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Sample records for bimolecular complementation defines

  1. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  2. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation to Assay the Interactions of Ubiquitylation Enzymes in Living Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczak, Ewa; Prigent, Claude; Rabut, Gwenaël

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is a versatile posttranslational protein modification catalyzed through the concerted action of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s). These enzymes form transient complexes with each other and their modification substrates and determine the nature of the ubiquitin signals attached to their substrates. One challenge in the field of protein ubiquitylation is thus to identify the E2-E3 pairs that function in the cell. In this chapter, we describe the use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation to assay E2-E3 interactions in living cells, using budding yeast as a model organism. PMID:27613039

  3. Visualization of protein interactions in living Drosophila embryos by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merabet Samir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions control the regulatory networks underlying developmental processes. The understanding of developmental complexity will, therefore, require the characterization of protein interactions within their proper environment. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC technology offers this possibility as it enables the direct visualization of protein interactions in living cells. However, its potential has rarely been applied in embryos of animal model organisms and was only performed under transient protein expression levels. Results Using a Hox protein partnership as a test case, we investigated the suitability of BiFC for the study of protein interactions in the living Drosophila embryo. Importantly, all BiFC parameters were established with constructs that were stably expressed under the control of endogenous promoters. Under these physiological conditions, we showed that BiFC is specific and sensitive enough to analyse dynamic protein interactions. We next used BiFC in a candidate interaction screen, which led to the identification of several Hox protein partners. Conclusion Our results establish the general suitability of BiFC for revealing and studying protein interactions in their physiological context during the rapid course of Drosophila embryonic development.

  4. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  5. Analysis of the papillomavirus E2 and bromodomain protein Brd4 interaction using bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Helfer

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines effectively protect against new infections of up to four HPV subtypes. However, these vaccines are not protective against many other clinically relevant HPV subtypes and are ineffective at treating established HPV infections. There is therefore a significant need for antiviral treatments for persistent HPV infections. A promising anti-HPV drug target is the interaction between the HPV E2 protein and cellular bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4 since this protein complex mediates several processes important for the viral life cycle including viral genome maintenance, replication, and transcription. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC technology, we demonstrate the E2 and Brd4 interaction on both interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis. The E2-Brd4 BiFC was significantly diminished by mutating the Brd4 binding sites in E2 or by a dominant negative inhibitor of the E2-Brd4 interaction, demonstrating the potential of BiFC for identifying inhibitors of this important virus-host interaction. Importantly, when Brd4 was released from chromatin using the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1(+, the E2-Brd4 interacting complex relocated into foci that no longer associate with mitotic chromosomes, pointing to JQ1(+ as a promising antiviral inhibitor of HPV genome maintenance during HPV persistent infection.

  6. An improved bimolecular fluorescence complementation tool based on superfolder green fluorescent protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhou; Jian Lin; Cuihong Zhou; Xiaoyan Deng; Bin Xia

    2011-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has been widely used in the analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in recent years. There are many notable advantages of BiFC such as convenience and direct visualization of PPI in cells. However, BiFC has one common limitation: the separated non-fluorescent fragments can be spontaneously self-assembled into an intact protein,which leads to false-positive results. In this study, a pair of complementary fragments (sfGFPN and sfGFPC) was constructed by splitting superfolder GFP (sfGFP) between the 214 and 215 amino acid residue, and sfGFPC was mutated by site-directed gene mutagenesis to decrease the signal of negative control. Our results showed that mutations in sfGFPC (sfGFPC(m12)) can effectively decrease the signal of negative control. Thus, we provide an improved BiFC tool for the analysis of PPI. Further,since the self-assembly problem is a common shortcoming for application of BiFC, our research provides a feasible strategy for other BiFC candidate proteins with the same problem.

  7. Protein-protein interactions visualized by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in tobacco protoplasts and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Regina; Schwenkert, Serena

    2014-03-09

    Many proteins interact transiently with other proteins or are integrated into multi-protein complexes to perform their biological function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is an in vivo method to monitor such interactions in plant cells. In the presented protocol the investigated candidate proteins are fused to complementary halves of fluorescent proteins and the respective constructs are introduced into plant cells via agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Subsequently, the proteins are transiently expressed in tobacco leaves and the restored fluorescent signals can be detected with a confocal laser scanning microscope in the intact cells. This allows not only visualization of the interaction itself, but also the subcellular localization of the protein complexes can be determined. For this purpose, marker genes containing a fluorescent tag can be coexpressed along with the BiFC constructs, thus visualizing cellular structures such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane. The fluorescent signal can be monitored either directly in epidermal leaf cells or in single protoplasts, which can be easily isolated from the transformed tobacco leaves. BiFC is ideally suited to study protein-protein interactions in their natural surroundings within the living cell. However, it has to be considered that the expression has to be driven by strong promoters and that the interaction partners are modified due to fusion of the relatively large fluorescence tags, which might interfere with the interaction mechanism. Nevertheless, BiFC is an excellent complementary approach to other commonly applied methods investigating protein-protein interactions, such as coimmunoprecipitation, in vitro pull-down assays or yeast-two-hybrid experiments.

  8. Visualization and quantification of APP intracellular domain-mediated nuclear signaling by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

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    Florian Riese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amyloid precursor protein (APP intracellular domain (AICD is released from full-length APP upon sequential cleavage by either α- or β-secretase followed by γ-secretase. Together with the adaptor protein Fe65 and the histone acetyltransferase Tip60, AICD forms nuclear multiprotein complexes (AFT complexes that function in transcriptional regulation. OBJECTIVE: To develop a medium-throughput machine-based assay for visualization and quantification of AFT complex formation in cultured cells. METHODS: We used cotransfection of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC fusion constructs of APP and Tip60 for analysis of subcellular localization by confocal microscopy and quantification by flow cytometry (FC. RESULTS: Our novel BiFC-constructs show a nuclear localization of AFT complexes that is identical to conventional fluorescence-tagged constructs. Production of the BiFC signal is dependent on the adaptor protein Fe65 resulting in fluorescence complementation only after Fe65-mediated nuclear translocation of AICD and interaction with Tip60. We applied the AFT-BiFC system to show that the Swedish APP familial Alzheimer's disease mutation increases AFT complex formation, consistent with the notion that AICD mediated nuclear signaling mainly occurs following APP processing through the amyloidogenic β-secretase pathway. Next, we studied the impact of posttranslational modifications of AICD on AFT complex formation. Mutation of tyrosine 682 in the YENPTY motif of AICD to phenylalanine prevents phosphorylation resulting in increased nuclear AFT-BiFC signals. This is consistent with the negative impact of tyrosine phosphorylation on Fe65 binding to AICD. Finally, we studied the effect of oxidative stress. Our data shows that oxidative stress, at a level that also causes cell death, leads to a reduction in AFT-BiFC signals. CONCLUSION: We established a new method for visualization and FC quantification of the interaction between

  9. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Assessment of Subcellular Localization in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Evan P S; Owens, Jake L; Hockerman, Gregory H; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a fluorescence imaging technique used to visualize protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live cells and animals. One unique application of BiFC is to reveal subcellular localization of PPIs. The superior signal-to-noise ratio of BiFC in comparison with fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables its wide applications. Here, we describe how confocal microscopy can be used to detect and quantify PPIs and their subcellular localization. We use basic leucine zipper transcription factor proteins as an example to provide a step-by-step BiFC protocol using a Nikon A1 confocal microscope and NIS-Elements imaging software. The protocol given below can be readily adapted for use with other confocal microscopes or imaging software. PMID:27515079

  10. Bimolecular Complementation to Visualize Filovirus VP40-Host Complexes in Live Mammalian Cells: Toward the Identification of Budding Inhibitors

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    Yuliang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virus-host interactions play key roles in promoting efficient egress of many RNA viruses, including Ebola virus (EBOV or “e” and Marburg virus (MARV or “m”. Late- (L- domains conserved in viral matrix proteins recruit specific host proteins, such as Tsg101 and Nedd4, to facilitate the budding process. These interactions serve as attractive targets for the development of broad-spectrum budding inhibitors. A major gap still exists in our understanding of the mechanism of filovirus budding due to the difficulty in detecting virus-host complexes and mapping their trafficking patterns in the natural environment of the cell. To address this gap, we used a bimolecular complementation (BiMC approach to detect, localize, and follow the trafficking patterns of eVP40-Tsg101 complexes in live mammalian cells. In addition, we used the BiMC approach along with a VLP budding assay to test small molecule inhibitors identified by in silico screening for their ability to block eVP40 PTAP-mediated interactions with Tsg101 and subsequent budding of eVP40 VLPs. We demonstrated the potential broad spectrum activity of a lead candidate inhibitor by demonstrating its ability to block PTAP-dependent binding of HIV-1 Gag to Tsg101 and subsequent egress of HIV-1 Gag VLPs.

  11. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

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    Kuang Lin-Yun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The investigation of protein-protein interactions is important for characterizing protein function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC has recently gained interest as a relatively easy and inexpensive method to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells. BiFC uses "split YFP" tags on proteins to detect interactions: If the tagged proteins interact, they may bring the two split fluorophore components together such that they can fold and reconstitute fluorescence. The sites of interaction can be monitored using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. However, "conventional" BiFC can investigate interactions only between two proteins at a time. There are instances when one may wish to offer a particular "bait" protein to several "prey" proteins simultaneously. Preferential interaction of the bait protein with one of the prey proteins, or different sites of interaction between the bait protein and multiple prey proteins, may thus be observed. Results We have constructed a series of gene expression vectors, based upon the pSAT series of vectors, to facilitate the practice of multi-color BiFC. The bait protein is tagged with the C-terminal portion of CFP (cCFP, and prey proteins are tagged with the N-terminal portions of either Venus (nVenus or Cerulean (nCerulean. Interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nVenus-tagged proteins generates yellow fluorescence, whereas interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nCerulean-tagged proteins generates blue fluorescence. Additional expression of mCherry indicates transfected cells and sub-cellular structures. Using this system, we have determined in both tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and in onion epidermal cells that Agrobacterium VirE2 protein interacts with the Arabidopsis nuclear transport adapter protein importin α-1 in the cytoplasm, whereas interaction of VirE2 with a different importin α isoform, importin α-4, occurs predominantly in the nucleus. Conclusion Multi

  12. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay for Direct Visualization of Protein-Protein Interaction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsien-Tsung; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assay is a method used to directly visualize protein-protein interaction in vivo using live-cell imaging or fixed cells. This protocol described here is based on our recent paper describing the functional association of human chromatin adaptor and transcription cofactor Brd4 with p53 tumor suppressor protein (Wu et al., 2013). BiFC was first described by Hu et al. (2002) using two non-fluorescent protein fragments of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), which is an Aequorea victoria GFP variant protein, fused respectively to a Rel family protein and a bZIP family transcription factor to investigate interactions between these two family members in living cells. The YFP was later improved by introducing mutations to reduce its sensitivity to pH and chloride ions, thus generating a super-enhanced YFP, named Venus fluorescent protein, without showing diminished fluorescence at 37 °C as typically observed with EYFP (Nagai et al., 2006). The fluorescence signal is regenerated by complementation of two non-fluorescent fragments (e.g., the Venus N-terminal 1–158 amino acid residues, called Venus-N, and its C-terminal 159–239 amino acid residues, named Venus-C; see Figure 1A and Gully et al., 2012; Ding et al., 2006; Kerppola, 2006) that are brought together by interaction between their respective fusion partners (e.g., Venus-N to p53, and Venus-C to the PDID domain of human Brd4; see Figure 1B and 1C). The intensity and cellular location of the regenerated fluorescence signals can be detected by fluorescence microscope. The advantages of the proximity-based BiFC assay are: first, it allows a direct visualization of spatial and temporal interaction between two partner proteins in vivo; second, the fluorescence signal provides a sensitive readout for detecting protein-protein interaction even at a low expression level comparable to that of the endogenous proteins; third, the intensity of the fluorescence signal is

  13. Defining the complement biomarker profile of c3 glomerulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Nester, Carla M; Martin, Bertha;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) applies to a group of renal diseases defined by a specific renal biopsy finding: a dominant pattern of C3 fragment deposition on immunofluorescence. The primary pathogenic mechanism involves abnormal control of the alternative complement pathway...

  14. Studies on interaction of cucurbit aphid-borne yellow virus proteins using yeast two-hybrid system and bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X H; Xiang, H Y; Wang, Z; Zhang, Y J; Han, C G; Li, D W; Yu, J L; Cheng, Y Q

    2011-01-01

    In this article, yeast two-hybrid system (YTHS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) were used to analyze the interactions of cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV)-encoded proteins. P0, P1, P1-2, P3, P4, and P5 were tested by YTHS in all possible pairwise combinations, and only P3/P3 interaction was detected. Results obtained by BiFC further confirmed the self-interaction of P3, and the subcellular localization of reconstituted YFP fluorescence was observed mainly in nuclei of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells. Domains involved in P3/P3 self-interaction were analyzed by YTHS and BiFC using deletion mutants. The results showed that R domain (residues 1-61) in the N-terminus could self-interact, and it also interacted with the S domain (residues 62-199) in the C-terminus of P3. The present work would serve as a molecular basis for further characterization of CABYV proteins, and the regions involved in P3/P3 self-interaction could provide the clue for understanding the capsid assembly pathway of CABYV. PMID:21978157

  15. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  16. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER

  17. Complement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have lower-than-normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. ... Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 8. Read More Cirrhosis Complement component 3 (C3) Complement component 4 Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney ...

  18. Interallelic complementation at the Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation defective locus defines discrete functional domains of the protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Ponomareff, G; Giordano, H; DeLotto, Y.; DeLotto, R

    2001-01-01

    The gastrulation defective (gd) locus encodes a novel serine protease that is involved in specifying the dorsal-ventral axis during embryonic development. Mutant alleles of gd have been classified into three complementation groups, two of which exhibit strong interallelic (intragenic) complementation. To understand the molecular basis of this interallelic complementation, we examined the complementation behavior of additional mutant alleles and sequenced alleles in all complementation groups....

  19. Luminescence Spectroscopy and Bimolecular Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which a low cost spectrofluorimeter is used to carry out elementary emission measurements on a transition metal complex. The students measure uncorrected emission and excitation spectra, and determine the rate constant for an exceedingly fast bimolecular reaction, the deactivation of an…

  20. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  1. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis of eukaryotic fusion products

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Ho-Pi; Vincenz, Claudius; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Kerppola, Tom K.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Background information. Cell fusion is known to underlie key developmental processes in humans and is postulated to contribute to tissue maintenance and even carcinogenesis. The mechanistic details of cell fusion, especially between different cell types, have been difficult to characterize because of the dynamic nature of the process and inadequate means to track fusion products over time. Here we introduce an inducible system for detecting and tracking live cell fusion products in vitro and ...

  2. Resonance Reaction in Diffusion-Influenced Bimolecular Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Jakob J; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new resonant reaction behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis.

  3. Complement Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activity) of complement proteins in the blood. Complement components may be measured individually or together to determine whether the system is functioning normally. C3 and C4 are the most frequently measured complement ...

  4. Sundanese Complementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  5. Analysis of Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Reversible Bimolecular Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lipková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A class of Brownian dynamics algorithms for stochastic reaction-diffusion models which include reversible bimolecular reactions is presented and analyzed. The method is a generalization of the λ-bcȳ model for irreversible bimolecular reactions which was introduced in [R. Erban and S. J. Chapman, Phys. Biol., 6(2009), 046001]. The formulae relating the experimentally measurable quantities (reaction rate constants and diffusion constants) with the algorithm parameters are derived. The probability of geminate recombination is also investigated. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. C3d-defined complement receptor-binding peptide p28 conjugated to circumsporozoite protein provides protection against Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Neutzner, Albert; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina; Tsokos, George C

    2007-11-01

    Immune response against circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei, a major surface protein on the sporozoite, confers protection in various murine malaria models. Engineered DNA vaccine encoding CSP and 3 copies of C3d caused an unexpected loss in protection attributed to the binding of C3d to the C-terminal region of CSP. Because the C3d region known as p28 represents the complement receptor (CR) 2-binding motif, we developed a CSP-3 copies of p28 DNA construct (CSP-3p28). CSP-3p28-immunized mice were better protected against P. berghei sporozoites than CSP-immunized mice 6 weeks after the 2nd boost, produced sufficient IgG1 anti-CSP and CSP C-terminus antibody and failed to produce IgG2a. CSP-3C3d-immunized mice were not protected, failed to produce IgG1 and produced high amounts of IgG2a. We conclude that use of the CR2-binding motif of C3d as molecular adjuvant to CSP results in anti-malaria protective immune response probably by targeting the chimeric protein to CR2. PMID:17931754

  7. C3d-defined complement receptor-binding peptide p28 conjugated to circumsporozoite protein provides protection against Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Neutzner, Albert; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina; Tsokos, George C

    2007-11-01

    Immune response against circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei, a major surface protein on the sporozoite, confers protection in various murine malaria models. Engineered DNA vaccine encoding CSP and 3 copies of C3d caused an unexpected loss in protection attributed to the binding of C3d to the C-terminal region of CSP. Because the C3d region known as p28 represents the complement receptor (CR) 2-binding motif, we developed a CSP-3 copies of p28 DNA construct (CSP-3p28). CSP-3p28-immunized mice were better protected against P. berghei sporozoites than CSP-immunized mice 6 weeks after the 2nd boost, produced sufficient IgG1 anti-CSP and CSP C-terminus antibody and failed to produce IgG2a. CSP-3C3d-immunized mice were not protected, failed to produce IgG1 and produced high amounts of IgG2a. We conclude that use of the CR2-binding motif of C3d as molecular adjuvant to CSP results in anti-malaria protective immune response probably by targeting the chimeric protein to CR2.

  8. Substituting complements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Dari-Mattiacci; F. Parisi

    2006-01-01

    The presence of multiple sellers in the provision of (nonsubstitutable) complementary goods leads to outcomes that are worse than those generated by a monopoly (with a vertically integrated production of complements), a problem known in the economic literature as complementary oligopoly and recently

  9. Substituting complements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Dari-Mattiacci; F. Parisi

    2009-01-01

    The presence of multiple sellers in the provision of (nonsubstitutable) complementary goods leads to outcomes that are worse than those generated by a monopoly (with a vertically integrated production of complements), a problem known in the economic literature as complementary oligopoly and recently

  10. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bimolecular recombination reactions: K-adiabatic and K-active forms of the bimolecular master equations and analytic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Expressions for a K-adiabatic master equation for a bimolecular recombination rate constant krec are derived for a bimolecular reaction forming a complex with a single well or complexes with multiple well, where K is the component of the total angular momentum along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination product. The K-active master equation is also considered. The exact analytic solutions, i.e., the K-adiabatic and K-active steady-state population distribution function of reactive complexes, g(EJK) and g(EJ), respectively, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active master equation cases using properties of inhomogeneous integral equations (Fredholm type). The solutions accommodate arbitrary intermolecular energy transfer models, e.g., the single exponential, double exponential, Gaussian, step-ladder, and near-singularity models. At the high pressure limit, the krec for both the K-adiabatic and K-active master equations reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high pressure limit expressions). Ozone and its formation from O + O2 are known to exhibit an adiabatic K. The ratio of the K-adiabatic to the K-active recombination rate constants for ozone formation at the high pressure limit is calculated to be ˜0.9 at 300 K. Results on the temperature and pressure dependence of the recombination rate constants and populations of O3 will be presented elsewhere.

  12. Theory of Crowding Effects on Bimolecular Reaction Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila

    2016-07-01

    An analytical expression for the rate constant of a diffusion-influenced bimolecular reaction in a crowded environment is derived in the framework of a microscopic model that accounts for: (1) the slowdown of diffusion due to crowding and the dependence of the diffusivity on the distance between the reactants, (2) a crowding-induced attractive short-range potential of mean force, and (3) nonspecific reversible binding to the crowders. This expression spans the range from reaction to diffusion control. Crowding can increase the reaction-controlled rate by inducing an effective attraction between reactants but decrease the diffusion-controlled rate by reducing their relative diffusivity. PMID:27096470

  13. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound [yields] bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN[sup [minus

  14. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound {yields} bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN{sup {minus}}, NCO{sup {minus}} and NCS{sup {minus}}. Transition state photoelectron spectra are presented for the following systems Br + HI, Cl + HI, F + HI, F + CH{sub 3}0H,F + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH,F + OH and F + H{sub 2}. A time dependent framework for the simulation and interpretation of the bound {yields} free transition state photoelectron spectra is subsequently developed and applied to the hydrogen transfer reactions Br + HI, F + OH {yields} O({sup 3}P, {sup 1}D) + HF and F + H{sub 2}. The theoretical approach for the simulations is a fully quantum-mechanical wave packet propagation on a collinear model reaction potential surface. The connection between the wavepacket time evolution and the photoelectron spectrum is given by the time autocorrelation function. For the benchmark F + H{sub 2} system, comparisons with three-dimensional quantum calculations are made.

  15. Complement component 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have lower-than-normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 6. Read More Cirrhosis Complement Complement component 3 (C3) Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis ...

  16. Complement system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shicui; Cui, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish is recently emerging as a model species for the study of immunology and human diseases. Complement system is the humoral backbone of the innate immune defense, and our knowledge as such in zebrafish has dramatically increased in the recent years. This review summarizes the current research progress of zebrafish complement system. The global searching for complement components in genome database, together with published data, has unveiled the existence of all the orthologues of mammalian complement components identified thus far, including the complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors, in zebrafish. Interestingly, zebrafish complement components also display some distinctive features, such as prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. Future studies should focus on the following issues that would be of special importance for understanding the physiological role of complement components in zebrafish: conclusive identification of complement genes, especially those with isotypic diversity; analysis and elucidation of function and mechanism of complement components; modulation of innate and adaptive immune response by complement system; and unconventional roles of complement-triggered pathways.

  17. Complement driven by conformational

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gros, P.; Milder, F.J.; Janssen, B.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Complement in mammalian plasma recognizes pathogenic, immunogenic and apoptotic cell surfaces, promotes inflammatory responses and marks particles for cell lysis, phagocytosis and B‑cell stimulation. At the heart of the complement system are two large proteins, complement component C3 and protease f

  18. Complement and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  19. Uncertainty for calculating transport on Titan: a probabilistic description of bimolecular diffusion parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Plessis, Sylvain; Mandt, Kathy; Greathouse, Thomas; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn

    2015-01-01

    Bimolecular diffusion coefficients are important parameters used by atmospheric models to calculate altitude profiles of minor constituents in an atmosphere. Unfortunately, laboratory measurements of these coefficients were never conducted at temperature conditions relevant to the atmosphere of Titan. Here we conduct a detailed uncertainty analysis of the bimolecular diffusion coefficient parameters as applied to Titan's upper atmosphere to provide a better understanding of the impact of uncertainty for this parameter on models. Because temperature and pressure conditions are much lower than the laboratory conditions in which bimolecular diffusion parameters were measured, we apply a Bayesian framework, a problem-agnostic framework, to determine parameter estimates and associated uncertainties. We solve the Bayesian calibration problem using the open-source QUESO library which also performs a propagation of uncertainties in the calibrated parameters to temperature and pressure conditions observed in Titan's u...

  20. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  1. Complement C3

    OpenAIRE

    Dinasarapu, Ashok Reddy; Chandrasekhar, Anjana; Sahu, Arvind; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 is the central component of the human complement system. It is ~186 kDa in size, consisting of an α-chain (~110 kDa) and a β-chain (~75 kDa) that are connected by cysteine bridges. C3 in its native form is inactive. Cleavage of C3 into C3b (~177 kDa) and C3a (~9 kDa) is a crucial step in the complement activation cascade, which can be initiated by one or more of the three distinct pathways, called alternative, classical and lectin complement pathways. In the alternative pathway,...

  2. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  3. Stereoselective bimolecular phenoxyl radical coupling by an auxiliary (dirigent) protein without an active center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davin, L.B.; Wang, Huai-Bin; Crowell, A.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-17

    The regio- and stereospecificity of bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling reactions, of especial importance in lignin and lignan biosynthesis, are clearly controlled in some manner in vivo; yet in vitro coupling by oxidases, such as laccases, only produce racemic products. In other words, laccases, peroxidases, and comparable oxidases are unable to control regio- or stereospecificity by themselves and thus some other agent must exist. A 78-kilodalton protein has been isolated that, in the presence of an oxidase or one electron oxidant, effects stereoselective bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling in vitro. Itself lacking a catalytically active (oxidative) center, its mechanism of action is presumed to involve capture of E-coniferyl alcohol-derived free-radical intermediates, with consequent stereoselective coupling to give (+)-pinoresinol. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Nanosecond pump and probe observation of bimolecular exciton effects in rubrene single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kebra A.; Richman, Brittany R.; Biaggio, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Transient grating pump and probe experiments are used to investigate excitonic processes on the nanosecond time scale in rubrene single crystals. We find that bimolecular interactions cause a photoinduced excited state density on the order of 0.5 × 1020 cm-3—corresponding to an average distance of ˜3 nm between individual states—to decrease by a factor of 2 after 2 ns, following a typical power-law decay. We assign the observed power-law decays to high-density interactions between excited states. Because of the high efficiency singlet exciton fission observed in rubrene, these bimolecular interactions are likely those between triplet excitons or between coherent quantum superpositions of a singlet and a pair of triplet-excitons.

  5. Nanosecond pump and probe observation of bimolecular exciton effects in rubrene single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Kebra A.; Richman, Brittany R.; Biaggio, Ivan [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Transient grating pump and probe experiments are used to investigate excitonic processes on the nanosecond time scale in rubrene single crystals. We find that bimolecular interactions cause a photoinduced excited state density on the order of 0.5 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}—corresponding to an average distance of ∼3 nm between individual states—to decrease by a factor of 2 after 2 ns, following a typical power-law decay. We assign the observed power-law decays to high-density interactions between excited states. Because of the high efficiency singlet exciton fission observed in rubrene, these bimolecular interactions are likely those between triplet excitons or between coherent quantum superpositions of a singlet and a pair of triplet-excitons.

  6. Bimolecular crystals with an intercalated structure improve poly(p-phenylenevinylene)-based organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyung-Geun; Park, Jun-Mo; Mangold, Hannah; Laquai, Frédéric; Choi, Tae-Lim; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The exciton dissociation, recombination, and charge transport of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) is influenced strongly by the nanomorphology of the blend, such as the grain size and the molecular packing. Although it is well known that polymers based on amorphous poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) have a fundamental limit to their efficiency because of low carrier mobility, which leads to increased recombination and unbalanced charge extraction, herein, we demonstrate that the issue can be overcome by forming bimolecular crystals of an amorphous PPV-based polymer:phenyl-C61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) intercalated structure. We used amorphous poly(2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylene vinylene-alt-2',5'-thienylene vinylene) (PPVTV), which has a simple chemical structure. A reasonably high power conversion efficiency (∼3.5 %) was obtained, although the material has an intrinsically amorphous structure and a relatively large band gap (2.0 eV). We demonstrate a correlation between a well-ordered bimolecular crystal of PPVTV:PCBM and an improved hole mobility of a PPVTV:PCBM film compared to a pristine PPVTV film by using 2 D grazing incidence XRD and space-charge-limited current measurements. Furthermore, we show that the bimolecular crystal structure in high-performance OPVs is related to an optimum molecular packing, which is influenced by the PPVTV:PCBM blending ratio, side-chain length, and molecular weight of the PPVTV polymer. Improved charge transport in PPVTV:PCBM bimolecular crystals leads to a fast sweep out of charges and thus suppression of nongeminate recombination under the operating conditions.

  7. Detonation wave solutions and linear stability in a four component gas with bimolecular chemical reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Filipe; De Silva, A.W.; Soares, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a four component gas undergoing a bimolecular chemical reaction of type A1 + A2 = A3 + A4, described by the Boltzmann equation (BE) for chemically reactive mixtures. We adopt hard-spheres elastic cross sections and modified line-of-centers reactive cross sections depending on both the activation energy and geometry of the reactive collisions. Then we consider the hydrodynamic limit specified by the reactive Euler equations, in an earlier stage of the chemical reaction, when the ga...

  8. Uncertainty for calculating transport on Titan: A probabilistic description of bimolecular diffusion parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessis, S.; McDougall, D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T.; Luspay-Kuti, A.

    2015-11-01

    Bimolecular diffusion coefficients are important parameters used by atmospheric models to calculate altitude profiles of minor constituents in an atmosphere. Unfortunately, laboratory measurements of these coefficients were never conducted at temperature conditions relevant to the atmosphere of Titan. Here we conduct a detailed uncertainty analysis of the bimolecular diffusion coefficient parameters as applied to Titan's upper atmosphere to provide a better understanding of the impact of uncertainty for this parameter on models. Because temperature and pressure conditions are much lower than the laboratory conditions in which bimolecular diffusion parameters were measured, we apply a Bayesian framework, a problem-agnostic framework, to determine parameter estimates and associated uncertainties. We solve the Bayesian calibration problem using the open-source QUESO library which also performs a propagation of uncertainties in the calibrated parameters to temperature and pressure conditions observed in Titan's upper atmosphere. Our results show that, after propagating uncertainty through the Massman model, the uncertainty in molecular diffusion is highly correlated to temperature and we observe no noticeable correlation with pressure. We propagate the calibrated molecular diffusion estimate and associated uncertainty to obtain an estimate with uncertainty due to bimolecular diffusion for the methane molar fraction as a function of altitude. Results show that the uncertainty in methane abundance due to molecular diffusion is in general small compared to eddy diffusion and the chemical kinetics description. However, methane abundance is most sensitive to uncertainty in molecular diffusion above 1200 km where the errors are nontrivial and could have important implications for scientific research based on diffusion models in this altitude range.

  9. Finite Complements in English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronald W. Langacker

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the conceptual basis of finite complimentation in English.It first considem the distinguishing property of a finite clause,namely grounding,effeeted by tense and the modals.Notions crucial for clausal grounding--including a reality conception and the striving for control at the effective and epistemic levelsalso figure in the semantic import of eomplementation.An essential feature of complement constructions is the involvement of multiple conceptualizers,each with their own conception of reality.The different types of complement and their grammatical markings can be characterized on this basis.Finite complements differ from other types by virtue of expressing an autonomous proposition capable of being apprehended by multiple conceptualizers,each from their own vantage point.Acognitive model representing phases in the striving for epistemic control provides a partial basis for the semantic description of predicates taking finite complements.The same model supports the description of both personal and impersonal complement constructions.

  10. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  11. Complement receptor 2–mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; GUTHRIDGE, JOEL M.; Holers, V. Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the mem...

  12. Bimolecular reactions of activated species: An analysis of problematic HC(O)C(O) chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin J.; Robertson, Struan H.; Blitz, Mark A.; Seakins, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the importance of non-thermal bimolecular association chemistry. Recently a fully reversible method for incorporating any number of such non-thermal reactions into a single master equation has been developed (Green and Robertson, 2014) [10]. Using this methodology experimental results for the system: (1) (CHO)2 + OH → HC(O)C(O) + H2O, (2) HC(O)C(O) → HCO + CO, (3) HC(O)C(O) + O2 → OH + CO + CO2, are modeled, reproducing the temperature and pressure dependence of the OH yield. An issue remains as to how to model energy partition into HC(O)C(O).

  13. Theoretical Study of Electron Transfer in Bimolecular System of NH3 and H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mulliken, NPA, MK and CHelpG population analyses have been accomplished at the level of MP2/6-31G(d,p) for the title system. The variations of four kinds of charges on NH3 with intermolecular distance infer that electron transfers from NH3 to H2O. MK and CHelpG population analyses indicate more electron transfer than Mulliken and NPA ones. The atomic charges resulted from MK and CHelpG schemes infer that electron transfers from N in NH3 to H in H2O, which confirms that this bimolecular complex possesses linear structure as H3N…HOH.

  14. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  15. Material properties in complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S. Moein; Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2011-01-01

    -immune performance’ relationship studies in nanomedicine research at many fronts. The interaction between nanomaterials and the complement system is complex and regulated by inter-related factors that include nanoscale size, morphology and surface characteristics. Each of these parameters may affect complement...... activation differently and through different sensing molecules and initiation pathways. The importance of material properties in triggering complement is considered and mechanistic aspects discussed. Mechanistic understanding of complement events could provide rational approaches for improved material design...

  16. Improved understanding of bimolecular reactions in deceptively simple homogeneous media: From laboratory experiments to Lagrangian quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Qian, Jiazhong; Papelis, Charalambos; Sun, Pengtao; Yu, Zhongbo

    2014-02-01

    Medium heterogeneity affects reaction kinetics by controlling the mixing of reactant particles, but the linkage between medium properties and reaction kinetics is difficult to build, even for simple, relatively homogeneous media. This study aims to explore the dynamics of bimolecular reactions, aniline + 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid → 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-aminobenzene, in relatively homogeneous flow cells. Laboratory experiments were conducted to monitor the transport of both conservative and reactive tracers through columns packed with silica sand of specific diameters. The measured tracer breakthrough curves exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a late-time tail becoming more pronounced with decreasing sand size, probably due to the segregated flow regions formed more easily in columns packed with smaller size sand. Numerical analysis using a novel Lagrangian model shows that subdiffusion has a twofold effect on bimolecular reactions. While subdiffusion enhances the power-law growth rate of product mass by prolonging the exposure of reactant particles in the depletion zone, the global reaction rate is constrained because subdiffusion constrains the mobility of reactant particles. Reactive kinetics in deceptively simple homogeneous media is therefore controlled by subdiffusion, which is sensitive to the dimensions of packed sand.

  17. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    (e.g. anti-C1inhibitor, anti-factor H) are important in defining autoimmune processes and diseases based on complement dysregulation. To improve the quality of complement laboratory analysis a standardization commmittee of the International Complement Society (ICS) and the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) was formed to provide guidelines for modern complement analysis and standards for the development of international testing programs. PMID:27475991

  18. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    (e.g. anti-C1inhibitor, anti-factor H) are important in defining autoimmune processes and diseases based on complement dysregulation. To improve the quality of complement laboratory analysis a standardization commmittee of the International Complement Society (ICS) and the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) was formed to provide guidelines for modern complement analysis and standards for the development of international testing programs.

  19. Complement component 3 (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003539.htm Complement component 3 (C3) To use the sharing features on this page, ... be some throbbing. Why the Test is Performed C3 and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor ...

  20. Ancient origins: complement in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SV Nair

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteins with obvious similarities to mammalian complement are widely distributed in the animal kingdom.In the vertebrate lineage, deuterostomes like sea urchins and tunicates express proteins that arehomologues of C3, the central component of the vertebrate complement cascade. Their genomes alsoencode molecules resembling factor B from the “alternative” complement activation pathway; andtunicates have collagenous lectins of the type that can activate complement in the absence of antibodies.This suggests that the core components of the complement system evolved before antibodies, which firstappear in jawed fish.

  1. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital. PMID:25941756

  2. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  3. Data preprocessing for parameter estimation. An application to a reactive bimolecular transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Cuch, Daniel A; Hasi, Claudio D El

    2015-01-01

    In this work we are concerned with the inverse problem of the estimation of modeling parameters for a reactive bimolecular transport based on experimental data that is non-uniformly distributed along the interval where the process takes place. We proposed a methodology that can help to determine the intervals where most of the data should be taken in order to obtain a good estimation of the parameters. For the purpose of reducing the cost of laboratory experiments, we propose to simulate data where is needed and it is not available, a PreProcesing Data Fitting (PPDF).We applied this strategy on the estimation of parameters for an advection-diffusion-reaction problem in a porous media. Each step is explained in detail and simulation results are shown and compared with previous ones.

  4. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally ...

  5. Complement system in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Pankita H; Wilkes, David S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  6. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition. PMID:12813023

  7. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  8. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    B cell receptor for antigen (BCR), a complex composed of the iC3b/C3d fragment-binding complement type 2 receptor (CR2, CD21) and its signaling element CD19 and the IgG-binding receptor FcgammaRIIb (CD32). The positive or negative outcome of signaling through this triad is determined by the context...... in which antigen is seen, be it alone or in association with natural or induced antibodies and/or C3-complement fragments. The aim of this review is to describe the present status of our understanding of complement's participation in acquired immunity and the regulation of autoimmune responses.......The preliminary evidence for the involvement of complement in promoting primary humoral responses dates back over a quarter of a century. However, it is only in the course of the past decade or so that the detailed mechanisms underlying complement's influence have been characterized in depth. It is...

  9. Development of Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation reagents for the detection of Arabidopsis thaliana KAT1 protein-protein interactions using the Golden Braid cloning system

    OpenAIRE

    MOSSI ALBIACH, ALEJANDRO

    2016-01-01

    [EN] KAT1 is an Arabidopsis thaliana potassium voltage-gated channel of the Shaker family. This ion channel is fundamental for the control of membrane conductance in guard cells, leading to stomatal opening or closing in response to environmental changes. The stomatal movement controls the gas exchange, as well as the amount of water lost due to transpiration. Therefore, the underlying mechanisms of these stomatal movements will likely be influenced by proteins that regulate KAT1 ...

  10. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  11. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani A.

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  12. A transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate of bimolecular reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction demonstrate a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate—increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. In previous work, this reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), leading to predictions that front motion scales as √t, and correspondingly the spatially integrated reaction rate decreases as the square root of time 1/√t. We present a general nondimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the spatially integrated reaction rate scales as √t rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the spatially integrated reaction rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) is shown to depend on the kinetic rate parameters, diffusion coefficients, and initial concentrations of the two species. Numerical simulation results confirm the theoretical estimates of the transition time. We present illustrative calculations in the context of in situ chemical oxidation for remediation of fractured rock systems where contaminants are largely dissolved in the rock matrix. We consider different contaminants of concern (COCs), including TCE, PCE, MTBE, and RDX. While the early time regime is very short lived for TCE, it can persist over months to years for MTBE and RDX, due to slow oxidation kinetics.

  13. On the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant of the Bimolecular Reaction of two Hydrated Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Butarbutar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been a longstanding issue in the radiation chemistry of water that, even though H2 is a molecular product, its “escape” yield g(H2 increases with increasing temperature. A main source of H2 is the bimolecular reaction of two hydrated electrons (eaq. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of this reaction (k1, measured under alkaline conditions, reveals that the rate constant drops abruptly above ~150°C. Recently, it has been suggested that this temperature dependence should be regarded as being independent of pH and used in high-temperature modeling of near-neutral water radiolysis. However, when this drop in the eaq self-reaction rate constant is included in low (isolated spurs and high (cylindrical tracks linear energy transfer (LET modeling calculations, g(H2 shows a marked downward discontinuity at ~150°C which is not observed experimentally. The consequences of the presence of this discontinuity in g(H2 for both low and high LET radiation are briefly discussed in this communication. It is concluded that the applicability of the sudden drop in k1 observed at ~150°C in alkaline water to near-neutral water is questionable and that further measurements of the rate constant in pure water are highly desirable.

  14. Heat differentiated complement factor profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsten, Carl; Skattum, Lillemor; Truedsson, Lennart; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Uhlén, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hammarström, Lennart; Nilsson, Peter; Neiman, Maja

    2015-08-01

    Complement components and their cascade of reactions are important defense mechanisms within both innate and adaptive immunity. Many complement deficient patients still remain undiagnosed because of a lack of high throughput screening tools. Aiming towards neonatal proteome screening for immunodeficiencies, we used a multiplex profiling approach with antibody bead arrays to measure 9 complement proteins in serum and dried blood spots. Several complement components have been described as heat sensitive, thus their heat-dependent detectability was investigated. Using sera from 16 patients with complement deficiencies and 23 controls, we confirmed that the proteins C1q, C2, C3, C6, C9 and factor H were positively affected by heating, thus the identification of deficient patients was improved when preheating samples. Measurements of C7, C8 and factor I were negatively affected by heating and non-heated samples should be used in analysis of these components. In addition, a proof of concept study demonstrated the feasibility of labeling eluates from dried blood spots to perform a subsequent correct classification of C2-deficiencies. Our study demonstrates the potential of using multiplexed single binder assays for screening of complement components that open possibilities to expand such analysis to other forms of deficiencies.

  15. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  16. Cooperation with Complement is Better

    CERN Document Server

    Yildirim, Ilker

    2008-01-01

    In a setting where heterogeneous agents interact to accomplish a given set of goals, cooperation is of utmost importance, especially when agents cannot achieve their individual goals by exclusive use of their own efforts. Even when we consider friendly environments and benevolent agents, cooperation involves several issues: with whom to cooperate, reciprocation, how to address credit assignment and complex division of gains, etc. We propose a model where heterogeneous agents cooperate by forming groups and formation of larger groups is promoted. Benefit of agents is proportional to the performance and the size of the group. There is a time pressure to form a group. We investigate how preferring similar or complement agents in group formation affects an agent's success. Preferring complement in group formation is found to be better, yet there is no need to push the strategy to the extreme since the effect of complementing partners is saturated.

  17. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Complement reagent. (a) Identification. A complement reagent is a device that consists of complement,...

  18. Complex arrangements whose complement has Euler characteristic +/-1

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Philippe; Laeremans, A.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we prove that a complex arrangement (i.e. a finite union of hyperplanes in C-n) whose complement has Euler characteristic +/-1 is defined over Q, meaning that there exist coordinates such that the equations of the hyperplanes of the arrangement have rational coefficients.

  19. Complement: Alive and Kicking Nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Hashemi, S.H.; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2009-01-01

    Administration of liposome- and polymer-based clinical nanomedicines, as well as many other proposed multifunctional nanoparticles, often triggers hypersensitivity reactions without the involvement of IgE. These anaphylactic reactions are believed to be secondary to activation of the complement...

  20. The lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie Diederich; Haugaard, Anna Karen; Garred, P;

    2014-01-01

    The pattern recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are important components of the innate immune system with known functions in host-virus interactions. This paper summarizes current knowledge of how these intriguing molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL), Ficolin-1, -2...

  1. Charge carrier concentration dependence of encounter-limited bimolecular recombination in phase-separated organic semiconductor blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiber, Michael C.; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Deibel, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the complex intermolecular configurations and nanostructure present in organic semiconductor donor-acceptor blends impacts charge carrier motion, interactions, and recombination behavior is a critical fundamental issue with a particularly major impact on organic photovoltaic applications. In this study, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are used to numerically quantify the complex bimolecular charge carrier recombination behavior in idealized phase-separated blends. Recent KMC simulations have identified how the encounter-limited bimolecular recombination rate in these blends deviates from the often used Langevin model and have been used to construct the new power mean mobility model. Here, we make a challenging but crucial expansion to this work by determining the charge carrier concentration dependence of the encounter-limited bimolecular recombination coefficient. In doing so, we find that an accurate treatment of the long-range electrostatic interactions between charge carriers is critical, and we further argue that many previous KMC simulation studies have used a Coulomb cutoff radius that is too small, which causes a significant overestimation of the recombination rate. To shed more light on this issue, we determine the minimum cutoff radius required to reach an accuracy of less than ±10 % as a function of the domain size and the charge carrier concentration and then use this knowledge to accurately quantify the charge carrier concentration dependence of the recombination rate. Using these rigorous methods, we finally show that the parameters of the power mean mobility model are determined by a newly identified dimensionless ratio of the domain size to the average charge carrier separation distance.

  2. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Decarboxylation chemistry has a rich history, and in more recent times, it has been recruited in the quest to develop cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient bond-coupling reactions. Thus, over the past two decades, there has been intense investigation into new metal-catalyzed reactions of carboxylic substrates. Understanding the elementary steps of metal-mediated transformations is at the heart of inventing new reactions and improving the performance of existing ones. Fortunately, during the same time period, there has been a convergence in mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, which allows these catalytic processes to be examined efficiently in the gas phase. Thus, electrospray ionization (ESI) sources have been combined with ion-trap mass spectrometers, which in turn have been modified to either accept radiation from tunable OPO lasers for spectroscopy based structural assignment of ions or to allow the study of ion-molecule reactions (IMR). The resultant "complete" gas-phase chemical laboratories provide a platform to study the elementary steps of metal-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in exquisite detail. In this Account, we illustrate how the powerful combination of ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations can be systematically used to examine the formation of organometallic ions and their chemical transformations. Specifically, ESI-MS allows the transfer of inorganic carboxylate complexes, [RCO2M(L)n](x), (x = charge) from the condensed to the gas phase. These mass selected ions serve as precursors to organometallic ions [RM(L)n](x) via neutral extrusion of CO2, accessible by slow heating in the ion trap using collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach provides access to an array of organometallic ions with well-defined stoichiometry. In terms of understanding the decarboxylation process, we highlight the role of the metal center (M), the organic group (R), and the auxiliary ligand (L), along with cluster nuclearity, in

  3. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    complement pathway regulator MAP-1. Furthermore, we found that complex formation between recombinant collectin-11 and recombinant MASP-2 on Candida albicans leads to deposition of C4b. Native collectin-11 in serum mediated complement activation and deposition of C4b and C3b, and formation of the terminal...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  4. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    of the B cell receptor for antigen (BCR), a complex composed of the iC3b/C3d fragment-binding complement type 2 receptor (CR2, CD21) and its signaling element CD19 and the IgG-binding receptor FcgammaRIIb (CD32). The positive or negative outcome of signaling through this triad is determined by the context...

  5. Charge-carrier relaxation dynamics in highly ordered poly( p -phenylene vinylene): Effects of carrier bimolecular recombination and trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soci, Cesare; Moses, Daniel; Xu, Qing-Hua; Heeger, Alan J.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the charge-carrier relaxation dynamics in highly ordered poly( p -phenylene vinylene) over a broad time range using fast (t>100ps) transient photoconductivity measurements. The carrier density was also monitored (t>100fs) by means of photoinduced absorption probed at the infrared active vibrational modes. We find that promptly upon charge-carrier photogeneration, the initial polaron dynamics is governed by bimolecular recombination, while later in the subnanosecond time regime carrier trapping gives rise to an exponential decay of the photocurrent. The more sensitive transient photocurrent measurements indicate that in the low excitation regime, when the density of photocarriers is comparable to that of the trapping states (˜1016cm-3) , carrier hopping between traps along with transport via extended states determines the carrier relaxation, a mechanism that is manifested by a long-lived photocurrent “tail.” This photocurrent tail is reduced by lowering the temperature and/or by increasing the excitation density. Based on these data, we develop a comprehensive kinetic model that takes into account the bipolar charge transport, the free-carrier bimolecular recombination, the carrier trapping, and the carrier recombination involving free and trapped carriers.

  6. Complement activation and complement control proteins in acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Whicher, J T; Barnes, M. P.; Brown, A; Cooper, M J; Read, R; Walters, G; Williamson, R C

    1982-01-01

    Serum levels of the complement proteins C3, C4, C1 inhibitor (C1 INH), factor I (C3b inactivator) and factor H (BIH) and plasma levels of cleavage products of C3 (C3c) and factor B were measured in 26 patients with acute pancreatitis. Breakdown of C3 occurred in 19 patients, as shown by a reduction in C3 level and the presence of C3c. C4 levels, however, did not fall and factor B breakdown products were not detected, thus suggesting that enzymatic cleavage of C3 occurred without significant i...

  7. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child.

  8. Complement activation in experimental human malaria infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Mollnes, T.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Klasen, I.S.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate complement activation in uncomplicated, early phases of human malaria. Fifteen healthy volunteers were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Parasitemia and complement activation products were assessed. During blood stage parasitem

  9. conformational complexity of complement component C3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the immune system and critical for the elimination of pathogens. In mammals the complement system consists of an intricate set of about 35 soluble and cell-surface plasma proteins. Central to complement is component C3, a large protein of 1,641 residues.

  10. ON COMPLEMENTED SUBGROUPS OF FINITE GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A subgroup H of a finite group G is said to be complemented in G if there exists a subgroup K of G such that G = HK and H ∩ K = 1. In this case, K is called a complement of H in G.In this note some results on complemented subgroups of finite groups are obtained.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the complement system decreases blood levels of another complement protein called C3, reducing the immune system's ability to fight infections. ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition C3 inactivator deficiency complement component 3 inactivator deficiency Related Information How are ...

  12. Complement in Lupus Nephritis: New Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Quigg, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder caused by loss of tolerance to self-antigens, the production of autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing immune complexes (ICs) in injured tissues. SLE is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and targeted organs, with lupus nephritis being one of the most serious complications. The complement system consists of three pathways and is tightly controlled by a set of regulatory proteins to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of SLE is well accepted; yet, its exact role is still not clear. Summary Complement plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. On the one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classical pathway components, such as C1q and C4, are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, IC-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathological features that are logical consequences of complement activation. Studies in genetically altered mice have shown that lack of complement inhibitors, such as complement factor H (CFH) or decay-accelerating factor (DAF) accelerates the development of experimental lupus nephritis, while treatment with recombinant protein inhibitors, such as Crry-Ig, CR2-Crry, CR2-DAF and CR2-CFH, ameliorates the disease development. Complement-targeted drugs, including soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10), C1 esterase inhibitor and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab), have been shown to inhibit complement safely, and are now being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Key Messages SLE is an autoimmune disorder which targets multiple systems. Complement is centrally involved and plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. Studies from experimental lupus models and clinical

  13. The Complement System in Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebin Qin; Bin Gao

    2006-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in mediating both acquired and innate responses to defend against microbial infection, and in disposing immunoglobins and apoptotic cells. The liver (mainly hepatocytes) is responsible for biosynthesis of about 80-90% of plasma complement components and expresses a variety of complement receptors.Recent evidence from several studies suggests that the complement system is also involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders including liver injury and repair, fibrosis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of liver diseases.

  14. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    activation, the coagulation system and the complement system. The complement system is an important part of the initial immune response and consists of fluid phase molecules in the blood stream. Three different activation pathways can initiate the complement system, the lectin, the classical...... and the alternative pathway, all converging in an amplification loop of the cascade system and downstream reactions. Thus, when exposed to foreign substances complement components will be activated and lead to a powerful inflammatory response. Biosurface induced complement activation is a recognised issue that has...

  15. Why the apparent order of bimolecular recombination in blend organic solar cells can be larger than two: A topological consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenashev, A. V.; Wiemer, M.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Gebhard, F.; Koch, M.; Baranovskii, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    The apparent order δ of non-geminate recombination higher than δ = 2 has been evidenced in numerous experiments on organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structures intensively studied for photovoltaic applications. This feature is claimed puzzling, since the rate of the bimolecular recombination in organic BHJ systems is proportional to the product of the concentrations of recombining electrons and holes and therefore the reaction order δ = 2 is expected. In organic BHJ structures, electrons and holes are confined to two different material phases: electrons to the acceptor material (usually a fullerene derivative) while holes to the donor phase (usually a polymer). The non-geminate recombination of charge carriers can therefore happen only at the interfaces between the two phases. Considering a simple geometrical model of the BHJ system, we show that the apparent order of recombination can deviate from δ = 2 due solely to the topological structure of the system.

  16. Unusual charge transport and reduced bimolecular recombination in PDTSiTzTz:PC71BM bulk heterojunction blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar cells with bulk heterojunction active layers containing donor-acceptor copolymer PDTSiTzTz exhibit persistent high fill factors with thicknesses up to 400 nm. Transport and recombination in a blend of PDTSiTzTz and fullerene derivative PC71BM is studied using lateral organic photovoltaic structures. This material system is characterized by carrier-concentration-dependent charge carrier mobilities, a strongly reduced bimolecular recombination factor, and a negative Poole–Frenkel coefficient. The analysis provides an explanation for the relatively thickness-independent fill factor behaviour seen in solar cells using the copolymer PDTSiTzTz. Cumulative insights from this copolymer can be employed for future organic photovoltaic material development, study of existing high performance bulk heterojunciton blends, and improved solar cell design. (paper)

  17. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  18. CR2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors: bench-to-bedside using a novel strategy for site-specific complement modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of the first human complement pathway-directed therapeutics, along with high-profile genetic association studies, has catalyzed renewed biopharmaceutical interest in developing drugs that modulate the complement system. Substantial challenges remain, however, that must be overcome before widespread application of complement inhibitors in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases becomes possible. Among these challenges are the following: (1) defining the complement pathways and effector mechanisms that cause tissue injury in humans and determining whether the relative importance of each varies by disease, (2) blocking or modulating, using traditional small molecule or biologic approaches, the function of complement proteins whose circulating levels are very high and whose turnover rates are relatively rapid, especially in the setting of acute and chronic autoimmune diseases, and (3) avoiding infectious complications or impairment of other important physiological functions of complement when using systemically active complement-blocking agents. This chapter will review data that address these challenges to therapeutic development, with a focus on the development of a novel strategy of blocking specific complement pathways by targeting inhibitors using a recombinant portion of the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) which specifically targets to sites of local complement C3 activation where C3 fragments are covalently fixed. Recently, the first of these CR2-targeted proteins has entered human phase I studies in the human disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The results of murine translational studies using CR2-targeted inhibitors strongly suggest that a guiding principle going forward in complement therapeutic development may well be to focus on developing strategies to modulate the pathway as precisely as possible by physically localizing therapeutic inhibitory effects. PMID:23402024

  19. CR2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors: bench-to-bedside using a novel strategy for site-specific complement modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of the first human complement pathway-directed therapeutics, along with high-profile genetic association studies, has catalyzed renewed biopharmaceutical interest in developing drugs that modulate the complement system. Substantial challenges remain, however, that must be overcome before widespread application of complement inhibitors in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases becomes possible. Among these challenges are the following: (1) defining the complement pathways and effector mechanisms that cause tissue injury in humans and determining whether the relative importance of each varies by disease, (2) blocking or modulating, using traditional small molecule or biologic approaches, the function of complement proteins whose circulating levels are very high and whose turnover rates are relatively rapid, especially in the setting of acute and chronic autoimmune diseases, and (3) avoiding infectious complications or impairment of other important physiological functions of complement when using systemically active complement-blocking agents. This chapter will review data that address these challenges to therapeutic development, with a focus on the development of a novel strategy of blocking specific complement pathways by targeting inhibitors using a recombinant portion of the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) which specifically targets to sites of local complement C3 activation where C3 fragments are covalently fixed. Recently, the first of these CR2-targeted proteins has entered human phase I studies in the human disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The results of murine translational studies using CR2-targeted inhibitors strongly suggest that a guiding principle going forward in complement therapeutic development may well be to focus on developing strategies to modulate the pathway as precisely as possible by physically localizing therapeutic inhibitory effects.

  20. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  1. Complement diagnostics: concepts, indications, and practical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the complement system have been shown to be direct or indirect pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions such as autoimmune disease, infections, cancer, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation, and inflammation. Complement analyses have been performed on these conditions in both prospective and retrospective studies and significant differences have been found between groups of patients, but in many diseases, it has not been possible to make predictions for individual patients because of the lack of sensitivity and specificity of many of the assays used. The basic indications for serological diagnostic complement analysis today may be divided into three major categories: (a) acquired and inherited complement deficiencies; (b) disorders with complement activation; (c) inherited and acquired C1INH deficiencies. Here, we summarize indications, techniques, and interpretations for basic complement analyses and present an algorithm, which we follow in our routine laboratory.

  2. Complement pathways and meningococcal disease : diagnostic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, A G; Truedsson, L; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an immunological effector system that bridges innate and acquired immunity in several ways. There is a striking association between susceptibility to meningococcal disease and various forms of complement deficiency (1,2). In defense against bacterial infection, the most important...... function of complement is probably to serve as a mediator of antibody-dependent immunity. Specific antibodies can trigger activation of the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation (3-5). It is well known that antibody-independent mechanisms interfere with alternative pathway...... activation on the bacterial surface (6,7). The newly discovered mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation appears to be protective against many types of infection (8) and adds previously unsuspected aspects of innate immunity to complement-mediated defense. Interestingly, immune responses...

  3. Role of complement in multiorgan failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Redl, Heinz; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Multiorgan failure (MOF) represents the leading cause of death in patients with sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) following severe trauma. The underlying immune response is highly complex and involves activation of the complement system as a crucial entity of innate immunity. Uncontrolled activation of the complement system during sepsis and SIRS with in excessive generation of complement activation products contributes to an ensuing dysfunction of various organ system...

  4. The role of complement activation in atherogenesis: the first 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaicu, Sonia I; Tatomir, Alexandru; Rus, Violeta; Mekala, Armugam P; Mircea, Petru A; Niculescu, Florin; Rus, Horea

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of atherosclerotic inflammation is a multi-step process defined by the interweaving of excess modified lipid particles, monocyte-macrophages populations, and innate immune and adaptive immunity effectors. A part of innate immunity, the complement system, is an important player in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis. The accumulation of either oxidized or enzymatically modified LDL-bound to C-reactive protein or not-prompts complement activation leading to the assembly of the terminal complement C5b-9 complex in the atherosclerotic lesion. The sublytic C5b-9 assembly leads to the activation and proliferation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells, accompanied by the release of various chemotactic, pro-adhesion, and procoagulant cytokines from these cells. Response gene to complement (RGC)-32, an essential effector of the terminal complement complex C5b-9, also affects atherogenesis, propelling vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, stimulating endothelial proliferation, and promoting vascular lesion formation. A substantial amount of experimental work has suggested a role for the complement system activation during atherosclerotic plaque formation, with the proximal classical complement pathway seemingly having a protective effect and terminal complement contributing to accelerated atherogenesis. All these data suggest that complement plays an important role in atherogenesis. PMID:26091721

  5. conformational complexity of complement component C3

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, B.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the immune system and critical for the elimination of pathogens. In mammals the complement system consists of an intricate set of about 35 soluble and cell-surface plasma proteins. Central to complement is component C3, a large protein of 1,641 residues. Activation of C3 into C3b leads to several molecular and cellular responses, and to stimulation of the adaptive immune system. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the complement system, the central com...

  6. Complement: an overview for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune system. It is a highly integrative system and has a number of functions, including host defense, removal of injured cells and debris, modulation of metabolic and regenerative processes, and regulation of adaptive immunity. Complement is activated via different pathways and it is regulated tightly by several mechanisms to prevent host injury. Imbalance between complement activation and regulation can manifest in disease and injury to self. This article provides an outline of complement activation pathways, regulatory mechanisms, and normal physiologic functions of the system.

  7. Complement activation and inhibition: a delicate balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, A P; Trouw, L A; Blom, A M

    2009-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune defence and not only recognizes microbes but also unwanted host molecules to enhance phagocytosis and clearance. This process of opsonisation must be tightly regulated to prevent immunopathology. Endogenous ligands such as dying cells, extracellular matrix...... proteins, pentraxins, amyloid deposits, prions and DNA, all bind the complement activator C1q, but also interact with complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein and factor H. This contrasts to the interaction between C1q and immune complexes, in which case no inhibitors bind, resulting in full complement...

  8. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Q Gaunsbaek

    Full Text Available The complement system is an important part of our immune system, and complement defects lead generally to increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. We have studied the role of complement activity in relation with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, and more specifically studied whether complement defects collectively predispose individuals for CRS or affect CRS severity. The participants comprised 87 CRS patients randomly selected from the general population, and a control group of 150 healthy blood donors. The CRS patients were diagnosed according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and nasal Polyps criteria, and severity was evaluated by the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-22. Serum samples were analysed by ELISA for activity of the respective pathways of complement, and subsequently for serum levels of relevant components. We found that the frequency of complement defects was significantly higher among CRS patients than among healthy control subjects. A majority of Mannan-binding lectin deficient CRS patients was observed. The presence of complement defects had no influence on the severity of subjective symptoms. Our studies show that defects in the complement system collectively may play an immunological role related to the development of CRS. However, an association between severity of symptoms and presence of complement defects could not be demonstrated.

  9. Role of Complement in Multiorgan Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rittirsch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiorgan failure (MOF represents the leading cause of death in patients with sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS following severe trauma. The underlying immune response is highly complex and involves activation of the complement system as a crucial entity of innate immunity. Uncontrolled activation of the complement system during sepsis and SIRS with in excessive generation of complement activation products contributes to an ensuing dysfunction of various organ systems. In the present review, mechanisms of the inflammatory response in the development of MOF in sepsis and SIRS with particular focus on the complement system are discussed.

  10. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  11. Complement Plays an Important Role in Spinal Cord Injury and Represents a Therapeutic Target for Improving Recovery following Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Pannu, Ravinder; Singh, Inderjit; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of an inflammatory cascade following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is thought to cause secondary injury and to adversely impact functional recovery, although the mechanisms involved are not well defined. We report on the dynamics of complement activation and deposition in the mouse spinal cord following traumatic injury, the role of complement in the development of SCI, and the characterization of a novel targeted complement inhibitor. Following traumatic injury, mice deficien...

  12. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  13. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P;

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  14. Complement resistance mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduijn, Dennis J; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Schaik, Willem; Bardoel, Bart W

    2016-10-01

    The current emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causes major problems in hospitals worldwide. To survive within the host, bacterial pathogens exploit several escape mechanisms to prevent detection and killing by the immune system. As a major player in immune defense, the complement system recognizes and destroys bacteria via different effector mechanisms. The complement system can label bacteria for phagocytosis or directly kill Gram-negative bacteria via insertion of a pore-forming complex in the bacterial membrane. The multi-drug resistant pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae exploits several mechanisms to resist complement. In this review, we present an overview of strategies used by K. pneumoniae to prevent recognition and killing by the complement system. Understanding these complement evasion strategies is crucial for the development of innovative strategies to combat K. pneumoniae. PMID:27364766

  15. Simulation study of the losses and influences of geminate and bimolecular recombination on the performances of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱键卓; 祁令辉; 杜会静; 柴莺春

    2015-01-01

    We use the method of device simulation to study the losses and influences of geminate and bimolecular recombinations on the performances and properties of the bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. We find that a fraction of electrons (holes) in the device are collected by anode (cathode). The direction of the corresponding current is opposite to the direction of photocurrent. And the current density increases with the bias increasing but decreases as bimolecular recombination (BR) or geminate recombination (GR) intensity increases. The maximum power, short circuit current, and fill factor display a stronger dependence on GR than on BR. While the influences of GR and BR on open circuit voltage are about the same. Our studies shed a new light on the loss mechanism and may provide a new way of improving the efficiency of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

  16. Effects of Bimolecular Recombination on Impedance Spectra in Organic Semiconductors: Analytical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Masashi; Takagi, Kenichiro; Nagase, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2016-04-01

    An analytical expression for impedance spectra in the case of double injection (both electrons and holes are injected into an organic semiconductor thin film) has been derived from the basic transport equations (the current density equation, the continuity equation and the Possion's equation). Capacitance-frequency characteristics calculated from the analytical expression have been examined at different recombination constants and different values of mobility balance defined by a ratio of electron mobility to hole mobility. Negative capacitance appears when the recombination constant is lower than the Langevin recombination constant and when the value of the mobility balance approaches unity. These results are consistent with the numerical results obtained by a device simulator (Atlas, Silvaco). PMID:27451625

  17. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  18. Complement system part II: role in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas S. Merle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic system, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing a direct killing by C5b-9 membrane attack complex by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a and helps the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T- and B- lymphocytes. But it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Also examples will be discussed, where inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, C3 glomerulopathies (C3G and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Age related macular degeneration (AMD and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of diseases, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target.

  19. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  20. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  1. Comparative assessment of continuum-scale models of bimolecular reactive transport in porous media under pre-asymptotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, G. M.; Ceriotti, G.; Thovert, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the ability of various continuum-scale models to reproduce the key features of a transport setting associated with a bimolecular reaction taking place in the fluid phase and numerically simulated at the pore-scale level in a disordered porous medium. We start by considering a continuum-scale formulation which results from formal upscaling of this reactive transport process by means of volume averaging. The resulting (upscaled) continuum-scale system of equations includes nonlocal integro-differential terms and the effective parameters embedded in the model are quantified directly through computed pore-scale fluid velocity and pore space geometry attributes. The results obtained through this predictive model formulation are then compared against those provided by available effective continuum models which require calibration through parameter estimation. Our analysis considers two models recently proposed in the literature which are designed to embed incomplete mixing arising from the presence of fast reactions under advection-dominated transport conditions. We show that best estimates of the parameters of these two models heavily depend on the type of data employed for model calibration. Our upscaled nonlocal formulation enables us to reproduce most of the critical features observed through pore-scale simulation without any model calibration. As such, our results clearly show that embedding into a continuum-scale model the information content associated with pore-scale geometrical features and fluid velocity yields improved interpretation of typically available continuum-scale transport observations.

  2. Origin of the high open circuit voltage in planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells: Role of the reduced bimolecular recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenchao; Yao, Yao; Wu, Chang-Qin

    2015-03-01

    The high open circuit voltage is an attractive feature for the currently popular organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells. In this paper, by employing the macroscopic device model simulation, we investigate its origin for the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Based on the calculated current density-voltage characteristics, it is revealed that compared to the excitonic solar cells, the fast thermal-activated exciton dissociation in the bulk due to the small exciton binding energy may improve the short circuit current and the fill factor, but its beneficial role on the open circuit voltage is marginal. The most significant contribution for the open circuit voltage comes from the reduced bimolecular recombination. In the perovskites, with the recombination prefactor many orders of magnitude smaller than that based on the Langevin's theory, the internal charge density level is significantly enhanced and the density gradient is removed, leading to the high quasi-Fermi level splitting and thus the small open circuit voltage loss. For the nonradiative recombination pathway due to the deep trap states, it may induce significant loss of open circuit voltage as the trap density is high, while for the moderately low density its effect on the open circuit voltage is small and negligible.

  3. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Bernet; Jayati Mullick; Akhilesh K Singh; Arvind Sahu

    2003-04-01

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the foreign pathogens. Although viruses are smaller in size and have relatively simple structure, they are not immune to complement attack. Thus, activation of the complement system can lead to neutralization of cell-free viruses, phagocytosis of C3b-coated viral particles, lysis of virus-infected cells, and generation of inflammatory and specific immune responses. However, to combat host responses and succeed as pathogens, viruses not only have developed/adopted mechanisms to control complement, but also have turned these interactions to their own advantage. Important examples include poxviruses, herpesviruses, retroviruses, paramyxoviruses and picornaviruses. In this review, we provide information on the various complement evasion strategies that viruses have developed to thwart the complement attack of the host. A special emphasis is given on the interactions between the viral proteins that are involved in molecular mimicry and the complement system.

  4. Properdin in complement activation and tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher, Allison M; Nilsson, Bo; Song, Wen-Chao

    2013-12-15

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: (1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, (2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and (3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases.

  5. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Lange, Bibi; Kjeldsen, Anette D;

    2012-01-01

    whether complement defects collectively predispose individuals for CRS or affect CRS severity. The participants comprised 87 CRS patients randomly selected from the general population, and a control group of 150 healthy blood donors. The CRS patients were diagnosed according to the European Position Paper...... was significantly higher among CRS patients than among healthy control subjects. A majority of Mannan-binding lectin deficient CRS patients was observed. The presence of complement defects had no influence on the severity of subjective symptoms. Our studies show that defects in the complement system collectively...

  6. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  7. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soon Cho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  8. Approximate Schur complement preconditioning of the lowest order nodal discretizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, J.D.; Ascher, U.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morel, J.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Particular classes of nodal methods and mixed hybrid finite element methods lead to equivalent, robust and accurate discretizations of 2nd order elliptic PDEs. However, widespread popularity of these discretizations has been hindered by the awkward linear systems which result. The present work exploits this awkwardness, which provides a natural partitioning of the linear system, by defining two optimal preconditioners based on approximate Schur complements. Central to the optimal performance of these preconditioners is their sparsity structure which is compatible with Dendy`s black box multigrid code.

  9. Quaternions, hexadecanions and the Schur complement in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the mathematical object invented by Sir William Rowan Hamilton, which he called quaternion, and we study its association with the matrix structure known as complement of Schur. We analyze the positivity of quaternions when represented by 2 × 2 matrices. We extend this very concept to the larger mathematical object, which generalizes the quaternion, the hexadecanion, which we shall define and use. We apply Schur's method to a quantum state that describes a beam of particles characterized by discrete degrees of freedom, the internal parity and the spin, as proposed by Lee and Yang (1956 Phys. Rev. 104 822). (paper)

  10. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  11. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  12. Surviving mousepox infection requires the complement system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Moulton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses subvert the host immune response by producing immunomodulatory proteins, including a complement regulatory protein. Ectromelia virus provides a mouse model for smallpox where the virus and the host's immune response have co-evolved. Using this model, our study investigated the role of the complement system during a poxvirus infection. By multiple inoculation routes, ectromelia virus caused increased mortality by 7 to 10 days post-infection in C57BL/6 mice that lack C3, the central component of the complement cascade. In C3(-/- mice, ectromelia virus disseminated earlier to target organs and generated higher peak titers compared to the congenic controls. Also, increased hepatic inflammation and necrosis correlated with these higher tissue titers and likely contributed to the morbidity in the C3(-/- mice. In vitro, the complement system in naïve C57BL/6 mouse sera neutralized ectromelia virus, primarily through the recognition of the virion by natural antibody and activation of the classical and alternative pathways. Sera deficient in classical or alternative pathway components or antibody had reduced ability to neutralize viral particles, which likely contributed to increased viral dissemination and disease severity in vivo. The increased mortality of C4(-/- or Factor B(-/- mice also indicates that these two pathways of complement activation are required for survival. In summary, the complement system acts in the first few minutes, hours, and days to control this poxviral infection until the adaptive immune response can react, and loss of this system results in lethal infection.

  13. Complement and fungal pathogens: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Würzner, Reinhard; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2008-11-01

    Fungal infections are a serious complication in immunocompromised patients such as human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, patients with organ transplantations or with haematological neoplasia. The lethality of opportunistic fungal infection is high despite a growing arsenal of antimycotic drugs, implying the urgent need for supportive immunological therapies to strengthen the current inefficient antimicrobial defences of the immunocompromised host. Therefore, increasing effort has been directed to investigating the interplay between fungi and the host immunity and thus to find starting points for additional therapeutic approaches. In this article, we review the actual state of the art concerning the role of complement in the pathogenesis of fungal infections. Important aspects include the activation of the complement system by the fungal pathogen, the efficiency of the complement-associated antimicrobial functions and the arsenal of immune evasion strategies applied by the fungi. The twin functions of complement as an interactive player of the innate immunity and at the same time as a modulator of the adaptive immunity make this defence weapon a particularly interesting therapeutic candidate to mobilise a more effective immune response and to strengthen in one fell swoop a broad spectrum of different immune reactions. However, we also mention the 'Yin-Yang' nature of the complement system in fungal infections, as growing evidence assigns to complement a contributory part in the pathogenesis of fungus-induced allergic manifestations. PMID:18705662

  14. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  15. Humoral pattern recognition and the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degn, S E; Thiel, S

    2013-08-01

    In the context of immunity, pattern recognition is the art of discriminating friend from foe and innocuous from noxious. The basis of discrimination is the existence of evolutionarily conserved patterns on microorganisms, which are intrinsic to these microorganisms and necessary for their function and existence. Such immutable or slowly evolving patterns are ideal handles for recognition and have been targeted by early cellular immune defence mechanisms such as Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and by humoral defence mechanisms such as the complement system. Complement is a proteolytic cascade system comprising around 35 different soluble and membrane-bound proteins. It constitutes a central part of the innate immune system, mediating several major innate effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. The complement cascade proceeds via controlled, limited proteolysis and conformational changes of constituent proteins through three activation pathways: the classical pathway, the alternative pathway and the lectin pathway, which converge in common effector functions. Here, we review the nature of the pattern recognition molecules involved in complement activation, as well as their close relatives with no or unknown capacity for activating complement. We proceed to examine the composition of the pattern recognition complexes involved in complement activation, focusing on those of the lectin pathway, and arrive at a new model for their mechanism of operation, supported by recently emerging evidence.

  16. Biochemical complementation of chalcone synthase mutants defines a role for flavonols in functional pollen.

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Y; Nagel, C.; Taylor, L P

    1992-01-01

    Chalcone synthase catalyzes the initial step of that branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway that leads to flavonoids. A lack of chalcone synthase activity has a pleiotropic effect in maize and petunia mutants: pollen fertility as well as flavonoid synthesis is disrupted. Both maize and petunia mutants are self-sterile due to a failure to produce a functional pollen tube. The finding that the mutant pollen is partially functional on wild-type stigmas led to the isolation and identification of k...

  17. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Is a Regulator of Epidermal Complement Component Expression and Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar;

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...... wounds in vivo and in cultured keratinocytes after exposure to supernatant from stimulated mononuclear cells. In contrast, the epidermal expression of complement components was downregulated in ex vivo injured skin lacking the stimulation from infiltrating inflammatory cells but with intact injury......-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated growth factor response. In cultured primary keratinocytes, stimulation with the potent EGFR ligand, TGF-α, yielded a significant downregulation of complement component expression. Indeed, EGFR inhibition significantly enhanced the induction of complement...

  18. Protein engineering to target complement evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2014-01-21

    The complement system is composed of soluble factors in plasma that enhance or "complement" immune-mediated killing through innate and adaptive mechanisms. Activation of complement causes recruitment of immune cells; opsonization of coated cells; and direct killing of affected cells through a membrane attack complex (MAC). Tumor cells up-regulate complement inhibitory factors - one of several strategies to evade the immune system. In many cases as the tumor progresses, dramatic increases in complement inhibitory factors are found on these cells. This review focuses on the classic complement pathway and the role of major complement inhibitory factors in cancer immune evasion as well as on how current protein engineering efforts are being employed to increase complement fixing or to reverse complement resistance leading to better therapeutic outcomes in oncology. Strategies discussed include engineering of antibodies to enhance complement fixation, antibodies that neutralize complement inhibitory proteins as well as engineered constructs that specifically target inhibition of the complement system.

  19. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it....

  20. Defining Quantum Control Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Mingsheng; Yu, Nengkun; Feng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A remarkable difference between quantum and classical programs is that the control flow of the former can be either classical or quantum. One of the key issues in the theory of quantum programming languages is defining and understanding quantum control flow. A functional language with quantum control flow was defined by Altenkirch and Grattage [\\textit{Proc. LICS'05}, pp. 249-258]. This paper extends their work, and we introduce a general quantum control structure by defining three new quantu...

  1. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system.

  2. Phylogenetic aspects of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkadis, I K; Mastellos, D; Lambris, J D

    2001-01-01

    During evolution two general systems of immunity have emerged: innate or, natural immunity and adaptive (acquired), or specific immunity. The innate system is phylogenetically older and is found in some form in all multicellular organisms, whereas the adaptive system appeared about 450 million years ago and is found in all vertebrates except jawless fish. The complement system in higher vertebrates plays an important role as an effector of both the innate and the acquired immune response, and also participates in various immunoregulatory processes. In lower vertebrates complement is activated by the alternative and lectin pathways and is primarily involved in the opsonization of foreign material. The Agnatha (the most primitive vertebrate species) possess the alternative and lectin pathways while cartilaginous fish are the first species in which the classical pathway appears following the emergence of immunoglobulins. The rest of the poikilothermic species, ranging from teleosts to reptilians, appear to contain a well-developed complement system resembling that of the homeothermic vertebrates. It seems that most of the complement components have appeared after the duplication of primordial genes encoding C3/C4/C5, fB/C2, C1s/C1r/MASP-1/MASP-2, and C6/C7/C8/C9 molecules, in a process that led to the formation of distinct activation pathways. However, unlike homeotherms, several species of poikilotherms (e.g. trout) have recently been shown to possess multiple forms of complement components (C3, factor B) that are structurally and functionally more diverse than those of higher vertebrates. We hypothesize that this remarkable diversity has allowed these animals to expand their innate capacity for immune recognition and response. Recent studies have also indicated the possible presence of complement receptors in protochordates and lower vertebrates. In conclusion, there is considerable evidence suggesting that the complement system is present in the entire lineage of

  3. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  4. Maggot excretions affect the human complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Schreurs, Marco W J; Renwarin, Lennaert; Dorresteijn, Corry; Hamann, Dörte; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the activation of the inflammatory response to injury, although inappropriate complement activation (CA) can lead to severe tissue damage. Maggot therapy is successfully used to treat infected wounds. In this study, we hypothesized that maggot excretions/secretions influence CA in order to modulate the host's inflammatory response. Therefore, the effect of maggot excretions on CA was investigated in preoperatively and postoperatively obtained sera from patients. Our results show that maggot excretions reduce CA in healthy and postoperatively immune-activated human sera up to 99.9%, via all pathways. Maggot excretions do not specifically initiate or inhibit CA, but break down complement proteins C3 and C4 in a cation-independent manner and this effect proves to be temperature tolerant. This study indicates a CA-reducing substrate that is already successfully used in clinical practice and may explain part of the improved wound healing caused by maggot therapy. Furthermore, the complement activation-reducing substance present in maggot excretions could provide a novel treatment modality for several diseases, resulting from an (over)active complement system.

  5. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...

  6. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  7. Supramolecular Control over Split-Luciferase Complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Ralph P G; Briels, Jeroen M; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; de Greef, Tom F A; Merkx, Maarten; Brunsveld, Luc

    2016-07-25

    Supramolecular split-enzyme complementation restores enzymatic activity and allows for on-off switching. Split-luciferase fragment pairs were provided with an N-terminal FGG sequence and screened for complementation through host-guest binding to cucurbit[8]uril (Q8). Split-luciferase heterocomplex formation was induced in a Q8 concentration dependent manner, resulting in a 20-fold upregulation of luciferase activity. Supramolecular split-luciferase complementation was fully reversible, as revealed by using two types of Q8 inhibitors. Competition studies with the weak-binding FGG peptide revealed a 300-fold enhanced stability for the formation of the ternary heterocomplex compared to binding of two of the same fragments to Q8. Stochiometric binding by the potent inhibitor memantine could be used for repeated cycling of luciferase activation and deactivation in conjunction with Q8, providing a versatile module for in vitro supramolecular signaling networks.

  8. The Complement System in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Daniel J; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is composed of a family of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that historically has been viewed as a key component of the innate immune system, with a primary role of providing a first-line defense against microorganisms. Although this role indeed is important, complement has many other physiological roles, including the following: (1) influencing appropriate immune responses, (2) disposing of waste in the circulation (immune complexes, cellular debris), and (3) contributing to damage of self-tissue through inflammatory pathways. These three roles are believed to be significant factors in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly its renal manifestation (lupus nephritis), contributing both protective and damaging effects. In this review, we provide an overview of the human complement system and its functions, and discuss its intricate and seemingly contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

  9. Use of X-ray diffraction, molecular simulations, and spectroscopy to determine the molecular packing in a polymer-fullerene bimolecular crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Miller, Nichole Cates

    2012-09-05

    The molecular packing in a polymer: fullerene bimolecular crystal is determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy. The conformation of the electron-donating polymer is significantly disrupted by the incorporation of the electron-accepting fullerene molecules, which introduce twists and bends along the polymer backbone and 1D electron-conducting fullerene channels. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Use of X-ray diffraction, molecular simulations, and spectroscopy to determine the molecular packing in a polymer-fullerene bimolecular crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Nichole Cates; Gysel, Roman; Sweetnam, Sean; McGehee, Michael D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Cho, Eunkyung [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Junk, Matthias J.N.; Chmelka, Bradley F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Risko, Chad; Kim, Dongwook; Bredas, Jean-Luc [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Miller, Chad E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Richter, Lee J.; Kline, R. Joseph [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Heeney, Martin; McCulloch, Iain [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Amassian, Aram [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Acevedo-Feliz, Daniel; Knox, Christopher [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Visualization Core Laboratory, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Hansen, Michael Ryan; Dudenko, Dmytro [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Toney, Michael F. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-11-27

    The molecular packing in a polymer: fullerene bimolecular crystal is determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy. The conformation of the electron-donating polymer is significantly disrupted by the incorporation of the electron-accepting fullerene molecules, which introduce twists and bends along the polymer backbone and 1D electron-conducting fullerene channels. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes. Solubilization inhibition and complement factor levels in SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Kappelgaard, E;

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two of 36 serum samples from 19 SLE patients showed reduced capacity to mediate complement-dependent solubilization of immune complexes (IC). SLE patients with nephritis exerted the lowest complement-mediated solubilization capacity (CMSC) whereas sera from patients with inactive disease g...

  12. Activation of Complement Following Total Hip Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thordardottir, S; Vikingsdottir, T; Bjarnadottir, H; Jonsson, H; Gudbjornsson, B

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether complement activation, via the classical and alternative pathways, occurs following a cemented total hip replacement (THR) surgery due to osteoarthritis. Blood samples were collected systematically from 12 patients - six male and six women, with a median age of 75 (range: 59-90 years) - preoperatively, 6 h post-operatively and on the first, second and third post-operative day. Total function of classical (CH50) and alternative pathways (AH50) was evaluated, along with the determination of serum concentrations of the complement proteins C3, C4, C3d, the soluble terminal complement complex (sTCC) sC5b-9, as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Measurements of CRP and albumin levels elucidated a marked inflammatory response following the operation. The CH50, AH50 and C3 and C4 levels were significantly lower 6 h after the surgery compared with the preoperative levels, but elevated above the preoperative levels during the following 3 days. The complement activation product C3d levels increased continually during the whole observation period, from 13.5 AU/ml (range: 8-19 AU/ml) preoperative to 20 AU/ml (range: 12-34 AU/ml) on the third post-operative day. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the sC5b-9 levels between the preoperative and the third post-operative day. These results demonstrate a significant activation of the complement system following cemented THR. Further studies are needed to elucidate the time frame and the pathogenic role of this observed complement activation.

  13. Complement activation and HLA-B27.

    OpenAIRE

    Meri, S.; Partanen, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of complement activation was studied in sera from HLA-B27 positive and negative subjects (27 with previous yersinia arthritis and 35 controls). Activation of complement with zymosan induced higher mean levels of the anaphylatoxin C3a in HLA-B27 positive sera (mean (SD) 7.40 (1.66) mg/l) than in HLA-B27 negative sera (6.41 (1.79) mg/l). Similarly, higher levels of C3d,g, another C3 breakdown fragment, were obtained in HLA-B27 positive sera after Escherichia coli 0111:B4 lipopoly...

  14. Identification of murine complement receptor type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fingeroth, J D; Benedict, M A; Levy, D.N.; Strominger, J L

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit antiserum reactive with the human complement component C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (complement receptor type 2, CR2) immunoprecipitates a Mr 155,000 murine B-cell surface antigen. The apparent molecular weight and cellular distribution of this murine antigen are similar to those of human CR2. Cells expressing the murine protein bind sheep erythrocytes coated with antibody and murine C1-C3d but do not bind Epstein-Barr virus at all. The monospecific antiserum to human CR2 together...

  15. HUS and the case for complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Edward M

    2015-10-29

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy that is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Excess complement activation underlies atypical HUS and is evident in Shiga toxin-induced HUS (STEC-HUS). This Spotlight focuses on new knowledge of the role of Escherichia coli-derived toxins and polyphosphate in modulating complement and coagulation, and how they affect disease progression and response to treatment. Such new insights may impact on current and future choices of therapies for STEC-HUS.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  17. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  18. How to define surveillance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper is to explore and compare ways of defining surveillance. In order to give meaning to concepts that describe the realities of society, social theory is needed. Therefore social theory is employed in this paper for discussing ways of defining surveillance. “Living in ‘surveillance societies’ may throw up challenges of a fundamental – ontological – kind” (Lyon, 1994, p.19. Social theory is a way of clarifying such ontological questions that concern the basic nature and reality of surveillance. A distinction between neutral and negative concepts of surveillance is drawn. Some potential disadvantages of neutral concepts of surveillance are outlined. This paper wants to contribute to the discussion of how to best define surveillance and wants to show that one of the main theoretical differences and questions in surveillance theory is if surveillance should be defined as a negative or a neutral concept.

  19. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system....5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... complement components C1q, C1r, C1s, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, in serum, other body fluids,...

  1. Complement Constructions in English: Fairly Difficult for EFL Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Fatemeh; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    2012-01-01

    Complement constructions vary significantly in English and Persian. There are more complementation structures in English than in Persian and a complement structure in Persian might have more than one equivalent in English. Producing complement structures (CSs) in English is very difficult for native speakers of Persian, especially in an EFL…

  2. Spacelab carrier complement thermal design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, S.; Key, R.; Kittredge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The present discussion of the Spacelab carrier complement, which encompasses a Module Carrier, a Module-Pallet Carrier, and a Multiplexer/Demultiplexer Pallet, gives attention to both active and passive thermal performance capabilities, and presents ground testing and analytical results obtained to date. An account is given of the prospective use of a Spacelab Multipurpose Experiment Support Structure.

  3. Graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanic, M.; Pedersen, Anders Sune; Pellicer, D.;

    2014-01-01

    We study square-complementary graphs, that is, graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic. We prove several necessary conditions for a graph to be square-complementary, describe ways of building new square-complementary graphs from existing ones, construct infinite families of square...

  4. Cross-Cultural Analysis on Complements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恒

    2014-01-01

    Nativized varieties of English must reflect native pragmatic norms and cultural conventions. Complements, as a polite social behavior, is analyzed from the perspective of Chinese English speaker and American English speaker to emphasize the im-portance of the cross-cultural differences in pragmatic uses.

  5. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547

  6. Role of complement and complement regulatory proteins in the complications of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pamela; Sahoo, Rupam; Vaidya, Anand; Chorev, Michael; Halperin, Jose A

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that the organ damage that complicates human diabetes is caused by prolonged hyperglycemia, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which high levels of glucose cause tissue damage in humans are still not fully understood. The prevalent hypothesis explaining the mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of diabetes complications includes overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increased flux through the polyol pathway, overactivity of the hexosamine pathway causing intracellular formation of advanced glycation end products, and activation of protein kinase C isoforms. In addition, experimental and clinical evidence reported in past decades supports a strong link between the complement system, complement regulatory proteins, and the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. In this article, we summarize the body of evidence that supports a role for the complement system and complement regulatory proteins in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, with specific emphasis on the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and of CD59, an extracellular cell membrane-anchored inhibitor of MAC formation that is inactivated by nonenzymatic glycation. We discuss a pathogenic model of human diabetic complications in which a combination of CD59 inactivation by glycation and hyperglycemia-induced complement activation increases MAC deposition, activates pathways of intracellular signaling, and induces the release of proinflammatory, prothrombotic cytokines and growth factors. Combined, complement-dependent and complement-independent mechanisms induced by high glucose promote inflammation, proliferation, and thrombosis as characteristically seen in the target organs of diabetes complications.

  7. Simulation study of the losses and influences of geminate and bimolecular recombination on the performances of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhuo; Qi, Ling-Hui; Du, Hui-Jing; Chai, Ying-Chun

    2015-10-01

    We use the method of device simulation to study the losses and influences of geminate and bimolecular recombinations on the performances and properties of the bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. We find that a fraction of electrons (holes) in the device are collected by anode (cathode). The direction of the corresponding current is opposite to the direction of photocurrent. And the current density increases with the bias increasing but decreases as bimolecular recombination (BR) or geminate recombination (GR) intensity increases. The maximum power, short circuit current, and fill factor display a stronger dependence on GR than on BR. While the influences of GR and BR on open circuit voltage are about the same. Our studies shed a new light on the loss mechanism and may provide a new way of improving the efficiency of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. A2012203016), the Science Fund from the Education Department of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. QN20131103 and Z2009114), the Doctor Foundation of Yanshan University, China (Grant No. B580), and the Young Teachers' Research Project of Yanshan University, China (Grant No. 13LGB028).

  8. Utilizing complement evasion strategies to design complement-based antibacterial immunotherapeutics: Lessons from the pathogenic Neisseriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sanjay; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; DeOliveira, Rosane B; Lewis, Lisa A; Gulati, Sunita; Rice, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed to combat the global threat of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Complement forms an important arm of innate defenses against infections. In physiological conditions, complement activation is tightly controlled by soluble and membrane-associated complement inhibitors, but must be selectively activated on invading pathogens to facilitate microbial clearance. Many pathogens, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis, express glycans, including N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), that mimic host structures to evade host immunity. Neu5Ac is a negatively charged 9-cabon sugar that inhibits complement, in part by enhancing binding of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH) through C-terminal domains (19 and 20) on FH. Other microbes also bind FH, in most instances through FH domains 6 and 7 or 18-20. Here we describe two strategies to target complement activation on Neisseriae. First, microbial binding domains of FH were fused to IgG Fc to create FH18-20/Fc (binds gonococci) and FH6,7/Fc (binds meningococci). A point mutation in FH domain 19 eliminated hemolysis caused by unmodified FH18-20, but retained binding to gonococci. FH18-20/Fc and FH6,7/Fc mediated complement-dependent killing in vitro and showed efficacy in animal models of gonorrhea and meningococcal bacteremia, respectively. The second strategy utilized CMP-nonulosonate (CMP-NulO) analogs of sialic acid that were incorporated into LOS and prevented complement inhibition by physiologic CMP-Neu5Ac and resulted in attenuated gonococcal infection in mice. While studies to establish the safety of these agents are needed, enhancing complement activation on microbes may represent a promising strategy to treat antimicrobial resistant organisms. PMID:27297292

  9. Demand Heterogeneity and the Adoption of Platform Complements

    OpenAIRE

    Rietveld, Joost; Eggers, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper offers a demand-based theory of how platform maturity affects the adoption of platform complements. We argue that differences between early and late adopters of the platform include willingness to pay for the platform-and-complement bundle, risk preferences, preference for novelty, and search behavior. These differences create heterogeneous demand conditions for complements that affect both average complement performance and variance in the types of complements that are...

  10. Discrimination between Host and Pathogens by the Complement System

    OpenAIRE

    Pangburn, Michael K.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cortes, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen-specific complement activation requires direct recognition of pathogens and/or the absence of complement control mechanisms on their surfaces. Antibodies direct complement activation to potential pathogens recognized by the cellular innate and adaptive immune systems. Similarly, the plasma proteins MBL and ficolins direct activation to microorganisms expressing common carbohydrate structures. The absence of complement control proteins permits amplification of complement by the altern...

  11. Current evidence for the role of complement in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Lindsay S; Saleem, Moin A

    2014-10-01

    Shiga toxin-associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (Stx HUS) is the leading cause of paediatric acute kidney injury. This toxin-mediated disease carries a significant morbidity and mortality but has no direct treatments. Rare familial atypical HUS (aHUS) is now understood to result from over-activation of the alternative complement pathway causing glomerular endothelial damage. By understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease, the monoclonal antibody eculizumab, which blocks the final common pathway of complement, is now being used to treat aHUS. For this reason, clinicians and scientists are studying the role of the alternative complement pathway in Stx HUS with the aim of targeting treatment in a similar way. There is some evidence suggesting that complement plays a role in the pathogenesis of Stx HUS, but other mechanisms may also be important. Clinically, modulating the complement system using plasma exchange provides no proven benefit in Stx HUS, and the use of eculizumab has provided conflicting results. Understanding the local effect of Stx on the glomerulus, in particular regulation of the complement and coagulation systems, may lead to advances in defining the precise pathogenesis of this disease. Then, targeted treatment strategies could be devised and clinical trials undertaken.

  12. Complement Component C3 Binds to Activated Normal Platelets without Preceding Proteolytic Activation and Promotes Binding to Complement Receptor 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Hamad; P.H. Nilsson; D. Wouters; J.D. Lambris; K.N. Ekdahl; B. Nilsson

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that complement is activated on the surface of activated platelets, despite the presence of multiple regulators of complement activation. To reinvestigate the mechanisms by which activated platelets bind to complement components, the presence of complement proteins on the surfac

  13. Local inflammation induces complement crosstalk which amplifies the antimicrobial response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By eliciting inflammatory responses, the human immunosurveillance system notably combats invading pathogens, during which acute phase proteins (CRP and cytokines are elevated markedly. However, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a persistent opportunistic pathogen prevalent at the site of local inflammation, and its acquisition of multiple antibiotic-resistance factors poses grave challenges to patient healthcare management. Using blood samples from infected patients, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa is effectively killed in the plasma under defined local infection-inflammation condition, where slight acidosis and reduced calcium levels (pH 6.5, 2 mM calcium typically prevail. We showed that this powerful antimicrobial activity is provoked by crosstalk between two plasma proteins; CRPratioL-ficolin interaction led to communication between the complement classical and lectin pathways from which two amplification events emerged. Assays for C4 deposition, phagocytosis, and protein competition consistently proved the functional significance of the amplification pathways in boosting complement-mediated antimicrobial activity. The infection-inflammation condition induced a 100-fold increase in CRPratioL-ficolin interaction in a pH- and calcium-sensitive manner. We conclude that the infection-induced local inflammatory conditions trigger a strong interaction between CRPratioL-ficolin, eliciting complement-amplification pathways which are autonomous and which co-exist with and reinforce the classical and lectin pathways. Our findings provide new insights into the host immune response to P. aeruginosa infection under pathological conditions and the potential development of new therapeutic strategies against bacterial infection.

  14. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  15. Estudio de la interacción entre los canales Kv7.2 y la calmodulina utilizando la técnica Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC)

    OpenAIRE

    Lazcanoiturburu Ferreira, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    Empleo de la técnica BiFC para estudiar la interacción entre los canales Kv7.2 y la CaM. Para ello se realizan clonajes, se co-transfectan distintas combinaciones de éstos en células de mamífero y se analiza y cuantifica la intensidad de fluorescencia obtenida mediante microscopía confocal.

  16. Complement C3 serum levels in anorexia nervosa: a potential biomarker for the severity of disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Carlin S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa carries the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Even the most critically ill anorexic patients may present with normal 'standard' laboratory values, underscoring the need for a new sensitive biomarker. The complement cascade, a major component of innate immunity, represents a driving force in the pathophysiology of multiple inflammatory disorders. The role of complement in anorexia nervosa remains poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of complement C3 levels, the extent of complement activation and of complement hemolytic activity in serum, as potential new biomarkers for the severity of anorexia nervosa. Patients and methods This was a prospective cohort study on 14 patients with severe anorexia nervosa, as defined by a body mass index (BMI 2. Serum samples were obtained in a biweekly manner until hospital discharge. A total of 17 healthy subjects with normal BMI values served as controls. The serum levels of complement C3, C3a, C5a, sC5b-9, and of the 50% hemolytic complement activity (CH50 were quantified and correlated with the BMIs of patients and control subjects. Results Serum C3 levels were significantly lower in patients with anorexia nervosa than in controls (median 3.7 (interquartile range (IQR 2.5-4.9 vs 11.4 (IQR 8.9-13.7, P P Conclusions Complement C3 serum levels may represent a sensitive new biomarker for monitoring the severity of disease in anorexia nervosa. The finding from this preliminary pilot study will require further investigation in future prospective large-scale multicenter trials.

  17. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  18. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  19. Adenovirus Activates Complement by Distinctly Different Mechanisms In Vitro and In Vivo: Indirect Complement Activation by Virions In Vivo▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Jie; Xu, Zhili; Jeffrey S Smith; Hofherr, Sean E.; Barry, Michael A.; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding innate immunity is key to improving the safety of adenovirus (Ad) vectors for systemic gene therapy. Ad has been shown to activate complement in vitro, but activation of complement after Ad injection in vivo has not been directly measured. Using complement protein C3a as a marker of complement activation, we show that types 2 and 5 human Ads cause rapid complement activation after intravenous injection in mice. Unexpectedly, the mechanisms in vivo were different than those in vi...

  20. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  1. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  2. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  3. Complementing the sugar code: role of GAGs and sialic acid in complement regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eLangford-Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugar molecules play a vital role on both microbial and mammalian cells, where they are involved in cellular communication, govern microbial virulence and modulate host immunity and inflammatory responses. The complement cascade, as part of a host’s innate immune system, is a potent weapon against invading bacteria but has to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate attack and damage to host tissues. A number of complement regulators, such as factor H and properdin, interact with sugar molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid, on host and pathogen membranes and direct the appropriate complement response by either promoting the binding of complement activators or inhibitors. The binding of these complement regulators to sugar molecules can vary from location to location, due to their different specificities and because distinct structural and functional subpopulations of sugars are found in different human organs, such as the brain, kidney and eye. This review will cover recent studies that have provided important new insights into the role of glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid in complement regulation and how sugar recognition may be compromised in disease

  4. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host's immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated.The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration.Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9.

  5. Complementation analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; Painter, R.B.; Paterson, M.C.; Kidson, C.; Inoue, T.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of laboratories genetic analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has been performed by studying the expression of the AT phenotype in fused somatic cells or mixtures of cell-free extracts from different patients. Complementation of the defective response to ionizing radiation was observed frequently, considering four different parameters for radiosensitivity in AT. The combined results from studies on cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblastoid cells from 17 unrelated families revealed the presence of at least four and possibly nine complementation groups. These findings suggest that there is an extensive genetic heterogeneity in AT. More extensive studies are needed for an integration of these data and to provide a set of genetically characterized cell strains for future research of the AT genetic defect.

  6. Compstatin analog Cp40 inhibits complement dysregulation in vitro in C3 glomerulopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Shao, Dingwu; Ricklin, Daniel; Hilkin, Brieanna M.; Nester, Carla M.; Lambris, John D.; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2015-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) defines a group of untreatable ultra-rare renal diseases caused by uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway. Nearly half of patients progress to end stage renal failure within 10 years. Cp40, a second-generation compstatin analog in clinical development, is a 14 amino-acid cyclic peptide that selectively inhibits complement activation in humans and non-human primates by binding to C3 and C3b. We hypothesized that by targeting C3 Cp40 would provide ...

  7. Network-complement transitions, symmetries, and cluster synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2016-09-01

    Synchronization in networks of coupled oscillators is known to be largely determined by the spectral and symmetry properties of the interaction network. Here, we leverage this relation to study a class of networks for which the threshold coupling strength for global synchronization is the lowest among all networks with the same number of nodes and links. These networks, defined as being uniform, complete, and multi-partite (UCM), appear at each of an infinite sequence of network-complement transitions in a larger class of networks characterized by having near-optimal thresholds for global synchronization. We show that the distinct symmetry structure of the UCM networks, which by design are optimized for global synchronizability, often leads to formation of clusters of synchronous oscillators, and that such states can coexist with the state of global synchronization.

  8. Complement and phagocytes - A complicated interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Mohamed Daha and I share a common interest in innate immunity. Working in institutes only 25 miles away from each other, that meant ample opportunity and relevance for collaboration. And so we did. Moreover, we have both been members of boards and councils of Dutch national organizations, and we have also become good friends. In this short recollection, I look back on 40 years of common activities in complement research and friendship.

  9. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  10. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  11. DEFINING SUCCESS IN PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues de Farias Filho

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Project Management Discipline has been widely used in the last years for companies around the world and these companies have been investing large amounts on surveys, training and consulting in order to get benefits for the organizations that need to create competitive advantage in the high competitive Market and to achieve their business strategy goals. Studies from the major world authors show many ways to define success at the organizations. In Brazil, the Benchmarking Study in GP from the PMI Chapters in 2009, show most studied companies don’t have a process do assess whether they are achieving the expected business goals with their investments in Project Management. This article goal is to demonstrate many ways to define success in project, which will facilitate the process to assess whether the companies are achieving these expected goals. The methodology used was a literature review, collecting publications, textbooks and documents from subject-matter-experts.

  12. Defining talent management components

    OpenAIRE

    Golchin Shafieian

    2014-01-01

    In today's world of global trade, it can guarantee success and excellence of organizations against competitors is talented human resources in an organization, especially at the managerial level. But the challenges that organizations face include: attracting, evaluating, exploring, and developing and keeping talent. The main objective of this study is to define the components of talent management in the University of Chaloos, in order to provide a way to reduce the challenges and short comings...

  13. Software Defined Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Roncero Hervás, Óscar

    2014-01-01

    Software Defined Networks (SDN) is a paradigm in which routing decisions are taken by a control layer. In contrast to conventional network structures, the control plane and forwarding plane are separated and communicate through standard protocols like OpenFlow. Historically, network management was based on a layered approach, each one isolated from the others. SDN proposes a radically different approach by bringing together the management of all these layers into a single controller. It is th...

  14. SDN : Software defined networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wiklund, Petter

    2014-01-01

    This report is a specialization in Software defined networking. SDN really comes to revolutionize the industry and it’s under constant development. But is the technology ready to be launched into operation yet? The report would initially involve a number of problems that today's network technology is facing. It then follows a deeper description of what this software-based networking technology really is and how it works. Further, the technique is being tested in a lab assignment, using a prog...

  15. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  16. Defining Business Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Trequattrini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present scientific contribution is to investigate from the business economics standpoing the emerging phenomenon of company networks. In particular, through the analysis of the theory of networks will be proposed the principal categories of business networks, and even before this the concept of the network will be defined. The proposed research, qualitatively, represents the point of departure for the study of the network phenomenon in light of the current economic phase termed “economy of knowledge”. Moreover, the research questions are the following: From where does the theory of networks arise? Do company networks consider themselves equal to knowledge networks?

  17. Defining Business Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Trequattrini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present scientific contribution is to investigate from the businesseconomics standpoing the emerging phenomenon of company networks. In particular,through the analysis of the theory of networks will be proposed the principal categories ofbusiness networks, and even before this the concept of the network will be defined. Theproposed research, qualitatively, represents the point of departure for the study of thenetwork phenomenon in light of the current economic phase termed “economy of knowledge”.Moreover, the research questions are the following: From where does the theory of networksarise? Do company networks consider themselves equal to knowledge networks?

  18. The influence of the "cage" effect on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions proceeding from different sites in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2016-08-28

    Manifestations of the "cage" effect at the encounters of reactants have been theoretically treated on the example of multistage reactions (including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages) proceeding from different active sites in liquid solutions. It is shown that for reactions occurring near the contact of reactants, consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of such multistage reactions (possible in the framework of the encounter theory only) can be made on the basis of chemical concepts of the "cage complex," just as in the case of one-site model described in the literature. Exactly as in the one-site model, the presence of the "cage" effect gives rise to new channels of reactant transformation that cannot result from elementary event of chemical conversion for the given reaction mechanism. Besides, the multisite model demonstrates new (as compared to one-site model) features of multistage reaction course. PMID:27586911

  19. Factor H-related proteins determine complement-activating surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsi, Mihály; Tortajada, Agustin; Uzonyi, Barbara; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    Complement factor H-related proteins (FHRs) are strongly associated with different diseases involving complement dysregulation, which suggests a major role for these proteins regulating complement activation. Because FHRs are evolutionarily and structurally related to complement inhibitor factor H (FH), the initial assumption was that the FHRs are also negative complement regulators. Whereas weak complement inhibiting activities were originally reported for these molecules, recent developments indicate that FHRs may enhance complement activation, with important implications for the role of these proteins in health and disease. We review these findings here, and propose that FHRs represent a complex set of surface recognition molecules that, by competing with FH, provide improved discrimination of self and non-self surfaces and play a central role in determining appropriate activation of the complement pathway.

  20. Software-Defined Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂华; 杨晓君; 刘淘英

    2015-01-01

    The cluster architecture has played an important role in high-end computing for the past 20 years. With the advent of Internet services, big data, and cloud computing, traditional clusters face three challenges: 1) providing flexible system balance among computing, memory, and I/O capabilities;2) reducing resource pooling overheads;and 3) addressing low performance-power efficiency. This position paper proposes a software-defined cluster (SDC) architecture to deal with these challenges. The SDC architecture inherits two features of traditional cluster: its architecture is multicomputer and it has loosely-coupled interconnect. SDC provides two new mechanisms: global I/O space (GIO) and hardware-supported native access (HNA) to remote devices. Application software can define a virtual cluster best suited to its needs from resources pools provided by a physical cluster, and traditional cluster ecosystems need no modification. We also discuss a prototype design and implementation of a 32-processor cloud server utilizing the SDC architecture.

  1. Defining talent management components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golchin Shafieian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In today's world of global trade, it can guarantee success and excellence of organizations against competitors is talented human resources in an organization, especially at the managerial level. But the challenges that organizations face include: attracting, evaluating, exploring, and developing and keeping talent. The main objective of this study is to define the components of talent management in the University of Chaloos, in order to provide a way to reduce the challenges and short comings and also to look for ways to improve employee performance is discussed. This study is based on data collected from all employees of the University of Chaloos in August 2013; through two questionnaires have been developed. The statistical population has been considered 407 persons in these universities and according the Morgan Table, 198 persons were selected as sample of among research society. More over, 28 questions are used for determining components of talent management. Finally, we concluded that the component of talent management have been properly defined in the Universities of Chaloos.

  2. Complement sensitivity of Entamoeba histolytica and various nonpathogenic amoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, B; Ebert, F; Horstmann, R D

    1994-12-01

    Culture forms of the potentially pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica were compared to those of the nonpathogenic species of E. dispar, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Endolimax nana, and E. moshkovskii regarding the sensitivity to lysis by human complement activated through the alternative pathway. E. dispar was found unique in its complement resistance; all other nonpathogenic isolates resembled E. histolytica in that they were complement sensitive. Thus, a state of complement sensitivity is not a particular property of potentially pathogenic amoebae. PMID:7716404

  3. Complement C3c as a Biomarker in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, A.; Ertl, G; Angermann, C. E.; Hofmann, U; Störk, S; Frantz, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Experimental data indicates an important role of the innate immune system in cardiac remodeling and heart failure (HF). Complement is a central effector pathway of the innate immune system. Animals lacking parts of the complement system are protected from adverse remodeling. Based on these data, we hypothesized that peripheral complement levels could be a good marker for adverse remodeling and prognosis in patients with HF. Methods and Results. Since complement activation conver...

  4. Complementing asteroseismology with 4MOST spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, R. S.; 4MOST Consortium; 4MOST Spectroscopy Consortium

    2016-09-01

    4MOST is a wide-field, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility under development for the VISTA telescope of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Its main science drivers are in the areas of galactic archeology, high-energy physics, galaxy evolution and cosmology. 4MOST will in particular provide the spectroscopic complements to the large area surveys coming from space missions like Gaia, eROSITA, Euclid, and PLATO. 4MOST will have an unique operations concept in which 5-years public surveys from both the consortium and the ESO community will be combined and observed in parallel during each exposure, resulting in more than 25 million spectra of targets spread over a large fraction of the southern sky. As a dedicated spectroscopic survey facility with a large field-of-view, a high multiplex that can be reconfigured quickly, and with a broad wavelength coverage, 4MOST is particularly well suited to complement the upcoming asteroseismology space missions like TESS and PLATO. Here we show that, by dedicating the observing time during twilight and poor observing conditions to bright stars, 4MOST will obtain resolution {R>18 000} spectra of nearly all stars brighter than ˜ 12th magnitude at Dec < 30o every ˜ 2 years. 4MOST is also expected to spectroscopically complement any fainter asteroseismology target to be observed with PLATO. These observations will provide a chemical characterization of nearly all stars to be observed with the TESS and PLATO missions and place any planets found in a full chemo-dynamical context of the star formation history of the Galaxy, yield very accurate ages and masses for all stars that can be characterized with asteroseismology, and allow removal of contaminants from target samples (e.g., spectroscopic binaries).

  5. Minimum staff complement: safety in numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adequate staffing is an essential safety barrier for event mitigation. For this reason, Canadian nuclear power plant (NPP) licences specify the minimum staff complement (MSC), which is the number and qualifications of staff always required on-site. A systematic analysis and its validation form the basis of the MSC. The analysis and validation demonstrate a licensee is able to control, cool and contain the reactor after any credible event. The CNSC published regulatory guidelines for analyzing the basis for essential staff levels, monitoring compliance with these levels, and controlling MSC changes (G-323). Lessons learned from a full-scale MSC analysis are discussed. (author)

  6. On Wiener index of graph complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaisankar Senbagamalar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Let $G$ be an $(n,m$-graph. We say that $G$ has property $(ast$ if for every pair of its adjacent vertices $x$ and $y$, there exists a vertex $z$, such that $z$ is not adjacent to either $x$ or $y$. If the graph $G$ has property $(ast$, then its complement $overline G$ is connected, has diameter 2, and its Wiener index is equal to $binom{n}{2}+m$, i.e., the Wiener index is insensitive of any other structural details of the graph $G$. We characterize numerous classes of graphs possessing property $(ast$, among which are trees, regular, and unicyclic graphs.

  7. Mechanisms of evasion of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula to the lethal activity of complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Juarez Ramalho-Pinto

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni became resistant to antibody-dependent complement damage in vitro after pre-incubation with normal human erythrocytes (NHuE whatever the ABO or Rh blood group. Resistant parasites were shown to acquire host decay accelerating factor (DAF , a 70 kDa glycoprotein attached to the membrane of NHue by a GPI anchor. IgG2a mAb anti-human DAF (IA10 immunoprecipitated a 70 kDa molecule from 125I-labeled schistosomula pre-incubated with NHuE and inhibited their resistance to complement-dependent killing in vtro. Incubationof schistosomula with erytrocytes from patients with paroxsimal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNHE or SRBC, wich are DAF-deficient, did not protect the parasites from complement lesion. Supernatant of 100,000 x g collected from NHuE incubated for 24 h in defined medium was shown to contain a soluble form of DAF and to protect schistosomula from complement killing. Schistosomula treated with trypsin before incubation with NHuE ghosts did not become resistant to complement damage. On the other hand, pre-treatment with chymotrypsin did not interfere with the acquisition of resistance by the schistosomula. These results indicate that, in vitro, NHuE DAF can be transferred to schistosomula in a soluble form and that the binding of this molecule to the parasite surface is dependent upon trypsin-sensitive chymotrypsin-insensitive polipeptide(s present on the surface of the worm.

  8. The Production of Complement Clauses in Children with Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Gillian; Rose, Miranda; Eadie, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to provide a comprehensive description of complement-clause production in children with language impairment. Complement clauses were examined with respect to types of complement structure produced, verb use, and both semantic and syntactic accuracy. Method: A group of 17 children with language impairment…

  9. Complement activation by tubular cells is mediated by properdin binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaarkeuken, E.M.; Siezenga, M.A.; Zuidwijk, K.; Kooten, C. van; Rabelink, T.J.; Daha, M.R.; Berger, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of filtered complement products on the brush border of the tubular epithelium is thought to be a key factor underlying proteinuria-induced tubulointerstitial injury. However, the mechanism of tubular complement activation is still unclear. Recent studies on mechanisms of complement activa

  10. Complement fixation test for the diagnosis of Lyme disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Artsob, H; Huibner, S

    1990-01-01

    Sera from 43 patients were tested for complement-fixing antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi; these patients included 8 with confirmed Lyme disease, 21 who were serologically positive but not likely to have Lyme disease, and 14 who were serologically negative. Seven individuals, all confirmed Lyme disease patients, had complement-fixing antibodies. Complement fixation may be a useful confirmatory test for Lyme disease.

  11. Defining critical thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Abbie

    2014-05-01

    Nursing education has long struggled to define critical thinking and explain how the process of critical thinking fits into the context of nursing. Despite this long time struggle, nurses and nurse educators continue to strive to foster critical thinking skills in nursing students as intuitively most nurses believe that critical thinking is necessary to function competently in the workplace. This article explores the most recent work of Dr. Stephen Brookfield and ties the concepts which are explored in Brookfield's work to nursing practice. Brookfield identifies that learners understand the meaning of critical thinking the best when the process is first demonstrated. Role modeling is a method educators can use to demonstrate critical thinking and is a strategy which nurses often use in the clinical area to train and mentor new nursing staff. Although it is not a new strategy in nursing education, it is a valuable strategy to engage learners in critical thinking activities. PMID:24418065

  12. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  13. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  14. Complement Component C3 Binds to Activated Normal Platelets without Preceding Proteolytic Activation and Promotes Binding to Complement Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Osama A Hamad; Nilsson, Per H.; Wouters, Diana; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that complement is activated on the surface of activated platelets, despite the presence of multiple regulators of complement activation. To reinvestigate the mechanisms by which activated platelets bind to complement components, the presence of complement proteins on the surfaces of nonactivated and thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. C1q, C4, C3, and C9 were found to bind to thrombin receptor...

  15. Early Neoplastic Progression Is Complement Independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E. de Visser

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration of leukocytes into premalignant tissue is a common feature of many epithelial neoplasms and is thought to contribute to cancer development. However, the molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms underlying activation of innate host responses to enhanced neoplastic cell proliferation are largely unknown. Considering the importance of the complement system in regulating inflammation during acute pathologic tissue remodeling, we examined the functional significance of complement component 3 (C3 as a regulator of inflammatory cell infiltration and activation during malignant progression by using a transgenic mouse model of multistage epithelial carcinogenesis, e.g., HPV16 mice. Whereas abundant deposition of C3 is a characteristic feature of premalignant hyperplasias and dysplasias coincident with leukocyte infiltration in neoplastic tissue, genetic elimination of C3 neither affects inflammatory cell recruitment toward neoplastic skin nor impacts responding pathways downstream of inflammatory cell activation, e.g., keratinocyte hyperproliferation or angiogenesis. Taken together, these data suggest that complementindependent pathways are critical for leukocyte recruitment into neoplastic tissue and leukocytemediated potentiation of tumorigenesis.

  16. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  17. [Biological roles of complement and recent topics in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamiya, Nobutaka

    2012-08-01

    The complement has been identified as a complementation factor to compensate for the function of an antibody. The complement consists of C1-C9, a complement-related molecule, and its regulating molecules. Three major biological roles of the complement have been classified: First: opsonization following phagocytosis and the elimination of microbes; second: direct destruction of bacteria due to membrane attack complex (MAC); third: complement activation following the induction of anaphylactoid factors and local recruitment and activation of neutrophilic leukocytes. In this review, the basic findings and recent treatments of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and hereditary angioedema (HAE) are summarized. Finally, there is a short review of a rare autosomal recessive disorder of 3MC syndrome and new biological functions of complement factors except for that of innate immunity are proposed.

  18. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena;

    2014-01-01

    , emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial...... fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...... system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit...

  19. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs.

  20. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  1. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  2. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H;

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me...

  3. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  4. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  5. Hanford Defined Wastes model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the methodology behind the Hanford Defined Wastes (HDW) model for estimating the contents of Hanford high level waste (HLW) tanks. The HDW model is based on historical process and transaction histories for each tank and has four major components: Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary (WSTRS), Tank Layer Model (TLM), Supernatant Mixing Model (SMM), and HDW Compositions. Three examples of the application of HDW model estimates are described, including comparisons with global site inventories, comparisons with per tank assays, and comparisons of HDW TOC (Total Organic Carbon) estimates with existing hydrogen watch list tanks. The HDW model provides a cross check on existing assumptions for the global site inventory of wastes. Note that existing inventories for Hanford are based on much the same source information as the HDW model, chemicals used and process flowsheet data. Despite that, the HDW model predicts that the sodium inventory for Hanford tanks is 40,300 MT (metric tonnes), which is only 58% of the previous baseline estimate of 69,000 MT. There are other significant differences for inventories of chromium, iron, and nitrate as well. There are two causes for these differences; (1) previous neglect of chemical inventory placed into the ground at Hanford; (2) double counting attributed to tank inventory that was retrieved, reprocessed, and returned to the tanks. This double-counted inventory was counted once when it first went into the tanks and then again after it was reprocessed. The HDW model estimates also can provide a basis for targeting tanks for organic safety issues. In particular, the HDW model has shown that 88% of flammable gas watch list tanks have HDW estimated organic concentrations in excess of 0.64 wt% TOC. Derivation of variabilities for the HDW model estimates and other potential uses will also be outlined

  6. Pregnancy-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Revisited in the Era of Complement Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhouri, Fadi; Roumenina, Lubka; Provot, François; Sallée, Marion; Caillard, Sophie; Couzi, Lionel; Essig, Marie; Ribes, David; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Bridoux, Frank; Rondeau, Eric; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the pathogenesis and presentation of pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (P-aHUS) remain ill-defined. We conducted a retrospective study to assess the presentation and outcomes of patients presenting with P-aHUS and the prevalence of alternative C3 convertase dysregulation. P-aHUS occurred in 21 of the 100 adult female patients with atypical HUS, with 79% presenting postpartum. We detected complement ...

  7. Diffeomorphic types of complements of nice point arrangements in CP~l

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAU Stephen S.-T.; YE Fei

    2009-01-01

    We use a new method to study arrangement in CP~l,define a class of nice point arrangements and show that if two nice point arrangements have the same combinatorics,then their complements are diffeomorphic to each other. In particular,the moduli space of nice point arrangements with same combinatorics in CP~l is connected. It generalizes the result on point arrangements in CP~3 to point arrangements in CP~l for any l.

  8. Diffeomorphic types of complements of nice point arrangements in CP~l

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAU; Stephen; S.-T.

    2009-01-01

    We use a new method to study arrangement in CPl,define a class of nice point arrangements and show that if two nice point arrangements have the same combinatorics,then their complements are diffeomorphic to each other.In particular,the moduli space of nice point arrangements with same combinatorics in CPl is connected.It generalizes the result on point arrangements in CP3 to point arrangements in CPl for any l.

  9. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Emeis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the in vitro effect of different form s of acidosis (pH 7.0 on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 μ mol/ml blood or lactic acid (5.5 μ mol/ml to heparin blood (N=12 caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002. Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007 and C5a (p=0.003 compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5.

  10. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeis, M; Sonntag, J; Willam, C; Strauss, E; Walka, M M; Obladen, M

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of different forms of acidosis (pH 7.0) on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 micromol/ml blood) or lactic acid (5.5 micromol/ml) to heparin blood (N=12) caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002). Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007) and C5a (p=0.003) compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5. PMID:9927235

  11. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32, whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32 complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN, angiotensin II (Ang II, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors.

  12. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  13. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention.

  14. The complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Jonatan; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2014-09-01

    The complement system plays a major role in the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the role of complement in SLE is complex since it may both prevent and exacerbate the disease. In this review, we explore the latest findings in complement-focused research in SLE. C1q deficiency is the strongest genetic risk factor for SLE, although such deficiency is very rare. Various recently discovered genetic associations include mutations in the complement receptors 2 and 3 as well as complement inhibitors, the latter related to earlier onset of nephritis. Further, autoantibodies are a distinct feature of SLE that are produced as the result of an adaptive immune response and how complement can affect that response is also being reviewed. SLE generates numerous disease manifestations involving contributions from complement such as glomerulonephritis and the increased risk of thrombosis. Furthermore, since most of the complement system is present in plasma, complement is very accessible and may be suitable as biomarker for diagnosis or monitoring of disease activity. This review highlights the many roles of complement for SLE pathogenesis and how research has progressed during recent years.

  15. Complement, a target for therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L

    2015-12-01

    The complement system is a key innate immune defence against infection and an important driver of inflammation; however, these very properties can also cause harm. Inappropriate or uncontrolled activation of complement can cause local and/or systemic inflammation, tissue damage and disease. Complement provides numerous options for drug development as it is a proteolytic cascade that involves nine specific proteases, unique multimolecular activation and lytic complexes, an arsenal of natural inhibitors, and numerous receptors that bind to activation fragments. Drug design is facilitated by the increasingly detailed structural understanding of the molecules involved in the complement system. Only two anti-complement drugs are currently on the market, but many more are being developed for diseases that include infectious, inflammatory, degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic disorders. In this Review, we describe the history, current landscape and future directions for anti-complement therapies.

  16. Complement, a target for therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L

    2015-12-01

    The complement system is a key innate immune defence against infection and an important driver of inflammation; however, these very properties can also cause harm. Inappropriate or uncontrolled activation of complement can cause local and/or systemic inflammation, tissue damage and disease. Complement provides numerous options for drug development as it is a proteolytic cascade that involves nine specific proteases, unique multimolecular activation and lytic complexes, an arsenal of natural inhibitors, and numerous receptors that bind to activation fragments. Drug design is facilitated by the increasingly detailed structural understanding of the molecules involved in the complement system. Only two anti-complement drugs are currently on the market, but many more are being developed for diseases that include infectious, inflammatory, degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic disorders. In this Review, we describe the history, current landscape and future directions for anti-complement therapies. PMID:26493766

  17. The Appositive NP-Complement Clause and Restructuring

    OpenAIRE

    Inada, Shun'ichiro

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines properties of Japanese Af-ga-aru construction involving an appositive NP-complement clause and presents a new approach to restructuring. The new analysis can explain the monoclausality of. sentences with an appositive NP-complement as well as that of restructuring constructions with a VP-complement. I will show that the former construction has the same properties as the latter while the former cannot be restructured at base structure or by overt operations based on two poi...

  18. PROTEIN ENGINEERING TO TARGET COMPLEMENT EVASION IN CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is composed of soluble factors in plasma that enhance or “complement” immune-mediated killing through innate and adaptive mechanisms. Activation of complement causes recruitment of immune cells; opsonization of coated cells; and direct killing of affected cells through a membrane attack complex (MAC). Tumor cells up-regulate complement inhibitory factors -one of several strategies to evade the immune system. In many cases as the tumor progresses, dramatic increases in co...

  19. The Complement of Normal Fuzzy Numbers: An Exposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoni Dhar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, our main intention is to revisit the existing definition of complementation of fuzzy sets and thereafter various theories associated with it are also commented on. The main contribution of this paper is to suggest a new definition of complementation of fuzzy sets on the basis of reference function. Some other results have also been introduced whenever possible by using this new definition of complementation.

  20. The Complement of Normal Fuzzy Numbers: An Exposition

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoni Dhar; Baruah, Hemanta K

    2013-01-01

    In this article, our main intention is to revisit the existing definition of complementation of fuzzy sets and thereafter various theories associated with it are also commented on. The main contribution of this paper is to suggest a new definition of complementation of fuzzy sets on the basis of reference function. Some other results have also been introduced whenever possible by using this new definition of complementation.

  1. Efficacy of Targeted Complement Inhibition in Experimental C3 Glomerulopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ruseva, Marieta M.; Peng, Tao; Lasaro, Melissa A.; Bouchard, Keith; Liu-Chen, Susan; Sun, Fang; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Marozsan, Andre; Wang, Yi; Pickering, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy refers to renal disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of C3 within the kidney, commonly along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). C3 glomerulopathy is associated with complement alternative pathway dysregulation, which includes functional defects in complement regulator factor H (FH). There is no effective treatment for C3 glomerulopathy. We investigated the efficacy of a recombinant mouse protein composed of domains from complement receptor 2 (CR2) and FH (CR...

  2. IMPROVING 9-INTERSECTION MODEL BY REPLACING THE COMPLEMENT WITH VORONOI REGION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    9-intersection model is the most popular framework used for formalizing the spatial relations between two spatial objects A and B. It transforms the topological relation ships between two simple spatial objects A and B into point-set topology problem in terms of the intersections of A's boundary ( A), interior (A0) and exterior (A - ) with B's bound ary ( B),interior (B0) and exterior (B-). It is shown in this paper that there exist some limitations of the original 9-intersection model due to its definition of an object's exterior as its complement,and it is difficult to distinguish different disjoint relations and relations be tween complex objects with holes, difficult or even impossible to compute the intersections with the two object' s complements ( A ∩ B -, A0 ∩ B -, A - ∩ B, A- ∩ B0 and A - ∩ B - )since the complements are infinitive. The authors suggest to re-define the exterior of spa tial object by replacing the complement with its Voronoi region. A new Voronoi-based 9-in- tersection (VNI) is proposed and used for formalizing topological relations between spatial objects. By improving the 9-interscetion model, it is now possible to distinguish disjoint rela tions and to deal with objects with boles. Also it is possible to compute the exterior-based in tersections and manipulate spatial relations with the VNI.

  3. Genotypic diversity of complement component C4 does not predict kidney transplant outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrmann, Markus; Döhler, Bernd; Ruhenstroth, Andrea; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Exner, Markus; Rees, Andrew J; Böhmig, Georg A

    2011-02-01

    Gene copy number of complement component C4, which varies among individuals, may determine the intrinsic strength of the classical complement pathway. Presuming a major role of complement as an effector in transplant rejection, we hypothesized that C4 genetic diversity may partially explain the variation in allograft outcomes. This retrospective study included 1969 deceased-donor kidney transplants randomly selected from the Collaborative Transplant Study DNA bank. We determined recipient and donor gene copy number of total C4, C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B), and C4 gene length variants (C4L and C4S) by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Groups defined according to recipient C4 gene copy number (low, intermediate, and high) had similar 10-year allograft survival. Genotypic groups showed comparable rates of graft dysfunction, treatment for rejection, immunological graft loss, hospitalization for infection, malignant disease, and death. Similarly, separate analyses of C4A, C4B, C4L, and C4S; combined evaluation of donor and recipient C4 genotype; or analysis of recipients with higher risk for rejection did not reveal considerable outcome effects. In conclusion, we did not demonstrate that C4 gene copy number associates with transplant outcome, and we found no evidence that the resulting variation in the strength of classical complement activation influences susceptibility to rejection.

  4. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  5. The role of complement in the acquired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Fischer, E M; Leslie, R G

    2000-01-01

    Studies over the past three decades have clearly established a central role for complement in the promotion of a humoral immune response. The primary function of complement, in this regard, is to opsonize antigen or immune complexes for uptake by complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) expressed...... participate in intercellular bridging. Finally, current studies suggest that CR2 may also play a role in the determination of B-cell tolerance towards self-antigens and thereby hold the key to the previously observed correlation between deficiencies of the early complement components and autoimmune disease....

  6. The complement C3 protein family in invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, M

    2011-01-01

    Complement C3 plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system of mammals as the central component of the complement system essential for its activation mechanism and effecter function. C3 has a unique intra-chain thioester bond that is shared by some complement and non-complement proteins forming a thioester protein (TEP) family. Phylogenetic analysis of TEP family genes of vertebrates and invertebrates revealed that the TEP family is divided into two subfamilies, the C3 subfamily and the al...

  7. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a `multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a `split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  8. Altmetrics – a complement to conventional metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Emerging metrics based on article-level does not exclude traditional metrics based on citations to the journal, but complements them. Both can be employed in conjunction to offer a richer picture of an article use from immediate to long terms. Article-level metrics (ALM) is the result of the aggregation of different data sources and the collection of content from multiple social network services. Sources used for the aggregation can be broken down into five categories: usage, captures, mentions, social media and citations. Data sources depend on the tool, but they include classic metrics indicators based on citations, academic social networks (Mendeley, CiteULike, Delicious) and social media (Facebook, Twitter, blogs, or Youtube, among others). Altmetrics is not synonymous with alternative metrics. Altmetrics are normally early available and allow to assess the social impact of scholarly outputs, almost at the real time. This paper overviews briefly the meaning of altmetrics and describes some of the existing tools used to apply this new metrics: Public Library of Science - Article-Level Metrics, Altmetric, Impactstory and Plum. PMID:26110028

  9. Altmetrics - a complement to conventional metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Emerging metrics based on article-level does not exclude traditional metrics based on citations to the journal, but complements them. Both can be employed in conjunction to offer a richer picture of an article use from immediate to long terms. Article-level metrics (ALM) is the result of the aggregation of different data sources and the collection of content from multiple social network services. Sources used for the aggregation can be broken down into five categories: usage, captures, mentions, social media and citations. Data sources depend on the tool, but they include classic metrics indicators based on citations, academic social networks (Mendeley, CiteULike, Delicious) and social media (Facebook, Twitter, blogs, or Youtube, among others). Altmetrics is not synonymous with alternative metrics. Altmetrics are normally early available and allow to assess the social impact of scholarly outputs, almost at the real time. This paper overviews briefly the meaning of altmetrics and describes some of the existing tools used to apply this new metrics: Public Library of Science--Article-Level Metrics, Altmetric, Impactstory and Plum.

  10. Mobile MSN Messenger: Still a Complement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nyberg

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how mobile instant messaging services can fit into the users’ current communication behavior, Ericsson Research performed a qualitative user study in Sweden in May 2007. The results showed that the respondents were positive towards (free of charge mobile MSN Messenger and perceived it as an ex¬tension of the computer-based version that could be used anywhere. However, although MSN Messenger on the com¬puter definitely was considered as a ‘must-have’ application, the mobile version was only perceived as a ‘nice-to-have’ application and a complement to text mes¬saging (SMS. Almost one year later, in April 2008, Ericsson Research performed a short qualita¬tive follow-up study with the same set of respondents to un¬derstand if and how the mobile MSN Messenger usage had changed. The results actually revealed that none of the re¬spondents used mobile MSN Messenger anymore as the application no longer was free of charge. On a general level, the study highlights important considera¬tions when intro¬ducing computer-based concepts and Internet services in a mo¬bile environment.

  11. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  12. Evasion of Complement-Mediated Lysis and Complement C3 Deposition Are Regulated by Francisella tularensis Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen1

    OpenAIRE

    Clay, Corey D.; Soni, Shilpa; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft) is a potential weapon of bioterrorism when aerosolized. Macrophage infection is necessary for disease progression and efficient phagocytosis by human macrophages requires serum opsonization by complement. Microbial complement activation leads to surface deposition of a highly regulated protein complex resulting in opsonization or membrane lysis. The nature of complement component C3 deposition, i.e., C3b (opsonization and lysis) or C3bi (opsonization ...

  13. Structure of Compstatin in Complex with Complement Component C3c Reveals a New Mechanism of Complement Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, B.J.C.; Halff, E.F.; LAMBRIS, J. D.; Gros, P

    2007-01-01

    Undesired complement activation is a major cause of tissue injury in various pathological conditions and contributes to several immune complex diseases. Compstatin, a 13-residue peptide, is an effective inhibitor of the activation of complement component C3 and thus blocks a central and crucial step in the complement cascade. The precise binding site on C3, the structure in the bound form, and the exact mode of action of compstatin are unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of compsta...

  14. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune Thomas; Petersen, Steen Vang;

    2015-01-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface...... for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details...

  15. Complement and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune inflammatory disorders, RA and SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nibhriti

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is a major effecter system of the innate immunity that bridges with adaptive immunity. The system consists of about 40 humoral and cell surface proteins that include zymogens, receptors and regulators. The zymogens get activated in a cascade fashion by antigen-antibody complex, antigen alone or by polymannans, respectively, by the classical, alternative and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways. The ongoing research on complement regulators and complement receptors suggest key role of these proteins in the initiation, regulation and effecter mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immunity. Although, the complement system provides the first line of defence against the invading pathogens, its aberrant uncontrolled activation causes extensive self tissue injury. A large number of humoral and cell surface complement regulatory protein keep the system well-regulated in healthy individuals. Complement profiling had brought important information on the pathophysiology of several infectious and chronic inflammatory disorders. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases that affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This brief review discusses on the complement system, its functions and its importance as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases with focus on SLE and RA.

  16. In vitro biosynthesis of complement protein D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnum, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: to determine site(s) of complement protein D biosynthesis and to examine D biosynthesis with respect to the kinetics of D secretion, the post-translational modification of D and the tissue-specific differences in D secretion and processing. Antigenic D was detected in the culture supernatants of two cell lines, U937 and HepG2, and adherent blood monocytes by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. D secreted by U937 cells was hemolytically active with a specific activity comparable to D in serum. De novo synthesis of D by U937 cells was demonstrated with the use of cycloheximide. Biosynthetic labeling using /sup 35/S labeled methionine or cysteine, followed by immunoprecipitation demonstrated a single d band intra- and extra-cellularly in all three cell types as analyzed by SDS-PAGE and auto-radiography. Elevated serum D levels in individuals with IgA nephropathy led to studies on the D levels in serum and urine of individuals with chronic renal failure and an individual with Fanconi's syndrome. The former group had elevated serum D levels, compared to normals, and insignificant levels of D in their urine while the patient with Fanconi's syndrome had normal serum D levels but markedly elevated urinary D levels. These studies demonstrate that the monocyte and hepatocyte are both sites of D synthesis and that there are no apparent differences in the secretion rates and processing of D produced by these cell types. The results also suggest that D is not synthesized or secreted as a precursor molecule. Additionally, these studies suggest that the kidney is a major site of D catabolism.

  17. Demand Heterogeneity and the Adoption of Platform Complements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Rietveld (Joost); J.P. Eggers

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper offers a demand-based theory of how platform maturity affects the adoption of platform complements. We argue that differences between early and late adopters of the platform include willingness to pay for the platform-and-complement bundle, risk preferences, preference for nov

  18. Complement Attack against Aspergillus and Corresponding Evasion Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Speth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis shows a high mortality rate particularly in immunocompromised patients. Perpetually increasing numbers of affected patients highlight the importance of a clearer understanding of interactions between innate immunity and fungi. Innate immunity is considered to be the most significant host defence against invasive fungal infections. Complement represents a crucial part of this first line defence and comprises direct effects against invading pathogens as well as bridging functions to other parts of the immune network. However, despite the potency of complement to attack foreign pathogens, the prevalence of invasive fungal infections is increasing. Two possible reasons may explain that phenomenon: First, complement activation might be insufficient for an effective antifungal defence in risk patients (due to, e.g., low complement levels, poor recognition of fungal surface, or missing interplay with other immune elements in immunocompromised patients. On the other hand, fungi may have developed evasion strategies to avoid recognition and/or eradication by complement. In this review, we summarize the most important interactions between Aspergillus and the complement system. We describe the various ways of complement activation by Aspergillus and the antifungal effects of the system, and also show proven and probable mechanisms of Aspergillus for complement evasion.

  19. Schur complements of matrices with acyclic bipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Olesky, D.D.; van den Driessche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite graphs are used to describe the generalized Schur complements of real matrices having nos quare submatrix with two or more nonzero diagonals. For any matrix A with this property, including any nearly reducible matrix, the sign pattern of each generalized Schur complement is shown to be ...

  20. Molecular interplay between bacteria and the terminal complement pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, E.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma proteins of the complement system fulfill important immune defense functions, including opsonization of bacteria for phagocytosis, generation of chemo-attractants and direct bacterial killing via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC or C5b-9 complex). The terminal complement pathw

  1. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-11-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  2. Production of Infinitival Complements by Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Karen Barako; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the production of infinitival complements by children with specific language impairment (SLI) as compared with mean length of utterance (MLU)-matched children in an effort to clarify inconsistencies in the literature. Spontaneous language samples were analysed for infinitival complements (reduced…

  3. The emerging role of complement inhibitors in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Legendre, Christophe M

    2015-11-01

    The role of complement in the biology of kidney transplantation is becoming more and more significant, especially but not only because we now have access to drugs inhibiting complement. After describing the main characteristics of complement biology, both activation of the complement cascade and the many regulatory factors, we will review the precise role of complement in kidney transplant biology. Complement activation has been involved in ischemia-reperfusion injury, in the recurrence of several diseases such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and antiphospholipid syndrome, as well as the process of antibody-mediated rejection, either acute or chronic. There are many potentially interesting drugs interfering with complement inhibition that have been or may be studied in kidney transplantation. Currently, the bulk of data concerns eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody blocking the complement cascade at the C5. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment and prevention of recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with an overall good safety profile. Although it has been reported to be efficacious to prevent antibody-mediated rejection, properly designed trials are currently being performed to state this efficacy. In addition, randomized trials are, in the process, regarding the prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury after kidney transplantation.

  4. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.;

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......, IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of complement activation, regulation and evasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system of our immune defense can rapidly recognize and eliminate pathogens in blood. Activation of complement depends on enzymatic complexes, known as C3 convertases, which are short lived and dissociate irreversibly. Staphylococcus aureus secretes a small protein (named SCIN) that su

  6. Multiple forms of complement C3 in trout that differ in binding to complement activators.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunyer, J O; Zarkadis, I K; Sahu, A.; LAMBRIS, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    In all other species analyzed to date, the functionally active form of complement component C3 exists as the product of a single gene. We have now identified and characterized three functional C3 proteins (C3-1, C3-3, and C3-4) in trout that are the products of at least two distinct C3 genes. All three proteins are composed of an alpha-and a beta-chain and contain a thioester bond in the alpha-chain. However, they differ in their electrophoretic mobility, glycosylation, reactivity with monosp...

  7. [Renal risks of dietary complements: a forgotten cause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Olympia; Humbert, Antoine; Burnier, Michel; Teta, Daniel

    2014-02-26

    The use of dietary complements like vitamins, minerals, trace elements, proteins, aminoacids and plant-derived agents is prevalent in the general population, in order to promote health and treat diseases. Dietary complements are considered as safe natural products and are easily available without prescription. However, these can lead to severe renal toxicity, especially in cases of unknown pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD). In particular, Chinese herbs including aristolochic acid, high doses of vitamine C, creatine and protein complements may lead to acute and chronic renal failure, sometimes irreversible. Dietary complement toxicity should be suspected in any case of unexplained renal impairement. In the case of pre-existing CKD, the use of potentially nephrotoxic dietary complements should be screened for.

  8. The problems of the complex sentences with complements in Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolova Ruselina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the complex sentences with complements in Bulgarian is a multifactor analysis, which has to take into account the following issues: a the lexical meaning of the main predicate, which determines the meaning of the complement in general; b the grammatical meanings of the main predicate - person (a special role plays the opposition between the speaker and the other participants in communication, number, tense, mood, evidentiality affirmativity or negation; c the functions of the linking words - complementizers, particles, interrogatives, relatives; d the meaning of the complement and its related presuppositions or implications (if any, its modality, its illocutionary force, its formal structure, its syntactic position in the complex sentence; e the combinatorial potential of the matrix sentence and the complement in both aspects - semantic and formal.

  9. Protease-dependent mechanisms of complement evasion by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    The human immune system has evolved a variety of mechanisms for the primary task of neutralizing and eliminating microbial intruders. As the first line of defense, the complement system is responsible for rapid recognition and opsonization of bacteria, presentation to phagocytes and bacterial cell killing by direct lysis. All successful human pathogens have mechanisms of circumventing the antibacterial activity of the complement system and escaping this stage of the immune response. One of the ways in which pathogens achieve this is the deployment of proteases. Based on the increasing number of recent publications in this area, it appears that proteolytic inactivation of the antibacterial activities of the complement system is a common strategy of avoiding targeting by this arm of host innate immune defense. In this review, we focus on those bacteria that deploy proteases capable of degrading complement system components into non-functional fragments, thus impairing complement-dependent antibacterial activity and facilitating pathogen survival inside the host.

  10. The Role of Complement in Antibody Therapy for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibroe, Peter P; Helvig, Shen Y; Moein Moghimi, S

    2014-04-01

    The complement system is part of the innate immune system, eliciting central immunoregulatory functions. Detection of foreign surfaces is either achieved through complement-specific patternrecognition molecules or mediated by antigen recognition of antibodies. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG, and IgM all have the potential to initiate a complement response, with the efficiency and response development closely related to the antibody isotype, multimeric state, and degree of glycosylation. A group of serum proteins constitutes the central effector functions of complement, thus allowing direct cell lysis, opsonization, and inflammation. These effector functions can be used in antibody therapies, especially against infectious diseases, as the target membranes lack complement regulatory proteins. The relative contribution of each function and the interplay with direct antibody-mediated clearance is not fully exploited, thus suggesting an option for further rational optimization of antibody therapies.

  11. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules.

  12. The role of complement in the acquired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Fischer, E M; Leslie, R G

    2000-01-01

    Studies over the past three decades have clearly established a central role for complement in the promotion of a humoral immune response. The primary function of complement, in this regard, is to opsonize antigen or immune complexes for uptake by complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) expressed...... on B cells, follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and some T cells. A variety of mechanisms appear to be involved in complement-mediated promotion of the humoral response. These include: enhancement of antigen (Ag) uptake and processing by both Ag-specific and non-specific B cells for presentation...... participate in intercellular bridging. Finally, current studies suggest that CR2 may also play a role in the determination of B-cell tolerance towards self-antigens and thereby hold the key to the previously observed correlation between deficiencies of the early complement components and autoimmune disease....

  13. Complement monitoring of Pluronic 127 gel and micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, Islam; Hunter, A Christy; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2013-01-01

    vascular occlusion. We show that poloxamer gel can trigger the complement system, which is an integral part of innate immunity and its inadvertent activation can induce clinically significant anaphylaxis. Complement activation by the poloxamer gel is through the alternative pathway, but material...... transformations from gel to the solution state further incite complement through calcium-sensitive pathways, where a role for C1q and antibodies has been eliminated. Poloxamer addition to plasma/serum (at levels above its critical micelle concentration, cmc) induced formation of large and diffused structures......, which may have been responsible for triggering complement. Since poloxamer 407 administration has been reported to cause significant changes in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels we further examined the role of lipoproteins in poloxamer-mediated complement activation. Our results show...

  14. Complement regulators in human disease: lessons from modern genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Liszewski, M; Atkinson, J P

    2015-03-01

    First identified in human serum in the late 19th century as a 'complement' to antibodies in mediating bacterial lysis, the complement system emerged more than a billion years ago probably as the first humoral immune system. The contemporary complement system consists of nearly 60 proteins in three activation pathways (classical, alternative and lectin) and a terminal cytolytic pathway common to all. Modern molecular biology and genetics have not only led to further elucidation of the structure of complement system components, but have also revealed function-altering rare variants and common polymorphisms, particularly in regulators of the alternative pathway, that predispose to human disease by creating 'hyperinflammatory complement phenotypes'. To treat these 'complementopathies', a monoclonal antibody against the initiator of the membrane attack complex, C5, has received approval for use. Additional therapeutic reagents are on the horizon.

  15. Complement system part I - molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMerle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins and the membrane attack complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure-function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors.

  16. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Pham, Christine T. N.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we employed an in vitro hemolysis assay to measure the serum complement activity of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that differed by size, surface charge, and surface chemistry, quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework.

  17. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:27591336

  18. Contribution of complement activation pathways to neuropathology differs among mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement proteins and activation products have been found associated with neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, a C5a receptor antagonist was shown to suppress neuropathology in two murine models of AD, Tg2576 and 3xTg. Previously, a genetic deficiency of C1q in the Tg2576 mouse model showed an accumulation of fibrillar plaques similar to the complement sufficient Tg2576, but reactive glia were significantly decreased and neuronal integrity was improved suggesting detrimental consequences for complement activation in AD. The goal of this study was to define the role of the classical complement activation pathway in the progression of pathology in the 3xTg mouse that develops tangles in addition to fibrillar plaques (more closely reflecting human AD pathology and to assess the influence of complement in a model of AD with a higher level of complement hemolytic activity. Methods 3xTg mice deficient in C1q (3xTgQ-/- were generated, and both 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- were backcrossed to the BUB mouse strain which has higher in vitro hemolytic complement activity. Mice were aged and perfused, and brain sections stained for pathological markers or analyzed for proinflammatory marker expression. Results 3xTgQ-/- mice showed similar amounts of fibrillar amyloid, reactive glia and hyperphosphorylated tau as the C1q-sufficient 3xTg at the ages analyzed. However, 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- on the BUB background developed pathology earlier than on the original 3xTg background, although the presence of C1q had no effect on neuropathological and pro-inflammatory markers. In contrast to that seen in other transgenic models of AD, C1q, C4 and C3 immunoreactivity was undetectable on the plaques of 3xTg in any background, although C3 was associated with reactive astrocytes surrounding the plaques. Importantly, properdin a component of the alternative complement pathway was associated with plaques in all models. Conclusions In contrast to

  19. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P N Scholl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112 and controls (n = 67. Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH, factor B-C2 (BF-C2 and complement C3 (C3 genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001, were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  20. Structure of Compstatin in Complex with Complement Component C3c Reveals a New Mechanism of Complement Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.J.C.; Halff, E.F.; Lambris, J.D.; Gros, P.

    2007-01-01

    Undesired complement activation is a major cause of tissue injury in various pathological conditions and contributes to several immune complex diseases. Compstatin, a 13-residue peptide, is an effective inhibitor of the activation of complement component C3 and thus blocks a central and crucial step

  1. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  2. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  3. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  4. Early intra-articular complement activation in ankle fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Salzmann, Gian M; Niemeyer, Philipp;

    2014-01-01

    osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1 β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture...... and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures....

  5. Defined Contribution vs Defined Pension: Reforming the Legal Retirement Age

    OpenAIRE

    Lacomba, Juan Antonio; Lagos, Francisco Miguel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of changing Social Security parameters on the optimal legal retirement age. Two Social Security Systems are studied, with opposite results. When the pension scheme has a defined contribution, a more redistributive system will delay the preferred legal retirement age. On the other hand, when the pension benefit is the defined parameter, the increase in the redistribution level will lower this preferred age.

  6. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Julia A; Hair, Pamela S; Pallera, Haree K; Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Phelps, Cody A; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M; Pascal, Stephen M; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M; Lattanzio, Frank A; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  7. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1 Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1. In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases.

  8. Functional analysis of Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Honoré, Christian; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole;

    2010-01-01

    Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation that could be applicable for research and clinical use. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was acetylated (acBSA) and chosen as a solid phase ligand for Ficolins in microtiter wells. Binding of Ficolins on acBSA was evaluated, as was functional complement activation...... assessed by C4, C3 and terminal complement complex (TCC) deposition. Serum Ficolin-3 bound to acBSA in a calcium dependent manner, while only minimal binding of Ficolin-2 and no binding of Ficolin-1 were observed. No binding to normal BSA was seen for any of the Ficolins. Serum C4, C3 and TCC deposition...... on acBSA were dependent only on Ficolin-3 in appropriate serum dilutions. Deposition of down stream complement components correlated highly significantly with the serum concentration of Ficolin-3 but not with Ficolin-2 in healthy donors. To make the assay robust for clinical use a chemical compound...

  9. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz;

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first...... lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component...... by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease...

  10. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu;

    2014-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which...... in turn activate downstream complement components, ultimately leading to elimination of the pathogen. Mice deficient in the key molecules of lectin pathway of complement have been generated in order to build knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the lectin pathway in health and disease. Despite...... in complement activation, pathogen infection, coagulation, host tissue injury and developmental biology have been revealed by in vivo investigations. This review provides an overview of the mice deficient in lectin pathway molecules and highlights some of the most important findings that have resulted from...

  11. Glomerular C3c localization indicates ongoing immune deposit formation and complement activation in experimental glomerulonephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, M.; Pruchno, C. J.; Burns, M.; Baker, P. J.; R. J. Johnson; Couser, W G

    1993-01-01

    In antibody-mediated glomerular disease, deposits of C3 (C3b) are common and are degraded by factor I to C3c and C3d. However, the kinetics of C3b degradation in glomerulonephritis have not been defined. To do this, we studied three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis with established C3 deposits (passive Heymann nephritis, cationized immunoglobulin G membranous nephropathy, and concanavalin A-anticoncanavalin A glomerulonephritis). C3b deposition was halted by administration of...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C3b inactivator immunological test... Systems § 866.5260 Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group...

  13. Complement plays an important role in spinal cord injury and represents a therapeutic target for improving recovery following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Pannu, Ravinder; Singh, Inderjit; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Initiation of an inflammatory cascade following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is thought to cause secondary injury and to adversely impact functional recovery, although the mechanisms involved are not well defined. We report on the dynamics of complement activation and deposition in the mouse spinal cord following traumatic injury, the role of complement in the development of SCI, and the characterization of a novel targeted complement inhibitor. Following traumatic injury, mice deficient in C3 had a significantly improved locomotor score when compared with wild-type controls, and analysis of their spinal cords revealed significantly more tissue sparing, with significantly less necrosis, demyelination, and neutrophil infiltration. Wild-type mice were also treated with CR2-Crry, a novel inhibitor of complement activation that targets to sites of C3 deposition. A single intravenous injection of CR2-Crry 1 hour after traumatic injury improved functional outcome and pathology to an extent similar to that seen in C3-deficient animals. CR2-Crry specifically targeted to the injured spinal cord in a distribution pattern corresponding to that seen for deposited C3. As immunosuppression is undesirable in patients following SCI, targeted CR2-Crry may provide appropriate bioavailability to treat SCI at a dose that does not significantly affect systemic levels of serum complement activity. PMID:16936276

  14. Interaction of campylobacter species with antibody, complement and phagocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernatowska, E.; Jose, P; Davies, H; Stephenson, M.; Webster, D

    1989-01-01

    The opsonisation of four different campylobacter species for human neutrophils was studied using a chemiluminescence system and electron microscopy. Opsonisation of Campylobacter fetus, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter jejuni was mediated by antibody and enhanced by complement. Antibody was not, however, required for the phagocytosis of Campylobacter pylori because it activates the classical pathway of complement directly. This unusual property may be important in the pathogenesis of C p...

  15. The problems of the complex sentences with complements in Bulgarian

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolova Ruselina

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the complex sentences with complements in Bulgarian is a multifactor analysis, which has to take into account the following issues: a) the lexical meaning of the main predicate, which determines the meaning of the complement in general; b) the grammatical meanings of the main predicate - person (a special role plays the opposition between the speaker and the other participants in communication), number, tense, mood, evidentiality affirmativity or negation; c) the function...

  16. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4(-/-) Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4(-/-) mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  17. Mutations of complement lectin pathway genes MBL2 and MASP2 associated with placental malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmberg Ville

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the host defense against malaria including Plasmodium falciparum malaria in pregnancy, but the roles of the various underlying genes and mechanisms predisposing to the disease are poorly understood. Methods 98 single-nucletoide polymorphisms were genotyped in a set of 17 functionally related genes of the complement system in 145 primiparous Ghanaian women with placental malaria, defined by placental parasitaemia or malaria pigment, and as a control, in 124 non-affected primiparae. Results Placental malaria was significantly associated with SNPs in the lectin pathway genes MBL2, MASP2, FCN2 and in properdin. In particular, the main African mannose-binding lectin deficiency variant (MBL2*G57E, rs1800451 increased the odds of placental malaria (OR 1.6; permuted p-value 0.014. In contrast, a common MASP2 mutation (R439H, rs12085877, which reduces the activity of MBL-MASP2 complexes occurred in 33% of non-affected women and in 22% primiparae with placental malaria (OR 0.55, permuted p-value 0.020. Conclusions Excessive complement activation is of importance in the pathogenesis of placental malaria by mediating inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial dysfunction. Mutated MBL and MASP2 proteins could have direct intrinsic effects on the susceptibility to placental malaria, in addition to their roles in regulation of downstream complement activation.

  18. Theoretical approaches to elections defining

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya V. Lebedeva

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to elections defining develop the nature, essence and content of elections, help to determine their place and a role as one of the major national law institutions in democratic system.

  19. Activation of human complement by immunoglobulin G antigranulocyte antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, P K; Currie, M S; Logue, G L

    1982-01-01

    The ability of antigranulocyte antibody to fix the third component of complement (C3) to the granulocyte surface was investigated by an assay that quantitates the binding of monoclonal anti-C3 antibody to paraformaldehyde-fixed cells preincubated with Felty's syndrome serum in the presence of human complement. The sera from 7 of 13 patients with Felty's syndrome bound two to three times as much C3 to granulocytes as sera from patients with uncomplicated rheumatoid arthritis. The complement-activating ability of Felty's syndrome serum seemed to reside in the monomeric IgG-containing serum fraction. For those sera capable of activating complement, the amount of C3 fixed to granulocytes was proportional to the amount of granulocyte-binding IgG present in the serum. Thus, complement fixation appeared to be a consequence of the binding of antigranulocyte antibody to the cell surface. These studies suggest a role for complement-mediated injury in the pathophysiology of immune granulocytopenia, as has been demonstrated for immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:7174786

  20. The Role of Complement System in Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Charchaflieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock is a critical clinical condition with a high mortality rate. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to develop effective therapies. Basic and clinical studies suggest that activation of complements in the common cascade, for example, complement component 3 (C3 and C5, is involved in the development of septic shock. The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. Activation of these two pathways is essential to clear endotoxin. Recent investigations have shed light on the role of lectin complement pathway in septic shock. Published reports suggest a protective role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL against sepsis. Our preliminary study of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2 in septic shock patients indicated that acute decrease of MASP-2 in the early phase of septic shock might correlate with in-hospital mortality. It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. This paper also discusses additional complement-related pathogenic mechanisms and intervention strategies for septic shock.

  1. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  2. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  3. Complement receptor expression and activation of the complement cascade on B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquart, H V; Svendsen, A; Rasmussen, J M;

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the expression of the complement receptors, CR1 on erythrocytes and blood leucocytes and CR2 on B cells, is reduced in patients with SLE, and that the reduced expression of CR1 on erythrocytes is related to disease activity. We have earlier demonstrated...... that normal B cells are capable of activating the alternative pathway (AP) of complement in a CR2-dependent fashion. In this study we have investigated whether disturbances in this activity may be related to the altered phenotype of SLE B cells. Flow cytometry was used to measure expression of complement...... activation by B cells in homologous serum. Finally, we demonstrated an inverse relationship between SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and the expression of complement receptor 2 (CR2) on SLE B cells. Thus, determination of CR2 on B cells may emerge as an additional laboratory tool in the assessment of SLE...

  4. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-23

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease. PMID:27337340

  5. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-22

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease.

  6. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Erika M.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J.; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S.; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation–enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  7. A novel method for direct measurement of complement convertases activity in human serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.M.; Volokhina, E.B.; Fransson, V.; Stromberg, P.; Berghard, L.; Viktorelius, M.; Mollnes, T.E.; Lopez-Trascasa, M.; Heuvel, B. van den; Goodship, T.H.; Marchbank, K.J.; Okroj, M.

    2014-01-01

    Complement convertases are enzymatic complexes that play a central role in sustaining and amplification of the complement cascade. Impairment of complement function leads directly or indirectly to pathological conditions, including higher infection rate, kidney diseases, autoimmune- or neurodegenera

  8. Modular Software-Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiemeier Arnd-Ragnar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the technical and commercial boundary conditions for software-defined radio (SDR, it is suggestive to reconsider the concept anew from an unconventional point of view. The organizational principles of signal processing (rather than the signal processing algorithms themselves are the main focus of this work on modular software-defined radio. Modularity and flexibility are just two key characteristics of the SDR environment which extend smoothly into the modeling of hardware and software. In particular, the proposed model of signal processing software includes irregular, connected, directed, acyclic graphs with random node weights and random edges. Several approaches for mapping such software to a given hardware are discussed. Taking into account previous findings as well as new results from system simulations presented here, the paper finally concludes with the utility of pipelining as a general design guideline for modular software-defined radio.

  9. Level of complement activity predicts cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The positive effect of reperfusion after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) can be reduced by ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury.Mannose-binding-lectin (MBL) and soluble C5b-9 (membrane-attack-complex) are involved in complement-driven cell lysis and may play a role in human...... descending coronary artery who were successfully treated with pPCI. Cardiac dysfunction was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction LVEF or = 35%. After adjustment...

  10. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Gabriela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae, comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process.

  11. Function of Serum Complement in Drinking Water Arsenic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Laila N.; Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Nabi, A. H. M. Nurun; Hossain, Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Serum complement function was evaluated in 125 affected subjects suffering from drinking water arsenic toxicity. Their mean duration of exposure was 7.4 ± 5.3 yrs, and the levels of arsenic in drinking water and urine samples were 216 ± 211 and 223 ± 302 μg/L, respectively. The mean bactericidal activity of complement from the arsenic patients was 92% and that in the unexposed controls was 99% (P < 0.01), but heat-inactivated serum showed slightly elevated activity than in controls. In patients, the mean complement C3 was 1.56 g/L, and C4 was 0.29 g/L compared to 1.68 g/L and 0.25 g/L, respectively, in the controls. The mean IgG in the arsenic patients was 24.3 g/L that was highly significantly elevated (P < 0.001). Arsenic patients showed a significant direct correlation between C3 and bactericidal activity (P = 0.014). Elevated levels of C4 indicated underutilization and possibly impaired activity of the classical complement pathway. We conclude reduced function of serum complement in drinking water arsenic toxicity. PMID:22545044

  12. Function of Serum Complement in Drinking Water Arsenic Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila N. Islam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum complement function was evaluated in 125 affected subjects suffering from drinking water arsenic toxicity. Their mean duration of exposure was 7.4±5.3 yrs, and the levels of arsenic in drinking water and urine samples were 216±211 and 223±302 μg/L, respectively. The mean bactericidal activity of complement from the arsenic patients was 92% and that in the unexposed controls was 99% (P<0.01, but heat-inactivated serum showed slightly elevated activity than in controls. In patients, the mean complement C3 was 1.56 g/L, and C4 was 0.29 g/L compared to 1.68 g/L and 0.25 g/L, respectively, in the controls. The mean IgG in the arsenic patients was 24.3 g/L that was highly significantly elevated (P<0.001. Arsenic patients showed a significant direct correlation between C3 and bactericidal activity (P=0.014. Elevated levels of C4 indicated underutilization and possibly impaired activity of the classical complement pathway. We conclude reduced function of serum complement in drinking water arsenic toxicity.

  13. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients. MOF score, lactate, C1-inhibitor and prothrombin time have been the only statistically significant predictors for lethal outcome suggesting that organ function, microcirculation, haemostasis and inflammatory response are essential elements of the pathomechanism and clinical course of diseases among critically ill patients.

  14. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard A; Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model.

  15. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E.

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. PMID:27571414

  16. Defining Usability of PN Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Ahola, Titta; Fleury, Alexandre;

    In this deliverable usability and user experience are defined in relation to MAGNET Beyond technologies, and it is described how the main MAGNET Beyond concepts can be evaluated through the involvement of users. The concepts include the new "Activity based communication approach" for interacting ...

  17. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam;

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...

  18. The lectin pathway of complement activation is a critical component of the innate immune response to pneumococcal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssif M Ali

    Full Text Available The complement system plays a key role in host defense against pneumococcal infection. Three different pathways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, mediate complement activation. While there is limited information available on the roles of the classical and the alternative activation pathways of complement in fighting streptococcal infection, little is known about the role of the lectin pathway, mainly due to the lack of appropriate experimental models of lectin pathway deficiency. We have recently established a mouse strain deficient of the lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2 and shown that this mouse strain is unable to form the lectin pathway specific C3 and C5 convertases. Here we report that MASP-2 deficient mice (which can still activate complement via the classical pathway and the alternative pathway are highly susceptible to pneumococcal infection and fail to opsonize Streptococcus pneumoniae in the none-immune host. This defect in complement opsonisation severely compromises pathogen clearance in the lectin pathway deficient host. Using sera from mice and humans with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that mouse ficolin A, human L-ficolin, and collectin 11 in both species, but not mannan-binding lectin (MBL, are the pattern recognition molecules that drive lectin pathway activation on the surface of S. pneumoniae. We further show that pneumococcal opsonisation via the lectin pathway can proceed in the absence of C4. This study corroborates the essential function of MASP-2 in the lectin pathway and highlights the importance of MBL-independent lectin pathway activation in the host defense against pneumococci.

  19. Absence of functional alternative complement pathway alleviates lupus cerebritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jessy J; Jacob, Alexander; Vezina, Paul; Sekine, Hideharu; Gilkeson, Gary S; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    The complement inhibitor, Crry, which blocks both the classical and alternative pathways, alleviates CNS disease in the lupus model, MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6lpr (MRL/lpr) mice. To understand the role of the alternative pathway, we studied mice deficient in a key alternative pathway protein, complement factor B (fB). Immune deposits (IgG and C3) were reduced in the brains of MRL/lpr fB-deficient (fB-/-MRL/lpr) compared to fB-sufficient (MRL/lpr) mice, indicating reduced complement activation. Reduced neutrophil infiltration (22% of MRL/lpr mice) and apoptosis (caspase-3 activity was reduced to 33% of MRL/lpr mice) in these mice indicates that the absence of the alternative pathway was neuroprotective. Furthermore, expression of phospho (p)-Akt (0.16+/-0.02 vs. 0.35+/-0.13, pcerebritis. PMID:17523212

  20. Structural basis for simvastatin competitive antagonism of complement receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Risager; Bajic, Goran; Zhang, Xianwei;

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune response to infection, but may also cause severe complications during inflammation. Small molecule antagonists to complement receptor (CR)3 have been widely sought, but a structural basis for their mode of action is not available. We...... report here on the structure of the human CR3 ligand-binding I domain in complex with simvastatin. Simvastatin targets the metal ion-dependent adhesion site of the open, ligand-binding conformation of the CR3 I domain by direct contact with the chelated Mg2+ ion. Simvastatin antagonizes I domain binding...... to the complement fragments iC3b and C3d, but not to intercellular adhesion molecule-1. By virtue of the I domain's wide distribution in binding kinetics to ligands, it was possible to identify ligand binding kinetics as discriminator for simvastatin antagonism. In static cellular experiments, 15-25 μM simvastatin...

  1. Progress in Parallel Schur Complement Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We consider preconditioning methods for nonself-adjoint advective-diffusive systems based on a non-overlapping Schur complement procedure for arbitrary triangulated domains. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop scalable preconditioning algorithms for fluid flow discretizations on parallel computing architectures. In our implementation of the Schur complement preconditioning technique, the triangulation is first partitioned into a number of subdomains using the METIS multi-level k-way partitioning code. This partitioning induces a natural 2X2 partitioning of the p.d.e. discretization matrix. By considering various inverse approximations of the 2X2 system, we have developed a family of robust preconditioning techniques. A computer code based on these ideas has been developed and tested on the IBM SP2 and the SGI Power Challenge array using MPI message passing protocol. A number of example CFD calculations will be presented to illustrate and assess various Schur complement approximations.

  2. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  3. The complement C3 protein family in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nonaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement C3 plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system of mammals as the central component of the complement system essential for its activation mechanism and effecter function. C3 has a unique intra-chain thioester bond that is shared by some complement and non-complement proteins forming a thioester protein (TEP family. Phylogenetic analysis of TEP family genes of vertebrates and invertebrates revealed that the TEP family is divided into two subfamilies, the C3 subfamily and the alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M subfamily. The establishment of the TEP genes and differentiation of them into the C3 and A2M subfamilies occurred prior to the divergence of Cnidaria and Bilateria, in a common ancestor of Eumetazoa more than 600 MYA. Since then the A2M subfamily has been retained by all metazoan lineages analyzed thus far. In contrast, the C3 subfamily has been retained only by deuterostomes and some protostomes, and has been lost in multiple protostome lineages. Although the direct functional analysis of the most invertebrate TEPs is still to be performed, conservation of the basic domain structure and functionally important residues for each molecule suggests that the basic function is also conserved. Functional analyses performed on a few invertebrate C3 support this conclusion. The gene duplication events that generated C4 and C5 from C3 occurred in a common ancestor of jawed vertebrates, indicating that invertebrate and cyclostome C3s represent the pre-duplication state. In addition to C3, complement Bf and MASP involved in the activation of C3 are also identified in Cnidaria and some invertebrates, indicating that the complement system is one of the most ancient innate immune systems of Eumetazoa.

  4. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde, Nehemiah; Gorham, Ronald D; Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection.

  5. Complement C3: an emerging risk factor in cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hertle, E.; van Greevenbroek, M.M.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    C3 is the central component of the complement system and activation of C3 via any of the three major activation pathways—the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathways—results in initiation of the terminal complement pathway and release of the anaphylatoxin C3a. Both terminal pathway activation and signalling of C3a and its inactivation product C3a-desarg via the C3a receptor and C5a-like receptor 2, respectively, can induce inflammatory, immunomodulatory and metabolic responses. C3 h...

  6. Functional analysis of Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Honoré, Christian Le Fèvre; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole;

    2010-01-01

    assessed by C4, C3 and terminal complement complex (TCC) deposition. Serum Ficolin-3 bound to acBSA in a calcium dependent manner, while only minimal binding of Ficolin-2 and no binding of Ficolin-1 were observed. No binding to normal BSA was seen for any of the Ficolins. Serum C4, C3 and TCC deposition...... was applied to the samples that inhibited interference from the classical pathway due to the presence of anti-BSA antibodies in some sera. We describe a novel functional method for measuring complement activation mediated by Ficolin-3 in human serum up to the formation of TCC. The assay provides...

  7. Complement and platelets: Mutual interference in the immune network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Würzner, Reinhard; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Kozarcanin, Huda; Hamad, Osama A; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina N

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the view of platelets has changed from mere elements of hemostasis to immunological multitaskers. They are connected in manifold ways to other cellular and humoral components of the immune network, one of which is the complement system, a potent player in soluble innate immunity. Our article reviews the crucial and complex interplay between platelets and complement, focusing on mutual regulation of these two interaction partners by their respective molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, the putative relevance of these processes to infectious diseases, inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune disorders, as well as the treatment of patients with biomaterials is highlighted.

  8. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R; de Rivera, Heather;

    2016-01-01

    to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia...... in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development...

  9. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins...... of the lectin pathway of the complement system were determined using time-resolved immunofluorometric assays. The first cohort investigated comprised a matched case-control study of 95 patients with CRC, 48 patients with adenomas and 48 individuals without neoplastic findings. Based on the results, Collectin...

  10. Animal venoms/toxins and the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambourgi, Denise V; van den Berg, Carmen W

    2014-10-01

    Nature is a wealthy source of agents that have been shown to be beneficial to human health, but nature is also a rich source of potential dangerous health damaging compounds. This review will summarise and discuss the agents from the animal kingdom that have been shown to interact with the human complement (C) system. Most of these agents are toxins found in animal venoms and animal secretions. In addition to the mechanism of action of these toxins, their contribution to the field of complement, their role in human pathology and the potential benefit to the venomous animal itself will be discussed. Potential therapeutic applications will also be discussed.

  11. Therapeutic complement inhibition – from experimental to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Bjerre, Anna; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-20

    Internationally, the use of the C5-inhibiting monoclonal antibody eculizumab has in the course of just a few years become the first choice of treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and the most severe phenotypes of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. At present eculizumab is the only complement inhibitor in ordinary clinical use. This despite the fact that there only exists one randomised, placebo-controlled trial of eculizumab for paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and none for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and that the therapy is very costly. There is reason to believe that complement inhibition as therapy will increase in the future, and that other drugs will also prove to be effective.

  12. Feedback Enhancement of Antibody Responses via Complement and Fc Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Jörgen

    2001-01-01

    IgG, IgM and IgE in complex with antigen have the capacity to regulate specific immune responses. In this investigation, the role of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRI, FcγRII and FcγRIII) and complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) for antibody-mediated enhancement of antibody responses are investigated. IgM is known to efficiently activate complement and thereby enhance specific antibody responses but it is not known if this involves binding to CR1/2. Using CR1/2 deficient mice, immunized with sheep ...

  13. Blockade of Alternative Complement Pathway in Dense Deposit Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacquépée, Mathieu; Fila, Marc; Peuchmaur, Michel; Perrier-Cornet, Emilia; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges

    2014-01-01

    A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment. PMID:24672732

  14. Blockade of Alternative Complement Pathway in Dense Deposit Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Berthe-Aucejo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment.

  15. Gene for ataxia-telangiectasia complementation group D (ATDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, John P.; Painter, Robert B.; Kapp, Leon N.; Yu, Loh-Chung

    1995-03-07

    Disclosed herein is a new gene, an AT gene for complementation group D, the ATDC gene and fragments thereof. Nucleic acid probes for said gene are provided as well as proteins encoded by said gene, cDNA therefrom, preferably a 3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, and recombinant nucleic acid molecules for expression of said proteins. Further disclosed are methods to detect mutations in said gene, preferably methods employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also disclosed are methods to detect AT genes from other AT complementation groups.

  16. Leishmanial protein kinases phosphorylate components of the complement system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermoso, T; Fishelson, Z; Becker, S I; Hirschberg, K.; Jaffe, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Externally oriented protein kinases are present on the plasma membrane of the human parasite, Leishmania. Since activation of complement plays an important role in the survival of these parasites, we examined the ability of protein kinases from Leishmania major to phosphorylate components of the human complement system. The leishmanial protein kinase-1 (LPK-1) isolated from promastigotes of L. major was able to phosphorylate purified human C3, C5 and C9. Only the alpha-chain of C3 and C5 was ...

  17. Complement Propriety and Conspiracy in Nanomedicine: Perspective and a Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is the first line of body's defense against intruders and it acts as a functional bridge between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. This commentary examines the key roles of complement activation in response to nanomedicine administration, including nucleic acid complexes. These comprise beneficial (eg, adjuvanticity) as well as adverse effects (eg, infusion-related reactions). Pigs (and sheep) are often used as predictive models of nanomedicine-mediated infusion-related reactions in humans. The validity of these models in relation to human responses is questioned, and an alternative hypothesis is presented. PMID:26720796

  18. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  19. Prevalence of Bimolecular Routes in the Activation of Diatomic Molecules with Strong Chemical Bonds (O2, NO, CO, N2) on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, David; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-05-19

    sites that are scarce on such surfaces. N-O bonds cleave instead via H*-assistance to form *HNOH* intermediates, with barriers much lower than for direct NO* dissociation. CO hydrogenation on Co and Ru occurs on crowded surfaces saturated with CO*; rates increase with increasing Co and Ru cluster size, indicating that low-index surfaces on large clusters can activate CO*. Direct CO*dissociation, however, occurs with high activation barriers on low-index Co and Ru surfaces, and even on defect sites (step-edge, corner sites) at high CO* coverages. CO* dissociation proceeds instead with H*-assistance to form *HCOH* species that cleave C-O bonds with lower barriers than direct CO* dissociation, irrespective of surface coordination. H2O increases CO activation rates by assisting H-additions to form *HCOH*, as in the case of peroxide formation in Au-catalyzed oxidations. N2 dissociation steps in NH3 synthesis on Ru and Fe are thought to also require defect sites; yet, barriers on Ru(0001) indicate that H*-assisted N2 activation - unlike O2, CO, and NO - is not significantly more facile than direct N2 dissociation, suggesting that defects and low-index planes may both contribute to NH3 synthesis rates. The activation of strong chemical bonds often occurs via bimolecular reactions. These steps weaken such bonds before cleavage on crowded low-index surfaces, thus avoiding the ubiquitous kinetic hurdles of direct dissociations without requiring defect sites.

  20. Defining Clusters of Related Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes Delgado; Porter, Michael E.; Scott Stern

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are geographic concentrations of industries related by knowledge, skills, inputs, demand, and/or other linkages. A growing body of empirical literature has shown the positive impact of clusters on regional and industry performance, including job creation, patenting, and new business formation. There is an increasing need for cluster-based data to support research, facilitate comparisons of clusters across regions, and support policymakers and practitioners in defining regional strate...

  1. Defining the TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ALLIANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlbom, Gabriella; Åman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project was to define the Technology Transfer Alliance (TTA), a nonprofit organization for Higher Education Institutions supporting capacity building in ICT and renewable energy through a project-driven learning. TTA is today still only an idea, waiting to be launched, which is why the goals for this bachelor thesis are to establish partnerships with institutions that will support the reaching of the goals of TTA, as well as providing a more solid definition of the functions o...

  2. AIDS defining disease: Disseminated cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Anupama

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated cryptococcosis is one of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining criteria and the most common cause of life threatening meningitis. Disseminated lesions in the skin manifest as papules or nodules that mimic molluscum contagiosum (MC. We report here a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient who presented with MC like lesions. Disseminated cryptococcosis was confirmed by India ink preparation and histopathology. The condition of the patient improved with amphotercin B.

  3. Defining and measuring ecological specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Devictor, Vincent; Clavel, Joanne; Julliard, Romain; Lavergne, Sébastien; Mouillot, David; Thuiller, Wilfried; Venail, Patrick; Villéger, Sébastien; Mouquet, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    1.  Ecological specialization is one of the main concepts in ecology and conservation. However, this concept has become highly context-dependent and is now obscured by the great variability of existing definitions and methods used to characterize ecological specialization. 2.  In this study, we clarify this concept by reviewing the strengths and limitations of different approaches commonly used to define and measure ecological specialization. We first show that ecological specialization can e...

  4. The definability of physical concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonai S. Sant'Anna

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Our main purpose here is to make some specific considerations about the definability of physical concepts like mass, force, time, space, spacetime, and closed systems in the context of physical theories. Our starting motivation is a simple example of a collection of definitions of closed system in the literature of physics and philosophy of physics. Next we discuss the problem of definitions in theoretical physics from the point of view of modern theories of definition.

  5. The definability of physical concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Adonai S. Sant'Anna

    2005-01-01

    Our main purpose here is to make some specific considerations about the definability of physical concepts like mass, force, time, space, spacetime, and closed systems in the context of physical theories. Our starting motivation is a simple example of a collection of definitions of closed system in the literature of physics and philosophy of physics. Next we discuss the problem of definitions in theoretical physics from the point of view of modern theories of definition.

  6. Defining and teaching veterinary professionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mossop, Liz

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research and discussion around the notion of medical professionalism, veterinary professionalism is an understudied area. The aim of this study was to define the concept of veterinary professionalism and analyse the hidden curriculum of a new veterinary school, in order to produce a new curriculum of professionalism. This study used a constructivist grounded theory method to develop the definition. An iterative approach, using interviews and focus groups, collected inform...

  7. Software Defined Radio Transceiver Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Corley, Gerry; Sanchez Mora , Magdalena; Farrell, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    This document presents the design and implementation of a low cost reconfigurable radio transceiver platform. The platform will be used as a research tool in the investigation of software defined radio techniques. The hardware presented is an evolution of work presented at the 2006 RIA colloquium. The platform consists of four hardware elements, namely a radio transmitter, a radio receiver, a baseband interface and a PC to perform signal processing and configuration. Data and control c...

  8. Defining the genetics of thrombotic microangiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Martins, Paula; El Sissy, Carine; Bordereau, Pauline; Gruber, Aurelia; Rosain, Jeremie; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic.

  9. Complement receptor expression and activation of the complement cascade on B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquart, H V; Svendsen, A; Rasmussen, J M;

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the expression of the complement receptors, CR1 on erythrocytes and blood leucocytes and CR2 on B cells, is reduced in patients with SLE, and that the reduced expression of CR1 on erythrocytes is related to disease activity. We have earlier demonstrated...... that normal B cells are capable of activating the alternative pathway (AP) of complement in a CR2-dependent fashion. In this study we have investigated whether disturbances in this activity may be related to the altered phenotype of SLE B cells. Flow cytometry was used to measure expression of complement...... receptors and regulatory proteins on B cells from SLE patients, as well as the deposition of C3 fragments occurring in vivo or after in vitro AP activation. We have confirmed, for a proportion of the patients studied, reduced expression of CR1 and CR2 on B cells, and shown a consistency between low CR2...

  10. Inhibition of zymosan-induced alternative complement pathway activation by concanavalin A.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, M. C.; Pensky, J.; Naff, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    Zymosan, a polysaccharide composed primarily of glucan and mannan residues, activates the complement system through the alternative complement pathway. We showed that zymosan-induced complement activation is inhibited by zymosan-bound lectins with carbohydrate specificities for mannosyl and glycosyl residues. Lectins unable to bind mannosyl or glucosyl residues did not inhibit zymosan-induced complement activation.

  11. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  12. Multiple complementizers in Modern Danish and Middle English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvad, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    This paper expands the empirical coverage of the cP/CP-distinction proposed by Nyvad, Christensen & Vikner (2015) by applying it to a range of embedded clause types involving multiple complementizers in Middle English and Modern Danish, and offering a uniform analysis. Due to the fact that a number...

  13. Complement inhibitory and anticoagulant activities of fractionated heparins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennink, W.E.; Klerx, J.P.A.M.; Dijk, H. van; Feijen, J.

    1984-01-01

    Almost monodisperse heparin fractions (w/n < 1.1) were obtained by gel filtration of a commercial heparin. These fractions were assayed for anticoagulant activity (thrombin times and APTT), chromogenic anti-factor Xa activity, inhibitory activity for the human classical complement pathway, carboxyl

  14. Complement and contact activation in term neonates after fetal acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, J.; Wagner, M.; Strauss, E.; Obladen, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate complement and contact activation after fetal acidosis.
METHODS—Fifteen term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy after umbilical arterial pH 7.20. Determinations of the complement function and C1-inhibitor activity were performed as kinetic tests 22-28 hours after birth. C1q, C1-inhibitor, and factor B concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion and those of C3a, C5a, and factor XIIa by enzyme immunoabsorbent assay.
RESULTS—Median complement function (46 vs 73 %), C1q (4.3 vs 9.1 mg/dl), and factor B (5.2 vs 7.7 mg/dl) decreased after fetal acidosis. The activated split products C3a (260 vs 185 µg/l), C5a (5.0 vs 0.6 µg/l), and factor XIIa (3.2 vs 1.3 µg/l) increased in the neonates after fetal acidosis. No differences were found in the concentration and activity of C1-inhibitor.
CONCLUSIONS—Complement and contact activation occurred in the newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Activation of these systems generates mediators which can trigger inflammation and tissue injury.

 PMID:9577283

  15. Hair: A Diagnostic Tool to Complement Blood Serum and Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1978-01-01

    Trace elements and some drugs can be identified in hair and it seems likely that other organic chemicals will be identifiable in the future. Since hair is so easily collected, stored, and analyzed it promises to be an ideal complement to serum and urine analysis as a diagnostic tool. (BB)

  16. Word order variation and foregrounding of complement clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tanya Karoli; Jensen, Torben Juel

    2015-01-01

    Through mixed models analyses of complement clauses in a corpus of spoken Danish we examine the role of sentence adverbials in relation to a word order distinction in Scandinavian signalled by the relative position of sentence adverbials and finite verb (V>Adv vs. Adv>V). The type of sentence...

  17. Coreference relations in complex sentence with a complement clause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskovljević-Popović Jasmina D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to analyze different co reference relations which can be established in a complex sentence between one of the arguments of the matrix clause and the understood/implicit subject of the complement clause introduced by the complementizer “da”. Various patterns of control relations which are present in contemporary Serbian - obligatory, non-obligatory, and shared control - have been enumerated and exemplified. Different types of constructions and different classes of verbs which introduce (or may introduce control relations have been identified and patterns of control instantiated by them have been described. It has been argued that the analysis of the Serbian data indicates that a type of the matrix predicate is not the only factor which determines the control relations established in a complex sentence, but that a type of situation/event described in the complement clause, as well as the relationship between the events denoted by the matrix and the complement clauses have their influence too. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 178004: Standardni srpski jezik: sintaksička, semantička i pragmatička istraživanja

  18. Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legendre, C.M.; Licht, C.; Muus, P.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Babu, S.; Bedrosian, C.; Bingham, C.; Cohen, D.J.; Delmas, Y.; Douglas, K.; Eitner, F.; Feldkamp, T.; Fouque, D.; Furman, R.R.; Gaber, O.; Herthelius, M.; Hourmant, M.; Karpman, D.; Lebranchu, Y.; Mariat, C.; Menne, J.; Moulin, B.; Nurnberger, J.; Ogawa, M.; Remuzzi, G.; Richard, T.; Sberro-Soussan, R.; Severino, B.; Sheerin, N.S.; Trivelli, A.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Goodship, T.; Loirat, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a genetic, life-threatening, chronic disease of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange or infusion may transiently maintain normal levels of hematologic measures but does not treat the underlying systemic disease. METHODS: We

  19. The role of complement in autoimmune renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, M. A.; Daha, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    The predominance of renal involvement in autoimmune diseases can most likely be assigned to the specialised function of the kidneys filtrating over 120 ml plasma per minute. Complement activation by autoantibodies directed against planted antigens or antigens already present in renal tissue in the s

  20. Structural and functional characterization of human complement factor P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is of great importance for the innate immune response, which can lead to opsonization and removal of invading pathogens, as well as immune complexes and damaged self-cells. Factor P (FP), also known as properdin, acts as a positive regulator of the alternative pathway...

  1. The Subject Complement – a Contrastive Romanian-German Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Pădurean

    2012-01-01

    The researchers have increasingly focused their attention on contrastive analysis studies, over the past few years. Therefore, in this study we aim at approaching the subject complement from a contrastive Romanian-German point of view. Our scientific approach is structured on two levels: the identification of similarities but also of differences between these two languages.

  2. Complement activation by salivary agglutinin is secretor status dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.T.G. Gunput; A.J.M. Ligtenberg; B. Terlouw; M. Brouwer; E.C.I. Veerman; D. Wouters

    2015-01-01

    After mucosal damage or gingival inflammation, complement proteins leak into the oral cavity and mix with salivary proteins such as salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp-340/DMBT1). This protein is encoded by the gene Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1), and it aggregates bacteria, viruses and fungi,

  3. Complement and renal transplantation : From donor to recipient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Schuurs, Theo A.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term kidney graft survival is affected by different variables including donor condition, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and graft rejection during the transplantation process. The complement system is an important mediator of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and in rejecting allografts. However,

  4. An improved europium release assay for complement-mediated cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Bystryn, J C

    1992-02-14

    An improved assay for complement-mediated cytolysis is described. The target cells are labeled with europium complexed to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (Eu-DTPA). Cytolysis caused by antibody plus complement leads to the release of the Eu-DTPA complex which is then formed into a highly fluorescent chelate by the addition of 2-naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (2-NTA). The amount of europium chelate formed--a measurement of cell death--is then quantified with a time-resolved fluorometer. The results of the assay are reproducible. Complement-mediated cytolysis when measured by europium release was five times more sensitive than when measured by conventional 51Cr release and three times than when measured by trypan blue exclusion. Because europium does not decay, target cells can be labelled in batches and stored frozen until use, which speeds and simplifies the assay. Thus, europium release assay is a simple and quantitative method to measure complement-mediated cytolysis which is sensitive and more rapid than conventional assays. PMID:1541836

  5. EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL AGITATION AND OF TEMPERATURE UPON COMPLEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    1. Under certain conditions, mechanical agitation destroys the complementary activity of guinea pig serum. It is most injurious when carried out constantly at a temperature of 37 degrees C., but it is extremely insignificant at 10 degrees C. After the first few hours at 37 degrees C., the destruction of complement proceeded much more rapidly, and after six hours it was almost complete. On the other hand, within one hour shaking had almost no destructive effect on complement, even at 37 degrees C. From this we may conclude that the several shakings which are necessary for fixation experiments during incubation do not modify perceptibly the outcome of the reactions. 2. The rate of destruction of the complement of guinea pig serum at temperatures above 45 degrees C. is progressively greater as it approaches 55 degrees C., at which temperature the activity is reduced in thirty minutes to one-thirtieth to one-fortieth of the original strength of the unheated serum; but it is not completely destroyed, as is commonly assumed. The velocity of destruction of guinea pig complement when exposed to 55 degrees C. for various lengths of time is found to be quite irregular, and not proportional to the length of time. This irregularity, however, presents a certain rhythm, a period of greater destruction alternating with one of less destruction.

  6. Software Defined DCF77 Receiver

    OpenAIRE

    F. Zaplata; M. Kasal

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows the solution of time stamp software defined receiver integration into low cost com-mercial devices. The receiver is based on a general pur-pose processor and its analog to digital converter. The amplified signal from a narrow-band antenna is connected to the converter and no complicated filtration has to be used. All signal processing is digitally provided by the processor. During signal reception, the processor stays available for its main tasks and signal processing con-sum...

  7. Software Defined DCF77 Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zaplata

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the solution of time stamp software defined receiver integration into low cost com-mercial devices. The receiver is based on a general pur-pose processor and its analog to digital converter. The amplified signal from a narrow-band antenna is connected to the converter and no complicated filtration has to be used. All signal processing is digitally provided by the processor. During signal reception, the processor stays available for its main tasks and signal processing con-sumes only a small part of its computational power.

  8. UNIQLO, Define Your Own Fashion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2009-01-01

    @@ Yes,women like and enjoy shopping.Always,they want to buy some well-designed clothes with the most 'in'factors; and what's of the great importance,they would like to hear the words:"wow! You fit the wear well!"However,the most satisfied right things could not be always waiting for you there or you would not help complaining the so-fast changing trends day by day.At that time,why not to seek some delights from the basic classic collections?UNIQLO maybe is a choice for you to define your own fashion.

  9. Alternative complement pathway deregulation is correlated with dengue severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J M Nascimento

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complement system, a key component that links the innate and adaptive immune responses, has three pathways: the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. In the present study, we have analyzed the levels of various complement components in blood samples from dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients and found that the level of complement activation is associated with disease severity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with DHF had lower levels of complement factor 3 (C3; p = 0.002 and increased levels of C3a, C4a and C5a (p<0.0001 when compared to those with the less severe form, DF. There were no significant differences between DF and DHF patients in the levels of C1q, immunocomplexes (CIC-CIq and CRP. However, small but statistically significant differences were detected in the levels of MBL. In contrast, the levels of two regulatory proteins of the alternative pathway varied widely between DF and DHF patients: DHF patients had higher levels of factor D (p = 0.01, which cleaves factor B to yield the active (C3bBb C3 convertase, and lower levels of factor H (p = 0.03, which inactivates the (C3bBb C3 convertase, than did DF patients. When we considered the levels of factors D and H together as an indicator of (C3bBb C3 convertase regulation, we found that the plasma levels of these regulatory proteins in DHF patients favored the formation of the (C3bBb C3 convertase, whereas its formation was inhibited in DF patients (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that an imbalance in the levels of regulatory factors D and H is associated with an abnormal regulation of complement activity in DHF patients.

  10. Infections of People with Complement Deficiencies and Patients Who Have Undergone Splenectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ram, Sanjay; Lewis, Lisa A.; Rice, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The complement system comprises several fluid-phase and membrane-associated proteins. Under physiological conditions, activation of the fluid-phase components of complement is maintained under tight control and complement activation occurs primarily on surfaces recognized as “nonself” in an attempt to minimize damage to bystander host cells. Membrane complement components act to limit complement activation on host cells or to facilitate uptake of antigens or microbes “tagged” with co...

  11. Licensing clausal complements : The case of Russian čto-clauses

    OpenAIRE

    Knyazev, M

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation describes and explains the distribution of Russian complement clauses with the complementizer čto. It is shown that complement clauses with čto display distributional restrictions that are not manifested by their English and Dutch counterparts and that do not follow from the standard account of complement clauses in the literature. Two classes of environments are discussed where such restrictions are observed, namely, complements of speech act verbs in their non-agentive use...

  12. Defining Life: The Virus Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism—the virus—producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  13. Development of Word Order in German Complement-Clause Constructions: Effects of Input Frequencies, Lexical Items, and Discourse Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Silke; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the development of word order in German children's spontaneous production of complement clauses. From soon after their second birthday, young German children use both verb final complements with complementizers and verb-second complements without complementizers. By their third birthday they use both kinds of complement clauses with…

  14. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  15. Shiga toxin activates complement and binds factor H: evidence for an active role of complement in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dorothea; Khan, Abdul Basit; Naim, Asma; Grif, Katharina; Brockmeyer, Jens; Karch, Helge; Joannidis, Michael; Clark, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Fidanzi, Sonja; Stoiber, Heribert; Dierich, Manfred P; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Würzner, Reinhard

    2009-05-15

    Infections with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are a major cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxins (Stxs), especially Stx2, are believed to represent major virulence factors of EHEC, contributing to HUS pathogenesis. Beside EHEC-associated HUS, there are hereditary atypical forms of HUS, which are mostly caused by mutations of complement regulators. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not complement is also involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC-induced typical HUS, by being activated either directly or indirectly by involvement of its inhibitors. Purified Stx2 markedly activated complement via the alternative pathway and was found to bind to factor H (FH), however, only when it was active. No apparent cleavage or destruction of FH was visible, and cofactor activity in fluid phase was unaffected, but clearly delayed for surface-attached FH, where it is essential for host cell protection. Binding studies using FH constructs revealed that Stx2 binds to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6-8 and SCRs18-20, but not to SCRs16-17, i.e., to regions involved in the surface recognition function of FH. In conclusion, complement, and in particular FH, not only plays an important role in atypical HUS, but most probably also in EHEC-induced HUS.

  16. Pasteurella pneumotropica evades the human complement system by acquisition of the complement regulators factor H and C4BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sahagún-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.

  17. Complement receptor expression and activation of the complement cascade on B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquart, H V; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Rasmussen, J M;

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the expression of the complement receptors, CR1 on erythrocytes and blood leucocytes and CR2 on B cells, is reduced in patients with SLE, and that the reduced expression of CR1 on erythrocytes is related to disease activity. We have earlier demonstrated that n...

  18. Defining life: synthesis and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. Section 1 defends that the recognition of "life" has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. Section 2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. Section 3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about "life". The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (Section 4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. Section 5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers

  19. Defining Life: Synthesis and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. §1 defends that the recognition of “life” has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. §2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. §3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about “life”. The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (§4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. §5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers to two conditions

  20. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  1. Complement activation and complement receptors on follicular dendritic cells are critical for the function of a targeted adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johan; Yrlid, Ulf; Stensson, Anneli; Schön, Karin; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Lycke, Nils Y

    2011-10-01

    A detailed understanding of how activation of innate immunity can be exploited to generate more effective vaccines is critically required. However, little is known about how to target adjuvants to generate safer and better vaccines. In this study, we describe an adjuvant that, through complement activation and binding to follicular dendritic cells (FDC), dramatically enhances germinal center (GC) formation, which results in greatly augmented Ab responses. The nontoxic CTA1-DD adjuvant hosts the ADP-ribosylating CTA1 subunit from cholera toxin and a dimer of the D fragment from Staphylococcus aureus protein A. We found that T cell-dependent, but not -independent, responses were augmented by CTA1-DD. GC reactions and serum Ab titers were both enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. This effect required complement activation, a property of the DD moiety. Deposition of CTA1-DD to the FDC network appeared to occur via the conduit system and was dependent on complement receptors on the FDC. Hence, Cr2(-/-) mice failed to augment GC reactions and exhibited dramatically reduced Ab responses, whereas Ribi adjuvant demonstrated unperturbed adjuvant function in these mice. Noteworthy, the adjuvant effect on priming of specific CD4 T cells was found to be intact in Cr2(-/-) mice, demonstrating that the CTA1-DD host both complement-dependent and -independent adjuvant properties. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of an adjuvant that directly activates complement, enabling binding of the adjuvant to the FDC, which subsequently strongly promoted the GC reaction, leading to augmented serum Ab titers and long-term memory development. PMID:21880985

  2. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage...... buffering, scheduling, and processing over the network. On the other hand, NC has shown great potential for increasing robustness and performance when deployed on intermediate nodes in the network. This new paradigm changes the dynamics of network protocols, requiring new designs that exploit its potential....... This paper advocates for the use of SDN to bring about future Internet and 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides a fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, that may also...

  3. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe;

    2015-01-01

    Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm....... The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals...

  4. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degn, Søren E.; Kjaer, Troels R.; Kidmose, Rune T.; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G.; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C.; Andersen, Gregers R.; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  5. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  6. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martin-Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press; M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014 465–468. [1,2].

  7. APIs for QoS configuration in Software Defined Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius; Soler, José

    2015-01-01

    control and management of the data plane (e.g. configurations of ports, queues, etc.). The current work contributes to the SDN ecosystem with the implementation of a plugin for the OVSDB protocol, for an existing SDN controller (SDNC). OVSDB complements OF with management functionality......The OpenFlow (OF) protocol is widely used in Software Defined Networking (SDN) to realize the communication between the controller and forwarding devices. OF allows great flexibility in managing traffic flows. However, OF alone is not enough to build more complex SDN services that require complete...... such as configuration of devices, ports, queues, etc. An Application Programming Interface (API) for dynamic configuration of QoS resources in the network devices is implemented herein, by using the capabilities of OVSDB. Further, the paper demonstrates the possibility to create network services with coarse granularity...

  8. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465-468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  9. Monotest in the complement fixation test: the Chorus system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Meli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The complement fixation test (CFT is a method used for the detection of antibodies against pathogens of infectious diseases, it has been proved to be a useful diagnostic method in the detection of acute disease in many medical laboratories.The test performed manually is time consuming and needs very skilled personnel.This study evaluates the automated Chorus CFT system with 87 serum samples in comparison with manual method using Virion-Serion reagents, against a panel of antigens, such as Adenovirus, Influenza A and B virus, Respiratory Syncythial Virus, Parainfluenza Mix, Mycoplasma Pneumoniae, and Echinococcus. The Chorus system includes standardized reagents and a monotest device to perform the single assay. In comparison to the manual CFT method, the correlation is 91.6% (7/83.The results obtained show that the automated Chorus system can be applied for detecting complement fixation antibodies against different infectious disease agents.

  10. Complements and the Wound Healing Cascade: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex pathway of regulated reactions and cellular infiltrates. The mechanisms at play have been thoroughly studied but there is much still to learn. The health care system in the USA alone spends on average 9 billion dollars annually on treating of wounds. To help reduce patient morbidity and mortality related to abnormal or prolonged skin healing, an updated review and understanding of wound healing is essential. Recent works have helped shape the multistep process in wound healing and introduced various growth factors that can augment this process. The complement cascade has been shown to have a role in inflammation and has only recently been shown to augment wound healing. In this review, we have outlined the biology of wound healing and discussed the use of growth factors and the role of complements in this intricate pathway.

  11. The complement cascade in kidney disease: from sideline to center stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Jennifer A; O'Rourke, Declan M; Courtney, Aisling E

    2013-09-01

    Activation of the complement pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pathologic and clinical features of these diseases are determined in part by the mechanism and location of complement activation within the kidney parenchyma. This review describes the physiology, action, and control of the complement cascade and explains the role of complement overactivation and dysregulation in kidney disease. There have been recent advances in the understanding of the effects of upregulation of the complement cascade after kidney transplantation. Complement plays an important role in initiating and propagating damage to transplanted kidneys in ischemia-reperfusion injury, antibody-mediated rejection, and cell-mediated rejection. Complement-targeting therapies presently are in development, and the first direct complement medication for kidney disease was licensed in 2011. The potential therapeutic targets for anticomplement drugs in kidney disease are described. Clinical and experimental studies are ongoing to identify further roles for complement-targeting therapy.

  12. Compatibility and Schur Complements of Operators on Hilbert C*-Module

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochun FANG; Jing YU

    2011-01-01

    Let E be a Hilbert C*-module, and (J) be an orthogonally complemented closed submodule of E. The authors generalize the definitions of (J)-complementability and (J)compatibility for general (adjointable) operators from Hilbert space to Hilbert C*-module,and discuss the relationship between each other. Several equivalent statements about (J)complementability and (J)-compatibility, and several representations of Schur complements of (J)-complementable operators (especially, of (J)-compatible operators and of positive (J)compatible operators) on a Hilbert C*-module are obtained. In addition, the quotient property for Schur complements of matrices is generalized to the quotient property for Schur complements of (J)-complementable operators and (J)*-complementable operators on a Hilbert C*-module.

  13. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  14. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  15. An approach to define semantics for BPM systems interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Mariela; Caliusco, María Laura; Chiotti, Omar; Rosa Galli, María

    2015-04-01

    This article proposes defining semantics for Business Process Management systems interoperability through the ontology of Electronic Business Documents (EBD) used to interchange the information required to perform cross-organizational processes. The semantic model generated allows aligning enterprise's business processes to support cross-organizational processes by matching the business ontology of each business partner with the EBD ontology. The result is a flexible software architecture that allows dynamically defining cross-organizational business processes by reusing the EBD ontology. For developing the semantic model, a method is presented, which is based on a strategy for discovering entity features whose interpretation depends on the context, and representing them for enriching the ontology. The proposed method complements ontology learning techniques that can not infer semantic features not represented in data sources. In order to improve the representation of these entity features, the method proposes using widely accepted ontologies, for representing time entities and relations, physical quantities, measurement units, official country names, and currencies and funds, among others. When the ontologies reuse is not possible, the method proposes identifying whether that feature is simple or complex, and defines a strategy to be followed. An empirical validation of the approach has been performed through a case study.

  16. Localization and functional significance of a polymorphic determinant in the third component of human complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Hansen, O C; Ploug, M;

    1987-01-01

    A polymorphic epitope in the third component of human complement was studied. This allotypic system is distinct from the electrophoretically determined C3 S/F polymorphism and is defined by the recognition of one allotype by a monoclonal antibody. Allotypic protein variants, C3F+ (reactive with...... this antibody) and C3S- (non-reactive with the antibody), were purified. Deglycosylation studies and N-terminal sequencing of CNBr fragments, reactive with the antibody, revealed that the polymorphic epitope was present in a beta chain fragment of mol. wt 20,000. In the intact C3 molecule, this...... fragment is situated with N-terminus at residue No. 202, using the numbering of the cDNA derived amino acid sequence of human prepro C3. Addition of Fab fragments from the alloselective antibody preferentially inhibited the activity of C3F+ in a haemolytic assay which is selective for the C3 activity in...

  17. Covalent binding and hemolytic activity of complement proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Law, S K; Lichtenberg, N A; Levine, R P

    1980-01-01

    We report the inactivation of the third component of complement (C3) by hydroxylamine. C3 hemolytic and covalent binding activities decline with identical kinetics, demonstrating a direct correlation between the two activities. We conclude that covalent, surface-bound C3b is hemolytically active. The inactivation of C3 is first order with respect to hydroxylamine. We also studied C3 inactivation with [14C]methylamine. The inactivation corresponds quantitatively with the labeling of C3 in the ...

  18. The fundamental group of the complement of complexified real arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let V be a finite dimensional vector space over the real or complex numbers. An arrangement in V is a finite collection of affine hyperplanes of V. Given a real arrangement A in a real vector space V. Then its complexification, AC, is a complex arrangement in the complex vector space VC, and will be called a complexified real arrangement. In this paper, we shall prove a presentation for the fundamental group of the complement of a complexified real arrangement. (author). 7 refs

  19. Generalized complement operators and applications in some semirings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijev, G. [Technical University of Sofia, 8, Kl.Ohridski Blvd, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-12-18

    Generalized complement operators on the semiring of all Boolean matrices as semilattice homomorphisms are considered. Some applications in solving equations on the set Bn of all binary relations are developed. In particular the structure of B3 is investigated by computer methods. Specific properties of the subsemigroup generated by all irregular relations in B3 are found. Stochastic experiments on the monoid Bn were made. The frequency of irregular elements as well as those of solvable equations depending on n is examined.

  20. Generalized complement operators and applications in some semirings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijev, G.

    2013-12-01

    Generalized complement operators on the semiring of all Boolean matrices as semilattice homomorphisms are considered. Some applications in solving equations on the set Bn of all binary relations are developed. In particular the structure of B3 is investigated by computer methods. Specific properties of the subsemigroup generated by all irregular relations in B3 are found. Stochastic experiments on the monoid Bn were made. The frequency of irregular elements as well as those of solvable equations depending on n is examined.

  1. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.;

    2010-01-01

    Since the original proposal by Fearon and Locksley (Fearon and Locksley. 1996. Science 272: 50-53) that the complement system linked innate and adaptive immunity, there has been a rapid expansion of studies on this topic. With the advance of intravital imaging, a number of recent papers revealed ...... opsonization of influenza and uptake by macrophages, and the capture of virus by dendritic cells residing in the medullary compartment of peripheral lymph nodes....

  2. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  3. Role of complement in the development of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boackle, Susan A; Holers, V Michael

    2003-01-01

    B cell complement receptors have been shown to be important in the generation of normal humoral immune responses, and they likely also participate in the development of autoimmunity. Complement component and receptor deficiencies have been associated with SLE in both animal models and patients with disease. Recent data suggest that Cr2 is a lupus susceptibility gene in the NZM2410 mouse model for lupus, as it generates complement receptors that are structurally and functionally altered. Complement deficiency may result in autoimmune disease because of the inability to appropriately clear immune complexes or apoptotic cells or by the impaired generation of C3-coated autoantigens for CR1/CR2. In turn, CR1/CR2 may participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance by lowering the threshold for negative selection of autoreactive B cells, by targeting autoantigen to FDCs in secondary lymphoid organs, or by regulating autoreactive T cell function. The effect of CR2 has not been dissected from that of CR1 in the animal studies performed to date. Furthermore, the effects of CR1/CR2 dysfunction or partial deficiency, which are found in the NZM2410 mouse model and in patients with SLE respectively, have not been delineated from those of complete deficiency, which has been studied in several animal models of autoimmunity and tolerance. Although CR1/CR2 dysfunction or deficiency may confer only a modest phenotype in isolation, it is likely that when combined with other disease susceptibility genes it will result in a fully penetrant end-stage disease phenotype. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance will be critical in developing appropriate therapeutic interventions for patients with autoimmune diseases such as SLE. PMID:12408051

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of complement component 5 and periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    L. Chai; Zee, KY; Song, YQ; Leung, WK

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Polymorphisms of host defence genes might increase one's risks for periodontitis. This study investigated whether tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gene encoding complement component 5 (C5) are associated with periodontitis in a Hong Kong Chinese population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eleven tagging SNPs of 229 patients with at least moderate periodontitis and 207 control subjects without periodontitis were genotyped using an i-plexGOLD MassARRAY mass-...

  5. Role of complement in the development of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boackle, Susan A; Holers, V Michael

    2003-01-01

    B cell complement receptors have been shown to be important in the generation of normal humoral immune responses, and they likely also participate in the development of autoimmunity. Complement component and receptor deficiencies have been associated with SLE in both animal models and patients with disease. Recent data suggest that Cr2 is a lupus susceptibility gene in the NZM2410 mouse model for lupus, as it generates complement receptors that are structurally and functionally altered. Complement deficiency may result in autoimmune disease because of the inability to appropriately clear immune complexes or apoptotic cells or by the impaired generation of C3-coated autoantigens for CR1/CR2. In turn, CR1/CR2 may participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance by lowering the threshold for negative selection of autoreactive B cells, by targeting autoantigen to FDCs in secondary lymphoid organs, or by regulating autoreactive T cell function. The effect of CR2 has not been dissected from that of CR1 in the animal studies performed to date. Furthermore, the effects of CR1/CR2 dysfunction or partial deficiency, which are found in the NZM2410 mouse model and in patients with SLE respectively, have not been delineated from those of complete deficiency, which has been studied in several animal models of autoimmunity and tolerance. Although CR1/CR2 dysfunction or deficiency may confer only a modest phenotype in isolation, it is likely that when combined with other disease susceptibility genes it will result in a fully penetrant end-stage disease phenotype. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance will be critical in developing appropriate therapeutic interventions for patients with autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  6. Efficacy of Targeted Complement Inhibition in Experimental C3 Glomerulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruseva, Marieta M.; Peng, Tao; Lasaro, Melissa A.; Bouchard, Keith; Liu-Chen, Susan; Sun, Fang; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Marozsan, Andre; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy refers to renal disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of C3 within the kidney, commonly along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). C3 glomerulopathy is associated with complement alternative pathway dysregulation, which includes functional defects in complement regulator factor H (FH). There is no effective treatment for C3 glomerulopathy. We investigated the efficacy of a recombinant mouse protein composed of domains from complement receptor 2 (CR2) and FH (CR2-FH) in two models of C3 glomerulopathy with either preexisting or triggered C3 deposition along the GBM. FH-deficient mice spontaneously develop renal pathology associated with abnormal C3 accumulation along the GBM and secondary plasma C3 deficiency. CR2-FH partially restored plasma C3 levels in FH-deficient mice 2 hours after intravenous injection. CR2-FH specifically targeted glomerular C3 deposits, reduced the linear C3 reactivity assessed with anti-C3 and anti-C3b/iC3b/C3c antibodies, and prevented further spontaneous accumulation of C3 fragments along the GBM. Reduction in glomerular C3d and C9/C5b-9 reactivity was observed after daily administration of CR2-FH for 1 week. In a second mouse model with combined deficiency of FH and complement factor I, CR2-FH prevented de novo C3 deposition along the GBM. These data show that CR2-FH protects the GBM from both spontaneous and triggered C3 deposition in vivo and indicate that this approach should be tested in C3 glomerulopathy. PMID:26047789

  7. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Wasowska, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejectio...

  8. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated proposes the Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) program to facilitate the development of a Software Defined Radio...

  9. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P<0.001. Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P<0.001. Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P<0.01 and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P<0.05. Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P<0.02. Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P<0.01. Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures.

  10. Pulp Fibroblasts Control Nerve Regeneration through Complement Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmilewsky, F; About, I; Chung, S-H

    2016-07-01

    Dentin-pulp regeneration is closely linked to the presence of nerve fibers in the pulp and to the healing mechanism by sprouting of the nerve fiber's terminal branches beneath the carious injury site. However, little is known about the initial mechanisms regulating this process in carious teeth. It has been recently demonstrated that the complement system activation, which is one of the first immune responses, contributes to tissue regeneration through the local production of anaphylatoxins such as C5a. While few pulp fibroblasts in intact teeth and in untreated fibroblast cultures express the C5a receptor (C5aR), here we show that all dental pulp fibroblasts, localized beneath the carious injury site, do express this receptor. This observation is consistent with our in vitro results, which showed expression of C5aR in lipoteichoic acid-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The interaction of C5a, produced after complement synthesis and activation from pulp fibroblasts, with the C5aR of these cells mediated the local brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) secretion. Overall, this activation guided the neuronal growth toward the lipoteichoic acid-stimulated fibroblasts. Thus, our findings highlight a new mechanism in one of the initial steps of the dentin-pulp regeneration process, linking pulp fibroblasts to the nerve sprouting through the complement system activation. This may provide a useful future therapeutic tool in targeting the fibroblasts in the dentin-pulp regeneration process. PMID:27053117

  11. Complement deficiency promotes cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafail, Stavros; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Foukas, Periklis G; Markiewski, Maciej M; DeAngelis, Robert A; Guariento, Mara; Ricklin, Daniel; Grice, Elizabeth A; Lambris, John D

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex homeostatic response to injury that engages numerous cellular activities, processes, and cell-to-cell interactions. The complement system, an intricate network of proteins with important roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, has been implicated in many physiological processes; however, its role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employ a murine model of excisional cutaneous wound healing and show that C3(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated early stages of wound healing. Reconstitution of C3(-/-) mice with serum from C3(+/+) mice or purified human C3 abrogated the accelerated wound-healing phenotype. Wound histology of C3(-/-) mice revealed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate compared with C3(+/+) mice. C3 deficiency also resulted in increased accumulation of mast cells and advanced angiogenesis. We further show that mice deficient in the downstream complement effector C5 exhibit a similar wound-healing phenotype, which is recapitulated in C5aR1(-/-) mice, but not C3aR(-/-) or C5aR2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that C5a signaling through C5aR may in part play a pivotal role in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells to the wound environment, which in turn could delay the early stages of cutaneous wound healing. These findings also suggest a previously underappreciated role for complement in wound healing, and may have therapeutic implications for conditions of delayed wound healing.

  12. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-01-01

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and...

  13. Investigation of Interaction of Vaccinia Virus Complement Control Protein and Curcumin with Complement Components C3 and C3b Using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Amod P.; Randall, Philippa J.; Murthy, Krishna; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Kotwal, Girish J.

    2010-01-01

    C3 and C3b, the components central to the complement activation, also play a damaging role in several inflammatory disorders. Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) and curcumin (Cur) are natural compounds with different biological origins reported to regulate complement activation. However, both VCP and Cur have not been investigated for their interaction with the third component (C3) prior to it being converted to its activated form (C3b). These two compounds have also not been com...

  14. Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) is a novel, potent inhibitor of complement activation

    OpenAIRE

    Lekowski, Robert; Collard, Charles D.; Reenstra, Wende R.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an important mediator of vascular injury following oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that complement activation following endothelial oxidative stress is mediated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and activation of the lectin complement pathway. Here, we investigated whether nine plant lectins which have a binding profile similar to that of MBL competitively inhibit MBL deposition and subsequent complement activation following human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC)...

  15. Impact of reducing complement inhibitor binding on the immunogenicity of native neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels-Treffandier, H; Nie, K.; Marsay, L.; Dold, C.; Sadarangani, M.; Reyes-Sandoval, A.; Langford, PR; Wyllie, D; Hill, F; Pollard, AJ; Rollier, CS

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis recruits host human complement inhibitors to its surface to down-regulate complement activation and enhance survival in blood. We have investigated whether such complement inhibitor binding occurs after vaccination with native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs), and limits immunogenicity of such vaccines. To this end, nOMVs reactogenic lipopolysaccharide was detoxified by deletion of the lpxl1 gene (nOMVlpxl1). nOMVs unable to bind human complement factor H (hfH) were gene...

  16. Human genetic deficiencies reveal the roles of complement in the inflammatory network: lessons from nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Christiansen, Dorte; Pharo, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    Complement component C5 is crucial for experimental animal inflammatory tissue damage; however, its involvement in human inflammation is incompletely understood. The responses to gram-negative bacteria were here studied taking advantage of human genetic complement-deficiencies--nature's own...... of complement and CD14. The present study provides important insight into the comprehensive role of complement in human inflammatory responses to gram-negative bacteria....

  17. The pivotal role of the mentor in triggering the research on Complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Despite the fact that was one of the first systems to be discovered and investigated in the innate immunity, Complement is continuing to receive growing attention by the scientific community. Complement is involved in several diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis or Systemic Lupus Erythematous. Successful therapeutic intervention in treating Complement-mediated diseases such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome represent a promising advance to continue the research on Complement to develop specific inhibitors for treating human diseases.

  18. Structural Basis for Simvastatin Competitive Antagonism of Complement Receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Maria Risager; Bajic, Goran; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Anne Kjær; Koldsø, Heidi; Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Schiøtt, Birgit; Andersen, Gregers R; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-08-12

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune response to infection but may also cause severe complications during inflammation. Small molecule antagonists to complement receptor 3 (CR3) have been widely sought, but a structural basis for their mode of action is not available. We report here on the structure of the human CR3 ligand-binding I domain in complex with simvastatin. Simvastatin targets the metal ion-dependent adhesion site of the open, ligand-binding conformation of the CR3 I domain by direct contact with the chelated Mg(2+) ion. Simvastatin antagonizes I domain binding to the complement fragments iC3b and C3d but not to intercellular adhesion molecule-1. By virtue of the I domain's wide distribution in binding kinetics to ligands, it was possible to identify ligand binding kinetics as discriminator for simvastatin antagonism. In static cellular experiments, 15-25 μm simvastatin reduced adhesion by K562 cells expressing recombinant CR3 and by primary human monocytes, with an endogenous expression of this receptor. Application of force to adhering monocytes potentiated the effects of simvastatin where only a 50-100 nm concentration of the drug reduced the adhesion by 20-40% compared with untreated cells. The ability of simvastatin to target CR3 in its ligand binding-activated conformation is a novel mechanism to explain the known anti-inflammatory effects of this compound, in particular because this CR3 conformation is found in pro-inflammatory environments. Our report points to new designs of CR3 antagonists and opens new perspectives and identifies druggable receptors from characterization of the ligand binding kinetics in the presence of antagonists. PMID:27339893

  19. Vasculitides and the Complement System: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ballanti, Eleonora; Triggianese, Paola; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis or thrombosis. Clinical symptoms may be limited to skin or to other organs or may include multiple manifestations as systemic conditions. The pathogenesis is related to the presence of leukocytes in the vessels and to the IC deposition, which implies the activation of the complement system (CS) and then the swelling and damage of vessel mural structures. The complement system (CS) is involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic vasculitides. This enzymatic system is a part of the innate immune system, and its function is linked to the modulation of the adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. Its activation is also critical for the development of natural antibodies and T cell response and for the regulation of autoreactive B cells. Complement triggering contributes to inflammation-driven tissue injury, which occurs during the ischemia/reperfusion processes, vasculitides, nephritis, arthritis, and many others diseases. In systemic vasculitides, a group of uncommon diseases characterized by blood vessel inflammation, the contribution of CS in the development of inflammatory damage has been demonstrated. Treatment is mainly based on clinical manifestations and severity of organ involvement. Evidences on the efficacy of traditional immunosuppressive therapies have been collected as well as data from clinical trials that involve the modulation of the CS. In particular in small-medium-vessel vasculitides, the CS represents an attractive target. Herein, we reviewed the pathogenetic role of CS in these systemic vasculitides as urticarial vasculitis, ANCA-associated vasculitides, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, cryoglobulinaemic vasculitides, Henoch-Schönlein purpura/IgA nephropathy, and Kawasaki disease and therefore its potential therapeutic use in this context. PMID

  20. Complement activation associated with polysorbate 80 in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shidong; Liu, Zhaohua; Hou, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Hong; Du, Wu; Wang, Wenfang; Qin, Yizhuo; Liu, Zhaoping

    2013-01-01

    Polysorbate 80 (Tween® 80) is the most extensively used surfactant in parenteral drug formulation. Its application as an adjunct for intravenous drug administration is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, severe hypersensitive reactions, which are typical non-immune anaphylactic reactions (pseudoallergy) characterized by the release of histamine and unvaried IgE antibodies, have been associated with Tween® 80. In order to explore the non-immune anaphylactic mechanisms of Tween® 80, we performed in vivo experiments to assess the changes in physiological and hematologic indicators after intravenous injection of Tween® 80 into dogs. Tween® 80 induced the release of histamine, and a 2-fold increase in SC5b-9, 2.5-fold increase in C4d, 1.3-fold increase in Bb, while IgE remained unchanged. It also produced changes in pulmonary pressure, systemic pressure and ECG. In in vitro experiments, Tween® 80 was incubated with dog serum in the presence of an inhibitor of complement activation (EGTA/Mg(2+)). Under these conditions, Tween® 80 increased the contents of C4d and Bb. The results of this study reveal that Tween® 80 can cause cardiopulmonary distress in dogs and activate the complement system through classical and alternative pathways as indicated in both in vivo and in vitro preparations. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of the beagle dog as an animal model for the study of complement activation-related pseudoallergy. These findings raise concerns with regard to the indiscriminate use of Tween® 80 in clinical applications. PMID:23159336

  1. Vasculitides and the Complement System: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ballanti, Eleonora; Triggianese, Paola; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis or thrombosis. Clinical symptoms may be limited to skin or to other organs or may include multiple manifestations as systemic conditions. The pathogenesis is related to the presence of leukocytes in the vessels and to the IC deposition, which implies the activation of the complement system (CS) and then the swelling and damage of vessel mural structures. The complement system (CS) is involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic vasculitides. This enzymatic system is a part of the innate immune system, and its function is linked to the modulation of the adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. Its activation is also critical for the development of natural antibodies and T cell response and for the regulation of autoreactive B cells. Complement triggering contributes to inflammation-driven tissue injury, which occurs during the ischemia/reperfusion processes, vasculitides, nephritis, arthritis, and many others diseases. In systemic vasculitides, a group of uncommon diseases characterized by blood vessel inflammation, the contribution of CS in the development of inflammatory damage has been demonstrated. Treatment is mainly based on clinical manifestations and severity of organ involvement. Evidences on the efficacy of traditional immunosuppressive therapies have been collected as well as data from clinical trials that involve the modulation of the CS. In particular in small-medium-vessel vasculitides, the CS represents an attractive target. Herein, we reviewed the pathogenetic role of CS in these systemic vasculitides as urticarial vasculitis, ANCA-associated vasculitides, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, cryoglobulinaemic vasculitides, Henoch-Schönlein purpura/IgA nephropathy, and Kawasaki disease and therefore its potential therapeutic use in this context.

  2. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G associated with Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, W.; Jaspers, N.G.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Belgium)); Jaeken, J. (Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium))

    1993-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are two rare inherited disorders with a clinical and cellular hypersensitivity to the UV component of the sunlight spectrum. Although the two traits are generally considered as clinically and genetically distinct entities, on the biochemical level a defect in the nucleotide excision-repair (NER) pathway is involved in both. Classical CS patients are primarily deficient in the preferential repair of DNA damage in actively transcribed genes, whereas in most XP patients the genetic defect affects both [open quotes]preferential[close quotes] and [open quotes]overall[close quotes] NER modalities. Here the authors report a genetic study of two unrelated, severely affected patients with the clinical characteristics of CS but with a biochemical defect typical of XP. By complementation analysis, using somatic cell fusion and nuclear microinjection of cloned repair genes, they assign these two patients to XP complementation group G, which previously was not associated with CS. This observation extends the earlier identification of two patients with a rare combined XP/CS phenotype within XP complementation groups B and D, respectively. It indicates that some mutations in at least three of the seven genes known to be involved in XP also can result in a picture of partial or even full-blown CS. It is concluded that the syndromes XP and CS are biochemically closely related and may be part of a broader clinical disease spectrum. The authors suggest, as a possible molecular mechanism underlying this relation, that the XPGC repair gene has an additional vital function, as shown for some other NER genes. 33 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. The receptor for complement component C3a mediates protection from intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by inhibiting neutrophil mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Mike C. L.; Brennan, Faith H; Lynch, Jason P. L.; Mantovani, Susanna; Phipps, Simon; Wetsel, Rick A.; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2013-01-01

    C3a is a key complement activation fragment, yet its neutrophil-expressed receptor (C3aR) still has no clearly defined role. In this study, we used a neutrophil-dependent mouse model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to explore the role of C3aR in acute tissue injuries. C3aR deficiency worsened intestinal injury, which corresponded with increased numbers of tissue-infiltrating neutrophils. Circulating neutrophils were significantly increased in C3aR−/− mice after intestinal ische...

  4. Contribution to the study of immune hemolysis by toad complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gennari

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available EA (sheep erythrocytes carrying rabbit antibody are lysed by toad complement under optimal conditions which include a low concentration of cells (1.54 x 10*8/ml, a low temperature of incubation (30°C and the same amounts of Ca++ and Mg++ as required for the titration of guinea-pig complement. Kinetic studies of the role of cations mentioned above in immune lysis by toad C have disclosed a fundamental difference as compared to guinea-pig C. In a limited complement system, the lysis by amphibian C is completely blocked by EDTA, even when the chelating agent is added as late as 15 minutes after zero-time. Inhibition by EGTA is only partial and the findings suggest that Mg++ is required not only at the beginning, but also at late stages of the lytic process. It has been speculated that the activation of amphibian complement proceeds mainly by the alternative pathway.EA (eritrócitos de carneiro, sensibilizados com anticorpos de coelho são lisados por complemento de sapo em condições ótimas, que consistem no uso de uma baixa concentração de células (1.54 x 10*8/ml, incubação a baixa temperatura (30°C e as mesmas quantidades de Ca++ e de Mg++, requeridas para a titulação da atividade hemolítica do complemento de cobaia. Estudos cinéticos do efeito dos cátions mencionados acima na imune-lise produzida pelo complemento de sapo revelam uma diferença fundamental com relação ao complemento de cobaía. Num sistema limitado pela quantidade de complemento, a lise pelo C de anfíbio é totalmente bloqueada por EDTA, mesmo quando a adição do agente quelante é feita após 15 minutos, ao passo que com EGTA o bloqueio é apenas parcial. Os achados experimentais sugerem que Mg++ seja requerido não apenas no estágio inicial, mas também em estágios tardios do processo lítico e permitem especular que a ativação do complemento de anfíbio se processa predominantemente pela via alternativa.

  5. Algebraic invariants, mutation, and commensurability of link complements

    CERN Document Server

    Chesebro, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We construct a family of hyperbolic link complements by gluing tangles along totally geodesic four-punctured spheres, then investigate the commensurability relation among its members. Those with different volume are incommensurable, distinguished by their scissors congruence classes. Mutation produces arbitrarily large finite subfamilies of nonisometric manifolds with the same volume and scissors congruence class. Depending on the choice of mutation, these manifolds may be commensurable or incommensurable, distinguished in the latter case by cusp parameters. All have trace field Q(i,\\sqrt{2}), but some have integral traces while others do not.

  6. Molecular basis of complement C3 deficiency in guinea pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Auerbach, H S; de Burger, R; Dodds, A.; Colten, H R

    1990-01-01

    In experiments to ascertain the biochemical basis of a genetically determined deficiency of the third component of complement (C3) in guinea pigs, we found that C3-deficient liver and peritoneal macrophages contain C3 messenger RNA of normal size (approximately 5 kb) and amounts, that this mRNA programs synthesis of pro-C3 in oocytes primed with liver RNA and in primary macrophage cultures. In each instance, heterodimeric native C3 protein was secreted with normal kinetics but the C3 protein ...

  7. Selection of functional cDNAs by complementation in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, G L; McConaughy, B L

    1983-01-01

    Yeast cDNA was prepared in a yeast expression plasmid to generate a cDNA plasmid pool composed of approximately 40,000 members. Several yeast mutants were transformed with the cDNA plasmid pool, and the cDNAs for ADC1, HIS3, URA3, and ASP5 were isolated by functional complementation. Restriction enzyme analysis confirmed the genetic identity of the ADC1, HIS3, and URA3 cDNAs and demonstrated that the URA3 cDNA contains 5' noncoding sequences. The relative abundance of the various cDNAs in the...

  8. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  9. DMPD: Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16754322 Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. Tohyama Y, Yamamura H. ...IUBMB Life. 2006 May-Jun;58(5-6):304-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Complement-mediated phagocytosis-...-the role of Syk. PubmedID 16754322 Title Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. Authors Tohyama

  10. The Object Complement in "Bahasa Malaysia." Colorado Research in Linguistics, No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, Colette

    Together with a study of object complements, a succinct description of the Malay classifier construction is given. Object complementation is studied in a generative-transformational framework. For sentence object complements, four types of surface structure are proposed, but it is claimed that two types of deep structure trees underlie the…

  11. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator... Test Systems § 866.5250 Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement C1 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system is a device that consists...

  12. Dysregulation of adaptive immune responses in complement C3-deficient patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Heikkila, Nelli; Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Paert; Botto, Marina; Daha, Mohamed R.; Drouet, Christian; Isaac, Lourdes; Helminen, Merja; Haahtela, Tari; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; Arstila, T. Petteri

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its effector functions, complement is an important regulator of adaptive immune responses. Murine studies suggest that complement modulates helper T-cell differentiation, and Th1 responses in particular are impaired in the absence of functional complement. Here, we have studied humora

  13. Dual modulating functions of thrombomodulin in the alternative complement pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Koichiro; Imaoka, Mio; Matsushita, Misao

    2016-07-19

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a transmembrane protein expressed on vascular endothelial cells. TM has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. It has recently been reported that TM modulates complement, an immune effector system that destroys pathogens and is also involved in inflammation. TM was demonstrated to enhance the degradation of C3b into iC3b by factor I and factor H, indicating that its role is in negative regulation in the alternative pathway of the complement system. In this study, we examined the effects of recombinant human soluble TM protein composed of the extracellular domains (rTM) on the alternative pathway. The degradation of C3b into iC3b by factor I and factor H was enhanced by rTM as assessed by SDS-PAGE, confirming the previous observation. We also found that rTM enhances the cleavage of C3 into C3b as a result of activation of the alternative pathway. These results indicate that TM has both activating and inactivating functions in the alternative pathway. PMID:27210597

  14. A Preliminary Genetic Analysis of Complement 3 Gene and Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianliang Ni

    Full Text Available Complement pathway activation was found to occur frequently in schizophrenia, and complement 3 (C3 plays a major role in this process. Previous studies have provided evidence for the possible role of C3 in the development of schizophrenia. In this study, we hypothesized that the gene encoding C3 (C3 may confer susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese. We analyzed 7 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of C3 in 647 schizophrenia patients and 687 healthy controls. Peripheral C3 mRNA expression level was measured in 23 drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls. Two SNPs (rs1047286 and rs2250656 that deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were excluded for further analysis. Among the remaining 5 SNPs, there was no significant difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the patient and control groups. Logistic regression analysis showed no significant SNP-gender interaction in either dominant model or recessive model. There was no significant difference in the level of peripheral C3 expression between the drug-naïve schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, the results of this study do not support C3 as a major genetic susceptibility factor in schizophrenia. Other factors in AP may have critical roles in schizophrenia and be worthy of further investigation.

  15. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  16. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Posch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection.

  17. On defining semantics of extended attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1980-01-01

    Knuth has introduced attribute grammars (AGs) as a tool to define the semanitcs of context-free languages. The use of AGs in connection with programming language definitions has mostly been to define the context-sensitive syntax of the language and to define a translation in code for a hypothetic...

  18. Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate inhibits the complement classical pathway by potentiating C1 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Hua Zhou

    Full Text Available Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS has become the subject of multidisciplinary investigation as a non-traditional contaminant in the heparin therapeutic preparations that were linked to severe adverse events. In this study, it was found that OSCS inhibited complement fixation on bacteria and bacterial lysis mediated by the complement classical pathway. The inhibition of complement by OSCS is not due to interference with antibody/antigen interaction or due to consumption of C3 associated with FXII-dependent contact system activation. However, OSCS complement inhibition is dependent on C1 inhibitor (C1inh since the depletion of C1inh from either normal or FXII-deficient complement plasma prevents OSCS inhibition of complement activity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that immobilized C1inhibitor bound greater than 5-fold more C1s in the presence of OSCS than in presence of heparin. Although heparin can also inhibit complement, OSCS and OSCS contaminated heparin are more potent inhibitors of complement. Furthermore, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG, an anti-inflammatory veterinary medicine with a similar structure to OSCS, also inhibited complement in the plasma of dogs and farm animals. This study provides a new insight that in addition to the FXII-dependent activation of contact system, oversulfated and polysulfated chondroitin-sulfate can inhibit complement activity by potentiating the classical complement pathway regulator C1inh. This effect on C1inh may play a role in inhibiting inflammation as well as impacting bacterial clearance.

  19. Inefficient complement system clearance of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes enables resistant strains to invade eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Cestari

    Full Text Available The complement system is the main arm of the vertebrate innate immune system against pathogen infection. For the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, subverting the complement system and invading the host cells is crucial to succeed in infection. However, little attention has focused on whether the complement system can effectively control T. cruzi infection. To address this question, we decided to analyse: 1 which complement pathways are activated by T. cruzi using strains isolated from different hosts, 2 the capacity of these strains to resist the complement-mediated killing at nearly physiological conditions, and 3 whether the complement system could limit or control T. cruzi invasion of eukaryotic cells. The complement activating molecules C1q, C3, mannan-binding lectin and ficolins bound to all strains analysed; however, C3b and C4b deposition assays revealed that T. cruzi activates mainly the lectin and alternative complement pathways in non-immune human serum. Strikingly, we detected that metacyclic trypomastigotes of some T. cruzi strains were highly susceptible to complement-mediated killing in non-immune serum, while other strains were resistant. Furthermore, the rate of parasite invasion in eukaryotic cells was decreased by non-immune serum. Altogether, these results establish that the complement system recognizes T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes, resulting in killing of susceptible strains. The complement system, therefore, acts as a physiological barrier which resistant strains have to evade for successful host infection.

  20. Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate inhibits the complement classical pathway by potentiating C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Rajabi, Mohsen; Chen, Trina; Karnaukhova, Elena; Kozlowski, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) has become the subject of multidisciplinary investigation as a non-traditional contaminant in the heparin therapeutic preparations that were linked to severe adverse events. In this study, it was found that OSCS inhibited complement fixation on bacteria and bacterial lysis mediated by the complement classical pathway. The inhibition of complement by OSCS is not due to interference with antibody/antigen interaction or due to consumption of C3 associated with FXII-dependent contact system activation. However, OSCS complement inhibition is dependent on C1 inhibitor (C1inh) since the depletion of C1inh from either normal or FXII-deficient complement plasma prevents OSCS inhibition of complement activity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that immobilized C1inhibitor bound greater than 5-fold more C1s in the presence of OSCS than in presence of heparin. Although heparin can also inhibit complement, OSCS and OSCS contaminated heparin are more potent inhibitors of complement. Furthermore, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG), an anti-inflammatory veterinary medicine with a similar structure to OSCS, also inhibited complement in the plasma of dogs and farm animals. This study provides a new insight that in addition to the FXII-dependent activation of contact system, oversulfated and polysulfated chondroitin-sulfate can inhibit complement activity by potentiating the classical complement pathway regulator C1inh. This effect on C1inh may play a role in inhibiting inflammation as well as impacting bacterial clearance. PMID:23077587

  1. Human L-ficolin, a recognition molecule of the lectin activation pathway of complement, activates complement by binding to pneumolysin, the major toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Youssif M; Kenawy, Hany I; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B; Andrew, Peter W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q(-/-) mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum.

  2. A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE PHENOMENA KNOWN AS COMPLEMENT-SPLITTING : FIRST PAPER: SPLITTING OF THE COMPLEMENT ASSOCIATED WITH GLOBULIN PRECIPITATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J; Noguchi, H

    1912-06-01

    It is generally accepted that complement may be split into a mid-piece and an end-piece. The mid-piece is thought to be in the globulin fraction, and the end-piece in the albumin fraction. The restoration of complement activity by putting together the albumin and globulin fractions does not prove, however, that each fraction contained a part of the complement, for the albumin fraction can be reactivated in the absence of the globulin fraction. Complement-splitting as brought about by hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxid, and dialysis, is really an inactivation of the whole complement by certain acids or alkalis, either added in the free state to the serum, or liberated as a result of the dissociation of certain electrolytes. That the whole complement, and not a part only, is present in the albumin fraction of the serum can be demonstrated by the removal of the inhibitory action of the acid or alkali. This can be effected by the addition, not only of alkali or acid, but also of any amphoteric substance. When hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxid, or dialysis are employed to produce the phenomenon known as complement-splitting, the complement is merely inactivated, not split.

  3. Complement-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, A M; Schønning, Kristian;

    1997-01-01

    3 isolates and found only a minor effect on antigen production (median enhancement 1.2-fold, range 0.6-1.5). Furthermore, addition of HIV-specific antibodies in combination with complement resulted in enhanced antigen production in 2/3 sera tested. However, the combination of complement...... and antibodies resulted in only a minor increase in enhancement of HIV infection compared to that obtained with complement alone. Finally, we found evidence of complement-mediated enhancement of HIV infection in resting PBMC. In conclusion, we demonstrated that complement-mediated enhancement of HIV infection......We investigated if complement-mediated enhancement of HIV infection occurs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In 7 experiments, we evaluated the effect of human complement on HIVIIIB infection in vitro. We measured HIV antigen production on day 4 and found that pre-incubation of HIV...

  4. Complement activation in the context of stem cells and tissue repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid; U; Schraufstatter; Sophia; K; Khaldoyanidi; Richard; G; DiScipio

    2015-01-01

    The complement pathway is best known for its role in immune surveillance and inflammation. However,its ability of opsonizing and removing not only pathogens,but also necrotic and apoptotic cells,is a phylogenetically ancient means of initiating tissue repair. The means and mechanisms of complement-mediated tissue repair are discussed in this review. There is increasing evidence that complement activation contributes to tissue repair at several levels. These range from the chemo-attraction of stem and progenitor cells to areas of complement activation,to increased survival of various cell types in the presence of split products of complement,and to the production of trophic factors by cells activated by the anaphylatoxins C3 a and C5 a. This repair aspect of complement biology has not found sufficient appreciation until recently. The following will examine this aspect of complement biology with an emphasis on the anaphylatoxins C3 a and C5 a.

  5. COMPLEMENT (OBJECT) IN TURKEY TURKISH
    TÜRKİYE TÜRKÇESİNDE DÜZ TÜMLEÇ (NESNE) THE DIRECT

    OpenAIRE

    Şahap BULAK

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examined the direct complement of elements of the sentence about which there are lots of problems to be solved. We have discussed the direct complement in eight different ways; direct complement, the definition of term of direct complement, the relationship between verb and direct complement, the suffixes of direct complement, the direct complement in passive sentences, direct complement in reflexive sentences, the direct complement in terms of subordinate relationship, direc...

  6. Interleukin 3 and granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor render human basophils responsive to low concentrations of complement component C3a.

    OpenAIRE

    Bischoff, S C; de Weck, A. L.; Dahinden, C A

    1990-01-01

    Complement component C3a is an anaphylatoxin known to induce plasma exudation and smooth muscle contraction in tissues. The effects on inflammatory effector leukocytes, however, are poorly defined and controversial, being at best weak and occurring at very high C3a concentrations. Here, we examined the effect of C3a upon mediator release from human basophils, with and without pretreatment with interleukin 3 (IL-3), a hematopoietic growth factor recently found to profoundly modify the basophil...

  7. Complement component 3: a new paradigm in tuberculosis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian; Juste, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are critical for the control of tuberculosis (TB) affecting humans and animals worldwide. First-generation vaccines protect from active TB but new vaccines are required to protect against pulmonary disease and infection. Recent advances in post-genomics technologies have allowed the characterization of host-pathogen interactions to discover new protective antigens and mechanisms to develop more effective vaccines against TB. Studies in the wild boar model resulted in the identification of complement component 3 (C3) as a natural correlate of protection against TB. Oral immunization with heat-inactivated mycobacteria protected wild boar against TB and showed that C3 plays a central role in protection. These results point at C3 as a target to develop novel vaccine formulations for more effective protection against TB in humans and animals. PMID:26605515

  8. Graphs cospectral with a friendship graph or its complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdollahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $n$ be any positive integer and let $F_n$ be the friendship (or Dutch windmill graph with $2n+1$ vertices and $3n$ edges. Here we study graphs with the same adjacency spectrum as the $F_n$. Two graphs are called cospectral if the eigenvalues multiset of their adjacency matrices are the same. Let $G$ be a graph cospectral with $F_n$. Here we prove that if $G$ has no cycle of length $4$ or $5$, then $Gcong F_n$. Moreover if $G$ is connected and planar then $Gcong F_n$.All but one of connected components of $G$ are isomorphic to $K_2$.The complement $overline{F_n}$ of the friendship graph is determined by its adjacency eigenvalues, that is, if $overline{F_n}$ is cospectral with a graph $H$, then $Hcong overline{F_n}$.

  9. Functional assay of the alternative complement pathway of rat serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two functional assays of the alternative pathway of complement activation in rat serum were developed. In the first assay, conditions were established for titration of alternative pathway activity by use of the 50% hemolytic end-point of rabbit red blood cells (RaRBC) in serum treated with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). The second assay of alternative pathway activity was based on the opsonization of heat-killed radiolabeled pneumococci of serotype 25 (Pn25). Opsonization of Pn25 was shown to proceed entirely via the alternative pathway in rat serum. There was excellent correlation between the results obtained with the RaRBC lysis test and those obtained with the opsonization test. Because of its technical simplicity, the RaRBC lysis test appeared to be the single most useful test of alternative pathway activity in rat serum. (Auth.)

  10. Complement alternative pathway activation in human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip M Segers

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Recently we reported complement activation in human NASH. However, it remained unclear whether the alternative pathway of complement, which amplifies C3 activation and which is frequently associated with pathological complement activation leading to disease, was involved. Here, alternative pathway components were investigated in liver biopsies of obese subjects with healthy livers (n = 10 or with NASH (n = 12 using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Properdin accumulated in areas where neutrophils surrounded steatotic hepatocytes, and colocalized with the C3 activation product C3c. C3 activation status as expressed by the C3c/native C3 ratio was 2.6-fold higher (p<0.01 in subjects with NASH despite reduced native C3 concentrations (0.94±0.12 vs. 0.57±0.09; p<0.01. Hepatic properdin levels positively correlated with levels of C3c (rs = 0.69; p<0.05 and C3c/C3 activation ratio (rs = 0.59; p<0.05. C3c, C3 activation status (C3c/C3 ratio and properdin levels increased with higher lobular inflammation scores as determined according to the Kleiner classification (C3c: p<0.01, C3c/C3 ratio: p<0.05, properdin: p<0.05. Hepatic mRNA expression of factor B and factor D did not differ between subjects with healthy livers and subjects with NASH (factor B: 1.00±0.19 vs. 0.71±0.07, p = 0.26; factor D: 1.00±0.21 vs. 0.66±0.14, p = 0.29;. Hepatic mRNA and protein levels of Decay Accelerating Factor tended to be increased in subjects with NASH (mRNA: 1.00±0.14 vs. 2.37±0.72; p = 0.22; protein: 0.51±0.11 vs. 1.97±0.67; p = 0.28. In contrast, factor H mRNA was downregulated in patients with NASH (1.00±0.09 vs. 0.71±0.06; p<0.05 and a similar trend was observed with hepatic protein levels (1.12±0.16 vs. 0.78±0.07; p = 0.08. Collectively, these data suggest a role for alternative

  11. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients.

  12. Recombinant complement receptor 2 radiolabeled with [99mTc(CO3]+: a potential new radiopharmaceutical for imaging activated complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Badar

    Full Text Available We describe the design and synthesis of a new Tc-99m labeled bioconjugate for imaging activated complement, based on Short Consensus Repeats 1 and 2 of Complement Receptor 2 (CR2, the binding domain for C3d. To avoid non specific modification of CR2 and the potential for modifying lysine residues critical to the CR2/C3d contact surface, we engineered a new protein, recombinant CR2 (rCR2, to include the C-terminal sequence VFPLECHHHHHH, a hexahistidine tag (for site-specific radiolabeling with [(99mTc(CO(3(OH(2(3](+. The protein was characterized by N-terminal sequencing, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. To test the function of the recombinant CR2, binding to C3d was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The function was further confirmed by binding of rCR2 to C3d(+ red blood cells (RBC which were generated by deposition of human or rat C3d and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The affinity of rCR2 for C3d(+, in presence of 150 mM NaCl, was measured using surface plasma resonance giving rise to a K(D≈500 nM. Radiolabeling of rCR2 or an inactive mutant of rCR2 (K41E CR2 or an unrelated protein of a similar size (C2A with [(99mTc(CO(3(OH(2(3](+ at gave radiochemical yields >95%. Site-specifically radiolabeled rCR2 bound to C3d to C3d(+ RBC. Binding of radiolabeled rCR2 to C3d was inhibited by anti-C3d and the radiolabeled inactive mutant K41E CR2 and C2A did not bind to C3d(+ RBCs. We conclude that rCR2-Tc(99m has excellent radiolabeling, stability and C3d binding characteristics and warrants in vivo evaluation as an activated complement imaging agent.

  13. Software Defined Networking (Dagstuhl Seminar 12363)

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Pan; Koponen, Teemu

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the talks and discussions of Dagstuhl Seminar 12363 "Software Defined Networking". The presented talks represent a spectrum of industrial and academic work as well as both technical and organizational developments surrounding Software Defined Networking (SDN). The topic of SDN has garnered significant attention over the past few years in the networking community and beyond, and indeed the term "Software Defined Networking" itself carries different meani...

  14. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Automation Inc, (IAI) is currently developing a software defined radio (SDR) platform that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation...

  15. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated (CLX) proposes the development of a Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) that leverages the inherent advantages of an...

  16. Cleavage of Complement C3b to iC3b on the Surface of Staphylococcus aureus Is Mediated by Serum Complement Factor I

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnion, K. M.; Hair, P. S.; Buescher, E. S.

    2004-01-01

    Complement-mediated opsonization of Staphylococcus aureus bearing the dominant capsule serotypes, serotypes 5 and 8, remains incompletely understood. We have previously shown that complement plays a vital role in the efficient phagocytosis of a serotype 5 S. aureus strain and that the opsonic fragments of the central complement protein C3, C3b and iC3b, were present on the bacterial surface after incubation in human serum. In the present studies, C3b and iC3b were found on several serotype 5 ...

  17. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purushottam Jha; Girish J Kotwal

    2003-04-01

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) was one of the first viral molecules demonstrated to have a role in blocking complement and hence in the evasion of host defense. Structurally it is very similar to the human C4b-BP and the other members of complement control protein. Functionally it is most similar to the CR1 protein. VCP blocks both major pathways of complement activation. The crystal structure of VCP was determined a little over a year ago and it is the only known structure of an intact and complete complement control protein. In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and potential drug.

  18. The Role of Properdin in Zymosan- and Escherichia coli-Induced Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Morten; Garred, Peter; Lindstad, Julie K;

    2012-01-01

    Properdin is well known as an enhancer of the alternative complement amplification loop when C3 is activated, whereas its role as a recognition molecule of exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiator of complement activation is less understood. We therefore studied the role...... of properdin in activation of complement in normal human serum by zymosan and various Escherichia coli strains. In ELISA, microtiter plates coated with zymosan induced efficient complement activation with deposition of C4b and terminal complement complex on the solid phase. Virtually no deposition of C4b...... or terminal complement complex was observed with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)-deficient serum. Reconstitution with purified MBL showed distinct activation in both readouts. In ELISA, normal human serum-induced deposition of properdin by zymosan was abolished by the C3-inhibiting peptide compstatin. Flow...

  19. The mammalian complement system as an epitome of host-pathogen genetic conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliani, Rachele; Forni, Diego; Filippi, Giulia; Mozzi, Alessandra; De Gioia, Luca; Pontremoli, Chiara; Pozzoli, Uberto; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The complement system is an innate immunity effector mechanism; its action is antagonized by a wide array of pathogens and complement evasion determines the virulence of several infections. We investigated the evolutionary history of the complement system and of bacterial-encoded complement-interacting proteins. Complement components targeted by several pathogens evolved under strong selective pressure in primates, with selection acting on residues at the contact interface with microbial/viral proteins. Positively selected sites in CFH and C4BPA account for the human specificity of gonococcal infection. Bacterial interactors, evolved adaptively as well, with selected sites located at interaction surfaces with primate complement proteins. These results epitomize the expectation under a genetic conflict scenario whereby the host's and the pathogen's genes evolve within binding avoidance-binding seeking dynamics. In silico mutagenesis and protein-protein docking analyses supported this by showing that positively selected sites, both in the host's and in the pathogen's interacting partner, modulate binding.

  20. VERSATILITY OF THE COMPLEMENT SYSTEM IN NEUROINFLAMMATION, NEURODEGENERATION AND BRAIN HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Orsini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury. This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement

  1. Synergistic actions of complement and lysozyme in clearance of Escherichia coli from amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Wang; Shicui Zhang; Zhimeng Zhuang; Zhiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Amphioxus appears to lack free circulating blood cells. How it clears invading pathogens from its body remains unknown to date. We demonstrate here that amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri is capable of efficiently eliminating the invading bacterium Escherichia coil from its humorai fluid, and the complement and lysozyme are both involved in the elimination of the invading pathogen. Both the com-plement and lysozyme act in concert against the invading bacterium, but the complement appears to play a more dominant role than the lysozyme.

  2. Association of the porcine C3 gene with haemolytic complement activity in the pig

    OpenAIRE

    Mekchay Supamit; Ponsuksili Siriluck; Schellander Karl; Wimmers Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The complement component C3 plays an essential role in the activated complement system, which is involved in phagocytosis, inflammation and immunoregulation to destroy infectious microorganisms. The C3 molecule has more implications in the general defence mechanisms. In this study, the porcine C3 cDNA sequences including 5'- and 3'- flanking regions were determined and the polymorphisms in this gene were identified to carry out an association analysis between C3 and complement activi...

  3. Capsule Production and Growth Phase Influence Binding of Complement to Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnion, K. M.; Lee, J. C.; Frank, M M

    2001-01-01

    Complement-mediated opsonization of bacteria by C3 binding is an important component of the host innate immune system. Little information is available concerning the interaction between complement proteins and capsule type 5 and 8 Staphylococcus aureus strains, even though these isolates are responsible for ∼70% of human staphylococcal infections. To investigate the importance of an intact complement pathway in an experimental staphylococcal infection, control and C3-depleted mice were challe...

  4. In-vitro activation of complement system by lactic acidosis in newborn and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hecke

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complement activation occurs secondary to a variety of external stimuli. Lactic acidosis has been previously shown to activate the complement factors C3a and C5a. In the present investigation we examined the differential effect of lactic acidosis on anaphylatoxin levels in cord and adult blood. Furthermore we aimed to determine if the entire complement cascade could be activated by lactic acidosis.

  5. The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Martin J.; Sughrue, Michael E.; Kane, Ari J.; Ahn, Brian J.; Fang, Shanna; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that the complement cascade is involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes in addition to its role as an immune effector. Research in a variety of organ systems has shown that complement proteins are direct participants in maintenance of cellular turnover, healing, proliferation and regeneration. As a physiologic housekeeper, complement proteins maintain tissue integrity in the absence of inflammation by disposing of cellular debris and...

  6. Complement and HIV-I infection/HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-04-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over 15 years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose-binding lectins (MBL), and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. In addition, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND, as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection.

  7. New perspectives on mannan-binding lectin-mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Søren Egedal; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system, mediating several major effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. Three complement activation pathways exist: the classical pathway (CP), the alternative pathway (AP), and the lectin pathway (LP). The LP...... picture of the complement system is more that of a small "scale-free" network where C3 acts as the main hub, than that of three linear pathways converging in a common terminal pathway....

  8. Defining Dynamic Graphics by a Graphical Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛其昌; 戴汝为

    1991-01-01

    A graphical language which can be used for defining dynamic picture and applying control actions to it is defined with an expanded attributed grammar.Based on this a system is built for developing the presentation of application data of user interface.This system provides user interface designers with a friendly and high efficient programming environment.

  9. Complementing xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts restore biological activity to UV-damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV survival curves of adenovirus 2 using fused complementing xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblast strains as virus hosts showed a component with an inactivation slope identical to that given by normal cells. This component was not observed when the fibroblasts were not fused or when fusions involved strains in the same complementing group. Extrapolation to zero dose indicated that three percent of the viral plaque-forming units had infected cells capable of normal repair; this suggested that three percent of the cells were complementing heterokaryons. Thus, heterokaryons formed from xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts belonging to different complementation groups are as capable of restoring biological activity to UV-damaged adenovirus 2 as are normal cells

  10. Neutrophil extracellular traps that are not degraded in systemic lupus erythematosus activate complement exacerbating the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Jonatan; Martin, Myriam; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Tydén, Helena; Lood, Christian; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing inflammation including activation of the complement system is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Antimicrobial neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of secreted chromatin that may act as a source of autoantigens typical for SLE. In this study, we investigated how complement interacts with NETs and how NET degradation is affected by complement in SLE patients. We found that sera from a subset of patients with active SLE had a reduced ability to degrade in vitro-generated NETs, which was mostly restored when these patients were in remission. Patients that failed to degrade NETs had a more active disease and they also displayed lower levels of complement proteins C4 and C3 in blood. We discovered that NETs activated complement in vitro and that deposited C1q inhibited NET degradation including a direct inhibition of DNase-I by C1q. Complement deposition on NETs may facilitate autoantibody production, and indeed, Abs against NETs and NET epitopes were more pronounced in patients with impaired ability to degrade NETs. NET-bound autoantibodies inhibited degradation but also further increased C1q deposition, potentially exacerbating the disease. Thus, NETs are a potent complement activator, and this interaction may play an important role in SLE. Targeting complement with inhibitors or by removing complement activators such as NETs could be beneficial for patients with SLE.

  11. Role of complement in host-microbe homeostasis of the periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Abe, Toshiharu; Maekawa, Tomoki; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    Complement plays a key role in immunity and inflammation through direct effects on immune cells or via crosstalk and regulation of other host signaling pathways. Deregulation of these finely balanced complement activities can link infection to inflammatory tissue damage. Periodontitis is a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that can destroy the tooth-supporting tissues. In this review, we summarize and discuss evidence that complement is involved in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiota and in the inflammatory process that leads to the destruction of periodontal bone. Recent insights into the mechanisms of complement involvement in periodontitis have additionally provided likely targets for therapeutic intervention against this oral disease.

  12. Complement activation and expression during chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Biozzi ABH mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaglia, V; Jackson, S J; Hughes, T R; Neal, J W; Baker, D; Morgan, B P

    2015-06-01

    Chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (crEAE) in mice recapitulates many of the clinical and histopathological features of human multiple sclerosis (MS), making it a preferred model for the disease. In both, adaptive immunity and anti-myelin T cells responses are thought to be important, while in MS a role for innate immunity and complement has emerged. Here we sought to test whether complement is activated in crEAE and important for disease. Disease was induced in Biozzi ABH mice that were terminated at different stages of the disease to assess complement activation and local complement expression in the central nervous system. Complement activation products were abundant in all spinal cord areas examined in acute disease during relapse and in the progressive phase, but were absent in early disease remission, despite significant residual clinical disease. Local expression of C1q and C3 was increased at all stages of disease, while C9 expression was increased only in acute disease; expression of the complement regulators CD55, complement receptor 1-related gene/protein y (Crry) and CD59a was reduced at all stages of the disease compared to naive controls. These data show that complement is activated in the central nervous system in the model and suggest that it is a suitable candidate for exploring whether anti-complement agents might be of benefit in MS.

  13. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  14. Complement: a novel factor in basal and ischemia-induced neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahpeymai, Yalda; Hietala, Max Albert; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Fotheringham, Andrew; Davies, Ioan; Nilsson, Ann-Katrin; Zwirner, Jörg; Wetsel, Rick A.; Gerard, Craig; Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela

    2006-01-01

    Through its involvement in inflammation, opsonization, and cytolysis, the complement protects against infectious agents. Although most of the complement proteins are synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS), the role of the complement system in the normal or ischemic CNS remains unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time that neural progenitor cells and immature neurons express receptors for complement fragments C3a and C5a (C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor). Mice that are def...

  15. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.;

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation...... the development of new treatment concepts for periodontitis. Further studies on the role of complement in periodontitis pathogenesis may also contribute to the understanding of why some individuals fail to resolve periodontitis. Here, we review evidence that links complement to the pathogenesis of periodontitis...

  16. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future.

  17. THE COMPARATIVE MERITS OF VARIOUS COMPLEMENTS AND AMBOCEPTORS IN THE SERUM DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    1. The maximum activity of an antihuman hemolytic amboceptor may be obtained by employing the homologous or heterologous complement, according to the variable relations existing between the species furnishing the amboceptor and the one supplying the complement. Thus, some amboceptors are best reactivated by the complement of the same species, while others may act most strongly when reactivated with the complements of certain suitable heterologous species. 2. From the above it is clear that the complementary activity of a given serum may be very variable according to the varieties of amboceptors employed. In expressing the complementary activity of a serum, the species of the host of the amboceptor must always be stated. Thus, one serum may have many different complementary titers according to the amboceptors used. A similar variation in the titers of the amboceptors occurs when a variety of complements are employed. 3. Certain species of animals (pig and sheep) yield sera which are comparatively poor in reactivating most varieties of antihuman amboceptors. The complements of these species deteriorate rapidly. 4. The serum of chicken contained but little complement for the amboceptors derived from the mammalia, while the amboceptor from the chicken was only poorly, or not at all, reactivable by the complements contained in the mammalian sera. The serum of pig was the only variety which reactivated this amboceptor in a fair degree. 5. For the fixation tests guinea pig complement is the most favorable. This complement is also the most active and durable of those which have been studied. The complements of pig and sheep are quite fixable, but their weakness and rapid deterioration render them unsuitable for fixation purposes. Rabbit complement is quite active but is not easily fixable. Goat complement is, as already stated, difficult to fix, in spite of its strong complementary activity. The other complements are unsuitable because of their feeble complementary

  18. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future. PMID:16787214

  19. Inhibition of the alternative complement activation pathway in traumatic brain injury by a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody: a randomized placebo-controlled study in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holers V Michael

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posttraumatic response to traumatic brain injury (TBI is characterized, in part, by activation of the innate immune response, including the complement system. We have recently shown that mice devoid of a functional alternative pathway of complement activation (factor B-/- mice are protected from complement-mediated neuroinflammation and neuropathology after TBI. In the present study, we extrapolated this knowledge from studies in genetically engineered mice to a pharmacological approach using a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody. This neutralizing antibody represents a specific and potent inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in mice. Methods A focal trauma was applied to the left hemisphere of C57BL/6 mice (n = 89 using a standardized electric weight-drop model. Animals were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: (1 Systemic injection of 1 mg monoclonal anti-factor B antibody (mAb 1379 in 400 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 hour and 24 hours after trauma; (2 Systemic injection of vehicle only (400 μl PBS, as placebo control, at identical time-points after trauma. Sham-operated and untreated mice served as additional negative controls. Evaluation of neurological scores and analysis of brain tissue specimens and serum samples was performed at defined time-points for up to 1 week. Complement activation in serum was assessed by zymosan assay and by murine C5a ELISA. Brain samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL histochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Results The mAb 1379 leads to a significant inhibition of alternative pathway complement activity and to significantly attenuated C5a levels in serum, as compared to head-injured placebo-treated control mice. TBI induced histomorphological signs of neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis in the injured brain hemisphere of placebo-treated control mice for up to 7 days. In contrast, the

  20. Kidney injury accelerates cystogenesis via pathways modulated by heme oxygenase and complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juling; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Schoeb, Trenton R; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Cui, Xiangqin; Mrug, Sylvie; Yoder, Bradley K; Johnson, Martin R; Szalai, Alexander J; Mrug, Michal

    2012-07-01

    AKI accelerates cystogenesis. Because cystogenic mutations induce strong transcriptional responses similar to those seen after AKI, these responses may accelerate the progression of cystic renal disease. Here, we modulated the severity of the AKI-like response in Cys1(cpk/cpk) mice, a model that mimics autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Specifically, we induced or inhibited activity of the renoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) and determined the effects on renal cystogenesis. We found that induction of HO attenuated both renal injury and the rate of cystogenesis, whereas inhibition of HO promoted cystogenesis. HO activity mediated the response of NFκB, which is a hallmark transcriptional feature common to both cystogenesis and AKI. Among the HO-modulated effects we measured, expression of complement component 3 (C3) strongly correlated with cystogenesis, a functionally relevant association as suggested by Cys1(cpk/cpk) mice with genetically induced C3 deficiency. Because both C3 deficiency and HO induction reduce cyst number and cyst areas, these two factors define an injury-stimulated cystogenic pathway that may provide therapeutic targets to slow the formation of new renal cysts and the growth of existing cysts. PMID:22518005

  1. Complement inhibition in biomaterial- and biosurface-induced thromboinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Huang, Shan; Nilsson, Bo; Teramura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic medicine today includes a vast number of procedures involving the use of biomaterials, transplantation of therapeutic cells or cell clusters, as well as of solid organs. These treatment modalities are obviously of great benefit to the patient, but also present a great challenge to the innate immune system, since they involve direct exposure of non-biological materials, cells of non-hematological origin as well as endothelial cells, damaged by ischemia-perfusion in solid organs to proteins and cells in the blood. The result of such an exposure may be an inappropriate activation of the complement and contact/kallikrein systems, which produce mediators capable of triggering the platelets and PMNs and monocytes, which can ultimately result in thrombotic and inflammatory (i.e., a thrombo-inflammatory) response to the treatment modality. In this concept review, we give an overview of the mechanisms of recognition within the innate immunity system, with the aim to identify suitable points for intervention. Finally, we discuss emerging and promising techniques for surface modification of biomaterials and cells with specific inhibitors in order to diminish thromboinflammation and improve clinical outcome.

  2. Complement receptor 1 and the molecular pathogenesis of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a pathogenic infection caused by protozoa of the genus plasmodium. It is mainly confined to sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and South America. This disease claims the life of over 1.5 to 2.7 million people per year. Owing to such a high incidence of malarial infections, there is an urgent need for the development of suitable vaccines. For the development of ideal vaccines, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of malarial pathogenesis and the factors that lead to malaria infection. Genetic factors have been proposed to play an important role in malarial pathogenesis. Complement receptor 1 (CR1 is an important host red blood cell protein involved in interaction with malarial parasite. Various polymorphic forms of CR1 have been found to be involved in conferring protection or increasing susceptibility to malaria infections. Low-density allele (L of CR1 gave contradictory results in different set of studies. In addition, Knops polymorphic forms Sl (a + and McC (a have been found to contribute more towards the occurrence of cerebral malaria in malaria endemic regions compared to individuals with Sl (a - / McC (a/b genotype. This article reviews the research currently going on in this area and throws light on as yet unresolved mysteries of the role of CR1 in malarial pathogenesis.

  3. Cloning and molecular characterization of complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β (C8β) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Anyuan; Yang, Jie; Tang, Shoujie; Wang, Chenghui

    2013-09-01

    Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the most important groups of food fishes in the world, has frequently suffered from serious challenge from pathogens in recent years. Immune responses of Nile tilapia should be understood to protect the aquaculture industry of this fish. The complement system has an important function in recognizing bacteria, opsonizing these pathogens by phagocytes, or killing them by direct lysis. In this study, two Nile tilapia complement component genes, complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β subunit (C8β), were cloned and their expression characteristics were analyzed. C1INH cDNA was found containing a 1791 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein with 597 amino acids, a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 236 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein structure for this gene consisted of two Ig-like domains and glycosyl hydrolase family-9 active site signature 2. The C8β cDNA consisted of a 1761 bp ORF encoding 587 amino acids, a 15 bp 5'-UTR and a 170 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein of C8β contained three motifs, thrombospondin type-1 repeat, membrane attack complex/perforin domain, and LDL-receptor class A. Expression analysis revealed that these two complement genes were highly expressed in the liver, however, were weakly expressed in the gill, heart, brain, kidney, intestine, spleen and dorsal muscle tissues. The present study provided insights into the complement system and immune functions of Nile tilapia.

  4. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  5. Proteolytic inactivation of nuclear alarmin high-mobility group box 1 by complement protease C1s during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, J G; Leong, J; Arkachaisri, T; Cai, Y; Teo, B H D; Tan, J H T; Das, L; Lu, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes prevents the release of intracellular alarmins and manifestation of autoimmunity. This prompt efferocytosis is complemented by intracellular proteolytic degradation that occurs within the apoptotic cells and in the efferosome of the phagocytes. Although the role of extracellular proteases in apoptotic cells clearance is unknown, the strong association of congenital C1s deficiency with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus highlights the protective nature that this extracellular protease has against autoimmunity. The archetypical role of serine protease C1s as the catalytic arm of C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2) involve in the propagation of the classical complement pathway could not provide the biological basis for this association. However, a recent observation of the ability of C1 complex to cleave a spectrum of intracellular cryptic targets exposed during apoptosis provides a valuable insight to the underlying protective mechanism. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an intracellular alarmin that is capable of inducing the formation of antinuclear autoantibodies and causes lupus-like conditions in mice, is identified as a novel potential target by bioinformatics analysis. This is verified experimentally with C1s, both in its purified and physiological form as C1 complex, cleaving HMGB1 into defined fragments of 19 and 12 kDa. This cleavage diminishes HMGB1 ability to enhance lipopolysaccharide mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines production from monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Further mass spectrometric analysis of the C1 complex treated apoptotic cellular proteins demonstrated additional C1s substrates and revealed the complementary role of C1s in apoptotic cells clearance through the proteolytic cleavage of intracellular alarmins and autoantigens. C1 complex may have evolved as, besides the bacteriolytic arm of antibodies in which it activates the complement cascade, a tissue renewal mechanism that reduces the

  6. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  7. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development.

  8. Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2015-08-01

    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6.20 and 6.06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively - the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.

  9. Anti-phospholipid antibodies restore mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury in complement receptor 2/complement receptor 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sherry D; Egan, Ryan P; Chai, Chunyan; Girardi, Guillermina; Holers, V Michael; Salmon, Jane; Monestier, Marc; Tsokos, George C

    2004-12-01

    Complement receptor 2-deficient (Cr2(-/-)) mice are resistant to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury because they lack a component of the natural Ab repertoire. Neither the nature of the Abs that are involved in I/R injury nor the composition of the target Ag, to which recognition is lacking in Cr2(-/-) mice, is known. Because anti-phospholipid Abs have been shown to mediate fetal growth retardation and loss when injected into pregnant mice, we performed experiments to determine whether anti-phospholipid Abs can also reconstitute I/R injury and, therefore, represent members of the injury-inducing repertoire that is missing in Cr2(-/-) mice. We demonstrate that both murine and human monoclonal and polyclonal Abs against negatively charged phospholipids can reconstitute mesenteric I/R-induced intestinal and lung tissue damage in Cr2(-/-) mice. In addition, Abs against beta2 glycoprotein I restore local and remote tissue damage in the Cr2(-/-) mice. Unlike Cr2(-/-) mice, reconstitution of I/R tissue damage in the injury-resistant Rag-1(-/-) mouse required the infusion of both anti-beta2-glycoprotein I and anti-phospholipid Ab. We conclude that anti-phospholipid Abs can bind to tissues subjected to I/R insult and mediate tissue damage. PMID:15557203

  10. Defining urban agglomerations to detect agglomeration economies

    CERN Document Server

    Cottineau, Clementine; Hatna, Erez; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are a persistent subject of debate among economists and urban planners. Their definition turns on whether or not larger cities and regions are more efficient and more productive than smaller ones. We complement existing discussion on agglomeration economies and the urban wage premium here by providing a sensitivity analysis of estimated coefficients to different delineations of urban agglomeration as well as to different definitions of the economic measure that summarises the urban premium. This quantity can consist of total wages measured at the place of work, or of income registered at the place of residence. The chosen option influences the scaling behaviour of city size as well as the spatial distribution of the phenomenon at the city level. Spatial discrepancies between the distribution of jobs and the distribution of households at different economic levels makes city definitions crucial to the estimation of economic relations which vary with city size. We argue this point by regr...

  11. Complement component C7 deficiency in a Spanish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Bermúdez, M F; Barroso, S; Walter, K; Alvarez, A J; Alarcón, A; López-Trascasa, M; Wichmann, I; Aguilar, F; Núñez-Roldán, A; Sánchez, B

    2003-08-01

    Different genetic mutations have been described in complement component C7 deficiency, a molecular defect which is clinically associated with an increased susceptibility to neisserial recurrent infections, although some cases remain asymptomatic. In this work we report the genetic bases of C7 deficiency in one Spanish family. Exon-specific PCR and sequencing revealed a novel point mutation at nucleotide 615 (exon 6) leading to a stop codon (UGG to UGA) in the patient, his mother, and sister. This transversion causes the premature truncation of the C7 protein (W183X). Additionally, we detected a missense mutation at position 1135 (exon 9) located in the first nucleotide of the codon GGG (CGG), resulting in an amino acid change (G357R) in the patient, his father, as well as in his sister. This latter mutation had been previously described in individuals from Moroccan Sephardic Jewish ancestry. Since both heterozygous mutations were found in the patient as well as in his asymptomatic sister, we analyse other meningococcal defence mechanisms such as polymorphisms of the opsonin receptors on polymorphonuclear cells. Results showed that the patient and his sister bore identical combinations of FcgammaRIIA-H/R131 and FcgammaRIIIB-NA1/2 allotypes. Our results provide further evidence that the molecular pathogenesis of C7 deficiency as well as susceptibility to meningococcal disease are heterogeneous, since different families carry different molecular defects, although many of the C7 defects appear to be homogeneous in individuals from certain geographical areas. The missense mutation G357R would make an interesting topic of analysis with regard to meningococcal disease susceptibility in the Spanish population. PMID:12869030

  12. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  13. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this research is to propose a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-band, multi-mode, miniaturized frequency-agile EVA software defined radio...

  14. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI is actively developing Software Defined Radio platforms that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation by modifying both transmit waveforms and...

  15. Defining of the BDX930 Assembly Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, R. S.; Moore, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A definition of the BDX930 assembly language is presented. Various definition problems and suggested solutions are included. A class of defined recognizers based on boolean valued nowrecursive functions is employed in preprocessing.

  16. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of Phase 2 is to build a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-mode, miniaturized EVA Software Defined Radio (SDR) that supports data telemetry,...

  17. Radiation Tolerant Software Defined Video Processor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MaXentric's is proposing a radiation tolerant Software Define Video Processor, codenamed SDVP, for the problem of advanced motion imaging in the space environment....

  18. How Innovation Systems and Development Theories complement each other

    OpenAIRE

    Natera, Jose Miguel; Pansera, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims at comparing some of the most influential theories of development with the notion of Innovation Systems (IS). The objective is to understand if this comparison can be used to delve into the role of innovation within the development process. We start defining the main features that characterizes Innovation Systems. Then we contrast it with different branches of development theories: the Sen’s theory of capability building and the Institutionalism, the neo-classic approach and cu...

  19. Optimum Criteria for Developing Defined Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic aspects concerning distributed applications are presented: definition, particularities and importance. For distributed applications linear, arborescent, graph structures are defined with different versions and aggregation methods. Distributed applications have associated structures which through their characteristics influence the costs of the stages in the development cycle and the exploitation costs transferred to each user. The complexity of the defined structures is analyzed. The minimum and maximum criteria are enumerated for optimizing distributed application structures.

  20. User Defined Spreadsheet Functions in Excel

    OpenAIRE

    Tyszkiewicz, Jerzy; Balson, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    Creating user defined functions (UDFs) is a powerful method to improve the quality of computer applications, in particular spreadsheets. However, the only direct way to use UDFs in spreadsheets is to switch from the functional and declarative style of spreadsheet formulas to the imperative VBA, which creates a high entry barrier even for proficient spreadsheet users. It has been proposed to extend Excel by UDFs declared by a spreadsheet: user defined spreadsheet functions (UDSFs). In this pap...