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Sample records for bimodal space power

  1. Alert-derivative bimodal space power and propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe, reliable, low-mass bimodal space power and propulsion systems could have numerous civilian and military applications. This paper discusses potential bimodal systems that could be derived from the ALERT space fission power supply concept. These bimodal concepts have the potential for providing 5 to 10 kW of electrical power and a total impulse of 100 MN-s at an average specific impulse of 770 s. System mass is on the order of 1000 kg

  2. Innovative Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible

  3. Bimodal space nuclear power system with fast reactor and Topaz II-type single-cell TFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with characteristics and conceptual studies of a bimodal space thermionic system with a fast reactor and single-cell TFEs which is designed to operate in two modes: rated power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 10 endash 80 kW(e) and forced thermal propulsion mode with thrust of 2200 N. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Bimodal space nuclear power system with fast reactor and Topaz II-type single-cell TFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A.; Ogloblin, B. G.; Shalaev, A. I.; Klimov, A. V.; Kirillov, E. Ya.; Shumov, D. P.; Radchenko, I. S.; Nicolaev, Y. V.

    1996-03-01

    The paper deals with characteristics and conceptual studies of a bimodal space thermionic system with a fast reactor and single-cell TFEs which is designed to operate in two modes: rated power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 10-80 kW(e) and forced thermal propulsion mode with thrust of 2200 N.

  5. Integrated propulsion and power modeling for bimodal nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Joshua

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) engines have been shown to reduce the weight of space vehicles to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by utilizing a common reactor for propulsion and power generation. These savings lead to reduced launch vehicle costs and/or increased mission safety and capability. Experimental work of the Rover/NERVA program demonstrated the feasibility of NTR systems for trajectories to Mars. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated the economic and performance benefits of BNTR operation. Relatively little, however, is known about the reactor-level operation of a BNTR engine. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a numerical BNTR engine model in order to study the feasibility and component-level impact of utilizing a NERVA-derived reactor as a heat source for both propulsion and power. The primary contribution is to provide the first-of-its-kind model and analysis of a NERVA-derived BNTR engine. Numerical component models have been modified and created for the NERVA reactor fuel elements and tie tubes, including 1-D coolant thermodynamics and radial thermal conduction with heat generation. A BNTR engine system model has been created in order to design and analyze an engine employing an expander-cycle nuclear rocket and Brayton cycle power generator using the same reactor. Design point results show that a 316 MWt reactor produces a thrust and specific impulse of 66.6 kN and 917 s, respectively. The same reactor can be run at 73.8 kWt to produce the necessary 16.7 kW electric power with a Brayton cycle generator. This demonstrates the feasibility of BNTR operation with a NERVA-derived reactor but also indicates that the reactor control system must be able to operate with precision across a wide power range, and that the transient analysis of reactor decay heat merits future investigation. Results also identify a significant reactor pressure-drop limitation during propulsion and power-generation operation that is caused by poor tie tube

  6. Design and physical studies of fast reactor for bimodal space thermionic system with single-cell TFEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, E. Ya.; Klimov, A. V.; Ogloblin, B. G.; Radchenko, I. S.; Shumov, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the design studies and results of neutron-physical calculations of a fast nuclear reactor of a bimodal space thermionic system with single-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFE) designed for operation in two modes. These modes are (a) the propulsion mode making possible the system movement in outer space by the use of a reactive thrust generated by hydrogen heated in the reactor and (b) the electric power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 40kW(e) for a long time. The paper also discusses the problems of nuclear reactor safeguarding in an emergency.

  7. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low

  8. Assessment of an SP-100 bi-modal propulsion and power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, J. J.; Demuth, S.; Huber, T.

    1993-02-01

    The attractiveness of using the SP-100 space nuclear power system for both electric power production and direct thermal propulsion is discussed. A conceptual modification to the SP-100 generic flight system that uses its hot, primary coolant to directly heat hydrogen propellant is presented. An analytical model of the system and its orbital-mechanical behavior is presented and used to assess the benefits of a number of orbital transfer missions. Both a 500 kW and a 2.4 MW system are assessed. Preliminary results indicate that for LEO-to-GEO transfers, the SP-100 bimodal system offers a 100% increase in payload over conventional chemical-only propulsion systems with transfer times on the order of days.

  9. Design and physical studies of fast reactor for bimodal space thermionic system with single-cell TFEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the design studies and results of neutron-physical calculations of a fast nuclear reactor of a bimodal space thermionic system with single-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFE) designed for operation in two modes. These modes are (a) the propulsion mode making possible the system movement in outer space by the use of a reactive thrust generated by hydrogen heated in the reactor and (b) the electric power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 40kW(e) for a long time. The paper also discusses the problems of nuclear reactor safeguarding in an emergency. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. An examination of bimodal nuclear power and propulsion benefits for outer solar system missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubrin, R. [Lockheed Martin Atronautics, PO Box 179, Denver, Colorado 80201 (United States); Mondt, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of the NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. The radiological hazard associated with using Earth gravity assists on such missions was examined and shown to be small compared to that currently accepted on Earth fly-by missions involving RTGs. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive options for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Pluto/Charon exploration utilizing a bi-modal PBR nuclear propulsion/power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetoklis, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a Pluto/Charon orbiter utilizing a bi-modal nuclear propulsion and power system based on the Particle Bed Reactor. The orbiter is sized for launch to Nuclear-Safe orbit atop a Titan IV or equivalent launch veicle. The bi-modal system provides thermal propulsion for Earth orbital departure and Pluto orbital capture, and 10 kWe of electric power for payload functions and for in-system maneuvering with ion thrusters. Ion thrusters are used to perform inclination changes about Pluto, a transfer from low Pluto orbit to low Charon orbit, and inclination changes about charon. A nominal payload can be deliverd in as little as 15 years, 1000 kg in 17 years, and close to 2000 kg in 20 years. Scientific return is enormously aided by the availability of up to 10 kWe, due to greater data transfer rates and more/better instruments. The bi-modal system can provide power at Pluto/Charon for 10 or more years, enabling an extremely robust, scientifically rewarding, and cost-effective exploration mission.

  12. Space Solar Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

    1992-08-01

    Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

  13. Cermet fuels for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A refractory-metal matrix, UN-fueled cermet is a very promising fuel candidate for a wide range of multi-megawatt space reactor systems, e.g., steady-state, flexible duty-cycle, or bimodal, single- or two-phase liquid-metal cooled reactors, or thermionic reactors. Cermet fuel is especially promising for reactor designs that require operational strategies which incorporate rapid power changes because of its anticipated capability to withstand thermal shock

  14. Development of a steady state creep behavior model of polycrystalline tungsten for bimodal space reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, A.; Hanan, N.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Gruber, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The fuel element for one of the many reactor concepts being currently evaluated for bimodal applications in space consists of spherical fuel particles clad with tungsten or alloys of tungsten. The fuel itself consists of stabilized UO{sub 2}. One of the life limiting phenomena for the fuel element is failure of the cladding because of creep deformation. This report summarizes the information available in literature regarding the creep deformation of tungsten and its alloys and proposes a relation to be used for calculating the creep strains for elevated temperatures in the low stress region ({sigma} {le} 20 MPa). Also, results of the application of this creep relation to one of the reactor design concepts (NEBA-3) are discussed. Based on the traditional definition of creep deformation, the temperatures of 1500 K to 2900 K for tungsten and its alloys are considered to be in the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} temperature range. In this temperature range, the rate controlling mechanisms for creep deformation are believed to be non-conservative motion of screw dislocations and short circuit diffusional paths. Extensive theoretical work on creep and in particular for creep of tungsten and its alloys have been reported in the literature. These theoretical efforts have produced complex mathematical models that require detailed materials properties. These relations, however, are not presently suitable for the creep analysis because of lack of consistent material properties required for their use. Variations in material chemistry and thermomechanical pre-treatment of tungsten have significant effects on creep and the mechanical properties. Analysis of the theoretical models and limited data indicates that the following empirical relation originally proposed by M. Jacox of INEL and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, for calculating creep deformation of tungsten cladding, can be used for the downselection of preliminary bimodal reactor design concepts.

  15. Space power subsystem sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a Space Power Subsystem Sizing program which has been developed by the Aerospace Power Division of Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The Space Power Subsystem program (SPSS) contains the necessary equations and algorithms to calculate photovoltaic array power performance, including end-of-life (EOL) and beginning-of-life (BOL) specific power (W/kg) and areal power density (W/m2). Additional equations and algorithms are included in the spreadsheet for determining maximum eclipse time as a function of orbital altitude, and inclination. The Space Power Subsystem Sizing program (SPSS) has been used to determine the performance of several candidate power subsystems for both Air Force and SDIO potential applications. Trade-offs have been made between subsystem weight and areal power density (W/m2) as influenced by orbital high energy particle flux and time in orbit

  16. Nuclear Power in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In the early years of the United States space program, lightweight batteries, fuel cells, and solar modules provided electric power for space missions. As missions became more ambitious and complex, power needs increased and scientists investigated various options to meet these challenging power requirements. One of the options was nuclear energy. By the mid-1950s, research had begun in earnest on ways to use nuclear power in space. These efforts resulted in the first radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are nuclear power generators build specifically for space and special terrestrial uses. These RTGs convert the heat generated from the natural decay of their radioactive fuel into electricity. RTGs have powered many spacecraft used for exploring the outer planets of the solar system and orbiting the sun and Earth. They have also landed on Mars and the moon. They provide the power that enables us to see and learn about even the farthermost objects in our solar system.

  17. Power engineering in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long and reliable functioning of the space vehicles depends in many respects on the reliability of their power facilities. The solar batteries with the operating life of 10-15 years constitute the power basis of the operating space vehicles. The growing requirements of the space power engineering present the incentive for further development and improvement of the solar and storage batteries. The characteristics and operating life of the modern storage batteries of various types are presented. Apart from this the alternative projects of the space engines on the basis of the nuclear power facilities with the liquid metal (Na, Li) or gaseous (Na, He, Xe) coolants are developed in the USA, Germany and Russia, which make it possible to obtain the thermal (1-5 MW) and electric (50-100 kW) power capacity

  18. Commercial microwave space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on central commercial space power, generating power via large scale solar arrays, and distributing power to satellites via docking, tethering or beamed power such as microwave or laser beams, that is being investigated as a potentially advantageous alternative to present day technology where each satellite carries its own power generating capability. The cost, size and weight for electrical power service, together with overall mission requirements and flexibility are the principal selection criteria, with the case of standard solar array panels based on the satellite, as the reference point. This paper presents and investigates a current technology design point for beamed microwave commercial space power. The design point requires that 25 kW be delivered to the user load with 30% overall system efficiency. The key elements of the design point are: An efficient rectenna at the user end; a high gain, low beam width, efficient antenna at the central space power station end, a reliable and efficient cw microwave tube. Design trades to optimize the proposed near term design point and to explore characteristics of future systems were performed. Future development for making the beamed microwave space power approach more competitive against docking and tethering are discussed

  19. Distributed Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of safely collecting solar power at geostationary orbit and delivering it to earth. A strategy which could harness a small fraction of the millions of gigawatts of sunlight passing near earth could adequately supply the power needs of earth and those of space exploration far into the future. Light collected and enhanced both spatially and temporally in space and beamed to earth provides probably the only practical means of safe and efficient delivery of this space solar power to earth. In particular, we analyzed the feasibility of delivering power to sites on earth at a comparable intensity, after conversion to a usable form, to existing power needs. Two major obstacles in the delivery of space solar power to earth are safety and the development of a source suitable for space. We focused our approach on: (1) identifying system requirements and designing a strategy satisfying current eye and skin safety requirements; and (2) identifying a concept for a potential space-based source for producing the enhanced light.

  20. Cermet-fueled space reactor for multimegawatt power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bimodal, cermet-fueled, nuclear space power system which provides 10 MWe of power for long-term, continuous operation and 500 MWe of power for burst operation is described. The cermet fuel for the nuclear system consists of a tungsten-urania, hexagonal matrix which is characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures and a high thermal conductivity. High-temperature qualification tests for the cermet fuel were carried out in the 1960s. The results of this program are utilized as a starting point for the conceptual design of a bimodal configuration with coolant exit temperatures exceeding 2400 K and a power density greater than 2400 W/cu cm. It is concluded that with an aggressive development program the cermet-fueled nuclear power system can be utilized to meet the multimegawatt requirements for high temperatures, high power densities, and long lifetimes

  1. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  2. Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Fission power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system.

  3. Space technology needs nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space technology needs nuclear power to solve its future problems. Manned space flight to Mars is hardly feasible without nuclear propulsion, and orbital nuclear power lants will be necessary to supply power to large satellites or large space stations. Nuclear power also needs space technology. A nuclear power plant sited on the moon is not going to upset anybody, because of the high natural background radiation level existing there, and could contribute to terrestrial power supply. (orig./HP)

  4. Advanced space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of electrical power source concepts for application to near term space missions is presented along with a comparison of their weight and area estimates. The power sources reviewed include photovoltaic solar arrays, solar concentrators, radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystems (DIPS) and nuclear reactors. The solar arrays are found to be the lightest systems in the 1-6 kWe range for a 10 year mission life but they have the largest area of the practicable sources. Solar dynamics has the smallest area of the solar systems and has the lightest mass above 20 kWe of all the solar sources when a closed Brayton cycle power conversion system is used. The DIPS is the lightest weight system from 6 to 11 kWe above which the thermionic reactor is the lightest assuming a 38 foot boom is used to minimize shield weight

  5. Heatpipe space power and propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe, reliable, low-mass space power and propulsion systems could have numerous civilian and military applications. This paper discusses two fission-powered concepts: the Heatpipe Power System (HPS), which provides power only; and the Heatpipe Bimodal System (HBS), which provides both power and thermal propulsion. Both concepts have 10 important features. First, only existing technology and recently tested fuel forms are used. Second, fuel can be removed whenever desired, which greatly facilitates system fabrication and handling. Third, full electrically heated system testing of all modes is possible, with minimal operations required to replace the heaters with fuel and to ready the system for launch. Fourth, the systems are passively subcritical during launch accidents. Fifth, a modular approach is used, and most technical issues can be resolved with inexpensive module tests. Sixth, bonds between dissimilar metals are minimized. Seventh, there are no single-point failures during power mode operation. Eighth, the fuel burnup rate is quite low to help ensure approx-gt 10-yr system life. Ninth, there are no pumped coolant loops, and the systems can be shut down and restarted without coolant freeze/thaw concerns. Finally, full ground nuclear test is not needed, and development costs will be low. One design for a low-power HPS uses SNAP-10A-style thermoelectric power converters to produce 5 kWe at a system mass of ∼500 kg. The unicouple thermoelectric converters have a hot-shoe temperature of 1275 K and reject waste heat at 775 K. This type of thermoelectric converter has been used extensively by the space program and has demonstrated an operational lifetime of decades. A core with a larger number of smaller modules (same overall size) can be used to provide up to 500 kWt to a power conversion subsystem, and a slightly larger core using a higher heatpipe to fuel ratio can provide approx-gt 1 MWt. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. Selection of higher eigenmode amplitude based on dissipated power and virial contrast in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Alfredo J.; Eslami, Babak; López-Guerra, Enrique A.; Solares, Santiago D., E-mail: ssolares@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    This paper explores the effect of the amplitude ratio of the higher to the fundamental eigenmode in bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the phase contrast and the dissipated power contrast of the higher eigenmode. We explore the optimization of the amplitude ratio in order to maximize the type of contrast that is most relevant to the particular study. Specifically, we show that the trends in the contrast range behave differently for different quantities, especially the dissipated power and the phase, with the former being more meaningful than the latter (a similar analysis can be carried out using the virial, for which we also provide a brief example). Our work is based on numerical simulations using two different conservative-dissipative tip-sample models, including the standard linear solid and the combination of a dissipation coefficient with a conservative model, as well as experimental images of thin film Nafion{sup ®} proton exchange polymers. We focus on the original bimodal AFM method, where the higher eigenmode is driven with constant amplitude and frequency (i.e., in “open loop”).

  7. Free-space power transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center organized a workshop on technology availability for free-space power transmission (beam power). This document contains a collection of viewgraph presentations that describes the effort by academia, industry, and the national laboratories in the area of high-frequency, high-power technology applicable to free-space power transmission systems. The areas covered were rectenna technology, high-frequency, high-power generation (gyrotrons, solar pumped lasers, and free electron lasers), and antenna technology.

  8. Bimodal Bilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; Borinstein, Helsa B.; Thompson, Robin; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2008-01-01

    Speech-sign or "bimodal" bilingualism is exceptional because distinct modalities allow for simultaneous production of two languages. We investigated the ramifications of this phenomenon for models of language production by eliciting language mixing from eleven hearing native users of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Instead of switching…

  9. Space power station. Uchu hatsuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, I. (Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-02-20

    A calculation tells that the amount of electric power the world will use in the future will require 100 to 500 power plants each with an output of 5-GW class. If this conception is true, it is beyond dispute that utilizing nuclear power will constitute a core of the power generation even though the geographical conditions are severe for nuclear power plants. It is also certain that power generation using clean solar energy will play important roles if power supply stability can be achieved. This paper describes plans to develop space solar power generation and space nuclear power generation that can supply power solving problems concerning geographical conditions and power supply stability. The space solar power generation is a system to arrest solar energy on a static orbit. According to a result of discussions in the U.S.A., the plan calls for solar cell sheets spread over the surface of a structure with a size of 5 km [times] 10 km [times] 0.5 km thick, and electric power obtained therefrom is transmitted to a rectenna with a size of 10 km [times] 13 km, a receiving antenna on the ground. The space nuclear power generation will be constructed similarly on a static orbit. Researches on space nuclear reactors have already begun. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Power beaming providing a space power infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper, based on two levels of technology maturity, applied the power beaming concept to four panned satellite constellations. The analysis shows that with currently available technology, power beaming can provide mass savings to constellations in orbits ranging from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit. Two constellations, space surveillance and tracking system and space-based radar, can be supported with current technology. The other two constellations, space-based laser array and boost surveillance and tracking system, will require power and transmission system improvements before their breakeven specific mass is achieved. A doubling of SP-100 conversion efficiency from 10 to 20% would meet or exceed breakeven for these constellations

  11. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  12. Space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials of the 19-th Symposium on Space Nuclear Energetic and Engine Units taking place in 2002, in Albuquerque, USA are reviewed. Reports on transformation of heat energy produced by nuclear reactors in electrical one are presented in the reports. Result of works on improvement as traditional (Brayton and Rankine cycles, thermoelectricity and thermionic emission), so innovation converter systems (Stirling engine, alkali metal thermal to electric converter - AMTEC, thermoacoustic engine) are represented

  13. Power systems for space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipbaugh, Calvin; Solomon, Kenneth A.

    The Outreach Program was designed to solicit creative ideas from academia, research institutions, private enterprises, and the general public and is intended to be helpful in defining promising technical areas and program paths for more detailed study. To the Outreach Program, a number of power system concepts were proposed. In conclusion, there are a number of advanced concepts for space power and propulsion sources that deserve study if we want to expand our ability to not only explore space, but to utilize it. Advanced nuclear concepts and power beaming concepts are two areas worthy of detailed assessments.

  14. Nuclear space power and propulsion requirements and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear power in space is going through a low point. The kinds of missions that would use nuclear power are expensive and there are few new expensive missions. Both NASA and DoD are in a mode of cheaper, faster, better, which means using what is available as much as possible and only incorporating new technology to reduce mission cost. NASA is performing Mission to Planet Earth and detailed exploration missions of Mars. These NASA missions can be done with solar-battery power subsystems and there is no need for nuclear power. The NASA mission to Pluto does require nuclear radioisotope power. Ways to reduce the power subsystem cost and the power level are being investigated. NASA is studying ways to explore beyond Mars with solar-battery power because of the cost and uncertainty in the availability and launchability of nuclear space power systems. The DoD missions are all in earth orbit and can be done with solar-battery systems. The major DoD requirement at present is to reduce costs of all their space missions. One way to do this is to develop highly efficient upper stage boosters that can be integrated with lower cost Earth to low orbit stages and still place their payloads in to higher orbits. One attractive upper stage is a nuclear bimodal (propulsion and power) engine to accomplished lower booster cost to place space assets in GEO. However this is not being pursued because of DOE's new policy not to fund nuclear space power research and development as well as the difficulty in obtaining launch approval for nuclear propulsion and power systems

  15. Nuclear space power and propulsion requirements and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swerdling, M. [IR Associates, North Hills, CA (United States); Isenberg, L. [IR Associates, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The use of nuclear power in space is going through a low point. The kinds of missions that would use nuclear power are expensive and there are few new expensive missions. Both NASA and DoD are in a mode of cheaper, faster, better, which means using what is available as much as possible and only incorporating new technology to reduce mission cost. NASA is performing Mission to Planet Earth and detailed exploration missions of Mars. These NASA missions can be done with solar-battery power subsystems and there is no need for nuclear power. The NASA mission to Pluto does require nuclear radioisotope power. Ways to reduce the power subsystem cost and the power level are being investigated. NASA is studying ways to explore beyond Mars with solar-battery power because of the cost and uncertainty in the availability and launchability of nuclear space power systems. The DoD missions are all in earth orbit and can be done with solar-battery systems. The major DoD requirement at present is to reduce costs of all their space missions. One way to do this is to develop highly efficient upper stage boosters that can be integrated with lower cost Earth to low orbit stages and still place their payloads in to higher orbits. One attractive upper stage is a nuclear bimodal (propulsion and power) engine to accomplished lower booster cost to place space assets in GEO. However this is not being pursued because of DOE`s new policy not to fund nuclear space power research and development as well as the difficulty in obtaining launch approval for nuclear propulsion and power systems.

  16. Space Solar Power: Satellite Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Frank E.

    1999-01-01

    Space Solar Power (SSP) applies broadly to the use of solar power for space related applications. The thrust of the NASA SSP initiative is to develop concepts and demonstrate technology for applying space solar power to NASA missions. Providing power from satellites in space via wireless transmission to a receiving station either on earth, another celestial body or a second satellite is one goal of the SSP initiative. The sandwich design is a satellite design in which the microwave transmitting array is the front face of a thin disk and the back of the disk is populated with solar cells, with the microwave electronics in between. The transmitter remains aimed at the earth in geostationary orbit while a system of mirrors directs sunlight to the photovoltaic cells, regardless of the satellite's orientation to the sun. The primary advantage of the sandwich design is it eliminates the need for a massive and complex electric power management and distribution system for the satellite. However, it requires a complex system for focusing sunlight onto the photovoltaic cells. In addition, positioning the photovoltaic array directly behind the transmitting array power conversion electronics will create a thermal management challenge. This project focused on developing designs and finding emerging technology to meet the challenges of solar tracking, a concentrating mirror system including materials and coatings, improved photovoltaic materials and thermal management.

  17. Reactor power for space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential 21st century missions envisioned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planners encompass ambitious, wide-ranging human and robotic solar system exploration objectives and scenarios. A critical common element in many of these future civil space mission initiatives is the ability to generate, with a very high degree of reliability, the considerable amounts of power needed to realize the mission goals. The extended duration and/or high power level requirements for many missions and, in instances, the lack of adequate solar energy flux for others, render the use of versatile nuclear power sources as either missions-enabling or very advantageous. Further, the use of high-performance reactor systems, when coupled with very high impulse electric propulsion systems, can enable or significantly enhance both human near-planets operations and robotic scientific missions to the very farthest reaches of the solar system. It is important that this nation continue to develop the means of acquiring a space reactor power source to ensure availability at such time that approved missions and possibly political considerations warrant its use

  18. Space power technology 21: Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The Space Power needs for the 21st Century and the program in photovoltaics needed to achieve it are discussed. Workshops were conducted in eight different power disciplines involving industry and other government agencies. The Photovoltaics Workshop was conducted at Aerospace Corporation in June 1987. The major findings and recommended program from this workshop are discussed. The major finding is that a survivable solar power capability is needed in photovoltaics for critical Department of Defense missions including Air Force and Strategic Defense Initiative. The tasks needed to realize this capability are described in technical, not financial, terms. The second finding is the need for lightweight, moderately survivable planar solar arrays. High efficiency thin III-V solar cells can meet some of these requirements. Higher efficiency, longer life solar cells are needed for application to both future planar and concentrator arrays with usable life up to 10 years. Increasing threats are also anticipated and means for avoiding prolonged exposure, retraction, maneuvering and autonomous operation are discussed.

  19. Atomic power in space: A history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Atomic Power in Space,'' a history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States, covers the period from the program's inception in the mid-1950s through 1982. Written in non-technical language, the history is addressed to both the general public and those more specialized in nuclear and space technologies. 19 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Space nuclear power and man's extraterrestrial civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines leading space nuclear power technology candidates. Particular emphasis is given the heat-pipe reactor technology currently under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This program is aimed at developing a 10-100 kWe, 7-year lifetime space nuclear power plant. As the demand for space-based power reaches megawatt levels, other nuclear reactor designs including: solid core, fluidized bed, and gaseous core, are considered

  1. Atomic Power in Space: A History

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    "Atomic Power in Space," a history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States, covers the period from the program's inception in the mid-1950s through 1982. Written in non-technical language, the history is addressed to both the general public and those more specialized in nuclear and space technologies. Interplanetary space exploration successes and achievements have been made possible by this technology, for which there is no known substitue.

  2. Emerging US Space Launch, Trends and Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Reviews the state of the art of emerging US space launch and spacecraft. Reviews the NASA budget ascontext, while providing example scenarios. Connects what has been learned in space systems commercial partnershipsto a potential path for consideration by the space solar power community.

  3. Irreducible complexity of iterated symmetric bimodal maps

    OpenAIRE

    Lampreia, J. P.; Severino, R.; J. Sousa Ramos

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a tree structure for the iterates of symmetric bimodal maps and identify a subset which we prove to be isomorphic to the family of unimodal maps. This subset is used as a second factor for a $\\ast $-product that we define in the space of bimodal kneading sequences. Finally, we give some properties for this product and study the *-product induced on the associated Markov shifts.

  4. Irreducible complexity of iterated symmetric bimodal maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lampreia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a tree structure for the iterates of symmetric bimodal maps and identify a subset which we prove to be isomorphic to the family of unimodal maps. This subset is used as a second factor for a ∗-product that we define in the space of bimodal kneading sequences. Finally, we give some properties for this product and study the ∗-product induced on the associated Markov shifts.

  5. Challenges for future space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forecasts of space power needs are presented. The needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self-sufficiency, and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations and from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Mars are determined. Future launch cost reductions are predicted. From these projections the performances necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options are identified. The availability of plentiful cost effective electric power and of low cost access to space are identified as crucial factors in the future extension of human presence in space

  6. In-Space Transportation for GEO Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A.; Donnahue, Benjamin B.; Henley, Mark W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes results of study tasks to evaluate design options for in-space transportation of geostationary Space Solar Power Satellites. Referring to the end-to-end architecture studies performed in 1988, this current activity focuses on transportation of Sun Tower satellite segments from an initial low Earth orbit altitude to a final position in geostationary orbit (GEO; i.e., 35,786 km altitude, circular, equatorial orbit). This report encompasses study activity for In-Space Transportation of GEO Space Solar Power (SSP) Satellites including: 1) assessment of requirements, 2) design of system concepts, 3) comparison of alternative system options, and 4) assessment of potential derivatives.

  7. Space nuclear power: a strategy for tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Energy: reliable, portable, abundant and low cost will be a most critical factor, perhaps the sine qua non, for the unfolding of man's permanent presence in space. Space-based nuclear power, in turn, is a key technology for developing such space platforms and the transportation systems necessary to service them. A strategy for meeting space power requirements is the development of a 100-kW(e) nuclear reactor system for high earth orbit missions, transportation from Shuttle orbits to geosynchronous orbit, and for outer planet exploration. The component technology for this nuclear power plant is now underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As permanent settlements are established on the Moon and in space, multimegawatt power plants will be needed. This would involve different technology similar to terrestrial nuclear power plants.

  8. Atomic power in space: A history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    ''Atomic Power in Space,'' a history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States, covers the period from the program's inception in the mid-1950s through 1982. Written in non-technical language, the history is addressed to both the general public and those more specialized in nuclear and space technologies. 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Models for multimegawatt space power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-06-01

    This report describes models for multimegawatt, space power systems which Sandia's Advanced Power Systems Division has constructed to help evaluate space power systems for SDI's Space Power Office. Five system models and models for associated components are presented for both open (power system waste products are exhausted into space) and closed (no waste products) systems: open, burst mode, hydrogen cooled nuclear reactor -- turboalternator system; open, hydrogen-oxygen combustion turboalternator system; closed, nuclear reactor powered Brayton cycle system; closed, liquid metal Rankine cycle system; and closed, in-core, reactor therminonic system. The models estimate performance and mass for the components in each of these systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Nuclear power: opening new vistas in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nation faces a wide range of future civilian and military mission opportunities in space. However, many of the power requirements for these applications are beyond the capabilities of currently available energy sources. Nuclear energy can provide a prime source of this enabling power and the Department of Energy is fully committed to meeting the engineering and management challenges in developing nuclear power for space applications. The elements of the department's current Space Nuclear Power Program: Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's), Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS), Multi-Hundred Kilowatt Space Reactor Power System (SP-100), and Multimegawatt (MMW) Reactor Concepts are summarized. Several aspects of these efforts are discussed including Safety, Mission Focus, and Technology Development

  11. Expert system for space power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and evaluation of space power supplies involves many qualitative, uncertain and heuristic factors that cannot be handled by conventional algorithmic computer programs. The authors are applying Artificial Intelligence/Expert Systems techniques to provide tools for designers and managers for the synthesis and analysis of space power supplies. The authors have evaluated the feasibility of an Expert System for the identification and selection of supplies for a wide range of NASA missions of various power levels (P) and durations

  12. Alternative power generation concepts for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of the NASA Space Station, there has emerged a general realization that large quantities of power in space are necessary and, in fact, enabling. This realization has led to the examination of alternative options to the ubiquitous solar array/battery power system. Several factors led to the consideration of solar dynamic and nuclear power systems. These include better scaling to high power levels, higher efficiency conversion and storage subsystems, and lower system specific mass. The objective of this paper is to present the results of trade and optimization studies that high-light the potential of solar and nuclear dynamic systems relative to photovoltaic power systems

  13. New generation of reactors for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear reactor power is expected to enable many new space missions that will require several times to several orders of magnitude anything flown in space to date. Power in the 100-kW range may be required in high earth orbit spacecraft and planetary exploration. The technology for this power system range is under development for the Department of Energy with the Los Alamos National Laboratory responsible for the critical components in the nuclear subsystem. The baseline design for this particular nuclear sybsystem technology is described in this paper; additionally, reactor technology is reviewed from previous space power programs, a preliminary assessment is made of technology candidates covering an extended power spectrum, and the status is given of other reactor technologies

  14. Inertial fusion power for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now considered very likely that within the next ten years, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) will have achieved high (10-100) gain (ratio of fusion energy produced to driver energy on target) in the laboratory. Current ICF power plant designs, based upon the most technologically advanced earthbound drivers, tend to be very high power (≅1000 MW/sub e/) and heavy (the Nova laser weighs about 500 tons without the building). Space power needs are currently much smaller than this (but are growing), and the space application places a premium on low mass and high efficiency. This paper evaluates current ICF driver and reactor alternative technologies using space power criteria. The authors also consider how current technologies might be altered to produce smaller, lighter fusion power sources for space. It is shown that the technologies currently leading for terrestrial application (emphasizing low development risk and low cost) are not the best ones for space power; however, technologies are identified that would result in attractive ICF space power plants an order of magnitude less massive

  15. Deep Space Cryogenic Power Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technology Application, Inc. (TAI) is proposing to demonstrate feasibility of implementing silicon germanium (SiGe) strained-gate technology in the power...

  16. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  17. New directions for space solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, John C.

    2009-07-01

    Several of the central issues associated with the eventual realization of the vision of solar power from space for terrestrial markets resolve around the expect costs associated with the assembly, inspection, maintenance and repair of future solar power satellite (SPS) stations. In past studies (for example, NASA's "Fresh Look Study", c. 1995-1997) efforts were made to reduce both the scale and mass of large, systems-level interfaces (e.g., the power management and distribution (PMAD) system) and on-orbit fixed infrastructures through the use of modular systems strategies. These efforts have had mixed success (as reflected in the projected on-orbit mass of various systems concepts. However, the author remains convinced of the importance of modular strategies for exceptionally large space systems in eventually realizing the vision of power from space. This paper will introduce some of the key issues associated with cost-competitive space solar power in terrestrial markets. It will examine some of the relevant SPS concepts and will assess the 'pros and cons' of each in terms of space assembly, maintenance and servicing (SAMS) requirements. The paper discusses at a high level some relevant concepts and technologies that may play r role in the eventual, successful resolution of these challenges. The paper concludes with an example of the kind of novel architectural approach for space solar power that is needed.

  18. Tethered nuclear power for the space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation. 23 references

  19. Space Power Facility Reverberation Chamber Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine C.; Dolesh, Robert J.; Garrett, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the process and results of calibrating the Space Environmental Test EMI Test facility at NASA Plum Brook Space Power Facility according to the specifications of IEC61000-4-21 for susceptibility testing from 100 MHz to 40 GHz. The chamber passed the field uniformity test, in both the empty and loaded conditions, making it the world's largest Reverberation Chamber.

  20. Can Power from Space Compete?

    OpenAIRE

    Macauley, Molly; Darmstadter, Joel; Fini, John; Greenberg, Joel; Maulbetsch, John; Schaal, A. Michael; Styles, Geoffrey; Vedda, James

    2000-01-01

    Satellite solar power (SSP) has been suggested as an alternative to terrestrial energy resources for electricity generation. In this study, we consider the market for electricity from the present to 2020, roughly the year when many experts expect SSP to be technically achievable. We identify several key challenges for SSP in competing with conventional electricity generation in developed and developing countries, discuss the role of market and economic analysis as technical development of SSP...

  1. Millimeterwave Space Power Grid architecture development 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komerath, Narayanan; Dessanti, Brendan; Shah, Shaan

    This is an update of the Space Power Grid architecture for space-based solar power with an improved design of the collector/converter link, the primary heater and the radiator of the active thermal control system. The Space Power Grid offers an evolutionary approach towards TeraWatt-level Space-based solar power. The use of millimeter wave frequencies (around 220GHz) and Low-Mid Earth Orbits shrinks the size of the space and ground infrastructure to manageable levels. In prior work we showed that using Brayton cycle conversion of solar power allows large economies of scale compared to the linear mass-power relationship of photovoltaic conversion. With high-temperature materials permitting 3600 K temperature in the primary heater, over 80 percent cycle efficiency was shown with a closed helium cycle for the 1GW converter satellite which formed the core element of the architecture. Work done since the last IEEE conference has shown that the use of waveguides incorporated into lighter-than-air antenna platforms, can overcome the difficulties in transmitting millimeter wave power through the moist, dense lower atmosphere. A graphene-based radiator design conservatively meets the mass budget for the waste heat rejection system needed for the compressor inlet temperature. Placing the ultralight Mirasol collectors in lower orbits overcomes the solar beam spot size problem of high-orbit collection. The architecture begins by establishing a power exchange with terrestrial renewable energy plants, creating an early revenue generation approach with low investment. The approach allows for technology development and demonstration of high power millimeter wave technology. A multinational experiment using the International Space Station and another power exchange satellite is proposed to gather required data and experience, thus reducing the technical and policy risks. The full-scale architecture deploys pairs of Mirasol sunlight collectors and Girasol 1 GW converter satellites t

  2. Nanostructured photovoltaics for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Seth M.; Bailey, Christopher; Polly, Stephen; Cress, Cory; Andersen, John; Forbes, David; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2009-10-01

    Quantum dot enhanced solar cells have been evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. A detailed balance simulation of InAs quantum dot (QD) enhanced solar cells has been performed. A 14% (absolute) efficiency improvement has been predicted if the middle junction of a state-of-the-art space multi-junction III-V solar cell can be bandgap engineered using QDs. Experimental results for a GaAs middle junction enhanced with InAs QDs have shown an 8% increase in short circuit current compared to a baseline device. The current enhancement per layer of QD was extracted from device spectral response (0.017 mA per QD layer). This value was used to estimate the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells with up to 200 layers of QDs added to the middle current-limiting junction. In addition, the radiation tolerance of QD cells, key to operation of these cells in space environments, shows improved characteristics. Open circuit voltage (VOC) in QD devices was more resilient to both alpha and proton displacement damage, resulting in a 10X reduction in the rate of VOC degradation.

  3. Multimegawatt power sources for commercial space operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two types of power sources available for long-term use in space, solar and nuclear energy, are evaluated. The size relationship between solar and nuclear energy with respect to energy generation is analyzed. Consideration is given to energy utilization, electrical energy, thermal energy, and power process requirements

  4. POWER LASER BEAMING AND APPLICATIONS IN SPACE

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, JA; Conway, E.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview of the concept of power laser beaming in space and its applications are presented. A direct solar-pumped iodine laser with the iodide t-C4F9I lasant is described as an example of the power laser system.

  5. Alternative Architecture for Commercial Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This presentation discuss the space solar power (SSP) concept. It takes us step by step through the process: the use of sunlight and solar cells to create power, the conversion of the sunlight into electricity, the conversion of electricity to microwaves, and finally the from microwaves back to electricity by the Rectennas on Earth.

  6. Wireless Power Transfer in 3D Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Bhuvaneshvari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this project is to develop a system of wireless power transfer in 3D space. This concept based on low frequency to high frequency conversion. High frequency power is transmit between air-core and inductor. This work presents an experiment for wireless energy transfer by using the Inductive resonant coupling (also known as resonant energy transfer phenomenon. The basic principles will be presented about this physical phenomenon, the experiment design, and the results obtained for the measurements performed on the system. The parameters measured were the efficiency of the power transfer, and the angle between emitter and receiver. We can achieve wireless power transfer up to 10watts in 3D space using high frequency through tuned circuit. The wireless power supply is motivated by simple and comfortable use of many small electric appliances with low power input.

  7. Space solar power - An energy alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The space solar power concept is concerned with the use of a Space Power Satellite (SPS) which orbits the earth at geostationary altitude. Two large symmetrical solar collectors convert solar energy directly to electricity using photovoltaic cells woven into blankets. The dc electricity is directed to microwave generators incorporated in a transmitting antenna located between the solar collectors. The antenna directs the microwave beam to a receiving antenna on earth where the microwave energy is efficiently converted back to dc electricity. The SPS design promises 30-year and beyond lifetimes. The SPS is relatively pollution free as it promises earth-equivalence of 80-85% efficient ground-based thermal power plant.

  8. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titran, Robert H.; Grobstein, Toni L.; Ellis, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The overall philosophy of the research was to develop and characterize new high temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  9. Optical Amplifier Based Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to design a safe optical power beaming system for use in space. Research was focused on identification of strategies and structures that would enable achievement near diffraction limited optical beam quality, highly efficient electrical to optical conversion, and high average power in combination in a single system. Efforts centered on producing high efficiency, low mass of the overall system, low operating temperature, precision pointing and tracking capability, compatibility with useful satellite orbits, component and system reliability, and long component and system life in space. A system based on increasing the power handled by each individual module to an optimum and the number of modules in the complete structure was planned. We were concerned with identifying the most economical and rapid path to commercially viable safe space solar power.

  10. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on monolithic refractory metal alloys and on metal matrix composites is being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in support of advanced space power systems. The overall philosophy of the research is to develop and characterize new high-temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites (Gr/Cu) for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites (W/NB) for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications

  11. Power electronic applications for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Roy L.; Lazbin, Igor

    1990-01-01

    NASA plans to orbit a permanently manned space station in the late 1990s, which requires development and assembly of a photovoltaic (PV) power source system to supply up to 75 kW of electrical power average during the orbital period. The electrical power requirements are to be met by a combination of PV source, storage, and control elements for the sun and eclipse periods. The authors discuss the application of power electronics and controls to manage the generation, storage, and distribution of power to meet the station loads, as well as the computer models used for analysis and simulation of the PV power system. The requirements for power source integrated controls to adjust storage charge power during the insolation period current limiting, breaker interrupt current values, and the electrical fault protection approach are defined. Based on these requirements, operating concepts have been defined which then become drivers for specific system and element design.

  12. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  13. A Solar Dynamic Power Option for Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the potential performance and related technology requirements of Solar Dynamic power systems for a Space Solar Power satellite. Space Solar Power is a concept where solar energy is collected in orbit and beamed to Earth receiving stations to supplement terrestrial electric power service. Solar Dynamic systems offer the benefits of high solar-to-electric efficiency, long life with minimal performance degradation, and high power scalability. System analyses indicate that with moderate component development, SD systems can exhibit excellent mass and deployed area characteristics. Using the analyses as a guide, a technology roadmap was -enerated which identifies the component advances necessary to make SD power generation a competitive option for the SSP mission.

  14. Commercialization of solar space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Alok; Sera, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to help U.S. companies commercialize renewable energy in India, with a special focus on solar energy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) is working with ENTECH, Inc., a solar photovoltaic (SPV) systems manufacturer to form partnerships with Indian companies. MCTTC has conducted both secondary and primary market research and obtained travel funding to meet potential Indian partners face to face. MCTTC and ENTECH traveled to India during June 2-20, 1994, and visited New Delhi, Bombay, Pune and Calcutta. Meetings were held with several key government officials and premier Indian business houses and entrepreneurs in the area of solar energy. A firsthand knowledge of India's renewable energy industry was gained, and companies were qualified in terms of capabilities and commitment to the SPV business. The World Bank has awarded India with 280 million to commercialize renewable energies, including 55 million for SPV. There is a market in India for both small-scale (kW) and large SPV (MW) applications. Each U.S. company needs to form a joint venture with an Indian firm and let the latter identify the states and projects with the greatest business potential. Several big Indian companies and entrepreneurs are planning to enter the SPV business, and they currently are seeking foreign technology partners. Since the lager companies have adopted a more conservative approach, however, partnerships with entrepreneurs might offer the quickest route to market entry in India.

  15. SPGD: A central power system for space title in French

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Space Power Generation and Distribution (SPGD) concept for providing power to any satellite in earth orbit via power beaming. Other applications such as providing power for terrestrial or space exploration purposes are identified. An assessment of SPGD versus conventional space power is summarized concluding SPGD appears extremely attractive for our space future. 1 ref

  16. Space Shuttle Orbiter auxiliary power unit status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, M.; Loken, G.; Horton, J.; Lukens, W.; Scott, W.; Baughman, J.; Bauch, T.

    An overview of the United States Space Shuttle Orbiter APU, which provides power to the Orbiter vehicle hydraulic system, is presented. Three complete APU systems, each with its own separate fuel system, supply power to three dedicated hydraulic systems. These in turn provide power to all Orbiter vehicle critical flight functions including launch, orbit, reentry, and landing. The basic APU logic diagram is presented. The APU includes a hydrazine-powered turbine that drives a hydraulic pump and various accessories through a high-speed gearbox. The APU also features a sophisticated thermal management system designed to ensure safe and reliable operation in the various launch, orbit, reentry, and landing environments.

  17. Space Solar Power Demonstrations: Challenges and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe T.; Mankins, John C.; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The prospects of using electrical power beamed from space are coming closer to reality with the continued pursuit and improvements in the supporting space solar research and technology. Space Solar Power (SSP) has been explored off and on for approximately three decades as a viable alternative and clean energy source. Results produced through the more recent Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) program involving extensive participation by industry, universities, and government has provided a sound technical basis for believing that technology can be improved to the extent that SSP systems can be built, economically feasible, and successfully deployed in space. Considerable advancements have been made in conceptual designs and supporting technologies including solar power generation, wireless power transmission, power management distribution, thermal management and materials, and the integrated systems engineering assessments. Basic technologies have progressed to the point were the next logical step is to formulate and conduct sophisticated demonstrations involving prototype hardware as final proof of concepts and identify high end technology readiness levels in preparation for full scale SSP systems designs. In addition to continued technical development issues, environmental and safety issues must be addressed and appropriate actions taken to reassure the public and prepare them for the future use of this alternative renewable energy resource. Accomplishing these objectives will allow informed future decisions regarding further SSP and related R&D investments by both NASA management and prospective external partners. In particular, accomplishing these objectives will also guide further definition of SSP and related technology roadmaps including performance objectives, resources and schedules; including 'multi-purpose' applications (terrestrial markets, science, commercial development of space, and other government missions).

  18. Wireless Power Transfer in 3D Space

    OpenAIRE

    C.Bhuvaneshvari; R.Rajesvari; K.M.S. MuthukumaraRajaguru

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop a system of wireless power transfer in 3D space. This concept based on low frequency to high frequency conversion. High frequency power is transmit between air-core and inductor. This work presents an experiment for wireless energy transfer by using the Inductive resonant coupling (also known as resonant energy transfer) phenomenon. The basic principles will be presented about this physical phenomenon, the experiment design, and the results obt...

  19. Multi-mode nuclear space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned with early versions of multi-mode nuclear space power systems (M-M NSPS) and their important mission applications for the early years of the next century. These systems are characterized as being capable of selectively operating over wide ranges of electric power levels and duty cycles and also produce direct propulsive thrust. Their special configurations will be composed of both current and neoteric elements and special configurations requiring substantial analysis, research, development and test

  20. Wireless Power Transmission Options for Space Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Seth; Davis, Dean; Born, Martin; Bayer, Martin; Howell, Joe; Mankins, John

    2008-01-01

    Space Solar Power (SSP), combined with Wireless Power Transmission (WPT), offers the far-term potential to solve major energy problems on Earth. In the long term, we aspire to beam energy to Earth from geostationary Earth orbit (GEO), or even further distances in space. In the near term, we can beam power over more moderate distances, but still stretch the limits of today s technology. In recent studies, a 100 kWe-class "Power Plug" Satellite and a 10 kWe-class Lunar Polar Solar Power outpost have been considered as the first steps in using these WPT options for SSP. Our current assessments include consideration of orbits, wavelengths, and structural designs to meet commercial, civilian government, and military needs. Notional transmitter and receiver sizes are considered for use in supplying 5 to 40 MW of power. In the longer term, lunar or asteroidal material can be used. By using SSP and WPT technology for near-term missions, we gain experience needed for sound decisions in designing and developing larger systems to send power from space to Earth.

  1. Space solar power - The transportation challenge. [for Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    The status of space transportation systems analyses referable to the SPS (solar power satellite) is reviewed briefly. Propulsion systems (including magnetoplasmadynamic) and booster arrangements for the SPS mission and variants in recovery arrangements (including winged recovery) are summarized, along with proposals for production of SPS components in space from lunar and asteroidal materials. Transportation of the pilot plant into low circumterrestrial orbit or high geosynchronous orbit, transfers between those orbits, and construction of a large work bench structure (orbital construction demonstration article - OCDA) in low earth orbit are discussed.

  2. Human exploration of space and power development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    Reasons for mounting the Space Exploration Initiative, the variables facing U.S. planners, and the developmental technologies that will be needed to support this initiative are discussed. The three more advanced technological approaches in the field of power generation described include a lunar-based solar power system, a geosynchronous-based earth orbit solar power satellite system, and the utilization of helium-3/deuterium fusion reaction to create a nuclear fuel cycle. It is noted that the major elements of the SEI will include a heavy-lift launch vehicle, a transfer vehicle and a descent/ascent vehicle for use on lunar missions and adaptable to Mars exploration.

  3. Space Solar Power Management and Distribution (PMAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, SSP PMAD (Space Solar Power Management and Distribution). The topics include: 1) Architecture; 2) Backside Thermal View; 3) Solar Array Interface; 4) Transformer design and risks; 5) Twelve phase rectifier; 6) Antenna (80V) Converters; 7) Distribution Cables; 8) Weight Analysis; and 9) PMAD Summary.

  4. An analysis of space power system masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Cull, Ronald C.; Kankam, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Various space electrical power system masses are analyzed with particular emphasis on the power management and distribution (PMAD) portion. The electrical power system (EPS) is divided into functional blocks: source, interconnection, storage, transmission, distribution, system control and load. The PMAD subsystem is defined as all the blocks between the source, storage and load, plus the power conditioning equipment required for the source, storage and load. The EPS mass of a wide range of spacecraft is then classified as source, storage or PMAD and tabulated in a database. The intent of the database is to serve as a reference source for PMAD masses of existing and in-design spacecraft. The PMAD masses in the database range from 40 kg/kW to 183 kg/kW across the spacecraft systems studied. Factors influencing the power system mass are identified. These include the total spacecraft power requirements, total amount of load capacity and physical size of the spacecraft. It is found that a new utility class of power systems, represented by Space Station Freedom, is evolving.

  5. Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-04-14

    Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

  6. Future Air Force space power needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements for future power for AF satellite mission vehicles fall into two categories. The first category is in the 1 to 50 kW range for missions of a continuous nature such as communication, navigation, surveillance, data relay and meteorology. The second category is in the multi-megawatt range for either continuous or burst power durations and are for other than solar power sources. Requirements for longer life and survivability in varying degrees are there for all systems. While the power levels do not appear difficult to achieve in view of the large array developments pursued by NASA Space Station technology, the other military requirements are very challenging and continue to be system drivers. The development of solar cells arrays should be in conjunction with other power supply technologies such as regulation and control components and energy storage subsystems. 1 reference

  7. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  8. Wireless Power Transfer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gabriel Vazquez; Yuan, Jiann-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an implementation for magnetic resonance wireless power transfer for space applications. The analysis includes an equivalent impedance study, loop material characterization, source/load resonance coupling technique, and system response behavior due to loads variability. System characterization is accomplished by executing circuit design from analytical equations and simulations using Matlab and SPICE. The theory was validated by a combination of different experiments that includes loop material consideration, resonance coupling circuits considerations, electric loads considerations and a small scale proof-of-concept prototype. Experiment results shows successful wireless power transfer for all the cases studied. The prototype provided about 4.5 W of power to the load at a separation of -5 cm from the source using a power amplifier rated for 7 W.

  9. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  10. Mobility and power in networked European space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Tim; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper seeks to contribute to debates about how urban, social and critical theory can conceptualise the socio-technologies of connection, resilience, mobility, and collapse in contemporary urban space. The paper offers a theoretical frame for conceptualising this New Urban Condition, focusing...... on themes of mobility, power, flow, network and scale. The analysis suggests the importance of close atention to the knowledge claims which are deployed in multi-level struggles to assert smooth futures in face of dysfunction....

  11. Cermet Coatings for Solar Stirling Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power converter. This paper will discuss the solar absorption characteristics of as-deposited cermet coatings as well as the solar absorption characteristics of the coatings after heating. The role of diffusion and island formation, during the deposition process and during heating will also be discussed.

  12. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays of storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  13. Advanced space solar dynamic power systems beyond IOC Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Wayne E.; Dustin, Miles O.

    1987-01-01

    Three different solar dynamic power cycle systems were evaluated for application to missions projected beyond the IOC Space Station. All three systems were found to be superior to two photovoltaic systems (a planar silicon array and a GaAs concentrator array), with both lower weight and area. The alkali-metal Rankine cycle was eliminated from consideration due to low performance, and the Stirling cycle was found to be superior to the closed Brayton cycle in both weight and area. LiF salt, which establishes peak cycle temperatures for both of the considered cycles at about 1090 K, was shown to be the most suitable material for Thermal Energy Storage.

  14. Power lines harmonic radiation in circumterrestrial space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Currently, one of the main areas in the near-Earth space research is the space weather exploration and forecasting. This study mainly relates to solar activity influence on the ionosphere and the Earth's atmosphere (i.e., the energy transfer in the direction of the Sun-magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere-surface of the Earth) and does not reflect a significant impact of the powerful natural and anthropogenic processes, which occur on the Earth's surface and influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere chain. The powerful sources and consumers of electrical energy (radio transmitters, power plants, power lines and industrial objects) cause different ionospheric phenomena, for example, changes of the electromagnetic (EM) field and plasma in the ionosphere, and affect on the state of the Earth atmosphere. Anthropogenic EM effects in the ionosphere are already observed by the scientific satellites. Consequences of anthropogenic impacts on the ionosphere are not currently known. Therefore, it is very important and urgent task to conduct the statistically significant research of the ionospheric parameters variations due to the influence of the powerful man-made factors, primarily owing to substantial increase of the EM energy production. Naturally, the satellite monitoring of the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the frequency range from tens of hertz to tens of MHz with wide ground support offers the best opportunity to observe the EM energy release, both in the global and local scales. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations can be used for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. The examples of power

  15. Green Applications for Space Power Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel (Principal Investigator)

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft propulsion and power for many decades has relied on Hydrazine monopropellant technology for auxiliary power units (APU), orbital circularization, orbit raising/lowering and attitude control. However, Hydrazine is toxic and therefore requires special ground handling procedures to ensure launch crew safety. The Swedish Company ECAPS has developed a technology based upon the propellant Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) that offers higher performance, higher density and reduced ground handling support than Hydrazine. This blended propellant is called LMP-103S. Currently, the United States Air Force (USAF) is pursuing a technology based on Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate (HAN, otherwise known as AF-M315E) with industry partners Aerojet and Moog. Based on the advantages offered by these propellants, MSFC should explore powering APU's with these propellants. Due to the availability of space hardware, the principal investigator has found a collection of USAF hardware, that will act as a surrogate, which operates on a Hydrazine derivative. The F-16 fighter jet uses H-70 or 30% diluted Hydrazine for an Emergency Power Unit (EPU) which supplies power to the plane. The PI has acquired two EPU's from planes slated for destruction at the Davis Monthan AFB. This CIF will include a partnership with 2 other NASA Centers who are individually seeking seed funds from their respective organizations: Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). KSC is preparing for future flights from their launch pads that will utilize green propellants and desire a low-cost testbed in which to test and calibrate new leak detection sensors. DFRC has access to F-16's which can be used by MSFC & KSC to perform a ground test that demonstrates emergency power supplied to the jet. Neither of the green propellant alternatives have been considered nor evaluated for an APU application. Work has already been accomplished to characterize and obtain the properties of these 2 propellants

  16. Space Power System Modeling with EBAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt and Whitney Rocket dyne's Engine Balance (EBAL) thermal/fluid system code has been expanded to model nuclear power closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. EBAL was originally developed to perform design analysis of hypersonic vehicle propellant and thermal management systems analysis. Later, it was adapted to rocket engine cycles. The new version of EBAL includes detailed, physics-based models of all key CBC system components. Some component examples are turbo-alternators, heat exchangers, heat pipe radiators, and liquid metal pumps. A liquid metal cooled reactor is included and a gas cooled reactor model is in work. Both thermodynamic and structural analyses are performed for each component. EBAL performs steady-state design analysis with optimization as well as off-design performance analysis. Design optimization is performed both at the component level by the component models and on the system level with a global optimizer. The user has the option to manually drive the optimization process or run parametric analysis to better understand system trade-off. Although recent EBAL developments have focused on a CBC conversion system, the code is easily extendible to other power conversion cycles. This new, more powerful version of EBAL allows for rapid design analysis and optimization of space power systems. A notional example of EBAL's capabilities is included. (authors)

  17. Biomimetic synthesized bimodal nanoporous silica: Bimodal mesostructure formation and application for ibuprofen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Hongyu; Lu, Fangzheng; Li, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    The present paper innovatively reports bimodal nanoporous silica synthesized using biomimetic method (B-BNS) with synthesized polymer (C16-L-serine) as template. Formation mechanism of B-BNS was deeply studied and exploration of its application as carrier of poorly water-soluble drug ibuprofen (IBU) was conducted. The bimodal nanopores and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS were achieved due to the dynamic self-assembly of C16-L-serine induced by silane coupling agent (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES) and silica source (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). Characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of B-BNS, and particularly, nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement demonstrated that B-BNS was meso-meso porous silica material. In application, B-BNS loaded IBU with high drug loading content due to its enlarged nanopores. After being loaded, IBU presented amorphous phase because nanoporous space and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS prevented the crystallization of IBU. In vitro release result revealed that B-BNS controlled IBU release with two release phases based on bimodal nanopores and improved dissolution in simulated gastric fluid due to crystalline conversion of IBU. It is convincible that biomimetic method provides novel theory and insight for synthesizing bimodal nanoporous silica, and unique functionalities of B-BNS as drug carrier can undoubtedly promote the application of bimodal nanoporous silica and development of pharmaceutical science. PMID:26478410

  18. Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1% efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented

  19. Learning bimodal structure in audio-visual data

    OpenAIRE

    Monaci, Gianluca; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Sommer, Friederich T.

    2009-01-01

    A novel model is presented to learn bimodally informative structures from audio-visual signals. The signal is represented as a sparse sum of audio- visual kernels. Each kernel is a bimodal function consisting of synchronous snippets of an audio waveform and a spatio-temporal visual basis function. To represent an audio-visual signal, the kernels can be positioned independently and arbitrarily in space and time. The proposed algorithm uses unsupervised learning to form dicti...

  20. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighth symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented in Part Three of the conference proceedings in the following areas of interest: space power electronics; heat pipe technology; space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors; power systems concepts; use of artificial intelligence in space; key issues in space nuclear power; flight qualifications and testing (including SP-100 nuclear assembly test program); microgravity two phase flow; simulation and modeling; manufacturing and processing; and space environmental effects. (MB)

  1. Operators of Approximations and Approximate Power Set Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-yong; MO Zhi-wen; SHU Lan

    2004-01-01

    Boundary inner and outer operators are introduced; and union, intersection, complement operators of approximations are redefined. The approximation operators have a good property of maintaining union, intersection, complement operators, so the rough set theory has been enriched from the operator-oriented and set-oriented views. Approximate power set spaces are defined, and it is proved that the approximation operators are epimorphisms from power set space to approximate power set spaces. Some basic properties of approximate power set space are got by epimorphisms in contrast to power set space.

  2. Cermet coatings for solar Stirling space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power convertor. The role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition and the solar absorptance of these coatings. Several candidate cermet coatings were created and their solar absorptance was characterized as-manufactured and after exposure to elevated temperatures. Coating composition was purposely varied through the thickness of the coating. As a consequence of changing composition, islands of metal are thought to form in the ceramic matrix. Computer modeling indicated that diffusion of the metal atoms played an important role in island formation while the ceramic was important in locking the islands in place. Much of the solar spectrum is absorbed as it passes through this labyrinth

  3. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in tens of megawatts. It is envisioned that the electrical power requirements will be two-fold; long-duration low power will be needed for station keeping, communications and/or surveillance, while short-duration high power will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to authors to propose a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multi-megawatt reactor power source are the following: standby, alert and pulsed power modes; high thermal output heat source (around 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime standby power (10-30 yrs); high temperature output (1500-1750 K); rapid burst power transition; high reliability (>95%); and meets stringent safety requirements. The proposed pellet bed reactor concept is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  4. High Power Uplink Amplifier for Deep Space Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Critical to the success of delivering on the promise of deep space optical communications is the creation of a stable and reliable high power multichannel optical...

  5. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the regenerative fuel cell project element is to develop power and energy storage technologies that enable new capabilities for future human space...

  6. An Advanced Light Weight Recuperator for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology holds great promise for power and propulsion demands of NASA current and future deep space explorations. Closed Brayton...

  7. An Advanced Light Weight Recuperator for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system is one of the most efficient energy conversion technologies for nuclear and solar electric propulsion. The recuperator...

  8. Recent Advances in Nuclear Powered Electric Propulsion for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, R. Joseph; Frisbee, Robert H.; Gilland, James H.; Houts, Michael G.; LaPointe, Michael R.; Maresse-Reading, Colleen M.; Oleson, Steven R.; Polk, James E.; Russell, Derrek; Sengupta, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear and radioisotope powered electric thrusters are being developed as primary in-space propulsion systems for potential future robotic and piloted space missions. Possible applications for high power nuclear electric propulsion include orbit raising and maneuvering of large space platforms, lunar and Mars cargo transport, asteroid rendezvous and sample return, and robotic and piloted planetary missions, while lower power radioisotope electric propulsion could significantly enhance or enable some future robotic deep space science missions. This paper provides an overview of recent U.S. high power electric thruster research programs, describing the operating principles, challenges, and status of each technology. Mission analysis is presented that compares the benefits and performance of each thruster type for high priority NASA missions. The status of space nuclear power systems for high power electric propulsion is presented. The paper concludes with a discussion of power and thruster development strategies for future radioisotope electric propulsion systems,

  9. Recent advances in nuclear powered electric propulsion for space exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassady, R. Joseph [Aerojet Corp., Redmond, CA (United States); Frisbee, Robert H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gilland, James H. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Houts, Michael G. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); LaPointe, Michael R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)], E-mail: michael.r.lapointe@nasa.gov; Maresse-Reading, Colleen M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Oleson, Steven R. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Polk, James E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Russell, Derrek [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA (United States); Sengupta, Anita [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Nuclear and radioisotope powered electric thrusters are being developed as primary in space propulsion systems for potential future robotic and piloted space missions. Possible applications for high-power nuclear electric propulsion include orbit raising and maneuvering of large space platforms, lunar and Mars cargo transport, asteroid rendezvous and sample return, and robotic and piloted planetary missions, while lower power radioisotope electric propulsion could significantly enhance or enable some future robotic deep space science missions. This paper provides an overview of recent US high-power electric thruster research programs, describing the operating principles, challenges, and status of each technology. Mission analysis is presented that compares the benefits and performance of each thruster type for high priority NASA missions. The status of space nuclear power systems for high-power electric propulsion is presented. The paper concludes with a discussion of power and thruster development strategies for future radioisotope electric propulsion systems.

  10. Detecting bimodality in astronomical datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Keith A.; Bird, Christina M.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss statistical techniques for detecting and quantifying bimodality in astronomical datasets. We concentrate on the KMM algorithm, which estimates the statistical significance of bimodality in such datasets and objectively partitions data into subpopulations. By simulating bimodal distributions with a range of properties we investigate the sensitivity of KMM to datasets with varying characteristics. Our results facilitate the planning of optimal observing strategies for systems where bimodality is suspected. Mixture-modeling algorithms similar to the KMM algorithm have been used in previous studies to partition the stellar population of the Milky Way into subsystems. We illustrate the broad applicability of KMM by analyzing published data on globular cluster metallicity distributions, velocity distributions of galaxies in clusters, and burst durations of gamma-ray sources. FORTRAN code for the KMM algorithm and directions for its use are available from the authors upon request.

  11. Detecting bimodality in astronomical datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Ashman, K M; Zepf, S E; Keith M Ashman; Christina M Bird; Steven E Zepf

    1994-01-01

    We discuss statistical techniques for detecting and quantifying bimodality in astronomical datasets. We concentrate on the KMM algorithm, which estimates the statistical significance of bimodality in such datasets and objectively partitions data into sub-populations. By simulating bimodal distributions with a range of properties we investigate the sensitivity of KMM to datasets with varying characteristics. Our results facilitate the planning of optimal observing strategies for systems where bimodality is suspected. Mixture-modeling algorithms similar to the KMM algorithm have been used in previous studies to partition the stellar population of the Milky Way into subsystems. We illustrate the broad applicability of KMM by analysing published data on globular cluster metallicity distributions, velocity distributions of galaxies in clusters, and burst durations of gamma-ray sources. PostScript versions of the tables and figures, as well as FORTRAN code for KMM and instructions for its use, are available by anon...

  12. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighth symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented in Part One of the conference proceedings in the following areas of interest: space applications/exploration; space nuclear safety (including Ulysses safety analysis and evaluation); reactor materials; reactors and shielding; space missions and power needs; nuclear electric propulsion: systems concepts; and static energy conversion systems. (MB)

  13. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  14. Space power development impact on technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Gilje, R. I.; Gordon, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the selection of a specific spacecraft power technology and the identification of technology development to meet system requirements. Requirements which influence the selection of a given technology include the power level required, whether the load is constant or transient in nature, and in the case of transient loads, the time required to recover the power, and overall system safety. Various power technologies, such as solar voltaic power, solar dynamic power, nuclear power systems, and electrochemical energy storage, are briefly described.

  15. Spacecraft Power. America in Space: The First Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    The various electric power sources suitable for use aboard spacecraft are described in this booklet. These power sources include batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, RTGs (radioisotope thermoelectric generator), and nuclear fission power plants. The introductory sections include a discussion of power requirements and the anatomy of a space power…

  16. Military space power systems technology trends and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses baseload and above-baseload (alert, active, pulsed and burst mode) power system options, places them in logical perspective relative to power level and operating time, discusses power systems technology state-of-the-art and trends and finally attempts to project future (post 2000) space power system capabilities

  17. Nuclear space power safety and facility guidelines study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses safety guidelines for space nuclear reactor power missions and was prepared by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) under a Department of Energy grant, DE-FG01-94NE32180 dated 27 September 1994. This grant was based on a proposal submitted by the JHU/APL in response to an open-quotes Invitation for Proposals Designed to Support Federal Agencies and Commercial Interests in Meeting Special Power and Propulsion Needs for Future Space Missionsclose quotes. The United States has not launched a nuclear reactor since SNAP 10A in April 1965 although many Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) have been launched. An RTG powered system is planned for launch as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn in 1997. Recently the Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO) sponsored the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) which was to demonstrate and evaluate the Russian-built TOPAZ II nuclear reactor as a power source in space. As of late 1993 the flight portion of this program was canceled but work to investigate the attributes of the reactor were continued but at a reduced level. While the future of space nuclear power systems is uncertain there are potential space missions which would require space nuclear power systems. The differences between space nuclear power systems and RTG devices are sufficient that safety and facility requirements warrant a review in the context of the unique features of a space nuclear reactor power system

  18. High-power converters for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. N.; Cooper, Randy

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 was a concept definition effort to extend space-type dc/dc converter technology to the megawatt level with a weight of less than 0.1 kg/kW (220 lb./MW). Two system designs were evaluated in Phase 1. Each design operates from a 5 kV stacked fuel cell source and provides a voltage step-up to 100 kV at 10 A for charging capacitors (100 pps at a duty cycle of 17 min on, 17 min off). Both designs use an MCT-based, full-bridge inverter, gaseous hydrogen cooling, and crowbar fault protection. The GE-CRD system uses an advanced high-voltage transformer/rectifier filter is series with a resonant tank circuit, driven by an inverter operating at 20 to 50 kHz. Output voltage is controlled through frequency and phase shift control. Fast transient response and stability is ensured via optimal control. Super-resonant operation employing MCTs provides the advantages of lossless snubbing, no turn-on switching loss, use of medium-speed diodes, and intrinsic current limiting under load-fault conditions. Estimated weight of the GE-CRD system is 88 kg (1.5 cu ft.). Efficiency of 94.4 percent and total system loss is 55.711 kW operating at 1 MW load power. The Maxwell system is based on a resonance transformer approach using a cascade of five LC resonant sections at 100 kHz. The 5 kV bus is converted to a square wave, stepped-up to a 100 kV sine wave by the LC sections, rectified, and filtered. Output voltage is controlled with a special series regulator circuit. Estimated weight of the Maxwell system is 83.8 kg (4.0 cu ft.). Efficiency is 87.2 percent and total system loss is 146.411 kW operating at 1 MW load power.

  19. CW 100MW microwave power transfer in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, K. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Inst. for Beam Particle Dynamics National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan) Texas Accelerator Center, The Woodlands, TX (United States)); Hiramatsu, S. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shiho, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    A proposal is made for high-power microwave transfer in space. The concept consists in a microwave power station integrating a multistage microwave free-electron laser and asymmetric dual-reflector system. Its use in space is discussed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Controllable synthesis of high loading LiFePO4/C nanocomposites using bimodal mesoporous carbon as support for high power Li-ion battery cathodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei; Cheng; Duo; Li; Anhui; Lu; Wencui; Li

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous LiFePO4/C composites containing 80 wt% of highly dispersed LiFePO4 nanoparticles(4-6 nm) were fabricated using bimodal mesoporous carbon(BMC) as continuous conductive networks. The unique pore structure of BMC not only promises good particle connectivity for LiFePO4, but also acts as a rigid nano-confinement support that controls the particle size. Furthermore, the capacities were investigated respectively based on the weight of LiFePO4 and the whole composite. When calculated based on the weight of the whole composite, it is 120 mAh·g-1at 0.1 C of the high loading electrode and 42 mAh·g-1at 10 C of the low loading electrode. The electrochemical performance shows that high LiFePO4 loading benefits large tap density and contributes to the energy storage at low rates, while the electrode with low content of LiFePO4 displays superior high rate performance, which can mainly be due to the small particle size, good dispersion and high utilization of the active material, thus leading to a fast ion and electron diffusion.

  1. Modern Air&Space Power and political goals at war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özer, Güngör.

    2014-05-01

    Modern AirandSpace Power is increasingly becoming a political tool. In this article, AirandSpacePower as a political tool will be discussed. The primary purpose of this article is to search how AirandSpacePower can provide contributions to security and also determine if it may reach the political goals on its own at war by SWOT Analysis Method and analysing the role of AirandSpace Power in Operation Unified Protector (Libya) as a case study. In conclusion, AirandSpacePower may not be sufficient to win the political goals on its own. However it may reach the political aims partially against the adversary on its own depending upon the situations. Moreover it can alone persuade the adversary to alter its behavior(s) in war.

  2. Magnetic Materials Suitable for Fission Power Conversion in Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial fission reactors use combinations of shielding and distance to protect power conversion components from elevated temperature and radiation. Space mission systems are necessarily compact and must minimize shielding and distance to enhance system level efficiencies. Technology development efforts to support fission power generation scenarios for future space missions include studying the radiation tolerance of component materials. The fundamental principles of material magnetism are reviewed and used to interpret existing material radiation effects data for expected fission power conversion components for target space missions. Suitable materials for the Fission Power System (FPS) Project are available and guidelines are presented for bounding the elevated temperature/radiation tolerance envelope for candidate magnetic materials.

  3. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  4. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  5. Transfer learning for bimodal biometrics recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Zhiping; Sun, Shuifa; Chen, Yanfei; Gan, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    Biometrics recognition aims to identify and predict new personal identities based on their existing knowledge. As the use of multiple biometric traits of the individual may enables more information to be used for recognition, it has been proved that multi-biometrics can produce higher accuracy than single biometrics. However, a common problem with traditional machine learning is that the training and test data should be in the same feature space, and have the same underlying distribution. If the distributions and features are different between training and future data, the model performance often drops. In this paper, we propose a transfer learning method for face recognition on bimodal biometrics. The training and test samples of bimodal biometric images are composed of the visible light face images and the infrared face images. Our algorithm transfers the knowledge across feature spaces, relaxing the assumption of same feature space as well as same underlying distribution by automatically learning a mapping between two different but somewhat similar face images. According to the experiments in the face images, the results show that the accuracy of face recognition has been greatly improved by the proposed method compared with the other previous methods. It demonstrates the effectiveness and robustness of our method.

  6. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Basic research on the tensile and creep properties of fibers, matrices, and composites will be discussed

  7. Automation of Space Station module power management and distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Robert; Weeks, Dave; Walls, Bryan

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on automation of space station module (SSM) power management and distribution (PMAD) system are presented. Topics covered include: reasons for power system automation; SSM/PMAD approach to automation; SSM/PMAD test bed; SSM/PMAD topology; functional partitioning; SSM/PMAD control; rack level autonomy; FRAMES AI system; and future technology needs for power system automation.

  8. Green Applications for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A key technical difference (aside from the differences in toxicity) between Hydrazine and the green propellant alternatives is the combustion temperature. ...

  9. Space nuclear power in views: 50 years ago and prevision for 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The second half of the XXth century became the age of the origin and formation of space nuclear power. During that time the potentialities and advantages of its application in large, medium and small nuclear rocket propulsions (NRP) were being earnestly demonstrated. The prototypes of different level NRP reactors were being tested in the USA and in the USSR during 1970-1980. Since 1956 the practical works on studying the opportunities of use the nuclear power installations (NPI) with direct methods of converting thermal power into electricity at the space vehicles have been launched. In addition to radio-isotopic space generators of current, reactor thermoelectric installations SNAP-10A of 0,5 kW, 'Bouk' of 3 kW and thermo-emission installation 'TOPAZ' of ∼6 kW were proposed, designed and constructed. 32 'Bouk' installations were operating in space during 1970-1988. Two 'TOPAZ' installations successfully passed flight space testing in 1987-1988. An important contribution to design and construction of 'Bouk' and 'TOPAZ' installations was made by V. Ya. Poupko. Simultaneously with the designs which reached their technical realization, the feasibility studies of the whole number of installations with different class reactors were carried out in the USSR (Russia) and USA. Brief descriptions of some of them are cited in the present Report. They were the modernized variants of thermo-emission and thermoelectric installations ('TOPAZ-2', SP-100) as well as the variants of combinations of the NPIs with multi-mode functioning, installations with power convert systems removed from the core, bimodal installations using NRP and NPI solutions, installations based on the lithium-niobium technology and installations with machine methods of conversion. However, in the end of the XXth - in the beginning of the XXIst centuries, depending on the economical expedience of the space NPIs, the higher requirements were presented to power (from several kW units to several

  10. Key issues in space nuclear power challenges for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. Key to success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience has been made. These needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self sufficiency and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from LEO to Mars has been determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options has been made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs. Finally the cost of present space power systems has been determined and projections made for future systems

  11. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankam, M. David; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  12. Power Management and Distribution System Developed for Thermionic Power Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Anastacio N.

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft solar, bimodal system combines propulsion and power generation into a single integrated system. An Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) provides orbital transfer capabilities, power generation for payloads, and onboard propulsion to the spacecraft. A key benefit of a bimodal system is a greater payload-to-spacecraft mass ratio resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. NASA has joined efforts with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to develop enabling technologies for such a system. The NASA/Air Force bimodal concept uses solar concentrators to focus energy into an integrated power plant. This power plant consists of a graphite core that stores thermal energy within a cavity. An array of thermionic converters encircles the graphite cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions. During the power generation phase of the bimodal system, the thermionic converters are exposed to the heated cavity and convert the thermal energy to electricity. Near-term efforts of the ISUS bimodal program are focused on a ground demonstration of key technologies in order to proceed to a full space flight test. Thermionic power generation is one key technology of the bimodal concept. Thermionic power converters impose unique operating requirements upon a power management and distribution (PMAD) system design. Single thermionic converters supply large currents at very low voltages. Operating voltages can vary over a range of up to 3 to 1 as a function of operating temperature. Most spacecraft loads require regulated 28-volts direct-current (Vdc) power. A combination of series-connected converters and powerprocessing boosters is required to deliver power to the spacecraft's payloads at this level.

  13. Free-piston Stirling technology for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space power. This work is being carried out under NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The overall goal of CSTI's High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space missions. The Stirling cycle offers an attractive power conversion concept for space power needs. Discussed in this paper is the completion of the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) testing - culminating in the generation of 25 kW of engine power from a dynamically-balanced opposed-piston Stirling engine at a temperature ratio of 2.0. Engine efficiency was approximately 22 percent. The SPDE recently has been divided into two separate single-cylinder engines, called Space Power Research Engines (SPRE), that now serve as test beds for the evaluation of key technology disciplines. These disciplines include hydrodynamic gas bearings, high-efficiency linear alternators, space qualified heat pipe heat exchangers, oscillating flow code validation, and engine loss understanding. The success of the SPDE at 650 K has resulted in a more ambitious Stirling endeavor - the design, fabrication, test and evaluation of a designed-for-space 25 kW per cylinder Stirling Space Engine (SSE). The SSE will operate at a hot metal temperature of 1050 K using superalloy materials. This design is a low temperature confirmation of the 1300 K design. It is the 1300 K free-piston Stirling power conversion system that is the ultimate goal; to be used in conjunction with the SP-100 reactor. The approach to this goal is in three temperature steps. However, this paper concentrates on the first two phases of this program - the 650 K SPDE and the 1050 K SSE

  14. Earth to space power beaming: A new NASA technology initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1992-02-01

    Laser power beaming from the Earth's surface is an innovative and potentially cost-effective option for reliably providing electrical power for applications such as space transportation, Earth-orbiting satellites, and lunar development. The maturation of laser power beaming technology can support low power applications such as upgraded conventional communications satellites in the present decade. Power beaming systems to support extensive lunar base operations that may consume extremely large amounts of power can be implemented early in the 21st century. The synergistic advantages of high-thrust, high specific-impulse electric propulsion may make enhanced, low cost space logistics an area of unique significance for laser power beaming. Economic forces will continue as a driving factor in the selection of major system elements for both commercial applications as well as the avant-garde national space missions envisioned for the 21st century. As a result, the implementation of laser power beaming systems will only take place if they can demonstrate clear economic benefits without sacrificing performance, personnel safety, or the environment. Similarly, the development activities that are a necessary precursor to any operational system will take place only if key industry and government leaders perceive laser power beaming systems as an achievable goal with realistic payoffs in comparison to competing energy options. This paper summarizes NASA's current research to evaluate laser power beaming systems as they apply to applications of greatest interest, and it includes a summary of the current laser power beaming program within the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. This research effort will quantify some key technical certainties and uncertainties pertaining to laser power beaming systems appropriate for space applications as well as establish a path of development that includes maturation of key technology components for reliable laser and

  15. Space nuclear power supply design in the shuttle ERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing technology and the transition period of the late 1970's from expendable launchers to reusable space shuttles and from single satellite designs to standardized and modularized configurations represents a strong motivation and unique opportunity to actively investigate new applications of nuclear power for satellites. The work reported here consists of a many faceted effort to establish nuclear power supply design guidelines for space missions through the 1980s. Configuration, integration, and launch constraints are reviewed. Of particular interest is the space shuttle system and new technologies related to nuclear power. These will require significant new innovations to optimize future missions

  16. High temperature power electronics for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  17. Space power by ground-based laser transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for providing power to space vehicles consists of using high-power CW lasers on the ground to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space. Such large lasers could be located at cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations, and use large mirrors with adaptive optical correction to reduce the beam spread due to diffraction or atmospheric turbulence. This can result in lower requirements for battery storage, due to continuous illumination of arrays even during periods of shadow by the earth, and higher power output, due to the higher efficiency of photovoltaic arrays under laser illumination compared to solar and the ability to achieve higher intensities of illumination. Applications include providing power for satellites during eclipse, providing power to resurrect satellites which are failing due to solar array degradation, powering orbital transfer vehicles or lunar transfer shuttles, and providing night power to a solar array on the moon.

  18. Silicon Carbide Based Power Mangement and Distribution for Space Nuclear Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, APEI, Inc. is proposing to develop a high efficiency, rad-hard, 100's kWe power management and distribution (PMAD) system for space nuclear...

  19. Space photovoltaic power generation. Uchu taiyo hatsuden ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, I. (Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-07-20

    Introduction is made of space photovoltaic power generation which is the ultimate clean energy source. This is a system to obtain electric energy from the solar cells placed on a geostatic orbit and transmit the power onto the earth by microwave. The US formulates a plan of placing 60[times]5GW power generation satellites to obtain 300GW power on the earth in 2000. As for the scale of space structure, the array of solar cells is dimensionally 10km[times]5km and the power transmitting antenna is 1km in diameter. The electric energy is amplified to microwave and power-transmitted by wireless onto the earth. The ground rectenna which receives it is dimensionally 10km[times]13km. The biggest difficulty consists in transportation of construction materials onto the orbit. In Japan, activity comprises three matters, which are research committee organized three years ago by the Agency of Industrial Science and technology, 10MW class model conceptually designed by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, and experiment conducted by Kyoto University on the power transmission by wireless. Pertaining to the research on the space power generation, the following two points are judged still unclarified: Reason for which the electric power companies did not apply the power transmission by wireless regarded as high in transmission efficiency. Influence of the microwave on the ionosphere and biosystem. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  20. An economically viable space power relay system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, Ivan; Boudreault, Richard

    1999-09-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the economics of a power relay system that takes advantage of recent technological advances to implement a system that is economically viable. A series of power relay systems are described and analyzed which transport power ranging from 1,250 megawatts to 5,000 megawatts, and distribute it to receiving sites at transcontinental distances. Two classes of systems are discussed—those with a single reflector and delivering all the power to a single rectenna, and a second type which has multiple reflectors and distributes it to 10 rectenna sites, sharing power among them. It is shown that when offering electricity at prices competitive to those prevalent in developed cities in the US that a low IRR is inevitable, and economic feasibility of a business is unlikely. However, when the target market is Japan where the prevalent electricity prices are much greater, that an IRR exceeding 65% is readily attainable. This is extremely attractive to potential investors, making capitalization of a venture likely. The paper shows that the capital investment required for the system can be less than 1 per installed watt, contributing less than 0.02 /KW-hr to the cost of energy provision. Since selling prices in feasible regions range from 0.18 to over 030 $/kW-hr, these costs are but a small fraction of the operating expenses. Thus a very large IRR is possible for such a business.

  1. Design investigation of solar powered lasers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, R.; Bruzzone, C.; Quimby, D.; Nelson, L.; Christiansen, W.; Neice, S.; Cassady, P.; Pindroh, A.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of solar powered lasers for continuous operation in space power transmission was investigated. Laser power transmission in space over distances of 10 to 100 thousand kilometers appears possible. A variety of lasers was considered, including solar-powered GDLs and EDLs, and solar-pumped lasers. An indirect solar-pumped laser was investigated which uses a solar-heated black body cavity to pump the lasant. Efficiencies in the range of 10 to 20 percent are projected for these indirect optically pumped lasers.

  2. Dynamics of bimodality in vehicular traffic flows

    OpenAIRE

    Mullick, Arjun; Ray, Arnab K.

    2012-01-01

    A model equation has been proposed to describe bimodal features in vehicular traffic flows. The dynamics of the bimodal distribution reveals the existence of a fixed point that is connected to itself by a homoclinic trajectory. The mathematical conditions associated with bimodality have been established. The critical factors necessary for both a breaking of symmetry and a transition from bimodal to unimodal behaviour, in the manner of a bifurcation, have been analysed.

  3. Striction-based Power Monitoring in Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program delivers a completely new technology solution to isolation and sensing of power flow (current and voltage). Based on striction materials technology,...

  4. ESA's approach to nuclear power sources for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power sources for space (NPS) are, according to current physics knowledge, the only power source option for some classes of space missions. Europe has successfully used nuclear power sources for space exploration missions (e.g. Huygens lander on Titan, Ulysses spacecraft). While some small-scale study and development efforts have been undertaken at national level during the past 40 years, these did not go beyond study and early prototype designing level. In the light of further European integration and European ambitions in space, an independent working group involving European institutional stakeholders has discussed options and proposed coherent European positions concerning the safety, use and development of NPS technology in Europe. This paper presents safety aspects and options as identified by this European Working Group and ongoing related ESA (European Space Agency) activities in this field. (authors)

  5. An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage unit for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Rose, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage Unit (ITSU), that would store and utilize heat energy in a 'pulsed' fashion in space operations, is described. Properties of various radioisotopes are considered in conjunction with characteristics of thermal energy storage materials, to evaluate possible implementation of such a device. The utility of the unit is discussed in light of various space applications, including rocket propulsion, power generation, and spacecraft thermal management.

  6. Antiproton-induced fission for space power and propulsion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gasdynamic Mirror[GDM] fusion reactor is investigated for use as a bi-modal propulsion device when driven by antiprotons.The deuterium-tritium[DT] fusion reactions in the device will be initiated by the heating provided by the fission fragments and annihilation products resulting from the 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in U-238 target nuclei.The energetic pions and muons of the proton-antiproton[or neutron]annihilation in the U-238 nucleus can heat a DT plasma to several keV during their relatively short lifetimes.The remaining heating to about 10 keV is provided by the fission fragments.Fissioning of U-238 by 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons has been shown to be 100% efficient,and the process can thus be effectively used in heating a suitable plasma to thermonuclear temperatures.With GDM as a steady state fusion reactor,and assuming certain efficiencies for the various components of the system,we calculate the energy multiplication factor 'Q' needed to sustain the steady-state operation for either the 'propulsive' mode or the 'power-producing' mode.With the aid of a system and mission analyses,we find that approximately 3.5 micrograms of antiprotons are required to accomplish a round mission to Mars in about 59 days.A similar amount is required to initiate and sustain the power-producing mode where gigawatts of electric power may be generated.Although roughly nanograms of antiprotons are currently produced annually,it is expected that hundreds of milligrams or even several grams will be produced annually in the next decade or so when Mars missions may be contemplated

  7. Earth & Space-Based Power Generation Systems - A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerta, M.; Blandow, V.; Collins, P.; Guillet, J.; Nordmann, Thomas; Schmidt, Patrick; Weindorf, Werner; Zittel, Werner

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the study [1] is to comparatively assess the economic viability, energy investment, risk and reliability issues of broad-scale introduction of terrestrial and space based solar power systems for a European power supply in 2030 at various scenario power levels. The scenario design in terms of base load and non-base load cases is only suited to gain principle knowledge about both terrestrial and space-based solar power system architectures. The comparative cost, energy, risk and reliability discussions and evaluations are based on highly asymmetrical input data due to different magnitudes of practical experiences. However, under the study assumptions given, space- based solar power systems may potentially provide a firm power supply and could be economically competitive to terrestrial solar power systems if space transportation costs in the lower hundreds EUR/kg payload are achieved. The energy payback time could be in the range of other solar power technologies far below their operational lifetimes. Risks attributed with SPS are mainly in the field of health and public acceptance of microwave power transmission, the general R&D risk and geopolitical implications.

  8. 'Bimodal' NTR and LANTR propulsion for human missions to Mars/Phobos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) is one of the leading propulsion options for future human missions to Mars due to its high specific impulse (Isp ∼850-1000 s) and attractive engine thrust-to-weight ratio (∼3-10). Because only a miniscule amount of enriched uranium-235 fuel is consumed in a NTR during the primary propulsion maneuvers of a typical Mars mission, engines configured for both propulsive thrust and modest power generation (referred to as 'bimodal' operation) provide the basis for a robust, 'power-rich' stage enabling propulsive Mars capture and reuse capability. A family of modular 'bimodal' NTR (BNTR) vehicles are described which utilize a common 'core' stage powered by three 66.7 kN (∼15 klbf) BNTRs that produce 50 kWe of total electrical power for crew life support, an active refrigeration/reliquification system for long term, 'zero-boiloff' liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage, and high data rate communications. Compared to other propulsion options, a Mars mission architecture using BNTR transfer vehicles requires fewer transportation system elements which reduces mission mass, cost and risk because of simplified space operations. For difficult Mars options, such as a Phobos rendezvous and sample return mission, volume (not mass) constraints limit the performance of the 'all LH2' BNTR stage. The use of ''LOX-augmented' NTR (LANTR) engines, operating at a modest oxygen-to-hydrogen (O/H) mixture ratio (MR) of 0.5, helps to increase 'bulk' propellant density and total thrust during the trans-Mars injection (TMI) burn. On all subsequent burns, the bimodal LANTR engines operate on LH2 only (MR=0) to maximize vehicle performance while staying within the mass limits of two ∼80 t 'Magnum' heavy lift launch vehicles (HLLVs)

  9. Power in the Production of Spaces Transformed by Rural Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisvoll, Svein

    2012-01-01

    The article critiques Halfacree's conceptualisation of rural space for masking the workings of power within "black boxes" such as "structural coherence" and "trial by space". One consequence is that rural change's social activities and also their social and personal consequences are cloaked, thereby rendering the localised fault lines of rurality…

  10. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. Human Exploration Mission Capabilities to the Moon, Mars, and Near Earth Asteroids Using ''Bimodal'' NTR Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) is one of the leading propulsion options for future human exploration missions because of its high specific impulse (Isp ∼ 850 to 1000 s) and attractive engine thrust-to-weight ratio (∼ 3 to 10). Because only a minuscule amount of enriched 235U fuel is consumed in an NRT during the primary propulsion maneuvers of a typical Mars mission, engines configured both for propulsive thrust and modest power generation (referred to as 'bimodal' operation) provide the basis for a robust, power-rich stage with efficient propulsive capture capability at the moon and near-earth asteroids (NEAs), where aerobraking cannot be utilized. A family of modular bimodal NTR (BNTR) space transfer vehicles utilize a common core stage powered by three ∼15-klbf engines that produce 50 kW(electric) of total electrical power for crew life support, high data rate communications with Earth, and an active refrigeration system for long-term, zero-boiloff liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage. This paper describes details of BNTR engines and designs of vehicles using them for various missions

  12. Heat pipe reactors for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. R.; Ranken, W. A.; Salmi, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kWe and operate in the temperature range 1200-1700 K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO2. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor. Virtues of the reactor designs are the avoidance of single-point failure mechanisms, the relatively high operating temperature, and the expected long lifetimes of the fuel element components.

  13. Power from space and the hydrogen economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Philip K.; Haynes, William E.

    2005-07-01

    Recent discoveries of methane hydrates under the Arctic permafrost and on continental shelves have revealed an immense energy resource. This has two major implications for the Solar Power Satellite (SPS). First, the SPS will not be built unless it can produce electricity at a price competitive with that generated using methane from hydrates (perhaps with sequestration of carbon dioxide). Second, steam reformation of methane is much cheaper than water electrolysis as a source of hydrogen, so there is little role for the SPS (or any other electric power technology) in the proposed hydrogen economy. On the other hand, an economy based on methane-electric hybrid vehicles offers advantages quite comparable to the hydrogen economy, without its technical problems and immense capital requirements. The methane economy also offers a transitional path to increasing direct use of electricity in transportation, a development that could create a major market for the SPS.

  14. Infrared monitoring of nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using parameters for unclassified astronomical observatories based on Maui and on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, we have determined the level of confidence of monitoring a ban on nuclear power in earth orbit. Existing military and astronomical observatories can detect and identify operating nuclear power sources on satellites, such as the Soviet RORSAT and American SP100, with a very high level of confidence to distances beyond geosynchronous orbit. A cold reactor can be detected with a medium level of confidence with visual observations by close-flying reconnaissance satellites with medium confidence, and in the future with very high confidence with the interrogation of neutrons. The smaller thermal sources, RTG and DIPS, could be detected with medium level of confidence under certain conditions. Large pulsed reactors can be detected with a medium confidence level with visual observations from close satellites, and with a very high level of confidence with neutron interrogation

  15. Infrared monitoring of nuclear power in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafemeister, David W.

    1988-12-01

    Using parameters for unclassified astronomical observatories based on Maui and on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, we have determined the level of confidence of monitoring a ban on nuclear power in earth orbit. Existing military and astronomical observatories can detect and identify operating nuclear power sources on satellites, such as the Soviet RORSAT and American SP100, with a very high level of confidence to distances beyond geosynchronous orbit. A cold reactor can be detected with a medium level of confidence with visual observations by close-flying reconnaissance satellites with medium confidence, and in the future with very high confidence with the interrogation of neutrons. The smaller thermal sources, RTG and DIPS, could be detected with medium level of confidence under certain conditions. Large pulsed reactors can be detected with a medium confidence level with visual observations from close satellites, and with a very high level of confidence with neutron interrogation.

  16. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government

  17. Power system requirements and selection for the space exploration initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) seeks to reestablish a US program of manned and unmanned space exploration. The President has called for a program which includes a space station element, a manned habitation of the moon, and a human exploration of Mars. The NASA Synthesis Group has developed four significantly different architectures for the SEI program. One key element of a space exploration effort is the power required to support the missions. The Power Speciality Team of the Synthesis Group was tasked with assessing and evaluating the power requirements and candidate power technologies for such missions. Inputs to the effort came from existing NASA studies as well as other governments agency inputs such as those from DOD and DOE. In addition, there were industry and university briefings and results of solicitations from the AIAA and the general public as part of the NASA outreach effort. Because of the variety of power needs in the SEI program, there will be a need for multiple power system technologies including solar, nuclear and electrochemical. Due to the high rocket masses required to propel payloads to the moon and beyond to Mars, there is great emphasis placed on the need for high power density and high energy density systems. Power system technology development work is needed results will determine the ultimate technology selections. 23 refs., 10 figs

  18. Systems definition space based power conversion systems: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Potential space-located systems for the generation of electrical power for use on earth were investigated. These systems were of three basic types: (1) systems producing electrical power from solar energy; (2) systems producing electrical power from nuclear reactors; (3) systems for augmenting ground-based solar power plants by orbital sunlight reflectors. Configurations implementing these concepts were developed through an optimization process intended to yield the lowest cost for each. A complete program was developed for each concept, identifying required production rates, quantities of launches, required facilities, etc. Each program was costed in order to provide the electric power cost appropriate to each concept.

  19. A Review of Tribomaterial Technology for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently proposed a nuclear closed-cycle electric power conversion system for generation of 100-kW of electrical power for space exploration missions. A critical issue is the tribological performance of sliding components within the power conversion unit that will be exposed to neutron radiation. This paper presents a review of the main considerations that have been made in the selection of solid lubricants for similar applications in the past as well as a recommendations for continuing development of the technology.

  20. Parametric cost model for solar space power and DIPS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed cost model has been developed to parametrically determine the program development and production cost of (1) photovoltaic, (2) solar dynamic and (3) dynamic isotope (DIPS) space power systems. The model is applicable in the net electrical power range of 3 to 300 kWe for solar power, and 0.5 to 10 kWe for DIPS. Application of the cost model allows spacecraft or space-based power system architecture and design trade studies or budgetary forecasting and cost benefit analyses. The cost model considers all major power subsystems (i.e., power generation, power conversion, energy storage, thermal management, and power management/distribution/control). It also considers system cost effects such as integration, testing, management, etc. The cost breakdown structure, model assumptions, ground rules, bases, Cost Estimation Relationship (CER) format and rationale are presented, and the application of the cost model to 100-kWe solar space power plants and to a 1.0-kWe DIPS are demonstrated

  1. Opening up the future in space with nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man's extraterrestrial development is dependent on abundant power. For example, space-based manufacturing facilities are projected to have a power demand of 300 kWe by the end of this Century, and several megawatts in the early part of next millennium. The development of the lunar resource base will result in power needs ranging from an initial 100 kW(e) to many megawatts. Human visits to Mars could be achieved using a multimegawatt nuclear electric propulsion system or high thrust nuclear rockets. Detailed exploration of the solar system will also be greatly enhanced by the availability of large nuclear electric propulsion systems. All of these activities will require substantial increases in space power - hundreds of kilowatts to many megawatts. The challenge is clear: how to effectively use nuclear energy to support humanity's expansion into space

  2. Open channel current noise analysis of S6 peptides from KvAP channel on bilayer lipid membrane shows bimodal power law scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rajan; Malik, Chetan; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2016-06-01

    Open channel current noise in synthetic peptide S6 of KvAP channel was investigated in a voltage clamp experiment on bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). It was observed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the component frequencies follows power law with different slopes in different frequency ranges. In order to know the origin of the slopes PSD analysis was done with signal filtering. It was found that the first slope in the noise profile follows 1 / f pattern which exists at lower frequencies and has high amplitude current noise, while the second slope corresponds to 1 /f 2 - 3 pattern which exists at higher frequencies with low amplitude current noise. In addition, white noise was observed at very large frequencies. It was concluded that the plausible reason for the multiple power-law scaling is the existence of different modes of non-equilibrium ion transport through the S6 channel.

  3. An Approach to Autonomous Control for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Under Project Prometheus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated deep space missions that would utilize space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. The initial study involved the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), which was proposed to conduct in-depth studies of three Jovian moons. Current radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and solar power systems cannot meet expected mission power demands, which include propulsion, scientific instrument packages, and communications. Historically, RTGs have provided long-lived, highly reliable, low-power-level systems. Solar power systems can provide much greater levels of power, but power density levels decrease dramatically at {approx} 1.5 astronomical units (AU) and beyond. Alternatively, an SNPS can supply high-sustained power for space applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of an SNPS must be able to provide continuous operatio for the mission duration with limited immediate human interaction and no opportunity for hardware maintenance or sensor calibration. In effect, the SNPS control system must be able to independently operate the power plant while maintaining power production even when subject to off-normal events and component failure. This capability is critical because it will not be possible to rely upon continuous, immediate human interaction for control due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion. In addition, uncertainties, rare events, and component degradation combine with the aforementioned inaccessibility and unattended operation to pose unique challenges that an SNPS control system must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design.

  4. A bimodal biometric identification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghari, Mohammad S.; Khuwaja, Gulzar A.

    2013-03-01

    Biometrics consists of methods for uniquely recognizing humans based upon one or more intrinsic physical or behavioral traits. Physicals are related to the shape of the body. Behavioral are related to the behavior of a person. However, biometric authentication systems suffer from imprecision and difficulty in person recognition due to a number of reasons and no single biometrics is expected to effectively satisfy the requirements of all verification and/or identification applications. Bimodal biometric systems are expected to be more reliable due to the presence of two pieces of evidence and also be able to meet the severe performance requirements imposed by various applications. This paper presents a neural network based bimodal biometric identification system by using human face and handwritten signature features.

  5. Oculomotor interference of bimodal distractors

    OpenAIRE

    Heeman, Jessica; Nijboer, Tanja C. W.; van der Stoep, Nathan; Theeuwes, Jan; Stigchel, Stefan Van der

    2016-01-01

    When executing an eye movement to a target location, the presence of an irrelevant distracting stimulus can influence the saccade metrics and latency. The present study investigated the influence of distractors of different sensory modalities (i.e. auditory, visual and audiovisual) which were presented at various distances (i.e. close or remote) from a visual target. The interfering effects of a bimodal distractor were more pronounced in the spatial domain than in the temporal domain. The res...

  6. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power HEMT testing, and battery design. In summary, we have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). And finally, we are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  7. Large Scale Magnetic Fields: Density Power Spectrum in Redshift Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh Gopal; Shiv K. Sethi

    2003-09-01

    We compute the density redshift-space power spectrum in the presence of tangled magnetic fields and compare it with existing observations. Our analysis shows that if these magnetic fields originated in the early universe then it is possible to construct models for which the shape of the power spectrum agrees with the large scale slope of the observed power spectrum. However requiring compatibility with observed CMBR anisotropies, the normalization of the power spectrum is too low for magnetic fields to have significant impact on the large scale structure at present. Magnetic fields of a more recent origin generically give density power spectrum ∝ 4 which doesn’t agree with the shape of the observed power spectrum at any scale. Magnetic fields generate curl modes of the velocity field which increase both the quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift space power spectrum. For curl modes, the hexadecapole dominates over quadrupole. So the presence of curl modes could be indicated by an anomalously large hexadecapole, which has not yet been computed from observation. It appears difficult to construct models in which tangled magnetic fields could have played a major role in shaping the large scale structure in the present epoch. However if they did, one of the best ways to infer their presence would be from the redshift space effects in the density power spectrum.

  8. Applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source of electrical power which enables information to be transmitted from the space crafts Voyager 1 and 2 back to Earth after a time period of more than a decade and at a distance of more than a billion miles is known as an RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator). It utilises the Seebeck effect in producing electricity from heat. In essence it consists of a large number of semiconductor thermocouples connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. A temperature difference is maintained across the thermocouples by providing a heat source, which in the case of an RTG is a radioactive isotope, and the heat sink is space. The combination of an energy-conversion system, free of moving parts and a long-life, high energy-density heat source, provides a supply of electrical power typically in the range of tens to hundred of watts and which operates reliably over extended periods of time. An electric power source, based upon thermoelectric conversion by which utilises a nuclear reactor as a heat source, has also been deployed in space and a 100-kW system is being developed to provide electrical power to a variety of commercial and military projects including SDI. Developments in thermoelectrics that have taken place in the western world during the past 30 years are primarily due to United States interest and involvement in the exploration of space. This paper reviews US applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space. (author)

  9. A cooperative power trading system based on satisfaction space technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposed a new power trading system model designed to ensure customer cooperation with power suppliers. Designed as an Internet application, the cooperative power trading system modelled power markets using a satisfaction space technology A network model of electric power trading systems was developed to create a communication network system that consisted of suppliers, customers, and auctioneers. When demand exceeded supply, the auctioneer in the trading system requested power reductions from customers. Rewards were paid to maintain the degree of satisfaction of the customers. The supplier's evaluation function was defined as a function of market price and power supply. A power reducing method was developed using a combinatorial optimization technique. Suppliers and customers submitted bids for initial power trading quantities, while the auctioneer decided a market price based on bidding values. After receiving the market price, suppliers and customers submitted a second set of bids for expected power trading quantities. A power reduction plan was then developed by the auctioneer to balance the amount of power supply and demand. The system can be applied to customers whose evaluation functions cannot be estimated beforehand, as the auctioneer was able to choose the most efficient power reduction point selected by consumers using a maximum steep slope method. Simulations conducted to validate the trading system demonstrated that the system is capable of choosing efficient energy reduction plans. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  10. The outlook for application of powerful nuclear thermionic reactor -powered space electric jet propulsion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes main study results for application of powerful space electric jet propulsion unit (EJPUs) which is powered by Nuclear Thermionic Power Unit (NTPU). They are combined in Nuclear Power/Propulsion Unit (NPPU) which serves as means of spacecraft equipment power supply and spacecraft movement. Problems the paper deals with are the following: information satellites delivery and their on-orbit power supply during 10-15 years, removal of especially hazardous nuclear wastes, mining of asteroid resources and others. Evaluations on power/time/mass relationship for this type of mission are given. EJPU parameters are compatible with Russian existent or being under development launch vehicle. (author)

  11. The outlook for application of powerful nuclear thermionic reactor - powered space electric jet propulsion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semyonov, Y.P.; Bakanov, Y.A.; Synyavsky, V.V.; Yuditsky, V.D. [Rocket-Space Corp. `Energia`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes main study results for application of powerful space electric jet propulsion unit (EJPUs) which is powered by Nuclear Thermionic Power Unit (NTPU). They are combined in Nuclear Power/Propulsion Unit (NPPU) which serves as means of spacecraft equipment power supply and spacecraft movement. Problems the paper deals with are the following: information satellites delivery and their on-orbit power supply during 10-15 years, removal of especially hazardous nuclear wastes, mining of asteroid resources and others. Evaluations on power/time/mass relationship for this type of mission are given. EJPU parameters are compatible with Russian existent or being under development launch vehicle. (author)

  12. IEC fusion: The future power and propulsion system for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid access to any point in the solar system requires advanced propulsion concepts that will provide extremely high specific impulse, low specific power, and a high thrust-to-power ratio. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion is one of many exciting concepts emerging through propulsion and power research in laboratories across the nation which will determine the future direction of space exploration. This is part of a series of papers that discuss different applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion concept for both in-space and terrestrial use. IEC will enable tremendous advances in faster travel times within the solar system. The technology is currently under investigation for proof of concept and transitioning into the first prototype units for commercial applications. In addition to use in propulsion for space applications, terrestrial applications include desalinization plants, high energy neutron sources for radioisotope generation, high flux sources for medical applications, proton sources for specialized medical applications, and tritium production

  13. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications: Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space Solar Power technology offers unique benefits for near-term NASA space science missions, which can mature this technology for other future applications. "Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transmission" (Laser-PV WPT) is a technology that uses a laser to beam power to a photovoltaic receiver, which converts the laser's light into electricity. Future Laser-PV WPT systems may beam power from Earth to satellites or large Space Solar Power satellites may beam power to Earth, perhaps supplementing terrestrial solar photo-voltaic receivers. In a near-term scientific mission to the moon, Laser-PV WPT can enable robotic operations in permanently shadowed lunar polar craters, which may contain ice. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding, to mature the technology for this initial application, in the moon's polar regions.

  14. Applications of free-space microwave power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, S. W.; Brown, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Some applications and properties of free-space power transmission are examined. Among the properties discussed are: no mass, either in the form of wire conductors or ferrying vehicles, is needed between the source of energy and the point of consumption; energy can be transferred at the velocity of light; no loss of energy in transferring energy throught the vacuum of space; and the energy transfer is insensitive to a difference in the gravitational potential of the transmitter and receiver locations. Applications discussed include the Solar Power Satellite, high altitude platforms for communications and remote sensing. Also discussed are rectennas and retrodirective arrays. Finally, an expression yielding minimum cost is presented.

  15. Refractory metal-matrix composites for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear power systems for SDI will require materials that have excellent high specific strength and creep resistance at high temperature, are compatible with space environmental conditions, and the heat transfer fluids of power conversion systems, and stable at high neutron fluence in extended operation. The development of composite components composed of continuous high strength tungsten alloy filaments in a ductile refractory metal alloy matrix is a logical next step in the progression of high temperature structural materials to meet these requirements. The basis for this technology advance is the extraordinary high temperature strength and recrystallization resistance of a class of tungsten alloys containing small quantities of hafnium carbide

  16. Civilian Power from Space in the Early 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Wood, L

    2003-06-01

    If power beamed from space is to be become widely used on Earth in the first half of the 21St century, several thus-far-persistent impediments must be obviated, including threshold effects and problematic aspects of cost, availability, reliability, hazards and environmental impacts. We sketch a generally-applicable route to doing so, noting key enabling technologies and practical features. Likely-essential features of any successful strategy include vigorous, systematic leveraging of all intrinsic features of space-derived power, e.g., addressing marginal, high-value-added markets for electric power in space- and time-agile manners to conveniently provide power-upon-demand, and incrementally ''wedging'' into ever-larger markets with ever more cost-efficient generations and scales of technology. We suggest that no prudent strategic plan will rely upon large-scale, long-term public subsidies--fiscal, regulatory, etc.--with their attendant ''sovereign risks'' and interminable delays, and that plan-essential governmental support likely will be limited to early feasibility demonstrations, provision of threshold technologies and a rational, competition-neutral licensing environment. If salient realities are uniformly respected and accessible technologies are intelligently leveraged, electricity derived from space-sourced power-beams may come into significant civilian use during the latter part of the first quarter of this century, and may become widely used by the half-century point.

  17. Nuclear power engineering in space. Nuclear rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This film tells about the scientific-technical conference on the problems of the nuclear rocket engine creation for space application. The mankind is at the threshold of flights to the nearest planets of the Solar system. Nuclear power transforms the fantasy into the reality. Nuclear power works not only at the nuclear plants of electric and heat supply but also in the powerful compact engines capable to transport space crafts with a man on board to the other planets of the Solar System. The International scientific-technical conference 'Nuclear Power Engineering in Space. Nuclear Rocket Engines', held in September 22-26, 1992 in Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) was dedicated to this topic discussed up to now only at the pages of fiction novels and confidential scientific papers. The leading USA firms occupied with problems of space and nuclear power engineering, scientific-research institutes of Russian Federation and Kazakhstan are among the Conference participants. The modern state-of-ths-art, problems, mathematical modeling of processes in NRE, technology of the high-temperature fuel creation, experimental abilities and achievements of the NRE ground running tests, ecological problems of the NRE tests and application were discussed at the Conference. The film includes video information about the first Soviet prototype nuclear propulsion facility (with maximum temperature about 3000 deg. C), that never was demonstrated before. (author)

  18. Multimegawatt space nuclear power supply, Phase 1 Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-17

    This Specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Boeing Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power System (MSNPS). The Boeing Multimegawatt Space Power System is part of the DOE/SDIO Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program. The purpose of this program is to provide a space-based nuclear power system to meet the needs of SDIO missions. The Boeing MSNPS is a category 1 concept which is capable of delivering 10's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds with effluent permitted. A design goal is for the system to have growth or downscale capability for other power system concepts. The growth objective is to meet the category 3 capability of 100's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds, also with effluent permitted. The purpose of this preliminary document is to guide the conceptual design effort throughout the Phase 1 study effort. This document will be updated through out the study. It will thus result in a record of the development of the design effort.

  19. Cermet-fueled reactors for multimegawatt space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cermet-fueled reactor has evolved as a potential power source for a broad range of multimegawatt space applications. In particular, the fast spectrum reactor concept can be used to deliver 10s of megawatts of electric power for continuous, long term, unattended operation, and 100s of megawatts of electric power for times exceeding several hundred seconds. The system can also be utilized with either a gas coolant in a Brayton power conversion cycle, or a liquid metal coolant in a Rankine power conversion cycle. Extensive testing of the cermet fuel element has demonstrated that the fuel is capable of operating at very high temperatures under repeated thermal cycling conditions, including transient conditions which approach the multimegawatt burst power requirements. The cermet fuel test performance is reviewed and an advanced cermet-fueled multimegawatt nuclear reactor is described in this paper

  20. Microwave-electronics - of prospect in space power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanke V. A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of perspective directions in the decision of problems of modern power - use of solar radiation as already existing, inexhaustible and ecologically clean source of energy. In a number of the countries the projects of creation of solar power stations in space, on an orbit of the Earth are developed. The review of a history and condition of works in this area is given within the framework of the national and international programs.

  1. Space-to-Space Power Beaming Enabling High Performance Rapid Geocentric Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Vassallo, Corinne; Tadge, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The use of electric propulsion is more prevalent than ever, with industry pursuing all electric orbit transfers. Electric propulsion provides high mass utilization through efficient propellant transfer. However, the transfer times become detrimental as the delta V transitions from near-impulsive to low-thrust. Increasing power and therefore thrust has diminishing returns as the increasing mass of the power system limits the potential acceleration of the spacecraft. By using space-to-space power beaming, the power system can be decoupled from the spacecraft and allow significantly higher spacecraft alpha (W/kg) and therefore enable significantly higher accelerations while maintaining high performance. This project assesses the efficacy of space-to-space power beaming to enable rapid orbit transfer while maintaining high mass utilization. Concept assessment requires integrated techniques for low-thrust orbit transfer steering laws, efficient large-scale rectenna systems, and satellite constellation configuration optimization. This project includes the development of an integrated tool with implementation of IPOPT, Q-Law, and power-beaming models. The results highlight the viability of the concept, limits and paths to infusion, and comparison to state-of-the-art capabilities. The results indicate the viability of power beaming for what may be the only approach for achieving the desired transit times with high specific impulse.

  2. Bimodal gene expression patterns in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolsky Yuri; Bugrim Andrej; Shi Weiwei; Kirillov Eugene; Bessarabova Marina; Nikolskaya Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We identified a set of genes with an unexpected bimodal distribution among breast cancer patients in multiple studies. The property of bimodality seems to be common, as these genes were found on multiple microarray platforms and in studies with different end-points and patient cohorts. Bimodal genes tend to cluster into small groups of four to six genes with synchronised expression within the group (but not between the groups), which makes them good candidates for robust conditional ...

  3. Performance Sampling and Bimodal Duration Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Jerker Denrell; Zur Shapira

    2006-01-01

    Performance sampling models of duration dependence in employee turnover and firm exit predict that hazard rates will initially be low, gradually rise to a maximum, and then fall. As we note in this paper, however, several empirical duration distributions have bimodal hazard rates. This paper shows that such bimodal hazard rates can be derived from existing models of performance sampling by small changes in the assumptions. In particular, bimodal hazard rates emerge if the mean or the variance...

  4. Space power by ground-based laser illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Reducing energy storage requirements of space power systems by illuminating the photovoltaic arrays with a remotely located laser system is addressed. It is proposed that large lasers be located on cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations and that large lenses or mirrors with adaptive optical correction be used to reduce the beam spread due to diffraction or atmospheric turbulence. During the eclipse periods or lunar night, the lasers illuminate the solar arrays to a level sufficient to provide operating power. Two applications are discussed: illumination of geosynchronous orbit satellites and illumination of a moonbase power system. Issues for photovoltaic receivers for such a system are discussed.

  5. Impacts of nuclear power sources on space debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some results of efforts dealing with computational analyses of probability of impact of nuclear power sources (NPS) on space debris (SD), destruction of the NPS structure on the impacts, change in orbital parameters as a result of the NPS impact and reentry. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. Automated power management within a Space Station module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William D.; Jones, Ellen F.

    1988-01-01

    An effort to advance and develop techniques and approaches for automation and autonomy in power management and distribution with a Space Station module is described. The applicable breadboard architecture is discussed, summarizing the function partitioning. The breadboard software is briefly addressed, and the breadboard automated operation is described in detail.

  7. Nuclear reactor closed Brayton cycle space power conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the past history, present status and future prospects for closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems to be used in space when requirements have been established. Since there is a classic lack of coordination between advanced technology and its perceived need that can be strongly affected by associated factors, recommendations will be made to assist in the current situation. 4 refs

  8. Space Vehicle Power System Comprised of Battery/Capacitor Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarotte, C.; Lancaster, G. S.; Eichenberg, D.; Butler, S. M.; Miller, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Recent improvements in energy densities of batteries open the possibility of using electric rather that hydraulic actuators in space vehicle systems. However, the systems usually require short-duration, high-power pulses. This power profile requires the battery system to be sized to meet the power requirements rather than stored energy requirements, often resulting in a large and inefficient energy storage system. Similar transient power applications have used a combination of two or more disparate energy storage technologies. For instance, placing a capacitor and a battery side-by-side combines the high energy density of a battery with the high power performance of a capacitor and thus can create a lighter and more compact system. A parametric study was performed to identify favorable scenarios for using capacitors. System designs were then carried out using equivalent circuit models developed for five commercial electrochemical capacitor products. Capacitors were sized to satisfy peak power levels and consequently "leveled" the power requirement of the battery, which can then be sized to meet system energy requirements. Simulation results clearly differentiate the performance offered by available capacitor products for the space vehicle applications.

  9. Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power sources (NPS) for use in outer space have been developed and used in space applications where unique mission requirements and constraints on electrical power and thermal management precluded the use of non-nuclear power sources. Such missions have included interplanetary missions to the outer limits of the Solar System, for which solar panels were not suitable as a source of electrical power because of the long duration of these missions at great distances from the Sun. According to current knowledge and capabilities, space NPS are the only viable energy option to power some space missions and significantly enhance others. Several ongoing and foreseeable missions would not be possible without the use of space NPS. Past, present and foreseeable space NPS applications include radioisotope power systems (for example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators and radioisotope heater units) and nuclear reactor systems for power and propulsion. The presence of radioactive materials or nuclear fuels in space NPS and their consequent potential for harm to people and the environment in Earth's biosphere due to an accident require that safety should always be an inherent part of the design and application of space NPS. NPS applications in outer space have unique safety considerations compared with terrestrial applications. Unlike many terrestrial nuclear applications, space applications tend to be used infrequently and their requirements can vary significantly depending upon the specific mission. Mission launch and outer space operational requirements impose size, mass and other space environment limitations not present for many terrestrial nuclear facilities. For some applications, space NPS must operate autonomously at great distances from Earth in harsh environments. Potential accident conditions resulting from launch failures and inadvertent re-entry could expose NPS to extreme physical conditions. These and other unique safety considerations for the use of

  10. Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective

  11. Fresnel Concentrators for Space Solar Power and Solar Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Rodney; Parks, Robert W.; Craig, Harry B. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large deployable Fresnel concentrators are applicable to solar thermal propulsion and multiple space solar power generation concepts. These concentrators can be used with thermophotovoltaic, solar thermionic, and solar dynamic conversion systems. Thin polyimide Fresnel lenses and reflectors can provide tailored flux distribution and concentration ratios matched to receiver requirements. Thin, preformed polyimide film structure components assembled into support structures for Fresnel concentrators provide the capability to produce large inflation-deployed concentrator assemblies. The polyimide film is resistant to the space environment and allows large lightweight assemblies to be fabricated that can be compactly stowed for launch. This work addressed design and fabrication of lightweight polyimide film Fresnel concentrators, alternate materials evaluation, and data management functions for space solar power concepts, architectures, and supporting technology development.

  12. Steady-state isotope power for deep-space explorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope power is essential for space explorations. While space missions lasting 25 years require a sustained power-to-weight ratio hardly attainable for current spacecraft designs and expected mission functions. In this paper, the authors report the results of an analysis that suggests that the isotope pairs 251Cf and 252Cf, operating in a tandem reaction network, are most appropriate fuels even for space missions well in excess of 25 years. The isotopes 251Cf and 252Cf possess a rare and highly complementary set of nuclear properties: fission and neutron capture cross sections for 251Cf are exceptionally high, 4,880 and 2,700 b, respectively, providing therefore both fission energy and breeding of 252Cf, this bred 252Cf isotope possesses decay channels for both alpha decay and spontaneous fission. As a consequence of these properties, injected 251Cf can sustain a fission chain by autocatalysis as well as by spontaneous fission

  13. Power Absorption by Closely Spaced Point Absorbers in Constrained Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, G.; Vantorre, M.; Beels, C.;

    2010-01-01

    The performance of an array of closely spaced point absorbers is numerically assessed in a frequency domain model Each point absorber is restricted to the heave mode and is assumed to have its own linear power take-off (PTO) system Unidirectional irregular incident waves are considered, represent......The performance of an array of closely spaced point absorbers is numerically assessed in a frequency domain model Each point absorber is restricted to the heave mode and is assumed to have its own linear power take-off (PTO) system Unidirectional irregular incident waves are considered...... also on the position and behaviour of the other buoys Applying the optimal control values for a single buoy to multiple closely spaced buoys results in a suboptimal solution for the array Other ways to determine the PTO parameters are diagonal optimisation (DO) and individual optimisation These methods...

  14. Space weather and power grids: findings and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausmann, Elisabeth; Andersson, Emmelie; Murtagh, William; Mitchison, Neil

    2014-05-01

    The impact of space weather on the power grid is a tangible and recurring threat with potentially serious consequences on society. Of particular concern is the long-distance high-voltage power grid, which is vulnerable to the effects of geomagnetic storms that can damage or destroy equipment or lead to grid collapse. In order to launch a dialogue on the topic and encourage authorities, regulators and operators in European countries and North America to learn from each other, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, and NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Centre, with the contribution of the UK Civil Contingencies Secretariat, jointly organised a workshop on the impact of extreme space weather on the power grid on 29-30 October 2013. Being structured into 6 sessions, the topics addressed were space-weather phenomena and the dynamics of their impact on the grid, experiences with prediction and now-casting in the USA and in Europe, risk assessment and preparedness, as well as policy implications arising from increased awareness of the space-weather hazard. The main workshop conclusions are: • There is increasing awareness of the risk of space-weather impact among power-grid operators and regulators and some countries consider it a priority risk to be addressed. • The predictability of space-weather phenomena is still limited and relies, in part, on data from ageing satellites. NOAA is working with NASA to launch the DSCOVR solar wind spacecraft, the replacement for the ACE satellite, in early 2015. • In some countries, models and tools for GIC prediction and grid impact assessment have been developed in collaboration with national power grids but equipment vulnerability models are scarce. • Some countries have successfully hardened their transmission grids to space-weather impact and sustained relatively little or no damage due to currents induced by past moderate space-weather events. • While there is preparedness

  15. Fuel Cells: Power System Option for Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneeth, M.; Mohanty, Surajeet

    2012-07-01

    Fuel Cells are direct energy conversion devices and, thereby, they deliver electrical energy at very high efficiency levels. Hydrogen and Oxygen gases are electrochemically processed, producing clean electric power with water as the only by product. A typical, Fuel Cell based power system involve a Electrochemical power converter, gas storage and management systems, thermal management systems and relevant control units. While there exists different types of Fuel cells, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are considered as the most suitable one for portable applications. Generally, Fuel Cells are considered as the primary power system option in space missions requiring high power ( > 5kW) and long durations and also where water is a consumable, such as manned missions. This is primarily due to the advantage that fuel cell based power systems offer, in terms of specific energy. Fuel cells have the potential to attain specific energy > 500Wh/kg, specific power >500W/kg, energy density > 400Whr/L and also power density > 200 W/L. This apart, a fuel cell system operate totally independent of sun light, whereas as battery based system is fully dependent on the same. This uniqueness provides added flexibility and capabilities to the missions and modularity for power system. High power requiring missions involving reusable launch vehicles, manned missions etc are expected to be richly benefited from this. Another potential application of Fuel Cell would be interplanetary exploration. Unpredictable and dusty atmospheres of heavenly bodies limits sun light significantly and there fuel cells of different types, eg, Bio-Fuel Cells, PEMFC, DMFCs would be able to work effectively. Manned or unmanned lunar out post would require continuous power even during extra long lunar nights and high power levels are expected. Regenerative Fuel Cells, a combination of Fuel Cells and Electrolysers, are identified as strong candidate. While application of Fuel Cells in high power

  16. Space power technology to meet civil mission requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space power technologies have undergone significant advancements over the past years. U. S. spacecraft of the 60's and 70's were, as a rule, low power, low voltage using solar photovoltaic power systems. These systems were silicon based cell technology (10-12% efficient) and used nickel-cadmium batteries for storage during the eclipse phase of the orbit. Considerable advancements have taken place in this area. New higher efficiency photovoltaic cells are now being flown, concentrator arrays with potential for low cost and low weight are being developed, and nickel-hydrogen batteries are replacing the nickel cadmium electrochemical storage systems of the past. These batteries have high capacity and are operationally more flexible. Additional advances in the form of nickel hydrogen long life bi-polar and high energy density batteries, now in the research stage, will enable new space opportunities in the future

  17. Space nuclear power: Key to outer solar system exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995, in response to threatened budget cuts, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) approved a position paper supporting the maintenance of the technology base for space nuclear power. The position paper contained four recomemndations: (1) DOE, NASA, and DoD should develop and support an integrated program that maintains the nuclear option and develops the needed high-payoff technologies; (2) Congress should provide strong, continuing financial and political support for the agencies' program; (3) Government and industry leaders should voice their advocacy for a strong space nuclear power program to support future system requirements; and (4) The US should continue to maintain its cooperation and technical interchanges with other countries to advance nuclear power source technology and to promote nuclear safety

  18. Creep properties of refractory alloys for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To satisfy power, mass, and volume requirements, space nuclear power systems are designed with refractory alloys for fuel cladding and reactor structures. This paper presents analysis of existing and new creep data for the refractory alloys that are candidates for fuel cladding or reactor structural applications for space power reactors. Analysis includes use of empirical parameters such as Larson-Miller, Dorn, Orr-Sherby-Dorn, and Manson-Haferd to predict long-term creep properties with data from relatively short-term tests. References curves for stress to produce 1% creep strain in 7 years versus these parameters are presented for Nb-1% Zr, PWC-11, Mo-11 and 14% Re, T-111, ASTAR-811C, CVD-W, W-5% Re, and W-25% Re

  19. Space Environment Stability and Physical Properties of New Materials for Space Power and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    To test and evaluate suitability of materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, and to achieve sufficient understanding of the mechanisms by which, the materials perform in their intended applications. Materials and proposed applications included but were not limited to: Improved anodes for lithium ion batteries, highly-transparent arc-proof solar array coatings, and improved surface materials for solar dynamic concentrators and receivers. Cooperation and interchange of data with industrial companies as appropriate.

  20. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  1. Binaural advantages in users of bimodal and bilateral cochlear implant devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Pak, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent users of bilateral and bimodal fittings should expect to benefit from all three different binaural advantages found to be present in normal-hearing listeners. Head-shadow and binaural squelch are advantages occurring under spatially separated speech and noise, while summation emerges when speech and noise coincide in space. For 14 bilateral or bimodal listeners, speech reception thresholds in the presence of four-talker babble were measured in sound-fiel...

  2. Structural Materials and Fuels for Space Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl; Busby, Jeremy; Porter, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with Stirling convertor power generation is one promising candidate in on-going Fission Surface Power (FSP) studies for future lunar and Martian bases. There are many challenges for designing and qualifying space-rated nuclear power plants. In order to have an affordable and sustainable program, NASA and DOE designers want to build upon the extensive foundation in nuclear fuels and structural materials. This talk will outline the current Fission Surface Power program and outline baseline design options for a lunar power plant with an emphasis on materials challenges. NASA first organized an Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study Team to establish a reference design that could be scrutinized for technical and fiscal feasibility. Previous papers and presentations have discussed this study process in detail. Considerations for the reference design included that no significant nuclear technology, fuels, or material development were required for near term use. The desire was to build upon terrestrial-derived reactor technology including conventional fuels and materials. Here we will present an overview of the reference design, Figure 1, and examine the materials choices. The system definition included analysis and recommendations for power level and life, plant configuration, shielding approach, reactor type, and power conversion type. It is important to note that this is just one concept undergoing refinement. The design team, however, understands that materials selection and improvement must be an integral part of the system development.

  3. Solar Pumped High Power Solid State Laser for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard L.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Frederick, Kevin B.; Phillips, Dane J.

    2004-01-01

    Highly coherent laser light provides a nearly optimal means of transmitting power in space. The simplest most direct means of converting sunlight to coherent laser light is a solar pumped laser oscillator. A key need for broadly useful space solar power is a robust solid state laser oscillator capable of operating efficiently in near Earth space at output powers in the multi hundred kilowatt range. The principal challenges in realizing such solar pumped laser oscillators are: (1) the need to remove heat from the solid state laser material without introducing unacceptable thermal shock, thermal lensing, or thermal stress induced birefringence to a degree that improves on current removal rates by several orders of magnitude and (2) to introduce sunlight at an effective concentration (kW/sq cm of laser cross sectional area) that is several orders of magnitude higher than currently available while tolerating a pointing error of the spacecraft of several degrees. We discuss strategies for addressing these challenges. The need to remove the high densities of heat, e.g., 30 kW/cu cm, while keeping the thermal shock, thermal lensing and thermal stress induced birefringence loss sufficiently low is addressed in terms of a novel use of diamond integrated with the laser material, such as Ti:sapphire in a manner such that the waste heat is removed from the laser medium in an axial direction and in the diamond in a radial direction. We discuss means for concentrating sunlight to an effective areal density of the order of 30 kW/sq cm. The method integrates conventional imaging optics, non-imaging optics and nonlinear optics. In effect we use a method that combines some of the methods of optical pumping solid state materials and optical fiber, but also address laser media having areas sufficiently large, e.g., 1 cm diameter to handle the multi-hundred kilowatt level powers needed for space solar power.

  4. Miniversal Deformations of Bimodal Picewise Linear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer Llop, Josep; Magret Planas, Maria dels Dolors; Pacha Andújar, Juan Ramón; Peña Carrera, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: Bimodal piecewise linear system, miniversal deformations, reduced forms. Bimodal linear systems are those consisting of two linear systems on each side of a given hyperplane, having continuous dynamics along that hyperplane. In this work, we focus on the derivation of (orthogonal) miniversal deformations, by using reduced forms.

  5. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, W.T.E.; Iakovlev, P.A.; Norde, W.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N=770) and short (N=48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS 29-PEO48 and PS37-PEO770 block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodgett

  6. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, WTE; Iakovlev, PA; Norde, W; Stuart, MAC

    2005-01-01

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N = 770) and short (N = 48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS29-PEO48 and PS37-PEO770 block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodg

  7. MHD conversion of solar energy. [space electric power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. V.; Decher, R.

    1978-01-01

    Low temperature plasmas wherein an alkali metal vapor is a component are uniquely suited to simultaneously absorb solar radiation by coupling to the resonance lines and produce electrical power by the MHD interaction. This work is an examination of the possibility of developing space power systems which take advantage of concentrated solar power to produce electricity. It is shown that efficient cycles in which expansion work takes place at nearly constant top cycle temperature can be devised. The power density of the solar MHD generator is lower than that of conventional MHD generators because of the relatively high seed concentration required for radiation absorption and the lower flow velocity permitted to avoid total pressure losses due to heating.

  8. A preliminary study of the modified Ericsson for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, J.; Louis, J. F.; Juhasz, A.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modifications of the Ericsson cycle are analyzed for their application as high power, compact and reliable space power systems. They use the same components as the technologically advanced and reliable Brayton system. These modifications approximate the Ericsson cycle's isothermal expansion by several stages of expansion with reheat and the isothermal compression by several compression stages with intercooling. Preliminary cycle analysis including non-ideal components indicates potential advantages in both power per unit area and efficiency over the Brayton system. Evaluation of the system mass indicates a significant mass and radiator area advantage of a Modified Ericsson cycle using one reheat and one expansion stage when a high temperature titanium radiator is used. Whereas the configuration using one reheat and one intercooling with two stages of compression and expansion provided the lowest mass per unit power using a lower temperature aluminum radiator.

  9. Power conditioning for large dc motors for space flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Martin S.; Anderson, Paul M.; Eason, Douglas J.; Landis, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The design and performance of a prototype power-conditioning system for use with large brushless dc motors on NASA space missions are discussed in detail and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, and graphs. The 5-kW 8-phase parallel module evaluated here would be suitable for use in the Space Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. A current-balancing magnetic assembly with low distributed inductance permits high-speed current switching from a low-voltage bus as well as current balancing between parallel MOSFETs.

  10. Thin-Film Photovoltaics: Status and Applications to Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1991-01-01

    The potential applications of thin film polycrystalline and amorphous cells for space are discussed. There have been great advances in thin film solar cells for terrestrial applications; transfer of this technology to space applications could result in ultra low weight solar arrays with potentially large gains in specific power. Recent advances in thin film solar cells are reviewed, including polycrystalline copper iridium selenide and related I-III-VI2 compounds, polycrystalline cadmium telluride and related II-VI compounds, and amorphous silicon alloys. The possibility of thin film multi bandgap cascade solar cells is discussed.

  11. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness and mission flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 Space Reactor Power System (SRPS) is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10s to 100s of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An effective infracture of Industry, National Laboratories and Government agencies has made substantial progress since the 1988 System Design Review. Hardware development and testing has progressed to the point of resolving the key technical feasibility issues. The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. The benefits of utilizing a low power (6 to 20 kWe range) early flight mission as a precursor to operational missions in the 100 kWe range has received renewed interest among Government Agencies and Industry. Studies and assessments were performed throughout 1992 to further refine the potential missions and the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Systems that could be available to support these missions. The results of assessment showed that the ''first generation'' technology available now from the SP-100 program can support a wide range of candidate missions. The status of the nuclear technology was matured to the level of supporting a flight design with the present available data base. The conductively coupled thermoelectric cell technology is now in the cell level testing and verification phase and component level readiness is projected to be complete by the end of GFY94. Power system designs using the present day flight proven RTG unicouple have been established and also represent an attractive option for early launches. These design concepts are discussed in further detail in a companion paper. (Josloff 1993)

  12. Optical waveguide system for solar power applications in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we will discuss an innovative optical system for solar power applications in space. In this system solar radiation is collected by the concentrator array which transfers the concentrated solar radiation to the optical waveguide (OW) transmission line made of low loss optical fibers. The OW transmission line directs the solar radiation to the place of solar power utilization such as: the thermochemical receiver for processing of lunar regolith for oxygen production; or the plant growth facility where the solar light is used for biomass production.

  13. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  14. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed. 10 references

  15. On the power quantum computation over real Hilbert spaces

    OpenAIRE

    McKague, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We consider the power of various quantum complexity classes with the restriction that states and operators are defined over a real, rather than complex, Hilbert space. It is well know that a quantum circuit over the complex numbers can be transformed into a quantum circuit over the real numbers with the addition of a single qubit. This implies that BQP retains its power when restricted to using states and operations over the reals. We show that the same is true for QMA(k), QIP(k), QMIP, and Q...

  16. Photovoltaic-Concentrator Based Power Beaming For Space Elevator Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MClimber team, at the Student Space Systems Fabrication Laboratory of the University of Michigan, has developed a prototype robotic climber for competition in the NASA sponsored Power Beaming Challenge. This paper describes the development of the system that utilizes a simple telescope to deliver an 8 kW beam to a photovoltaic panel in order to power a one kilometer climb. Its unique approach utilizes a precision GPS signal to track the panel. Fundamental systems of the project were implemented using a design strategy focusing on robustness and modularity. Development of this design and its results are presented.

  17. Molybdenum-rhenium alloy development for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refractory metals and refractory metal alloys are essential to the development of advanced nuclear reactor systems for space power applications because of the anticipated high operating temperatures of these systems. The refractory metals and alloys based on niobium, molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten are being considered for use in these systems because of their high temperature capabilities and compatibility with alkali metals. Molybdenum-base alloys offer many advantages in these systems, but their brittleness at low temperatures serves as a major deterrent to their use. Molybdenum-rhenium alloys with 11-13 wt% rhenium have been found to possess good low temperature ductility that results from the solution softening process in this alloy system. The development of solution softened molybdenum-rhenium alloys for use in space nuclear power applications is in progress at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and this paper presents a review and update of this work

  18. Space Solar Power Technology for Lunar Polar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Mark W.; Howell, Joe T.

    2004-01-01

    The technology for Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transistor (Laser-PV WPT) is being developed for lunar polar applications by Boeing and NASA Marshall Space Center. A lunar polar mission could demonstrate and validate Laser-PV WPT and other SSP technologies, while enabling access to cold, permanently shadowed craters that are believed to contain ice. Crater may hold frozen water and other volatiles deposited over billion of years, recording prior impact event on the moon (and Earth). A photo-voltaic-powered rover could use sunlight, when available, and laser light, when required, to explore a wide range of lunar terrain. The National Research Council recently found that a mission to the moon's south pole-Aitkir basin has priority for space science

  19. CVD refractory metals and alloys for space nuclear power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CVD technology has made significant contributions to the development of space nuclear power systems during the period 1962 to 1972. For the in-core thermionic concept, CVD technology is essential to the fabrication of the tungsten electron emitter. For the liquid metal cooled fuel pin using uranium nitride as fuel and T-111 and Nb-1 Zr as cladding, a tungsten barrier possibly produced by CVD methods is essential to the fuel-cladding compatibility at the designed operating temperature. Space power reactors may use heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system. CVD technology has been used for fabricating the heat pipe used as cross-flow heat exchanger, including the built-in channels on the condenser wall for liquid lithium return. 28 references, 17 figures

  20. Spaces of power: feminism, neoliberalism and gendered labor

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers an intervention into current debates about the demise of feminist politics in neoliberal times. It draws on an empirical study of women working the spaces of power over the last 50 years to trace different mappings of the ‘landscapes of antagonism’ in which feminism and neoliberalism are entangled. The paper challenges singular conceptions of both feminism and neoliberalism, and seeks to offer a political-cultural analysis that does not erase the possibility of politics

  1. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys

  2. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys. (DLC)

  3. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

  4. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, J.

    2002-01-01

    A solar power generation station on a mountaintop near the moon's North or South pole can receive sunlight 708 hours per lunar day, for continuous power generation. Power can be beamed from this station over long distances using a laser-based wireless power transmission system and a photo-voltaic receiver. This beamed energy can provide warmth, electricity, and illumination for a robotic rover to perform scientific experiments in cold, dark craters where no other power source is practical. Radio-frequency power transmission may also be demonstrated in lunar polar applications to locate and recover sub-surface deposits of volatile material, such as water ice. High circular polarization ratios observed in data from Clementine spacecraft and Arecibo radar reflections from the moon's South pole suggest that water ice is indeed present in certain lunar polar craters. Data from the Lunar Prospector spacecraft's epi-thermal neutron spectrometer also indicate that hydrogen is present at the moon's poles. Space Solar Power technology enables investigation of these craters, which may contain a billion-year-old stratigraphic record of tremendous scientific value. Layers of ice, preserved at the moon's poles, could help us determine the sequence and composition of comet impacts on the moon. Such ice deposits may even include distinct strata deposited by secondary ejecta following significant Earth (ocean) impacts, linked to major extinctions of life on Earth. Ice resources at the moon's poles could provide water and air for human exploration and development of space as well as rocket propellant for future space transportation. Technologies demonstrated and matured via lunar polar applications can also be used in other NASA science missions (Valles Marineris. Phobos, Deimos, Mercury's poles, asteroids, etc.) and in future large-scale SSP systems to beam energy from space to Earth. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding to mature the technology for such a near

  5. Overview of space power electronic's technology under the CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a NASA Program targeted at the development of specific technologies in the areas of transportation, operations and science. Each of these three areas consists of major elements and one of the operation's elements is the High Capacity Power element. The goal of this element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA initiatives. The High Capacity Power element is broken down into several subelements that includes energy conversion in the areas of the free piston Stirling power converter and thermoelectrics, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental compatibility and system's lifetime. A recent overview of the CSTI High capacity Power element and a description of each of the program's subelements is given by Winter (1989). The goals of the Power Management subelement are twofold. The first is to develop, test, and demonstrate high temperature, radiation-resistant power and control components and circuits that will be needed in the Power Conditioning, Control and Transmission (PCCT) subsystem of a space nuclear power system. The results obtained under this goal will also be applicable to the instrumentation and control subsystem of a space nuclear reactor. These components and circuits must perform reliably for lifetimes of 7-10 years. The second goal is to develop analytical models for use in computer simulations of candidate PCCT subsystems. Circuits which will be required for a specific PCCT subsystem will be designed and built to demonstrate their performance and, also, to validate the analytical models and simulations. The tasks under the Power Management subelement will now be described in terms of objectives, approach and present status of work.

  6. Standardized Modular Power Interfaces for Future Space Explorations Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies show that future human explorations missions are composed of multi-vehicle assemblies with interconnected electric power systems. Some vehicles are often intended to serve as flexible multi-purpose or multi-mission platforms. This drives the need for power architectures that can be reconfigured to support this level of flexibility. Power system developmental costs can be reduced, program wide, by utilizing a common set of modular building blocks. Further, there are mission operational and logistics cost benefits of using a common set of modular spares. These benefits are the goals of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project. A common set of modular blocks requires a substantial level of standardization in terms of the Electrical, Data System, and Mechanical interfaces. The AMPS project is developing a set of proposed interface standards that will provide useful guidance for modular hardware developers but not needlessly constrain technology options, or limit future growth in capability. In 2015 the AMPS project focused on standardizing the interfaces between the elements of spacecraft power distribution and energy storage. The development of the modular power standard starts with establishing mission assumptions and ground rules to define design application space. The standards are defined in terms of AMPS objectives including Commonality, Reliability-Availability, Flexibility-Configurability and Supportability-Reusability. The proposed standards are aimed at assembly and sub-assembly level building blocks. AMPS plans to adopt existing standards for spacecraft command and data, software, network interfaces, and electrical power interfaces where applicable. Other standards including structural encapsulation, heat transfer, and fluid transfer, are governed by launch and spacecraft environments and bound by practical limitations of weight and volume. Developing these mechanical interface standards is more difficult but

  7. Space Solar Power Satellite Systems, Modern Small Satellites, and Space Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsrud, Corey Alexis Marvin

    Space solar power satellite (SSPS) systems is the concept of placing large satellite into geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) to harvest and convert massive amounts of solar energy into microwave energy, and to transmit the microwaves to a rectifying antenna (rectenna) array on Earth. The rectenna array captures and converts the microwave power into usable power that is injected into the terrestrial electric grid for use. This work approached the microwave power beam as an additional source of power (with solar) for lower orbiting satellites. Assuming the concept of retrodirectivity, a GEO-SSPS antenna array system tracks and delivers microwave power to lower orbiting satellites. The lower orbiting satellites are equipped with a stacked photovoltaic (PV)/rectenna array hybrid power generation unit (HPGU) in order to harvest solar and/or microwave energy for on-board use during orbit. The area, and mass of the PV array part of the HPGU was reduced at about 32% beginning-of-life power in order to achieve the spacecraft power requirements. The HPGU proved to offer a mass decrease in the PGU, and an increase in mission life due to longer living component life of the rectenna array. Moreover, greater mission flexibility is achieved through a track and power delivery concept. To validate the potential advantages offered by a HPGU, a mission concept was presented that utilizes modern small satellites as technology demonstrators. During launch, a smaller power receiving "daughter" satellite sits inside a larger power transmitting "mother" satellite. Once separated from the launch vehicle the daughter satellite is ejected away from the mother satellite, and each satellite deploys its respective power transmitting or power receiving hardware's for experimentation. The concept of close proximity mission operations between the satellites is considered. To validate the technology of the space rectenna array part of the HPGU, six milestones were completed in the design. The first

  8. Space reactor power 1986: A year of choices and transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year has been an eventful one for the Space Reactor Programs. Both the SP-100 and Multimegawatt programs have made significant progress over the last year and that progress is the focus of this paper. In the SP-100 program the thermoelectric energy conversion concept powered by a compact, high-temperature, lithium-cooled, uranium-nitride-fueled fast spectrum reactor was selected for engineering development and ground demonstration testing at an electrical power level of 300 kilowatts. In addition, the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory was selected as the preferred site for the reactor ground test and a request for proposals (RFP) was issued to obtain an industrial contractor to design, develop, fabricate and direct the testing of the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. Moreover, a Reference Mission has been established for SP-100; this will help to focus efforts during the current phase of the program. In the Multimegawatt (MMW) program, activities moved from the planning phase into one of technology development and assessment with attendant preliminary definition and evaluation of power concepts against requirements of the Strategic Defencse Initiative

  9. Applications of Brayton Cycle technology to space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Closed Brayton (CBC) power conversion cycle can be used with a wide range of heat sources for space power applications. These heat source include solar concentrator, radioisotope, and reactor. With a solar concentrator, a solar dynamic ground demonstration test using existing Brayton components is being assembled for testing at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This 2-kWe system has a turbine inlet temperature of 1,015 K and is a complete end-to-end simulation of the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic design. With a radioisotope heat source, a 1-kWe Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) is under development using an existing turbo alternator compressor (TAC) for testing at the same NASA-LeRC facility. This DIPS unit is being developed as a replacement to Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to conserve the Pu-238 supply for interplanetary exploration. With a reactor heat source, many studies have been performed coupling the SP-100 reactor with a Brayton power conversion cycle. Applications for this reactor/CBC system include global communications satellites and electric propulsion for interplanetary exploration

  10. High Power Combline Filter for Deep Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. G. Subramanyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An S-band, compact, high power filter, for use in the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO, has been designed and tested for multipaction. The telemetry, tracking, and commanding (TT&C transponder of MOM is required to handle continuous RF power of 200 W in the telemetry path besides simultaneously maintaining an isolation of greater than 145 dBc to its sensitive telecommand path. This is accomplished with the help of a complex diplexer, requiring high power, high rejection transmit path filter, and a low power receive path filter. To reduce the complexity in the multipaction-free design and testing, the transmit path filter of the diplexer is split into a low rejection filter integral to the diplexer and an external high rejection filter. This paper highlights the design and space qualification phases of this high rejection filter. Multipaction test results with 6 dB margin are also presented. Major concerns of this filter design are isolation, insertion loss, and multipaction. Mission performance of the on-board filter is normal.

  11. Space nuclear power requirements for ozone layer modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work estimates the power requirements for using photochemical processes driven by space nuclear power to counteract the Earth's ozone layer depletion. The total quantity of ozone (O3) in the Earth's atmosphere is estimated to be about 4.7 x 1037 molecules. The ozone production and destruction rates in the stratosphere are both on the order of 4.9 x 1031 molecules/s, differing by a small fraction so that the net depletion rate is about 0.16 to 0.26% per year. The delivered optical power requirement for offsetting this depletion is estimated to be on the order of 3 GW. If the power were produced by satellite reactors at 800 km altitude (orbit decay time ∼ 300 years), some means of efficient power beaming would be needed to deliver the power to stratospheric levels (10--50 km). Ultraviolet radiation at 140--150 nm could have higher absorption rates in O2 (leading to production of atomic oxygen, which can combine with O2 to form O3) than in ozone (leading to photodissociation of O3). Potential radiation sources include H2 lasers and direct nuclear pumping of ultraviolet fluorescers. 5 refs

  12. Liquid metal coolants for space nuclear power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consideration is given to the results of investigations conducting in IPPE from the 1950s on the technology and heat transfer of liquid metal coolants (lithium and sodium-potassium eutectic alloy) of space nuclear power plants (SNPP). The advantage of lithium coolant is its low density, splendid heat-transfer properties, high boiling point, low saturated vapor pressure, low activation when passing through reactor core, etc. Its disadvantage is high melting point and the higher corrosion activity than sodium-potassium alloy one. Prospects of lithium coolant use in developing current powerful SNPP are shown. Reliable operation of liquid metal part (with sodium-potassium coolant) of SNPP of low power and limited life at satellites launching in the USSR in 1970-80s is pointed out

  13. Nuclear power in space. Use of reactors and radioactive substances as power sources in satellites and space probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today solar panels are the most common technique to supply power to satellites. Solar panels will work as long as the power demand of the satellite is limited and the satellite can be equipped with enough panels, and kept in an orbit that allows enough sunlight to hit the panels. There are various types of space missions that do not fulfil these criteria. With nuclear power these types of missions can be powered regardless of the sunlight and as early as 1961 the first satellite with a nuclear power source was placed in orbit. Out of seventy known space missions that has made use of nuclear power, ten have had some kind of failure. In no case has the failure been associated with the nuclear technology used. This report discusses to what degree satellites with nuclear power are a source for potential radioactive contamination of Swedish territory. It is not a discussion for or against nuclear power in space. Neither is it an assessment of consequences if radioactive material from a satellite would reach the earth's surface. Historically two different kinds of Nuclear Power Sources (NPS) have been used to generate electric power in space. The first is the reactor where the energy is derived from nuclear fission of 235U and the second is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) where electricity is generated from the heat of naturally decaying radionuclides. NPS has historically only been used in space by United States and the Soviet Union (and in one failing operation Russia). Nuclear Power Sources have been used in three types of space objects: satellites, space probes and moon/Mars vehicles. USA has launched one experimental reactor into orbit, all other use of NPS by the USA has been RTG:s. The Soviet Union, in contrast, only launched a few RTG:s but nearly forty reactors. The Soviet use of NPS is less transparent than the use in USA and some data published on Soviet systems are more or less well substantiated assessments. It is likely that also future

  14. Emerging Space Powers The New Space Programs of Asia, the Middle East, and South America

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian; Pirard, Théo

    2010-01-01

    This work introduces the important emerging space powers of the world. Brian Harvey describes the origins of the Japanese space program, from rocket designs based on WW II German U-boats to tiny solid fuel 'pencil' rockets, which led to the launch of the first Japanese satellite in 1970. The next two chapters relate how Japan expanded its space program, developing small satellites into astronomical observatories and sending missions to the Moon, Mars, comet Halley, and asteroids. Chapter 4 describes how India's Vikram Sarabhai developed a sounding rocket program in the 1960s. The following chapter describes the expansion of the Indian space program. Chapter 6 relates how the Indian space program is looking ahead to the success of the moon probe Chandrayan, due to launch in 2008, and its first manned launching in 2014. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 demonstrate how, in Iran, communications and remote sensing drive space technology. Chapter 10 outlines Brazil's road to space, begun in the mid-1960's with the launch of th...

  15. Advanced Electric Propulsion for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    The sun tower concept of collecting solar energy in space and beaming it down for commercial use will require very affordable in-space as well as earth-to-orbit transportation. Advanced electric propulsion using a 200 kW power and propulsion system added to the sun tower nodes can provide a factor of two reduction in the required number of launch vehicles when compared to in-space cryogenic chemical systems. In addition, the total time required to launch and deliver the complete sun tower system is of the same order of magnitude using high power electric propulsion or cryogenic chemical propulsion: around one year. Advanced electric propulsion can also be used to minimize the stationkeeping propulsion system mass for this unique space platform. 50 to 100 kW class Hall, ion, magnetoplasmadynamic, and pulsed inductive thrusters are compared. High power Hall thruster technology provides the best mix of launches saved and shortest ground to Geosynchronous Earth Orbital Environment (GEO) delivery time of all the systems, including chemical. More detailed studies comparing launch vehicle costs, transfer operations costs, and propulsion system costs and complexities must be made to down-select a technology. The concept of adding electric propulsion to the sun tower nodes was compared to a concept using re-useable electric propulsion tugs for Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) to GEO transfer. While the tug concept would reduce the total number of required propulsion systems, more launchers and notably longer LEO to GEO and complete sun tower ground to GEO times would be required. The tugs would also need more complex, longer life propulsion systems and the ability to dock with sun tower nodes.

  16. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 20000K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 5000K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 30000K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel

  17. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Leitgab, M.; Cowley, A

    2014-01-01

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power bea...

  18. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development

  19. Space craft thermal thermionic reactors with flat power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactors are potential candidates for energy generation in space missions over longer periods where high power output is required. Among different nuclear energy conversion options, the statical ones, such as thermo-electric or thermionic reactors, are preferable in order to avoid the kinetic disturbances of the space craft and furthermore in order to reduce the failure probabilities to a minimum, caused by lubricants and seals. In the present study, the main parameters of different types of thermal thermionic reactors are discussed which are fueled with U-233 or U-235 and moderated with ZrH1.7 or Beryllium. The investigated thermionic reactors will be layed out to have a constant heat production density on the emitter surface over the space variable, so as to achieve a maximum engineering efficiency with respect to the electrical conversion, nuclear fuel utilization, material damage, thermal and radiation gradients. The power flattening procedure is performed by varying the moderator to fuel ratio, both in axial and radial directions

  20. Test results of Ya-21u thermionic space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Soviet-made TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system unit designated Ya-21u underwent a total of 15 tests both in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR) (1989--1990) and in the US (August 1993 to March 1995) for a cumulative test/operation time of 7681 h at conditions far exceeding design limits. These tests included steady-state operation at different power levels, fast start-ups and power optimizations, and shock and vibration tests. Test results are presented and analyzed. Results indicate a gradual change in the performance parameters such as the optimum cesium pressure and optimum load voltage. The electric power and conversion efficiency of the unit at an input thermal power of 105 kW decreased from 3.7 kW (electric) and 4% in the test in the USSR to 2.13 kW (electric) and 2.3% in the last test in the US. A discussion and qualitative assessment of potential causes of the performance changes of the Ya-21u unit are given

  1. Cooperating expert systems for space station power distribution management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a complex system such as the manned Space Station, it is deemed necessary that many expert systems must perform tasks in a concurrent and cooperative manner. An important question to arise is: what cooperative-task-performing models are appropriate for multiple expert systems to jointly perform tasks. The solution to this question will provide a crucial automation design criteria for the Space Station complex systems architecture. Based on a client/server model for performing tasks, the authors have developed a system that acts as a front-end to support loosely-coupled communications between expert systems running on multiple Symbolics machines. As an example, they use the two ART*-based expert systems to demonstrate the concept of parallel symbolic manipulation for power distribution management and dynamic load planner/scheduler in the simulated Space Station environment. This on-going work will also explore other cooperative-task-performing models as alternatives which can evaluate inter and intra expert system communication mechanisms. It will serve as a testbed and a bench-marking tool for other Space Station expert subsystem communication and information exchange

  2. Combined-Brayton cycle, space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it is a widely recognized dynamic space conversion system, the Brayton cycle has been studied in France since several years, especially within the framework of a limited space program. A recuperated cycle of 20 to 30 kWe has been considered so far. However, possible applications could evolve and the need for an extended, diversified utilization of the Brayton cycle could appear. So, for Lunar or Mars bases which would accept large radiators and can benefit from a certain gravity level, combined cycle systems could be proposed. Following a reference to past works on space combined cycles, a possible association of a Brayton cycle with a thermoionic reactor is presented. The power level of a 'Topaz-2' type space nuclear system can be boosted from 8 kWe to around 36 to 53 kWe, at the expense of a large radiator of course. Furthermore, combined Brayton-Rankine, organic (toluene) or steam, cycles can pave the way to a simpler gas-cooled, particle bed reactor concept. A particular arrangement of HeXe heater and boiler or steam generator in series is proposed. It makes it possible to lower the reactor inlet temperature, which is quite adequate for the use of light water as moderator. Oustanding net efficiencies of 25.8 to 27.6 per cent, given the reactor temperature profile, are obtained. Consequences on the reactor design are mentioned

  3. Systems definition space-based power conversion systems. [for satellite power transmission to earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Potential space-located systems for the generation of electrical power for use on Earth are discussed and include: (1) systems producing electrical power from solar energy; (2) systems producing electrical power from nuclear reactors; and (3) systems for augmenting ground-based solar power plants by orbital sunlight reflectors. Systems (1) and (2) would utilize a microwave beam system to transmit their output to Earth. Configurations implementing these concepts were developed through an optimization process intended to yield the lowest cost for each. A complete program was developed for each concept, identifying required production rates, quantities of launches, required facilities, etc. Each program was costed in order to provide the electric power cost appropriate to each concept.

  4. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.

  5. Overview of materials technologies for space nuclear power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Ott, L. J.; Ingersoll, D. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A wide range of different space nuclear systems are currently being evaluated as part of the DOE Special Purpose Fission Technology program. The near-term subset of systems scheduled to be evaluated range from 50 kWe gas-, pumped liquid metal-, or liquid metal heat pipe-cooled reactors for space propulsion to 3 kWe heat pipe or pumped liquid metal systems for Mars surface power applications. The current status of the materials technologies required for the successful development of near-term space nuclear power and propulsion systems is reviewed. Materials examined in this overview include fuels (UN, UO2, UZrH), cladding and structural materials (stainless steel, superalloys, refractory alloys), neutron reflector materials (Be, BeO), and neutron shield materials (B4C,LiH). The materials technologies issues are considerably less demanding for the 3 kWe reactor systems due to lower operating temperatures, lower fuel burnup, and lower radiation damage levels. A few reactor subcomponents in the 3 kWe reactors under evaluation are being used near or above their engineering limits, which may adversely affect the 5 to 10 year lifetime design goal. It appears that most of these issues for the 3 kWe reactor systems can be accommodated by incorporating a few engineering design changes. Design limits (temperature, burnup, stress, radiation levels) for the various materials proposed for space nuclear reactors will be summarized. For example, the temperature and stress limits for Type 316 stainless steel in the 3 kWe Na-cooled heat pipe reactor (Stirling engine) concept will be controlled by thermal creep and CO2 corrosion considerations rather than radiation damage issues. Conversely, the lower operating temperature limit for the LiH shield material will likely be defined by ionizing radiation damage (radiolysis)-induced swelling, even for the relatively low radiation doses associated with the 3 kWe reactor. .

  6. Survey of future requirements for large space structures. [space platforms, large antennas, and power surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The future requirements for large space structures were examined and the foundation for long range planning of technology development for such structures is provided. Attention is concentrated on a period after 1985 for actual use. Basic ground rule of the study was that applications be of significant importance and have promise of direct economic benefit to mankind. The inputs to the study came from visits to a large number of government and industrial organizations, written studies in current literature, and approximate analyses of potential applications. The paper identifies diverse space applications for large area structures in three general categories: (1) large surfaces for power, (2) large antenna to receive and transmit energy over the radio frequency bandwidth, and (3) space platforms to provide area for general utilizations.

  7. Performance/Power Space Exploration for Binary64 Division Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The digit-recurrence division algorithm is used in several high-performance processors because it provides good tradeoffs in terms of latency, area and power dissipation. In this work we develop a minimally redundant radix-8 divider for binary64 (double-precision) aiming at obtaining better energ...... efficiency in the performance-per-watt space. The results show that the radix-8 divider, when compared to radix-4 and radix-16 units, requires less energy to complete a division for high clock rates....

  8. Robustness of Spacing-based Power Divergence Statistics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boček, Pavel

    Praha : ÚTIA AVČR, v.v.i, 2011 - (Janžura, M.; Ivánek, J.). s. 23-23 [7th International Workshop on Data - Algorithms - Decision Making. 27.11.2011-29.11.2011, Mariánská] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GAP202/10/0618 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : alpha-divergence * goodness-of-fit Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/SI/bocek- robustness of spacing-based power divergence statistics.pdf

  9. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  10. Design of space-type electronic power transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, J. F.; Lagadinos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Both open and encapsulated varieties of high reliability, low weight, and high efficiency moderate and high voltage transformers were investigated to determine the advantages and limitations of their construction in the ranges of power and voltage required for operation in the hard vacuum environment of space. Topics covered include: (1) selection of the core material; (2) preliminary calculation of core dimensions; (3) selection of insulating materials including magnet wire insulation, coil forms, and layer and interwinding insulation; (4) coil design; (5) calculation of copper losses, core losses and efficiency; (6) calculation of temperature rise; and (7) optimization of design with changes in core selection or coil design as required to meet specifications.

  11. Protoflight photovoltaic power module system-level tests in the space power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Juan C.; Kirch, Luke A.

    1989-01-01

    Work Package Four, which includes the NASA-Lewis and Rocketdyne, has selected an approach for the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic (PV) Power Module flight certification that combines system level qualification and acceptance testing in the thermal vacuum environment: The protoflight vehicle approach. This approach maximizes ground test verification to assure system level performance and to minimize risk of on-orbit failures. The preliminary plans for system level thermal vacuum environmental testing of the protoflight PV Power Module in the NASA-Lewis Space Power Facility (SPF), are addressed. Details of the facility modifications to refurbish SPF, after 13 years of downtime, are briefly discussed. The results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of system level environmental testing in screening out incipient part and workmanship defects and unique failure modes are discussed. Preliminary test objectives, test hardware configurations, test support equipment, and operations are presented.

  12. PLASMAK star power for energy intensive space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneutronic energy (fusion with little or negligible neutron flux) requires plasma pressures and stable confinement times larger than an be delivered by current approaches. If plasma pressures appropriate to burn times on the order of milliseconds could be achieved in aneutronic fuels, then high power densities and very compact, relatively clean burning engines for space and other applications would be at hand. The PLASMAK innovation will make this possible; its unique pressure efficient structure, exceptional stability, fluid-mechanically compressible Mantle and direct inductive MHD electric power conversion advantages are described. Peak burn densities of tens of megawatts per cc give it compactness even in the multi-gigawatt electric output size. Engineering advantages indicate a rapid development schedule at very modest cost

  13. A Note on Bimodal Accretion Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Dullemond, C.P.; Turolla, R.

    1998-01-01

    The existence of bimodal disks is investigated. Following a simple argument based on energetic considerations we show that stationary, bimodal accretion disk models in which a Shakura--Sunyaev disk (SSD) at large radii matches an advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) at smaller radii are never possible using the standard slim disk approach, unless some extra energy flux is present. The same argument, however, predicts the possibility of a transition from an outer Shapiro--Lightman--Eardle...

  14. System simulation of a multicell thermionic space power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Alan Vincent

    For many years, thermionic power has been considered for space application. The prominent feature of the power conversion system is that there are no moving parts. Although designs have been developed by various organizations, no comprehensive system models are known to exist which can simulate transient behavior of a multicell design nor is there a method to directly couple these models to other codes that can calculate variations in reactivity. Thus, a procedure has been developed to couple the performance calculations of a space nuclear reactor thermal/hydraulics code with a neutron diffusion code to analyze temperature feedback. Thermionic power is based on the thermionic emissions principle where free electrons in a conductor have sufficient energy to escape the surface. Kinetic energy is given to the electrons by heating the conductor. Specifically, a 48 kWe thermionic power converter system model has been developed and used to model startup and other transients. Less than 10% of the fuel heat is converted to electricity, and the rest is rejected to space via a heat pipe radiator. An electromagnetic pump circulates the liquid metal coolant. First, a startup transient model was developed which showed stable operation through ignition of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs) and thawing of the radiator heat pipes. Also, the model's capability was expanded to include two-phase heat transfer to model boiling using coupled mass and thermal energy conservation equations. The next step incorporated effects of reactivity feedback---showing that various mechanisms will prevent power and temperature run-up for a flow reduction scenario where the reactor control systems fail to respond. In particular, the Doppler effect was shown to counter a positive worth due to partial core voiding although steps must be taken to preclude film boiling in that high superheats will result in TFE failures. Finally, analysis of the core grid spacer location suggests it should be located at

  15. Development of the space power plants in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art and prospects for development of the space power plants in the USA are considered. Design specifications of a 100 kW basic plant are presented as well as the data on expenditures and dead-line for construction of the power plants developed according to the SP-100 program. For construction of hidh power plants (> 10 MWt) dust-fuelled FBR and RBR reactors are shown to be the most promising. Borh reactors concepts, based on direct gas cooling of duel particles, are characterized by small particle sizer (of an order of 500 μm), high power density of the reactor core, insignificant temperature difference between fuel particles and coolant (about 10 K), high temperature of the coolant at the reactor core outlet (1500-3000 K). Both reactors are compact-maximum lenth is 1-1.2 m, their mass is 2-3 t. As to the neutron characterisitcs, the FBR reactor is analogous to RBR type, but has a fixed fuel bed

  16. A heat receiver design for solar dynamic space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karl W.; Dustin, Miles O.; Crane, Roger

    1990-01-01

    An advanced heat pipe receiver designed for a solar dynamic space power system is described. The power system consists of a solar concentrator, solar heat receiver, Stirling heat engine, linear alternator and waste heat radiator. The solar concentrator focuses the sun's energy into a heat receiver. The engine and alternator convert a portion of this energy to electric power and the remaining heat is rejected by a waste heat radiator. Primary liquid metal heat pipes transport heat energy to the Stirling engine. Thermal energy storage allows this power system to operate during the shade portion of an orbit. Lithium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic is the thermal energy storage material. Thermal energy storage canisters are attached to the midsection of each heat pipe. The primary heat pipes pass through a secondary vapor cavity heat pipe near the engine and receiver interface. The secondary vapor cavity heat pipe serves three important functions. First, it smooths out hot spots in the solar cavity and provides even distribution of heat to the engine. Second, the event of a heat pipe failure, the secondary heat pipe cavity can efficiently transfer heat from other operating primary heat pipes to the engine heat exchanger of the defunct heat pipe. Third, the secondary heat pipe vapor cavity reduces temperature drops caused by heat flow into the engine. This unique design provides a high level of reliability and performance.

  17. Stirling System Modeling for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic model of a high-power Stirling convertor has been developed for space nuclear power systems modeling. The model is based on the Component Test Power Convertor (CTPC), a 12.5-kWe free-piston Stirling convertor. The model includes the fluid heat source, the Stirling convertor, output power, and heat rejection. The Stirling convertor model includes the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, mechanical mass-spring damper systems, and the linear alternator. The model was validated against test data. Both nonlinear and linear versions of the model were developed. The linear version algebraically couples two separate linear dynamic models; one model of the Stirling cycle and one model of the thermal system, through the pressure factors. Future possible uses of the Stirling system dynamic model are discussed. A pair of commercially available 1-kWe Stirling convertors is being purchased by NASA Glenn Research Center. The specifications of those convertors may eventually be incorporated into the dynamic model and analysis compared to the convertor test data. Subsequent potential testing could include integrating the convertors into a pumped liquid metal hot-end interface. This test would provide more data for comparison to the dynamic model analysis.

  18. Space Solar Power Concepts: Demonstrations to Pilot Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Connie K.; Feingold, Harvey; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The availability of abundant, affordable power where needed is a key to the future exploration and development of space as well as future sources of clean terrestrial power. One innovative approach to providing such power is the use of wireless power transmission (WPT). There are at least two possible WPT methods that appear feasible; microwave and laser. Microwave concepts have been generated, analyzed and demonstrated. Technologies required to provide an end-to-end system have been identified and roadmaps generated to guide technology development requirements. Recently, laser W T approaches have gained an increased interest. These approaches appear to be very promising and will possibly solve some of the major challenges that exist with the microwave option. Therefore, emphasis is currently being placed on the laser WPT activity. This paper will discuss the technology requirements, technology roadmaps and technology flight experiments demonstrations required to lead toward a pilot plant demonstration. Concepts will be discussed along with the modeling techniques that are used in developing them. Feasibility will be addressed along with the technology needs, issues and capabilities for particular concepts. Flight experiments and demonstrations will be identified that will pave the road from demonstrations to pilot plants and beyond.

  19. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  20. High Voltage Power Supply Design Guide for Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bever, Renate S.; Ruitberg, Arthur P.; Kellenbenz, Carl W.; Irish, Sandra M.

    2006-01-01

    This book is written for newcomers to the topic of high voltage (HV) in space and is intended to replace an earlier (1970s) out-of-print document. It discusses the designs, problems, and their solutions for HV, mostly direct current, electric power, or bias supplies that are needed for space scientific instruments and devices, including stepping supplies. Output voltages up to 30kV are considered, but only very low output currents, on the order of microamperes. The book gives a brief review of the basic physics of electrical insulation and breakdown problems, especially in gases. It recites details about embedment and coating of the supplies with polymeric resins. Suggestions on HV circuit parts follow. Corona or partial discharge testing on the HV parts and assemblies is discussed both under AC and DC impressed test voltages. Electric field analysis by computer on an HV device is included in considerable detail. Finally, there are many examples given of HV power supplies, complete with some of the circuit diagrams and color photographs of the layouts.

  1. Power conversion for a microreactor: a nuclear space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generating nuclear power in space is of fundamental importance if it is desired to realize some aggressive type of exploration. Basically, at Earth orbit (either LEO or GEO) most applications tend to use solar panels, which are just fine, in spite of problems such as vibration, non optimal light incidence angle and non electricity generation due to Earth's shadow. For deep space exploration the nuclear power is been considered as a strong candidate and maybe the only one. The Institute for Advanced Studies is conducting the TERRA project that tracks the developments in the area and, also, intends to develop the key technologies that will allow such a machine to be build with indigenous technology. TERRA stands for TEcnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados. This project, at its first stage aims at the specification of the microreactor fuel element with its possible geometrical arrangements. Also for this stage a gas Brayton closed cycle is being considered as a heat conversion to electricity and/or propulsion effect. The basic idea is to adapt an open loop aeronautic gas turbine to operate as a closed loop gas Turbine. This arrangement will use heat pipes as a cold source, or a heat rejection passive system. Up to this point a lot has been done in terms of numerical and graphical development. It is expected that some built up will be happening during this year. An account of this work will be presented at the conference. (author)

  2. Potential civil mission applications for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modest energy needs of spacecraft over the last twenty-five years have been met by photovoltaic arrays with batteries, primary fuel cells, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Although these energy sources have been adequate in the past, the next generation of space missions will place requirements on energy systems that might be difficult to satisfy with these currently utilized technologies. The extent of future space exploration could very well be limited by the cost and difficulty of supplying energy to the spacecraft unless advanced technologies are developed. A number of applications studies have emphasized the need for a lighter, cheaper, and more compact high-energy source than the scaling up of current technologies would permit (Angelo and Buden 1981). A nuclear reactor power system has the potential of satisfying these requirements. The joint NASA/DOD/DOE SP-100 program has been initiated to explore and evaluate this option and to develop critical elements of the technology. The major thrust of the program at the outset is aimed at space reactor systems of the 100 kW class

  3. Space Solar Power Satellite Technology Development at the Glenn Research Center: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; George, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). is participating in the Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology program (SERT) for the development of a solar power satellite concept. The aim of the program is to provide electrical power to Earth by converting the Sun's energy and beaming it to the surface. This paper will give an overall view of the technologies being pursued at GRC including thin film photovoltaics, solar dynamic power systems, space environmental effects, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion. The developmental path not only provides solutions to gigawatt sized space power systems for the future, but provides synergistic opportunities for contemporary space power architectures. More details of Space Solar Power can be found by reading the references sited in this paper and by connecting to the web site http://moonbase.msfc.nasa.gov/ and accessing the "Space Solar Power" section "Public Access" area.

  4. Powering Up With Space-Time Wind Forecasting

    KAUST Repository

    Hering, Amanda S.

    2010-03-01

    The technology to harvest electricity from wind energy is now advanced enough to make entire cities powered by it a reality. High-quality, short-term forecasts of wind speed are vital to making this a more reliable energy source. Gneiting et al. (2006) have introduced a model for the average wind speed two hours ahead based on both spatial and temporal information. The forecasts produced by this model are accurate, and subject to accuracy, the predictive distribution is sharp, that is, highly concentrated around its center. However, this model is split into nonunique regimes based on the wind direction at an offsite location. This paper both generalizes and improves upon this model by treating wind direction as a circular variable and including it in the model. It is robust in many experiments, such as predicting wind at other locations. We compare this with the more common approach of modeling wind speeds and directions in the Cartesian space and use a skew-t distribution for the errors. The quality of the predictions from all of these models can be more realistically assessed with a loss measure that depends upon the power curve relating wind speed to power output. This proposed loss measure yields more insight into the true value of each models predictions. © 2010 American Statistical Association.

  5. Pu-powered space probes face uncertain future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crashed into the gas clouds of Jupiter in July, the only representatives of humankind with a good view were a trio of spacecraft, Voyager 2, Galileo, and Ulysses. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) supplied by the Department of Energy provided the power to run the observing instruments on these spacecraft, but now that source of power-and all deep-space missions-may be in jeopardy. Despite the fact that the recently passed congressional appropriations bill increased funding for the RTG program by nearly 20 percent, from $51 million in 1994 to $61 million in 1995, rumors persist that the program is in danger of being discontinued. Peter Ulrich, chief of the Flight Programs Branch of the Solar System Exploration Division of the Office of Space Science at NASA, was confident that the program would stay alive through NASA's next mission. RTGs will be on board the Cassini spacecraft scheduled to blast off in 1997 for an exploration of Saturn and its rings and moons. RTG's use the heat produced by the alpha decay of plutonium-238 to heat a thermocouple, which generates electricity. Cassini is designed to carry three RTGs, producing a total of 750 W of electricity initially, decreasing to about 600 W by the time it reaches Saturn seven years after launch. The RTGs on Cassini will carry a total of about 70 lb of plutonium oxide. RTGs have no moving parts. They are simple, rugged, and reliable. According to Ulrich, open-quotes It's really a very well-matched power source for something like a remote mission.close quotes The political situation is less clear, though. open-quotes What I hear unofficially is funding looks dime,close quotes said the DOE spokesperson, open-quotes and the lights are being turned off for these missions.close quotes If that happens, the lights will go out on NASA's deep-space missions to other parts of our solar system

  6. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power

  7. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  8. Cyclic gaseous core reactors for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive theoretical-experimental investigations have been performed at the University of Florida on cyclic gaseous core reactors. Neutronics-energetics analyses have led to a basic scientific understanding of the behavior associated with conceptual operation of these devices. Thermal-physical properties studies have resulted in the identification of desirable working fluids and UF6-materials interaction studies have identified a number of potential problems as well as corresponding potential solutions. The results of these research efforts indicate that the cyclic gaseous core reactor is a versatile and promising nuclear energy concept that has attractive features for space power generation. These include low critical mass, high fuel utilization, high output temperature and good thermal efficiency, wide operating ranges, excellent control and safety characteristics, and adaptability to a wide variety of different energy conversion systems

  9. Instrumentation and controls evaluation for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of control and protection systems should be coordinated with the design of the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical aspects of the core and plant at the earliest possible stage of concept development. An integrated systematic design approach is necessary to prevent uncoordinated choices in one technology area from imposing impractical or impossible requirements in another. Significant development and qualification will be required for virtually every aspect of reactor control and instrumentation. In-core instrumentation widely used in commercial light water reactors will not likely be usable in the higher temperatures of a space power plant. Thermocouples for temperature measurement and gamma thermometers for flux measurement appear to be the only viable candidates. Recent developments in ex-core neutron detectors may provide achievable alternatives to in-core measurements. Reliable electronic equipment and high-temperature actuators will require major development efforts

  10. Instrumentation and Controls evaluation for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of control and protection systems should be coordinated with the design of the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical aspects of the core and plant at the earliest possible stage of concept development. An integrated systematic design approach is necessary to prevent uncoordinated choices in one technology area from imposing impractical or impossible requirements in another. Significant development and qualification will be required for virtually every aspect of reactor control and instrumentation. In-core instrumentation widely used in commercial light water reactors will not likely be usable in the higher temperatures of a space power plant. Thermocouples for temperature measurement and gamma thermometers for flux measurement appear to be the only viable candidates. Recent developments in ex-core neutron detectors may provide achievable alternatives to in-core measurements. Reliable electronic equipment and high-temperature actuators will require major development efforts

  11. Advances in space power research and technology at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and plans in various areas of the NASA Space Power Program are discussed. Solar cell research is narrowed to GaAs, multibandgap, and thin Si cells for arrays in planar and concentrator configurations, with further work to increase cell efficiency, radiation hardness, develop flexible encapsulants, and reduce cost. Electrochemical research is concentrating on increasing energy and power density, cycle and wet stand life, reliability and cost reduction of batteries. Further development of the Ni-H2 battery and O2-H2 fuel cell to multihundred kW with a 5 year life and 30,000 cycles is noted. Basic research is ongoing for alkali metal anodes for high energy density secondary cells. Nuclear thermoelectric propulsion is being developed for outer planets exploration propulsion systems, using Si-Ge generators, and studies with rare earth chalcogenides and sulfides are mentioned. Power Systems Management seeks to harmonize increasing power supply levels with inner and outer spacecraft environments, circuits, demands, and automatic monitoring. Concomitant development of bipolar transistors, an infrared rectenna, spacecraft charging measurement, and larger heat pipe transport capacity are noted

  12. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 5: Space shuttle powered explicit guidance. [space shuttle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    An optimum powered explicit guidance algorithm capable of handling all space shuttle exoatospheric maneuvers is presented. The theoretical and practical basis for the currently baselined space shuttle powered flight guidance equations and logic is documented. Detailed flow diagrams for implementing the steering computations for all shuttle phases, including powered return to launch site (RTLS) abort, are also presented. Derivation of the powered RTLS algorithm is provided, as well as detailed flow diagrams for implementing the option. The flow diagrams and equations are compatible with the current powered flight documentation.

  13. Catalogue of space objects and events as a powerful tool for scientific researches on space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, V.; Stepanyants, V.; Tuchin, A.; Khutorovsky, Z.

    Wide work on developing and maintenance of the Catalogue of scientific information on space objects and events is continuing at the Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics. The work is making in cooperation with Russian company "Space information analytical systems" (KIA Systems). Powerful software tool is developed by now including:- informational core (relational database in RDBMS Oracle 8i environment)with special tools for automatic initial processing and systematization ofdata- software complex for orbital modeling and space objects and eventsdynamical catalogue maintenance- special information - analytical software Informational core covers wide spectrum of data needed for following purposes:- full-scale and high quality modeling of object's motion in near-Earth space(orbital and measurement data, solar flux and geomagnetic indices, Earthrotation parameters etc.)- determination of various events parameters (launches, manoeuvres,fragmentations etc.)- analysis of space debris sources- studying long-term orbital evolution (over several years or tens of years)- other The database is storing huge volume of data including:- optical measurements- TLEs- information about all space launches took place since 1957- information about space missions and programs- manoeuvres- fragmentations- launch sequences for typical orbital insertions- various characteristics for orbital objects (payloads, stages, fragments)- officially released UN and ITU registration data- other By now there are records storing in informational core for more than 28000 orbital objects (both catalogued and not), about all orbital launch attempts since 04.10.1957 (including failed ones), more than 30millions records of orbital information (TLEs, state vectors, polynomial data), more than 200000 optical measurements (normal places) for GEO region objects, calculated data on more than 14 millions of close approaches had taken place during last five years and other data. Software complex for orbital

  14. Space and Terrestrial Power System Integration Optimization Code BRMAPS for Gas Turbine Space Power Plants With Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    In view of the difficult times the US and global economies are experiencing today, funds for the development of advanced fission reactors nuclear power systems for space propulsion and planetary surface applications are currently not available. However, according to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 the U.S. needs to invest in developing fission reactor technology for ground based terrestrial power plants. Such plants would make a significant contribution toward drastic reduction of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming. To accomplish this goal the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project (NGNP) has been established by DOE under the Generation IV Nuclear Systems Initiative. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was designated as the lead in the development of VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) and HTGR (High Temperature Gas Reactor) technology to be integrated with MMW (multi-megawatt) helium gas turbine driven electric power AC generators. However, the advantages of transmitting power in high voltage DC form over large distances are also explored in the seminar lecture series. As an attractive alternate heat source the Liquid Fluoride Reactor (LFR), pioneered at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the mid 1960's, would offer much higher energy yields than current nuclear plants by using an inherently safe energy conversion scheme based on the Thorium --> U233 fuel cycle and a fission process with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The power plants are to be sized to meet electric power demand during peak periods and also for providing thermal energy for hydrogen (H2) production during "off peak" periods. This approach will both supply electric power by using environmentally clean nuclear heat which does not generate green house gases, and also provide a clean fuel H2 for the future, when, due to increased global demand and the decline in discovering new deposits, our supply of liquid fossil fuels will have been used up. This is

  15. Low-cost space fission power systems utilizing US and former Soviet Union experience and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the author's approach to space power total economics. In the past 40 years of U.S. government sponsored space nuclear power developments, total economics has received only token consideration. In the real world, nuclear power has had limited acceptance where it provided the enabling capability i.e. isotopes for low power, long life, deep space missions, or reactor power for underwater nuclear submarines. It was also accepted where it was perceived to be more economic. Examples are nuclear reactor powered aircraft carriers, escort vessels and central station power stations. In any case, real and perceived public and environmental safety must always be included into the economic equation

  16. Dispersion modeling of thermal power plant emissions on stochastic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorle, J. M. R.; Sambana, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to couple a deterministic atmospheric dispersion solver based on Gaussian model with a nonintrusive stochastic model to quantify the propagation of multiple uncertainties. The nonintrusive model is based on probabilistic collocation framework. The advantage of nonintrusive nature is to retain the existing deterministic plume dispersion model without missing the accuracy in extracting the statistics of stochastic solution. The developed model is applied to analyze the SO2 emission released from coal firing unit in the second stage of the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) in Dadri, India using "urban" conditions. The entire application is split into two cases, depending on the source of uncertainty. In case 1, the uncertainties in stack gas exit conditions are used to construct the stochastic space while in case 2, meteorological conditions are considered as the sources of uncertainty. Both cases develop 2D uncertain random space in which the uncertainty propagation is quantified in terms of plume rise and pollutant concentration distribution under slightly unstable atmospheric stability conditions. Starting with deterministic Gaussian plume model demonstration and its application, development of stochastic collocation model, convergence study, error analysis, and uncertainty quantification are presented in this paper.

  17. Technology status of tantalum alloys for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum alloys have a variety of properties which make them attractive candidates for application in nuclear power systems required to operate in space at elevated temperatures (1200 to 16000K) for extended time periods. Most of the technology development on this class of alloys which is pertinent to space system application occurred during the 1960 to 1972 time period under NASA sponsorship. The most extensive data bases resulting from this earlier work were obtained on the alloys T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and ASTAR 811C (Ta-8W-1Re-0.7Hf-0.025C). Emphasis in this paper is directed at the following technical factors: producibility, creep strength, weldability and compatibility. These factors are considered to be the most important elements in the selection of alloys for this application. Review of the available information indicates that alloys of this type are appropriate for application in many systems, particularly those utilizing alkali metals as the working fluid. 43 refs

  18. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  19. Power Electronics Being Developed for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    Electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space missions need to operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments that include very low temperatures. Spacecraft that operate in such cold environments carry a large number of heaters so that the ambient temperature for the onboard electronics remains near 20 C. Electronics that can operate at cryogenic temperatures will simplify system design and reduce system size and weight by eliminating the heaters and their associated structures. As a result, system development and launch cost will be reduced. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, an ongoing program is focusing on the development of power electronics geared for deep space low-temperature environments. The research and development efforts include electrical components design, circuit design and construction, and system integration and demonstration at cryogenic temperatures. Investigations are being carried out on circuits and systems that are targeted for use in NASA missions where low temperatures will be encountered: devices such as ceramic and tantalum capacitors, metal film resistors, semiconductor switches, magnetics, and integrated circuits including dc/dc converters, operational amplifiers, voltage references, and motor controllers. Test activities cover a wide range of device and circuit performance under simple as well as complex test conditions, such as multistress and thermal cycling. The effect of low-temperature conditions on the switching characteristics of an advanced silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor is shown. For gate voltages (VGS) below 2.6 V, drain currents at -190 C are lower than drain currents at room temperature (20 C).

  20. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  1. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

  2. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  3. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leitgab, M

    2014-01-01

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

  4. Ultralightweight Fresnel Lens Solar Concentrators for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeill, M. J.; McDanal, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    The first phase of this project was completed in March 2000, and included the successful technology demonstration of a new ultralightweight photovoltaic concentrator array at the fully functional panel level. The new array is called the Stretched Lens Aurora (SLA) array, and uses deployable, flexible, thin-film silicone rubber Fresnel lenses to focus sunlight onto high efficiency multijunction solar cells, which are mounted to a composite radiator surface for waste heat dissipation. A prototype panel was delivered to NASA Marshall in March 2000, and comprised four side-by-side lenses focussing sunlight onto four side-by-side photovoltaic receivers. This prototype panel was tested by NASA Glenn prior to delivery to NASA Marshall. The best of the four lens/receiver modules achieved 27.4% efficiency at room temperature in the NASA Glenn solar simulator tests. This performance equates to 375 W/sq.m. areal power and 378 W/kg specific power at the fully functional panel level. We believe this to be the first space solar array of any kind to simulataneously meet the two long-standing NASA goals of 300 W/sq.m. and 300 W/kg at the functional panel level. Key results for the first phase of the program have been documented by ENTECH in a Draft Final Technical Report, which is presently being reviewed by NASA, and which should be published in the near future.

  5. Application of Hybrid Optimization-Expert System for Optimal Power Management on Board Space Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James; Chattopadhyay, Deb; Basheer, Omar Ali AL

    1996-01-01

    The space power system has two sources of energy: photo-voltaic blankets and batteries. The optimal power management problem on-board has two broad operations: off-line power scheduling to determine the load allocation schedule of the next several hours based on the forecast of load and solar power availability. The nature of this study puts less emphasis on speed requirement for computation and more importance on the optimality of the solution. The second category problem, on-line power rescheduling, is needed in the event of occurrence of a contingency to optimally reschedule the loads to minimize the 'unused' or 'wasted' energy while keeping the priority on certain type of load and minimum disturbance of the original optimal schedule determined in the first-stage off-line study. The computational performance of the on-line 'rescheduler' is an important criterion and plays a critical role in the selection of the appropriate tool. The Howard University Center for Energy Systems and Control has developed a hybrid optimization-expert systems based power management program. The pre-scheduler has been developed using a non-linear multi-objective optimization technique called the Outer Approximation method and implemented using the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). The optimization model has the capability of dealing with multiple conflicting objectives viz. maximizing energy utilization, minimizing the variation of load over a day, etc. and incorporates several complex interaction between the loads in a space system. The rescheduling is performed using an expert system developed in PROLOG which utilizes a rule-base for reallocation of the loads in an emergency condition viz. shortage of power due to solar array failure, increase of base load, addition of new activity, repetition of old activity etc. Both the modules handle decision making on battery charging and discharging and allocation of loads over a time-horizon of a day divided into intervals of 10

  6. An Ultra Low Power Cryo-Refrigerator for Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA Space Science Missions will incorporate detectors, sensors, shields, and telescopes that must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures. An enabling...

  7. Bimodality and negative heat capacity in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution addresses the question of the possible link between multifragmentation and the liquid-gas phase transition of nuclear matter. Bi-modality seems to be a robust signal of this link in the sense that theoretical calculations indicate that it is preserved even if a sizeable fraction of the available energy has not been shared among all the degrees of freedom. The corresponding measured properties are coherent with what is expected in a liquid-gas phase transition picture. Moreover, bi-modality and negative heat capacity are observed for the same set of events. (authors)

  8. Co-speech gesture in bimodal bilinguals

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Shannon; Emmorey, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The effects of knowledge of sign language on co-speech gesture were investigated by comparing the spontaneous gestures of bimodal bilinguals (native users of American Sign Language and English; n = 13) and non-signing native English speakers (n = 12). Each participant viewed and re-told the Canary Row cartoon to a non-signer whom they did not know. Nine of the thirteen bimodal bilinguals produced at least one ASL sign, which we hypothesise resulted from a failure to inhibit ASL. Compared with...

  9. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio, E-mail: santos-en@yahoo.com; Chiesa, Matteo [Laboratory for Energy and NanoScience (LENS), Institute Center for Future Energy (iFES), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barcons, Victor [Departament de Disseny i Programació de Sistemes Electrònics, UPC - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Bases, 61, 08242 Manresa (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface.

  10. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface

  11. Bimodal condensation silicone elastomers as dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    unimodal refers to that there is one polymer only in the system. As an alternative to unimodal networks there are the bimodal networks where two polymers with significantly different molecular weights are mixed with one crosslinker. [2]Silicone rubber can be divided into condensation type and addition type...... according to the curing reaction. The advantages of condensation silicones compared to addition are the relatively low cost, the curing rate largely being independent of temperature, the excellent adhesion, and the catalyst being nontoxic. [3]In this work, a series of bimodal condensation silicone...

  12. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  13. Radioisotope fueled pulsed power generation system for propulsion and electrical power for deep space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Troy

    Space exploration missions to the moon, Mars, and other celestial bodies have allowed for great scientific leaps to enhance our knowledge of the universe; yet the astronomical cost of these missions limits their utility to only a few select agencies. Reducing the cost of exploratory space travel will give rise to a new era of exploration, where private investors, universities, and world governments can send satellites to far off planets and gather important data. By using radioisotope power sources and thermal storage devices, a duty cycle can be introduced to extract large amounts of energy in short amounts of time, allowing for efficient space travel. The same device can also provide electrical power for subsystems such as communications, drills, lasers, or other components that can provide valuable scientific information. This project examines the use of multiple radioisotope sources combined with a thermal capacitor using Phase Change Materials (PCMs) which can collect energy over a period of time. The result of this design culminates in a variety of possible spacecraft with their own varying costs, transit times, and objectives. Among the most promising are missions to Mars which cost less than 17M, missions that can provide power to satellite constellations for decades, or missions that can deliver large, Opportunity-sized (185kg) payloads to mars for less than 53M. All made available to a much wider range of customer with commercially available satellite launches from earth. The true cost of such progress though lies in the sometimes substantial increase in transit times for these missions.

  14. Observing power blackouts from space - A disaster related study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Ziskin, D.; Baugh, K. E.; Tuttle, B.; Erwin, E.; Kerle, N.

    2009-04-01

    capability of detecting power blackouts in OLS data have been identified (e.g. sunlight, heavy cloud cover and bright moonlight). Furthermore, the change detection procedure only works when power blackouts happen or still persist at night at the time of an OLS overpass. In some cases (e.g. Hurricane Katrina) it has been possible to track the gradual recovery of power by repeating the procedure on nights following a disaster event. In this paper several examples of successful power blackout detection following natural disasters including hurricanes (e.g. Isabel 2003 and Wilma 2005 in the USA) and earthquakes (e.g. Gujarat Earthquake 2001 in India) will be presented, whereas overlaid hurricane paths and earthquake epicenters serve as landmarks and indicate locations around the potential highest impact. Disaster impact assessment and post-disaster research is strongly related to impacts on population, related infrastructure and activities (Kerle et al. 2005, Zhang and Kerle 2008). In particular in the case of emergency management and response humans are the main actors and first-pass assessment of affected population and locations of affected areas are essential. Space-based power blackout detection, as described above, has the potential to delineate the spatial extent of the disaster impact. Overlaying the respective OLS data with regional population data such as LandScan (Dobson et al. 2000) or Gridded Population of the World (CIESIN and CIAT 2005) allows estimating a potential number of affected people. Without a doubt such estimates comprise a considerable number of uncertainties. However, the capability of providing the information in near-real time as offered by using DMSP-OLS makes the presented approach very valuable for emergency and disaster managers worldwide. REFERENCES Center for International Earth Science Information Network CIESIN at Columbia University, and Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical CIAT (2005). Gridded Population of the World Version 3 (GPWv

  15. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort will establish the feasibility of developing a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space...

  16. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADVR, Inc. proposes the development of a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space qualified, phase modulator for the NASA Laser Interferometer...

  17. Analysis and Test of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Power System for Space Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Varanauski, Donald; Clark, Robert, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop a prototype Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell breadboard system for fuhlre space applications. This prototype will be used to develop a comprehensive design basis for a space-rated PEM fuel cell powerplant. The prototype system includes reactant pressure regulators, ejector-based reactant pumps, a 4-kW fuel cell stack and cooling system, and a passive, membranebased oxygen / water separator. A computer model is being developed concurrently to analytically predict fluid flow in the oxidant reactant system. Fuel cells have historically played an important role in human-rated spacecraft. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used fuel cells for vehicle electrical power. The Space Shuttle currently uses three Alkaline Fuel Cell Powerplants (AFCP) to generate all of the vehicle's 15-20kW electrical power. Engineers at the Johnson Space Center have leveraged off the development effort ongoing in the commercial arena to develop PEM fuel cel ls for terrestrial uses. The prototype design originated from efforts to develop a PEM fuel cell replacement for the current Space Shuttle AFCP' s. In order to improve on the life and an already excellent hi storical record of reliability and safety, three subsystems were focused on. These were the fuel cell stack itself, the reactant circulation devices, and reactant / product water separator. PEM fuel cell stack performance is already demonstrating the potential for greater than four times the useful life of the current Shuttle's AFCP. Reactant pumping for product water removal has historically been accomplished with mechanical pumps. Ejectors offer an effective means of reactant pumping as well as the potential for weight reduction, control simplification, and long life. Centrifugal water separation is used on the current AFCP. A passive, membrane-based water separator offers compatibility with the micro-gravity environment of space, and the potential for control simplification, elimination of

  18. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  19. Controllability of Continuous Bimodal Linear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Josep Ferrer; Juan R. Pacha; Marta Peña

    2013-01-01

    We consider bimodal linear systems consisting of two linear dynamics acting on each side of a given hyperplane, assuming continuity along the separating hyperplane. We prove that the study of controllability can be reduced to the unobservable case, and for these ones we obtain a simple explicit characterization of controllability for dimensions 2 and 3, as well as some partial criteria for higher dimensions.

  20. Bimodal Networks as Candidates for Electroactive Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrt, Frederikke; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela;

    An alternative network formulation method was adopted in order to obtain a different type of silicone based elastomeric systems - the so-called bimodal networks - using two vinyl-terminated polydimethyl siloxanes (PDMS) of different molecular weight, a labelled crosslinker (3 or 4-functional), and...

  1. Bimodal mesoporous silica with bottleneck pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, M J; Brühwiler, D

    2015-11-01

    Bimodal mesoporous silica consisting of two sets of well-defined mesopores is synthesized by a partial pseudomorphic transformation of an ordered mesoporous starting material (SBA-15 type). The introduction of a second set of smaller mesopores (MCM-41 type) establishes a pore system with bottlenecks that restricts the access to the core of the bimodal mesoporous silica particles. The particle size and shape of the starting material are retained, but micropores present in the starting material disappear during the transformation, leading to a true bimodal mesoporous product. A varying degree of transformation allows the adjustment of the pore volume contribution of the two mesopore domains. Information on the accessibility of the mesopores is obtained by the adsorption of fluorescence-labeled poly(amidoamine) dendrimers and imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This information is correlated with nitrogen sorption data to provide insights regarding the spatial distribution of the two mesopore domains. The bimodal mesoporous materials are excellent model systems for the investigation of cavitation effects in nitrogen desorption isotherms. PMID:26399172

  2. Gas Foil Bearings for Space Propulsion Nuclear Electric Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The choice of power conversion technology is critical in directing the design of a space vehicle for the future NASA mission to Mars. One candidate design consists of a foil bearing supported turbo alternator driven by a helium-xenon gas mixture heated by a nuclear reactor. The system is a closed-loop, meaning there is a constant volume of process fluid that is sealed from the environment. Therefore, foil bearings are proposed due to their ability to use the process gas as a lubricant. As such, the rotor dynamics of a foil bearing supported rotor is an important factor in the eventual design. The current work describes a rotor dynamic analysis to assess the viability of such a system. A brief technology background, assumptions, analyses, and conclusions are discussed in this report. The results indicate that a foil bearing supported turbo alternator is possible, although more work will be needed to gain knowledge about foil bearing behavior in helium-xenon gas.

  3. Adaptive Modeling of the International Space Station Electrical Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin Ray

    2007-01-01

    Software simulations provide NASA engineers the ability to experiment with spacecraft systems in a computer-imitated environment. Engineers currently develop software models that encapsulate spacecraft system behavior. These models can be inaccurate due to invalid assumptions, erroneous operation, or system evolution. Increasing accuracy requires manual calibration and domain-specific knowledge. This thesis presents a method for automatically learning system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques are applied to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). We also explore a knowledge fusion approach that uses traditional engineered EPS models to supplement the learned models. We observed that these engineered EPS models provide useful background knowledge to reduce predictive error spikes when confronted with making predictions in situations that are quite different from the training scenarios used when learning the model. Evaluations using ISS sensor data and existing EPS models demonstrate the success of the adaptive approach. Our experimental results show that adaptive modeling provides reductions in model error anywhere from 80% to 96% over these existing models. Final discussions include impending use of adaptive modeling technology for ISS mission operations and the need for adaptive modeling in future NASA lunar and Martian exploration.

  4. A New Probabilistic Transformation in Generalized Power Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lifang; HE You; GUAN Xin; DENG Yong; HAN Deqiang

    2011-01-01

    The mapping from the belief to the probability domain is a controversial issue,whose original purpose is to make(hard) decision,but for contrariwise to erroneous widespread idea/claim,this is not the only interest for using such mappings nowadays.Actually the probabilistic transformations of belief mass assignments are very useful in modern multitarget multisensor tracking systems where one deals with soft decisions,especially when precise belief structures are not always available due to the existence of uncertainty in human being's subjective judgments.Therefore,a new probabilistic transformation of interval-valued belief structure is put forward in the generalized power space,in order to build a subjective probability measure from any basic belief assignment defined on any model of the frame of discernment.Several examples are given to show how the new transformation works and we compare it to the main existing transformations proposed in the literature so far.Results are provided to illustrate the rationality and efficiency of this new proposed method making the decision problem simpler.

  5. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis were conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  6. Mapping a New Geography of Space and Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Fabricant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I analyze the ways in which MST-Bolivia (Movimiento Sin Tierra forged a national-level movement through one counter-hegemonic event: the Fifth Indigenous March for Land and Territory, which originated in Santa Cruz de la Sierra in October 2006.  This march enacted a powerful performance of pan-indigenous solidarity and nationalistic sentiment which led to a public declaration by president Evo Morales to approve the New Agrarian Reform Law. I focus in particular on the organizational and spatial structure of the march, and on the significance of seizing public space in protest.  En este trabajo analizo cómo el MST-Bolivia (Movimiento Sin Tierra forjó un movimiento de alcance nacional a través de un evento contra-hegemónico: la Quinta Marcha Indígena por la Tierra y el Territorio, originada en Santa Cruz de la Sierra en octubre de 2006. Esta Marcha articuló un poderoso performance de solidaridad y nacionalismo pan-indígena que llevó al Presidente Evo Morales a declarar públicamente la aprobación de la Ley de Reconversión Comunitaria de la Reforma Agraria. En mi trabajo me enfoco particularmente en la estructura organizativa y espacial de la Marcha como también en los efectos que produce la toma del espacio público en signo de protesta.

  7. Novel Space-based Solar Power Technologies and Architectures for Earth and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe T.; Fikes, John C.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    Research, development and studies of novel space-based solar power systems, technologies and architectures for Earth and beyond are needed to reduce the cost of clean electrical power for terrestrial use and to provide a stepping stone for providing an abundance of power in space, i.e., manufacturing facilities, tourist facilities, delivery of power between objects in space, and between space and surface sites. The architectures, technologies and systems needed for space to Earth applications may also be used for in-space applications. Advances in key technologies, i.e., power generation, power management and distribution, power beaming and conversion of beamed power are needed to achieve the objectives of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. Power beaming or wireless power transmission (WPT) can involve lasers or microwaves along with the associated power interfaces. Microwave and laser transmission techniques have been studied with several promising approaches to safe and efficient WPT identified. These investigations have included microwave phased array transmitters, as well as laser transmission and associated optics. There is a need to produce "proof-of-concept" validation of critical WPT technologies for both the near-term, as well as far-term applications. Investments may be harvested in near-term beam safe demonstrations of commercial WPT applications. Receiving sites (users) include ground-based stations for terrestrial electrical power, orbital sites to provide power for satellites and other platforms, future space elevator systems, space vehicle propulsion, and space to surface sites. This paper briefly discusses achieving a promising approach to the solar power generation and beamed power conversion. The approach is based on a unique high-power solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array (SLA) for both solar power generation and beamed power conversion. Since both versions (solar and laser) of SLA use many identical components

  8. Power Efficiency of Systems Applied for Heating Building and Structure External Walls with Ventilated Air Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    I. F. Fialko; A. S. Statsenko

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers power-efficient systems applied for heating building and structure external walls with ventilated air spaces and prescribes directions and problems pertaining to power-efficiency improvement of such systems.

  9. Low-power formaldehyde detector for space applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace contamination of the International Space Station (ISS) by formaldehyde?a known carcinogen? is a significant potential threat to crew health. The spacecraft...

  10. Low-Power Formaldehyde Detector for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace contamination of the International Space Station (ISS) by formaldehyde -- a known carcinogen -- is a significant threat to crew health. The spacecraft maximum...

  11. Hypermodular Self-Assembling Space Solar Power -- Design Option for Mid-Term GEO Utility-Scale Power Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Leitgab, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a design for scaleable space solar power systems based on free-flying reflectors and module self-assembly. Lower system cost of utility-scale space solar power is achieved by design independence of yet-to-be-built in-space assembly or transportation infrastructure. Using current and expected near-term technology, this study describe a design for mid-term utility-scale power plants in geosynchronous orbits. High-level economic considerations in the context of current and expected future launch costs are given as well.

  12. Fano resonance in two-dimensional optical waveguide arrays with a bi-modal defect

    OpenAIRE

    Vicencio, R.; Gorbach, A.; Flach, S.

    2005-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional extension of the Fano-Anderson model on the basis of a two-dimensional optical waveguide array with a bi-modal defect. We demonstrate numerically the persistence of the Fano resonance in wavepacket scattering process by the defect. An analytical approximation is derived for the total scattered light power.

  13. Space fusion energy conversion using a field reversed configuration reactor: A new technical approach for space propulsion and power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Miley, George H.; Santarius, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion energy conversion design approach, the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) - when burning deuterium and helium-3, offers a new method and concept for space transportation with high energy demanding programs, like the Manned Mars Mission and planetary science outpost missions require. FRC's will increase safety, reduce costs, and enable new missions by providing a high specific power propulsion system from a high performance fusion engine system that can be optimally designed. By using spacecraft powered by FRC's the space program can fulfill High Energy Space Missions (HESM) in a manner not otherwise possible. FRC's can potentially enable the attainment of high payload mass fractions while doing so within shorter flight times.

  14. Thermal-hydraulics for space power, propulsion, and thermal management system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present volume discusses thermal-hydraulic aspects of current space projects, Space Station thermal management systems, the thermal design of the Space Station Free-Flying Platforms, the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System, advanced multi-MW space nuclear power concepts, chemical and electric propulsion systems, and such aspects of the Space Station two-phase thermal management system as its mechanical pumped loop and its capillary pumped loop's supporting technology. Also discussed are the startup thaw concept for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System, calculational methods and experimental data for microgravity conditions, an isothermal gas-liquid flow at reduced gravity, low-gravity flow boiling, computations of Space Shuttle high pressure cryogenic turbopump ball bearing two-phase coolant flow, and reduced-gravity condensation

  15. Power system for production, construction, life support and operations in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one looks to man's future in space it becomes obvious that unprecedented amounts of power are required for the exploration, colonization, and exploitation of space. Activities envisioned include interplanetary travel and LEO to GEO transport using electric propulsion, Earth and lunar observatories, advance space stations, free-flying manufacturing platforms, communications platforms, and eventually evolutionary lunar and Mars bases. These latter bases would start as camps with modest power requirements (kWes) and evolve to large bases as manufacturing, food production, and life support materials are developed from lunar raw materials. These latter activities require very robust power supplies (MWes). The advanced power system technologies being pursued by NASA to fulfill these future needs are described. Technologies discussed will include nuclear, photovoltaic, and solar dynamic space power systems, including energy storage, power conditioning, power transmission, and thermal management. The state-of-the-art and gains to be made by technology advancements will be discussed. Mission requirements for a variety of applications (LEO, GEO, lunar, and Martian) will be treated, and data for power systems ranging from a few kilowatts to megawatt power systems will be represented. In addition the space power technologies being initiated under NASA's new Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Space Leadership Planning Group Activities will be discussed

  16. Power systems for production, construction, life support, and operations in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one looks to man's future in space it becomes obvious that unprecedented amounts of power are required for the exploration, colonization, and exploitation of space. Activities envisioned include interplanetary travel and LEO to GEO transport using electric propulsion, earth and lunar observatories, advance space stations, free-flying manufacturing platforms, communications platforms, and eventually evolutionary lunar and Mars bases. These latter bases would start as camps with modest power requirements (kWes) and evolve to large bases as manufacturing, food production, and life support materials are developed from lunar raw materials. These latter activities require very robust power supplies (MWes). The advanced power system technologies being pursued by NASA to fulfill these future needs are described. Technologies discussed will include nuclear, photovoltaic, and solar dynamic space power systems, including energy storage, power conditioning, power transmission, and thermal management. The state-of-the-art and gains to be made by technology advancements will be discussed. Mission requirements for a variety of applications (LEO, GEO, lunar, and Martian) will be treated, and data for power systems ranging from a few kilowatts to megawatt power systems will be represented. In addition the space power technologies being initiated under NASA's new Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Space Leadership Planning Group Activities will be discussed

  17. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultra-Compact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide band-gap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and...

  18. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  19. 46 CFR 92.05-15 - Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power. 92.05-15 Section 92.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power. (a) The provisions of this...

  20. 46 CFR 190.05-15 - Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power. 190.05-15 Section 190.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Segregation of spaces containing the emergency source of electric power. (a) When a compartment containing...

  1. Thermo-Acoustic Convertor for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sunpower will introduce thermoacoustic Stirling heat engine (TASHE) technology into its existing Stirling convertor technology to eliminate the moving mechanical...

  2. Lightweight Radiator Fins for Space Nuclear Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 1 project shall investigate concept radiator fins that incorporate novel carbon materials for improved performance of segmented high temperature...

  3. MITEE-B: A Compact Ultra Lightweight Bi-Modal Nuclear Propulsion Engine for Robotic Planetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Paniagua, John; Borowski, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) enables unique new robotic planetary science missions that are impossible with chemical or nuclear electric propulsion systems. A compact and ultra lightweight bi-modal nuclear engine, termed MITEE-B (MInature ReacTor EnginE - Bi-Modal) can deliver 1000's of kilograms of propulsive thrust when it operates in the NTP mode, and many kilowatts of continuous electric power when it operates in the electric generation mode. The high propulsive thrust NTP mode enables spacecraft to land and takeoff from the surface of a planet or moon, to hop to multiple widely separated sites on the surface, and virtually unlimited flight in planetary atmospheres. The continuous electric generation mode enables a spacecraft to replenish its propellant by processing in-situ resources, provide power for controls, instruments, and communications while in space and on the surface, and operate electric propulsion units. Six examples of unique and important missions enabled by the MITEE-B engine are described, including: (1) Pluto lander and sample return; (2) Europa lander and ocean explorer; (3) Mars Hopper; (4) Jupiter atmospheric flyer; (5) SunBurn hypervelocity spacecraft; and (6) He3 mining from Uranus. Many additional important missions are enabled by MITEE-B. A strong technology base for MITEE-B already exists. With a vigorous development program, it could be ready for initial robotic science and exploration missions by 2010 AD. Potential mission benefits include much shorter in-space times, reduced IMLEO requirements, and replenishment of supplies from in-situ resources.

  4. MITEE-B: A compact ultra lightweight bi-modal nuclear propulsion engine for robotic planetary science missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) enables unique new robotic planetary science missions that are impossible with chemical or nuclear electric propulsion systems. A compact and ultra lightweight bi-modal nuclear engine, termed MITEE-B (MInature ReacTor EnginE - Bi-Modal) can deliver 1000's of kilograms of propulsive thrust when it operates in the NTP mode, and many kilowatts of continuous electric power when it operates in the electric generation mode. The high propulsive thrust NTP mode enables spacecraft to land and takeoff from the surface of a planet or moon, to hop to multiple widely separated sites on the surface, and virtually unlimited flight in planetary atmospheres. The continuous electric generation mode enables a spacecraft to replenish its propellant by processing in-situ resources, provide power for controls, instruments, and communications while in space and on the surface, and operate electric propulsion units. Six examples of unique and important missions enabled by the MITEE-B engine are described, including: (1) Pluto lander and sample return; (2) Europa lander and ocean explorer; (3) Mars Hopper; (4) Jupiter atmospheric flyer; (5) SunBurn hypervelocity spacecraft; and (6) He3 mining from Uranus. Many additional important missions are enabled by MITEE-B. A strong technology base for MITEE-B already exists. With a vigorous development program, it could be ready for initial robotic science and exploration missions by 2010 AD. Potential mission benefits include much shorter in-space times, reduced IMLEO requirements, and replenishment of supplies from in-situ resources

  5. Civilian and military applications of space nuclear power: a congressional perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I would like to talk about how space nuclear power fits into space programs in general. You are aware that NASA identified a civilian use that would require nuclear power on the order of 100 kilowatts - that is planetary exploration - before the military indicated their interest. Actually there are many possible civilian and military uses for space nuclear power. I would like to briefly review them because it provides insight into the future direction of the US space program. I would also like to discuss the baseline directed energy weapons program that appears to be emerging

  6. The flight safety review/approval process for U.S. nuclear-powered space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1961, the US has launched > 20 spacecraft using nuclear power sources. One of these space missions involved a nuclear reactor; the remainder were powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Space nuclear power/propulsion systems are receiving greater attention in the US and abroad. These developments suggest that nuclear systems may play an expanding role in future space endeavors. Although space nuclear power/propulsion offers distinct advantages, it also poses significant safety challenges. Stringent design and operational flight safety measures are required to protect the public an the environment under normal and accident conditions. Moreover, formal safety reviews are mandatory to obtain flight approval. This paper describes the flight safety review and launch approval process used in the US for nuclear-powered space missions

  7. On Bimodal Offset Cauchy Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija S.V.S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bivariate Cauchy distribution has received applications in many areas, including biological analyses, clinical trials, stochastic modeling of decreasing failure rate life components, study of labour turnover, queuing theory and reliability (Nayak (1987 and Lee and Gross (1991. In the study of biological analyses, clinical trials and reliability circular distributions will yield suitable results. Circular data arises in a number of different areas such as geological, meteorological, biological and industrial sciences. It is not suggestive to use standard statistical techniques to model circular data, due to the circular geometry of the sample space (p.2 Jammalamadaka and Sen Gupta (2001. It is possible to construct a circular model by transforming a bivariate linear random variate to just its directional component and the resultant model is called ‘offset distribution’. In the literature most of the available circular models were constructed by wrapping a linear model. In recent years some wrapped models were constructed by Dattatreya Rao et al (2007. Here an attempt is made to exploit method of offsetting on Bivariate Cauchy distribution to construct a circular model named by us “OFFSET CAUCHY DISTRIBUTION (OC”. The characteristic function of the Offset Cauchy model is derived and its characteristics are discussed.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Bimodal Mesoporous Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaofang; GUO Cuili; WANG Xiaoli; WU Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with controllable bimodal pore size distribution was synthesized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as chemical template for small mesopores and silica gel as physical template for large mesopores.The structure of synthesized samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements.The experimental results show that bimodal mesoporous silica consists of small mesopores of about 3 nm and large mesopores of about 45 nm.The small mesopores which were formed on the external surface and pore walls of the silica gel had similar characters with those of MCM-41,while large mesopores were inherited from parent silica gel material.The pore size distribution of the synthesized silica can be adjusted by changing the relative content of TEOS and silica gel or the feeding sequence of silica gel and NH4OH.

  9. Refining Bimodal Microstructure of Materials with MSTRUCT

    OpenAIRE

    Matěj, Z.; Kadlecová, A.; Janeček, M.; Matějová, L. (Lenka); Dopita, M.; Kužel, R.

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities of modelling the diffraction profiles from bimodal microstructure in computer program MSTRUCT are demonstrated on two examples. A special Double Component profile effect can be utilized for such problems. At first it was applied to an analysis of a mixture of two nanocrystalline anatase powders with different crystallite sizes and the relative ratio of both components was determined from X-ray diffraction data. In the second case study, diffraction peaks from a pure polycry...

  10. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: A Powerful Resource in Space Science and Space Weather Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J. S.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a NASA affiliated interagency partnership with the primary goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable this small group to serve as a hub for raising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC resources are publicly available online, providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of modern space science models (developed by the international research community). CCMC has revolutionized the way simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs and serves hundreds of educators, students and researchers every year. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unrivaled capabilities and experiences, the team provides in-depth space weather training to students and professionals worldwide, and offers an amazing opportunity for undergraduates to engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting and research. In-house development of state-of-the-art space weather tools and applications provides exciting opportunities to students majoring in computer science and computer engineering fields to intern with the software engineers at the CCMC while also learning about the space weather from the NASA scientists.

  11. A comparative study of nuclear technology and direct energy conversion methods for space power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reason, Joseph P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. The objectives of this thesis are to investigate the theory of direct energy conversion, research the development of space nuclear power systems, evaluate the status of current systems, and draw conclusions about the feasibility and merit of using nuclear power for future space missions. Development of the earliest systems began in 1955 with the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program and Project Rover. A detailed review of...

  12. Low-Power Multi-Aspect Space Radiation Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave; Freeman, Jon C.; Burkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of all of these detector technologies will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the deep space radiation field.

  13. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. Free-piston Stirling technology is applicable for both solar and nuclear powered systems. As such, the NASA Lewis Research Center serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated SP-100 Advanced Technology program. This program provides the technology push for providing significant component and subsystem options for increased efficiency, reliability and survivability, and power output growth at reduced specific mass. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators

  14. A novel design project for space solar power station (SSPS-OMEGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yiqun; Duan, Baoyan; Wang, Dongxu; Li, Xun

    2016-04-01

    The space solar power station (SSPS) capable of providing earth with primary power has been researched for 50 years. The SSPS is a tremendous design involving optics, mechanics, electromagnetism, thermology, control, and other disciplines. This paper presents a novel design project for SSPS named OMEGA. The space segment of the proposed GEO-based SSPS is composed of four main parts, such as spherical solar power collector, hyperboloid photovoltaic (PV) cell array, power management and distribution (PMAD) and microwave transmitting antenna. Principle of optics, structure configuration, wired and wireless power transmissions are presented.

  15. Space Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Scaling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.

    1989-01-01

    The design feasibility study is documented of a single cylinder, free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator (FPSE/LA) power module generating 150 kW-electric (kW sub e), and the determination of the module's maximum feasible power level. The power module configuration was specified to be a single cylinder (single piston, single displacer) FPSE/LA, with tuning capacitors if required. The design requirements were as follows: (1) Maximum electrical power output; (2) Power module thermal efficiency equal to or greater than 20 percent at a specific mass of 5 to 8 kg/kW(sub e); (3) Heater wall temperature/cooler wall temperature = 1050 K/525 K; (4) Sodium heat-pipe heat transport system, pumped loop NaK (sodium-potassium eutectic mixture) rejection system; (5) Maximum power module vibration amplitude = 0.0038 cm; and (6) Design life = 7 years (60,000 hr). The results show that a single cylinder FPSE/LA is capable of meeting program goals and has attractive scaling attributes over the power range from 25 to 150 kW(sub e). Scaling beyond the 150 kW(sub e) power level, the power module efficiency falls and the power module specific mass reaches 10 kg/kW(sub e) at a power output of 500 kW(sub e). A discussion of scaling rules for the engine, alternator, and heat transport systems is presented, along with a detailed description of the conceptual design of a 150 kW(sub e) power module that meets the requirements. Included is a discussion of the design of a dynamic balance system. A parametric study of power module performance conducted over the power output range of 25 to 150 kW(sub e) for temperature ratios of 1.7, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 is presented and discussed. The results show that as the temperature ratio decreases, the efficiency falls and specific mass increases. At a temperature ratio of 1.7, the 150 kW(sub e) power module cannot satisfy both efficiency and specific mass goals. As the power level increases from 25 to 150 kW(sub e) at a fixed temperature ratio, power

  16. Striction-based Power Monitoring in Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program will leverage recent advances in striction materials and coupled striction devices as to enable highly isolated (analog) voltage and current flow...

  17. A Low Input Power Cryocooler for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions will require cryocoolers providing cooling capacities upwards of 0.3W at 35K with heat rejection capability to temperature sinks as low as 150K...

  18. Thermo-Acoustic Convertor for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase Sunpower looked at Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engines (TASHEs). These ranged from a TASHE which was sized for the heat from a single General Purpose Heat...

  19. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Advanced Energy Storage Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of high specific energy devices will enable NASA’s future robotic and human-exploration missions.  The need for advances in energy...

  20. Assessment of ceramic composites for MMW space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed multimegawatt nuclear power systems which operate at high temperatures, high levels of stress, and in hostile environments, including corrosive working fluids, have created interest in the use of ceramic composites as structural materials. This report assesses the applicability of several ceramic composites in both Brayton and Rankine cycle power systems. This assessment considers an equilibrium thermodynamic analysis and also a nonequilibrium assessment. (FI)

  1. Space matters: the relational power of mobile technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Odendaal

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of mobile telephony and proliferation of digital networks imply a critical role for these technologies in overcoming the constraints of space in fragmented cities. Academic literature draws from a range of disciplines but fails to address the significance of new technologies for African and South African cities. Debates on technologies and urban spaces reflect a Northern bias and case literature that dwells on the developmental aspects of ICT do not engage with the bro...

  2. Democritos: preparing demonstrators for high power nuclear electric space propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Frederic; RUAULT, Jean-Marc; Worms, Jean-Claude; Detsis, Emmanouil; Beaurain, André; Lassoudiere, Francois; Gaia, Enrico; Tosi, Maria -Christina; Jansen, Frank; Bauer, Waldemar; Semenkin, Alexander; Tinsley, Tim; Hodgson, Zara

    2015-01-01

    The Democritos project aims at preparing demonstrators for a megawatt class nuclearelectric space propulsion. It is funded by Horizon 2020, the R&T program of the European Community. It is a new European and Russian project, including as partners: Nuclear National Laboratory (U.K.), DLR (Germany), The Keldysh Research Center (Russia), Thales Alenia Space Italia (Italy), Snecma (France), ESF (France) and CNES (France). IEAV (Brazil) will join as an observer. Democritos is the follo...

  3. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development. The SP-100 program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future. 5 references

  4. Proposal of bimodal solution for urban vehicular contamination problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Osorio Gómez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In research field of alternative solutions to internal combustion engine vehicles, the Politecnico di Milano has developed a design and manufacturing project for an adaptable electro-mechanical kit intended to transform a city car with en-dothermic propulsion into a bimodal one, using existent technologies and innovative solutions. This project involves mechanical and electrical competences in order to develop a new transmission parallel to the current endothermic propulsion and its control system. This paper describes, in general, the developed procedure to obtain the final proto-type. At first, the requirements and constraints to fulfil a standard transport urban cycle has been established and the vehicle to modify was selected, in this case the Fiat Grande Punto. Next, new components and the required space to their installation have been identified and specified, whilst mechanical components were designed and manufactured. Instruments of reverse engineering and virtual prototyping have been employed to carry out the geometrical models, simulations and layouts and to identify useful spaces in the vehicle. Finally, general modifications, installation of new components, implementation of control and data acquisition system, fine-tuning and check of specifications fulfilment have been carried out. A 30 km range working in electrical mode, with a top speed of 70 km/h, is assured with the developed kit. These results demonstrate the feasibility to implement a forward bimodal propulsion system into a com-mercial city car with a little invasive commercial kit, and now, the Politecnico is working at its industrialization and im-plementation to different models of city cars. Regione Lombardia (Regional government in Italy has funded this project as an investigation oriented to find new solutions to sustainable transport and reduction of environmental pollution.

  5. Advanced Modular Power Approach to Affordable, Supportable Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Kimnach, Greg L.; Fincannon, James; Mckissock,, Barbara I.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Wong, Edmond

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of missions to the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) indicate that these missions often involve several distinct separately launched vehicles that must ultimately be integrated together in-flight and operate as one unit. Therefore, it is important to see these vehicles as elements of a larger segmented spacecraft rather than separate spacecraft flying in formation. The evolution of large multi-vehicle exploration architecture creates the need (and opportunity) to establish a global power architecture that is common across all vehicles. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project managed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is aimed at establishing the modular power system architecture that will enable power systems to be built from a common set of modular building blocks. The project is developing, demonstrating and evaluating key modular power technologies that are expected to minimize non-recurring development costs, reduce recurring integration costs, as well as, mission operational and support costs. Further, modular power is expected to enhance mission flexibility, vehicle reliability, scalability and overall mission supportability. The AMPS project not only supports multi-vehicle architectures but should enable multi-mission capability as well. The AMPS technology development involves near term demonstrations involving developmental prototype vehicles and field demonstrations. These operational demonstrations not only serve as a means of evaluating modular technology but also provide feedback to developers that assure that they progress toward truly flexible and operationally supportable modular power architecture.

  6. Space Nuclear Power Public and Stakeholder Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Sandra M.; Sklar, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The 1986 Challenger accident coupled with the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident increased public concern about the safety of spacecraft using nuclear technology. While three nuclear powered spacecraft had been launched before 1986 with little public interest, future nuclear powered missions would see significantly more public concern and require NASA to increase its efforts to communicate mission risks to the public. In 1987 a separate risk communication area within the Launch Approval Planning Group of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was created to address public concern about the health, environmental, and safety risks of NASA missions. The lessons learned from the risk communication strategies developed for the nuclear powered Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini missions are reviewed in this paper and recommendations are given as to how these lessons can be applied to future NASA missions that may use nuclear power systems and other potentially controversial NASA missions.

  7. Direct conversion of infrared radiant energy for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed technology to convert the earth radiant energy (infrared albedo) for spacecraft power is presented. The resultant system would eliminate energy storage requirements and simplify the spacecraft design. The design and performance of a infrared rectenna is discussed.

  8. Review of the Tri-Agency Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program (SP-100) was created in February 1983 by Memorandum of Agreement among NASA, DARPA and DOE. The tasks of the SP-100 organization in its first year have included detailed program, objective, and role definition; civil and military mission analysis; space nuclear power system functional requirement definition; conclusion of initial space nuclear power system concepted definition studies; selection of primary concepts for technology feasibility validation; defining and initiating specific technology programs and objectives to support the system concepts; and obtaining initial experimental and analytic results

  9. United Nations deliberations of the use of nuclear power sources in space: 1978-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Sholtis, Joseph A., Jr.; Rashkow, Bruce C.

    1988-01-01

    The United Nations (U.N.) is continuing its deliberations on the use of nuclear power sources (NPS) in space. Although no complete set of legal principles has yet been agreed upon, certain scientific and technical criteria for the safe design and use of NPS have been accepted. In this respect, it should be noted that in its 1981 report, the Working Group on the Use of Power Sources in Outer Space concluded that power sources can be used safely in outer space, provided that all necessary safety requirements are met. This is also a succinct statement of the U.S. position.

  10. Approach to develop space solar power as a new energy system for developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomo, Makoto [Inst. of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The idea of space solar power proposed by Glaser was explained as a set of a solar power station in geostationary earth orbit to transmit microwave power and a ground station to receive the microwave power. Most of the ideas and concepts since Glaser used the same context. On the other hand, Collins et al. introduced the concept of microwave `fuel` to assess the commercial relations of power from space, in which space solar power stations are considered to sell microwave power to any unspecified rectenna. This concept changed the theoretical context of `power from space` to an industrial and economic relation of producers and buyers of an industrial product. This new context has been applied to the SPS 2000 conceptual study. As a result, if 2.45 GHz microwave power transmission is used, each rectenna can be planned and engineered independently from the space sector by local users, especially in developing countries, who are familiar with such activities as introducing solar energy systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Ground-Based and Space-Based Laser Beam Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozek, John M.

    1995-01-01

    A space power system based on laser beam power is sized to reduce mass, increase operational capabilities, and reduce complexity. The advantages of laser systems over solar-based systems are compared as a function of application. Power produced from the conversion of a laser beam that has been generated on the Earth's surface and beamed into cislunar space resulted in decreased round-trip time for Earth satellite electric propulsion tugs and a substantial landed mass savings for a lunar surface mission. The mass of a space-based laser system (generator in space and receiver near user) that beams down to an extraterrestrial airplane, orbiting spacecraft, surface outpost, or rover is calculated and compared to a solar system. In general, the advantage of low mass for these space-based laser systems is limited to high solar eclipse time missions at distances inside Jupiter. The power system mass is less in a continuously moving Mars rover or surface outpost using space-based laser technology than in a comparable solar-based power system, but only during dust storm conditions. Even at large distances for the Sun, the user-site portion of a space-based laser power system (e.g., the laser receiver component) is substantially less massive than a solar-based system with requisite on-board electrochemical energy storage.

  12. Reliability Considerations for Ultra- Low Power Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Johnston, Allan

    2012-01-01

    NASA, the aerospace community, and other high reliability (hi-rel) users of advanced microelectronic products face many challenges as technology continues to scale into the deep sub- micron region and ULP devices are sought after. Technology trends, ULP microelectronics, scaling and performance tradeoffs, reliability considerations, and spacecraft environments will be presented from a ULP perspective for space applications.

  13. Space matters: the relational power of mobile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Odendaal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of mobile telephony and proliferation of digital networks imply a critical role for these technologies in overcoming the constraints of space in fragmented cities. Academic literature draws from a range of disciplines but fails to address the significance of new technologies for African and South African cities. Debates on technologies and urban spaces reflect a Northern bias and case literature that dwells on the developmental aspects of ICT do not engage with the broader significance with regards to urban change in African cities. This research addresses these gaps by examining the local transformative qualities of mobile telephony in a South African city, Durban. It focuses on the ways in which informal traders active in the city use technology. Actor-network theory was used in the analysis of the field work, uncovering material and human actors, network stabilization processes and agency in determining the transformative potential of this form of digital networking at city and local scales. Findings indicate that appropriation of technology is informed by livelihood strategies. Innovation is enabled when translation extends to appropriation. More in-depth research is needed on how technology is molded and appropriated to suit livelihoods. Throughout the research the spatial dimensions of the relationship between mobile telephony and networks were considered. The network spaces that emerge from actor relations do not correspond with the physical spaces usually considered in policy.

  14. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli; Amir F. Payam; Ricardo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the ...

  15. Bidirectional grapheme-phoneme activation in a bimodal detection task

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, Ton; Frauenfelder, Ulrich Hans; Schreuder, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A divided attention paradigm was used to investigate whether graphemes and phonemes can mutually activate or inhibit each other during bimodal processing. In 3 experiments, Dutch subjects reacted to visual and auditory targets in single-channel or bimodal stimuli. In some bimodal conditions, the visual and auditory targets were nominally identical or redundant (e.g., visual A and auditory /a/); in others they were not (e.g., visual U and auditory /a/). Temporal aspects of cross-modal activati...

  16. Reactive Sintering of Bimodal WC-Co Hardmetals

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Tarraste; Kristjan Juhani; Jüri Pirso; Mart Viljus

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal WC-Co hardmetals were produced using novel technology - reactive sintering. Milled and activated tungsten and graphite powders were mixed with commercial coarse grained WC-Co powder and then sintered. The microstructure of produced materials was free of defects and consisted of evenly distributed coarse and fine tungsten carbide grains in cobalt binder. The microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of reactive sintered bimodal WC-Co hardmetals is exhibited. Developed bimodal har...

  17. Thermoelectric converter modeling in nuclear space power conversion and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoelectric converters are being used on low power planetary spacecraft. The same type of conversion was considered for Ground Engineering System development of nuclear power generation under the SP-100 program for high power earth orbiting spacecraft. Here, the baseline design is aimed at generating power using a nuclear reactor to produce heat, a thermoelectric converter to produce electricity, a power regulator to match the output to changing payload demands, and a thermal radiator to dissipate waste heat. The converter performance has to be evaluated considering its characteristics. The characteristics and constraints imposed by the nuclear reactor, the payloads and regulator, and the waste heat radiator should be conformed to. Presented here are a thermodynamic reversible engine model for the thermoelectric converter, and its application to evaluate the converter and system performance under steady-state and transient thermal conditions due to load changes. The type of output voltage regulator, either a series or shunt, has an impact on the converter performance. This impact is evaluated and advantages and disadvantages of both are indicated. The converter performance is evaluated along its voltage-current characteristics. Influence of the conversion efficiency is assessed on thermal distribution and electrical output

  18. Preparation of All-Ceramic, High Performance Li-ion Batteries for Deep Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lithium (Li) ion batteries are among the most promising power sources for many civilian, military and space applications due to their high power and high energy...

  19. Structural Stability of Planar Bimodal Linear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Ferrer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural stability ensures that the qualitative behavior of a system is preserved under small perturbations. We study it for planar bimodal linear dynamical systems, that is, systems consisting of two linear dynamics acting on each side of a given hyperplane and assuming continuity along the separating hyperplane. We describe which one of these systems is structurally stable when (real spiral does not appear and when it does we give necessary and sufficient conditions concerning finite periodic orbits and saddle connections. In particular, we study the finite periodic orbits and the homoclinic orbits in the saddle/spiral case.

  20. HRM, POWER and possible spaces of becoming human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia

    2003-01-01

    institutions, the power of aleader or person in terms of the right to execute punishment and the duty to obedienceor empowerment, as a countermove to the effects of bureaucratic workplace routines`... where initiative is stifled and workers become alienated'1. Indirectly one canidentify power as interesting in...... HR practice?'Barbara Townley (1994, 1998, 1999) has done this extensively and demonstrates how afoucauldian analysis focuses on practices, which structure social relations. (Townley,1998: 194) Townley conceptualizes HRM as the medium through which theemployment relationship may be organized or...

  1. Advanced In-Space Propulsion (AISP): High Temperature Boost Power Processing Unit (PPU) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task is to investigate the technology path to develop a 10kW modular Silicon Carbide (SiC) based power processing unit (PPU). The PPU utilizes the high...

  2. Political geography : an introduction to space and power.

    OpenAIRE

    Painter, J; Jeffrey, A

    2009-01-01

    Revised and updated, this is a new edition of a core undergraduate resource on Political Geography. Unique in the teaching literature, Political Geography (published originally as Politics, Geography, and 'Political Geography') retains its focus on the social and cultural, while systematically overviewing the entire discipline. The text explains: - Politics, geography, and "political" geography: power, resources, institutions, and the history of political geography - State formation: ...

  3. Finite element analysis of space debris removal by high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li; Jiang, Guanlei; Yu, Shuang; Li, Ming

    2015-08-01

    With the development of space station technologies, irradiation of space debris by space-based high-power lasers, can locally generate high-temperature plasmas and micro momentum, which may achieve the removal of debris through tracking down. Considered typical square-shaped space debris of material Ti with 5cm×5cm size, whose thermal conductivity, density, specific heat capacity and emissivity are 7.62W/(m·°C), 4500kg/m3, 0.52J/(kg·°C) and 0.3,respectively, based on the finite element analysis of ANSYS, each irradiation of space debris by high-power lasers with power density 106W/m2 and weapons-grade lasers with power density 3000W/m2 are simulated under space environment, and the temperature curves due to laser thermal irradiation are obtained and compared. Results show only 2s is needed for high-power lasers to make the debris temperature reach to about 10000K, which is the threshold temperature for plasmas-state conversion. While for weapons-grade lasers, it is 13min needed. Using two line elements (TLE), and combined with the coordinate transformation from celestial coordinate system to site coordinate system, the visible period of space debris is calculated as 5-10min. That is, in order to remove space debris by laser plasmas, the laser power density should be further improved. The article provides an intuitive and visual feasibility analysis method of space debris removal, and the debris material and shape, laser power density and spot characteristics are adjustable. This finite element analysis method is low-cost, repeatable and adaptable, which has an engineering-prospective applications.

  4. Earth-to-Geostationary Orbit Transportation for Space Solar Power System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A.; Donahue, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Schuyler C.; McClanahan, James A.; Carrington, Connie K. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space solar power satellites have the potential to provide abundant quantities of electricity for use on Earth. One concept, the Sun Tower, can be assembled in geostationary orbit from pieces transferred from Earth. The cost of transportation is one of the major hurdles to space solar power. This study found that autonomous solar-electric transfer is a good choice for the transportation from LEO to GEO.

  5. Preliminary assessment of the accident probabilities of a NERVA derivative reactor for space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas cooled, solid core graphite reactors based on the Nuclear Engine Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) technology are attractive space nuclear power sources for SDI multimegawatt applications. A reactor of this type is called a NERVA Derivative Reactor (NDR). A simplified accident probability analysis of a NDR reactor for space power mission was carried out. The objective of the analysis was to identify the worst case accident and critical reactor design areas where the incorporation of appropriate design features may reduce the risks involved

  6. A programmable transformer coupled converter for high-power space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustka, R. E.; Bush, J. R., Jr.; Graves, J. R.; Lanier, J. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A programmable transformer coupled converter (PTCC) is being developed by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for application in future large space power systems. The PTCC uses an internal microprocessor to control the output characteristics of its three Cuk integrated magnetics type power stages which have a combined capability of 5.4 kW (30 V at 180 A). Details of design trade-offs and test results are presented.

  7. New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-08

    This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.

  8. Automation of the space station core module power management and distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Under the Advanced Development Program for Space Station, Marshall Space Flight Center has been developing advanced automation applications for the Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) system inside the Space Station modules for the past three years. The Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution System (SSM/PMAD) test bed features three artificial intelligence (AI) systems coupled with conventional automation software functioning in an autonomous or closed-loop fashion. The AI systems in the test bed include a baseline scheduler/dynamic rescheduler (LES), a load shedding management system (LPLMS), and a fault recovery and management expert system (FRAMES). This test bed will be part of the NASA Systems Autonomy Demonstration for 1990 featuring cooperating expert systems in various Space Station subsystem test beds. It is concluded that advanced automation technology involving AI approaches is sufficiently mature to begin applying the technology to current and planned spacecraft applications including the Space Station.

  9. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations. [Laser beaming to airplanes; microwave beaming to ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.; Hertzberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 2000/sup 0/K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 500/sup 0/K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 3000/sup 0/K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel.

  10. The Bimodality Index: A Criterion for Discovering and Ranking Bimodal Signatures from Cancer Gene Expression Profiling Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Identifying genes with bimodal expression patterns from large-scale expression profiling data is an important analytical task. Model-based clustering is popular for this purpose. That technique commonly uses the Bayesian information criterion (BIC for model selection. In practice, however, BIC appears to be overly sensitive and may lead to the identification of bimodally expressed genes that are unreliable or not clinically useful. We propose using a novel criterion, the bimodality index, not only to identify but also to rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns. The bimodality index can be computed using either a mixture model-based algorithm or Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques.Results: We carried out simulation studies and applied the method to real data from a cancer gene expression profiling study. Our findings suggest that BIC behaves like a lax cutoff based on the bimodality index, and that the bimodality index provides an objective measure to identify and rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns from large-scale gene expression datasets. R code to compute the bimodality index is included in the ClassDiscovery package of the Object-Oriented Microarray and Proteomic Analysis (OOMPA suite available at the web site http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/Software/OOMPA.

  11. Differential topological characteristics of the DSR on injection space of electrical power system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余贻鑫; 曾沅; 冯飞

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the differential topological characteristics of the dynamic security region (DSR) on injection space of electrical power system by differential topology theories. It is shown that the boundary of the DSR on injection space has no suspension and is compact, and there are no holes inside the DSR defined based on controlling unstable equilibrium point (UEP) method. The 10-generator, 39-bus New England Test System, is taken as an example to show these characteristics of the DSR on injection space.

  12. Power Supplies for Space Systems Quality Assurance by Sandia Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, R. L.; Harnar, R. R.

    1976-07-01

    The Sandia Laboratories` participation in Quality Assurance programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space systems over the past 10 years is summarized. Basic elements of this QA program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are presented, including SNAP 19 (Nimbus, Pioneer, Viking), SNAP 27 (Apollo), Transit, Multi Hundred Watt (LES 8/9 and MJS), and a new program, High Performance Generator Mod 3. The outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

  13. Power supplies for space systems quality assurance by Sandia Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sandia Laboratories' participation in Quality Assurance programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space systems over the past 10 years is summarized. Basic elements of this QA program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are presented, including SNAP 19 (Nimbus, Pioneer, Viking), SNAP 27 (Apollo), Transit, Multi-Hundred Watt (LES 8/9 and MJS), and a new program, High-Performance Generator Mod 3. The outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted

  14. Bimodal distribution characteristic of microstructure and mechanical properties of nanostructured composite ceramic coatings prepared by supersonic plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The microstructure of NCs exhibited a bimodal distribution. • The proportions of FM and PM regions both increased with spray power increasing. • The mechanical properties followed Weibull distribution. - Abstract: Nanostructured composite ceramic coatings (NCs) were deposited by supersonic plasma spraying (SPS) technique. The microstructures of NCs were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that the microstructure of NCs exhibited a bimodal distribution consisting of fully melted regions (FM regions) and partially melted regions (PM regions). With the spray power increasing, the proportions of FM regions and PM regions both increased, but no distinct laws were found. The measured data of elastic modulus, micro-hardness and fracture toughness were analyzed using Weibull statistics. The results showed that these micromechanical properties followed Weibull distribution and presented a characteristic of bimodal distribution

  15. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  16. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Placco, Guilherme M., E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: lamartine.guimaraes@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear; Faria, Saulo M. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  17. Space-time trajectories of wind power generation: Parameterized precision matrices under a Gaussian copula approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastu, Julija; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on generating space-time trajectories of wind power generation, consisting of paths sampled from high-dimensional joint predictive densities, describing wind power generation at a number of contiguous locations and successive lead times. A modelling approach taking advantage of...

  18. A survey of beam-combining technologies for laser space power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, J. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of laser beams holds much promise for obtaining powerful beams. Methods are surveyed for beam combination (coherent and incoherent) and two of them are identified as the most effective means for achieving high power transmission in space. The two methods as applied to laser diode arrays are analyzed, and potentially productive work areas for the advancement of technology are delineated.

  19. Applicability of trends in nuclear safety analysis to space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is presented of some current trends in nuclear safety analysis that may be relevant to space nuclear power systems. This includes: lessons learned from operating power reactor safety and licensing; approaches to the safety design of advanced and novel reactors and facilities; the roles of risk assessment, extremely unlikely accidents, safety goals/targets; and risk-benefit analysis and communication

  20. Systems analysis of the space shuttle. [communication systems, computer systems, and power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, D. L.; Oh, S. J.; Thau, F.

    1975-01-01

    Developments in communications systems, computer systems, and power distribution systems for the space shuttle are described. The use of high speed delta modulation for bit rate compression in the transmission of television signals is discussed. Simultaneous Multiprocessor Organization, an approach to computer organization, is presented. Methods of computer simulation and automatic malfunction detection for the shuttle power distribution system are also described.

  1. Active and reactive power control of a current-source PWM-rectifier using space vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, M.; Tuusa, H. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). Department of Electrical Engineering, Power Electronics

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current-source PWM-rectifier with active and reactive power control is presented. The control system is realized using space vector methods. Also, compensation of the reactive power drawn by the line filter is discussed. Some simulation results are shown. (orig.) 8 refs.

  2. A Crewed Mission to Apophis Using a Hybrid Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, David R.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Burke, Laura M.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A BNTEP system is a dual propellant, hybrid propulsion concept that utilizes Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion during high thrust operations, providing 10's of kilo-Newtons of thrust per engine at a high specific impulse (Isp) of 900 s, and an Electric Propulsion (EP) system during low thrust operations at even higher Isp of around 3000 s. Electrical power for the EP system is provided by the BNTR engines in combination with a Brayton Power Conversion (BPC) closed loop system, which can provide electrical power on the order of 100's of kWe. High thrust BNTR operation uses liquid hydrogen (LH2) as reactor coolant propellant expelled out a nozzle, while low thrust EP uses high pressure xenon expelled by an electric grid. By utilizing an optimized combination of low and high thrust propulsion, significant mass savings over a conventional NTR vehicle can be realized. Low thrust mission events, such as midcourse corrections (MCC), tank settling burns, some reaction control system (RCS) burns, and even a small portion at the end of the departure burn can be performed with EP. Crewed and robotic deep space missions to a near Earth asteroid (NEA) are best suited for this hybrid propulsion approach. For these mission scenarios, the Earth return V is typically small enough that EP alone is sufficient. A crewed mission to the NEA Apophis in the year 2028 with an expendable BNTEP transfer vehicle is presented. Assembly operations, launch element masses, and other key characteristics of the vehicle are described. A comparison with a conventional NTR vehicle performing the same mission is also provided. Finally, reusability of the BNTEP transfer vehicle is explored.

  3. Simulation and primary circuit control of the SP-100 space nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear power reactors with thermoelectric conversion are one of the main sources for space application that can provide enough electric power. In this paper we discuss the working conditions, basic structure and operational characteristics of an EMTE pump needed to flow control of a metal liquid nuclear space reactor primary circuit. The BEMTE-1 program is used to study this system during normal operation to simulate the SP-100 american reactor primary cooling circuit and to obtain the actuation point of the system. (author)

  4. Automating security monitoring and analysis for Space Station Freedom's electric power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, James L.; Sobajic, Dejan J.; Pao, Yoh-Han

    1990-01-01

    Operating a large, space power system requires classifying the system's status and analyzing its security. Conventional algorithms are used by terrestrial electric utilities to provide such information to their dispatchers, but their application aboard Space Station Freedom will consume too much processing time. A new approach for monitoring and analysis using adaptive pattern techniques is presented. This approach yields an on-line security monitoring and analysis algorithm that is accurate and fast; and thus, it can free the Space Station Freedom's power control computers for other tasks.

  5. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  6. Overview of thermal management issues for advanced military space nuclear reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the functional and system imposed design constraints and development issues related to military space nuclear power thermal management. The envisioned requirements related to power level, power form and profile, operating duration, and life encompass a wide variety of conceptual future military spacecraft missions. ''Baseload,'' near-constant power output, and ''burstload,'' high peak to average power profile requirements introduce a wide spectrum of potential space reactor configuration needs with a corresponding range of steady state and transient, periodic thermal management technological needs. Spacecraft system operational conditions and design constraints (allowable power/payload mass and volume fractions, survivability and endurability, autonomy, integrability, and orbital operations considerations) impose additional thermal management technological needs. Candidate thermal management technologies are described in terms of their attributes and state of development

  7. Space Station Freedom electric power system evolution analysis status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The ability is examined of the SSF baselined EPS to transition to operate at a greater system capacity beyond the SSF Permanent Manned Capability PMC) milestone. Specifically, a status of a current analysis is discussed concerning additions, modifications, changeout, or combination thereof of baseline EPS hardware and/or software needed to accomplish the power generation, distribution, operation, and use needed to meet evolving SSF mission objectives. This discussion results in several EPS architectural options that facilitate the addition or substitution of new technologies.

  8. A controller based on FPGA state-space equation solver for HIRFL-CSR power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control system of HIRFL-CSR magnet power supply should be improved. In order to realize the complex control algorithms based on modern control theory, digital controller of the power supply was designed with ARM + FPGA architecture. State-space equation solver was designed in the FPGA to realize the state feedback control of the power supply. The results show that the dynamic response speed, steady state accuracy and robustness of the control system are greatly improved. (authors)

  9. Direct Estimation of Power Distribution in Reactors for Nuclear Thermal Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Tunc; Miller, Don W.; Burghelea, Andrei

    2004-02-01

    A recently proposed constant temperature power sensor (CTPS) has the capability to directly measure the local power deposition rate in nuclear reactor cores proposed for space thermal propulsion. Such a capability reduces the uncertainties in the estimated power peaking factors and hence increases the reliability of the nuclear engine. The CTPS operation is sensitive to the changes in the local thermal conditions. A procedure is described for the automatic on-line calibration of the sensor through estimation of changes in thermal .conditions.

  10. Review of the design status of the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heat Pipe Space Nuclear Reactor (HPSNR) System is one of the advanced designs for space nuclear power applications presently being considered. However, a number of design features will continue to require substantial technology and development before considering the system for deployment. This paper reviews the design status of the HPSNR system, as of October 1982, discusses the limitations of the current design and emphasizes those technical areas requiring additional research needed to support continual system development. The topics and design limitations discussed are common to most space nuclear power systems that are currently being developed under the SP-100 program to produce 100 kWe of continuous power in a space environment

  11. A note on bimodal singularities and mirror symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Mase, Makiko; UEDA, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the relation between transposition mirror symmetry of Berlund and H\\"ubsch for bimodal singularities and polar duality of Batyrev for associated toric K3 hypersurfaces. We also show that homological mirror symmetry for singularities implies the geometric construction of Coxeter-Dynkin diagrams of bimodal singularities by Ebeling and Ploog.

  12. Energetic Argument for Bimodal Black Hole Accretion discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林一清; 卢炬甫; 顾为民

    2002-01-01

    Based on simple energetic considerations, we show that two crucial ingredients of bimodal black hole accretiondiscs, namely the sonic point and the transition radius, can be determined from the disc constant parameters.Thus, we can further justify the model of bimodal discs containing thermal instability triggered transition.

  13. The Bimodal Bilingual Brain: Effects of Sign Language Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; McCullough, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Bimodal bilinguals are hearing individuals who know both a signed and a spoken language. Effects of bimodal bilingualism on behavior and brain organization are reviewed, and an fMRI investigation of the recognition of facial expressions by ASL-English bilinguals is reported. The fMRI results reveal separate effects of sign language and spoken…

  14. Differentiable Families of Planar Bimodal Linear Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Josep Ferrer; M. Dolors Magret; Marta Peña

    2014-01-01

    We consider bimodal linear control systems consisting of two subsystems acting on each side of a given hyperplane, assuming continuity along it. For a differentiable family of planar bimodal linear control systems, we obtain its stratification diagram and, if controllability holds for each value of the parameters, we construct a differentiable family of feedbacks which stabilizes both subsystems for each value of the parameters.

  15. Lightweight Inflatable Solar Array: Providing a Flexible, Efficient Solution to Space Power Systems for Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Fabisinski, Leo; Justice, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is critical to consumers, spacecraft, military and other applications alike. In the aerospace industry, an increased emphasis on small satellite flights and a move toward CubeSat and NanoSat technologies, the need for systems that could package into a small stowage volume while still being able to power robust space missions has become more critical. As a result, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Concepts Office identified a need for more efficient, affordable, and smaller space power systems to trade in performing design and feasibility studies. The Lightweight Inflatable Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space or on Earth. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to soldiers in the field. By using very thin, ultraflexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume (shown in artist rendering in Figure 1 below). The proposed presentation will provide an overview of the progress to date on the LISA project as well as a look at its potential, with continued development, to revolutionize small spacecraft and portable terrestrial power systems.

  16. Influence and hazard of disastrous space weather on power grid in China%Influence and hazard of disastrous space weather on power grid in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Lianguang; Zheng Kuan; Liu Chunming

    2011-01-01

    Based on the measured data of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in Guangdong Ling' ao 500 kV power networks during several magnetic storms at the peak years of 23rd Solar Cycle, the GIC calculation results of 750 kV planning power grid in Shartxi, Gansu, Qinghai and Ningxia, the structure and characteristics of power networks from 500 kV to 1 000 kV, and super magnetic storm in 1859 are analyzed in this paper. Through the analysis, the possible impacts of extreme space weather on the future ultra-high voltage (UHV) grid, the security of large-scale power system in China are expounded, and the research suggestions coping with the strong solar storms are proposed.

  17. Improved Statistical Analysis of Low Abundance Phenomena in Bimodal Bacterial Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich Reinhard; Jan Roelof van der Meer

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accura...

  18. Preserving the nuclear option: The AIAA position paper on space nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to published reports about the decline in funding for space nuclear power, the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) approved a position paper in March 1995 that recommends (1) development and support of an integrated space nuclear power program by DOE, NASA and DoD; (2) Congressional support for the program; (3) advocacy of the program by government and industry leaders; and (4) continuation of cooperation between the U.S. and other countries to advance nuclear power source technology and to promote safety. This position paper has been distributed to various people having oversight of the U.S. space nuclear power program. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. The ground testing of a 2 kWe solar dynamic space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 25 years Space Solar Dynamic component development has advanced to the point where it is considered a leading candidate power source technology for the evolutionary phases of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Selection of SD power was based on studies and analyses which indicated significant savings in life cycle costs, launch mass and EVA requirements were possible when the system is compared to more conventional photovoltaic/battery power systems. Issues associated with micro-gravity operation such as the behavior of the thermal energy storage materials are being addressed in other programs. This paper reports that a ground test of a 2 kWe solar dynamic system is being planned by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to address the integration issues. The test will be scalable up to 25 kWe, will be flight configured and will incorporate relevant features of the SSF Solar Dynamic Power Module design

  20. Space and Power in the Ivory Tower: Effective Space Management and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    At a time when there are enormous economic pressures on campuses to use resources effectively, space being one of these resources, the academic culture of shared governance, with its fragmented roles for decision making, presents additional challenges. These roles are fragmented due to independent faculty and administrative action. They are…

  1. Solar Pumped Solid State Lasers for Space Solar Power: Experimental Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard L.; Carrington, Connie K.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Green, Jason J. A.; Laycock, Rustin L.

    2003-01-01

    We outline an experimentally based strategy designed to lead to solar pumped solid state laser oscillators useful for space solar power. Our method involves solar pumping a novel solid state gain element specifically designed to provide efficient conversion of sunlight in space to coherent laser light. Kilowatt and higher average power is sought from each gain element. Multiple such modular gain elements can be used to accumulate total average power of interest for power beaming in space, e.g., 100 kilowatts and more. Where desirable the high average power can also be produced as a train of pulses having high peak power (e.g., greater than 10(exp 10 watts). The modular nature of the basic gain element supports an experimental strategy in which the core technology can be validated by experiments on a single gain element. We propose to do this experimental validation both in terrestrial locations and also on a smaller scale in space. We describe a terrestrial experiment that includes diagnostics and the option of locating the laser beam path in vacuum environment. We describe a space based experiment designed to be compatible with the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We anticipate the gain elements will be based on low temperature (approx. 100 degrees Kelvin) operation of high thermal conductivity (k approx. 100 W/cm-K) diamond and sapphire (k approx. 4 W/cm-K). The basic gain element will be formed by sequences of thin alternating layers of diamond and Ti:sapphire with special attention given to the material interfaces. We anticipate this strategy will lead to a particularly simple, robust, and easily maintained low mass modelocked multi-element laser oscillator useful for space solar power.

  2. A One-year, Short-Stay Crewed Mars Mission Using Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) - A Preliminary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laura A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    A crewed mission to Mars poses a signi cant challenge in dealing with the physiolog- ical issues that arise with the crew being exposed to a near zero-gravity environment as well as signi cant solar and galactic radiation for such a long duration. While long sur- face stay missions exceeding 500 days are the ultimate goal for human Mars exploration, short round trip, short surface stay missions could be an important intermediate step that would allow NASA to demonstrate technology as well as study the physiological e ects on the crew. However, for a 1-year round trip mission, the outbound and inbound hy- perbolic velocity at Earth and Mars can be very large resulting in a signi cant propellant requirement for a high thrust system like Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Similarly, a low thrust Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system requires high electrical power lev- els (10 megawatts electric (MWe) or more), plus advanced power conversion technology to achieve the lower speci c mass values needed for such a mission. A Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) system is examined here that uses three high thrust Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) engines allowing short departure and capture maneuvers. The engines also generate electrical power that drives a low thrust Electric Propulsion (EP) system used for ecient interplanetary transit. This combined system can help reduce the total launch mass, system and operational requirements that would otherwise be required for equivalent NEP or Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) mission. The BNTEP system is a hybrid propulsion concept where the BNTR reactors operate in two separate modes. During high-thrust mode operation, each BNTR provides 10's of kilo- Newtons of thrust at reasonably high speci c impulse (Isp) of 900 seconds for impulsive trans-planetary injection and orbital insertion maneuvers. When in power generation / EP mode, the BNTR reactors are coupled to a Brayton power conversion system allowing each

  3. Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested. The manufacturing plan showed that the chosen materials and processes are compatible with today's production techniques, that the production volume can readily be achieved and that the costs are reasonable

  4. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver is considered which uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage medium and which was designed for a 7-kW Brayton engine. This heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies, while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7-kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  5. Bimodal stimulation: benefits for music perception and sound quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucher, Catherine M; McDermott, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    With recent expansions in cochlear implantation candidacy criteria, increasing numbers of implantees can exploit their remaining hearing by using bimodal stimulation (combining electrical stimulation via the implant with acoustic stimulation via hearing aids). This study examined the effect of bimodal stimulation on music perception and perceived sound quality. The perception of music and sound quality by nine post-lingually deafened adult implantees was examined in three conditions: implant alone, hearing aid alone and bimodal stimulation. On average, bimodal stimulation provided the best results for music perception and perceived sound quality when compared with results obtained with electrical stimulation alone. Thus, for implantees with usable acoustic hearing, bimodal stimulation may be advantageous when listening to music and other non-speech sounds. PMID:19230032

  6. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM. Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  7. Overview of Small and Large-Scale Space Solar Power Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Seth; Henley, Mark; Howell, Joe; Carrington, Connie; Fikes, John

    2006-01-01

    An overview of space solar power studies performed at the Boeing Company under contract with NASA will be presented. The major concepts to be presented are: 1. Power Plug in Orbit: this is a spacecraft that collects solar energy and distributes it to users in space using directed radio frequency or optical energy. Our concept uses solar arrays having the same dimensions as ISS arrays, but are assumed to be more efficient. If radiofrequency wavelengths are used, it will necessitate that the receiving satellite be equipped with a rectifying antenna (rectenna). For optical wavelengths, the solar arrays on the receiving satellite will collect the power. 2. Mars Clipper I Power Explorer: this is a solar electric Mars transfer vehicle to support human missions. A near-term precursor could be a high-power radar mapping spacecraft with self-transport capability. Advanced solar electric power systems and electric propulsion technology constitute viable elements for conducting human Mars missions that are roughly comparable in performance to similar missions utilizing alternative high thrust systems, with the one exception being their inability to achieve short Earth-Mars trip times. 3. Alternative Architectures: this task involves investigating alternatives to the traditional solar power satellite (SPS) to supply commercial power from space for use on Earth. Four concepts were studied: two using photovoltaic power generation, and two using solar dynamic power generation, with microwave and laser power transmission alternatives considered for each. All four architectures use geostationary orbit. 4. Cryogenic Propellant Depot in Earth Orbit: this concept uses large solar arrays (producing perhaps 600 kW) to electrolyze water launched from Earth, liquefy the resulting hydrogen and oxygen gases, and store them until needed by spacecraft. 5. Beam-Powered Lunar Polar Rover: a lunar rover powered by a microwave or laser beam can explore permanently shadowed craters near the lunar

  8. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.B. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Marshall, A.C. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I ampersand C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. Bimodal and multimodal plant biomass particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H.

    2013-07-09

    An industrial feedstock of plant biomass particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein the particles are individually characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L, wherein the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces, and wherein the particles in the feedstock are collectively characterized by having a bimodal or multimodal size distribution.

  11. Bimodal condensation silicone elastomers as dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    , the top and bottom surfaces of the elastomer (7:3) prepared at 23oC and 50% humidity were tested by water contact angle and optical microscope. The results show the bimodal condensation elastomer possesses structural heterogeneity, which may lead to favourable properties for DE applications....... elastomers were prepared by mixing different mass ratios (9:1, 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, 5:5, 4:6) between long polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chains and short PDMS chains. The resulting elastomers were investigated with respect to their rheology, dielectric properties, tensile strength, electrical breakdown, as well as.......Moreover, a series of elastomers with the same mass ratio (7:3) between long and short PDMS chains were made at different humidity (90%, 70%, 50%, 30%, 10%) at 23oC. The dielectric and mechincal properties of the resulting elastomers were shown to depend strongly on the atmospheric humidity level.In addition...

  12. Sex identification in female crayfish is bimodal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquiloni, Laura; Massolo, Alessandro; Gherardi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Sex identification has been studied in several species of crustacean decapods but only seldom was the role of multimodality investigated in a systematic fashion. Here, we analyse the effect of single/combined chemical and visual stimuli on the ability of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii to identify the sex of a conspecific during mating interactions. Our results show that crayfish respond to the offered stimuli depending on their sex. While males rely on olfaction alone for sex identification, females require the combination of olfaction and vision to do so. In the latter, chemical and visual stimuli act as non-redundant signal components that possibly enhance the female ability to discriminate potential mates in the crowded social context experienced during mating period. This is one of the few clear examples in invertebrates of non-redundancy in a bimodal communication system.

  13. Emergence of bimodality in controlling complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Tao; Csóka, Endre; Pósfai, Márton; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to control complex systems is a fundamental challenge of contemporary science. Recently introduced tools to identify the driver nodes, nodes through which we can achieve full control, predict the existence of multiple control configurations, prompting us to classify each node in a network based on their role in control. Accordingly a node is critical, intermittent or redundant if it acts as a driver node in all, some or none of the control configurations. Here we develop an analytical framework to identify the category of each node, leading to the discovery of two distinct control modes in complex systems: centralized vs distributed control. We predict the control mode for an arbitrary network and show that one can alter it through small structural perturbations. The uncovered bimodality has implications from network security to organizational research and offers new insights into the dynamics and control of complex systems.

  14. A bimodal search strategy for SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.; Tarter, J.

    1980-01-01

    The search strategy and resultant observational plan which was developed to carry out a comprehensive Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) over that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum known as the terrestrial microwave window is described. The limiting sensitivity achieved was parameterized and calculated for Deep Space Network antennas as well as several radio astronomy observatories. A brief description of the instrumentation to be employed in the search and the classes of signals to be looked for is given. One observational goal is to survey the entire sky over a wide range of frequency to a relatively constant flux level. This survey ensures that all potential life sites are observed to some limiting equivalent isotropic radiated power depending upon their distance. A second goal is to survey a set of potential transmission sites selected a priori to be especially promising, achieving very high sensitivity over a smaller range of frequency.

  15. Development of Bimodal Grain Structures in Nb-Containing High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels during Slab Reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Debalay; Davis, Claire; Strangwood, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Bimodal (mixed coarse and fine) grain structures, which have been observed in some Nb-containing thermomechanically-controlled rolled steel plates, adversely affect their mechanical properties by causing scatter in cleavage fracture stress values. It is known that bimodal grain structures can develop during reheating prior to rolling; however, no quantitative predictions of the level of bimodality or the critical reheat temperatures for formation have been reported. In this article, three high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel slabs with varying microalloying additions (Ti, Nb, and V) have been characterized in the as-continuously cast and reheated (to various temperatures in the range 1050 °C to 1225 °C) conditions to determine the link between their grain size distribution (and any bimodality observed) and the microalloy precipitate type, size, and distribution. The as-cast slabs showed inhomogeneous microalloying precipitate distributions with the separation between precipitate-rich and precipitate-poor regions being consistent with interdendritic segregation and hence, the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). The susceptibility of the slabs to the formation of bimodality, based on the steel chemical compositions and critical reheat temperature ranges has been identified, both experimentally and theoretically using ThermoCalc (Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden) modeling of precipitate stability in the solute-rich and the solute-depleted regions formed during casting.

  16. PC Software graphics tool for conceptual design of space/planetary electrical power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Decision Support System (DSS), a personal computer software graphics tool for designing conceptual space and/or planetary electrical power systems. By using the DSS, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters, such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, and bus power. With this tool, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. The DSS is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool with online help and a custom graphical user interface. An example design and results are illustrated for a typical space power system with multiple types of power sources, frequencies, energy storage systems, and loads.

  17. SP-100 nuclear space power reactor system hardware and testing progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 Space Reactor System was established by agencies of the US government as the system of choice to meet the nation's long lifetime, high reliability space power needs in the 10's to 100's of kWe power range. SP-100 is compatible with all power conversion technologies that can utilize reactor coolant temperatures ≤ 1,350 K. The technologies incorporated in SP-100 are directly applicable to earth orbiting satellites, planetary probes or surface power for commercial, military or civil missions. The most significant hardware and testing accomplishments that were made during the past year are reported in this summary paper, including fuel, fabrication technologies, control mechanisms, liquid metal pumps, lithium thaw behavior and characterization, and thermoelectric power conversion

  18. Space nuclear power studies in France - overview of the Erato program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cooperative program about nuclear space power systems has been initiated in 1982 by both CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) with a view to assessing the feasibility, the lead time, and the cost of nuclear space power systems of the 20 to 400 kWe class. A first study phase, completed in mid 1986, has been devoted to preliminary feasibility and cost studies of a reference 200 kWe turboelectric power system ERATO compatible with the ARIANE V launcher. The present three-year study phase is mainly oriented toward the assessment of the potential advantages of nuclear power systems over solar dynamic and photovoltaic systems, within the 20 kWe power range, which corresponds to the expected power needs of the first european space missions. This paper is intended to give an overview of the present program phase, with emphasis on the design studies dedicated to three concepts of 20 kWe nuclear turboelectric power systems selected for comparison against non nuclear power systems

  19. Methodolgy For Evaluation Of Technology Impacts In Space Electric Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holda, Julie

    2004-01-01

    The Analysis and Management branch of the Power and Propulsion Office at NASA Glenn Research Center is responsible for performing complex analyses of the space power and In-Space propulsion products developed by GRC. This work quantifies the benefits of the advanced technologies to support on-going advocacy efforts. The Power and Propulsion Office is committed to understanding how the advancement in space technologies could benefit future NASA missions. They support many diverse projects and missions throughout NASA as well as industry and academia. The area of work that we are concentrating on is space technology investment strategies. Our goal is to develop a Monte-Carlo based tool to investigate technology impacts in space electric power systems. The framework is being developed at this stage, which will be used to set up a computer simulation of a space electric power system (EPS). The outcome is expected to be a probabilistic assessment of critical technologies and potential development issues. We are developing methods for integrating existing spreadsheet-based tools into the simulation tool. Also, work is being done on defining interface protocols to enable rapid integration of future tools. Monte Carlo-based simulation programs for statistical modeling of the EPS Model. I decided to learn and evaluate Palisade's @Risk and Risk Optimizer software, and utilize it's capabilities for the Electric Power System (EPS) model. I also looked at similar software packages (JMP, SPSS, Crystal Ball, VenSim, Analytica) available from other suppliers and evaluated them. The second task was to develop the framework for the tool, in which we had to define technology characteristics using weighing factors and probability distributions. Also we had to define the simulation space and add hard and soft constraints to the model. The third task is to incorporate (preliminary) cost factors into the model. A final task is developing a cross-platform solution of this framework.

  20. Fabric composite radiators for space nuclear power applications. Final report, March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, A.C.; Al-Baroudi, H.; Gulshan-Ara, Z.; Kiestler, W.C.; Snuggerud, R.D.; Abdul-Hamid, S.A.; Marks, T.S.

    1993-03-24

    Nuclear power systems will be required to provide much greater power levels for both civilian and defense space activities in the future than an currently needed. Limitations on the amount of usable power from radioisotope thermal generators and the limited availability of radioisotope heat source materials lead directly to the conclusion that nuclear power reactors will be needed to enhance the exploration of the solar system as well as to provide for an adequate defense. Lunar bases and travel to the Martian surface will be greatly enhanced by the use of high levels of nuclear power. Space based radar systems requiring many kilowatts of electrical power can provide intercontinental airline traffic control and defense early warning systems. Since the, figure of merit used in defining any space power system is the specific power, the decrease in die mass of any reactor system component will yield a tremendous benefit to the overall system performance. Also, since the heat rejection system of any power system can make up a large portion of the total system mass, any reduction in the mass of the heat rejection radiators will significantly affect the performance of the power system. Composite materials which combine the high strength, flexibility, and low mass characteristics of Si% based fibers with the attractive compatibility and heat transfer features of metallic foils, have been proposed for use m a number of space radiator applications. Thus, the weave of the fabric and the high strength capability of the individual fibers are combined with the high conductivity and chemical stability of a metallic liner to provide a light weight, flexible alternative to heavy, rigid, metallic radiator structural containers. The primary focus of this investigation revolves around two applications of the fabric composite materials, notably a fabric heat pipe radiator design and the Bubble Membrane Radiator concept.

  1. Radioisotope space power generator. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of the Isotec Technology Program shifted from development of a Galileo generator to study of a segmented selenide element and couple technology. The goal of the FY 79 program was to determine the feasibility of fabricating segmented selenide P and N elements which exploit the high thermoelectric efficiency of (Cu,Ag)2Se and Gd2Se3 materials. A preliminary evaluation of segmented element efficiencies, material compatibilities, and fabrication abilities was used to select (Cu,Ag)2Se/Fe(Bi,Sb)2Te3 for the P element and Gd2Se3/PbTe for the N element. The iron barrier between the (Cu,Ag)2Se and (Bi,Sb)2Te3 prevented degradation of thermoelectric properties from copper contamination of the (Bi,Sb)2Te3. Fabrication processes for both elements were developed. Gd2Se3 was friable and difficult to fabricate crack-free. It also exhibited a phase transition from cubic to orthorhombic, which increased its susceptibility to microcracking and reduced its thermoelectric efficiency. Life testing of an all-bonded couple with unsegmented (Cu,Ag)2Se P-type and Gd2Se3 N-type elements was stopped after 3300 h in a nominal 8300C/3900C thermal gradient. The Gd2Se3 leg did not show any significant degradation during the test. Examination of the hot end of the P element showed the need for a less reactive hot cap material and an improved vapor supression system. Module testing of a 1-W (Bi,Sb)2(Se,Te)3 generator was performed for 5000 h with no degradation in power. High-temperature Thermid 600 adhesive curing cycles were examined, 75-mW module loading tests were performed, and diagnostic examination of RTG-2A and RTG-201 was completed

  2. SPACE-R nuclear power system SC-320 thermionic fuel element performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993 and 1994, the Russian Scientific Research Institute NII NPO ''LUCH'' and Space Power, Inc., (SPI), of San Jose, California, developed a prototype of the single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) for the SPACE-R space nuclear power system (NPS). The SPACE-R system was designed as a part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Space Reactor Development Program to develop a long life, space reactor system capable of supplying up to 40 kW(e) output power. The jointly developed SC-320 TFE is a prototype of the next generation thermionic converter for nuclear applications in space. This paper presents the results of the initial demonstration tests and subsequent parametric evaluations conducted on the SC-320 TFE as compared to the calculated performance characteristics. The demonstration tests were conducted jointly by Russian and American specialists at the Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque

  3. Free-piston Stirling engine system considerations for various space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Government is evaluating power requirements for future space applications. As power requirements increase solar or nuclear dynamic systems become increasingly attractive. Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE) have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation. Therefore, they are excellent candidates for the dynamic power conversion module of a space-based, power-generating system. FPSE can be coupled with many potential heat sources (radioisotope, solar, or nuclear reactor), various heat input systems (pumped loop, heat pipe), heat rejection (pumped loop or heat pipe), and various power management and distribution systems (AC, DC, high or low voltage, and fixed or variable load). This paper will review potential space missions that can be met using free-piston Stirling engines and discusses options of various system integration approaches. Currently free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power applications is being developed under contract with NASA-Lewis Research Center. This paper will also briefly outline the program and recent progress

  4. Energy storage and thermal control system design status. [for space station power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Stephen N.; Willhoite, Bryan C.; Van Ommering, Gert

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) will initially rely on photovoltaics for power generation and Ni/H2 batteries for electrical energy storage. The current design for the development status of two major subsystems in the PV Power Module is discussed. The energy storage subsystem comprised of high capacity Ni/H2 batteries and the single-phase thermal control system that rejects the excess heat generated by the batteries and other components associated with power generation andstorage is described.

  5. Bimodality as a signal of liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, O.; Lacroix, D.; Vient, E

    2005-09-15

    We use the HIPSE (Heavy-Ion Phase-Space Exploration) Model to discuss the origin of the bi-modality in charge asymmetry observed in nuclear reactions around the Fermi energy. We show that it may be related to the important angular momentum (spin) transferred into the quasi-projectile before secondary decay. As the spin overcomes the critical value, a sudden opening of decay channels is induced and leads to a bimodal distribution for the charge asymmetry. In the model, it is not assigned to a liquid-gas phase transition but to specific instabilities in nuclei with high spin. Therefore, we propose to use these reactions to study instabilities in rotating nuclear droplets. (authors)

  6. Nuclear power supplies: their potential and the practical problems to their achievement for space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anticipated growth of the space station power requirement provides a good example of the problem the space nuclear power supply developers have to contend with: should a reactor power supply be developed that attempts to be all things to all missions, i.e., is highly flexible in its ability to meet a wide variety of missions, or should the development of a reactor system await a specific mission definition and be customized to this mission. This leads, of course, to a chicken-and-egg situation. For power requirements of several hundreds of kilowatts or more, no nuclear power source exists or is even far enough along in the definition stage (much less the development stage) for NASA to reasonably assume probable availability within the next 10 years. The real problem of space nuclear power is this ''chicken-and-egg'' syndrome: DOE will not develop a space reactor system for NASA without a firm mission, and NASA will not specify a firm mission requiring a space reactor because such a system doesn't exist and is perceived not to be developable within the time frame of the mission. The problem is how to break this cycle. The SP-100 program has taken an important first step to breaking this cycle, but this program is much more design-specific than what is required to achieve a broad technology base and latitude in achievable power level. In contrast to the SP-100 approach, a wider perspective is required: the development of the appropriate technologies for power levels can be broken into ranges, say, from 100 kWe to 1000 kWe, and from 1000 kWe to 10,000 kWe

  7. Perturbation theory approach for the power spectrum: from dark matter in real space to massive haloes in redshift space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the accuracy of Eulerian perturbation theory for describing the matter and galaxy power spectra in real and redshift space in light of future observational probes for precision cosmology. Comparing the analytical results with a large suite of N-body simulations (160 independent boxes of 13.8 (Gpc/h)3 volume each, which are publicly available), we find that re-summing terms in the standard perturbative approach predicts the real-space matter power spectrum with an accuracy of ∼<2% for k ≤ 0.20 h/Mpc at redshifts z∼<1.5. This is obtained following the widespread technique of writing the resummed propagator in terms of 1-loop contributions. We show that the accuracy of this scheme increases by considering higher-order terms in the resummed propagator. By combining resummed perturbation theories with several models for the mappings from real to redshift space discussed in the literature, the multipoles of the dark-matter power spectrum can be described with sub-percent deviations from N-body results for k ≤ 0.15 h/Mpc at z∼<1. As a consequence, the logarithmic growth rate, f, can be recovered with sub-percent accuracy on these scales. Extending the models to massive dark-matter haloes in redshift space, our results describe the monopole term from N-body data within 2% accuracy for scales k ≤ 0.15 h/Mpc at z∼<0.5; here f can be recovered within < 5% when the halo bias is known. We conclude that these techniques are suitable to extract cosmological information from future galaxy surveys

  8. Influence of age, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on localization of auditory, visual, and bimodal targets by human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobreva, Marina S; O'Neill, William E; Paige, Gary D

    2012-12-01

    A common complaint of the elderly is difficulty identifying and localizing auditory and visual sources, particularly in competing background noise. Spatial errors in the elderly may pose challenges and even threats to self and others during everyday activities, such as localizing sounds in a crowded room or driving in traffic. In this study, we investigated the influence of aging, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on the localization of auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual (bimodal) targets. Head-restrained young and elderly subjects localized targets in a dark, echo-attenuated room using a manual laser pointer. Localization accuracy and precision (repeatability) were quantified for both ongoing and transient (remembered) targets at response delays up to 10 s. Because eye movements bias auditory spatial perception, localization was assessed under target fixation (eyes free, pointer guided by foveal vision) and central fixation (eyes fixed straight ahead, pointer guided by peripheral vision) conditions. Spatial localization across the frontal field in young adults demonstrated (1) horizontal overshoot and vertical undershoot for ongoing auditory targets under target fixation conditions, but near-ideal horizontal localization with central fixation; (2) accurate and precise localization of ongoing visual targets guided by foveal vision under target fixation that degraded when guided by peripheral vision during central fixation; (3) overestimation in horizontal central space (±10°) of remembered auditory, visual, and bimodal targets with increasing response delay. In comparison with young adults, elderly subjects showed (1) worse precision in most paradigms, especially when localizing with peripheral vision under central fixation; (2) greatly impaired vertical localization of auditory and bimodal targets; (3) increased horizontal overshoot in the central field for remembered visual and bimodal targets across response delays; (4) greater vulnerability to

  9. Low earth orbit environmental effects on the space station photovoltaic power generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the Low Earth Orbital Environment, its impact on the photovoltaic power systems of the space station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the photovoltaic power systems of the space station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the space station with the desired life are also summarized

  10. Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion: Materials Challenges for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Mike

    2008-01-01

    The current focus of NASA s space fission effort is Fission Surface Power (FSP). FSP systems could be used to provide power anytime, anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars. FSP systems could be used at locations away from the lunar poles or in permanently shaded regions, with no performance penalty. A potential reference 40 kWe option has been devised that is cost-competitive with alternatives while providing more power for less mass. The potential reference system is readily extensible for use on Mars. At Mars the system could be capable of operating through global dust storms and providing year-round power at any Martian latitude. To ensure affordability, the potential near-term, 40 kWe reference concept is designed to use only well established materials and fuels. However, if various materials challenges could be overcome, extremely high performance fission systems could be devised. These include high power, low mass fission surface power systems; in-space systems with high specific power; and high performance nuclear thermal propulsion systems. This tutorial will provide a brief overview of space fission systems and will focus on materials challenges that, if overcome, could help enable advanced exploration and utilization of the solar system.

  11. Feasibility Study of Space Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Stephen J.; Leete, Stephen J.; Jaffe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of two-stage Space-Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat to Earth (SSP-TA) system architectures that offer significant advantages over conventional single stage space-to-earth architectures is being studied. There have been many proposals for the transmission of solar power collected in space to the surface of the earth so that solar energy could provide a major part of the electric power requirements on earth. There are, however, serious difficulties in implementing the single stage space-based solar power systems that have been previously studied. These difficulties arise due to: i) the cost of transporting the components needed for the extremely large microwave transmit beaming aperture into space orbit, ii) the even larger collection apertures required on earth, iii) the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) a lack of flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. Two candidate system architectures are described here to overcome these difficulties. In both cases a two-stage space to tethered aerostat to earth transmission system (SSP-TA) is proposed. The use of high altitude tethered aerostats (or powered airships) avoids the effects of attenuation of EM energy propagating through the earth s lower atmosphere. This allows the use of beaming frequencies to be chosen from the range of high millimeter (THz) to near-infra-red (NIR) to the visible. This has the potential for: i) greatly reduced transportation costs to space, ii) much smaller receiver collection apertures and ground stations, iii) elimination of the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) ease in transportation and flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. A preliminary comparison of system performance and efficiencies is presented.

  12. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise. PMID:26172735

  13. Electric field determination of polymeric dc power cable in the presence of space charge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, G.; Choo, W.; Fu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Space charge in polymeric power cables has been previously measured by the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique and its influence on electric field distribution has been estimated assuming that the conductivity is independent of electric field. In this paper we proposed a method of determining electric field distribution considering the influence of the effect of electric field on the conductivity. The cable insulation is divided into thin layers with different conductivities and space char...

  14. The political ecology of hydropower development in Guatemala: Actors, power and spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Cecilie Karina von

    2010-01-01

    In this study I analyse the human and environmental interactions in the hydropower sector in Guatemala, with en emphasis on actors, spaces and power relations, using a political ecology framework. The local and civil society agency and participation in decision making about hydropower development has been explored through the various invited, claimed, and transformed spaces. Guatemala is a relevant case because of its potential for hydropower development; it is also a country with a high perc...

  15. Analysis of electromagnetic interference from power system processing and transmission components for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Peter W.; Demerdash, Nabeel A. O.; Hurysz, B.; Luo, Z.; Denny, Hugh W.; Millard, David P.; Herkert, R.; Wang, R.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to analyze the potential effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) originating from power system processing and transmission components for Space Station Freedom. The approach consists of four steps: (1) developing analytical tools (models and computer programs); (2) conducting parameterization (what if?) studies; (3) predicting the global space station EMI environment; and (4) providing a basis for modification of EMI standards.

  16. Comprehensive Evaluation of Power Supplies at Cryogenic Temperatures for Deep Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The operation of power electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated in many future space missions such as planetary exploration and deep space probes. In addition to surviving the space hostile environments, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. DC/DC converters are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. As part of the on-going Low Temperature Electronics Program at NASA, several commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) DC/DC converters, with specifications that might fit the requirements of specific future space missions have been selected for investigation at cryogenic temperatures. The converters have been characterized in terms of their performance as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to - 180 C. These converters ranged in electrical power from 8 W to 13 W, input voltage from 9 V to 72 V and an output voltage of 3.3 V. The experimental set-up and procedures along with the results obtained on the converters' steady state and dynamic characteristics are presented and discussed.

  17. Status of CEA reactor studies for a 200 kWe turbo electric space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present European ARIANE space program will expand after 1995 in the development of the large ARIANE 5 launch vehicle. Considering, that the range of power needs (50 to 400 kWe) and operation times required for the space missions planned after the year 2000, are relevant to a nuclear power system, the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) invited in 1983 the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) to undertake preliminary studies on space power systems. The purpose of the present two year phase (mid 1984-mid 1986) is to identify key technologies for a space generator within the power range of interest and to estimate the development cost of such a project to be examined for commitment in 1986. This work mainly consists in the feasibility and cost assessment of a reference 200 kWe turboelectric space generator, selected for the maturity and availability of the conversion system and for its attractive specific mass compared to thermionics and thermoelectricity, considering the available radiator area afforded by the specific ARIANE 5 geometrical features. The system is basically composed of a fast neutron spectrum lithium cooled reactor, of a Brayton conversion loop and of a heat pipe radiator

  18. Advanced Magnetic-Nuclear Power Systems for Reliability Demanding Applications Including Deep Space Missions

    OpenAIRE

    Tsvetkov, Pavel; Guy, Troy

    2010-01-01

    The MAGNUS concept, which is based on the FFMCR approach, offers space power and propulsion technology with a number of unique characteristics such as: ï‚· Direct FF energy conversion is uniquely suitable for space operation; ï‚· High efficiency DEC promises reduced thermal control and radiators; ï‚· High specific impulse allows short trip times and extends exploration to the outer reaches of the solar system and beyond; ï‚· Achievability of long-term operation assures power for missions with...

  19. Space Nuclear Power Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report, For Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Levine

    2006-01-27

    This letter transmits, for information, the Project Prometheus Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) Pre-Conceptual Design Report completed by the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT). This report documents the work pertaining to the Reactor Module, which includes integration of the space nuclear reactor with the reactor radiation shield, energy conversion, and instrumentation and control segments. This document also describes integration of the Reactor Module with the Heat Rejection segment, the Power Conditioning and Distribution subsystem (which comprise the SNPP), and the remainder of the Prometheus spaceship.

  20. Short-term wind power forecasting: probabilistic and space-time aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastu, Julija

    work deals with the proposal and evaluation of new mathematical models and forecasting methods for short-term wind power forecasting, accounting for space-time dynamics based on geographically distributed information. Different forms of power predictions are considered, starting from traditional point...... extension from point to probabilistic forecasts is dealt with, hence requiring to describe the uncertainty associated with the point predictions previously generated. Both parametric and non-parametric approaches to forming predictive densities are considered, while ways to include space-time effects into...

  1. Space nuclear power system concepts and the test facility needs/programmatic requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of the planning needs for the SP-100 and Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems programs. Factors of concern include: establishment of mission performance test goals; determination of current Federal Order requirements; compliance with applicable institutional and regulatory requirements, especially those related to site environmental qualification; analysis of lessons learned from the commercial nuclear power, NERVA and SNAP programs; determination of needed technical program support services; analysis of regulatory requirements for similar nuclear programs; establishment of test program safeguards and security; analysis of public health and safety; determination of site program readiness; and determination of public acceptance of the space program and the proposed test site

  2. High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project Advanced Space-Rated Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) has an agreement with China National Offshore Oil Corporation New Energy Investment Company, Ltd. (CNOOC), under the United States-China EcoPartnerships Framework, to create a bi-national entity seeking to develop technically feasible and economically viable solutions to energy and environmental issues. Advanced batteries have been identified as one of the initial areas targeted for collaborations. CWRU invited NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) personnel from the Electrochemistry Branch to CWRU to discuss various aspects of advanced battery development as they might apply to this partnership. Topics discussed included: the process for the selection of a battery chemistry; the establishment of an integrated development program; project management/technical interactions; new technology developments; and synergies between batteries for automotive and space operations. Additional collaborations between CWRU and NASA GRC's Electrochemistry Branch were also discussed.

  3. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  4. A closed Brayton power conversion unit concept for nuclear electric propulsion for deep space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt and Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level

  5. Space nuclear power studies in France. - A new concept of particle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cooperative program about space nuclear turboelectric space power systems was initiated in 1982 by both the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) agencies of the French government, with a view to assessing the feasibility, the lead time and the cost for the development of nuclear space power systems relevant to the power range of 20 to 400 kWe. The effort on conceptual studies recently shifted towards low power systems (20 kWe). In order to widely cover the range of possible technologies for the 20-kWe space power systems, and to assess the impact of the reactor concept (liquid metal versus gas cooled) and of the relevant operating temperature upon the system performances, a set of three reference turboelectric systems were selected for comparison. Those considered for both extreme bounds of the explored range of maximum heat source temperature (970 K and 1470 K), use a liquid metal cooled reactor (sodium or Nak and lithium respectively) and the basic features of the 200 kWe system. In addition to both liquid metal cooled systems, a third system using a gas cooled epithermal particle bed reactor, to drive a direct cycle conversion system with a turbine inlet temperature of 1120 K is being investigated; this system is intended to make full use of the heat resisting materials and of the techniques, which have been developed for the high temperature gas cooled reactors

  6. Overview of NASA's Space Solar Power Technology Advanced Research and Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe; Mankins, John C.; Davis, N. Jan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large solar power satellite (SPS) systems that might provide base load power into terrestrial markets were examined extensively in the 1970s by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Following a hiatus of about 15 years, the subject of space solar power (SSP) was reexamined by NASA from 1995-1997 in the 'fresh look' study, and during 1998 in an SSP 'concept definition study', and during 1999-2000 in the SSP Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) program. As a result of these efforts, during 2001, NASA has initiated the SSP Technology Advanced Research and Development (STAR-Dev) program based on informed decisions. The goal of the STAR-Dev program is to conduct preliminary strategic technology research and development to enable large, multi-megawatt to gigawatt-class space solar power (SSP) systems and wireless power transmission (WPT) for government missions and commercial markets (in-space and terrestrial). Specific objectives include: (1) Release a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for SSP Projects; (2) Conduct systems studies; (3) Develop Component Technologies; (4) Develop Ground and Flight demonstration systems; and (5) Assess and/or Initiate Partnerships. Accomplishing these objectives will allow informed future decisions regarding further SSP and related research and development investments by both NASA management and prospective external partners. In particular, accomplishing these objectives will also guide further definition of SSP and related technology roadmaps including performance objectives, resources and schedules; including 'multi-purpose' applications (commercial, science, and other government).

  7. The TEF modeling and analysis approach to advance thermionic space power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermionics space power systems have been proposed as advanced power sources for future space missions that require electrical power levels significantly above the capabilities of current space power systems. The Defense Special Weapons Agency close-quote s (DSWA) Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) is carrying out both experimental and analytical research to advance thermionic space power technology to meet this expected need. A Modeling and Analysis (M ampersand A) project has been created at the TEF to develop analysis tools, evaluate concepts, and guide research. M ampersand A activities are closely linked to the TEF experimental program, providing experiment support and using experimental data to validate models. A planning exercise has been completed for the M ampersand A project, and a strategy for implementation was developed. All M ampersand A activities will build on a framework provided by a system performance model for a baseline Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) concept. The system model is composed of sub-models for each of the system components and sub-systems. Additional thermionic component options and model improvements will continue to be incorporated in the basic system model during the course of the program. All tasks are organized into four focus areas: 1) system models, 2) thermionic research, 3) alternative concepts, and 4) documentation and integration. The M ampersand A project will provide a solid framework for future thermionic system development. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. A 32-GHz solid-state power amplifier for deep space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamhof, P. D.; Rascoe, D. L.; Lee, K. A.; Lansing, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.5-W solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) has been demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 35 GHz for future deep space missions. Output power and efficiency measurements for a monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC)-based SSPA are reported. Technical design details for the various modules and a thermal analysis are discussed, as well as future plans.

  9. Power consumption in agitated vessels with dual pitched blade turbines: baffle length and impeller spacing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markopoulos, J.; Babalona, E.; Tsiliopoulou, E.; Tasopoulou, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Univ. Box. 453, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-09-01

    The power consumed in mechanically agitated vessels is an important parameter, especially for the energy requirements and the heat and mass transfer efficiencies of these systems. Power consumption does not only depend on the impeller type, the fluid properties and the stirring speed, but also on the geometry of the agitated system, including the impeller spacing and the length of the baffles in the mixing vessel. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Feasibility study on polonium-209 as radioisotope fuel for space nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the performance and the production method of alternative isotopes of 238Pu as a radioisotope fuel for use in space radioisotope power generators. Polonium-209 has the possibility to be an alternative material of 238Pu. It has enough half-time of 102 years and the specific power of 490 W/kg. From the simulation, the beam current of 14 A with 40 MeV proton energy provides 1 kg/yr of 209Po annually. (author)

  11. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  12. Verification of Space Station Secondary Power System Stability Using Design of Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Kamiar J.; Booker, Andrew J.; Mong, Alvin C.; Manners, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods used in verification of large DC power systems with applications to the International Space Station (ISS). Large DC power systems contain many switching power converters with negative resistor characteristics. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability such as complex sources and undefined loads. The Space Station program has developed impedance specifications for sources and loads. The overall approach to system stability consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and testing. Testing of large complex distributed power systems is not practical due to size and complexity of the system. Computer modeling has been extensively used to develop hardware specifications as well as to identify system configurations for lab testing. The statistical method of Design of Experiments (DoE) is used as an analysis tool for verification of these large systems. DOE reduces the number of computer runs which are necessary to analyze the performance of a complex power system consisting of hundreds of DC/DC converters. DoE also provides valuable information about the effect of changes in system parameters on the performance of the system. DoE provides information about various operating scenarios and identification of the ones with potential for instability. In this paper we will describe how we have used computer modeling to analyze a large DC power system. A brief description of DoE is given. Examples using applications of DoE to analysis and verification of the ISS power system are provided.

  13. Overview of Intelligent Power Controller Development for Human Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James F.; Dever, Timothy P.; McNelis, Anne M.; Beach, Raymond F.; Trase, Larry M.; May, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent or autonomous control of an entire spacecraft is a major technology that must be developed to enable NASA to meet its human exploration goals. NASA's current long term human space platform, the International Space Station, is in low Earth orbit with almost continuous communication with the ground based mission control. This permits the near real-time control by the ground of all of the core systems including power. As NASA moves beyond low Earth orbit, the issues of communication time-lag and lack of communication bandwidth beyond geosynchronous orbit does not permit this type of operation. This paper presents the work currently ongoing at NASA to develop an architecture for an autonomous power control system as well as the effort to assemble that controller into the framework of the vehicle mission manager and other subsystem controllers to enable autonomous control of the complete spacecraft. Due to the common problems faced in both space power systems and terrestrial power system, the potential for spin-off applications of this technology for use in micro-grids located at the edge or user end of terrestrial power grids for peak power accommodation and reliability are described.

  14. Space Power Program Semiannual Progress Report for period ending June 30, 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1963-10-11

    This is a report of progress on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's research and development program on nuclear power plants for electrical power production in space vehicles. The work is carried out under AEG Reactor Experiments, Fuels, and Materials, and Reactor Component programs. Research and development work is under way on the stainless steel boiling-potassium reactor and the Medium Power Reactor Experiment, boiling alkali metal heat transfer, high-temperature and refractory alloys, fuel material, and space reactor shielding, particularly in connection with SNAP 2, 8, 10, and 50. Many of these OREL efforts are directed toward the development of a specific type of power plant, but they also furnish a significant contribution of scientific and engineering information needed in other programs on advanced SNAP systems. Progress on research and development directly related to the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) is presented mostly in Part I of this report. Progress on the MPRE will, in the future, be reported on a quarterly basis. The form of the reporting will alternate from MPRE Quarterly Progress Reports to Space Power Semiannual Progress Reports.

  15. Future Market Share of Space Solar Electric Power Under Open Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Mahasenan, N.; Clarke, J. F.; Edmonds, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper assesses the value of Space Solar Power deployed under market competition with a full suite of alternative energy technologies over the 21st century. Our approach is to analyze the future energy system under a number of different scenarios that span a wide range of possible future demographic, socio-economic, and technological developments. Scenarios both with, and without, carbon dioxide concentration stabilization policies are considered. We use the comprehensive set of scenarios created for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (Nakicenovic and Swart 2000). The focus of our analysis will be the cost of electric generation. Cost is particularly important when considering electric generation since the type of generation is, from a practical point of view, largely irrelevant to the end-user. This means that different electricity generation technologies must compete on the basis of price. It is important to note, however, that even a technology that is more expensive than average can contribute to the overall generation mix due to geographical and economic heterogeneity (Clarke and Edmonds 1993). This type of competition is a central assumption of the modeling approach used here. Our analysis suggests that, under conditions of full competition of all available technologies, Space Solar Power at 7 cents per kW-hr could comprise 5-10% of global electric generation by the end of the century, with a global total generation of 10,000 TW-hr. The generation share of Space Solar Power is limited due to competition with lower-cost nuclear, biomass, and terrestrial solar PV and wind. The imposition of a carbon constraint does not significantly increase the total amount of power generated by Space Solar Power in cases where a full range of advanced electric generation technologies are also available. Potential constraints on the availability of these other electric generation options can increase the amount of

  16. AN LED-BASED SOLAR SIMULATOR FOR RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND TESTING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SPACE POWER SYSTEMS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar cells are the critical power source for the majority of space missions. The advancement from single junction silicon cells to current, state-of-the-art,...

  17. Galaxy bimodality versus stellar mass and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Baldry, I; Bower, R; Glazebrook, K; Nichol, R; Bamford, S; Budavari, T

    2006-01-01

    We analyse a z<0.1 galaxy sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey focusing on the variation of the galaxy colour bimodality with stellar mass and projected neighbour density Sigma, and on measurements of the galaxy stellar mass functions. The characteristic mass increases with environmental density from about 10^10.6 Msun to 10^10.9 Msun (Kroupa IMF, H_0=70) for Sigma in the range 0.1--10 per Mpc^2. The galaxy population naturally divides into a red and blue sequence with the locus of the sequences in colour-mass and colour-concentration index not varying strongly with environment. The fraction of galaxies on the red sequence is determined in bins of 0.2 in log Sigma and log mass (12 x 13 bins). The red fraction f_r generally increases continuously in both Sigma and mass such that there is a unified relation: f_r = F(Sigma,mass). Two simple functions are proposed which provide good fits to the data. These data are compared with analogous quantities in semi-analytical models based on the Millennium N-body ...

  18. Earth storable bimodal engine, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    An in-depth study of an Earth Storable Bimodal (ESB) Engine using earth storable propellants N2O/N2H4 and operating in either a monopropellant or bipropellant mode was conducted. Detailed studies were completed for both a hot-gas, regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a ducted hot-gas, film cooled thrust chamber. Hydrazine decomposition products were used for cooling in either configuration. The various arrangements and configurations of hydrazine reactors, secondary injectors, chambers and gimbal methods were considered. The two basic materials selected for the major components were columbium alloys and L-605. The secondary injector types considered were previously demonstrated by JPL and consisted of a liquid-on-gas triplet, a liquid-on-gas doublet, and a liquid-on-gas coaxial injector. Various design tradeoffs were made with different reactor types located at: the secondary injector station, the thrust chamber throat, and the nozzle/extension interface. Associated thermal, structural, and mass analyses were completed.

  19. Bi-Modal Methods: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunji K. A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Various security challenges such as Boko Haram, theft, kidnapping, ISIL, abduction, and so on have been on a high rise as one of the major menace facing our society today. In order to overcome these challenges there is need for identification of the culprits to bring them to book. Uni-modal biometric is not enough to combat these security challenges because of its shortcomings which include- spoof attach, noise in the sensed data, inter class variation and so on. Combining two or more biometric features (bi-modal has been proved to provide better performance than uni-modal biometric approach for authentication and verification. This paper presents some literature on biometrics systems that can be employed in achieving a better accuracy in authentication and verification of biometric features. Different kind of fusion strategies to combine these characteristics, different available classifiers and fusion methodologies to achieve greater and accurate recognition performance were also discussed. It is hopeful that researchers in the area of biometrics will find this work very useful.

  20. Audiovisual bimodal mutual compensation of Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The perception of human languages is inherently a multi-modalprocess, in which audio information can be compensated by visual information to improve the recognition performance. Such a phenomenon in English, German, Spanish and so on has been researched, but in Chinese it has not been reported yet. In our experiment, 14 syllables (/ba, bi, bian, biao, bin, de, di, dian, duo, dong, gai, gan, gen, gu/), extracted from Chinese audiovisual bimodal speech database CAVSR-1.0, were pronounced by 10 subjects. The audio-only stimuli, audiovisual stimuli, and visual-only stimuli were recognized by 20 observers. The audio-only stimuli and audiovisual stimuli both were presented under 5 conditions: no noise, SNR 0 dB, -8 dB, -12 dB, and -16 dB. The experimental result is studied and the following conclusions for Chinese speech are reached. Human beings can recognize visual-only stimuli rather well. The place of articulation determines the visual distinction. In noisy environment, audio information can remarkably be compensated by visual information and as a result the recognition performance is greatly improved.

  1. Audiovisual bimodal mutual compensation of Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Zhi

    2001-01-01

    [1]Richard, P., Schumeyer, Kenneth E. B., The effect of visual information on word initial consonant perception of dysarthric speech, in Proc. ICSLP'96 October 3-6 1996, Philadephia, Pennsylvania, USA.[2]Goff, B. L., Marigny, T. G., Benoit, C., Read my lips...and my jaw! How intelligible are the components of a speaker's face? Eurospeech'95, 4th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology, Madrid, September 1995.[3]McGurk, H., MacDonald, J. Hearing lips and seeing voices, Nature, 1976, 264: 746.[4]Duran A. F., Mcgurk effect in Spanish and German listeners: Influences of visual cues in the perception of Spanish and German confliction audio-visual stimuli, Eurospeech'95. 4th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology, Madrid, September 1995.[5]Luettin, J., Visual speech and speaker recognition, Ph.D thesis, University of Sheffield, 1997.[6]Xu Yanjun, Du Limin, Chinese audiovisual bimodal speech database CAVSR1.0, Chinese Journal of Acoustics, to appear.[7]Zhang Jialu, Speech corpora and language input/output methods' evaluation, Chinese Applied Acoustics, 1994, 13(3): 5.

  2. Intelligent agents: adaptation of autonomous bimodal microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrice; Terry, Theodore B.

    2014-03-01

    Autonomous bimodal microsystems exhibiting survivability behaviors and characteristics are able to adapt dynamically in any given environment. Equipped with a background blending exoskeleton it will have the capability to stealthily detect and observe a self-chosen viewing area while exercising some measurable form of selfpreservation by either flying or crawling away from a potential adversary. The robotic agent in this capacity activates a walk-fly algorithm, which uses a built in multi-sensor processing and navigation subsystem or algorithm for visual guidance and best walk-fly path trajectory to evade capture or annihilation. The research detailed in this paper describes the theoretical walk-fly algorithm, which broadens the scope of spatial and temporal learning, locomotion, and navigational performances based on optical flow signals necessary for flight dynamics and walking stabilities. By observing a fly's travel and avoidance behaviors; and, understanding the reverse bioengineering research efforts of others, we were able to conceptualize an algorithm, which works in conjunction with decisionmaking functions, sensory processing, and sensorimotor integration. Our findings suggest that this highly complex decentralized algorithm promotes inflight or terrain travel mobile stability which is highly suitable for nonaggressive micro platforms supporting search and rescue (SAR), and chemical and explosive detection (CED) purposes; a necessity in turbulent, non-violent structured or unstructured environments.

  3. 12th Symposium on Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion. Conference on Alternative Power from Space (APFS),Conference on Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies and Applications (A-DTTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 12th symposium on Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium theme was ''commercialization and technology transfer''. The topics discussed include: wireless power transmission, solar power from space next generation spacecraft, space power electronics and power management, flight testing of components, manufacturing and processing of materials, nuclear propulsion, reactors and shielding and many others of interest to the scientific community representing industry, government and academic institutions. There were 163 papers presented at the conference and 60 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  4. 12th Symposium on Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion. Conference on Alternative Power from Space (APFS),Conference on Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies and Applications (A-DTTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.E. [ed.] [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 12th symposium on Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium theme was ``commercialization and technology transfer``. The topics discussed include: wireless power transmission, solar power from space next generation spacecraft, space power electronics and power management, flight testing of components, manufacturing and processing of materials, nuclear propulsion, reactors and shielding and many others of interest to the scientific community representing industry, government and academic institutions. There were 163 papers presented at the conference and 60 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. (AIP)

  5. More Wind Power Integration with Adjusted Energy Carriers for Space Heating in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun He

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Northern China, due to the high penetration of coal-fired cogeneration facilities, which are generally equipped with extraction-condensing steam turbines, lots of wind power resources may be wasted during the heating season. In contrast, considerable coal is consumed in the power generation sector. In this article, firstly it is revealed that there exists a serious divergence in the ratio of electrical to thermal energy between end users’ demand and the cogenerations’ production during off-peak load at night, which may negate active power-balancing of the electric power grid. Secondly, with respect to this divergence only occurring during off-peak load at night, a temporary proposal is given so as to enable the integration of more wind power. The authors suggest that if the energy carrier for part of the end users’ space heating is switched from heating water to electricity (e.g., electric heat pumps (EHPs can provide space heating in the domestic sector, the ratio of electricity to heating water load should be adjusted to optimize the power dispatch between cogeneration units and wind turbines, resulting in fuel conservation. With this proposal, existing infrastructures are made full use of, and no additional ones are required. Finally a numerical simulation is performed in order to illustrate both the technical and economic feasibility of the aforementioned proposal, under ongoing infrastructures as well as electricity and space heating tariff conditions without changing participants’ benefits. The authors aim to persuade Chinese policy makers to enable EHPs to provide space heating to enable the integration of more wind power.

  6. EMTP based stability analysis of space station electric power system in a test bed environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravid, Narayan V.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Oconnor, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Electric Power System (EPS) will convert solar energy into electric energy and distribute the same using an 'all dc', Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) System. Power conditioning devices (dc to dc converters) are needed to interconnect parts of this system operating at different nominal voltage levels. Operation of such devices could generate under damped oscillations (instability) under certain conditions. Criteria for instability are examined and verified for a single device. Suggested extension of the criteria to a system operation is examined by using the EMTP model of the PMAD DC test bed. Wherever possible, data from the test bed is compared with the modeling results.

  7. Passive Shielding Effect on Space Profile of Magnetic Field Emissions for Wireless Power Transfer to Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has...... fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications....... been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side...

  8. Description of A 2.3 kW power transformer for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, I.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the principal features and special testing of a high-frequency high-power low-specific-weight (0.57 kg/kW) 2.3-kW electronic power transformer developed for space applications. The transformer is operated in a series resonant inverter supplying beam power to a 30-cm mercury ion thruster. High efficiency (above 98.5%) is obtained through careful detailed design. A number of unique heat removal techniques are discussed which control the winding temperature using only the available conductive cooling.

  9. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model.

  10. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  11. INTEGRATING NEPHELOMETER RESPONSE CORRECTIONS FOR BIMODAL SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correction factors are calculated for obtaining true scattering extinction coefficients from integrating nephelometer measurements. The corrections are based on the bimodal representation of ambient aerosol size distributions, and take account of the effects of angular truncation...

  12. Reactive Sintering of Bimodal WC-Co Hardmetals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tarraste

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal WC-Co hardmetals were produced using novel technology - reactive sintering. Milled and activated tungsten and graphite powders were mixed with commercial coarse grained WC-Co powder and then sintered. The microstructure of produced materials was free of defects and consisted of evenly distributed coarse and fine tungsten carbide grains in cobalt binder. The microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of reactive sintered bimodal WC-Co hardmetals is exhibited. Developed bimodal hardmetal has perspective for demanding wear applications for its increased combined hardness and toughness. Compared to coarse material there is only slight decrease in fracture toughness (K1c is 14.7 for coarse grained and 14.4 for bimodal, hardness is increased from 1290 to 1350 HV units.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7511

  13. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  14. Bimodal magmatism produced by progressively inhibited crustal assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, F C; Troll, V R; Ellam, R M; Freda, C; Font, L; Donaldson, C H; Klonowska, I

    2014-01-01

    The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) rock suites is a fundamental question in volcanology. Here we use major and trace elements, high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, experimental petrology and thermodynamic modelling to investigate bimodal magmatism at the iconic Carlingford Igneous Centre, Ireland. We show that early microgranites are the result of extensive assimilation of trace element-enriched partial melts of local metasiltstones into mafic parent magmas. Melting experiments reveal the crust is very fusible, but thermodynamic modelling indicates repeated heating events rapidly lower its melt-production capacity. Granite generation ceased once enriched partial melts could no longer form and subsequent magmatism incorporated less fertile restite compositions only, producing mafic intrusions and a pronounced compositional gap. Considering the frequency of bimodal magma suites in the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and the ubiquity of suitable crustal compositions, we propose 'progressively inhibited crustal assimilation' (PICA) as a major cause of bimodality in continental volcanism. PMID:24947142

  15. Investigation of possibilities for solar powered high energy lasers in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, J. D. G.; Gerry, E. T.; Zeiders, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of solar powered high energy lasers in space has been studied. Preliminary analysis indicates that both direct and indirect pumping methods lead to high energy lasers having interesting efficiencies and capabilities. Many topics for further research have been identified.

  16. 46 CFR 108.139 - Boundary bulkheads and decks of a space containing emergency power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boundary bulkheads and decks of a space containing emergency power. 108.139 Section 108.139 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Structural Fire Protection § 108.139 Boundary bulkheads and...

  17. Electric space heating scheduling for real-time explicit power control in active distribution networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costanzo, Giuseppe Tommaso; Bernstein, Andrey; Chamorro, Lorenzo Reyes;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach for abstracting the flexibility of a building space heating system and using it within a composable framework for real-time explicit power control of microgrids and, more in general, active distribution networks. In particular, the proposed approach is de...

  18. Prospects to solar energy power generation in space. Uchu taiyo hatsuden eno tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, I. (Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Solar energy power generation in space uses large arrays of solar cells developed on a geosynchronous orbit to obtain electric energy, which is transmitted to the earth using microwaves. The idea had already been advocated in 1968, which was followed a decade later by joint discussions done by NASA and DOE. The concept intended to take care of the U.S. power demand by using 60 power plant satellites, each having an output of 5 GW. This expanse of the scale, regarded reasonable even today, calls for the solar cell arrays in space spreading over an area of 10 km [times] 5 km if silicon solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 15% are used, and rectenna on the ground (a received wave converting facility) forming an ellipse of 10 km [times] 13 km (assuming a location at the north latitude of 36[degree]). Although there are a number of problems in the idea such as transportation means to lift construction materials into the space and effect of microwaves on the ionosphere and the ecosystems, the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology organized a 'committee for investigating and studying the space power generation systems' in the fiscal year 1991, and has been moving discussions forward since then. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Investigations of IPPE thermophysicists in the field of space nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of space nuclear power facilities development in IPPE is considered. The main attention is paid to coolant choice; development of demonstration high-temperature lithium benches, acquisition of equipment and safe working methods; working out of physicochemical fundamentals of core coolants use, their technology, study of coolant physicochemical properties

  20. Forward Modeling of Reduced Power Spectra From Three-Dimensional k-Space

    OpenAIRE

    von Papen, Michael; Saur, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a numerical forward model to evaluate one-dimensional reduced power spectral densities (PSD) from arbitrary energy distributions in $\\mathbf{k}$-space. In this model, we can separately calculate the diagonal elements of the spectral tensor for incompressible axisymmetric turbulence with vanishing helicity. Given a critically balanced turbulent cascade with $k_\\|\\sim k_\\perp^\\alpha$ and $\\alpha

  1. Space station electrical power distribution analysis using a load flow approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Ervin M.

    1987-01-01

    The space station's electrical power system will evolve and grow in a manner much similar to the present terrestrial electrical power system utilities. The initial baseline reference configuration will contain more than 50 nodes or busses, inverters, transformers, overcurrent protection devices, distribution lines, solar arrays, and/or solar dynamic power generating sources. The system is designed to manage and distribute 75 KW of power single phase or three phase at 20 KHz, and grow to a level of 300 KW steady state, and must be capable of operating at a peak of 450 KW for 5 to 10 min. In order to plan far into the future and keep pace with load growth, a load flow power system analysis approach must be developed and utilized. This method is a well known energy assessment and management tool that is widely used throughout the Electrical Power Utility Industry. The results of a comprehensive evaluation and assessment of an Electrical Distribution System Analysis Program (EDSA) is discussed. Its potential use as an analysis and design tool for the 20 KHz space station electrical power system is addressed.

  2. Micro space power system using MEMS fuel cell for nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkwang; Kim, Taegyu

    2014-08-01

    A micro space power system using micro fuel cell was developed for nano-satellites. The power system was fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication technologies. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell was selected in consideration of space environment. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was selected as a hydrogen source while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was selected as an oxygen source. The power system consists of a micro fuel cell, micro-reactor, micro-pump, and fuel cartridges. The micro fuel cell was fabricated on a light-weight and corrosion-resistant glass plates. The micro-reactor was used to generate hydrogen from NaBH4 alkaline solution via a catalytic hydrolysis reaction. All components such as micro-pump, fuel cartridges, and auxiliary battery were integrated for a complete power system. The storability of NaBH4 solution was evaluated at -25 °C and the performance of the micro power system was measured at various operating conditions. The power output of micro power system reasonably followed up the given electric load conditions.

  3. On the controllability of bimodal piecewise linear systems

    OpenAIRE

    Çamlıbel, Mehmet Kanat; Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Schumacher, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies controllability of bimodal systems that consist of two linear dynamics on each side of a given hyperplane. We show that the controllability properties of these systems can be inferred from those of linear systems for which the inputs are constrained in a certain way. Inspired by the earlier work on constrained controllability of linear systems, we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for a bimodal piecewise linear system to be controllable.

  4. Right unimodal and bimodal singularities in positive characteristic

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hong Duc

    2015-01-01

    The problem of classification of real and complex singularities was initiated by Arnol'd in the sixties who classified simple, unimodal and bimodal w.r.t. right equivalence. The classification of right simple singularities in positive characteristic was achieved by Greuel and the author in 2014. In the present paper we classify right unimodal and bimodal singularities in positive characteristic by giving explicit normal forms. Moreover we completely determine all possible adjacencies of simpl...

  5. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  6. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  7. The Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution automation test bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollar, Louis F.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Module Power Management And Distribution (SSM/PMAD) automation test bed project was begun at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the mid-1980s to develop an autonomous, user-supportive power management and distribution test bed simulating the Space Station Freedom Hab/Lab modules. As the test bed has matured, many new technologies and projects have been added. The author focuses on three primary areas. The first area is the overall accomplishments of the test bed itself. These include a much-improved user interface, a more efficient expert system scheduler, improved communication among the three expert systems, and initial work on adding intermediate levels of autonomy. The second area is the addition of a more realistic power source to the SSM/PMAD test bed; this project is called the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS). The third area is the completion of a virtual link between the SSM/PMAD test bed at MSFC and the Autonomous Power Expert at Lewis Research Center.

  8. Analysis of thermal cycles and working fluids for power generation in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of power in space for terrestrial use is of great interest in view of the rapidly rising power demand and its environmental impacts. Space also offers a very low temperature, making it a perfect heat sink for power plants, thus offering much higher efficiencies. This paper focuses on the evaluation and analysis of thermal Brayton, Ericsson and Rankine power cycles operating at space conditions on several appropriate working fluids. Under the examined conditions, the thermal efficiency of Brayton cycles reaches 63%, Ericsson 74%, and Rankine 85%. These efficiencies are significantly higher than those for the computed or real terrestrial cycles: by up to 45% for the Brayton, and 17% for the Ericsson; remarkably 44% for the Rankine cycle even when compared with the best terrestrial combined cycles. From the considered working fluids, the diatomic gases (N2 and H2) produce somewhat better efficiencies than the monatomic ones in the Brayton and Rankine cycles. The Rankine cycles require radiator areas that are larger by up to two orders of magnitude than those required for the Brayton and Ericsson cycles. The results of the analysis of the sensitivity of the cycle performance parameters to major parameters such as turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio are presented, equations or examining the effects of fluid properties on the radiator area and pressure drop were developed, and the effects of the working fluid properties on cycle efficiency and on the power production per unit radiator area were explored to allow decisions on the optimal choice of working fluids

  9. The application of high temperature superconductors to space electrical power distribution components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent discovery of a class of high temperature superconducting (HTS) ceramics which remain superconducting at temperatures near 1250K has stimulated the terrestrial electric power industry to take a new look at the impact superconductors could have on the generation, storage and distribution of electric power. It is equally important that the space electric power community ask the same questions and examine its systems and components to determine what could be achieved by the introduction of HTS into its technology. This paper examines some important space based electrical power distribution systems and components and compare the pre HTS state-of-the-art with what might be achieved with the introduction of HTS. Components to be compared include transformers (present weight of high frequency power transformers is about 0.2 kg/kw at 20 KVA), capacitors (at 40 kHZ and 0.05 kg/kVA), and transmission lines where the expected current density could increase two orders of magnitude from perhaps 100 amp/cm/sup 2/ to 20,000 amp/cm/sup 2/. It was concluded that the primary gain from HTS in larger space systems will be in HTS use as transmission lines, rather than in transformers or capacitors

  10. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  11. Space nuclear-power reactor design based on combined neutronic and thermal-fluid analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance analysis of a space nuclear-power system requires sophisticated analytical capabilities such as those developed during the nuclear rocket propulsion (Rover) program. In particular, optimizing the size of a space nuclear reactor for a given power level requires satisfying the conflicting requirements of nuclear criticality and heat removal. The optimization involves the determination of the coolant void (volume) fraction for which the reactor diameter is a minimum and temperature and structural limits are satisfied. A minimum exists because the critical diameter increases with increasing void fraction, whereas the reactor diameter needed to remove a specified power decreases with void fraction. The purpose of this presentation is to describe and demonstrate our analytical capability for the determination of minimum reactor size. The analysis is based on combining neutronic criticality calculations with OPTION-code thermal-fluid calculations

  12. Comments on dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some form of Dual-Mode Nuclear Space Power ampersand Propulsion System (D-MNSP ampersand PS) will be essential to spacefaring throughout teh solar system and that such systems must evolve as mankind moves into outer space. The initial D-MNPSP ampersand PS Reference System should be based on (1) present (1990), and (2) advanced (1995) technology for use on comparable mission in the 2000 and 2005 time period respectively. D-MNSP ampersand PS can be broken down into a number of subsystems: Nuclear subsystems including the energy source and controls for the release of thermal power at elevated temperatures; power conversion subsystems; waste heat rejection subsystems; and control and safety subsystems. These systems are briefly detailed

  13. Thermal stability improvement of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations using non-uniform finger spacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liang; Zhang Wan-Rong; Jin Dong-Yue; Shen Pei; Xie Hong-Yun; Ding Chun-Bao; Xiaa Ying; Sun Bo-Tao; Wang Ren-Qing

    2011-01-01

    method of non-uniform finger spacing is proposed to enhance thermal stability of a multiple finger power SiGe hererojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations. Temperature distribution on the emitter fingers of a multi-finger SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is studied using a numerical electro-thermal model. The results show that the SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor with non-uniform finger spacing has a small temperature difference between fingers compared with a traditional uniform finger spacing heterojunction bipolar transistor at the same power dissipation. What is most important is that the ability to improve temperature non-uniformity is not weakened as power dissipation increases. So the method of non-uniform finger spacing is very effective in enhancing the thermal stability and the power handing capability of power device. Experimental results verify our conclusious.

  14. Thermal stability improvement of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations using non-uniform finger spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of non-uniform finger spacing is proposed to enhance thermal stability of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations. Temperature distribution on the emitter fingers of a multi-finger SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is studied using a numerical electro-thermal model. The results show that the SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor with non-uniform finger spacing has a small temperature difference between fingers compared with a traditional uniform finger spacing heterojunction bipolar transistor at the same power dissipation. What is most important is that the ability to improve temperature non-uniformity is not weakened as power dissipation increases. So the method of non-uniform finger spacing is very effective in enhancing the thermal stability and the power handing capability of power device. Experimental results verify our conclusions. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  15. The Bimodality Index: A Criterion for Discovering and Ranking Bimodal Signatures from Cancer Gene Expression Profiling Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Wang; Sijin Wen; Fraser Symmans, W; Lajos Pusztai; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying genes with bimodal expression patterns from large-scale expression profiling data is an important analytical task. Model-based clustering is popular for this purpose. That technique commonly uses the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for model selection. In practice, however, BIC appears to be overly sensitive and may lead to the identification of bimodally expressed genes that are unreliable or not clinically useful. We propose using a novel criterion, the bimodali...

  16. Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Maximizing photovoltaic power generation of a space-dart configured satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae Young; Cutler, James W.; Mancewicz, Joe; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2015-06-01

    Many small satellites are power constrained due to their minimal solar panel area and the eclipse environment of low-Earth orbit. As with larger satellites, these small satellites, including CubeSats, use deployable power arrays to increase power production. This presents a design opportunity to develop various objective functions related to energy management and methods for optimizing these functions over a satellite design. A novel power generation model was created, and a simulation system was developed to evaluate various objective functions describing energy management for complex satellite designs. The model uses a spacecraft-body-fixed spherical coordinate system to analyze the complex geometry of a satellite's self-induced shadowing with computation provided by the Open Graphics Library. As an example design problem, a CubeSat configured as a space-dart with four deployable panels is optimized. Due to the fast computation speed of the solution, an exhaustive search over the design space is used to find the solar panel deployment angles which maximize total power generation. Simulation results are presented for a variety of orbit scenarios. The method is extendable to a variety of complex satellite geometries and power generation systems.

  18. Development of a Novel Wireless Electric Power Transfer System for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    VazquezRamos, Gabriel; Yuan, Jiann-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    This paper will introduce a new implementation for wireless electric power transfer systems: space applications. Due to the risks that constitute the use of electrical connector for some space missions/applications, a simple wireless power system design approach will be evaluated as an alternative for the use of electrical connectors. This approach takes into consideration the overall system performance by designing the magnetic resonance elements and by verifying the overall system electrical behavior. System characterization is accomplished by executing circuit and analytical simulations using Matlab(TradeMark) and LTSpiceIV(TradeMark) software packages. The design methodology was validated by two different experiments: frequency consideration (design of three magnetic elements) and a small scale proof-ofconcept prototype. Experiment results shows successful wireless power transfer for all the cases studied. The proof-of-concept prototype provided approx.4 W of wireless power to the load (light bulb) at a separation of 3 cm from the source. In addition. a resonant circuit was designed and installed to the battery terminals of a handheld radio without batteries, making it tum on at a separation of approx.5 cm or less from the source. It was also demonstrated by prototype experimentation that multiple loads can be powered wirelessly at the same time with a single electric power source.

  19. Design of a gigawatt space solar power satellite using optical concentrator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessanti, B.; Komerath, N.; Shah, S.

    A 1-gigawatt space solar power satellite using a large array of individually pointable optical elements is identified as the key mass element of a large scale space solar power architecture using the Space Power Grid concept. The proposed satellite design enables a significant increase in specific power. Placed in sun-synchronous dynamic orbits near 2000km altitude, these satellites can maintain the constant solar view requirement of GEO-based architectures, while greatly reducing the beaming distance required, decreasing the required antenna size and in turn the overall system mass. The satellite uses an array of individually pointable optical elements (which we call a Mirasol Concentrator Array) to concentrate solar energy to an intensified feed target that feeds into the main heater of the spacecraft, similar conceptually to heliostat arrays. The spacecraft then utilizes Brayton cycle conversion to take advantage of non-linear power level scaling in order to generate high specific power values. Using phase array antennas, the power is then beamed at a millimeter wave frequency of 220GHz down to Earth. The design of the Mirasol concentrator system will be described and a detailed mass estimation of the system is developed. The technical challenges of pointing the elements and maintaining constant solar view is investigated. An end-to-end efficiency analysis is performed. Subsystem designs for the spacecraft are outlined. A detailed mass budget is refined to reflect reductions in uncertainty of the spacecraft mass, particularly in the Mirasol system. One of the key mass drivers of the spacecraft is the active thermal control system. The design of a lightweight thermal control system utilizing graphene sheets is also detailed.

  20. Volume and Mass Estimation of Three-Phase High Power Transformers for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft historically have had sub-1kW(sub e), electrical requirements for GN&C, science, and communications: Galileo at 600W(sub e), and Cassini at 900W(sub e), for example. Because most missions have had the same order of magnitude power requirements, the Power Distribution Systems (PDS) use existing, space-qualified technology and are DC. As science payload and mission duration requirements increase, however, the required electrical power increases. Subsequently, this requires a change from a passive energy conversion (solar arrays and batteries) to dynamic (alternator, solar dynamic, etc.), because dynamic conversion has higher thermal and conversion efficiencies, has higher power densities, and scales more readily to higher power levels. Furthermore, increased power requirements and physical distribution lengths are best served with high-voltage, multi-phase AC to maintain distribution efficiency and minimize voltage drops. The generated AC-voltage must be stepped-up (or down) to interface with various subsystems or electrical hardware. Part of the trade-space design for AC distribution systems is volume and mass estimation of high-power transformers. The volume and mass are functions of the power rating, operating frequency, the ambient and allowable temperature rise, the types and amount of heat transfer available, the core material and shape, the required flux density in a core, the maximum current density, etc. McLyman has tabulated the performance of a number of transformers cores and derived a "cookbook" methodology to determine the volume of transformers, whereas Schawrze had derived an empirical method to estimate the mass of single-phase transformers. Based on the work of McLyman and Schwarze, it is the intent herein to derive an empirical solution to the volume and mass estimation of three-phase, laminated EI-core power transformers, having radiated and conducted heat transfer mechanisms available. Estimation of the mounting hardware, connectors