and atopic dogs (n = 33) to immobilized human fibronectin and epidermal cytokeratin and canine fibrinogen in vitro. Staphylococcus intermedius and the positive control S. aureus P1 exhibited concentration-dependent binding to all three protein layers. The negative control S. aureus Newman strain and S. hominis did not bind. The majority of S. intermedius isolates adhered strongly, and there was no significant difference between isolates from atopic and healthy dogs or from lesional or nonlesional skin of atopic dogs (fibronectin P = 0.971 and 0.837; fibrinogen P = 0.811 and 0.564; cytokeratin P = 0.409 and 0.564). These results suggest that S. intermedius may possess specific microbial components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules, like S. aureus, that bind to the substrates used in this study. Adherence and therefore colonization and infection in canine atopic dermatitis, however, are more likely to be related to host factors rather than the possession of specific virulence factors.

  18. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Herman-Bausier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN, consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation.

  19. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Valotteau, Claire; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Alsteens, David; Foster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn)-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN), consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:27795393

  20. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  1. Resin diffusion through demineralized dentin matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO Ricardo M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has focused on the factors that may affect the permeability of adhesive resins into the demineralized dentin matrix during the development of the bonding process. The effects of surface moisture are discussed respectively to the adhesive systems, and the problems related to incomplete hybrid layer formation presented.

  2. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  3. ELASTOMERIC REACTIVE MICROGELS AS TOUGHENER FOR EPOXY ADHESIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zheng; XUE Ruilan; YU Yunchao

    1987-01-01

    Elastomeric reactive microgels were evaluated as toughener for epoxy adhesives. It turned out that elastomeric microgels can improve lap shear strength and peel strength greatly. The glass transition temperature of the resin matrix was not affected by the presence of dispersed microgel particles, and thus the microgel-toughened adhesives have a good bond strength at elevated temperatures.

  4. Spontaneous and cytokine induced basophil adhesion evaluated by microtiter assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Sha; Poulsen, Lars K; Reimert, Claus Michael;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a microtiter assay for evaluating basophil spontaneous adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins exemplified by fibronectin and cytokine induced basophil adhesion to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The percentage of basophils adhering to either ECM or BSA was quantified...

  5. Induction of gastric cancer cell adhesion through transforming growth factor-beta1-mediated peritoneal fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xiao-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peritoneal dissemination is one of the main causes of death in gastric cancer patients. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1, one of the most potent fibrotic stimuli for mesothelial cells, may play a key role in this processing. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the effects of TGF-β1 on regulation of gastric cancer adhesion to mesothelial cells. Methods Peritoneal tissues and peritoneal wash fluid were obtained for hematoxylin and eosin staining or ELISA to measure fibrosis and TGF-β1 levels, respectively. The peritoneal mesothelial cell line, HMrSV5, was used to determine the role of TGF-β1 in regulation of gastric cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells and expression of collagen, fibronectin, and Smad 2/3 by using adhesion assay, western blot, and RT-PCR. Results The data showed that TGF-β1 treatment was able to induce collagen III and fibronectin expression in the mesothelial cells, which was associated with an increased adhesion ability of gastric cancer cells, but knockdown of minimal sites of cell binding domain of extracellular matrix can partially inhibit these effects. Conclusion Peritoneal fibrosis induced by TGF-β1 may provide a favorable environment for the dissemination of gastric cancer.

  6. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  7. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  8. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-11-03

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure-function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin-matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. IGD motifs, which are required for migration stimulatory activity of fibronectin type I modules, do not mediate binding in matrix assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Maurer

    Full Text Available Picomolar concentrations of proteins comprising only the N-terminal 70-kDa region (70K of fibronectin (FN stimulate cell migration into collagen gels. The Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD motifs in four of the nine FN type 1 (FNI modules in 70K are important for such migratory stimulating activity. The 70K region mediates binding of nanomolar concentrations of intact FN to cell-surface sites where FN is assembled. Using baculovirus, we expressed wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations in (3FNI and (5FNI; (7FNI and (9FNI; or (3FNI, (5FNI, (7FNI, and (9FNI. Wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations were equally active in binding to assembly sites of FN-null fibroblasts. This finding indicates that IGD motifs do not mediate the interaction between 70K and the cell-surface that is important for FN assembly. Further, FN fragment N-(3FNIII, which does not stimulate migration, binds to assembly sites on FN-null fibroblast. The Ile-to-Ala mutations had effects on the structure of FNI modules as evidenced by decreases in abilities of 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations to bind to monoclonal antibody 5C3, which recognizes an epitope in (9FNI, or to bind to FUD, a polypeptide based on the F1 adhesin of Streptococcus pyogenes that interacts with 70K by the β-zipper mechanism. These results suggest that the picomolar interactions of 70K with cells that stimulate cell migration require different conformations of FNI modules than the nanomolar interactions required for assembly.

  10. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ non-dynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of non-dynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of non-physiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semitransparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex

  11. Advances in Study on Scaffold/matrix Attachment Region Binding Protein 1%核基质结合区结合蛋白质1研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗金波; 乔炜

    2012-01-01

    Change of nuclear matrix associated protein is one of the major phenotypes of malignant tumor cells leading to alteration in chromatin folding, the change of fidelity of genome replication and gene expression. Aberrant expression of matrix attachment region (MAR) binding proteins (MARBPs) modulates the chromatin constitution and disruption of transcriptional network that leads to oncogenesis. Some of these proteins are expressed specifically in tumor tissue and could be served as promising diagnostic or prognostic markers. Scaffold/matrix attachment region binding protein 1 (SMAR1) expression is drastically down-regulated in breast cancer. This article reviewed the roles of SMAR1 in cell growth, apoptosis and tumorigenesis.%核基质相关蛋白改变是恶性肿瘤细胞的主要表现形式,可使染色质发生折叠、基因复制保真度和基因表达发生改变.核基质结合区(MAR)结合蛋白(MARBPs)表达异常可影响染色质构成、干扰转录调控程序,致肿瘤形成.某些MARBPs特异性表达于肿瘤组织,是肿瘤诊断和预后的指标.核基质结合区结合蛋白质1(SMAR1)在乳腺癌中的表达急剧下调.本文就SMAR1在细胞生长、凋亡和肿瘤形成中的作用作一综述.

  12. The effect of polyethylene glycol adhesion barrier (Spray Gel) on preventing peritoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasiran, F; Eryilmaz, R; Isik, A; Okan, I; Somay, A; Sahin, M

    2015-01-01

    The prominent cells in the late phase of wound healing during proliferation and matrix deposition are fibroblasts. Foreign materials in the operation site like prosthesis prolong the inflammation and induce fibroblast proliferation (8). 3 different prostheses used in this study induced chronic inflammation and fibrosis and provided an effective repair. Dense and thick adhesions due to fibrosis also induced strong adhesions to omentum and small intestine if only polypropylene mesh used for hernia repair. However, there was no difference between SprayGel treated polypropylene mesh and Sepramesh when compared for fibrosis. It also prevents the intraabdominal adhesion formation. It is nontoxic, sticky adherent, non- immigrant and easy to use both in open and laparoscopic surgeries. This experimental study revealed that polyethyleneglycol applied polypropylene mesh accomplishes hernia repair with significantly less adhesion formation than polypropylene mesh alone while securing a remarkable economy than adhesion barrier coated dual meshes (Tab. 6, Fig. 7, Ref. 23). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  13. p62/IMP2 stimulates cell migration and reduces cell adhesion in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Francia, Giulio; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    p62/IMP2 is an oncofetal protein that is overexpressed in several types of cancer, and is a member of the family of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding proteins. We previously reported that high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody are present in sera from cancer patients, compared to healthy individuals. Here, we report the overexpression of p62/IMP2 in tumor tissues of 72 out of 104 cases of human breast cancer, and high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody in patients’ sera (in 63 out of 216 cases). To explore the role of p62/IMP2 in breast cancer progression, we generated p62/IMP2 transfected variants of two human breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231 and LM2-4. Using in vitro assays we found that overexpression of p62/IMP2 can increase cell migration, and reduce cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. A Human Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules qPCR array was performed with our generated variants, and it identified a group of mRNAs whose expression was altered with p62/IMP2 overexpression, including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA – which we show to be a p62/IMP2 binding partner. Overall, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which p62/IMP2 can contribute to breast cancer progression. PMID:26416451

  14. Focal adhesions and assessment of cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Klein, CL; Wagner, M; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    1999-01-01

    Focal adhesions are highly ordered assemblies of transmembrane receptors, extracellular matrix proteins, and a large number of cytoplasmic proteins, including structural proteins, as well as tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates. They are now accepted as a prime component of signal tr

  15. Gangliosides regulate tumor cell adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Tamara; Jabbar, Adnan A; Wen, Fei-Qui; Patel, Dharmesh A; Valentino, Leonard A

    2003-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins is critical for migration and invasion. The factors that regulate tumor cell adhesion are poorly characterized. Gangliosides promote platelet adhesion and may also play a role in the adhesion of other cell types. We hypothesized that pharmacological depletion of membrane gangliosides from adherent cells would abrogate adhesion to collagen and promote migration and invasion. To test these hypotheses, LA-N1 neuroblastoma cells, which avidly adhere to collagen and are rich with membrane gangliosides (43.69 nmol/10(8) cells), were cultured in the presence of D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol-HCl. Endogenous gangliosides were reduced by 98% (0.76 nmol/10(8) cells) and adhesion to collagen decreased by 67%. There were no changes in cell morphology, viability, proliferation rate or apoptosis. Pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells in conditioned medium from control cells restored adhesion to collagen (0.45 +/- 0.002), comparable to that of control cells (0.49 +/- 0.035). Similarly, pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells with purified GD2 completely restored adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner. When LA-N1 cells were cultured with retinoic acid, a biological response modifier known to increase endogenous gangliosides, adhesion to collagen increased. Next, we questioned whether changes in adhesion would be reflected as changes in migration and invasion. Cells depleted of endogenous cellular gangliosides migrated more than control cells. Finally, control cells replete with their endogenous gangliosides demonstrated less invasive potential than control cells. The data demonstrate that endogenous tumor gangliosides increase neuroblastoma cell adhesion to collagen and reduce migration and invasion in vitro.

  16. Beta 1 integrin binding plays a role in the constant traction force generation in response to varying stiffness for cells grown on mature cardiac extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershlak, Joshua R; Black, Lauren D

    2015-01-15

    We have previously reported a unique response of traction force generation for cells grown on mature cardiac ECM, where traction force was constant over a range of stiffnesses. In this study we sought to further investigate the role of the complex mixture of ECM on this response and assess the potential mechanism behind it. Using traction force microscopy, we measured cellular traction forces and stresses for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown on polyacrylamide gels at a range of stiffnesses (9, 25, or 48 kPa) containing either adult rat heart ECM, different singular ECM proteins including collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin, or ECM mimics comprised of varying amounts of collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin. We also measured the expression of integrins on these different substrates as well as probed for β1 integrin binding. There was no significant change in traction force generation for cells grown on the adult ECM, as previously reported, whereas cells grown on singular ECM protein substrates had increased traction force generation with an increase in substrate stiffness. Cells grown on ECM mimics containing collagen I, fibronectin and laminin were found to be reminiscent of the traction forces generated by cells grown on native ECM. Integrin expression generally increased with increasing stiffness except for the β1 integrin, potentially implicating it as playing a role in the response to adult cardiac ECM. We inhibited binding through the β1 integrin on cells grown on the adult ECM and found that the inhibition of β1 binding led to a return to the typical response of increasing traction force generation with increasing stiffness. Our data demonstrates that cells grown on the mature cardiac ECM are able to circumvent typical stiffness related cellular behaviors, likely through β1 integrin binding to the complex composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 单抗CD44-生物素-亲和素系统提高软骨细胞与支架黏附能力的研究%CD44 monoclonal antibody-biotin-avidin binding system for the improvement of cell adhesion to scaffolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林红; 周健; 沈龙祥; 阮玉辉; 戴文达; 郭常安; 陈峥嵘

    2012-01-01

    three-dimensional culture system were investigated.The histologic analysis was used to evaluate the cell growth in the scaffolds.The mRNA expression level of type Ⅱ collagen,aggrecan and sox9 was detected by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Group C showed better results in the cell spreading area,the cell proliferation rate and the mRNA expression level of type Ⅱ collagen,aggrecan and sox9 than group B,and group B more than group A,group C > group B > group A ( P < 0.05 ).The results showed that the cell exfoliation rate in group A was 2.17 times of that in group B which was 1.71 times of that in group C,group A > group B > group C ( P < 0.05 ).The histologic sections showed the proliferation of cells was exuberant and expression of extracellular matrix was stronger in group C,that in group B was between group C and group A in which they were weaker.Conclusion The CD44 monoclonal antibody-biotin-avidin binding system could improve the chondrocytes adhesion,proliferation and phenotypic expression in cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Cell adhesion controlled by adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR124/ADGRA2 is mediated by a protein complex comprising intersectins and Elmo-Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Magda Nohemí; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Hamoud, Noumeira; Chidiac, Rony; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gratton, Jean Philippe; Côté, Jean-François; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2017-07-21

    Developmental angiogenesis and the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier involve endothelial cell adhesion, which is linked to cytoskeletal dynamics. GPR124 (also known as TEM5/ADGRA2) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family member that plays a pivotal role in brain angiogenesis and in ensuring a tight blood-brain barrier. However, the signaling properties of GPR124 remain poorly defined. Here, we show that ectopic expression of GPR124 promotes cell adhesion, additive to extracellular matrix-dependent effect, coupled with filopodia and lamellipodia formation and an enrichment of a pool of the G protein-coupled receptor at actin-rich cellular protrusions containing VASP, a filopodial marker. Accordingly, GPR124-expressing cells also displayed increased activation of both Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. Mechanistically, we uncover novel direct interactions between endogenous GPR124 and the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors Elmo/Dock and intersectin (ITSN). Small fragments of either Elmo or ITSN1 that bind GPR124 blocked GPR124-induced cell adhesion. In addition, Gβγ interacts with the C-terminal tail of GPR124 and promotes the formation of a GPR124-Elmo complex. Furthermore, GPR124 also promotes the activation of the Elmo-Dock complex, as measured by Elmo phosphorylation on a conserved C-terminal tyrosine residue. Interestingly, Elmo and ITSN1 also interact with each other independently of their GPR124-recognition regions. Moreover, endogenous phospho-Elmo and ITSN1 co-localize with GPR124 at lamellipodia of adhering endothelial cells, where GPR124 expression contributes to polarity acquisition during wound healing. Collectively, our results indicate that GPR124 promotes cell adhesion via Elmo-Dock and ITSN. This constitutes a previously unrecognized complex formed of atypical and conventional Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 that is putatively involved in GPR124-dependent angiogenic responses. © 2017 by The American Society for

  19. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion ...

  20. Leukocyte adhesion - a fundamental process in leukocyte physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahmberg C.G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion is of pivotal functional importance. The adhesion involves several different adhesion molecules, the most important of which are the leukocyte ß2-integrins (CD11/CD18, the intercellular adhesion molecules, and the selectins. We and others have extensively studied the specificity and binding sites in the integrins and the intercellular adhesion molecules for their receptors and ligands. The integrins have to become activated to exert their functions but the possible mechanisms of activation remain poorly understood. Importantly, a few novel intercellular adhesion molecules have been recently described, which seem to function only in specific tissues. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly apparent that changes in integrins and intercellular adhesion molecules are associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases.

  1. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 mediates a mechanism of metabolic cardioprotection consisting of negative regulation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase pathway in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Berry, Evan; Hernandez-Anzaldo, Samuel; Takawale, Abhijit; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we reported that cardiac matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 is upregulated in hypertensive mice. How MMP-2 affects the development of cardiac disease is unclear. Here, we report that MMP-2 protects from hypertensive cardiac disease. In mice infused with angiotensin II, the lack of MMP-2 (Mmp2(-/-)) did not affect the severity of the hypertension but caused cardiac hypertrophy to develop earlier and to a greater extent versus wild-type (Mmp2(+/+)) mice, as measured by heart weight:body weight ratio and upregulation of hypertrophy and fibrosis markers. We further found numerous metabolic and inflammatory gene expression abnormalities in the left ventricle of Mmp2(-/-) mice. Interestingly, Mmp2(-/-) mice expressed greater amounts of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (a target of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2-mediated transcription and rate limiting enzyme in cholesterol and isoprenoids biosynthesis) in addition to markers of inflammation including chemokines of the C-C motif ligand family. We focused on the functionally related genes for sterol regulatory binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, attenuated angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in Mmp2(-/-) and wild-type (Mmp2(+/+)) mice, with Mmp2(-/-) mice showing resistance to cardioprotection by lovastatin. MMP-2 deficiency predisposes to cardiac dysfunction as well as metabolic and inflammatory gene expression dysregulation. This complex phenotype is, at least in part, because of the cardiac sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase pathway being upregulated in MMP-2 deficiency.

  3. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  4. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  5. Work of adhesion and separation between soft elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu

    2015-03-01

    The JKR (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts) method is widely used to measure the work of adhesion between soft materials. In this paper, the JKR theory is summarized and three dimensionless parameters are proposed to design a proper JKR experiment. The work of adhesion and the work of separation between two commonly used soft elastomers PDMS (Sylgard 184) and Ecoflex 0300 are obtained with the measured pull-in and pull-off forces using a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). The effect of crosslinking density and solvent extraction are examined. It is found that the pull-in adhesion stays more or less constant for all contact pairs we measured. While the effect of crosslinking density is not significant for pristine PDMS, it is very obvious that the higher self-adhesion can be found in less crosslinked PDMS after solvent extraction. Such an effect is even more drastic for PDMS-to-Ecoflex adhesion. A unified adhesion mechanism is proposed to explain these complex adhesion behaviors. It is concluded that the chain-matrix interaction is the most effective adhesion mechanism compared to chain-chain or matrix-matrix interactions and the three interactions are exclusive to each other. This work is supported by the NSF CMMI award under Grant No. 1301335.

  6. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  7. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  8. Co元素对硬质合金基底金刚石涂层膜基界面结合强度的影响∗%The Influence of Co binding phase on adhesive strength of diamond coating with cemented carbide substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简小刚; 陈军

    2015-01-01

    Diamond coating has many excellent properties as the same as those of the natural diamond, such as extreme hard-ness, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion coefficient, high chemical stability, and good abrasive resistance, which is considered as the best tool coating material applied to the high-silicon aluminum alloy cutting. We can use the hot filament chemical vapor deposition method (HFCVD) to deposit a 2—20 µm diamond coating on the cemented carbide tool to improve the cutting performance and increase the tool life significantly. Many experiments have proved that the existence of cobalt phase can weaken the adhesive strength of diamond coating. However, we still lack a perfect theory to explain why the Co element can reduce the adhesive strength of diamond coating is still lacking. What we can do now is only to improve the adhesive strength of diamond coating by doing testing many times in experiments. Compared with these traditional experiments, the first principles simulation based on quantum mechanics can describe the microstructure property and electron density of materials. It is successfully used to investigate the surface, interface, electron component, and so on etc. We can also use this method to study the interface problem at an atomic level. So the first principles based upon density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate the influence of cobalt binding phase in cemented carbide substrate on adhesive strength of diamond coating. In this article, we uses Material Studios software to build WC/diamond and WC-Co/diamond interface models to evaluate the influence of cobalt phase on the adhesive strength of diamond coating with CASTEP program which can calculate the most stablest structure of film-substrate interface. We use PBE functional form to obtain the exchange potential and relevant potential, and to solve the self-consistent Kohn-Sham equations. We calculate the interfacial bonding energy, analyse the electron density of

  9. Inhibition of enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, J; Van den Steen, P E; Mine, A; Van Landuyt, K L; Poitevin, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Meerbeek, B

    2009-12-01

    Adhesive procedures activate dentin-associated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and so iatrogenically initiate bond degradation. We hypothesized that adding MMP inhibitors to adhesive primers may prevent this endogenous enzymatic degradation, thereby improving bond durability. A non-specific MMP inhibitor (chlorhexidine) and a MMP-2/9-specific inhibitor (SB-3CT) were admixed to the primers of an etch & rinse and a self-etch adhesive, both considered as gold-standard adhesives within their respective categories. For dentin powder exposed to the adhesives under clinical application conditions, gelatin zymography revealed the release of MMP-2 (not of MMP-9) by the etch & rinse adhesive, while no release of enzymes could be detected for the mild self-etch adhesive, most likely because of its limited dentin demineralization effect. The built-in MMP inhibitors appeared effective in reducing bond degradation only for the etch & rinse adhesive, and not for the self-etch adhesive. Water sorption of adhesive interfaces most likely remains the principal mechanism of bond degradation, while endogenous enzymes appear to contribute to bond degradation of only etch & rinse adhesives.

  10. The Adhesion Modulating Properties of Tenascin-W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Brellier, Enrico Martina, Matthias Chiquet, Jacqueline Ferralli, Michael van der Heyden, Gertraud Orend, Johannes C. Schittny, Ruth Chiquet-Ehrismann, Richard P. Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenascins are extracellular matrix glycoproteins associated with cell motility, proliferation and differentiation. Tenascin-C inhibits cell spreading by binding to fibronectin; tenascin-R and tenascin-X also have anti-adhesive properties in vitro. Here we have studied the adhesion modulating properties of the most recently characterized tenascin, tenascin-W. C2C12 cells, a murine myoblast cell line, will form broad lamellipodia with stress fibers and focal adhesion complexes after culture on fibronectin. In contrast, C2C12 cells cultured on tenascin-W fail to spread and form stress fibers or focal adhesion complexes, and instead acquire a multipolar shape with short, actin-tipped pseudopodia. The same stellate morphology is observed when C2C12 cells are cultured on a mixture of fibronectin and tenascin-W, or on fibronectin in the presence of soluble tenascin-W. Tenascin-W combined with fibronectin also inhibits the spreading of mouse embryo fibroblasts when compared with cells cultured on fibronectin alone. The similarity between the adhesion modulating effects of tenascin-W and tenascin-C in vitro led us to study the possibility of tenascin-W compensating for tenascin-C in tenascin-C knockout mice, especially during epidermal wound healing. Dermal fibroblasts harvested from a tenascin-C knockout mouse express tenascin-W, but dermal fibroblasts taken from a wild type mouse do not. However, there is no upregulation of tenascin-W in the dermis of tenascin-C knockout mice, or in the granulation tissue of skin wounds in tenascin-C knockout animals. Similarly, tenascin-X is not upregulated in early wound granulation tissue in the tenascin-C knockout mice. Thus, tenascin-W is able to inhibit cell spreading in vitro and it is upregulated in dermal fibroblasts taken from the tenascin-C knockout mouse, but neither it nor tenascin-X are likely to compensate for missing tenascin-C during wound healing.

  11. Understanding adhesive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This review paper firstly provides an outline of the development of resin-based adhesives. A simple classification method is described based on whether an acid etching agent requiring a washing and drying step is used. These systems are called etch and rinse systems. The other adhesives that do not have the washing and drying steps are referred to as self-etching adhesives. The advantages and disadvantages of these groups of adhesives are discussed. Methods of adhering to the tooth surface are provided, especially where the resin-based adhesive reliability is difficult to control.

  12. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  13. Upregulation of miR-328 and inhibition of CREB-DNA-binding activity are critical for resveratrol-mediated suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and subsequent metastatic ability in human osteosarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Hsiao, Michael; Hsieh, Feng-Koo; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcomas, the most common malignant bone tumors, show a potent capacity for local invasion and pulmonary metastasis. Resveratrol (RESV), a phytochemical, exhibits multiple tumor-suppressing activities and has been tested in clinical trials. However, the antitumor activities of RESV in osteosarcomas are not yet completely defined. In osteosarcoma cells, we found that RESV inhibited the migration/invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. We identified that RESV exhibited a transcriptional inhibitory effect on MMP-2 through reducing CREB-DNA-binding activity. Moreover, a microRNA (miR) analysis showed that miR-328 was predominantly upregulated after RESV treatment. Inhibition of miR-328 significantly relieved MMP-2 and motility suppression imposed by RESV treatment. Furthermore, ectopic miR-328 expression in highly invasive cells decreased MMP-2 expression and invasive abilities. Mechanistic investigations found that JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were involved in RESV-regulated CREB-DNA-binding activity, miR328 expression, and cell motility. Clinical samples indicated inverse expression between MMP-2 and miR-328 in normal bone and osteosarcoma tissues. The inverse correlation of MMP-2 and miR-328 was also observed in tumor specimens, and MMP-2 expression was linked to tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the role of RESV-induced molecular and epigenetic regulation in suppressing tumor metastasis. PMID:25605016

  14. Analysis of metal-binding proteins separated by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J Susanne; Mounicou, Sandra; Zoriy, Miroslav V; Becker, J Sabine; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2008-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) have become established as very efficient and sensitive biopolymer and elemental mass spectrometric techniques for studying metal-binding proteins (metalloproteins) in life sciences. Protein complexes present in rat tissues (liver and kidney) were separated in their native state in the first dimension by blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Essential and toxic metals, such as zinc, copper, iron, nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead, were detected by scanning the gel bands using quadrupole LA-ICP-MS with and without collision cell as a microanalytical technique. Several proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-MS together with a database search. For example, on one protein band cut from the BN-PAGE gel and digested with the enzyme trypsin, two different proteins - protein FAM44B and cathepsin B precursor - were identified. By combining biomolecular and elemental mass spectrometry, it was possible to characterize and identify selected metal-binding rat liver and kidney tissue proteins.

  15. Nanomechanical Contribution of Collagen and von Willebrand Factor A in Marine Underwater Adhesion and Its Implication for Collagen Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hee Young; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Foo, Mathias; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-03-14

    Recent works on mussel adhesion have identified a load bearing matrix protein (PTMP1) containing von Willebrand factor (vWF) with collagen binding capability that contributes to the mussel holdfast by manipulating mussel collagens. Using a surface forces apparatus, we investigate for the first time, the nanomechanical properties of vWF-collagen interaction using homologous proteins of mussel byssus, PTMP1 and preCollagens (preCols), as collagen. Mimicking conditions similar to mussel byssus secretion (pH < 5.0) and seawater condition (pH 8.0), PTMP1 and preCol interact weakly in the "positioning" phase based on vWF-collagen binding and strengthen in "locked" phase due to the combined effects of electrostatic attraction, metal binding, and mechanical shearing. The progressive enhancement of binding between PTMP1 with porcine collagen under the aforementioned conditions is also observed. The binding mechanisms of PTMP1-preCols provide insights into the molecular interaction of the mammalian collagen system and the development of an artificial extracellular matrix based on collagens.

  16. Microtubule-dependent modulation of adhesion complex composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel H J; Humphries, Jonathan D; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angélique; Humphries, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule network regulates the turnover of integrin-containing adhesion complexes to stimulate cell migration. Disruption of the microtubule network results in an enlargement of adhesion complex size due to increased RhoA-stimulated actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of adhesion complex turnover; however, the microtubule-dependent changes in adhesion complex composition have not been studied in a global, unbiased manner. Here we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine adhesion complex changes that occur upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole. Nocodazole-treated cells displayed an increased abundance of the majority of known adhesion complex components, but no change in the levels of the fibronectin-binding α5β1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed these findings, but revealed a change in localisation of adhesion complex components. Specifically, in untreated cells, α5-integrin co-localised with vinculin at peripherally located focal adhesions and with tensin at centrally located fibrillar adhesions. In nocodazole-treated cells, however, α5-integrin was found in both peripherally located and centrally located adhesion complexes that contained both vinculin and tensin, suggesting a switch in the maturation state of adhesion complexes to favour focal adhesions. Moreover, the switch to focal adhesions was confirmed to be force-dependent as inhibition of cell contractility with the Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, prevented the nocodazole-induced conversion. These results highlight a complex interplay between the microtubule cytoskeleton, adhesion complex maturation state and intracellular contractile force, and provide a resource for future adhesion signaling studies. The proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001183.

  17. Pathogenesis of Intra-abdominal and pelvic adhesion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imudia, Anthony N; Kumar, Sanjeev; Saed, Ghassan M; Diamond, Michael P

    2008-07-01

    Abdominal and pelvic adhesions are a frequent occurrence and are responsible for significant morbidity resulting in abdominal and pelvic pain, infertility, and small bowel obstruction. The process of adhesion development begins when damage to peritoneal surfaces from any source (operative trauma, infection, foreign bodies, desiccation, irradiation, allergic reaction, or chemical injury) induces a series of biochemical/molecular biologic cascades involving different elements. These elements include peritoneal fluid, neutrophils, leukocytes, macrophages, cytokines, mesothelial cells, and tissue and coagulation factors, which teleologically have the intention of peritoneal repair; however, these processes also result in adhesion development. Major pathways that play significant roles in the healing process of peritoneal damage leading to adhesion development are the fibrinolytic system, extracellular matrix deposition, growth factor and cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, angiogenesis, apoptosis and proliferation, and remesothelialization. Greater understanding of the regulation and interaction of these processes provides the potential for reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

  18. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  19. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  20. The zebrafish galectins Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 bind in vitro to the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein and reduce viral adhesion to fish epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Mancini, Justin; Feng, Chiguang; González-Montalbán, Núria; Ravindran, Chinnarajan; Jackson, Shawn; de las Heras-Sánchez, Ana; Giomarelli, Barbara; Ahmed, Hafiz; Haslam, Stuart M; Wu, Gang; Dell, Anne; Ammayappan, Arun; Vakharia, Vikram N; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2016-02-01

    The infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV; Rhabdoviridae, Novirhabdovirus) infects teleost fish, such as salmon and trout, and is responsible for significant losses in the aquaculture industry and in wild fish populations. Although IHNV enters the host through the skin at the base of the fins, the viral adhesion and entry mechanisms are not fully understood. In recent years, evidence has accumulated in support of the key roles played by protein-carbohydrate interactions between host lectins secreted to the extracellular space and virion envelope glycoproteins in modulating viral adhesion and infectivity. In this study, we assessed in vitro the potential role(s) of zebrafish (Danio rerio) proto type galectin-1 (Drgal1-L2) and a chimera galectin-3 (Drgal3-L1) in IHNV adhesion to epithelial cells. Our results suggest that the extracellular Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 interact directly and in a carbohydrate-dependent manner with the IHNV glycosylated envelope and glycans on the epithelial cell surface, significantly reducing viral adhesion.

  1. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interfac...

  2. 阿司匹林和氯吡格雷对体外血小板黏附内皮细胞基质活性的影响及其机制研究%Ettects ot Aspirin and Clopidogrel on the Adhesion Activity ot Platelet to Endothelial Cell Matrix in Vitro and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晋坤; 毛华; 尹扬光; 董文; 杜峰; 鲁玉明; 熊宗华; 邓梦扬

    2015-01-01

    200μl 血小板黏附内皮细胞基质活性分别低于对照组、阿司匹林组和氯吡格雷组(P ﹤0.05)。蛋白质免疫印迹法显示,阿司匹林和氯吡格雷均能抑制由 ox - LDL 引起的 TM 表达的减少。ox - LDL 能明显诱导血管内皮细胞 LOX -1表达,阿司匹林能明显抑制由 ox - LDL 引起的 LOX -1和 IL -6的表达;而氯吡格雷则能明显抑制内皮细胞 CD40的表达。结论阿司匹林和氯吡格雷均能从上调 TM 和抑制炎性因子两方面降低血小板对内皮细胞基质的黏附作用。但两者联合更能抑制由 ox - LDL引起的炎性因子的表达,降低血小板对内皮细胞基质的黏附。%Objective To study the effects of aspirin and clopidogrel on the adhesion activity of platelet to endothelial cell matrix in vitro and its mechanism, and to find the reasons why combination use of two drugs is better than monotherapy. Methods A total of 42 healthy female SD rats were bought from the animal centre of Third Military Medical University. By using random number table method,SD rats were divided into aspirin group(8 rats),clopidogrel group(8 rats),aspirin and clopidogrel(combination)group(8 rats),control group(8 rats),the other 10 rats were used for primary isolation and culture of cells. The isolated and cultured primary rat vascular endothelial cells were treated with ox - LDL to establish damaged vascular endothelial cell model. 100 mg/ kg aspirin,10 mg/ kg clopidogrel,combination of 100 mg/ kg aspirin and 10 mg/ kg clopidogrel,and 200 μl castor oil were used respectively to prepare endothelial cell matrix plate. 3 days before the separation and preparation of platelet from plasma,rats in aspirin group were fed with 100 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 aspirin,rats in clopidogrel group were fed with 10 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 clopidogrel,rats in aspirin and clopidogrel group were fed with 100 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 aspirin and 10 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 clopidogrel,rats in control group were fed with

  3. Adhesion of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Spores to Phaseolus vulgaris Hypocotyls and to Polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D H; Kauss, H

    1984-04-01

    Adhesion of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum spores to Phaseolus vulgaris hypocotyls and to polystyrene was inhibited by the respiratory inhibitors sodium azide and antimycin A, indicating a requirement for metabolic activity in adhesion. Various commercial proteins and Tween 80 also reduced adhesion to both surfaces. Binding was enhanced by the presence of salts: sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium chlorides were equally effective. The removal of surface wax from hypocotyls by chloroform treatment greatly reduced their subsequent ability to bind spores. The results suggest a similar mechanism for spore adhesion to the plant surface and to polystyrene, involving purely physical surface properties rather than group-specific binding sites.

  4. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  5. Structural Insight into the Mechanisms of Targeting and Signaling of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase whose focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain interacts with other focal adhesion molecules in integrin-mediated signaling. Localization of activated FAK to focal adhesions is indispensable for its function. Here we describe a solution structure of the FAT domain bound to a peptide derived from paxillin, a FAK-binding partner. The FAT domain is composed of four helices that form a “right-turn” elongated bundle; the globular fold is ma...

  6. Cell adhesion and polarisation on molecularly defined spacing gradient surfaces of cyclic RGDfK peptide patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Arnold, Marco; Cavalcanti-Adam, Ada; López-García, Mónica; Kessler, Horst; Spatz, Joachim P

    2008-09-01

    In vivo cell migration and location are orchestrally guided by soluble and bound chemical gradients. Here, gradients of extracellular matrix molecules are formed synthetically by the combination of a surface nanopatterning technique called block copolymer nanolithography (BCN) and a biofunctionalisation technique. A modified substrate dip-coating process of BCN allows for the formation of precise molecular gradients of cyclic RGDfK peptide patches at interfaces, which are presented to cells for testing cell adhesion and polarisation. Surfaces formed by BCN consist of hexagonally ordered gold dot patterns with a gradient in particle spacing. Each dot serves as a chemical anchor for the binding of cyclic RGDfK peptides, which are specifically recognised by alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. Due to steric hindrance only up to one integrin binds to one functionalised gold dot which forms a peptide patch spacing. We demonstrate how cell morphology, adhesion area, actin and vinculin distribution as well as cell body polarisation are influenced by the peptide patch spacing gradient. As a consequence, these gradients of adhesive ligands induce cell orientation towards smaller particle spacing when the gradient strength is 15nm/mm at least. This implicates that an adherent cell's sensitivity to differentiate between ligand patch spacing is approximately 1nm across the cell body.

  7. Heparanase facilitates cell adhesion and spreading by clustering of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flonia Levy-Adam

    Full Text Available Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys(158-Asp(171, termed KKDC was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity.

  8. IPP Complex Reinforces Adhesion by Relaying Tension-Dependent Signals to Inhibit Integrin Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina M. Vakaloglou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton-mediated forces regulate the assembly and function of integrin adhesions; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The tripartite IPP complex, comprising ILK, Parvin, and PINCH, mediates the integrin-actin link at Drosophila embryo muscle attachment sites (MASs. Here, we demonstrate a developmentally earlier function for the IPP complex: to reinforce integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM adhesion in response to tension. In IPP-complex mutants, the integrin-ECM linkage at MASs breaks in response to intense muscle contractility. Mechanistically, the IPP complex is required to relay force-elicited signals that decelerate integrin turnover at the plasma membrane so that the integrin immobile fraction is adequate to withstand tension. Epistasis analysis shows that alleviation of muscle contractility, downregulation of endocytosis, and enhanced integrin binding to the ECM are sufficient to restore integrin-ECM adhesion and maintain integrin-adhesome organization in IPP-complex mutants. Our findings reveal a role for the IPP complex as an essential mechanosensitive regulatory switch of integrin turnover in vivo.

  9. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  10. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  11. More automation, more adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Jens-Peter

    2012-07-01

    Although aluminium has become established as an absorber plate material, it is still seldom used for piping. Moreover, adhesive processes are becoming increasingly important in collector production. (orig.)

  12. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  13. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  14. Surface displaced alfa-enolase of Lactobacillus plantarum is a fibronectin binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Vastano, Valeria; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Candela, Marco; Vici, Manuela; Muscariello, Lidia; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are one of the most important health promoting groups of the human intestinal microbiota. Their protective role within the gut consists in out competing invading pathogens for ecological niches and metabolic substrates. Among the features necessary to provide health benefits, commensal microorganisms must have the ability to adhere to human intestinal cells and consequently to colonize the gut. Studies on mechanisms mediating adhesion of lactobacilli to human intestinal cells showed that factors involved in the interaction vary mostly among different species and strains, mainly regarding interaction between bacterial adhesins and extracellular matrix or mucus proteins. We have investigated the adhesive properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, a member of the human microbiota of healthy individuals. Results We show the identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum LM3 cell surface protein (48 kDa), which specifically binds to human fibronectin (Fn), an extracellular matrix protein. By means of mass spectrometric analysis this protein was identified as the product of the L. plantarum enoA1 gene, coding the EnoA1 alfa-enolase. Surface localization of EnoA1 was proved by immune electron microscopy. In the mutant strain LM3-CC1, carrying the enoA1 null mutation, the 48 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable neither by anti-enolase Western blot nor by Fn-overlay immunoblotting assay. Moreover, by an adhesion assay we show that LM3-CC1 cells bind to fibronectin-coated surfaces less efficiently than wild type cells, thus demonstrating the significance of the surface displaced EnoA1 protein for the L. plantarum LM3 adhesion to fibronectin. Conclusion Adhesion to host tissues represents a crucial early step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensal bacteria. We demonstrated the involvement of the L. plantarum Eno A1 alfa-enolase in Fn-binding, by studying LM3 and LM3-CC1 surface

  15. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  16. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III (.,; )

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  17. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu Ying; Tu Qiufen; Huang Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  18. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  19. Instant acting adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  20. The right motifs for plant cell adhesion: what makes an adhesive site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Markus; Weber, Wadim; Babel, Laura; Grunewald, Miriam; Meckel, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Cells of multicellular organisms are surrounded by and attached to a matrix of fibrous polysaccharides and proteins known as the extracellular matrix. This fibrous network not only serves as a structural support to cells and tissues but also plays an integral part in the process as important as proliferation, differentiation, or defense. While at first sight, the extracellular matrices of plant and animals do not have much in common, a closer look reveals remarkable similarities. In particular, the proteins involved in the adhesion of the cell to the extracellular matrix share many functional properties. At the sequence level, however, a surprising lack of homology is found between adhesion-related proteins of plants and animals. Both protein machineries only reveal similarities between small subdomains and motifs, which further underlines their functional relationship. In this review, we provide an overview on the similarities between motifs in proteins known to be located at the plant cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton interface to proteins of the animal adhesome. We also show that by comparing the proteome of both adhesion machineries at the level of motifs, we are also able to identify potentially new candidate proteins that functionally contribute to the adhesion of the plant plasma membrane to the cell wall.

  1. Improving adhesion of seasonings to crackers with hydrocolloid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matthew E; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2013-11-01

    Food powders were applied on crackers that had been coated using water, oil, emulsion, sucrose, or hydrocolloid solutions. The hydrocolloids that were used include gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan, methylcellulose, gum karaya, gum tragacanth, gum arabic, guar gum, modified starch, and maltodextrin. Solutions of similar hydrophobicity to the powder gave the greatest adhesion. NaCl, barbecue (BBQ), ranch, and sour cream & onion (SC&O) seasoning showed greatest adhesion with water, cheese powder with an emulsion of 12.5% to 25% oil, and cocoa powder with oil. For NaCl, BBQ, ranch, and SC&O seasoning, hydrocolloids improved the adhesion over using water alone, with gellan gum providing the greatest adhesion. Hydrocolloid structural differences, including the presence or absence of branching, substitution of sugar units, and molecular weight affect water binding and thickening of the hydrocolloid spray that seemed to be significant factors affecting adhesion of powders to the target surface. For cheese powder, hydrocolloids were capable of replacing the oil within an emulsion while improving or maintaining the same level of adhesion, with gum arabic providing the greatest adhesion. For cocoa powder, hydrocolloid solutions were ineffective adhesives due to differences in hydrophilicity that result in insolubility. The effect of hydrocolloid concentration on adhesion was dependent both on the hydrocolloid type and the concentration that is sprayable, with 0.5% being the optimum concentration for most gums. Adhesion using sucrose solutions was determined by particle size and relative hydrophobicity. Increasing sucrose concentration decreased adhesion of smaller particles, but increased adhesion of larger particles. Adhesion of NaCl significantly increased with decreasing NaCl size using oil, water, and sucrose solutions.

  2. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  4. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the constrained factorization problems of sparse principal components analysis (PCA) for gene expression modeling, low-rank matrix completion for recommender systems, and robust matrix factorization for video surveillance, this dissertation explores the modeling, methodology, and theory of matrix factorization.We begin by exposing the theoretical and empirical shortcomings of standard deflation techniques for sparse PCA and developing alternative methodology more suitable for def...

  5. An easily accessible sulfated saccharide mimetic inhibits in vitro human tumor cell adhesion and angiogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Marano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides aberrantly expressed on tumor cells influence processes such as cell adhesion and modulation of the cell’s microenvironment resulting in an increased malignancy. Schmidt’s imidate strategy offers an effective method to synthesize libraries of various oligosaccharide mimetics. With the aim to perturb interactions of tumor cells with extracellular matrix proteins and host cells, molecules with 3,4-bis(hydroxymethylfuran as core structure were synthesized and screened in biological assays for their abilities to interfere in cell adhesion and other steps of the metastatic cascade, such as tumor-induced angiogenesis.The most active compound, (4-{[(β-D-galactopyranosyloxy]methyl}furan-3-ylmethyl hydrogen sulfate (GSF, inhibited the activation of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 as well as migration of the human melanoma cells of the lines WM-115 and WM-266-4 in a two-dimensional migration assay. GSF inhibited completely the adhesion of WM-115 cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, fibrinogen and fibronectin.In an in vitro angiogenesis assay with human endothelial cells, GSF very effectively inhibited endothelial tubule formation and sprouting of blood vessels, as well as the adhesion of endothelial cells to ECM proteins. GSF was not cytotoxic at biologically active concentrations; neither were 3,4-bis{[(β-D-galactopyranosyloxy]methyl}furan (BGF nor methyl β-D-galactopyranoside nor 3,4-bis(hydroxymethylfuran, which were used as controls, eliciting comparable biological activity. In silico modeling experiments, in which binding of GSF to the extracellular domain of the integrin αvβ3 was determined, revealed specific docking of GSF to the same binding site as the natural peptidic ligands of this integrin. The sulfate in the molecule coordinated with one manganese ion in the binding site.These studies show that this chemically easily accessible molecule GSF, synthesized in three steps from 3,4-bis

  6. Design and characterization of artificial extracellular matrix proteins for use as small-diameter vascular grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    Synthetic small-diameter vascular grafts often fail within three years of implantation. The underlying causes of graft failure are thought to be (i) a mismatch in the mechanical properties between the graft and host material and (ii) an inability of the graft to support the adhesion of endothelial cells. To address these two issues, artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins contain elastin-like regions to provide physical integrity and cell-binding domains derived from fibronectin to promote endothelial cell attachment. Using recombinant protein technology, a family of artificial proteins was created with differing ratios of elastin-like regions to cell-binding domains, with variable placement of amino acid crosslinking residues, and with differing identity of cell-binding domain. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) adhere in a sequence-specific manner to aECM proteins, secrete basal levels of key fibrinolytic regulators, and are capable of resisting a physiologically relevant detachment force. HUVEC spread more quickly and adhere more firmly to aECM proteins that contain the RGD versus the CS5 cell-binding domain. Decreasing the density of RGD cell-binding domains results in decreased HUVEC adhesion. Furthermore, amino acid selection even at sites up to 16 residues away from the cell-binding domain impacts HUVEC spreading and adhesion. HUVEC also adhere more strongly to stiffer aECM films. Therefore, the identity, density, and context of the cell-binding domain as well as the elastic modulus of the substrate are all important variables in influencing cell-substrate interactions. Proper amino acid sequence choice also influences the susceptibility of aECM proteins to elastase proteolysis; modifying 3% of the amino acid side chains results in a 7-fold reduction in degradation rate. An alternative strategy to decrease degradation involves incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, 5,5,5-trifluoroisoleucine, into the favored proteolytic cut site

  7. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (psepsis.

  8. Spatiotemporal Constraints on the Force-Dependent Growth of Focal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Jonathan; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Oakes, Patrick W.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are the predominant mechanism by which cells mechanically couple to and exert traction forces on their extracellular matrix (ECM). It is widely presumed that FA size is modulated by force to mediate changes in adhesion strength at different levels of cellular tension. However, previous studies seeking correlations between force and FA morphology have yielded variable and often conflicting results. Here we show that a strong correlation between adhesion size and traction force exists only during the initial stages of myosin-mediated adhesion maturation and growth. For mature adhesions, no correlation between traction stress and size is observed. Rather, the tension that is sustained at mature adhesions is more strongly influenced by proximity to the cell edge, with peripheral adhesions transmitting higher tension than adhesions near the cell center. Finally, we show that mature adhesions can withstand sixfold increases in tension without changes in size. Thus, although a strong correlation between adhesion size and mechanical tension is observed during the initial stages of myosin-mediated adhesion maturation, no correlation is observed in mature, elongated adhesions. This work places spatiotemporal constraints on the force-dependent growth of adhesions and provides insight into the mechanical regulation of cell-ECM adhesion. PMID:21689521

  9. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    The formation of appropriate neuronal circuits is an essential part of nervous system development and relies heavily on the outgrowth of axons and dendrites and their guidance to their respective targets. This process is governed by a large array of molecules, including glial cell line......-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the interaction of which induce neurite outgrowth. In the present study the requirements for NCAM-mediated GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth were investigated in cultures of hippocampal neurons, which do not express Ret. We demonstrate...

  10. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Anja; Jørgensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE...... genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically...

  11. Mode i testing of adhesive joints: Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noekkentved, A. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-07-01

    The J integral approach for adhesive bonded joints is particularly attractive for modelling failure process zones. The J integral can be established by a general approach and experimental measurements. By this method, the cohesive law of the adhesive in question can be obtained. Polymer joints with different mechanical properties and geometries are considered in order to study the effect of plasticity within the bond of ductile adhesives, since this can enhance their fracture toughness. The cohesive laws established will be implemented in numerical models - more in part 2. The objective of the project is to establish and demonstrate methods for modelling the mechanical behaviour of adhesively bonded joints in polymer matrix composite materials. Fracture mechanics will assist to establish the relevant framework for their mechanical performance. The main results from this study are expected to be part in a set of recommendations regarding production parameters, design, inspection and control of adhesively bonded joints. (au)

  12. New adhesives and bonding techniques. Why and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Nicola; Cavalli, Giovanni; Gagliani, Massimo; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, adhesive dentistry is a fundamental part of daily clinical work. The evolution of adhesive materials and techniques has been based on the need for simplicity in the step-by-step procedures to obtain long-lasting direct and indirect restorations. For this reason, recently introduced universal multimode adhesives represent a simple option for creating a hybrid layer, with or without the use of phosphoric acid application. However, it is important to understand the limitations of this latest generation of adhesive systems as well as how to use them on coronal and radicular dentin. Based on the findings in the literature, universal multimode adhesives have shown promising results, even if the problem of hybrid layer degradation due to the hydrolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) still exists. Studies are therefore required to help us understand how to reduce this degradation.

  13. Drosophila neurotactin mediates heterophilic cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthalay, Y; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R; de la Escalera, S; Jiménez, F; Piovant, M

    1990-01-01

    Neurotactin is a 135 kd membrane glycoprotein which consists of a core protein, with an apparent molecular weight of 120 kd, and of N-linked oligosaccharides. In vivo, the protein can be phosphorylated in presence of radioactive orthophosphate. Neurotactin expression in the larval CNS and in primary embryonic cell cultures suggests that it behaves as a contact molecule between neurons or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy studies reveal that neurotactin is uniformly expressed along the areas of contacts between cells, without, however, being restricted to a particular type of junction. It putative adhesive properties have been tested by transfecting non adhesive Drosophila S2 cells with neurotactin cDNA. Heat shocked transfected cells do not aggregate, suggesting that neurotactin does not mediate homophilic cell adhesion. However, these transfected cells bind to a subpopulation of embryonic cells which probably possess a related ligand. The location at cellular junctions between specific neurons or epithelial cells, the heterophilic binding to a putative ligand and the ability to be phosphorylated are consistent with the suggestion that neurotactin functions as an adhesion molecule. Images Fig.1 Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.4 Fig.5 PMID:2120048

  14. Understanding the molecular basis for differential binding of integrins to collagen and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Muhammad H

    2007-01-15

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion plays a central role in cell migration and signaling. Overexpression of integrins is also associated with cancer invasion and metastasis. Although a number of problems in integrin-matrix interactions have been studied in detail, the molecular specificity, which increases integrin adhesion to native collagen but results in poor integrin-gelatin interaction, is not understood. In this report, we study the role of individual amino acids in integrin-collagen and integrin-gelatin interactions using long-term (>100 ns) molecular simulations. The results, which are force-field independent, show that denatured collagen induces helical conformations in integrin amino acids and significantly reduces the poly-proline II content, which stabilizes the integrin-collagen interactions. Our simulations provide a possible explanation of the molecular specificity in integrin binding and suggest new targets for regulating integrin-mediated invasion and metastasis.

  15. Changes in the adhesive phenotype of regional lymphocytes in rats with adjuvant arthritis: alteration by cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altankov, G; Marinova-Mutafchieva, L; Nikolaeva, N; Penkova, R

    1991-05-01

    A quantitative spectrophotometrical method was used to study the adhesive phenotype of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes of rats with early stage adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA), pretreated or not with cyclophosphamide (CY). The results showed that adhesion of lymphocytes from AA-sensitized lymph nodes to gelatin and collagens (type I, II, III and IV) was enhanced, especially to collagen type II. However, adhesion to fibronectin and to fibrinogen did not differ from adhesion in nontreated rats. Application of CY was found to aggravate AA development and influence the lymphocytes' adhesiveness. Adhesion was inhibited in all cases except to fibrinogen, where it was augmented, compared to the adhesion in both AA and control groups. Relationships between the lymphocyte adhesive phenotype and the expression of histological changes suggest that lymphocyte-matrix interactions could play an important role in the pathogenesis of AA development and the mechanism of CY action.

  16. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  17. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  18. The Role of the Composition of Adhesive Systems on Adhesive System-Tooth Surface Adhesion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeliz GÜVEN; Oya AKTÖREN

    2014-01-01

    .... Keeping an updated knowledge of the composition, characteristics and mechanisms of adhesion of the currently available adhesive systems as well as knowing how the dental substrates interact with...

  19. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  20. The talin head domain reinforces integrin-mediated adhesion by promoting adhesion complex stability and clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Ellis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development.

  1. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the cadherin cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, C

    1992-04-17

    Differential adhesion between embryonic cells has been proposed to be mediated by a family of closely related glycoproteins called the cadherins. The cadherins mediate adhesion in part through an interaction between the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and intracellular proteins, called the catenins. To determine whether these interactions could regulate cadherin function in embryos, a form of N-cadherin was generated that lacks an extracellular domain. Expression of this mutant in Xenopus embryos causes a dramatic inhibition of cell adhesion. Analysis of the mutant phenotype shows that at least two regions of the N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain can inhibit adhesion and that the mutant cadherin can inhibit catenin binding to E-cadherin. These results suggest that cadherin-mediated adhesion can be regulated by cytoplasmic interactions and that this regulation may contribute to morphogenesis when emerging tissues coexpress several cadherin types.

  2. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  3. Prediction of glycolipid-binding domains from the amino acid sequence of lipid raft-associated proteins: application to HpaA, a protein involved in the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastrointestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Jacques; Garmy, Nicolas; Yahi, Nouara

    2006-09-12

    Protein-glycolipid interactions mediate the attachment of various pathogens to the host cell surface as well as the association of numerous cellular proteins with lipid rafts. Thus, it is of primary importance to identify the protein domains involved in glycolipid recognition. Using structure similarity searches, we could identify a common glycolipid-binding domain in the three-dimensional structure of several proteins known to interact with lipid rafts. Yet the three-dimensional structure of most raft-targeted proteins is still unknown. In the present study, we have identified a glycolipid-binding domain in the amino acid sequence of a bacterial adhesin (Helicobacter pylori adhesin A, HpaA). The prediction was based on the major properties of the glycolipid-binding domains previously characterized by structural searches. A short (15-mer) synthetic peptide corresponding to this putative glycolipid-binding domain was synthesized, and we studied its interaction with glycolipid monolayers at the air-water interface. The synthetic HpaA peptide recognized LacCer but not Gb3. This glycolipid specificity was in line with that of the whole bacterium. Molecular modeling studies gave some insights into this high selectivity of interaction. It also suggested that Phe147 in HpaA played a key role in LacCer recognition, through sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions with the hydrophobic side of the galactose ring of LacCer. Correspondingly, the replacement of Phe147 with Ala strongly affected LacCer recognition, whereas substitution with Trp did not. Our method could be used to identify glycolipid-binding domains in microbial and cellular proteins interacting with lipid shells, rafts, and other specialized membrane microdomains.

  4. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  5. Adhesion to porcelain and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotti, Raymond L

    2007-04-01

    Some compelling clinical benefits of porcelain and metal adhesion are presented. Current concepts for metal adhesion are reviewed, including modifications of metal surface and resin chemistry. Porcelain adhesion is reviewed, including little-known methods that use silane but no hydrofluoric acid etching. Clinical protocols for use of metal and porcelain adhesives are presented.

  6. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  7. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  8. Adhesion of Escherichia coli under flow conditions reveals potential novel effects of FimH mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feenstra, T.; Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane; Wieser, E.

    2017-01-01

    H mutations on bacterial adhesion using a novel adhesion assay, which models the physiological flow conditions bacteria are exposed to. We introduced 12 different point mutations in the mannose binding pocket of FimH in an E. coli strain expressing type 1 fimbriae only (MSC95-FimH). We compared the bacterial...... mutations abrogated adhesion. We demonstrated that FimH residues E50 and T53 are crucial for adhesion under flow conditions. The coating of endothelial cells on biochips and modelling of physiological flow conditions enabled us to identify FimH residues crucial for adhesion. These results provide novel...

  9. Identification of collagen encapsulation at the dentin/adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Katz, J Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dentin/adhesive interfacial characteristics of three current commercial adhesives with different relative hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, using a nondestructive staining technique. Dentin surfaces of 18 unerupted human third molars were randomly selected for treatment with one of three commercial dentin bonding agents according to manufacturers' instructions for the "wet" bonding technique. The adhesives were ranked based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic component ratios (ie, ability to dissolve in water), highest to lowest, as follows: Uno (Pulpdent) > Prime&Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply Caulk) > Single Bond (SB, 3M ESPE). Dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface sections were stained with Goldner's trichrome, a classical bone stain, and examined using light microscopy. The extent and degree to which the adhesive encapsulates the demineralized dentin matrix is reflected in the color differences in the stained sections. The depth of demineralization appeared comparable among these bonding systems, but adhesive infiltration varied from highest to lowest as follows: Uno > PBNT > SB. The differential staining technique provided a clear representation of the depth of dentin demineralization and extent/degree of adhesive encapsulation of the exposed collagen at the d/a interface. This technique provides a mechanism for readily identifying vulnerable sites at the d/a interface. The composition of the one-bottle adhesive systems has a substantial effect on the interfacial structure of the d/a bond.

  10. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  11. pH Responsive and Oxidation Resistant Wet Adhesive based on Reversible Catechol-Boronate Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkar, Ameya R; Barker, Brett; Clisch, Matthew; Jiang, Jingfeng; Lee, Bruce P

    2016-08-09

    A smart adhesive capable of binding to a wetted surface was prepared by copolymerizing dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) and 3-acrylamido phenylboronic acid (AAPBA). pH was used to control the oxidation state and the adhesive property of the catechol side chain of DMA and to trigger the catechol-boronate complexation. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the complex at pH 9, which was not present at pH 3. The formation of the catechol-boronate complex increased the cross-linking density of the adhesive network. Most notably, the loss modulus values of the adhesive were more than an order of magnitude higher for adhesive incubated at pH 9 when compared to those measured at pH 3. This drastic increase in the viscous dissipation property is attributed to the introduction of reversible complexation into the adhesive network. Based on the Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics test, adhesive containing both DMA and AAPBA demonstrated strong interfacial binding properties (work of adhesion (Wadh) = 2000 mJ/m(2)) to borosilicate glass wetted with an acidic solution (pH 3). When the pH was increased to 9, Wadh values (180 mJ/m(2)) decreased by more than an order of magnitude. During successive contact cycles, the adhesive demonstrated the capability to transition reversibly between its adhesive and nonadhesive states with changing pH. Adhesive containing only DMA responded slowly to repeated changes in pH and became progressively oxidized without the protection of boronic acid. Although adhesive containing only AAPBA also demonstrated strong wet adhesion (Wadh ∼ 500 mJ/m(2)), its adhesive properties were not pH responsive. Both DMA and AAPBA are required to fabricate a smart adhesive with tunable and reversible adhesive properties.

  12. The N-terminal part of Als1 protein from Candida albicans specifically binds fucose-containing glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Dagmara S; Ielasi, Francesco S; Goossens, Katty V Y; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2011-06-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans expresses on its surface Als (Agglutinin like sequence) proteins, which play an important role in the adhesion to host cells and in the development of candidiasis. The binding specificity of these proteins is broad, as they can bind to various mammalian proteins, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and N- and E-cadherins. The N-terminal part of Als proteins constitutes the substrate-specific binding domain and is responsible for attachment to epithelial and endothelial cells. We have used glycan array screening to identify possible glycan receptors for the binding domain of Als1p-N. Under those conditions, Als1p-N binds specifically to fucose-containing glycans, which adds a lectin function to the functional diversity of the Als1 protein. The binding between Als1p-N and BSA-fucose glycoconjugate was quantitatively characterized using surface plasmon resonance, which demonstrated a weak millimolar affinity between Als1p-N and fucose. Furthermore, we have also quantified the affinity of Als1p-N to the extracellular matrix proteins proteins fibronectin and laminin, which is situated in the micromolar range. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of Als1p-N-Als1p-N interaction was in the micromolar affinity range.

  13. Adhesive polypeptides of Staphylococcus aureus identified using a novel secretion library technique in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Liisa

    2011-05-01

    surface plasmon resonance analysis. Conclusions A new technique for identification of unknown bacterial adhesive polypeptides was constructed. Application of the method on S. aureus allowed us to identify three known adhesins and in addition, five new polypeptides binding to human plasma and extracellular matrix proteins. The method, here used on S. aureus, is convenient due to the use of soluble proteins from the growth medium and can in principle be applied to any bacterial species of interest.

  14. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohannessian Arthur

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines. Methods Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. Results In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. Conclusions We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

  15. The R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 complex controls endothelial cell adhesion and morphogenesis via active integrin endocytosis and Rac signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiara Sandri; Guido Serini; Francesca Caccavari; Donatella Valdembri; Chiara Camillo; Stefan Veltel; Martina Santambrogio; Letizia Lanzetti; Fedenco Bussolino; Johanna Ivaska

    2012-01-01

    During developmental and tumor angiogenesis,semaphorins regulate blood vessel navigation by signaling through plexin receptors that inhibit the R-Ras subfamily of small GTPases.R-Ras is mainly expressed in vascular cells,where it induces adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through unknown mechanisms.We identify the Ras and Rab5 interacting protein RIN2 as a key effector that in endothelial cells interacts with and mediates the pro-adhesive and-angiogenic activity of R-Ras.Both R-Ras-GTP and RIN2 localize at nascent ECM adhesion sites associated with lamellipodia.Upon binding,GTP-loaded R-Ras converts RIN2 from a Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)to an adaptor that first interacts at high affinity with Rab5-GTP to promote the selective endocytosis of ligand-bound/active β1 integrins and then causes the translocation of R-Ras to early endosomes.Here,the R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 signaling module activates Racl-dependent cell adhesion via TIAM1,a Rac GEF that localizes on early endosomes and is stimulated by the interaction with both Ras proteins and the vesicular lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate.In conclusion,the ability of R-Ras-GTP to convert RIN2 from a GEF to an adaptor that preferentially binds Rab5-GTP allows the triggering of the endocytosis of ECM-bound/active β1 integrins and the ensuing funneling of R-Ras-GTP toward early endosomes to elicit the pro-adhesive and TIAM1-mediated activation of Racl.

  16. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Becker, Sarah F; Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2016-07-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo.

  17. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration...

  18. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  19. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide;

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix...

  20. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  1. A Strong Contractile Actin Fence and Large Adhesions Direct Human Pluripotent Colony Morphology and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Närvä

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-type-specific functions and identity are tightly regulated by interactions between the cell cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have ultimate differentiation capacity and exceptionally low-strength ECM contact, yet the organization and function of adhesion sites and associated actin cytoskeleton remain poorly defined. We imaged hPSCs at the cell-ECM interface with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and discovered that adhesions at the colony edge were exceptionally large and connected by thick ventral stress fibers. The actin fence encircling the colony was found to exert extensive Rho-ROCK-myosin-dependent mechanical stress to enforce colony morphology, compaction, and pluripotency and to define mitotic spindle orientation. Remarkably, differentiation altered adhesion organization and signaling characterized by a switch from ventral to dorsal stress fibers, reduced mechanical stress, and increased integrin activity and cell-ECM adhesion strength. Thus, pluripotency appears to be linked to unique colony organization and adhesion structure.

  2. Matrix Thermalization

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Nguyen, Kévin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  3. A Bone Glue with Sustained Adhesion under Wet Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistlich, Laura; Rücker, Anja; Schamel, Martha; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Bone glues often suffer from low adhesion to bone under wet conditions. This study aims to improve wet adhesiveness of a bone glue based on a photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate matrix through in situ interpenetrating network formation by addition of six-armed isocyanate functional star-shaped prepolymers (NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO)). Biodegradable ceramic fillers are added to adjust the paste workability. The 3-point bending strength of the bone glues is in the range of 3.5-5.5 MPa and not significantly affected by the addition of NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO). Storage in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) decreases the bending strength of all formulations to approximately 1 MPa but the adhesion to cortical bone increases from 0.15-0.2 to 0.3-0.5 MPa after adding 20-40 wt% NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO) to the matrix. Bone glues without the NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO) additive lose their adhesiveness to bone after aging in PBS for 7 days, whereas modified glues maintain a shear strength of 0.18-0.25 MPa demonstrating the efficacy of the approach. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy investigations of the fracture surfaces prove a high amount of residual adhesive on the bone surface indicating that adhesion to the bone under wet conditions is stronger than cohesion.

  4. Role of adhesion molecules in mobilization of hematopoietic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈彤; 谢毅

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of adhesion molecules' expressions during the recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) mobilization in periphera l blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), and to confirm the influence of rhG- CSF on hematopoietic stem cells, which are proposed to guide mobilization in PBS CT. Methods Mice were injected subcutaneously with diluted rhG-CSF or normal saline for 7 days. The blood Sca-1+ stem cell count and bone marrow (BM) nucleated cell count were enumerated. The expressions of CD49d and CD44 and the adhesive ability of mononuclear cells to bone marrow matrix (fibronectin) were examined by flow c ytometry and 51Cr adhesive assay, respectively.Results The mobilizing effect of rhG-CSF on mice was the same as on humans. The number of Sca-1+ cells in peripheral blood reached the peak on the seventh day, the BM nucleated cell count was reduced, and the expressions of CD49d and the cells ' adhesive ability in BM and PB declined. Conclusions rhG-CSF can reduce some cell adhesion molecules' expressions and the adhesive a bility of hematopoietic stem cells to BM matrix, therefore mobilizing hematopoie tic stem cells (HSC) from the BM to the peripheral blood.

  5. The surface properties of carbon fibers and their adhesion to organic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, W. D.; Drzal, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the surface properties of carbon fibers is reviewed, with emphasis on fiber/matrix adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Subjects treated include carbon fiber structure and chemistry, techniques for the study of the fiber surface, polymer/fiber bond strength and its measurement, variations in polymer properties in the interphase, and the influence of fiber matrix adhesion on composite mechanical properties. Critical issues are summarized and search recommendations are made.

  6. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  7. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  8. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix molecules such as fibronectin can promote cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Although some interactions of fibronectin with cell surface receptors have now been identified, the consequent activation of intracellular messenger systems by cell/matrix interactions have...... still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form....... Fibroblasts spread within 1h on substrata composed of fibronectin and formed focal adhesions by 3h, as monitored by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) and by labeling for talin, vinculin and integrin beta 1 subunits. In addition, stress fibers were visible. When cells were allowed to spread for 1h...

  9. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  10. Adhesive F-actin waves: a novel integrin-mediated adhesion complex coupled to ventral actin polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B Case

    Full Text Available At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in "ventral F-actin waves" that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These "adhesive F-actin waves" require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization.

  11. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  12. Talin2-mediated traction force drives matrix degradation and cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lei; Jafari, Naser; Li, Xiang; Chen, Zaozao; Li, Liqing; Hytönen, Vesa P; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Huang, Cai

    2016-10-01

    Talin binds to β-integrin tails to activate integrins, regulating cell migration, invasion and metastasis. There are two talin genes, TLN1 and TLN2, encoding talin1 and talin2, respectively. Talin1 regulates focal adhesion dynamics, cell migration and invasion, whereas the biological function of talin2 is not clear and, indeed, talin2 has been presumed to function redundantly with talin1. Here, we show that talin2 has a much stronger binding to β-integrin tails than talin1. Replacement of talin2 Ser339 with Cys significantly decreased its binding to β1-integrin tails to a level comparable to that of talin1. Talin2 localizes at invadopodia and is indispensable for the generation of traction force and invadopodium-mediated matrix degradation. Ablation of talin2 suppressed traction force generation and invadopodia formation, which were restored by re-expressing talin2 but not talin1. Furthermore, re-expression of wild-type talin2 (but not talin2(S339C)) in talin2-depleted cells rescued development of traction force and invadopodia. These results suggest that a strong interaction of talin2 with integrins is required to generate traction, which in turn drives invadopodium-mediated matrix degradation, which is key to cancer cell invasion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Regulation of cell adhesion strength by peripheral focal adhesion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D

    2011-12-21

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength.

  14. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  15. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  16. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  17. Fibronectin Growth Factor-Binding Domains Are Required for Fibroblast Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubao; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Pan, Zhi; Macri, Lauren; Zong, Wei-Xing; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Rafailovich, Miriam; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is required for embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound repair, and its Arg–Gly–Asp-containing central cell-binding domain (CCBD) is essential for mesenchymal cell survival and growth. Here, we demonstrate that FN contains three growth factor-binding domains (FN-GFBDs) that bind platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a potent fibroblast survival and mitogenic factor. These sites bind PDGF-BB with dissociation constants of 10–100 nm. FN-null cells cultured on recombinant CCBD (FNIII8–11) without a FN-GFBD demonstrated minimal metabolism and underwent autophagy at 24 hours, followed by apoptosis at 72 hours, even in the presence of PDGF-BB. In contrast, FN-null cells plated on FNIII8–11 contiguous with FN-GFBD survived without, and proliferated with, PDGF-BB. FN-null cell survival on FNIII8–11 and noncontiguous arrays of FN-GFBDs required these domains to be adsorbed on the same surface, suggesting the existence of a mesenchymal cell-extracellular matrix synapse. Thus, fibroblast survival required GF stimulation in the presence of a FN-GFBD, as well as adhesion to FN through the CCBD. The findings that fibroblast survival is dependent on FN-GFBD underscore the critical importance of pericellular matrix for cell survival and have significant implications for cutaneous wound healing and regeneration. PMID:20811396

  18. Adhesion of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Spores to Phaseolus vulgaris Hypocotyls and to Polystyrene

    OpenAIRE

    Young, David H.; Kauss, Heinrich

    1984-01-01

    Adhesion of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum spores to Phaseolus vulgaris hypocotyls and to polystyrene was inhibited by the respiratory inhibitors sodium azide and antimycin A, indicating a requirement for metabolic activity in adhesion. Various commercial proteins and Tween 80 also reduced adhesion to both surfaces. Binding was enhanced by the presence of salts: sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium chlorides were equally effective. The removal of surface wax from hypocotyls by chloroform ...

  19. The Adhesion of Lactobacillus salivarius REN to a Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line Requires S-layer Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Sang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius REN, a novel probiotic isolated from Chinese centenarians, can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently colonize the host. We show here that the surface-layer protein choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of L. salivarius REN was involved in adherence to the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. Adhesion of a cbpA deletion mutant was significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type, suggesting that CbpA acts as an adhesin that mediates the interaction between the bacterium and its host. To identify the molecular mechanism of adhesion, we determined the crystal structure of a truncated form of CbpA that is likely involved in binding to its cell-surface receptor. The crystal structure identified CbpA as a peptidase of the M23 family whose members harbor a zinc-dependent catalytic site. Therefore, we propose that CbpA acts as a multifunctional surface protein that cleaves the host extracellular matrix and participates in adherence. Moreover, we identified enolase as the CbpA receptor on the surface of HT-29 cells. The present study reveals a new class of surface-layer proteins as well as the molecular mechanism that may contribute to the ability of L. salivarius REN to colonize the human gut. PMID:28281568

  20. Adhesive activity of Lu glycoproteins is regulated by interaction with spectrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xiuli; Gauthier, Emilie; Zhang, Xihui; Guo, Xinhua; Anstee, David; Mohandas, Narla; Anne Chasis, Joel

    2008-03-18

    The Lutheran (Lu) and Lu(v13) blood group glycoproteins function as receptors for extracellular matrix laminins. Lu and Lu(v13) are linked to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton through a direct interaction with spectrin. However, neither the molecular basis of the interaction nor its functional consequences have previously been delineated. In the present study, we defined the binding motifs of Lu and Lu(v13) on spectrin and identified a functional role for this interaction. We found that the cytoplasmic domains of both Lu and Lu(v13) bound to repeat 4 of the spectrin chain. The interaction of full-length spectrin dimer to Lu and Lu(v13) was inhibited by repeat 4 of {alpha}-spectrin. Further, resealing of this repeat peptide into erythrocytes led to weakened Lu-cytoskeleton interaction as demonstrated by increased detergent extractability of Lu. Importantly, disruption of the Lu-spectrin linkage was accompanied by enhanced cell adhesion to laminin. We conclude that the interaction of the Lu cytoplasmic tail with the cytoskeleton regulates its adhesive receptor function.

  1. Effects of MMP inhibitors incorporated within dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahdy, A; Koller, G; Sauro, S; Bartsch, J W; Sherriff, M; Watson, T F; Banerjee, A

    2012-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition has been shown to reduce adhesive bond degradation when applied as a pre-conditioner, adding to clinical steps in the placement of adhesives, but their incorporation within dental adhesives has not been fully explored. This study examined the effect of including 2 MMP inhibitors (BB94 and GM6001) within the primers of 3 commercially available adhesives. Fluorometric assay and zymography showed that adhesives with MMP inhibitors had high affinity toward both synthetic fluorogenic FRET peptides (95%) and dentin powder substrates, respectively. The immediate microtensile bond strength was enhanced for 2 types of adhesives following the addition of both inhibitors. However, no changes were detected between the control and the inhibitor groups following 3-month storage. The modified two-step etch-and-rinse and single-step systems showed less Rhodamine B penetration to the "hybrid layer" and to the "adhesive", respectively. The incorporation of BB94 and GM6001 within the primers resulted in the inhibition of dentin MMPs with improved initial bond strength and enhanced sealing ability.

  2. Poly(acrylic acid) grafted montmorillonite as novel fillers for dental adhesives: synthesis, characterization and properties of the adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhi, Laleh; Atai, Mohammad; Nodehi, Azizollah; Imani, Mohammad; Ghaemi, Azadeh; Khosravi, Kazem

    2012-04-01

    This work investigates the graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto nanoclay platelets to be utilized as reinforcing fillers in an experimental dental adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive and its shear bond strength to dentin are studied. The effect of the modification on the stability of the nanoparticle dispersion in the dilute adhesive is also investigated. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted onto the pristine Na-MMT nanoclay (Cloisite(®) Na(+)) through the free radical polymerization of acylic acid in an aqueous media. The resulting PAA-g-nanoclay was characterized using FTIR, TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The modified nanoclays were added to an experimental dental adhesive in different concentrations and the morphology of the nanoclay layers in the photocured adhesive matrix was studied using TEM and XRD. Shear bond strength of the adhesives containing different filler contents was tested on the human premolar teeth. The stability of nanoclay dispersion in the dilute adhesive was also studied using a separation analyzer. The results were then statistically analyzed and compared. The results confirmed the grafting reaction and revealed a partially exfoliated structure for the PAA-g-nanoclay. Incorporation of 0.2 wt.% of the modified nanoclay into the experimental adhesive provided higher shear bond strength. The dispersion stability of the modified nanoparticles in the dilute adhesive was also enhanced more than 25 times. Incorporation of the modified particles as reinforcing fillers into the adhesive resulted in higher mechanical properties. The nanofiller containing bonding agent also showed higher shear bond strength due to the probable interaction of the carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of the modified particles with hydroxyapatite of dentin. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Molecular basis of red blood cell adhesion to endothelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, J-L; Wautier, M-P

    2011-01-01

    The extent of red blood cell adhesion is correlated with the incidence of vascular complications and the severity of the disease. Patients with sickle cell anemia (HbSS) experience vasoocclusive episodes. The adhesion of RBCs from HbSS patients is increased and related to VLA-4 exposure, which binds to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1). Inter Cellular Adhesion Molecule (ICAM-1), CD31, CD36 and glycans are potential receptors for PfEMP1 of RBCs parasited by plasmodium falciparum. The incidence of vascular complications is very high in patients with diabetes mellitus. RBC adhesion is increased and statistically correlated with the severity of the angiopathy. Glycation of RBC membrane proteins is responsible for binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Polycythemia Vera (PV) is the most frequent myeloproliferative disorder and characterized by a high occurrence of thrombosis of mesenteric and cerebral vessels. PV is due to a mutation of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 V617F). This mutation stimulates erythropoiesis and is the cause of Lu/BCAM (CD239) phosphorylation, which potentiated the interaction with laminin alpha 5. The couple laminin alpha 5 endothelial and phosphorylated Lu/BCAM explained the increased adhesion of RBCs from patients PV to endothelium.

  4. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structur...

  5. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  6. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB, a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human tropoelastin (HTE, the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N. Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  7. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  8. First analysis of a bacterial collagen-binding protein with collagen Toolkits: promiscuous binding of YadA to collagens may explain how YadA interferes with host processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jack C; Elovaara, Heli; Bihan, Dominique; Pugh, Nicholas; Kilpinen, Sami K; Raynal, Nicolas; Skurnik, Mikael; Farndale, Richard W; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    The Yersinia adhesin YadA mediates the adhesion of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica to collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix. Though YadA has been proposed to bind to a specific site in collagens, the exact binding determinants for YadA in native collagen have not previously been elucidated. We investigated the binding of YadA to collagen Toolkits, which are libraries of triple-helical peptides spanning the sequences of type II and III human collagens. YadA bound to many of them, in particular to peptides rich in hydroxyproline but with few charged residues. We were able to block the binding of YadA to collagen type IV with the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), suggesting that the same site in YadA binds to triple-helical regions in network-forming collagens as well. We showed that a single Gly-Pro-Hyp triplet in a triple-helical peptide was sufficient to support YadA binding, but more than six triplets were required to form a tight YadA binding site. This is significantly longer than the case for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins. YadA-expressing bacteria bound promiscuously to Toolkit peptides. Promiscuous binding could be advantageous for pathogenicity in Y. enterocolitica and, indeed, for other pathogenic bacteria. Many of the tightly binding peptides are also targets for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins, and YadA was able to inhibit the interaction between selected Toolkit peptides and platelets. This leads to the intriguing possibility that YadA may interfere in vivo with host processes mediated by endogenous collagen-binding proteins.

  9. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  10. Effect of blasting treatment and Fn coating on MG63 adhesion and differentiation on titanium: a gene expression study using real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, M; Aguirre, A; Engel, E; Pavon, G; Gil, F J; Planell, J A; Migonney, V; Aparicio, C

    2011-03-01

    Biomaterial surface properties, via alterations in the adsorbed protein layer, and the presence of specific functional groups can influence integrin binding specificity, thereby modulating cell adhesion and differentiation processes. The adsorption of fibronectin, a protein directly involved in osteoblast adhesion to the extracellular matrix, has been related to different physical and chemical properties of biomaterial surfaces. This study used blasting particles of different sizes and chemical compositions to evaluate the response of MG63 osteoblast-like cells on smooth and blasted titanium surfaces, with and without fibronectin coatings, by means of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. This response included (a) expression of the α(5), α(v) and α(3) integrin subunits, which can bind to fibronectin through the RGD binding site, and (b) expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) as cell-differentiation markers. ALP activity and synthesis of OC were also tested. Cells on SiC-blasted Ti surfaces expressed higher amounts of the α(5) mRNA gene than cells on Al(2)O(3)-blasted Ti surfaces. This may be related to the fact that SiC-blasted surfaces adsorbed higher amounts of fibronectin due to their higher surface free energy and therefore provided a higher number of specific cell-binding sites. Fn-coated Ti surfaces decreased α(5) mRNA gene expression, by favoring the formation of other integrins involved in adhesion over α(5)β(1). The changes in α(5) mRNA expression induced by the presence of fibronectin coatings may moreover influence the osteoblast differentiation pathway, as fibronectin coatings on Ti surfaces also decreased both ALP mRNA expression and ALP activity after 14 and 21 days of cell culture.

  11. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    of substrates in aqueous environment. The adhesive properties of the barnacle adhesive proteins have been utilized for various dental and medical purposes. These polyphenolic proteins are currently in demand as they are non-toxic biomaterial, highly effective...

  12. Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    of mask respirators with bio -inspired adhesive integrated into their peripheral seals; and (2) assessment of the competitive position of the new bio -inspired adhesives in broader fields of application.

  13. Biological adhesion of Parthenocissus tricuspidata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Tianxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parthenocissus tricuspidata is a climbing plant of the grape family. It can climb with its adhesive discs on different substrates such as stone mountains, roadside stone banks, exterior walls of buildings, thereby withstanding strong winds and storms without detachment. The details about the adhesion process of Parthenocissus tricuspidata are not yet entirely understood. We studied the component-structure-property relationship of the adhesive discs in detail and propose a twostage model to describe the biological adhesion: (i structural contact and (ii adhesive action. These two stages and their variations play an important role for the attaching of the adhesive disc to different structural surfaces. We believe that in Parthenocissus tricuspidata different mechanisms work together to allow the adhesive disc to climb on various vertical substrates and reveal strong adhesive properties.

  14. [Dentin adhesives. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandini, R; Novelli, C; Pierleoni, P

    1991-11-01

    Even if mechanical bonding to enamel utilizing the acid-etch technique has been very successful, adhesion to dentin is still a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Dentin is a vital tissue and differs in composition from enamel: acid-etching does not enhance the bond strength of composite resins to dentin and may elicit a severe pulpal response. For an effective bond to occur, a dentin bonding system has to be used. The first generation of methacrylate-based dentin adhesives was capable of chemical bonding to the inorganic phase of dentin. The chemical basis for this resin-dentin adhesive was the interaction between a phosphate group attached to the methacrylate and the calcium ions on the dentin surface. This system yielded rather low bond strengths which were clinically unsatisfying. The second generation of dentin adhesives became available to the profession recently. Each of these new bonding systems use similar chemical composition for the same purpose of bonding with physicochemical interaction to the hard tooth tissues. All these systems contain a mild acid dentin conditioner to remove the smear layer and an aqueous resin containing primer to improve monomer penetration into the hydrophilic dentin surface. The second generation dentin bonding systems are extremely sensitive to variations upon the completeness of instructions and how accurately these are followed by dental practitioners.

  15. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  16. Allosteric Regulation of Fibronectin/α5β1 Interaction by Fibronectin-Binding MSCRAMMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Garcia, Brandon L.; Visai, Livia; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Höök, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of microbes to host tissues is a hallmark of infectious disease and is often mediated by a class of adhesins termed MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules). Numerous pathogens express MSCRAMMs that specifically bind the heterodimeric human glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn). In addition to roles in adhesion, Fn-binding MSCRAMMs exploit physiological Fn functions. For example, several pathogens can invade host cells by a mechanism whereby MSCRAMM-bound Fn bridges interaction with α5β1 integrin. Here, we investigate two Fn-binding MSCRAMMs, FnBPA (Staphylococcus aureus) and BBK32 (Borrelia burgdorferi) to probe structure-activity relationships of MSCRAMM-induced Fn/α5β1integrin activation. Circular dichroism, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and dynamic light scattering techniques uncover a conformational rearrangement of Fn involving domains distant from the MSCRAMM binding site. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate a significant enhancement of Fn/α5β1 integrin affinity in the presence of FnBPA or BBK32. Detailed kinetic analysis of these interactions reveal that this change in affinity can be attributed solely to an increase in the initial Fn/α5β1 on-rate and that this rate-enhancement is dependent on high-affinity Fn-binding by MSCRAMMs. These data implicate MSCRAMM-induced perturbation of specific intramolecular contacts within the Fn heterodimer resulting in activation by exposing previously cryptic α5β1 interaction motifs. By correlating structural changes in Fn to a direct measurement of increased Fn/α5β1 affinity, this work significantly advances our understanding of the structural basis for the modulation of integrin function by Fn-binding MSCRAMMs. PMID:27434228

  17. Vitronectin-binding PAI-1 protects against the development of cardiac fibrosis through interaction with fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianyong; Yang, Hai-Chun; Kon, Valentina; Fogo, Agnes B; Lawrence, Daniel A; Ma, Ji

    2014-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes or abates fibrotic processes occurring in different organs. Binding of PAI-1 to vitronectin, an extracellular matrix component, may inhibit vitronectin-integrin complex-mediated cellular responses in pathophysiological conditions. To investigate the importance of plasmin suppression vs vitronectin-binding pathways of PAI-1 in cardiac fibrosis, we studied uninephrectomized mice fed a high salt diet and infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) together with different PAI-1 variants, including PAI-1AK (AK) that inhibits plasminogen activators but does not bind vitronectin, PAI-1RR (RR) that binds vitronectin but does not have protease inhibitory effects or control PAI-1 (CPAI), the control mutant that has similar molecular backbone and half-life as AK and RR while retaining all functions of native PAI-1. Compared with RR and CPAI, non-vitronectin-binding AK significantly increased expression of cardiac fibroblast marker, periostin (Ang+AK 8.40±3.55 vs Ang+RR 2.23±0.44 and Ang+CPAI 2.33±0.12% positive area, both PPAI-1 against fibrosis, fibroblasts from normal adult human ventricles were stimulated with Ang and different PAI-1 variants. Protease inhibitory AK and CPAI increased supernatant fibronectin, while decreasing plasminogen activator/plasmin activities and matrix metalloproteinase. RR and CPAI variants significantly reduced fibroblast expression of integrin β3, vitronectin level in the supernatant and fibroblast adhesion to vitronectin compared with the non-vitronectin-binding AK. Further, RR and CPAI preserved apoptotic, decreased anti-apoptotic and proliferative activities in fibroblasts. Thus, PAI-1 promotes or protects against development of cardiac fibrosis differentially through the protease inhibitory pathway or through its binding to vitronectin.

  18. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Cadherins are a superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich extracellular cadherin (EC) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate 'classical' cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a 'strand-swapped' conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the 'X-dimer'. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor that drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms that are only now beginning to be understood.

  19. High iron sequestrating bifidobacteria inhibit enteropathogen growth and adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vazquez-Gutierrez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota plays an important role in host health, in particular by its barrier effect and competition with exogenous pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the competition of Bifidobacterium pseudolongum PV8-2 (Bp PV8-2 and Bifidobacterium kashiwanohense PV20-2 (Bk PV20-2, isolated from anemic infant gut microbiota and selected for their high iron sequestration properties was investigated against Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhi and Escherichia coli O157:H45 (EHEC by using co-culture tests and assays with intestinal cell lines. Single and co-cultures were carried out anaerobically in chemically semi-defined low iron (1.5 µM Fe medium (CSDLIM without and with added ferrous iron (30 µM Fe. Surface properties of the tested strains were measured by bacterial adhesion to solvent xylene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and to extracellular matrix molecules, mucus II, collagen I, fibrinogen, fibronectin. HT29-MTX mucus-secreting intestinal cell cultures were used to study bifidobacteria competition, inhibition and displacement of the enteropatogens. During co-cultures in CSDLIM we observed strain-dependent inhibition of bifidobacterial strains on enteropathogens, independent of pH, organic acid production and supplemented iron. Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 inhibited S. Typhi N15 and EHEC after 24 h compared to single culture growth. In contrast Bk PV20-2 showed less inhibition on S. Typhi N15 than Bp PV8-2, and no inhibition on EHEC. Affinity for intestinal cell surface glycoproteins was strain-specific, with high affinity of Bp PV8-2 for mucin and Bk PV20-2 for fibronectin. Bk PV20-2 showed high adhesion potential (15.6 +/- 6.0 % to HT29-MTX cell layer compared to Bp PV8-2 (1.4 +/- 0.4 %. In competition, inhibition and displacement tests, Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 reduced S. Typhi N15 and EHEC adhesion, while Bk PV20-2 was only active on S. Typhi N15 adhesion. To conclude, bifidobacterial strains selected for their high iron binding

  20. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature

  1. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  2. AFM measurements of adhesive forces between carbonaceous particles and the substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianqi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Ke [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Educations, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Adhesive force of spherical carbonaceous particle MCMBs and HTR-10 graphite matrix debris were measured for the first time. • The measured equivalent works of adhesion were much smaller than the ideal values. • The shape factor and the particle morphology reduce the adhesive force. • The adhesion effect does not change directly with the asperity size. - Abstract: Graphite dust is carbonaceous particles generated during operation of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTR). Graphite dust resuspension is the key behavior associated with HTR source term analyses and environmental safety assessment. The adhesive force is the key factor that determines the resuspension rate. The present study used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the adhesive force between a single carbonaceous particle and the substrate. The measurements were performed on mica, graphite IG110 and Inconel 800H. The prepared “probe cantilevers” were mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), fuel element debris from HTR-10 and graphite NBG18. The equivalent work of adhesion was derived from the measured adhesive force and calculated based on substrate profile approximation and the JKR theoretical model. The measured work was smaller than the ideal work of adhesion, most likely due to the rough particle morphology and the rough substrate surface. Additionally, a shape factor imposes a constraint on the lateral deformation of the particles. Furthermore, surface roughness could reduce the adhesive force some depending on the particle size. Once the particle was too small to be trapped into a trough, the adhesive force would not be further reduced.

  3. Matrix compliance and the regulation of cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sambandamoorthy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM regulates many physiological processes in part by controlling cell proliferation. It is well established that many normal cells require integrin-mediated adhesion to enter S phase of the cell cycle. Recent evidence indicates that integrins also regulate cytokinesis. Mechanical properties of the ECM can dictate entry into S phase; however, it is not known whether they also can affect the successful completion of cell division. To address this issue, we modulated substrate compliance using fibronectin-coated acrylamide-based hydrogels. Soft and hard substrates were generated with approximate elastic moduli of 1600 and 34,000 Pascals (Pa respectively. Our results indicate that dermal fibroblasts successfully complete cytokinesis on hard substrates, whereas on soft substrates, a significant number fail and become binucleated. Cytokinesis failure occurs at a step following the formation of the intercellular bridge connecting presumptive daughter cells, suggesting a defect in abscission. Like dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells require cell-matrix adhesion for successful cytokinesis. However, in contrast to dermal fibroblasts, they are able to complete cytokinesis on both hard and soft substrates. These results indicate that matrix stiffness regulates the successful completion of cytokinesis, and does so in a cell-type specific manner. To our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate that matrix stiffness can affect cytokinesis. Understanding the cell-type specific contribution of matrix compliance to the regulation of cytokinesis will provide new insights important for development, as well as tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  4. β Integrin-like protein-mediated adhesion and its disturbances during cell cultivation of the mussel Mytilus trossulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorova, Mariia A; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we focus on the specific contribution of β integrin-like protein to adhesion-mediated events in molluscan larval cells in culture that could not have been investigated within the whole animal. An analysis of disturbances to cell-substratum adhesion, caused by the integrin receptor inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS)-peptide, the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-chelators and the stress influence of freezing-thawing, reveals that all these factors resulted in the partial destruction of the integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction in culture and, in particular, changes in the distribution and relative abundance of β integrin-positive cells. The experiments, carried out on selected substrates, found that β integrin-positive cells demonstrate different affinities for the substrates. This finding further supports the assumption that epithelial differentiation in cultivated cells of larval Mytilus may be mediated by β integrin-like proteins via binding to laminin; direct binding to other components of the ECM could not be demonstrated. The mussel β integrin-positive cells are not involved in myogenic or neuronal differentiation on any of the substrates but part of them has tubulin-positive cilia, forming some epithelia-like structures. Our data indicate that β integrin-positive cells are able to proliferate in vitro which suggests that they could participate in renewing the digestive epithelium in larvae. The findings provide evidence that the distribution pattern of β integrin-like protein depends on the cell type and the factors influencing the adhesion.

  5. Adiponectin Enhances Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Promotes Monocyte Adhesion in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Jui-Chieh; Shih, James Meng-Kun; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted predominantly by differentiated adipocytes and is involved in energy homeostasis. Adiponectin expression is significantly high in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an important adhesion molecule that mediates monocyte adhesion and infiltration during OA pathogenesis. Adiponectin-induced expression of ICAM-1 in human OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) was examined by using qPCR, flow cytometry and western blotting. The intracellular signaling pathways were investigated by pretreated with inhibitors or transfection with siRNA. The monocyte THP-1 cell line was used for an adhesion assay with OASFs. Stimulation of OASFs with adiponectin induced ICAM-1 expression. Pretreatment with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors (AraA and compound C) or transfection with siRNA against AMPKα1 and two AMPK upstream activator- liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) diminished the adiponectin-induced ICAM-1 expression. Stimulation of OASFs with adiponectin increased phosphorylation of LKB1, CaMKII, AMPK, and c-Jun, resulting in c-Jun binding to AP-1 element of ICAM-1 promoter. In addition, adiponectin-induced activation of the LKB1/CaMKII, AMPK, and AP-1 pathway increased the adhesion of monocytes to the OASF monolayer. Our results suggest that adiponectin increases ICAM-1 expression in human OASFs via the LKB1/CaMKII, AMPK, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathway. Adiponectin-induced ICAM-1 expression promoted the adhesion of monocytes to human OASFs. These findings may provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of OA and can utilize this knowledge to design a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24667577

  6. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  8. The LAR transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase and a coiled-coil LAR-interacting protein co-localize at focal adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Focal adhesions are sites of cell-extracellular matrix interactions that function in anchoring stress fibers to the plasma membrane and in adhesion-mediated signal transduction. Both focal adhesion structure and signaling ability involve protein tyrosine phosphorylation. LAR is a broadly expressed transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase comprised of a cell adhesion-like ectodomain and two intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase domains. We have identified a novel cytoplasmic 160 kDa pho...

  9. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various tre