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Sample records for bimanual reaching movements

  1. Mirror versus parallel bimanual reaching

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi, Farnaz; Kenyon, Robert V.; Patton, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Background In spite of their importance to everyday function, tasks that require both hands to work together such as lifting and carrying large objects have not been well studied and the full potential of how new technology might facilitate recovery remains unknown. Methods To help identify the best modes for self-teleoperated bimanual training, we used an advanced haptic/graphic environment to compare several modes of practice. In a 2-by-2 study, we compared mirror vs. parallel reaching move...

  2. Balanced motor primitive can explain generalization of motor learning effects between unimanual and bimanual movements

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    Takiyama, Ken; Sakai, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Motor learning in unimanual and bimanual planar reaching movements has been intensively investigated. Although distinct theoretical frameworks have been proposed for each of these reaching movements, the relationship between these movements remains unclear. In particular, the generalization of motor learning effects (transfer of learning effects) between unimanual and bimanual movements has yet to be successfully explained. Here, by extending a motor primitive framework, we analytically proved that the motor primitive framework can reproduce the generalization of learning effects between unimanual and bimanual movements if the mean activity of each primitive for unimanual movements is balanced to the mean for bimanual movements. In this balanced condition, the activity of each primitive is consistent with previously reported neuronal activity. The unimanual-bimanual balance leads to the testable prediction that generalization between unimanual and bimanual movements is more widespread to different reaching directions than generalization within respective movements. Furthermore, the balanced motor primitive can reproduce another previously reported phenomenon: the learning of different force fields for unimanual and bimanual movements.

  3. Facilitation and interference during the preparation of bimanual movements: contributions from starting locations, movement amplitudes, and target locations.

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    Blinch, Jarrod; Cameron, Brendan D; Franks, Ian M; Carpenter, Mark G; Chua, Romeo

    2015-11-01

    Symmetric, target-directed, bimanual movements take less time to prepare than asymmetric movements (Diedrichsen et al. in Cerebral Cortex 16(12):1729-1738, 2006; Heuer and Klein in Psychol Res 70(4):229-244, 2006b). The preparation savings for symmetric movements may be related to the specification of symmetric amplitudes, target locations, or both. The goals of this study were to determine which symmetric movement parameters facilitate the preparation of bimanual movements and to compare the size of the facilitation for different parameters. Thirty participants performed bimanual reaching movements that varied in terms of the symmetry/asymmetry of starting locations, movement amplitudes, and target locations. Reaction time savings were examined by comparing movements that had one symmetric parameter (and two asymmetric parameters) to movements with all asymmetric parameters. We observed significant savings (~10 ms) for movements with symmetric amplitudes and movements with symmetric target locations. Reaction time costs were examined by comparing movements that had two asymmetric parameters (and one symmetric parameter) to movements with all symmetric parameters. We observed significant reaction time costs (~13 ms) for all movements with asymmetric amplitudes. These results suggest that movement preparation is facilitated when amplitudes or target locations are symmetric and that movement preparation suffers interference when amplitudes are asymmetric. The relative importance of the three parameters to movement preparation, from most to least important, is movement amplitudes, target locations, and then starting locations. Interference with asymmetric amplitudes or target locations may be caused by cross-talk between concurrent processes of parameter specification during response programming. PMID:25388127

  4. Goal conceptualization and symmetry of arm movements affect bimanual coordination in individuals after stroke.

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    Kantak, Shailesh; McGrath, Robert; Zahedi, Nazaneen

    2016-07-28

    Coordination during goal-directed movements emerges from an interaction of task and individual constraints. It is not known how individuals with unilateral stroke and age-matched controls coordinate their arms when performing symmetric and asymmetric movements to accomplish common task goals compared to independent task goals. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke and ten age-matched controls executed a bimanual task under virtual conditions that allowed systematic manipulation of symmetry and goal conditions. Spatial and temporal bimanual coordination was characterized using the cross-correlation coefficients and time lag between the tangential velocities between the two hands. While task conditions had little effect on coordination of control participants, individuals with stroke were less coordinated in space and time during common-goal bimanual actions employing asymmetric arm movements. Further, patients demonstrated lesser contribution of their paretic arm compared to their non-paretic arm during common-goal conditions. These findings indicate that conceptualization of task goals (common vs. independent) and symmetry of arm movements influence coordination and contribution of the two hands during bimanual tasks in patients with stroke. PMID:27180035

  5. Kinematic parameters of hand movement during a disparate bimanual movement task in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy.

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    Rudisch, Julian; Butler, Jenny; Izadi, Hooshang; Zielinski, Ingar Marie; Aarts, Pauline; Birtles, Deirdre; Green, Dido

    2016-04-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (uCP) experience problems performing tasks requiring the coordinated use of both hands (bimanual coordination; BC). Additionally, some children with uCP display involuntary symmetrical activation of the opposing hand (mirrored movements). Measures, used to investigate therapy-related improvements focus on the functionality of the affected hand during unimanual or bimanual tasks. None however specifically address spatiotemporal integration of both hands. We explored the kinematics of hand movements during a bimanual task to identify parameters of BC. Thirty-seven children (aged 10.9±2.6years, 20 male) diagnosed with uCP participated. 3D kinematic motion analysis was performed during the task requiring opening of a box with their affected- (AH) or less-affected hand (LAH), and pressing a button inside with the opposite hand. Temporal and spatial components of data were extracted and related to measures of hand function and level of impairment. Total task duration was correlated with the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function in both conditions (either hand leading with the lid-opening). Spatial accuracy of the LAH when the box was opened with their AH was correlated with outcomes on the Children's Hand Use Experience Questionnaire. Additionally, we found a subgroup of children displaying non-symmetrical movement interference associated with greater movement overlap when their affected hand opened the box. This subgroup also demonstrated decreased use of the affected hand during bimanual tasks. Further investigation of bimanual interference, which goes beyond small scaled symmetrical mirrored movements, is needed to consider its impact on bimanual task performance following early unilateral brain injury. PMID:26803675

  6. Asymmetric interference in left-handers during bimanual movements reflects switch in lateralized control characteristics.

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    Kagerer, Florian A

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between the hands are a collateral of simultaneous bimanual movements and can inform us about the functional asymmetries of the dominant and nondominant hemisphere-effector systems. Few studies on bimanual coordination have focused on discrete movement control, and even fewer have looked at this in the context of handedness. Using a novel bimanual paradigm in which both hands perform simultaneous target-directed movements, this study addressed interference between the hands in two groups of left-handed individuals. In one group, the dominant hand was perturbed, and in the other, the nondominant hand; the respective contralateral hand moved without visual feedback. Results show that the kinematic perturbation of the dominant left hand resulted in directional interference in the nonvisible right hand. Similarly to previous studies using this bimanual paradigm, interference became manifest through isodirectional deviations in the nonvisible hand in the majority of participants. The findings mirror the results of a previous study in right-handers. At the same time, interference was overall weaker in the left-handers, and not as exclusively dominant to nondominant as in the previous right-handed sample. The results not only confirm that hand control characteristics switch with handedness, but also shape interactions between the hands accordingly in left-handers. PMID:26821317

  7. Recovery in stroke rehabilitation through the rotation of preferred directions induced by bimanual movements: a computational study.

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    Ken Takiyama

    Full Text Available Stroke patients recover more effectively when they are rehabilitated with bimanual movement rather than with unimanual movement; however, it remains unclear why bimanual movement is more effective for stroke recovery. Using a computational model of stroke recovery, this study suggests that bimanual movement facilitates the reorganization of a damaged motor cortex because this movement induces rotations in the preferred directions (PDs of motor cortex neurons. Although the tuning curves of these neurons differ during unimanual and bimanual movement, changes in PD, but not changes in modulation depth, facilitate such reorganization. In addition, this reorganization was facilitated only when encoding PDs are rotated, but decoding PDs are not rotated. Bimanual movement facilitates reorganization because this movement changes neural activities through inter-hemispheric inhibition without changing cortical-spinal-muscle connections. Furthermore, stronger inter-hemispheric inhibition between motor cortices results in more effective reorganization. Thus, this study suggests that bimanual movement is effective for stroke rehabilitation because this movement rotates the encoding PDs of motor cortex neurons.

  8. Interference Effects in Bimanual Coordination Are Independent of Movement Type

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    Calvin, Sarah; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneously executed limb movements interfere with each other. Whereas the interference between discrete movements is examined mostly from a cognitive perspective, that between rhythmic movements is studied mainly from a dynamical systems perspective. As the tools and concepts developed by both communities are limited in their applicability to…

  9. Dysfunctional Putamen Modulation during Bimanual Finger-to-thumb Movement in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

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    Lirong Yan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting middle-aged and elderly people. PD can be viewed as "circuit disorder", indicating that large scale cortico-subcortical pathways were involved in its pathophysiology. The brain network in an experimental context is emerging as an important biomarker in disease diagnosis and prognosis prediction. This context-dependent network for PD and the underling functional mechanism remains unclear. In this paper, the brain network profiles in 11 PD patients without dementia were studied and compared with 12 healthy controls. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were acquired when the subjects were performing a pseudorandomized unimanual or bimanual finger-to-thumb movement task. The activation was detected and the network profiles were analysed by psychophysiological interaction (PPI toolbox. For the controls and PD patients, the motor areas including the primary motor and premotor areas, supplementary motor area, the cerebellum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal gyrus were activated. The right putamen exhibited significant control > PD activation and weaker activity during the bimanual movement relative to the unimanual movement in the control group. The decreased putamen modulation on some nucleus in basal ganglia, such as putamen, thalamus and caudate, and some cortical areas, such as cingulate, parietal, angular, frontal, temporal and occipital gyrus was detected in the bimanual hand movement condition relative to the unimanual movement condition. Between group PPI difference was detected in cingulate gyrus, angular gyrus and precuneus (control > PD and inferior frontal gyrus (PD > control. The deficient putamen activation and its enhanced connectivity with the frontal gyrus could be a correlate of impaired basal ganglia inhibition and frontal gyrus compensation to maintain the task performance during the motor programs of PD patients.

  10. Performing two different actions simultaneously: The critical role of interhemispheric interactions during the preparation of bimanual movement.

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    Fujiyama, Hakuei; Van Soom, Jago; Rens, Guy; Cuypers, Koen; Heise, Kirstin-Friederike; Levin, Oron; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2016-04-01

    Even though it has been suggested that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) are highly involved in the planning of bimanual movements, the exact nature (facilitatory or inhibitory) of their role is not well understood. Using a dual-site transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm, we examined the functional influence from DLPFC and PMd to the contralateral primary cortex (M1) during the preparation of a complex bimanual coordination task in which inter-hand movement frequency was manipulated. Only the left PMd showed inter-hand frequency-specific modulations in the interaction with the contralateral M1. Left PMd-right M1 interaction became facilitatory during the preparation phase when the left hand had to move faster than the right hand, while inhibitory modulation was observed when the movement frequency arrangement was reversed. Interestingly, bilateral DLPFC showed a facilitatory interaction with the contralateral M1s during the preparation period only in difficult conditions, irrespective of the inter-hand frequency ratio, suggesting a less task-specific role in the organization of complex bimanual actions. Observed task-related modulations in DLPFC-M1 and left PMd-right M1 interactions during preparation were significantly correlated with up-coming performance, predicting successful bimanual movements. These observations highlight the distinct roles of DLPFC and left PMd in the preparation of bimanual movements that require a differential contribution of each limb. PMID:26963084

  11. Mirror symmetric bimanual movement priming can increase corticomotor excitability and enhance motor learning.

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    Winston D Byblow

    Full Text Available Repetitive mirror symmetric bilateral upper limb may be a suitable priming technique for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. Here we demonstrate neurophysiological and behavioural after-effects in healthy participants after priming with 20 minutes of repetitive active-passive bimanual wrist flexion and extension in a mirror symmetric pattern with respect to the body midline (MIR compared to an control priming condition with alternating flexion-extension (ALT. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS indicated that corticomotor excitability (CME of the passive hemisphere remained elevated compared to baseline for at least 30 minutes after MIR but not ALT, evidenced by an increase in the size of motor evoked potentials in ECR and FCR. Short and long-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI, LICI, short afferent inhibition (SAI and interhemispheric inhibition (IHI were also examined using pairs of stimuli. LICI differed between patterns, with less LICI after MIR compared with ALT, and an effect of pattern on IHI, with reduced IHI in passive FCR 15 minutes after MIR compared with ALT and baseline. There was no effect of pattern on SAI or FCR H-reflex. Similarly, SICI remained unchanged after 20 minutes of MIR. We then had participants complete a timed manual dexterity motor learning task with the passive hand during, immediately after, and 24 hours after MIR or control priming. The rate of task completion was faster with MIR priming compared to control conditions. Finally, ECR and FCR MEPs were examined within a pre-movement facilitation paradigm of wrist extension before and after MIR. ECR, but not FCR, MEPs were consistently facilitated before and after MIR, demonstrating no degradation of selective muscle activation. In summary, mirror symmetric active-passive bimanual movement increases CME and can enhance motor learning without degradation of muscle selectivity. These findings rationalise the use of mirror symmetric bimanual movement as a

  12. Cortical areas functionally linked with the cerebellar second homunculus during out-of-phase bimanual movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) to study cortical activation during index finger-thumb opposition of both hands using in-phase and out-of-phase modes. In-phase movements activated the sensorimotor cortex. During out-of-phase movements, activations were also observed in the supplementary motor area (SMA), in the cingulate motor area (CMA) and, less frequently, in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). As we have previously shown and confirmed in the present study, the same out-of-phase bimanual movements specifically activate the cerebellar second homunculus, leading us to postulate that the cerebellar second homunculus and medial wall motor areas participate in a circuit specifically involved in timing complex movements. (orig.)

  13. Cortical areas functionally linked with the cerebellar second homunculus during out-of-phase bimanual movements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain [Hopital des Quinze-Vingts, Service de NeuroImagerie, Paris (France)

    2006-04-15

    We used functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) to study cortical activation during index finger-thumb opposition of both hands using in-phase and out-of-phase modes. In-phase movements activated the sensorimotor cortex. During out-of-phase movements, activations were also observed in the supplementary motor area (SMA), in the cingulate motor area (CMA) and, less frequently, in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). As we have previously shown and confirmed in the present study, the same out-of-phase bimanual movements specifically activate the cerebellar second homunculus, leading us to postulate that the cerebellar second homunculus and medial wall motor areas participate in a circuit specifically involved in timing complex movements. (orig.)

  14. Improving a Bimanual Motor Skill Through Unimanual Training.

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    Hayashi, Takuji; Nozaki, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    When we learn a bimanual motor skill (e.g., rowing a boat), we often break it down into unimanual practices (e.g., a rowing drill with the left or right arm). Such unimanual practice is thought to be useful for learning bimanual motor skills efficiently because the learner can concentrate on learning to perform a simpler component. However, it is not so straightforward to assume that unimanual training (UT) improves bimanual performance. We have previously demonstrated that motor memories for reaching movements consist of three different parts: unimanual-specific, bimanual-specific, and overlapping parts. According to this scheme, UT appears to be less effective, as its training effect is only partially transferred to the same limb for bimanual movement. In the present study, counter-intuitively, we demonstrate that, even after the bimanual skill is almost fully learned by means of bimanual training (BT), additional UT could further improve bimanual skill. We hypothesized that this effect occurs because UT increases the memory content in the overlapping part, which might contribute to an increase in the memory for bimanual movement. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether the UT performed after sufficient BT could improve the bimanual performance. Participants practiced performing bimanual reaching movements (BM) in the presence of a novel force-field imposed only on their left arm. As an index for the motor performance, we used the error-clamp method (i.e., after-effect of the left arm) to evaluate the force output to compensate for the force-field during the reaching movement. After sufficient BT, the training effect reached a plateau. However, UT performed subsequently improved the bimanual performance significantly. In contrast, when the same amount of BT was continued, the bimanual performance remained unchanged, highlighting the beneficial effect of UT on bimanual performance. Considering memory structure, we also expected that BT could improve unimanual

  15. The averaged EMGs recorded from the arm muscles during bimanual rowing movements

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    Tomasz eTomiak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose was to analyze quantitatively the the average surface EMGs of the muscles that function around the elbow and shoulder joints of both arms in similar bimanual ‘rowing’ movements, which were produced under identical elastic loads applied to the levers (‘oars’. The muscles of PM group (‘pulling’ muscles: elbow flexors, shoulder extensors generated noticeable velocity-dependent dynamic EMG components during the pulling and returning phases of movement and supported a steady-state activity during the hold phase. The muscles of RM group (‘returning’ muscles: elbow extensors, shoulder flexors co-contracted with PM group during the movement phases and decreased activity during the hold phase. The dynamic components of the EMGs strongly depended on the velocity factor in both muscle groups, whereas the side and load factors and combinations of various factors acted only in PM group muscles. Various subjects demonstrated diverse patterns of activity redistribution among muscles. We assume that central commands to the same muscles in two arms may be essentially different during execution of similar movement programs. Extent of the diversity in the EMG patterns of such muscles may reflect the subject’s skilling in motor performance; on the other hand, the diversity can reflect redistribution of activity between synergic muscles, thus providing a mechanism directed against development of the muscle fatigue.

  16. Speeded Reaching Movements around Invisible Obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Todd E.; Wolfe, Uta; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary In everyday, cluttered environments, moving to reach or grasp an object can result in unintended collisions with other objects along the path of movement. Depending on what we run into (a priceless Ming vase, a crotchety colleague) we can suffer serious monetary or social consequences. It makes sense to choose movement trajectories that trade off the value of reaching a goal against the consequences of unintended collisions along the way. In the research described here, subject...

  17. A Model for Imitating Human Reaching Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Hersch, M; Billard, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of human-like reaching movements. This model is then used to give a humanoid robot the ability to imitate human reaching motions. It illustrates that having a robot control similar to human control can greatly ease the human-robot interaction.

  18. INCITE: A randomised trial comparing constraint induced movement therapy and bimanual training in children with congenital hemiplegia

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    Gilmore Rose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital hemiplegia is the most common form of cerebral palsy (CP accounting for 1 in 1300 live births. These children have limitations in capacity to use the impaired upper limb and bimanual coordination deficits which impact on daily activities and participation in home, school and community life. There are currently two diverse intensive therapy approaches. Traditional therapy has adopted a bimanual approach (BIM training and recently, constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT has emerged as a promising unimanual approach. Uncertainty remains about the efficacy of these interventions and characteristics of best responders. This study aims to compare the efficacy of CIMT to BIM training to improve outcomes across the ICF for school children with congenital hemiplegia. Methods/Design A matched pairs randomised comparison design will be used with children matched by age, gender, side of hemiplegia and level of upper limb function. Based on power calculations a sample size of 52 children (26 matched pairs will be recruited. Children will be randomised within pairs to receive either CIMT or BIM training. Both interventions will use an intensive activity based day camp model, with groups receiving the same dosage of intervention delivered in the same environment (total 60 hours over 10 days. A novel circus theme will be used to enhance motivation. Groups will be compared at baseline, then at 3, 26 and 52 weeks following intervention. Severity of congenital hemiplegia will be classified according to brain structure (MRI and white matter fibre tracking, cortical excitability using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS, functional use of the hand in everyday tasks (Manual Ability Classification System and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Outcomes will address neurovascular changes (functional MRI, functional connectivity, and brain (reorganisation (TMS, body structure and function (range of motion, spasticity

  19. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

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    Imms Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental or bimanual occupational therapy group (control. Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following

  20. Tactile Gap Detection Deteriorates during Bimanual Symmetrical Movements under Mirror Visual Feedback.

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    Janet H Bultitude

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that incongruence between signals for motor intention and sensory input can cause pain and other sensory abnormalities. This claim is supported by reports that moving in an environment of induced sensorimotor conflict leads to elevated pain and sensory symptoms in those with certain painful conditions. Similar procedures can lead to reports of anomalous sensations in healthy volunteers too. In the present study, we used mirror visual feedback to investigate the effects of sensorimotor incongruence on responses to stimuli that arise from sources external to the body, in particular, touch. Incongruence between the sensory and motor signals for the right arm was manipulated by having the participants make symmetrical or asymmetrical movements while watching a reflection of their left arm in a parasagittal mirror, or the left hand surface of a similarly positioned opaque board. In contrast to our prediction, sensitivity to the presence of gaps in tactile stimulation of the right forearm was not reduced when participants made asymmetrical movements during mirror visual feedback, as compared to when they made symmetrical or asymmetrical movements with no visual feedback. Instead, sensitivity was reduced when participants made symmetrical movements during mirror visual feedback relative to the other three conditions. We suggest that small discrepancies between sensory and motor information, as they occur during mirror visual feedback with symmetrical movements, can impair tactile processing. In contrast, asymmetrical movements with mirror visual feedback may not impact tactile processing because the larger discrepancies between sensory and motor information may prevent the integration of these sources of information. These results contrast with previous reports of anomalous sensations during exposure to both low and high sensorimotor conflict, but are nevertheless in agreement with a forward model interpretation of perceptual

  1. Compensatory Versus Noncompensatory Shoulder Movements Used for Reaching in Stroke.

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    Levin, Mindy F; Liebermann, Dario G; Parmet, Yisrael; Berman, Sigal

    2016-08-01

    Background The extent to which the upper-limb flexor synergy constrains or compensates for arm motor impairment during reaching is controversial. This synergy can be quantified with a minimal marker set describing movements of the arm-plane. Objectives To determine whether and how (a) upper-limb flexor synergy in patients with chronic stroke contributes to reaching movements to different arm workspace locations and (b) reaching deficits can be characterized by arm-plane motion. Methods Sixteen post-stroke and 8 healthy control subjects made unrestrained reaching movements to targets located in ipsilateral, central, and contralateral arm workspaces. Arm-plane, arm, and trunk motion, and their temporal and spatial linkages were analyzed. Results Individuals with moderate/severe stroke used greater arm-plane movement and compensatory trunk movement compared to those with mild stroke and control subjects. Arm-plane and trunk movements were more temporally coupled in stroke compared with controls. Reaching accuracy was related to different segment and joint combinations for each target and group: arm-plane movement in controls and mild stroke subjects, and trunk and elbow movements in moderate/severe stroke subjects. Arm-plane movement increased with time since stroke and when combined with trunk rotation, discriminated between different subject groups for reaching the central and contralateral targets. Trunk movement and arm-plane angle during target reaches predicted the subject group. Conclusions The upper-limb flexor synergy was used adaptively for reaching accuracy by patients with mild, but not moderate/severe stroke. The flexor synergy, as parameterized by the amount of arm-plane motion, can be used by clinicians to identify levels of motor recovery in patients with stroke. PMID:26510934

  2. Effectiveness of Constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy in Upper motor function outcome in child with hemiplegic Cerebral palsy

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    Zafer, Hira; Amjad, Imran; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Shaukat, Enfall

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at determining the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy for improving functional status in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Methods: This study was a randomized control trial, children (n = 20) with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy was randomly allocated to CIMT (constraint induced movement therapy) and BMT (bimanual therapy) group. The children with spastic hemiplegia, age between 1.5 and 12 year and having 10 degrees of wrist extension and 10 degrees of finger extension were included in study. Treatment regime was two hours of daily training six days a week for two weeks. Constraint was applied to CIMT group for six hours. The outcome tool QUEST was used for baseline and post treatment assessment. Result: CIMT had superior outcome as compared to BMT in improving functional status (p=0.007). On QUEST tool grasp and dissociated movements results were significant (p=0.005) and (p=0.028) respectively. Weight bearing and protective extension resulted in no significant outcome (p=0.080) and (p=0.149) respectively. Dissociated movements and grasp are significantly improved but there is no difference for weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT treated group as compared to BMT treated group. Conclusion: CIMT approach is better in improving functional status of child with cerebral palsy as compared to BMT. Significant improvement in grasp and dissociated movement is noted in group of CIMT while there was no significant improvement in weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT group when compared to BMT. CIMT is considered the appropriate treatment approach for unilateral conditions while BMT for bilateral conditions. PMID:27022371

  3. Problems in planning bimanually incongruent grasp postures relate to simultaneous response specification processes.

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    Hughes, Charmayne M L; Seegelke, Christian; Reissig, Paola

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the current experiments was to examine whether the problems associated with grasp posture planning during bimanually incongruent movements are due to crosstalk at the motor programming level. Participants performed a grasping and placing task in which they grasped two objects from a table and placed them onto a board to targets that required identical (congruent) or non-identical degrees of rotation (incongruent). The interval between the presentation of the first stimulus and the second stimulus (stimulus onset asynchrony: SOA) was manipulated. Results demonstrate that the problems associated with bimanually incongruent grasp posture planning are reduced at SOA durations longer than 1000ms, indicating that the costs associated with bimanual incongruent movements arise from crosstalk at the motor programming level. In addition, reach-to-grasp times were shorter, and interlimb limb coupling was higher, for congruent, compared to incongruent, object end-orientation conditions in both Experiment 1 and 2. The bimanual interference observed during reach-to-grasp execution is postulated to arise from limitations in the visual motor system or from conceptual language representations. The present results emphasize that bimanual interference arises from constraints active at multiple levels of the neurobiological-cognitive system. PMID:24650762

  4. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, P.B.M.; Hartingsveldt, M. van; Anderson, P.G.; Tillaar, I. van den; Burg, J. van der; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol i

  5. Inter-limb interference during bimanual adaptation to dynamic environments

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    Casadio, Maura; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Squeri, Valentina; Masia, Lorenzo; Morasso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Skillful manipulation of objects often requires the spatio-temporal coordination of both hands and, at the same time, the compensation of environmental forces. In bimanual coordination, movements of the two hands may be coupled because each hand needs to compensate the forces generated by the other hand or by an object operated by both hands (dynamic coupling), or because the two hands share the same workspace (spatial coupling). We examined how spatial coupling influences bimanual coordination, by looking at the adaptation of velocity-dependent force fields during a task in which the two hands simultaneously perform center-out reaching movements with the same initial position and the same targets, equally spaced on a circle. Subjects were randomly allocated to two groups, which differed in terms of the force fields they were exposed to: in one group (CW-CW), force fields had equal clockwise orientations in both hands; in the other group (CCW-CW), they had opposite orientations. In both groups, in randomly selected trials (catch trials) of the adaptation phase, the force fields were unexpectedly removed. Adaptation was quantified in terms of the changes of directional error for both hand trajectories. Bimanual coordination was quantified in terms of inter-limb longitudinal and sideways displacements, in force field and in catch trials. Experimental results indicate that both arms could simultaneously adapt to the two force fields. However, in the CCW-CW group, adaptation was incomplete for the movements from the central position to the more distant targets with respect to the body. In addition, in this group the left hand systematically leads in the movements toward targets on the left of the starting position, whereas the right hand leads in the movements to targets on the right. We show that these effects are due to a gradual sideways shift of the hands, so that during movements the left hand tends to consistently remain at the left of the right hand. These

  6. The processing of visual and auditory information for reaching movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazebrook, Cheryl M; Welsh, Timothy N; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-09-01

    Presenting target and non-target information in different modalities influences target localization if the non-target is within the spatiotemporal limits of perceptual integration. When using auditory and visual stimuli, the influence of a visual non-target on auditory target localization is greater than the reverse. It is not known, however, whether or how such perceptual effects extend to goal-directed behaviours. To gain insight into how audio-visual stimuli are integrated for motor tasks, the kinematics of reaching movements towards visual or auditory targets with or without a non-target in the other modality were examined. When present, the simultaneously presented non-target could be spatially coincident, to the left, or to the right of the target. Results revealed that auditory non-targets did not influence reaching trajectories towards a visual target, whereas visual non-targets influenced trajectories towards an auditory target. Interestingly, the biases induced by visual non-targets were present early in the trajectory and persisted until movement end. Subsequent experimentation indicated that the magnitude of the biases was equivalent whether participants performed a perceptual or motor task, whereas variability was greater for the motor versus the perceptual tasks. We propose that visually induced trajectory biases were driven by the perceived mislocation of the auditory target, which in turn affected both the movement plan and subsequent control of the movement. Such findings provide further evidence of the dominant role visual information processing plays in encoding spatial locations as well as planning and executing reaching action, even when reaching towards auditory targets. PMID:26253323

  7. Modeling basal ganglia for understanding Parkinsonian reaching movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdoom, K N; Subramanian, D; Chakravarthy, V S; Ravindran, B; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Meenakshisundaram, N

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational model that highlights the role of basal ganglia (BG) in generating simple reaching movements. The model is cast within the reinforcement learning (RL) framework with correspondence between RL components and neuroanatomy as follows: dopamine signal of substantia nigra pars compacta as the temporal difference error, striatum as the substrate for the critic, and the motor cortex as the actor. A key feature of this neurobiological interpretation is our hypothesis that the indirect pathway is the explorer. Chaotic activity, originating from the indirect pathway part of the model, drives the wandering, exploratory movements of the arm. Thus, the direct pathway subserves exploitation, while the indirect pathway subserves exploration. The motor cortex becomes more and more independent of the corrective influence of BG as training progresses. Reaching trajectories show diminishing variability with training. Reaching movements associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) are simulated by reducing dopamine and degrading the complexity of indirect pathway dynamics by switching it from chaotic to periodic behavior. Under the simulated PD conditions, the arm exhibits PD motor symptoms like tremor, bradykinesia and undershooting. The model echoes the notion that PD is a dynamical disease. PMID:21105828

  8. An investigation of the neural circuits underlying reaching and reach-to-grasp movements: from planning to execution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Begliomini

    2014-09-01

    Results suggest that reaching and grasping movements planning and execution might share a common brain network, providing further confirmation to the idea that the neural underpinnings of reaching and grasping may overlap in both spatial and temporal terms (Verhagen et al., 2013.

  9. The effects of task demands on bimanual skill acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Bimanual coordination is essential for everyday activities. It is thought that different degrees of demands may affect learning of new bimanual patterns. One demand is at the level of performance and involves breaking the tendency to produce mirror-symmetric movements. A second is at a perceptual level and involves controlling each hand to separate (i.e., split) goals. A third demand involves switching between different task contexts (e.g., a different uni- or bimanual task), instead of continuously practicing one task repeatedly. Here, we studied the effect of these task demands on motor planning (reaction time) and execution (error) while subjects learned a novel bimanual isometric pinch force task. In Experiment 1, subjects continuously practiced in one of the two extremes of the following bimanual conditions: (1) symmetric force demands and a perceptually unified target for each hand or (2) asymmetric force demands and perceptually split targets. Subjects performing in the asymmetric condition showed some interference between hands, but all subjects, regardless of group, could learn the isometric pinch force task similarly. In Experiment 2, subjects practiced these and two other conditions, but in a paradigm where practice was briefly interrupted by the performance of either a unimanual or a different bimanual condition. Reaction times were longer and errors were larger well after the interruption when the main movement to be learned required asymmetric forces. There was no effect when the main movement required symmetric forces. These findings demonstrate two main points. First, people can learn bimanual tasks with very different demands on the same timescale if they are not interrupted. Second, interruption during learning can negatively impact both planning and execution and this depends on the demands of the bimanual task to be learned. This information will be important for training patient populations, who may be more susceptible to increased task demands

  10. Human posterior parietal cortex encodes the movement goal in a pro-/anti-reach task

    OpenAIRE

    Gertz, Hanna; Fiehler, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on reach planning in humans has implicated a frontoparietal network, including the precuneus (PCu), a putative human homolog of the monkey parietal reach region (PRR), and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Using a pro-/anti-reach task, electrophysiological studies in monkeys have demonstrated that the movement goal rather than the location of the visual cue is encoded in PRR and PMd. However, if only the effector but not the movement goal is specified (underspecified conditi...

  11. Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure. PMID:22814094

  12. Changes in Interhemispheric Transfer Rate and the Development of Bimanual Coordination during Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, Jacqueline; Hardy-Leger, Isabelle; Kervella, Claude; Marks, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effect of interhemispheric communication development on age-related changes in bimanual coordination. Findings indicated that improved interhemispheric communication contributes to progress in bimanual coordination, especially that which requires resisting the attraction of mirror movements in order to rotate both hands with parallel…

  13. Reaching movement onset- and end-related characteristics of EEG spectral power modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evariste eDemandt

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The spectral power of intracranial field potentials shows movement-related modulations during reaching movements to different target positions that in frequencies up to the high-γ range (approximately 50 to above 200 Hz can be reliably used for single-trial inference of movement parameters. However, identifying spectral power modulations suitable for single-trial analysis for non-invasive approaches remains a challenge. We recorded non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG during a self-paced center-out and center-in arm movement task, resulting in 8 reaching movement classes (4 center-out, 4 center-in. We found distinct slow (≤ 5 Hz, μ (7.5 to 10 Hz, β (12.5 to 25 Hz, low-γ (27.5 to approximately 50Hz and high-γ (above 50 Hz movement onset- and end-related responses. Movement class-specific spectral power modulations were restricted to the β band at approximately 1 s after movement end and could be explained by the sensitivity of this response to different static, post-movement electromyography (EMG levels. Based on the β band, significant single-trial inference of reaching movement endpoints was possible. The findings of the present study support the idea that single-trial decoding of different reaching movements from non-invasive EEG spectral power modulations is possible, but also suggest that the informative time window is after movement end and that the informative frequency range is restricted to the β band.

  14. Biologically Plausible Control of Fast Reaching Movements Using Non-Traditional Cost Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Gamble, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Optimal control has been used as a technique to uncover mathematical principles which are observed regularly in the dynamics of human movement. We present two new models of human reaching movements. While both are rooted in optimal control theory, the models were conceived by questioning basic tenets and typical practices used in optimal control as applied to human movement. In the first model, we use cost functions that measure various control signals via the L_infinity norm as opposed to th...

  15. Do Curved Reaching Movements Emerge From Competing Perceptions? A Reply to van der Wel et al.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spivey, M.J.; Dale, R.; Knoblich, G.K.; Grosjean, M.

    2010-01-01

    Spivey, Grosjean, and Knoblich (2005) reported smoothly curved reaching movements, via computer-mouse tracking, which suggested a continuously evolving flow of distributed lexical activation patterns into motor movement during a phonological competitor task. For example, when instructed to click the

  16. Handedness consistency influences bimanual coordination: a behavioural and electrophysiological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtis, Dimitrios; De Saedeleer, Lien; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has shown that handedness consistency might be a more important factor than direction of hand dominance in the performance of various cognitive and motor tasks. We investigated the effect of handedness consistency in bimanual coordination. We employed a task where participants had to respond to visual cues and perform symmetrical or asymmetrical bimanual movements towards cue-designated targets. Response and movement times were recorded in parallel with electroencephalography (EEG). Behavioural analyses showed that participants with inconsistent hand preference were equally fast in initiating symmetrical and asymmetrical bimanual movements, whereas participants with consistent hand preference were slower in initiating (the more demanding) asymmetrical movements. Moreover, the amplitudes of the Movement Related Potential and the suppression of the 10 Hz-mu rhythm were larger in participants with inconsistent hand preference over premotor and primary sensorimotor areas, although it is possible that the suppression of the mu rhythm may also depend on hand dominance. Our findings suggest that individuals with inconsistent hand preference have an advantage in the planning and organization of bimanual movements, which may not be related to the direction of their hand dominance. PMID:24732382

  17. Whole-Body Reaching Movements Formulated by Minimum Muscle-Tension Change Criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Naoki; Choi, Kyuheong; Kagawa, Takahiro; Uno, Yoji

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that planar reaching movements of the human shoulder and elbow joints have invariant features: roughly straight hand paths and bell-shaped velocity profiles. The optimal control models with the criteria of smoothness or precision, which determine a unique movement pattern, predict such features of hand trajectories. In this letter on expanding the research on simple arm reaching movements, we examine whether the smoothness criteria can be applied to whole-body reaching movements with many degrees of freedom. Determining a suitable joint trajectory in the whole-body reaching movement corresponds to the optimization problem with constraints, since body balance must be maintained during a motion task. First, we measured human joint trajectories and ground reaction forces during whole-body reaching movements, and confirmed that subjects formed similar movements with common characteristics in the trajectories of the hand position and body center of mass. Second, we calculated the optimal trajectories according to the criteria of torque and muscle-tension smoothness. While the minimum torque change trajectories were not consistent with the experimental data, the minimum muscle-tension change model was able to predict the stereotyped features of the measured trajectories. To explore the dominant effects of the extension from the torque change to the muscle-tension change, we introduced a weighted torque change cost function. Considering the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the muscle as the weighting factor of each joint torque, we formulated the weighted torque change cost as a simplified version of the minimum muscle-tension change cost. The trajectories owing to the minimum weighted torque change criterion also showed qualitative agreement with the common features of the measured data. Proper estimation of the MVC forces in the body joints is essential to reproduce human whole-body movements according to the minimum muscle-tension change

  18. Visuomotor Map Determines How Visually Guided Reaching Movements are Corrected Within and Across Trials123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When a visually guided reaching movement is unexpectedly perturbed, it is implicitly corrected in two ways: immediately after the perturbation by feedback control (online correction) and in the next movement by adjusting feedforward motor commands (offline correction or motor adaptation). Although recent studies have revealed a close relationship between feedback and feedforward controls, the nature of this relationship is not yet fully understood. Here, we show that both implicit online and offline movement corrections utilize the same visuomotor map for feedforward movement control that transforms the spatial location of visual objects into appropriate motor commands. First, we artificially distorted the visuomotor map by applying opposite visual rotations to the cursor representing the hand position while human participants reached for two different targets. This procedure implicitly altered the visuomotor map so that changes in the movement direction to the target location were more insensitive or more sensitive. Then, we examined how such visuomotor map distortion influenced online movement correction by suddenly changing the target location. The magnitude of online movement correction was altered according to the shape of the visuomotor map. We also examined offline movement correction; the aftereffect induced by visual rotation in the previous trial was modulated according to the shape of the visuomotor map. These results highlighted the importance of the visuomotor map as a foundation for implicit motor control mechanisms and the intimate relationship between feedforward control, feedback control, and motor adaptation.

  19. The Roles of Vision and Proprioception in the Planning of Reaching Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Sarlegna, Fabrice R.; Sainburg, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    While vision and proprioception can both provide information about arm configuration prior to movement, substantial evidence suggests that each modality is used for different stages of the planning process. In this chapter, we provide support for the idea that vision is mainly used to define the trajectory and the kinematics of reaching movements. Proprioception appears to be critical in the transformation of this plan into the motor commands sent to the arm muscles.

  20. Mixed body- and gaze-centered coding of proprioceptive reach targets after effector movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stefanie; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that an effector movement intervening between encoding and reaching to a proprioceptive target determines the underlying reference frame: proprioceptive reach targets are represented in a gaze-independent reference frame if no movement occurs but are represented with respect to gaze after an effector movement (Mueller and Fiehler, 2014a). The present experiment explores whether an effector movement leads to a switch from a gaze-independent, body-centered reference frame to a gaze-dependent reference frame or whether a gaze-dependent reference frame is employed in addition to a gaze-independent, body-centered reference frame. Human participants were asked to reach in complete darkness to an unseen finger (proprioceptive target) of their left target hand indicated by a touch. They completed 2 conditions in which the target hand remained either stationary at the target location (stationary condition) or was actively moved to the target location, received a touch and was moved back before reaching to the target (moved condition). We dissociated the location of the movement vector relative to the body midline and to the gaze direction. Using correlation and regression analyses, we estimated the contribution of each reference frame based on horizontal reach errors in the stationary and moved conditions. Gaze-centered coding was only found in the moved condition, replicating our previous results. Body-centered coding dominated in the stationary condition while body- and gaze-centered coding contributed equally strong in the moved condition. Our results indicate a shift from body-centered to combined body- and gaze-centered coding due to an effector movement before reaching towards proprioceptive targets. PMID:27157885

  1. Gravitoinertial force background level affects adaptation to coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, J. R.; Dizio, P.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the combined effects on reaching movements of the transient, movement-dependent Coriolis forces and the static centrifugal forces generated in a rotating environment. Specifically, we assessed the effects of comparable Coriolis force perturbations in different static force backgrounds. Two groups of subjects made reaching movements toward a just-extinguished visual target before rotation began, during 10 rpm counterclockwise rotation, and after rotation ceased. One group was seated on the axis of rotation, the other 2.23 m away. The resultant of gravity and centrifugal force on the hand was 1.0 g for the on-center group during 10 rpm rotation, and 1.031 g for the off-center group because of the 0.25 g centrifugal force present. For both groups, rightward Coriolis forces, approximately 0.2 g peak, were generated during voluntary arm movements. The endpoints and paths of the initial per-rotation movements were deviated rightward for both groups by comparable amounts. Within 10 subsequent reaches, the on-center group regained baseline accuracy and straight-line paths; however, even after 40 movements the off-center group had not resumed baseline endpoint accuracy. Mirror-image aftereffects occurred when rotation stopped. These findings demonstrate that manual control is disrupted by transient Coriolis force perturbations and that adaptation can occur even in the absence of visual feedback. An increase, even a small one, in background force level above normal gravity does not affect the size of the reaching errors induced by Coriolis forces nor does it affect the rate of reacquiring straight reaching paths; however, it does hinder restoration of reaching accuracy.

  2. Kinematic features of whole-body reaching movements underwater: Neutral buoyancy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, T; Bourdin, C; Buloup, F; Mille, M-L; Sainton, P; Sarlegna, F R; Taillebot, V; Vercher, J-L; Weiss, P; Bringoux, L

    2016-07-01

    Astronauts' training is conventionally performed in a pool to reproduce weightlessness by exploiting buoyancy which is supposed to reduce the impact of gravity on the body. However, this training method has not been scientifically validated yet, and requires first to study the effects of underwater exposure on motor behavior. We examined the influence of neutral buoyancy on kinematic features of whole-body reaching underwater and compared them with those produced on land. Eight professional divers were asked to perform arm reaching movements toward visual targets while standing. Targets were presented either close or far from the subjects (requiring in the latter case an additional whole-body displacement). Reaching movements were performed on land or underwater in two different contexts of buoyancy. The divers either wore a diving suit only with neutral buoyancy applied to their center of mass or were additionally equipped with a submersible simulated space suit with neutral buoyancy applied to their body limbs. Results showed that underwater exposure impacted basic movement features, especially movement speed which was reduced. However, movement kinematics also differed according to the way buoyancy was exerted on the whole-body. When neutral buoyancy was applied to the center of mass only, some focal and postural components of whole-body reaching remained close to land observations, notably when considering the relative deceleration duration of arm elevation and concomitant forward trunk bending when reaching the far target. On the contrary, when neutral buoyancy was exerted on body segments, movement kinematics were close to those reported in weightlessness, as reflected by the arm deceleration phase and the whole-body forward displacement when reaching the far target. These results suggest that astronauts could benefit from the application of neutral buoyancy across the whole-body segments to optimize underwater training and acquire specific motor skills which

  3. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisoli, Antonio; Procopio, Caterina; Chisari, Carmelo; Creatini, Ilaria; Bonfiglio, Luca; Bergamasco, Massimo; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients' group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0-66 points), Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0-60 pts) and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion) and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA) parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement) and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space). These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved interjoint coordination of elbow

  4. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisoli Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients’ group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0–66 points, Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0–60 pts and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space. These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved

  5. Assessing the Impact of Movement Consequences on the Development of Early Reaching in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joshua L; Corbetta, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Prior research on infant reaching has shown that providing infants with repeated opportunities to reach for objects aids the emergence and progression of reaching behavior. This study investigated the effect of movement consequences on the process of learning to reach in pre-reaching infants. Thirty-five infants aged 2.9 months at the onset of the study were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Two groups received a 14-day intervention to distinct reaching tasks: (1) in a contingent group, a toy target moved and sounded upon contact only, and (2) in a continuous group, the toy moved and sounded continuously, independent of hand-toy contact. A third control group did not receive any intervention; this group's performance was assessed only on 2 days at a 15-day interval. Results revealed that infants in the contingent group made the most progress over time compared to the two other groups. Infants in this group made significantly more overall contacts with the sounding/moving toy, and they increased their rate of visually attended target contacts relative to non-visually attended target contacts compared to the continuous and control groups. Infants in the continuous group did not differ from the control group on the number of hand-toy contacts nor did they show a change in visually attended target versus non-visually attended target contacts ratio over time. However, they did show an increase in movement speed, presumably in an attempt to attain the moving toy. These findings highlight the importance of contingent movement consequences as a critical reinforcer for the selection of action and motor learning in early development. Through repeated opportunities to explore movement consequences, infants discover and select movements that are most successful to the task-at-hand. This study further demonstrates that distinct sensory-motor experiences can have a significant impact on developmental trajectories and can influence the skills young infants will discover through

  6. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika;

    2014-01-01

    neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing of...... proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception was...... the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing...

  7. Reach-to-grasp movements in Macaca fascicularis monkeys: the Isochrony Principle at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Humans show a spontaneous tendency to increase the velocity of their movements depending on the linear extent of their trajectory in order to keep execution time approximately constant. Termed the isochrony principle, this compensatory mechanism refers to the observation that the velocity of voluntary movements increases proportionally with their linear extension. Although there is a wealth of psychophysical data regarding isochrony in humans, there is none regarding non-human primates. The present study attempts to fill that gap by investigating reach-to-grasp movement kinematics in free-ranging macaques. Video footage of monkeys grasping objects located at different distances was analyzed frame-by-frame using digitalization techniques. The amplitude of arm peak velocity was found to be correlated with the distance to be covered, and total movement duration remained invariant although target distances varied. Like in humans, the "isochrony principle" seems to be operative as there is a gearing down/up of movement velocity that is proportional to the distance to be covered in order to allow for a relatively constant movement duration. Based on a centrally generated temporal template, this mode of motor programming could be functional in macaques given the high speed and great instability of posture and joint kinematics characterizing their actions. The data presented here take research in the field of comparative motor control a step forward as they are based on precise measurements of spontaneous grasping movements by animals living/acting in their natural environment. PMID:23658547

  8. Investigating the effects of bimanual multitouch interaction on creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Bevans, Allen Leon

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of an exploratory comparative study investigating the potential effects of bimanual interaction on creativity. Recent research from cognitive psychology and neuroscience suggests that body movement influences divergent thinking performance in previously unexpected ways. Divergent thinking is the process of generating multiple valid responses to a situation, and is an important part of creative behaviour. To examine the impact of the body movements afforded by ...

  9. Assessing the impact of movement consequences on the development of early reaching in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L Williams

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prior research on infant reaching has shown that providing infants with repeated opportunities to reach for objects aids the emergence and progression of reaching behavior. This study investigated the effect of movement consequences on the process of learning to reach in pre-reaching infants. Thirty-five infants aged 2.9 months at the onset of the study were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Two groups received a 14-day intervention to distinct reaching tasks: (1 in a contingent group, a toy target moved and sounded upon contact only, and (2 in a continuous group, the toy moved and sounded continuously, independent of hand-toy contact. A third control group did not receive any intervention; this group’s performance was assessed only on two days at a 15-day interval. Results revealed that infants in the contingent group made the most progress over time compared to the two other groups. Infants in this group made significantly more overall contacts with the sounding/moving toy, and they increased their rate of visually-attended target contacts relative to non-visually-attended target contacts compared to the continuous and control groups. Infants in the continuous group did not differ from the control group on the number of hand-toy contacts nor did they show a change in visually-attended target versus non-visually-attended target contacts ratio over time. However, they did show an increase in movement speed, presumably in an attempt to attain the moving toy. These findings highlight the importance of contingent movement consequences as a critical reinforcer for the selection of action and motor learning in early development. Through repeated opportunities to explore movement consequences, infants discover and select movements that are most successful to the task-at-hand. This study further demonstrates that distinct sensory-motor experiences can have a significant impact on developmental trajectories and can influence the skills young infants

  10. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern. PMID:18842313

  11. Decoding three-dimensional reaching movements using electrocorticographic signals in humans

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    Bundy, David T.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Szrama, Nicholas; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) signals have emerged as a potential control signal for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications due to balancing signal quality and implant invasiveness. While there have been numerous demonstrations in which ECoG signals were used to decode motor movements and to develop BCI systems, the extent of information that can be decoded has been uncertain. Therefore, we sought to determine if ECoG signals could be used to decode kinematics (speed, velocity, and position) of arm movements in 3D space. Approach. To investigate this, we designed a 3D center-out reaching task that was performed by five epileptic patients undergoing temporary placement of ECoG arrays. We used the ECoG signals within a hierarchical partial-least squares (PLS) regression model to perform offline prediction of hand speed, velocity, and position. Main Results. The hierarchical PLS regression model enabled us to predict hand speed, velocity, and position during 3D reaching movements from held-out test sets with accuracies above chance in each patient with mean correlation coefficients between 0.31 and 0.80 for speed, 0.27 and 0.54 for velocity, and 0.22 and 0.57 for position. While beta band power changes were the most significant features within the model used to classify movement and rest, the local motor potential and high gamma band power changes, were the most important features in the prediction of kinematic parameters. Significance. We believe that this study represents the first demonstration that truly three-dimensional movements can be predicted from ECoG recordings in human patients. Furthermore, this prediction underscores the potential to develop BCI systems with multiple degrees of freedom in human patients using ECoG.

  12. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  13. Control of arm movement: reaching synergies for neuroprosthesis with life-like control

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    Popović Mirjana B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents control methods for restoration of reaching and grasping that mimics the mapping in the space of output states found in healthy subjects. The hypothesis was that the externally driven movements are most likely to advance the recovery of functioning if they follow lifelike control mechanisms. For this, it is important to analyze movement considering the conditions such as: 1 variety of functional tasks (drinking, writing, using computer disk; 2 different locations of the object (with respect to the body; with respect to the active arm; 3 variable loading of the hand (light, heavy; and 4 available grasp strategy (palmar, lateral, pinch. The overall goals of our study were the following 1 identification of coordinated synergies in functional tasks, 2 investigation of differences and similarities between these synergies related to different grasp types, and 3 analysis of the impact of direction, distance and load to synergies. Three spatial reaching synergies were validated for the following coordinated rotations: shoulder adduction/abduction vs. elbow flexion/extension angular velocity (synergy SI, humeral rotation vs. elbow flexion/extension angular velocity (synergy S2, and shoulder vs. elbow flexion/extension angular velocity (synergy S3. These are timely synchronized with the phases of functional tasks; where four reaching phases were distinguished. Here, we present alternation of synergies' coupling during successive phases of a functional task. Preliminary results indicate that the two phases of a functional task termed "no-object" phases used one coupling, between synergies S2 and S3; while the two other phases termed "object" phases were coupled by synergies SI and S2. We established the generalization on the following two objectives: the discrimination of tasks' phases and matching the synergies with task phases. This result reduces the number of mappings necessary for the design of neuroprosthesis with life

  14. Ajustes nos movimentos de alcançar e apreender objetos: impacto da Síndrome de Down Adjustments in the movements of reaching for and grasping objects: the impact of Down Syndrome

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    Mariana Martins dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar a influência das propriedades dos objetos nos ajustes realizados por lactentes típicos e com Síndrome de Down (SD dos quatro aos oito meses de idade ao alcançar e apreender objetos. MÉTODOS: 16 lactentes, avaliados uma vez ao mês dos 4 aos 8 meses, sendo oito típicos e oito com SD. Quatro objetos esféricos (maleável grande, maleável pequeno, rígido grande e rígido pequeno foram apresentados, e os cinco primeiros movimentos válidos foram registrados para análise das variáveis: ajuste proximal (uni e bimanual, ajuste distal (orientação da palma, abertura da mão e apreensão do objeto. RESULTADOS: os lactentes típicos apresentaram mais ajuste bimanual para objetos grandes aos seis e oito meses e os com SD aos sete meses. Quanto aos ajustes distais, os lactentes típicos variaram seu comportamento enquanto os com SD apresentaram uso predominante da posição oblíqua. Em geral, o grupo típico apresentou maior sucesso na apreensão dos objetos rígidos e maleável pequeno quando comparados aos lactentes com SD. CONCLUSÕES: Os lactentes com SD apresentaram menor variedade de ajustes o que levou a um menor sucesso na apreensão, possivelmente devido a restrições intrínsecas da SD.OBJECTIVES: to verify the influence that properties of objects have on the reaching and grasping adjustments made by infants with and without Down syndrome (DS between four to eight months of age. METHODS: 16 infants, eight typical and eight with DS, were evaluated once a month from months 4 to 8. Four spherical objects (large soft, small soft, large hard and small hard were offered and the first five valid movements were recorded for analysis of the variables: proximal adjustment (uni- and bimanual, distal adjustments (palm orientation, hand opening and grasping of the object. RESULTS: the typical infants displayed greater bimanual adjustment for large objects at six and eight months and those with DS at seven months. As for distal

  15. Robot-assisted reaching exercise promotes arm movement recovery in chronic hemiparetic stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study

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    Rymer W Zev

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Providing active assistance to complete desired arm movements is a common technique in upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke. Such active assistance may improve recovery by affecting somatosensory input, motor planning, spasticity or soft tissue properties, but it is labor intensive and has not been validated in controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of robotically administered active-assistive exercise and compare those with free reaching voluntary exercise in improving arm movement ability after chronic stroke. Methods Nineteen individuals at least one year post-stroke were randomized into one of two groups. One group performed 24 sessions of active-assistive reaching exercise with a simple robotic device, while a second group performed a task-matched amount of unassisted reaching. The main outcome measures were range and speed of supported arm movement, range, straightness and smoothness of unsupported reaching, and the Rancho Los Amigos Functional Test of Upper Extremity Function. Results and discussion There were significant improvements with training for range of motion and velocity of supported reaching, straightness of unsupported reaching, and functional movement ability. These improvements were not significantly different between the two training groups. The group that performed unassisted reaching exercise improved the smoothness of their reaching movements more than the robot-assisted group. Conclusion Improvements with both forms of exercise confirmed that repeated, task-related voluntary activation of the damaged motor system is a key stimulus to motor recovery following chronic stroke. Robotically assisting in reaching successfully improved arm movement ability, although it did not provide any detectable, additional value beyond the movement practice that occurred concurrently with it. The inability to detect any additional value of robot-assisted reaching

  16. Motor adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements: endpoint but not trajectory adaptation transfers to the nonexposed arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. Reaching movements made in a rotating room generate Coriolis forces that are directly proportional to the cross product of the room's angular velocity and the arm's linear velocity. Such Coriolis forces are inertial forces not involving mechanical contact with the arm. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished at the onset of each reach. Prerotation subjects pointed with both the right and left arms in alternating sets of eight movements. During rotation at 10 rpm, the subjects reached only with the right arm. Postrotation, the subjects pointed with the left and right arms, starting with the left, in alternating sets of eight movements. 3. The initial perrotary reaching movements of the right arm were highly deviated both in movement path and endpoint relative to the prerotation reaches of the right arm. With additional movements, subjects rapidly regained straight movement paths and accurate endpoints despite the absence of visual or tactile feedback about reaching accuracy. The initial postrotation reaches of the left arm followed straight paths to the wrong endpoint. The initial postrotation reaches of the right arm had paths with mirror image curvature to the initial perrotation reaches of the right arm but went to the correct endpoint. 4. These observations are inconsistent with current equilibrium point models of movement control. Such theories predict accurate reaches under our experimental conditions. Our observations further show independent implementation of movement and posture, as evidenced by transfer of endpoint adaptation to the nonexposed arm without transfer of path adaptation. Endpoint control may occur at a relatively central stage that represents general constraints such as gravitoinertial force background or egocentric direction relative to both arms, and control of path may occur at a more peripheral stage that represents moments of inertia and muscle dynamics unique to each

  17. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. I. Anticipatory compensation for self-generated coriolis and interaction torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B.; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2003-01-01

    When reaching movements involve simultaneous trunk rotation, additional interaction torques are generated on the arm that are absent when the trunk is stable. To explore whether the CNS compensates for such self-generated interaction torques, we recorded hand trajectories in reaching tasks involving various amplitudes and velocities of arm extension and trunk rotation. Subjects pointed to three targets on a surface slightly above waist level. Two of the target locations were chosen so that a similar arm configuration relative to the trunk would be required for reaching to them, one of these targets requiring substantial trunk rotation, the other very little. Significant trunk rotation was necessary to reach the third target, but the arm's radial distance to the body remained virtually unchanged. Subjects reached at two speeds-a natural pace (slow) and rapidly (fast)-under normal lighting and in total darkness. Trunk angular velocity and finger velocity relative to the trunk were higher in the fast conditions but were not affected by the presence or absence of vision. Peak trunk velocity increased with increasing trunk rotation up to a maximum of 200 degrees /s. In slow movements, peak finger velocity relative to the trunk was smaller when trunk rotation was necessary to reach the targets. In fast movements, peak finger velocity was approximately 1.7 m/s for all targets. Finger trajectories were more curved when reaching movements involved substantial trunk rotation; however, the terminal errors and the maximal deviation of the trajectory from a straight line were comparable in slow and fast movements. This pattern indicates that the larger Coriolis, centripetal, and inertial interaction torques generated during rapid reaches were compensated by additional joint torques. Trajectory characteristics did not vary with the presence or absence of vision, indicating that visual feedback was unnecessary for anticipatory compensations. In all reaches involving trunk

  18. Effects of Background Lighting Color and Movement Distance on Reaching Times Among Participants With Low Vision, Myopia, and Normal Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Fu; Huang, Kuo-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of target distance (30, 35, and 40 cm) and the color of background lighting (red, green, blue, and yellow) on the duration of movements made by participants with low vision, myopia, and normal vision while performing a reaching task; 48 students (21 women, 27 men; M age = 21.8 year, SD = 2.4) participated in the study. Participants reached for a target (a white LED light) whose vertical position varied randomly across trials, ranging in distance from 30 to 40 cm. Movement time was analyzed using a 3 (participant group) × [4 (color of background lighting) × 3 (movement distance)] mixed-design ANOVA model. Results indicated longer times for completing a reaching movement when: participants belonged to the low vision group; the target distance between the starting position and the target position was longer (40 cm); and the reaching movement occurred in the red-background lighting condition. These results are particularly relevant for situations in which a user is required to respond to a signal by reaching toward a button or an icon. PMID:27166331

  19. Hand and Grasp Selection in a Preferential Reaching Task: The Effects of Object Location, Orientation, and Task Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharoun, Sara M.; Scanlan, Kelly A.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    As numerous movement options are available in reaching and grasping, of particular interest are what factors influence an individual’s choice of action. In the current study a preferential reaching task was used to assess the propensity for right handers to select their preferred hand and grasp a coffee mug by the handle in both independent and joint action object manipulation contexts. Mug location (right-space, midline, and left-space) and handle orientation (toward, away, to left, and to right of the participant) varied in four tasks that differed as a function of intention: (1) pick-up (unimanual, independent); (2) pick-up and pour (bimanual, independent); (3) pick-up and pass (unimanual, joint action); and (4) pick-up, pour and pass (bimanual, joint action). In line with previous reports, a right-hand preference for unimanual tasks was observed. Furthermore, extending existing literature to a preferential reaching task, role differentiation between the hands in bimanual tasks (i.e., preferred hand mobilizing, non-preferred hand stabilizing) was displayed. Finally, right-hand selection was greatest in right space, albeit lower in bimanual tasks compared to what is typically reported in unimanual tasks. Findings are attributed to the desire to maximize biomechanical efficiency in reaching. Grasp postures were also observed to reflect consideration of efficiency. More specifically, within independent object manipulation (pick-up; pick-up and pour) participants only grasped the mug by the handle when it afforded a comfortable posture. Furthermore, in joint action (pick-up and pass; pick-up, pour and pass), the confederate was only offered the handle if the intended action of the confederate was similar or required less effort than that of the participant. Together, findings from the current study add to our knowledge of hand and grasp selection in unimanual and bimanual object manipulation, within the context of both independent and joint action tasks. PMID

  20. Reaching in reality and virtual reality: a comparison of movement kinematics in healthy subjects and in adults with hemiparesis

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    Feldman Anatol G

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual reality (VR is an innovative tool for sensorimotor rehabilitation increasingly being employed in clinical and community settings. Despite the growing interest in VR, few studies have determined the validity of movements made in VR environments with respect to real physical environments. The goal of this study was to compare movements done in physical and virtual environments in adults with motor deficits to those in healthy individuals. Methods The participants were 8 healthy adults and 7 adults with mild left hemiparesis due to stroke. Kinematics of functional arm movements involving reaching, grasping and releasing made in physical and virtual environments were analyzed in two phases: 1 reaching and grasping the ball and 2 ball transport and release. The virtual environment included interaction with an object on a 2D computer screen and haptic force feedback from a virtual ball. Temporal and spatial parameters of reaching and grasping were determined for each phase. Results Individuals in both groups were able to reach, grasp, transport, place and release the virtual and real ball using similar movement strategies. In healthy subjects, reaching and grasping movements in both environments were similar but these subjects used less wrist extension and more elbow extension to place the ball on the virtual vertical surface. Participants with hemiparesis made slower movements in both environments compared to healthy subjects and during transport and placing of the ball, trajectories were more curved and interjoint coordination was altered. Despite these differences, patients with hemiparesis also tended to use less wrist extension during the whole movement and more elbow extension at the end of the placing phase. Conclusion Differences in movements made by healthy subjects in the two environments may be explained by the use of a 2D instead of a 3D virtual environment and the absence of haptic feedback from the VR target

  1. Evidence for subjective values guiding posture and movement coordination in a free-endpoint whole-body reaching task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, P. M.; Berret, B.; Papaxanthis, C.; Stapley, P. J.; Pozzo, T.

    2016-01-01

    When moving, humans must overcome intrinsic (body centered) and extrinsic (target-related) redundancy, requiring decisions when selecting one motor solution among several potential ones. During classical reaching studies the position of a salient target determines where the participant should reach, constraining the associated motor decisions. We aimed at investigating implicit variables guiding action selection when faced with the complexity of human-environment interaction. Subjects had to perform whole body reaching movements towards a uniform surface. We observed little variation in the self-chosen motor strategy across repeated trials while movements were variable across subjects being on a continuum from a pure ‘knee flexion’ associated with a downward center of mass (CoM) displacement to an ‘ankle dorsi-flexion’ associated with an upward CoM displacement. Two optimality criteria replicated these two strategies: a mix between mechanical energy expenditure and joint smoothness and a minimization of the amount of torques. Our results illustrate the presence of idiosyncratic values guiding posture and movement coordination that can be combined in a flexible manner as a function of context and subject. A first value accounts for the reach efficiency of the movement at the price of selecting possibly unstable postures. The other predicts stable dynamic equilibrium but requires larger energy expenditure and jerk. PMID:27053508

  2. Cross talk in implicit assignment of error information during bimanual visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Shoko; Nozaki, Daichi

    2011-09-01

    When a neural movement controller, called an "internal model," is adapted to a novel environment, the movement error needs to be appropriately associated with the controller. However, their association is not necessarily guaranteed for bimanual movements in which two controllers--one for each hand--result in two movement errors. Considering the implicit nature of the adaptation process, the movement error of one hand can be erroneously associated with the controller of the other hand. Here, we investigated this credit-assignment problem in bimanual movement by having participants perform bimanual, symmetric back-and-forth movements while displaying the position of the right hand only with a cursor. In the training session, the cursor position was gradually rotated clockwise, such that the participants were unaware of the rotation. The movement of the right hand gradually rotated counterclockwise as a consequence of adaptation. Although the participants knew that the cursor reflected the movement of the right hand, such gradual adaptation was also observed for the invisible left hand, especially when the cursor was presented on the left side of the display. Thus the movement error of the right hand was implicitly assigned to the left-hand controller. Such cross talk in credit assignment might influence motor adaptation performance, even when two cursors are presented; the adaptation was impaired when the rotations imposed on the cursors were opposite compared with when they were in the same direction. These results indicate the inherent presence of cross talk in the process of associating action with consequence in bimanual movement. PMID:21653713

  3. LINKING MOTOR-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS AND VELOCITY PROFILES IN MULTI-JOINT ARM REACHING MOVEMENTS

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    Julià L Amengual

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the movement related brain potentials (MRPBs needs accurate technical approaches to disentangle the specific patterns of bran activity during the preparation and execution of movements. During the last forty years, synchronizing the electromiographic activation (EMG of the muscle with the electrophysiological recordings (EEG has been commonly ussed for these purposes. However, new clinical approaches in the study of motor diseases and rehabilitation suggest the demand of new paradigms that might go further into the study of the brain activity associated with the kinematics of movement. As a response to this call, we have used a 3-D hand tracking system with the aim to record continuously the position of an ultrasonic sender located on the hand during the performance of multi-joint self-pace movements. We synchronized the time-series of position of velocity of the sender with the EEG recordings, obtaining specific patterns of brain activity as a function of the fluctuations of the kinematics during the natural movement performance. Additionally, the distribution of the brain activity during the preparation and execution phases of movement was similar that reported previously using the EMG, suggesting the validity of our technique. We claim that this paradigm could be usable in patients because of its simplicity and the potential knowledge that can be extracted from clinical protocols.

  4. Spike-field activity in parietal area LIP during coordinated reach and saccade movements

    OpenAIRE

    Hagan, Maureen A.; Dean, Heather L.; Pesaran, Bijan

    2011-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex is situated between visual and motor areas and supports coordinated visually guided behavior. Area LIP in the intraparietal sulcus contains representations of visual space and has been extensively studied in the context of saccades. However, area LIP has not been studied during coordinated movements, so it is not known whether saccadic representations in area LIP are influenced by coordinated behavior. Here, we studied spiking and local field potential (LFP) acti...

  5. Reaching for health : The Australian women's health movement and public policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gray Jamieson, Gwendolyn

    2012-01-01

    The women’s health movement shocked and scandalised when it burst into Australian politics in the early 1970s. It cast the light of day onto taboo subjects such as sexual assault, abortion and domestic violence, provoking outrage and condemnation. Some of the services women created for themselves were subjected to police raids; sex education material was branded ‘indecent’. Moreover, women dared to criticise revered institutions, such as the medical system. Yet for all its perceived radicalis...

  6. Cineradiographic (video X-ray) analysis of skilled reaching in a single pellet reaching task provides insight into relative contribution of body, head, oral, and forelimb movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Leblond, Hugues; Rossignol, Serge; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2008-10-10

    The forelimb movements (skilled reaching) used by rats to reach for a single food pellet to place into the mouth have been used to model many neurological conditions. They have been described as a sequence of oppositions of head-pellet, paw-pellet and pellet-mouth that can be described as movements of the distal portion of body segments in relation to their fixed proximal joints. Movement scoring is difficult, however, because the location and movement of body segments is estimated through the overlying fur and skin, which is pliable and partially obscures movement. Using moderately high-speed cineradiographic filming from lateral, dorsal, and frontal perspectives, the present study describes how forelimb and skeletal bones move during the skilled reaching act. The analysis indicates that: (i) head movements for orienting to food, enabled by the vertical orientation of the rostral spinal cord, are mainly independent of trunk movement, (ii) skilled reaching consists of a sequence of upper arm and extremity movements each involving a number of concurrent limb segment and joint movements and (iii) food pellets are retrieved from the paw using either the incisors and/or tongue. The findings are discussed in relation to the idea that X-ray cinematography is valuable tool for assisting descriptive analysis and can contribute to understanding general principles of the relations between whole body, head, oral, and upper extremity movement. PMID:18514337

  7. Phase tuning properties of the Local Field Potentials during reach movements in the fronto-parietal areas PRR and PMd of rhesus monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Martinez-Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    The fronto-parietal reach network in primates comprises the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and the parietal reach region (PRR). The spiking activity of neurons in these areas is typically highly selective for the direction of a planned reach movement. For a large-enough population of motor-tuned neurons, the preferred movement direction (PD: direction of highest firing rate) of the individual neurons cover the full range of possible directions [1]. An important consequence of this heterogenity ...

  8. Adapting relative phase of bimanual isometric force coordination through scaling visual information intermittency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafe, Charley W; Pacheco, Matheus M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-06-01

    Visual information plays an adaptive role in the relation between bimanual force coupling and error corrective processes of isometric force control. In the present study, the evolving distribution of the relative phase properties of bimanual isometric force coupling was examined by scaling within a trial the temporal feedback rate of visual intermittency (short to long presentation intervals and vice versa). The force error (RMSE) was reduced, and time-dependent irregularity (SampEn) of the force output was increased with greater amounts of visual information (shorter intermittency). Multi-stable coordination patterns of bimanual isometric force control were differentially shifted toward and away from the intrinsic dynamics by the changing the intermittency of visual information. The distribution of Hilbert transformed relative phase values showed progressively a predominantly anti-phase mode under less intermittent visual information to predominantly an in-phase mode with limited (almost no) visual information. Correlation between the hands showed a continuous reduction, rather than abrupt "transition," with increase in visual information, although no mean negative correlation was realized, despite the tendency towards an anti-phase distribution. Lastly, changes in both the performance outcome and bimanual isometric force coordination occurred at visual feedback rates faster than the minimal visual processing times established from single limb movement and isometric force protocols. PMID:27017544

  9. Evaluating the User Experience of Exercising Reaching Motions With a Robot That Predicts Desired Movement Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2016-01-01

    The notion of an optimal difficulty during practice has been articulated in many areas of cognitive psychology: flow theory, the challenge point framework, and desirable difficulties. Delivering exercises at a participant's desired difficulty has the potential to improve both motor learning and users' engagement in therapy. Motivation and engagement are among the contributing factors to the success of exercise programs. The authors previously demonstrated that error amplification can be used to introduce levels of challenge into a robotic reaching task, and that machine-learning algorithms can dynamically adjust difficulty to the desired level with 85% accuracy. Building on these findings, we present the results of a proof-of-concept study investigating the impacts of practicing under desirable difficulty conditions. A control condition with a predefined random order for difficulty levels was deemed more suitable for this study (compared to constant or continuously increasing difficulty). By practicing the task at their desirable difficulties, participants in the experimental group perceived their performance at a significantly higher level and reported lower required effort to complete the task, in comparison to a control group. Moreover, based on self-reports, participants in the experimental group were willing, on average, to continue the training session for 4.6 more training blocks (∼45 min) compared to the control group's average. This study demonstrates the efficiency of delivering the exercises at the user's desired difficulty level to improve the user's engagement in exercise tasks. Future work will focus on clinical feasibility of this approach in increasing stroke survivors' engagement in their therapy programs. PMID:25945816

  10. Motor Prediction at the Edge of Instability: Alteration of Grip Force Control during Changes in Bimanual Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, Frederic; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of actions is fundamental for skilled motor behavior. We investigated whether motor prediction is influenced by the fact that some movements are easier to perform and stabilize than others. Twelve subjects performed a bimanual rhythmical task either symmetrically or asymmetrically (the latter being more difficult and…

  11. Encoding and Retrieval During Bimanual Rhythmic Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Kevin; Turvey, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2 experiments, bimanual 1:1 rhythmic coordination was performed concurrently with encoding or retrieval of word lists. Effects of divided attention (DA) on coordination were indexed by changes in mean relative phase and recurrence measures of shared activity between the 2 limbs. Effects of DA on memory were indexed by deficits in recall…

  12. Bimanual coupling paradigm as an effective tool to investigate productive behaviors in motor and body awareness impairments

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    Francesca eGarbarini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available When humans move simultaneously both hands strong coupling effects arise and neither of the two hands is able to perform independent actions. It has been suggested that such motor constraints are tightly linked to action representation rather than to movement execution. Hence, bimanual tasks can represent an ideal experimental tool to investigate internal motor representations in those neurological conditions in which the movement of one hand is impaired. Indeed, any effect on the ‘moving’ (healthy hand would be caused by the constraints imposed by the ongoing motor program of the ‘impaired’ hand. Here, we review recent studies that successfully utilized the above-mentioned paradigms to investigate some types of productive motor behaviors in stroke patients. Specifically, bimanual tasks have been employed in left hemiplegic patients who report illusory movements of their contralesional limbs (anosognosia for hemiplegia. They have also been administered to patients affected by a specific monothematic delusion of body ownership, namely the belief that another person’s arm and his/her voluntary action belong to them. In summary, the reviewed studies show that bimanual tasks are a simple and valuable experimental method apt to reveal information about the motor programs of a paralyzed limb. Therefore, it can be used to objectively examine the cognitive processes underpinning motor programming in patients with different delusions of motor behavior. Additionally, it also sheds light on the mechanisms subserving bimanual coordination in the intact brain suggesting that action representation might be sufficient to produce these effects.

  13. Bimanual Force Variability and Chronic Stroke: Asymmetrical Hand Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate force variability generated by both the paretic and non-paretic hands during bimanual force control. Nine chronic stroke individuals and nine age-matched individuals with no stroke history performed a force control task with both hands simultaneously. The task involved extending the wrist and fingers at 5%, 25%, and 50% of maximum voluntary contraction. Bimanual and unimanual force variability during bimanual force control was determined by calcula...

  14. Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery technique and clinical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman

    2009-01-01

    Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery has been introduced recently as a technique for cataract surgery and it is gaining interest of many cataract surgeons in the world. Over the last few years many changes were made in the phacoemulsification machines and the intraocular lenses design which allowed bimanual microincisional cataract surgery to be safer and more efficient. The purpose of this review is to introduce the technique of bimanual microincisional cataract surgery and to review al...

  15. Testing multiple coordination constraints with a novel bimanual visuomotor task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene M Sisti

    Full Text Available The acquisition of a new bimanual skill depends on several motor coordination constraints. To date, coordination constraints have often been tested relatively independently of one another, particularly with respect to isofrequency and multifrequency rhythms. Here, we used a new paradigm to test the interaction of multiple coordination constraints. Coordination constraints that were tested included temporal complexity, directionality, muscle grouping, and hand dominance. Twenty-two healthy young adults performed a bimanual dial rotation task that required left and right hand coordination to track a moving target on a computer monitor. Two groups were compared, either with or without four days of practice with augmented visual feedback. Four directional patterns were tested such that both hands moved either rightward (clockwise, leftward (counterclockwise, inward or outward relative to each other. Seven frequency ratios (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2, 1∶1, 2∶3. 1∶2, 1∶3 between the left and right hand were introduced. As expected, isofrequency patterns (1∶1 were performed more successfully than multifrequency patterns (non 1∶1. In addition, performance was more accurate when participants were required to move faster with the dominant right hand (1∶3, 1∶2 and 2∶3 than with the non-dominant left hand (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2. Interestingly, performance deteriorated as the relative angular velocity between the two hands increased, regardless of whether the required frequency ratio was an integer or non-integer. This contrasted with previous finger tapping research where the integer ratios generally led to less error than the non-integer ratios. We suggest that this is due to the different movement topologies that are required of each paradigm. Overall, we found that this visuomotor task was useful for testing the interaction of multiple coordination constraints as well as the release from these constraints with practice in the presence of

  16. Interhemispheric connectivity during bimanual isometric force generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Tazoe, Toshiki; Soteropoulos, Demetris S; Perez, Monica A

    2016-03-01

    Interhemispheric interactions through the corpus callosum play an important role in the control of bimanual forces. However, the extent to which physiological connections between primary motor cortices are modulated during increasing levels of bimanual force generation in intact humans remains poorly understood. Here we studied coherence between electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and the ipsilateral cortical silent period (iSP), two well-known measures of interhemispheric connectivity between motor cortices, during unilateral and bilateral 10%, 40%, and 70% of maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) into index finger abduction. We found that EEG-EEG coherence in the alpha frequency band decreased while the iSP area increased during bilateral compared with unilateral 40% and 70% but not 10% of MVC. Decreases in coherence in the alpha frequency band correlated with increases in the iSP area, and subjects who showed this inverse relation were able to maintain more steady bilateral muscle contractions. To further examine the relationship between the iSP and coherence we electrically stimulated the ulnar nerve at the wrist at the alpha frequency. Electrical stimulation increased coherence in the alpha frequency band and decreased the iSP area during bilateral 70% of MVC. Altogether, our findings demonstrate an inverse relation between alpha oscillations and the iSP during strong levels of bimanual force generation. We suggest that interactions between neural pathways mediating alpha oscillatory activity and transcallosal inhibition between motor cortices might contribute to the steadiness of strong bilateral isometric muscle contractions in intact humans. PMID:26538610

  17. Abnormal Sense of Agency in Patients with Schizophrenia: Evidence from Bimanual Coupling Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarini, Francesca; Mastropasqua, Angela; Sigaudo, Monica; Rabuffetti, Marco; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Pia, Lorenzo; Rocca, Paola

    2016-01-01

    A fruitful approach to the understanding the human awareness of action is the study of those pathologies in which some aspects of it are altered. Previous evidences showed that patients with schizophrenia tend to attribute someone else’ actions to their own, as internally, rather than externally, generated. Here, we asked whether schizophrenics have an “excessive” sense of agency, while observing others’ movements. We took advantage from the circles-lines task, known to show bimanual interferences. Twenty schizophrenics and 20 age-matched healthy controls were administered: (a) the bimanual version of the task: drawing lines with one hand and circles with the other; and (b) a modified version: drawing lines while observing the examiner drawing circles. In the bimanual version, patients and controls showed a comparable interference effect. In the observation version, schizophrenics, compared to controls, showed a significantly greater interference effect of the examiners’ hand drawing circles on the own hand drawing lines. This effect was significantly correlated to the strength of the positive symptoms (hallucinations and delusions) and to the alteration of the sense of agency, reported during the task. These findings suggest that an altered sense of agency, as shown by schizophrenics, can induce objective consequences on the motor system. PMID:27014005

  18. Vision of the active limb impairs bimanual motor tracking in young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu P. Boisgontier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intensive investigation of bimanual coordination, it remains unclear how directing vision toward either limb influences performance, and whether this influence is affected by age. To examine these questions, we assessed the performance of young and older adults on a bimanual tracking task in which they matched motor-driven movements of their right hand (passive limb with their left hand (active limb according to in-phase and anti-phase patterns. Performance in six visual conditions involving central vision, and/or peripheral vision of the active and/or passive limb was compared to performance in a no vision condition. Results indicated that directing central vision to the active limb consistently impaired performance, with higher impairment in older than young adults. Conversely, directing central vision to the passive limb improved performance in young adults, but less consistently in older adults. In conditions involving central vision of one limb and peripheral vision of the other limb, similar effects were found to those for conditions involving central vision of one limb only. Peripheral vision alone resulted in similar or impaired performance compared to the no vision condition. These results indicate that the locus of visual attention is critical for bimanual motor control in young and older adults, with older adults being either more impaired or less able to benefit from a given visual condition.

  19. Hand preference on unimanual and bimanual tasks in strepsirrhines: The case of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaiolli, Barbara; Spiezio, Caterina; Hopkins, William D

    2016-08-01

    Assessing manual lateralization in non-human primates could be an optimal way to understand the adaptive value of this asymmetry in humans. Though many studies have investigated hand preferences in Old and New World monkeys and apes, fewer studies have considered manual lateralization in strepsirrhines, especially in experimental tasks. This study investigated hand preferences for a unimanual and a bimanual task of 17 captive ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), housed at Parco Natura Viva (VR), Italy. The effect of age on handedness has been also investigated. The lemurs were tested on a unimanual task, in which subjects were restricted to using one hand to retrieve the food inside an apparatus, and on a bimanual task, in which lemurs had to use one hand to keep the apparatus door open while reaching with the other hand to retrieve the food inside it. At the population-level, our results revealed an asymmetrical hand use distribution, in particular a bias toward a right hand preference for food reaching in both the unimanual and the bimanual tasks. Furthermore, at the individual-level, the bimanual task seems to elicit a greater hand preference than the unimanual task. Results of this study underline the importance of experimental tasks in determining hand preference in strepsirrhines. Furthermore, as bimanual tasks elicited a stronger degree of lateralization, they appear to be more suited to investigate manual laterality. Finally, findings from this study highlight the presence of a right hand preference in ring-tailed lemurs, shedding new light on the evolution of human right handedness. Am. J. Primatol. 78:851-860, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27078687

  20. Brief communication: Hand preference for bimanual and unimanual feeding in captive gorillas: extension in a second colony of apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Megan

    2012-08-01

    Right-hand dominance is widely considered to be a uniquely human trait. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit similar population-level hand preferences remains a topic of considerable debate. Despite extensive research focusing on laterality in nonhuman primates, our interpretation of these studies is limited due to methodological issues including the lack of a common measure of hand preference and the use of tasks that may not be reliable indicators of handedness. The use of consistent methods between studies is necessary to enable comparisons within and between species and allow for more general conclusions to be drawn from these results. The present study replicates methods used in recent research reporting population-level right-handedness in captive gorillas (Meguerditchian et al.,2010). Observational data were collected on hand preference for unimanual and bimanual feeding in 14 captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Individual-level preferences were found, primarily for bimanual feeding; however, the data reveal no group-level directional bias (contra Meguerditchian et al.). Like the study by Meguerditchian et al. (2010), though, bimanual feeding revealed significantly stronger hand preferences than unimanual reaching, and age, sex, group membership, or rearing history had no effect on hand preference. Finally, variations in diet and corresponding grip type between studies suggest that hand preferences may vary across bimanual tasks depending on grip morphology. This study aims to contribute to our existing knowledge of primate laterality by increasing the number of individuals investigated using methods that allow for comparisons with similar research. PMID:22639326

  1. Moving & feeling: the modulation of tactile perception during goal-directed movements: Evidence from reaching, grasping, catching, & throwing

    OpenAIRE

    Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on tactile perception and aims at a comprehensive analysis of its characteristics over the time-course of various goal-directed movements. Tactile perception is assessed by means of discrimination and detection paradigms, as well as event-related potentials (ERPs). The main question investigated throughout the thesis is: ‘What changes in tactile perception, if any, take place over the time course of a goal-directed movement?’ In Chapter 2, the mechanisms related to such id...

  2. Choice reaching with a LEGO arm robot (CoRLEGO): The motor system guides visual attention to movement-relevant information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Soeren; Woodgate, Philip J W; Sami, Saber A; Heinke, Dietmar

    2015-12-01

    We present an extension of a neurobiologically inspired robotics model, termed CoRLEGO (Choice reaching with a LEGO arm robot). CoRLEGO models experimental evidence from choice reaching tasks (CRT). In a CRT participants are asked to rapidly reach and touch an item presented on the screen. These experiments show that non-target items can divert the reaching movement away from the ideal trajectory to the target item. This is seen as evidence attentional selection of reaching targets can leak into the motor system. Using competitive target selection and topological representations of motor parameters (dynamic neural fields) CoRLEGO is able to mimic this leakage effect. Furthermore if the reaching target is determined by its colour oddity (i.e. a green square among red squares or vice versa), the reaching trajectories become straighter with repetitions of the target colour (colour streaks). This colour priming effect can also be modelled with CoRLEGO. The paper also presents an extension of CoRLEGO. This extension mimics findings that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the motor cortex modulates the colour priming effect (Woodgate et al., 2015). The results with the new CoRLEGO suggest that feedback connections from the motor system to the brain's attentional system (parietal cortex) guide visual attention to extract movement-relevant information (i.e. colour) from visual stimuli. This paper adds to growing evidence that there is a close interaction between the motor system and the attention system. This evidence contradicts the traditional conceptualization of the motor system as the endpoint of a serial chain of processing stages. At the end of the paper we discuss CoRLEGO's predictions and also lessons for neurobiologically inspired robotics emerging from this work. PMID:26667353

  3. Proximal movements compensate for distal forelimb movement impairments in a reach-to-eat task in Huntington's disease: new insights into motor impairments in a real-world skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alexander; Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Dunnett, Stephen B; Whishaw, Ian Q; Nikkhah, Guido

    2011-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) causes severe motor impairments that are characterized by chorea, dystonia, and impaired fine motor control. The motor deficits include deficits in the control of the forelimb, but as yet there has been no comprehensive assessment of the impairments in arm, hand and digit movements as they are used in every-day tasks. The present study investigated the reaching of twelve HD subjects and twelve age-matched control subjects on a reach-to-eat task. The subjects were asked to reach for a small food item, with the left or the right hand, and then bring it to the mouth for eating. The task assesses the major features of skilled forelimb use, including orienting to a target, transport of the hand to a target, use of a precision grasp of the target, limb withdrawal to the mouth, and release of the food item into the mouth, and the integration of the movements into a smooth act. The movements were analyzed frame-by-frame by scoring the video record using an established movement element rating scale and by biometric analysis to describe limb trajectory. All HD subjects displayed greater reliance on more proximal movements in reaching. They also displayed overall jerkiness, a significant impairment in end point error correction (i.e. no smooth trajectories), deficits in timing and terminating motion (overshooting the target), impairments in rotation of the hand, abnormalities in grasping, and impairments in releasing the food item to the mouth. Although impairment in the control of the distal segments of the limb was common to all subjects, the intrusion of choreatic movements produced a pattern of highly variable performance between subjects. The quantification of reaching performance as measured by this analysis provides new insights into the impairments of HD subjects, allows an easily administered and inexpensive way to document the many skilled limb movement abnormalities, and relates the impairments to a real-world context. The protocol can

  4. Compensation or Restoration: Closed-Loop Feedback of Movement Quality for Assisted Reach-to-Grasp Exercises with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Florian; Naros, Georgios; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Assistive technology allows for intensive practice and kinematic measurements during rehabilitation exercises. More recent approaches attach a gravity-compensating multi-joint exoskeleton to the upper extremity to facilitate task-oriented training in three-dimensional space with virtual reality feedback. The movement quality, however, is mostly captured through end-point measures that lack information on proximal inter-joint coordination. This limits the differentiation between compensation strategies and genuine restoration both during the exercise and in the course of rehabilitation. We extended in this proof-of-concept study a commercially available seven degree-of-freedom arm exoskeleton by using the real-time sensor data to display a three-dimensional multi-joint visualization of the user's arm. Ten healthy subjects and three severely affected chronic stroke patients performed reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living assisted by the attached exoskeleton and received closed-loop online feedback of the three-dimensional movement in virtual reality. Patients in this pilot study differed significantly with regard to motor performance (accuracy, temporal efficiency, range of motion) and movement quality (proximal inter-joint coordination) from the healthy control group. In the course of 20 training and feedback sessions over 4 weeks, these pathological measures improved significantly toward the reference parameters of healthy participants. It was moreover feasible to capture the evolution of movement pattern kinematics of the shoulder and elbow and to quantify the individual degree of natural movement restoration for each patient. The virtual reality visualization and closed-loop feedback of joint-specific movement kinematics makes it possible to detect compensation strategies and may provide a tool to achieve the rehabilitation goals in accordance with the individual capacity for genuine functional restoration; a proposal that warrants

  5. Attentional Loads Associated with Interlimb Interactions Underlying Rhythmic Bimanual Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderikhoff, Arne; Peper, C. E.; Beek, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of rhythmic bimanual coordination under dual-task conditions revealed (1) a dependence of secondary task performance on the stability of coordinative tasks, in that secondary task performance was better during in-phase than antiphase coordination, and (2) a shift in the mean relative phasing between the limbs compared to single-task…

  6. Bimanual motor deficits in older adults predicted by diffusion tensor imaging metrics of corpus callosum subregions

    OpenAIRE

    Serbruyns, Leen; Gooijers, Jolien; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Meesen, Raf; Cuypers, Koen; Sisti, Helene; Leemans, Alexander; Swinnen, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Age-related changes in the microstructural organization of the corpus callosum (CC) may explain declines in bimanual motor performance associated with normal aging. We used diffusion tensor imaging in young (n = 33) and older (n = 33) adults to investigate the microstructural organization of seven specific CC subregions (prefrontal, premotor, primary motor, primary sensory, parietal, temporal and occipital). A set of bimanual tasks was used to assess various aspects of bimanual motor function...

  7. Bimanual robot manipulation and packaging of shoes in footwear industry

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J.; García-Aracil, Nicolás; Bormann, Richard; Fischer, Jan; Graf, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The present paper presents the ongoing research undertaken as a research experiment, called HERMES, inside Echord european integrated project framework. The goal of the HERMES experiment is to study, analyze and finally implement the packaging of shoes on a robot system that mimics the required degree of flexibility and dexterity provided by the human workers. The use of a bimanual system with anthropomorphic hands has been chosen as it could also be applied to solve other processes of simila...

  8. Hand preferences for coordinated bimanual actions in 777 great apes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, William D; Phillips, Kimberley A; Bania, Amanda;

    2011-01-01

    -level right-handedness in chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas, but left-handedness in orangutans. Directional biases in handedness were consistent across independent samples of apes within each genus. We suggest that, contrary to previous claims, population-level handedness is evident in great apes but differs......Whether or not nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable scientific debate. Here, we examined handedness for coordinated bimanual actions in a sample of 777 great apes including chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans. We found population...

  9. Complexity matching effects in bimanual and interpersonal syncopated finger tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coey, Charles A; Washburn, Auriel; Hassebrock, Justin; Richardson, Michael J

    2016-03-11

    The current study was designed to investigate complexity matching during syncopated behavioral coordination. Participants either tapped in (bimanual) syncopation using their two hands, or tapped in (interpersonal) syncopation with a partner, with each participant using one of their hands. The time series of inter-tap intervals (ITI) from each hand were submitted to fractal analysis, as well as to short-term and multi-timescale cross-correlation analyses. The results demonstrated that the fractal scaling of one hand's ITI was strongly correlated to that of the other hand, and this complexity matching effect was stronger in the bimanual condition than in the interpersonal condition. Moreover, the degree of complexity matching was predicted by the strength of short-term cross-correlation and the stability of the asynchrony between the two tapping series. These results suggest that complexity matching is not specific to the inphase synchronization tasks used in past research, but is a general result of coordination between complex systems. PMID:26840612

  10. Advanced Bimanual Manipulation Results from the DEXMART Project

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Dexterous and autonomous manipulation is a key technology for the personal and service robots of the future. Advances in Bimanual Manipulation edited by Bruno Siciliano provides the robotics community with the most noticeable results of the four-year European project DEXMART (DEXterous and autonomous dual-arm hand robotic manipulation with sMART sensory-motor skills: A bridge from natural to artificial cognition). The volume covers a host of highly important topics in the field, concerned with modelling and learning of human manipulation skills, algorithms for task planning, human-robot interaction, and grasping, as well as hardware design of dexterous anthropomorphic hands. The results described in this five-chapter collection are believed to pave the way towards the development of robotic systems endowed with dexterous and human-aware dual-arm/hand manipulation skills for objects, operating with a high degree of autonomy in unstructured real-world environments.

  11. Variability in bimanual wheelchair propulsion : consistency of two instrumented wheels during handrim wheelchair propulsion on a motor driven treadmill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Riemer J. K.; Lamoth, Claudine J.; de Groot, Sonja; Veeger, Dirkjan H. E. J.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Handrim wheelchair propulsion is a complex bimanual motor task. The bimanually applied forces on the rims determine the speed and direction of locomotion. Measurements of forces and torques on the handrim are important to study status and change of propulsion technique (and consequently

  12. Variability in bimanual wheelchair propulsion: consistency of two instrumented wheels during handrim wheelchair propulsion on a motor driven treadmill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, R.J.K.; Lamoth, C.J.; De Groot, S.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Van der Woude, L.H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Handrim wheelchair propulsion is a complex bimanual motor task. The bimanually applied forces on the rims determine the speed and direction of locomotion. Measurements of forces and torques on the handrim are important to study status and change of propulsion technique (and consequently m

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics of the corpus callosum in relation to bimanual coordination : Effect of task complexity and sensory feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooijers, Jolien; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Sisti, Helene M.; Geurts, Monique; Heitger, Marcus H.; Leemans, Alexander; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2013-01-01

    When manipulating objects with both hands, the corpus callosum (CC) is of paramount importance for interhemispheric information exchange. Hence, CC damage results in impaired bimanual performance. Here, healthy young adults performed a complex bimanual dial rotation task with or without augmented vi

  14. HMM and IOHMM for the Recognition of Mono- and Bi-Manual 3D Hand Gestures

    OpenAIRE

    Just, Agnès; Bernier, O.; Marcel, Sébastien

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the recognition of isolated complex mono- and bi-manual hand gestures. In the proposed system, hand gestures are represented by the 3D trajectories of blobs obtained by tracking colored body parts. In this paper, we study the results obtained on a complex database of mono- and bi-manual gestures. These results are obtained by using Input/Output Hidden Markov Model (IOHMM), implemented within the framework of an open source machine learning library, and...

  15. Recognition of Isolated Complex Mono- and Bi-Manual 3D Hand Gestures

    OpenAIRE

    Just, Agnès; Bernier, O.; Marcel, Sébastien

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the recognition of isolated complex mono- and bi-manual hand gestures. In the proposed system, hand gestures are represented by the 3D trajectories of blobs. Blobs are obtained by tracking colored body parts in real-time using the EM algorithm. In most of the studies on hand gestures, only small vocabularies have been used. In this paper, we study the results obtained on a more complex database of mono- and bi-manual gestures. These results are obtaine...

  16. Physiology and prospects of bimanual tracheoesophageal brass instrument play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, F J M; Dirven, R; Jacobi, I; van den Brekel, M W M

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether trachea pressures during brass instrument play of laryngectomised patients are within the range of those measured during tracheoesophageal voicing, and whether application of an automatic speaking valve can 'free' both hands to play a brass instrument. Objective assessment of voicing and music playing parameters was carried out in 2 laryngectomised patients with a low-pressure indwelling voice-prosthesis able to play brass instruments (tenor horn and slide trombone): sound pressure levels in dB, maximum phonation time in seconds and trachea pressures in mmHg; videofluoroscopy, stroboscopy and digital high speed endoscopy to assess neoglottis vibration and opening. The dynamic range of the voice in the patients was 29 and 20 dB, and maximum phonation time was 22 and 19 sec, respectively; intratracheal pressures during voicing varied from 7 mmHg for the softest /a/ to 49 mmHg for the loudest /a/. For brass instrument play, the intratracheal pressures varied from 14 mmHg for the softest tone to 48 mmHg for the loudest tone. Imaging confirmed earlier findings that the neoglottis is closing and vibrating during voicing and remains 'open' without vibrations during music play, indicating good neoglottis control and innervation. From these objective measurements, we can conclude that trachea pressures during brass instrument play are within physiological ranges for tracheoesophageal voicing with a low-pressure indwelling voice-prosthesis. Furthermore, it was shown that application of a stable baseplate for retaining an automatic speaking valve and an additional customisable 'neck brace' makes bimanual play possible again. PMID:26246666

  17. Hand Preference for Pointing Gestures and Bimanual Manipulation around the Vocabulary Spurt Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet, Helene; Jover, Marianne; Vauclair, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the development of hand preference for bimanual manipulative activities and pointing gestures in toddlers observed longitudinally over a 5-month period, in relation to language acquisition. The lexical spurt was found to be accompanied by an increase in the right-sided bias for pointing but not for manipulation. Moreover,…

  18. Brain Plasticity following Intensive Bimanual Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: Preliminary Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Weinstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity studies examining children with hemiparesis (CH have focused predominantly on unilateral interventions. CH also have bimanual coordination impairments with bimanual interventions showing benefits. We explored neuroplasticity following hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT of 60 hours in twelve CH (6 females, mean age 11 ± 3.6 y. Serial behavioral evaluations and MR imaging including diffusion tensor (DTI and functional (fMRI imaging were performed before, immediately after, and at 6-week follow-up. Manual skills were assessed repeatedly with the Assisting Hand Assessment, Children’s Hand Experience Questionnaire, and Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Beta values, indicating the level of activation, and lateralization index (LI, indicating the pattern of brain activation, were computed from fMRI. White matter integrity of major fibers was assessed using DTI. 11/12 children showed improvement after intervention in at least one measure, with 8/12 improving on two or more tests. Changes were retained in 6/8 children at follow-up. Beta activation in the affected hemisphere increased at follow-up, and LI increased both after intervention and at follow-up. Correlations between LI and motor function emerged after intervention. Increased white matter integrity was detected in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract after intervention in about half of the participants. Results provide first evidence for neuroplasticity changes following bimanual intervention in CH.

  19. Brain Plasticity following Intensive Bimanual Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: Preliminary Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Maya; Myers, Vicki; Green, Dido; Schertz, Mitchell; Shiran, Shelly I.; Geva, Ronny; Artzi, Moran; Gordon, Andrew M.; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    Neuroplasticity studies examining children with hemiparesis (CH) have focused predominantly on unilateral interventions. CH also have bimanual coordination impairments with bimanual interventions showing benefits. We explored neuroplasticity following hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) of 60 hours in twelve CH (6 females, mean age 11 ± 3.6 y). Serial behavioral evaluations and MR imaging including diffusion tensor (DTI) and functional (fMRI) imaging were performed before, immediately after, and at 6-week follow-up. Manual skills were assessed repeatedly with the Assisting Hand Assessment, Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire, and Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Beta values, indicating the level of activation, and lateralization index (LI), indicating the pattern of brain activation, were computed from fMRI. White matter integrity of major fibers was assessed using DTI. 11/12 children showed improvement after intervention in at least one measure, with 8/12 improving on two or more tests. Changes were retained in 6/8 children at follow-up. Beta activation in the affected hemisphere increased at follow-up, and LI increased both after intervention and at follow-up. Correlations between LI and motor function emerged after intervention. Increased white matter integrity was detected in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract after intervention in about half of the participants. Results provide first evidence for neuroplasticity changes following bimanual intervention in CH. PMID:26640717

  20. Bimanual motor deficits in older adults predicted by diffusion tensor imaging metrics of corpus callosum subregions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serbruyns, L.; Gooijers, J.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Meesen, R. L.; Cuypers, K.; Sisti, H. M.; Leemans, A.; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes in the microstructural organization of the corpus callosum (CC) may explain declines in bimanual motor performance associated with normal aging. We used diffusion tensor imaging in young (n = 33) and older (n = 33) adults to investigate the microstructural organization of seven s

  1. Reversal of Handedness Effects on Bimanual Coordination in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, G. M.; Ringenbach, S. D. R.; Jung, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research on unimanual tasks suggested that motor asymmetries between hands may be reduced in people with Down syndrome. Our study examined handedness (as assessed by hand performance) and perceptual-motor integration effects on bimanual coordination. Methods: Adults with Down syndrome (13 non-right-handed, 22 right-handed), along with…

  2. Stability of bimanual coordination in Parkinson's disease and cognitive modulation of intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, RH

    2001-01-01

    The functional integrity of the bimanual neuro-motor system of Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects (stage II) compared to controls (2 X n = 16) was evaluated by measures of coordination stability of tapping in in-phase, anti-phase, and 90 degrees -phase. Recently, intentional influence was modeled as

  3. Manual Specialisation and Tool Use in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): The Effect of Unimanual and Bimanual Strategies on Hand Preference

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, William D.; Rabinowitz, Deborah M.

    1997-01-01

    Hand preference for tool use was assessed in a sample of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Whether the subjects solved the tool task using either a unimanual or coordinated bimanual strategy was manipulated in the chimpanzees. No population-level hand preference was found for tool use when unimanual strategies were used by the chimpanzees. However, a population-level right-hand bias was found when coordinated bimanual actions were required of the chimpanzees. A significant correlation wa...

  4. Reaching into Pictorial Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Robert; Vishwanath, Dhanraj; Domini, Fulvio

    2014-02-01

    While binocular viewing of 2D pictures generates an impression of 3D objects and space, viewing a picture monocularly through an aperture produces a more compelling impression of depth and the feeling that the objects are "out there", almost touchable. Here, we asked observers to actually reach into pictorial space under both binocular- and monocular-aperture viewing. Images of natural scenes were presented at different physical distances via a mirror-system and their retinal size was kept constant. Targets that observers had to reach for in physical space were marked on the image plane, but at different pictorial depths. We measured the 3D position of the index finger at the end of each reach-to-point movement. Observers found the task intuitive. Reaching responses varied as a function of both pictorial depth and physical distance. Under binocular viewing, responses were mainly modulated by the different physical distances. Instead, under monocular viewing, responses were modulated by the different pictorial depths. Importantly, individual variations over time were minor, that is, observers conformed to a consistent pictorial space. Monocular viewing of 2D pictures thus produces a compelling experience of an immersive space and tangible solid objects that can be easily explored through motor actions.

  5. SURGICAL AND VISUAL OUTCOME OF PHACOEMULSIFICATION SURGERY (ROUTINE AND MICRO - PHACO (BIMANUAL PHACO: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery has evolved over the past few decades with progressive decrease in the size of the incision. Originally from 12 mm intracapsular incision to bimanual phacoemulsification (Micro - Phaco that has incision size of just 700 microns. In the pres ent comparative PROSPECTIVE study best corrected visual acuity postoperatively and surgically induced astigmatism were compared in routine Phacoemulsification technique and bimanual phaco (Micro - Phaco 60 eyes were studied. There was no statistically signi ficant difference in postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA of patients operated with Micro - Phaco or routine Phacoemulsification. There was difference in surgically induced astigmatism (SIA ; average SIA in microphaco was 0.5972 as against 0.832 8 in routine Phacoemulsification.

  6. Digitartic: bi-manual gestural control of articulation in performative singing synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Feugère, Lionel; D'Alessandro, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    ISSN 2220-4806. International audience Digitartic, a system for bi-manual gestural control of Vowel- Consonant-Vowel performative singing synthesis is presented. This system is an extension of a real-time gesture-controlled vowel singing instrument developed in the Max MSP language. In addition to pitch, vowels and voice strength controls, Digitartic is designed for gestural control of articulation parameters, including various places and manners of articulation. The phases of articulat...

  7. SPad: A Bimanual Interaction Technique for Productivity Applications on Multi-touch Tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Foucault, Cédric; Micaux, Manfred; Bonnet, David; Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel

    2014-01-01

    SPad is a new bimanual interaction technique designed to improve productivity on multi-touch tablets: the user activates quasimodes with the thumb of the non-dominant hand while holding the device with that hand and interacts with the content with the dominant hand. The paper describes the design of SPad and a tablet application that demonstrates how it enables faster, more direct and more powerful interaction without increasing complexity.

  8. Lensectomy using a bimanual microincision cataract surgery technique during pars plana vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Suk Ho; Kwon, Oh W

    2009-01-01

    Lens extraction during vitrectomy is sometimes necessary to obtain an adequate view of the retina. Currently, phacoemulsification through a clear corneal incision with implantation of a foldable intraocular lens has become the preferred technique for cataract extraction during pars plana vitrectomy. The authors described the technique of lensectomy using a bimanual microincisional cataract surgery technique during pars plana vitrectomy and insertion of the intraocular lens at the end of surgery, which has several advantages over conventional coaxial phacoemulsification procedures. PMID:19205506

  9. Contextual Interference in Complex Bimanual Skill Learning Leads to Better Skill Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Pauwels; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Iseult A M Beets

    2014-01-01

    The contextual interference (CI) effect is a robust phenomenon in the (motor) skill learning literature. However, CI has yielded mixed results in complex task learning. The current study addressed whether the CI effect is generalizable to bimanual skill learning, with a focus on the temporal evolution of memory processes. In contrast to previous studies, an extensive training schedule, distributed across multiple days of practice, was provided. Participants practiced three frequency ratios ac...

  10. Bimanual coordination and the intermittency of visual information in isometric force tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafe, Charley W; Pacheco, Matheus M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intermittency of visual information in the bimanual coordination of an isometric force coordination task was investigated as a function of criterion force level. Eight levels of visual information intermittency (.2-25.6 Hz) were used in blocked fashion at each force level. Participants were required to produce a constant force output matching as accurately as possible the criterion force target. The results showed that performance improved as the intermittency of visual information was reduced-this effect being a function of force level. The distribution of the relative phase through the trial revealed a preference for the two hands to be coupled together (in-phase) at the slower rates of visual presentation (~.2 Hz). However, as the rate of visual feedback was increased (up to ~25.6 Hz), there was a transition to predominantly a negative correlation pattern (anti-phase). The pattern of bimanual coordination in this isometric tracking task is driven by the availability of information for error correction and the interactive influence of perceptual-motor constraints. PMID:26960740

  11. Proprioceptive bimanual test in intrinsic and extrinsic coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iandolo, Riccardo; Squeri, Valentina; De Santis, Dalia; Giannoni, Psiche; Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Is there any difference between matching the position of the hands by asking the subjects to move them to the same spatial location or to mirror-symmetric locations with respect to the body midline? If the motion of the hands were planned in the extrinsic space, the mirror-symmetric task would imply an additional challenge, because we would need to flip the coordinates of the target on the other side of the workspace. Conversely, if the planning were done in intrinsic coordinates, in order to move both hands to the same spot in the workspace, we should compute different joint angles for each arm. Even if both representations were available to the subjects, the two tasks might lead to different results, providing some cue on the organization of the "body schema". In order to answer such questions, the middle fingertip of the non-dominant hand of a population of healthy subjects was passively moved by a manipulandum to 20 different target locations. Subjects matched these positions with the middle fingertip of their dominant hand. For most subjects, the matching accuracy was higher in the extrinsic modality both in terms of systematic error and variability, even for the target locations in which the configuration of the arms was the same for both modalities. This suggests that the matching performance of the subjects could be determined not only by proprioceptive information but also by the cognitive representation of the task: expressing the goal as reaching for the physical location of the hand in space is apparently more effective than requiring to match the proprioceptive representation of joint angles. PMID:25741268

  12. Rapid Plasticity of Motor Corticospinal system with Robotic Reach Training

    OpenAIRE

    Kantak, Shailesh S.; Jones-Lush, Lauren M.; Narayanan, Priya; Judkins, Timothy N.; Wittenberg, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Goal-directed reaching is important for activities of daily living. Populations of neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1) that project to spinal motor circuits are known to represent kinematics of reaching movements. We investigated whether repetitive practice of goal-directed reaching movements induces use-dependent plasticity of those kinematic characteristics, in a manner similar to finger movements, as had been shown previously. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used over the ...

  13. When visuo-motor incongruence aids motor performance : the effect of perceiving motion structures during transformed visual feedback on bimanual coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, H; Buekers, MJ; Zaal, FT; Swinnen, SP

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments are reported in which bimanual coordination tasks were performed under correct and transformed visual feedback conditions. Participants were to generate cyclical line-drawing patterns, with varying degrees of coordinative stability, while perceiving correct or transformed visual info

  14. Reaching with the sixth sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Bülthoff, Heinrich H;

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system constitutes the silent sixth sense: It automatically triggers a variety of vital reflexes to maintain postural and visual stability. Beyond their role in reflexive behavior, vestibular afferents contribute to several perceptual and cognitive functions and also support...... voluntary control of movements by complementing the other senses to accomplish the movement goal. Investigations into the neural correlates of vestibular contribution to voluntary action in humans are challenging and have progressed far less than research on corresponding visual and proprioceptive...... involvement. Here, we demonstrate for the first time with event-related TMS that the posterior part of the right medial intraparietal sulcus processes vestibular signals during a goal-directed reaching task with the dominant right hand. This finding suggests a qualitative difference between the processing...

  15. Segmental Trunk Control Acquisition and Reaching in Typically Developing Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwani, Jaya; Santamaria, Victor; Saavedra, Sandra L.; Wood, Stacy; Porter, Francine; Woollacott, Marjorie H.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the influence of an external support at the thoracic and pelvic level of the trunk on the success of reaching, postural stability and reaching kinematics while infants reached for a toy. Seventeen infants (4–6 months) were clustered into two groups according to their trunk control assessed with the Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control (SATCo). Major differences were seen between groups with pelvic support, whereas with thoracic support, all infants showed similar quality reaching behaviours. With the external pelvic support, infants who had acquired trunk control in the lumbar region were more accurate in their reaching movements (less movement time, improved straightness of reach, less movement units and path length per movement unit) and were more stable (decreased trunk and head displacement) during a reach than infants that had only acquired trunk control in the thoracic region. These results support the hypothesis that trunk control influences the quality of reaching behaviour. PMID:23681292

  16. Reach Address Database (RAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores the reach address of each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams,...

  17. Influência do tamanho e da rigidez dos objetos nos ajustes proximais e distais do alcance de lactentes Influence of object size and rigidity on proximal and distal adjustments to infant reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NACF Rocha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Estudos têm identificado que as propriedades dos objetos induzem os ajustes no alcance; no entanto, poucos investigaram a influência específica do tamanho e rigidez dos objetos em lactentes jovens. OBJETIVO: Verificar se lactentes de 4 a 6 meses realizam ajustes proximais e distais ao alcançarem objetos de diferentes tamanhos e rigidez. MÉTODOS: Nove lactentes saudáveis foram posicionados em uma cadeira inclinada a 50º. Quatro objetos foram apresentados, um rígido grande (RG, um rígido pequeno (RP, um maleável grande (MG e um maleável pequeno (MP, por um período de 1 minuto cada. Em um total de 384 alcances, foram analisados os ajustes proximais (alcance uni e bimanual e distais (orientação da mão horizontal, vertical e oblíqua; mão aberta, fechada e semi-aberta e o sucesso do alcance dos objetos. RESULTADOS: Constatou-se ajuste bimanual para o objeto RG e unimanual para os demais. A orientação da mão oblíqua foi predominante no toque dos objetos, enquanto para a preensão dos mesmos, a predominância foi a vertical, principalmente para o objeto RG. A orientação horizontal não foi observada na preensão do objeto RG. A mão semi-aberta foi mais freqüente no início do alcance para todos os objetos, enquanto no toque do objeto RG a mão aberta foi predominante. O sucesso do alcance foi maior para os objetos maleáveis (MG, MP do que para os rígidos (RG e RP. CONCLUSÃO: Lactentes jovens estudados são capazes de planejar e ajustar seus movimentos baseados na percepção das propriedades físicas dos objetos, o que sugere interação percepção-ação.BACKGROUND: Studies have identified that object properties lead to adjustments to reaching. However, few have investigated the specific influence of object size and rigidity among young infants. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether four to six-month-old infants make proximal and distal adjustments when reaching for objects of different sizes and rigidity. METHOD

  18. The effects of intensive bimanual training with and without tactile training on tactile function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsing-Ching; Gordon, Andrew M.; Henrionnet, Aline; Hautfenne, Sylvie; Friel, Kathleen M.; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP) often have tactile impairments. Intensive bimanual training improves the motor abilities, but the effects on the sensory system have not been studied. Here we compare the effects of bimanual training with and without tactile training on tactile impairments. Twenty children with USCP (6–15.5 years; MACS: I–III) were randomized to receive either bimanual therapy (HABIT) or HABIT + tactile training (HABIT + T). All participants received 82 h of standardized HABIT. In addition 8 sessions of 1 h were provided to both groups. The HABIT + T group received tactile training (without vision) using materials of varied shapes and textures. The HABIT group received training with the same materials without tactile directed training (full vision). Primary outcomes included grating orientation task/GOT and stereognosis. Secondary outcomes included two-point discrimination/TPD, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments/SWM. The GOT improved in both groups after training, while stereognosis of the more-affected hand tended to improve (but p = 0.063). No changes were found in the TPD and the SWM. There were no group × test interactions for any measure. We conclude tactile spatial resolution can improve after bimanual training. Either intensive bimanual training alone or incorporation of materials with a diversity of shapes/textures may drive these changes. PMID:26698408

  19. Structured movement representations of a phantom limb associated with phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumi, Michihiro; Sumitani, Masahiko; Wake, Naoki; Sano, Yuko; Ichinose, Akimichi; Kumagaya, Shin-Ichiro; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo; Morioka, Shu

    2015-09-25

    The relation between phantom limb pain (PLP) and the movement representation of a phantom limb remains controversial in several areas of neurorehabilitation, although there are a few studies in which the representation of phantom limb movement was precisely evaluated. We evaluated the structured movement representation of a phantom limb objectively using a bimanual circle-line coordination task. We then investigated the relation between PLP and the structured movement representation. Nine patients with a brachial plexus avulsion injury were enrolled who perceived a phantom limb and had neuropathic pain. While blindfolded, the participants repeatedly drew vertical lines using the intact hand and intended to draw circles using the phantom limb simultaneously. "Drawing of circles" by the phantom limb resulted in an oval transfiguration of the vertical lines ("bimanual coupling" effect). We used an arbitrary ovalization index (OI) to quantify the oval transfiguration. When the OI neared 100%, the trajectory changed toward becoming more circular. A significant negative correlation was observed between the intensity of PLP and the OI (r=-0.66, pphantom limb are necessary for alleviating PLP. PMID:26272300

  20. Contextual interference in complex bimanual skill learning leads to better skill persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Pauwels

    Full Text Available The contextual interference (CI effect is a robust phenomenon in the (motor skill learning literature. However, CI has yielded mixed results in complex task learning. The current study addressed whether the CI effect is generalizable to bimanual skill learning, with a focus on the temporal evolution of memory processes. In contrast to previous studies, an extensive training schedule, distributed across multiple days of practice, was provided. Participants practiced three frequency ratios across three practice days following either a blocked or random practice schedule. During the acquisition phase, better overall performance for the blocked practice group was observed, but this difference diminished as practice progressed. At immediate and delayed retention, the random practice group outperformed the blocked practice group, except for the most difficult frequency ratio. Our main finding is that the random practice group showed superior performance persistence over a one week time interval in all three frequency ratios compared to the blocked practice group. This study contributes to our understanding of learning, consolidation and memory of complex motor skills, which helps optimizing training protocols in future studies and rehabilitation settings.

  1. Fusion of Haptic and Gesture Sensors for Rehabilitation of Bimanual Coordination and Dexterous Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningbo Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Disabilities after neural injury, such as stroke, bring tremendous burden to patients, families and society. Besides the conventional constrained-induced training with a paretic arm, bilateral rehabilitation training involves both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the neural injury, fitting well with the fact that both arms are needed in common activities of daily living (ADLs, and can promote good functional recovery. In this work, the fusion of a gesture sensor and a haptic sensor with force feedback capabilities has enabled a bilateral rehabilitation training therapy. The Leap Motion gesture sensor detects the motion of the healthy hand, and the omega.7 device can detect and assist the paretic hand, according to the designed cooperative task paradigm, as much as needed, with active force feedback to accomplish the manipulation task. A virtual scenario has been built up, and the motion and force data facilitate instantaneous visual and audio feedback, as well as further analysis of the functional capabilities of the patient. This task-oriented bimanual training paradigm recruits the sensory, motor and cognitive aspects of the patient into one loop, encourages the active involvement of the patients into rehabilitation training, strengthens the cooperation of both the healthy and impaired hands, challenges the dexterous manipulation capability of the paretic hand, suits easy of use at home or centralized institutions and, thus, promises effective potentials for rehabilitation training.

  2. Contextual interference in complex bimanual skill learning leads to better skill persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Lisa; Swinnen, Stephan P; Beets, Iseult A M

    2014-01-01

    The contextual interference (CI) effect is a robust phenomenon in the (motor) skill learning literature. However, CI has yielded mixed results in complex task learning. The current study addressed whether the CI effect is generalizable to bimanual skill learning, with a focus on the temporal evolution of memory processes. In contrast to previous studies, an extensive training schedule, distributed across multiple days of practice, was provided. Participants practiced three frequency ratios across three practice days following either a blocked or random practice schedule. During the acquisition phase, better overall performance for the blocked practice group was observed, but this difference diminished as practice progressed. At immediate and delayed retention, the random practice group outperformed the blocked practice group, except for the most difficult frequency ratio. Our main finding is that the random practice group showed superior performance persistence over a one week time interval in all three frequency ratios compared to the blocked practice group. This study contributes to our understanding of learning, consolidation and memory of complex motor skills, which helps optimizing training protocols in future studies and rehabilitation settings. PMID:24960171

  3. Control of Integrated Task Sequences Shapes Components of Reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Priya; Whitall, Jill; Kagerer, Florian A

    2016-01-01

    Reaching toward an object usually consists of a sequence of elemental actions. Using a reaching task sequence, the authors investigated how task elements of that sequence affected feedforward and feedback components of the reaching phase of the movement. Nine right-handed adults performed, with their dominant and nondominant hands, 4 tasks of different complexities: a simple reaching task; a reach-to-grasp task; a reach-to-grasp and lift object task; and a reach-to-grasp, lift, and place object task. Results showed that in the reach-to-grasp and lift object task more time was allocated to the feedforward component of the reach phase, while latency between the task elements decreased. We also found between-hand differences, supporting previous findings of increased efficiency of processing planning-related information in the preferred hand. The presence of task-related modifications supports the concept of contextual effects when planning a movement. PMID:27254601

  4. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  5. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  6. Reaching Your Fitness Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Reaching Your Fitness Goals You’ll begin to see results in ... longer, and more easily. As you increase your fitness level, you also might find that you need ...

  7. Feldenkrais sensory imagery and forward reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P A; Rogers, D K

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sensory imagery on subsequent movement, a unilateral Fleldenkrais lesson of imaging a soft bristle brush passing over one half of the body and in which no movement occurred, was given to 12 naive subjects. Forward flexion for each side of the body was measured at a sit-and-reach box. For 8 and 10 subjects who reported the perception of a side as being longer and lighter following the sensory imagery, there was also a significant increase in the forward flexion range on that side. PMID:11153843

  8. Do bimanual coordination, tool use, and body posture contribute equally to hand preferences in bonobos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardo, Ameline; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Meunier, Hélène

    2015-05-01

    Approximately 90% of the human population is right-handed. The emergence of this hand preference in humans is thought to be linked to the ability to execute complex tasks and habitual bipedalism. In order to test these hypotheses, the present study explored, for the first time, hand preference in relation to both body posture (seated and bipedal) and task complexity (bimanual coordination and two tool use tasks of different complexity) in bonobos (Pan paniscus). Few studies have explored the effects of both posture and task complexity on handedness, and investigations with bonobos are scarce, particularly studies on tool use. Our study aims to overcome such a gap by addressing two main questions: 1) Does a bipedal posture increase the strength of hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? 2) Independent of body posture, does task complexity increase the strength of the hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? Our results show that independent of body posture, the more complex the task, the more lateralization occurred. Moreover, subjects tended to be right-handed for tasks involving tool use. However, posture had no significant effect on hand preference in the tasks tested here. Therefore, for a given task, bonobos were not more lateralized in a bipedal posture than in a seated one. Task complexity might thus have contributed more than bipedal posture to the emergence of human lateralization and the preponderance of right-handedness, although a larger sample size and more data are needed to be conclusive. PMID:25870160

  9. Rapid plasticity of motor corticospinal system with robotic reach training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, S S; Jones-Lush, L M; Narayanan, P; Judkins, T N; Wittenberg, G F

    2013-09-01

    Goal-directed reaching is important for the activities of daily living. Populations of neurons in the primary motor cortex that project to spinal motor circuits are known to represent the kinematics of reaching movements. We investigated whether repetitive practice of goal-directed reaching movements induces use-dependent plasticity of those kinematic characteristics, in a manner similar to finger movements, as had been shown previously. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to evoke upper extremity movements while the forearm was resting in a robotic cradle. Plasticity was measured by the change in kinematics of these evoked movements following goal-directed reaching practice. Baseline direction of TMS-evoked arm movements was determined for each subject. Subjects then practiced three blocks of 160 goal-directed reaching movements in a direction opposite to the baseline direction (14 cm reach 180° from baseline direction) against a 75-Nm spring field. Changes in TMS-evoked whole arm movements were assessed after each practice block and after 5 min following the end of practice. Direction and the position of the point of peak velocity of TMS-evoked movements were significantly altered following training and at a 5-min interval following training, while amplitude did not show significant changes. This was accompanied by changes in the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the shoulder and elbow agonist muscles that partly explained the change in direction, mainly by increase in agonist MEP, without significant changes in antagonists. These findings demonstrate that the arm representation accessible by motor cortical stimulation under goes rapid plasticity induced by goal-directed robotic reach training in healthy subjects. PMID:23669007

  10. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  11. Bimanual elbow robotic orthoses: preliminary investigations on an impairment force feedback rehabilitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Herrnstadt

    2015-03-01

    The protocol was designed to engage the user in an assortment of static and dynamic arm matching and opposing tasks. The training incorporates force feedback movements, force feedback positioning, and force matching tasks with same and opposite direction movements. We are able to suggest identification

  12. Coding and Interpreting Movement on the Rorschach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holaday, Margot

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 26 Rorschach experts and 19 students of Rorschach use was conducted to help students using the Exner Comprehensive System determine whether to code movement for nouns with definitions that include movement. Experts and students did not reach agreement, but a literature review suggests such nouns should often be coded as movement. (SLD)

  13. Reaching Beyond The Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mariah; Rosenthal, L.; Gaughan, A.; Hopkins, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strawbridge Observatory at Haverford College is home to a undergraduate-led public observing program. Our program holds ~once monthly public events throughout the academic year that take advantage of eyepiece observing on our 16-inch and 12-inch telescopes as well as of the classroom, library, and projection system. These resources allow us to organize a variety of astronomy related activities that are engaging for individuals of all ages: accessible student talks, current film screenings and even arts and crafts for the families who attend with young children. These events aim to spark curiosity in others about scientific discovery and about the remarkable nature of the world in which we live. In addition to exciting local families about astronomy, this program has excited Haverford students from a range of disciplines about both science and education. Being entirely student led means that we are able to take the initiative in planning, coordinating and running all events, fostering an atmosphere of collaboration, experimentation and commitment amongst our volunteers. Additionally, this program is one of the few at Haverford that regularly reaches beyond the campus walls to promote and build relationships with the outside community. In light of this, our program presents a distinctive and enlightening opportunity for student volunteers: we get to use our scientific backgrounds to educate a general audience, while also learning from them about how to communicate and inspire in others the excitement we feel about the subject of astronomy. The work on this project has been supported by NSF AST-1151462.

  14. UX-15 Reaches LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The creation of the world's largest sandstone cavern, not a small feat! At the bottom, cave-in preventing steel mesh can be seen clinging to the top of the tunnel. The digging of UX-15, the cavern that will house ATLAS, reached the upper ceiling of LEP on October 10th. The breakthrough which took place nearly 100 metres underground occurred precisely on schedule and exactly as planned. But much caution was taken beforehand to make the LEP breakthrough clean and safe. To prevent the possibility of cave-ins in the side tunnels that will eventually be attached to the completed UX-15 cavern, reinforcing steel mesh was fixed into the walls with bolts. Obviously no people were allowed in the LEP tunnels below UX-15 as the breakthrough occurred. The area was completely evacuated and fences were put into place to keep all personnel out. However, while personnel were being kept out of the tunnels below, this has been anything but the case for the work taking place up above. With the creation of the world's largest...

  15. Effects of target location and uncertainty on reaching movements in standing position Los efectos de la ubicación de la diana y la incertidumbre en los movimientos de alcance en la posición vertical Efeitos da localização do alvo e da incerteza em movimentos de alcance na postura ereta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz de França Bahia Loureiro Junior

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of target location and uncertainty of target position on reaching movements while standing were investigated. Ten healthy, right-handed adults stood facing a 17'' touchscreen. They were instructed to press with their right index fingertip a push bottom and touch the center of the target displayed on the screen after it was lighted on, moving quickly their arm. The target was shown either ipsi- or contralateral to the right arm and either in a certain or uncertain position. Reaction time (RT, movement time (MT, and radial error (RE were assessed. Results revealed shorter RT (≈ 35 ms and smaller RE (≈ 0.19 cm for certain than for uncertain condition and slightly longer RT (≈ 8 ms and MT (≈ 18 ms for reaches towards the contralateral target. In conclusion, the findings of this study showing the effect of uncertainty of target location as well as target position are also applied to arm reaching in standing position.Los efectos de la ubicación de la diana y la incertidumbre acerca de la posición de la diana en los movimientos de alcance fueron investigados. Diez adultos sanos y diestros estaban frente a una pantalla táctil de 17''. Se les instruyó para presionar un interruptor con el dedo índice derecho y tocar el centro de la diana que aparece en la pantalla después de haber sido iluminado, moviéndo rápidamente su miembro superior. La diana fue mostrada ya sea ipsi o contralateralmente y los participantes tenían o no certidumbre sobre la posición de la misma. El tiempo de reacción (TR, el tiempo de movimiento (TM, y el error radial (ER fueron evaluados. Los resultados revelaron ser más cortos TR (≈ 35 ms y RE menor (≈ 0,19cm en la condición de certeza y mayores TR (≈ 8 ms y TM (≈ 18 ms en los movimientos hacia la meta contralateral. En conclusión, los hallazgos de este estudio que muestra los efectos de la incertidumbre de la ubicación de la diana, así como la posición de la diana se aplican también a

  16. Learning to select targets within targets in reaching tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Herbort, Oliver; Ognibene, Dimitri; Butz, Martin V.; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2007-01-01

    We present a developmental neural network model of motor learning and control, called RL SURE REACH. In a childhood phase, a motor controller for goal directed reaching movements with a redundant arm develops unsupervised. In subsequent task-specific learning phases, the neural network acquires goal-modulation skills. These skills enable RL SURE REACH to master a task that was used in a psychological experiment by Trommersh ? user, Maloney, and Landy (2003). This task required participants to...

  17. Estudio comparativo entre la facoemulsificacion convencional coaxial y la tecnica bimanual microincisional en la cirugia de la catarata

    OpenAIRE

    Anglada i Escalona, J. Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Justificación: La cirugía bimanual (MICS) de la catarata tiene como características básicas la separación de funciones y el concepto de mínima agresión. Se explican las claves para la transición quirúrgica desde la técnica coaxial convencional. Metodología: Estudio prospectivo y comparativo de 222 procedimientos quirúrgicos con un año de seguimiento. Para cada una de las técnicas se seleccionaron diferentes grupos, tal como se especifica: 3 grupos de cirugía coaxial, con incisiones de 3.2...

  18. Protest movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the development of protest movements in postwar Germay and outlines two essential overlapping 'flow cycles'. The first of these was characterised by the restaurative postwar years. It culminated and ended in the students' revolt. This revolt is at the same time the start of a second cycle of protest which encompasses all subsequent individual movement and is initated by an economic, political and sociocultural procrastination of modernisation. This cycle culminates in the late 70s and early 80s and clearly lost momentum over the last few years. The follwoing phases and themes are described profoundly: against restauration and armament in the 1950; the revolutionary impatience of the students' movement, politisation of everyday life by the womens' movement and citizens' action groups, antinuclear- and ecological movement, differentiation and stabilisation of the movement in the 70s and 80s; break-up and continuity in the German protest behaviour. The paper contains a detailed chronicle of protest activities since 1945. (orig.)

  19. Effect of an on-hip load-carrying belt on physiological and perceptual responses during bimanual anterior load carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z G; Sun, S Q; Goonetilleke, R S; Chow, D H K

    2016-07-01

    Manual load carriage continues to be a major contributor of musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates the physiological and subjective effects of an on-hip load-carrying belt (HLCB) during bimanual anterior load carriage. Fifteen healthy male participants walked on a level ground treadmill at 4.5 km/h for 5 min carrying 5, 10 and 15 kg loads with hands and arms in front of the body, with and without using the HLCB (WD and ND). Heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and, central and peripheral ratings of perceived exertion were the dependent variables. The mean heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and peripheral rating of perceived exertion increased significantly with load under both WD and ND conditions. At a load of 15 kg, the mean heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and peripheral rating of perceived exertion were significantly lower by 6.6%, 8.0%, 11.8% and 13.9% respectively in WD condition when compared to the ND condition. There was no significant difference between WD and ND conditions with 5 or 10 kg load. It can be concluded that the HLCB could reduce a person's physiological and peripheral perceptual responses when walking on a level ground treadmill at 4.5 km/h with a load of 15 kg. Using a HLCB or similar device is therefore recommended for bimanual anterior load carriage for loads of 15 kg or probably larger. PMID:26995043

  20. On the analysis of movement smoothness

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measures of smoothness play an important role in the assessment of sensorimotor impairment and motor learning. Traditionally, movement smoothness has been computed mainly for discrete movements, in particular arm, reaching and circle drawing, using kinematic data. There are currently very few studies investigating smoothness of rhythmic movements, and there is no systematic way of analysing the smoothness of such movements. There is also very little work on the smoothness of othe...

  1. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    OpenAIRE

    Imms Christine; Hoare Brian J; Rawicki Hyam; Carey Leeanne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability an...

  2. Visuomotor transformations: early cortical mechanisms of reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, R; Ferraina, S; Mayer, A B

    1998-12-01

    Recent studies of visually guided reaching in monkeys support the hypothesis that the visuomotor transformations underlying arm movements to spatial targets involve a parallel mechanism that simultaneously engages functionally related frontal and parietal areas linked by reciprocal cortico-cortical connections. The neurons in these areas possess similar combinations of response properties. The multimodal combinatorial properties of these neurons and the gradient architecture of the parietofrontal network emerge as a potential substrate to link the different sensory and motor signals that arise during reaching behavior into common hybrid reference frames. This convergent combinatorial process is evident at early stages of visual information processing in the occipito-parietal cortex, suggesting the existence of re-entrant motor influences on cortical areas once believed to have only visual functions. PMID:9914239

  3. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  4. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    note onsets and short interaction times between player and instrument do not allow for much adjustment once a stroke is initiated. The paper surveys research that shows a close relationship between movement and sound production, and how playing conditions such as tempo and the rebound after impact......Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well defined...

  5. On the origins of human handedness and language: a comparative review of hand preferences for bimanual coordinated actions and gestural communication in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques; Hopkins, William D

    2013-09-01

    Within the evolutionary framework about the origin of human handedness and hemispheric specialization for language, the question of expression of population-level manual biases in nonhuman primates and their potential continuities with humans remains controversial. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of evidence showing consistent population-level handedness particularly for complex manual behaviors in both monkeys and apes. In the present article, within a large comparative approach among primates, we will review our contribution to the field and the handedness literature related to two particular sophisticated manual behaviors regarding their potential and specific implications for the origins of hemispheric specialization in humans: bimanual coordinated actions and gestural communication. Whereas bimanual coordinated actions seem to elicit predominance of left-handedness in arboreal primates and of right-handedness in terrestrial primates, all handedness studies that have investigated gestural communication in several primate species have reported stronger degree of population-level right-handedness compared to noncommunicative actions. Communicative gestures and bimanual actions seem to affect differently manual asymmetries in both human and nonhuman primates and to be related to different lateralized brain substrates. We will discuss (1) how the data of hand preferences for bimanual coordinated actions highlight the role of ecological factors in the evolution of handedness and provide additional support the postural origin theory of handedness proposed by MacNeilage [MacNeilage [2007]. Present status of the postural origins theory. In W. D. Hopkins (Ed.), The evolution of hemispheric specialization in primates (pp. 59-91). London: Elsevier/Academic Press] and (2) the hypothesis that the emergence of gestural communication might have affected lateralization in our ancestor and may constitute the precursors of the hemispheric specialization for language. PMID

  6. Population-Level Right Handedness for a Coordinated Bimanual Task in Chimpanzees: Replication and Extension in a Second Colony of Apes

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, William D.; Hook, Michelle; Braccini, Stephanie; Steven J. Schapiro

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of previously published findings on hand preferences in chimpanzees by evaluating hand use in a second colony of captive chimpanzees. We assessed hand preferences for a coordinated bimanual task in 116 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and compared them to previously published findings in captive chimpanzees at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The new sample showed signifi...

  7. Psychophysical Evaluation of the Capability for Phantom Limb Movement in Forearm Amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Mita, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    A phantom limb is the sensation that an amputated limb is still attached to the body and is moving together with other body parts. Phantom limb phenomenon is often described on the basis of the patient's subjective sense, for example as represented using a visual analog scale (VAS). The aim of this study was to propose a novel quantification method for behavioral aspect of phantom limb by psychophysics. Twelve unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform phantom wrist motion with various motion frequencies (60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240% of preferred speed). The attainment of phantom limb motion in each session was rated by the VAS ranging from 0 (hard) to 10 (easy). The relationship between the VAS and motion frequency was mathematically fitted by quadric function, and the value of shift and the degree of steepness were obtained as evaluation variables for the phantom limb movement. In order to test whether the proposed method can reasonably quantify the characteristics of phantom limb motion, we compared the variables among three different phantom limb movement conditions: (1) unilateral (phantom only), (2) bimanual, and (3) bimanual wrist movement with mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF). While VAS rating showed a larger extent of inter- and intra-subject variability, the relationship of the VAS in response to motion frequency could be fitted by quadric curve, and the obtained parameters based on quadric function well characterize task-dependent changes in phantom limb movement. The present results suggest the potential usefulness of psychophysical evaluation as a validate assessment tool of phantom limb condition. PMID:27227973

  8. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  9. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  10. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  11. Reaching during virtual rotation: context specific compensations for expected coriolis forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J. V.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Subjects who are in an enclosed chamber rotating at constant velocity feel physically stationary but make errors when pointing to targets. Reaching paths and endpoints are deviated in the direction of the transient inertial Coriolis forces generated by their arm movements. By contrast, reaching movements made during natural, voluntary torso rotation seem to be accurate, and subjects are unaware of the Coriolis forces generated by their movements. This pattern suggests that the motor plan for reaching movements uses a representation of body motion to prepare compensations for impending self-generated accelerative loads on the arm. If so, stationary subjects who are experiencing illusory self-rotation should make reaching errors when pointing to a target. These errors should be in the direction opposite the Coriolis accelerations their arm movements would generate if they were actually rotating. To determine whether such compensations exist, we had subjects in four experiments make visually open-loop reaches to targets while they were experiencing compelling illusory self-rotation and displacement induced by rotation of a complex, natural visual scene. The paths and endpoints of their initial reaching movements were significantly displaced leftward during counterclockwise illusory rotary displacement and rightward during clockwise illusory self-displacement. Subjects reached in a curvilinear path to the wrong place. These reaching errors were opposite in direction to the Coriolis forces that would have been generated by their arm movements during actual torso rotation. The magnitude of path curvature and endpoint errors increased as the speed of illusory self-rotation increased. In successive reaches, movement paths became straighter and endpoints more accurate despite the absence of visual error feedback or tactile feedback about target location. When subjects were again presented a stationary scene, their initial reaches were indistinguishable from pre

  12. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  13. Movement speed is biased by prior experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada; Greenwood, Richard; Rothwell, John C.; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    How does the motor system choose the speed for any given movement? Many current models assume a process that finds the optimal balance between the costs of moving fast and the rewards of achieving the goal. Here, we show that such models also need to take into account a prior representation of preferred movement speed, which can be changed by prolonged practice. In a time-constrained reaching task, human participants made 25-cm reaching movements within 300, 500, 700, or 900 ms. They were then trained for 3 days to execute the movement at either the slowest (900-ms) or fastest (300-ms) speed. When retested on the 4th day, movements executed under all four time constraints were biased toward the speed of the trained movement. In addition, trial-to-trial variation in speed of the trained movement was significantly reduced. These findings are indicative of a use-dependent mechanism that biases the selection of speed. Reduced speed variability was also associated with reduced errors in movement amplitude for the fast training group, which generalized nearly fully to a new movement direction. In contrast, changes in perpendicular error were specific to the trained direction. In sum, our results suggest the existence of a relatively stable but modifiable prior of preferred movement speed that influences the choice of movement speed under a range of task constraints. PMID:24133220

  14. Disparity in Frontal Lobe Connectivity on a Complex Bimanual Motor Task Aids in Classification of Operator Skill Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Leff, Daniel Richard; Shetty, Kunal; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Objective metrics of technical performance (e.g., dexterity, time, and path length) are insufficient to fully characterize operator skill level, which may be encoded deep within neural function. Unlike reports that capture plasticity across days or weeks, this articles studies long-term plasticity in functional connectivity that occurs over years of professional task practice. Optical neuroimaging data are acquired from professional surgeons of varying experience on a complex bimanual coordination task with the aim of investigating learning-related disparity in frontal lobe functional connectivity that arises as a consequence of motor skill level. The results suggest that prefrontal and premotor seed connectivity is more critical during naïve versus expert performance. Given learning-related differences in connectivity, a least-squares support vector machine with a radial basis function kernel is employed to evaluate skill level using connectivity data. The results demonstrate discrimination of operator skill level with accuracy ≥0.82 and Multiclass Matthew's Correlation Coefficient ≥0.70. Furthermore, these indices are improved when local (i.e., within-region) rather than inter-regional (i.e., between-region) frontal connectivity is considered (p = 0.002). The results suggest that it is possible to classify operator skill level with good accuracy from functional connectivity data, upon which objective assessment and neurofeedback may be used to improve operator performance during technical skill training. PMID:26899241

  15. Closed chamber globe stabilization and needle capsulorhexis using irrigation hand piece of bimanual irrigation and aspiration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Harminder K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prerequisites for a good capsulorhexis include a deep, well maintained anterior chamber, globe stabilization and globe manipulation. This helps to achieve a capsulorhexis of optimal size, shape and obtain the best possible position for a red glow under retroillumination. We report the use of irrigation handpiece of bimanual irrigation aspiration system to stabilize the globe, maintain a deep anterior chamber and manipulate the globe to a position of optimal red reflex during needle capsulorhexis in phacoemulsification. Methods Two side ports are made with 20 G MVR 'V' lance knife (Alcon, USA. The irrigation handpiece with irrigation on is introduced into the anterior chamber through one side port and the 26-G cystitome (made from 26-G needle is introduced through the other. The capsolurhexis is completed with the needle. Results Needle capsulorhexis with this technique was used in 30 cases of uncomplicated immature senile cataracts. 10 cases were done under peribulbar anaesthesia and 20 under topical anaesthesia. A complete capsulorhexis was achieved in all cases. Conclusion The irrigating handpiece maintains deep anterior chamber, stabilizes the globe, facilitates pupillary dilatation, and helps in maintaining the eye in the position with optimal red reflex during needle capsulorhexis. This technique is a safe and effective way to perform needle capsulorhexis.

  16. Pro gaming tips Halo Reach

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    ABOUT THE BOOK Halo Reach is the latest installment, and goes back to Halo's roots in more ways than one. Set around one of the most frequently referenced events in the Haloverse-The Fall of Reach-Reach puts you in the shoes of Noble 6, an unnamed Spartan, fighting a doomed battle to save the planet. Dual-wielding's gone, health is back, and equipment now takes the form of different "classes," with different weapon loadouts and special abilities (such as sprinting, cloaking, or flight). If you're reading this guide, you're either new to the Halo franchise and looking to get a leg up on all

  17. Interaction torque contributes to planar reaching at slow speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshi Fumihiko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How the central nervous system (CNS organizes the joint dynamics for multi-joint movement is a complex problem, because of the passive interaction among segmental movements. Previous studies have demonstrated that the CNS predictively compensates for interaction torque (INT which is arising from the movement of the adjacent joints. However, most of these studies have mainly examined quick movements, presumably because the current belief is that the effects of INT are not significant at slow speeds. The functional contribution of INT for multijoint movements performed in various speeds is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of INT to a planer reaching in a wide range of motion speeds for healthy subjects. Methods Subjects performed reaching movements toward five targets under three different speed conditions. Joint position data were recorded using a 3-D motion analysis device (50 Hz. Torque components, muscle torque (MUS, interaction torque (INT, gravity torque (G, and net torque (NET were calculated by solving the dynamic equations for the shoulder and elbow. NET at a joint which produces the joint kinematics will be an algebraic sum of torque components; NET = MUS - G - INT. Dynamic muscle torque (DMUS = MUS-G was also calculated. Contributions of INT impulse and DMUS impulse to NET impulse were examined. Results The relative contribution of INT to NET was not dependent on speed for both joints at every target. INT was additive (same direction to DMUS at the shoulder joint, while in the elbow DMUS counteracted (opposed to INT. The trajectory of reach was linear and two-joint movements were coordinated with a specific combination at each target, regardless of motion speed. However, DMUS at the elbow was opposed to the direction of elbow movement, and its magnitude varied from trial to trial in order to compensate for the variability of INT. Conclusion Interaction torque was important at

  18. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project

  19. Lunar Probe Reaches Deep Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's second lunar probe, Chang'e-2, has reached an orbit 1.5 million kilometers from Earth for an additional mission of deep space exploration, the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense announced.

  20. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence...

  1. Movement in Architecture: A Spacial Movement Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Lauren Coleen

    2010-01-01

    As the body moves through space ephemeral lines of movement are created. These lines of movement are influenced by body tendencies. We learn from the body by watching the path and patterning of movement. From the study of the movement of the body, theories of spacial movement were developed. The goal of my project is to draw from spacial movement theory to create an architectural expression that motivates movement of the body on my site and through my building. The focus of my thesis is ...

  2. Uncorrected visual acuity in the immediate postoperative period following uncomplicated cataract surgery: bimanual microincision cataract surgery versus standard coaxial phacoemulsification.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, Ayman

    2012-02-01

    AIM: We compared bimanual microincision cataract surgery (MICS) and standard coaxial phacoemulsification (CAP) in terms of uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) recorded 1 h and 2 weeks postoperatively. METHODS: This was a prospective, nonrandomised comparative study. All MICS procedures were performed by one surgeon (MGM), and all CAP procedures were performed by another surgeon (SB). Eyes with visually consequential ocular morbidity were excluded. The primary outcome measure was UCVA recorded 1 h postoperatively. RESULTS: One hundred eyes underwent MICS and CAP (50 eyes in each group). The treatment groups did not differ significantly in terms of preoperative mean best corrected visual acuity (6\\/24 +\\/- 4.3 lines and 6\\/20 +\\/- 4.4 lines in the MICS and the CAP groups, respectively; P = 0.65). Also, there was no significant difference in terms of postoperative UCVA at 1 h or at 2 weeks (mean +\\/- standard deviation UCVA 1 h postoperatively: MICS: 6\\/36 +\\/- 5.7 lines; CAP: 6\\/30 +\\/- 4.7 lines; P = 0.80; UCVA 2 weeks postoperatively: MICS: 6\\/10 +\\/- 1.9 lines; CAP: 6\\/10 +\\/- 2.2 lines; P = 0.90). However, nine eyes (18%) and one eye (2%) achieved a UCVA of C6\\/12 at 1 h following MICS and CAP, respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Mean UCVA at 1 h and at 2 weeks following cataract surgery was not significantly different between eyes undergoing MICS and CAP. However, a greater proportion of patients achieved a UCVA of C6\\/12 following MICS when compared with CAP.

  3. Movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Mckeown, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders can be hypokinetic (e.g., parkinsonism), hyperkinetic, or dystonic in nature and commonly arise from altered function in nuclei of the basal ganglia or their connections. As obvious structural changes are often limited, standard imaging plays less of a role than in other neurologic disorders. However, structural imaging is indicated where clinical presentation is atypical, particularly if the disorder is abrupt in onset or remains strictly unilateral. More recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism. Functional imaging can assess regional cerebral blood flow (functional MRI (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), cerebral glucose metabolism (PET), neurochemical and neuroreceptor status (PET and SPECT), and pathologic processes such as inflammation or abnormal protein deposition (PET) (Table 49.1). Cerebral blood flow can be assessed at rest, during the performance of motor or cognitive tasks, or in response to a variety of stimuli. In appropriate situations, the correct imaging modality and/or combination of modalities can be used to detect early disease or even preclinical disease, and to monitor disease progression and the effects of disease-modifying interventions. Various approaches are reviewed here. PMID:27430452

  4. Family (oikos Evangelism for reaching forward caste Hindus in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DW Fowlkes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article acknowledges the need for Church Planting Movements among the unreached peoples of India. Of particular concern to this study is the application of Church Planting Movement strategy to forward caste Hindus of India. It is shown that evangelizing households (family or �oikos� evangelism is a New Testament strategy and the most appropriate strategy for reaching forward caste Hindus. It is concluded that Christian disciples remaining within Hindu culture and familial systems hold the potential for the most indigenous approach to evangelizing forward caste Hindus.

  5. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  6. Neural Correlates of Reach Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrichsen, Jörn; Hashambhoy, Yasmin; Rane, Tushar; Shadmehr, Reza

    2005-01-01

    Reach errors may be broadly classified into errors arising from unpredictable changes in target location, called target errors, and errors arising from miscalibration of internal models, called execution errors. Execution errors may be caused by miscalibration of dynamics (e.g.. when a force field alters limb dynamics) or by miscalibration of kinematics (e.g., when prisms alter visual feedback). While all types of errors lead to similar online corrections, we found that the motor system showe...

  7. The Reach of the Arts

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, J.; W.P. Knulst

    2000-01-01

    Original title: Het bereik van de kunsten. The reach of the arts (Het bereik van de kunsten) is the fourth study in a series which periodically analyses the status of cultural participation, reading and use of other media. The series, Support for culture (Het culturele draagvlak) is sponsored by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. This study investigates the interest in the performing and visual arts. Most attention is devoted to visits to theatres, concert halls and museums...

  8. Parieto-frontal coding of reaching: an integrated framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnod, Y; Baraduc, P; Battaglia-Mayer, A; Guigon, E; Koechlin, E; Ferraina, S; Lacquaniti, F; Caminiti, R

    1999-12-01

    In the last few years, anatomical and physiological studies have provided new insights into the organization of the parieto-frontal network underlying visually guided arm-reaching movements in at least three domains. (1) Network architecture. It has been shown that the different classes of neurons encoding information relevant to reaching are not confined within individual cortical areas, but are common to different areas, which are generally linked by reciprocal association connections. (2) Representation of information. There is evidence suggesting that reach-related populations of neurons do not encode relevant parameters within pure sensory or motor "reference frames", but rather combine them within hybrid dimensions. (3) Visuomotor transformation. It has been proposed that the computation of motor commands for reaching occurs as a simultaneous recruitment of discrete populations of neurons sharing similar properties in different cortical areas, rather than as a serial process from vision to movement, engaging different areas at different times. The goal of this paper was to link experimental (neurophysiological and neuroanatomical) and computational aspects within an integrated framework to illustrate how different neuronal populations in the parieto-frontal network operate a collective and distributed computation for reaching. In this framework, all dynamic (tuning, combinatorial, computational) properties of units are determined by their location relative to three main functional axes of the network, the visual-to-somatic, position-direction, and sensory-motor axis. The visual-to-somatic axis is defined by gradients of activity symmetrical to the central sulcus and distributed over both frontal and parietal cortices. At least four sets of reach-related signals (retinal, gaze, arm position/movement direction, muscle output) are represented along this axis. This architecture defines informational domains where neurons combine different inputs. The position

  9. How to reach library users who cannot reach libraries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Ljuić

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the ways of getting library activities closer to the individuals or groups of users who have difficulties to or cannot visit the library themselves. The author presents the services offered by the Maribor Public Library and discusses how one of the basic human rights – the right to the access of cultural goods, knowledge and information - is exercised also through library activities. By enabling access to library material and information, public libraries help to fulfill basic human rights and thus raise the quality of living in a social environment. The following forms of library activities are presented in the article: »distance library« – borrowing books at home, in hospital, station for the bibliobus for disabled users, »mobile collections« in the institutions where users, due to their age or illness, have difficulties in accessing or even cannot reach library materials and information by themselves.

  10. Compensatory arm reaching strategies after stroke: Induced position analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available After stroke, movement patterns of the upper limb (UL during functional arm reaching change to accommodate altered constraints. These compensatory movement control strategies do not, however, have a one-to-one mapping with posttraining outcomes. In this study, we quantify arm movement control strategies in unilateral and bilateral reaching tasks using induced position analysis. In addition, we assess how those strategies are associated with UL residual impairments and with functional improvement after a specific bilateral arm training intervention. Twelve individuals with chronic stroke were measured while reaching to a box as part of their pre- and posttesting assessments. Other measurements included the Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity Assessment (FM, Modified Wolf Motor Function Test (WT, and the University of Maryland Arm Questionnaire for Stroke (UMAQS. We identified arm control strategies that did not differ between unilateral and bilateral tasks but did differ by FM impairment level and by predicted gains in WT but not UMAQS. Increased shoulder relative to elbow moment contribution was associated with less impairment and greater gains of speed in functional tasks. These results suggest that one goal of training to achieve better outcomes may be to decrease the abnormal coupling of the shoulder and elbow.

  11. Distractor interference during a choice limb reaching task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ray

    Full Text Available According to action-centered models of attention, the patterns of distractor interference that emerge in selective reaching tasks are related to the time and effort required to resolve a race for activation between competing target and non-target response producing processes. Previous studies have only used unimanual aiming tasks and, as such, only examined the effects of competition that occurs within a limb. The results of studies using unimanual aiming movements often reveal an "ipsilateral effect"--distractors on the same side of space as the effector cause greater interference than distractors on the opposite side of space. The cost of the competition when response selection is between the limbs has yet to be addressed. Participants in the present study executed reaching movements to 1 of 4 (2 left, 2 right possible target locations with and without a distractor. Participants made ipsilateral reaches (left hand to left targets, right hand to right targets. In contrast to studies using unimanual aiming movements, a "contralateral effect" was observed; distractors affording responses for the other hand (in contralateral space caused more interference than distractors affording responses for the same hand. The findings from the present research demonstrate that when certain portions of response planning must be resolved prior to response initiation, distractors that code for that dimension cause the greatest interference.

  12. REACH and nanomaterials: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New challenges for regulators are emerging about a specific assessment and appropriate management of the potential risks of nanomaterials. In the framework of European legislation on chemicals, Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 REACH aims to ensure the safety of human health and the environment through the collection of information on the physico-chemical characteristics of the substances and on their profile (eco) toxicological and the identification of appropriate risk management linked to 'exposure to these substances without impeding scientific progress and the competitiveness of industry. In order to cover the current shortage of information on the safety of nanomaterials and tackle the acknowledged legal vacuum, are being a rich activities, carried out both by regulators both by stake holders, and discussions on the proposals for adapting the European regulatory framework for chemicals . The European Commission is geared to strengthen the REACH Regulation by means of updates of its annexes. The importance of responding to the regulatory requirements has highlighted the need for cooperation between European organizations, scientists and industries to promote and ensure the safe use of nanomaterials.

  13. Reach Envelope of Human Extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jingzhou(杨景周); ZHANG Yunqing(张云清); CHEN Liping(陈立平); ABDEL-MALEK Karim

    2004-01-01

    Significant attention in recent years has been given to obtain a better understanding of human joint ranges, measurement, and functionality, especially in conjunction with commands issued by the central nervous system. While researchers have studied motor commands needed to drive a limb to follow a path trajectory, various computer algorithms have been reported that provide adequate analysis of limb modeling and motion. This paper uses a rigorous mathematical formulation to model human limbs, understand their reach envelope, delineate barriers therein where a trajectory becomes difficult to control, and help visualize these barriers. Workspaces of a typical forearm with 9 degrees of freedom, a typical finger modeled as a 4- degree-of-freedom system, and a lower extremity with 4 degrees of freedom are discussed. The results show that using the proposed formulation, joint limits play an important role in distinguishing the barriers.

  14. The enrichment industry reaches maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the nuclear power industry enters the 1980s, uranium enrichment supply can no longer be considered one of the critical problem areas of the nuclear fuel cycle. It has become an industrial and commercial activity which has reached a high degree of maturity. Three main aspects of this maturity are discussed: 1. the availability of enrichment services from several facilities with very diverse ownership; 2. the involvement of private industry, especially in Europe, and the application of normal commercial rules to enrichment contracts; 3. the ability of the enrichment industry to cope with recent setbacks in the advancement of nuclear power programmes whilst carrying out an active research and development programme that will help to ensure its future technical and economic viability. (U.K.)

  15. Impaired motor preparation and execution during standing reach in people with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe Waller, Sandy; Yang, Chieh-Ling; Magder, Laurence; Yungher, Don; Gray, Vicki; Rogers, Mark W

    2016-09-01

    Movement preparation of both anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and goal directed movement during a standing reaching task in adults with chronic hemiparesis and healthy controls was investigated. Using a simple reaction time paradigm, while standing on two separate force platforms, subjects received a warning light cue to "get ready to reach" followed 2.5s later by an imperative light cue to "reach as quickly as possible" with the paretic arm (matched arm for controls) to touch a target in front of them for a total of 90 trials. In 30 of the reaching trials a loud acoustic stimulus (LAS) of 123 dB was randomly - -200, or 0ms relative to the "go" cue. APA (postural) responses were characterized by the onset and maximal posterior displacement of center of pressure (CoP) and onset/offset of electromyography (EMG) from tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SOL), while reach was characterized by onset and maximal forward displacement of the reach hand and onset of the anterior (AD), biceps brachii (BB) and middle deltoid (MD). Subjects with stroke, demonstrated a marked reduction in the occurrence of the StartReact responses for both APA and forward reach at all LAS time points indicating movement preparation dysfunction. Movement execution during a cued reach showed significant delays in APA and reach onsets, significant reduction in the magnitude of APA (posterior CoP displacement) and reach excursion, and an increased latency between the APA and reach compared to controls. EMG activation patterns for the TA and SOL demonstrated co contraction compared to the temporally sequenced pattern of control subjects. When LAS was provided at the "go" there were earlier but not significant differences in APA onset latency compared to reaching without LAS and significant delays in reach onset latency when compared to control subjects with or without LAS. An early burst of EMG in biceps brachii muscles with a further delay of the reach onset compared to reaching without LAS may

  16. Metasurface holograms reaching 80% efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoxing; Mühlenbernd, Holger; Kenney, Mitchell; Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2015-04-01

    Surfaces covered by ultrathin plasmonic structures--so-called metasurfaces--have recently been shown to be capable of completely controlling the phase of light, representing a new paradigm for the design of innovative optical elements such as ultrathin flat lenses, directional couplers for surface plasmon polaritons and wave plate vortex beam generation. Among the various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurfaces, which consist of an array of plasmonic nanorods with spatially varying orientations, have shown superior phase control due to the geometric nature of their phase profile. Metasurfaces have recently been used to make computer-generated holograms, but the hologram efficiency remained too low at visible wavelengths for practical purposes. Here, we report the design and realization of a geometric metasurface hologram reaching diffraction efficiencies of 80% at 825 nm and a broad bandwidth between 630 nm and 1,050 nm. The 16-level-phase computer-generated hologram demonstrated here combines the advantages of a geometric metasurface for the superior control of the phase profile and of reflectarrays for achieving high polarization conversion efficiency. Specifically, the design of the hologram integrates a ground metal plane with a geometric metasurface that enhances the conversion efficiency between the two circular polarization states, leading to high diffraction efficiency without complicating the fabrication process. Because of these advantages, our strategy could be viable for various practical holographic applications. PMID:25705870

  17. Metasurface holograms reaching 80% efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoxing; Mühlenbernd, Holger; Kenney, Mitchell; Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2015-05-01

    Surfaces covered by ultrathin plasmonic structures—so-called metasurfaces—have recently been shown to be capable of completely controlling the phase of light, representing a new paradigm for the design of innovative optical elements such as ultrathin flat lenses, directional couplers for surface plasmon polaritons and wave plate vortex beam generation. Among the various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurfaces, which consist of an array of plasmonic nanorods with spatially varying orientations, have shown superior phase control due to the geometric nature of their phase profile. Metasurfaces have recently been used to make computer-generated holograms, but the hologram efficiency remained too low at visible wavelengths for practical purposes. Here, we report the design and realization of a geometric metasurface hologram reaching diffraction efficiencies of 80% at 825 nm and a broad bandwidth between 630 nm and 1,050 nm. The 16-level-phase computer-generated hologram demonstrated here combines the advantages of a geometric metasurface for the superior control of the phase profile and of reflectarrays for achieving high polarization conversion efficiency. Specifically, the design of the hologram integrates a ground metal plane with a geometric metasurface that enhances the conversion efficiency between the two circular polarization states, leading to high diffraction efficiency without complicating the fabrication process. Because of these advantages, our strategy could be viable for various practical holographic applications.

  18. Soft neurological signs in childhood by measurement of arm movements using acceleration and angular velocity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Inomoto, Osamu; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Soft neurological signs (SNS) are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4-12 years (107 boys, 116 girls) and 18 adults aged 21-26 years (16 males, two females) participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants' hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function. PMID:26473867

  19. Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft neurological signs (SNS are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  20. Exemplar-based Parametric Hidden Markov Models for Recognition and Synthesis of Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker; Grest, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in movement recognition is the recognition of movements of a particular type. E.g. pointing movements are of a particular type but differ in terms of the pointing direction. Arm movements with the goal of reaching out and grasping an object are of a particular type but differ with...

  1. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  2. How Do Chinese Enterprises Look at REACH?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The new European REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization of Chemicals) regulation has come into force. As soon as the REACH white paper was issued, Chinese enterprises started to research the possible impacts of REACH and prepare to cope with them. How then do these Chinese enterprises look at REACH? Following are views of some Chinese enterprises exporting chemical products to the European Union.

  3. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement-based intera......In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  4. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  5. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  6. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  7. ALMA Telescope Reaches New Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    ball at a distance of nine miles, and to keep their smooth reflecting surfaces accurate to less than the thickness of a human hair. Once the transporter reached the high plateau it carried the antenna to a concrete pad -- a docking station with connections for power and fiber optics -- and positioned it with an accuracy of a small fraction of an inch. The transporter is guided by a laser steering system and, just like some cars, also has ultrasonic collision detectors. These sensors ensure the safety of the state-of-the-art antennas as the transporter drives them across what will soon be a rather crowded plateau. Ultimately, ALMA will have at least 66 antennas distributed over about 200 pads, spread over distances of up to 11.5 miles and operating as a single, giant telescope. Even when ALMA is fully operational, the transporters will be used to move the antennas between pads to reconfigure the telescope for different kinds of observations. This first ALMA antenna at the high site will soon be joined by others, and the ALMA team looks forward to making their first observations from the Chajnantor plateau. They plan to link three antennas by early 2010, and to make the first scientific observations with ALMA in the second half of 2011. ALMA will help astronomers answer important questions about our cosmic origins. The telescope will observe the Universe using light with millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, between infrared light and radio waves in the electromagnetic spectrum. Light at these wavelengths comes from some of the coldest, and from some of the most distant objects in the cosmos. These include cold clouds of gas and dust where new stars are being born, or remote galaxies towards the edge of the observable universe. The Universe is relatively unexplored at submillimeter wavelengths, as the telescopes need extremely dry atmospheric conditions, such as those at Chajnantor, and advanced detector technology. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

  8. Stream Habitat Reach Summary - NCWAP [ds158

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Stream Habitat - NCWAP - Reach Summary [ds158] shapefile contains in-stream habitat survey data summarized to the stream reach level. It is a derivative of the...

  9. Hand preferences in preschool children: Reaching, pointing and symbolic gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet, Hélène; Centelles, Laurie; Jover, Marianne; Plachta, Suzy; Vauclair, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Manual asymmetries emerge very early in development and several researchers have reported a significant right-hand bias in toddlers although this bias fluctuates depending on the nature of the activity being performed. However, little is known about the further development of asymmetries in preschoolers. In this study, patterns of hand preference were assessed in 50 children aged 3-5 years for different activities, including reaching movements, pointing gestures and symbolic gestures. Contrary to what has been reported in children before 3 years of age, we did not observe any difference in the mean handedness indices obtained in each task. Moreover, the asymmetry of reaching was found to correlate with that of pointing gestures, but not with that of symbolic gestures. In relation to the results reported in infants and adults, this study may help deciphering the mechanisms controlling the development of handedness by providing measures of manual asymmetries in an age range that has been so far rather neglected. PMID:25651377

  10. Quantifying Age-Related Differences in Human Reaching while Interacting with a Rehabilitation Robotic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Yadav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New movement assessment and data analysis methods are developed to quantify human arm motion patterns during physical interaction with robotic devices for rehabilitation. These methods provide metrics for future use in diagnosis, assessment and rehabilitation of subjects with affected arm movements. Specifically, the current study uses existing pattern recognition methods to evaluate the effect of age on performance of a specific motion, reaching to a target by moving the end-effector of a robot (an X-Y table. Differences in the arm motion patterns of younger and older subjects are evaluated using two measures: the principal component analysis similarity factor (SPCA to compare path shape and the number of Fourier modes representing 98% of the path ‘energy’ to compare the smoothness of movement, a particularly important variable for assessment of pathologic movement. Both measures are less sensitive to noise than others previously reported in the literature and preserve information that is often lost through other analysis techniques. Data from the SPCA analysis indicate that age is a significant factor affecting the shapes of target reaching paths, followed by reaching movement type (crossing body midline/not crossing and reaching side (left/right; hand dominance and trial repetition are not significant factors. Data from the Fourier-based analysis likewise indicate that age is a significant factor affecting smoothness of movement, and movements become smoother with increasing trial number in both younger and older subjects, although more rapidly so in younger subjects. These results using the proposed data analysis methods confirm current practice that age-matched subjects should be used for comparison to quantify recovery of arm movement during rehabilitation. The results also highlight the advantages that these methods offer relative to other reported measures.

  11. Dissociation of the Reach and the Grasp in the destriate (V1) monkey Helen: a new anatomy for the dual visuomotor channel theory of reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, Ian Q; Karl, Jenni M; Humphrey, Nicholas K

    2016-08-01

    Dual visuomotor channel theory proposes that reaching depends on two neural pathways that extend from visual cortex (V1) to motor cortex via the parietal lobe. The Reach pathway directs the hand to the target's location and the Grasp pathway shapes the hand and digits for purchase. Sighted human participants integrate the Reach and the Grasp, but without vision they dissociate the movements to capitalize on tactile cues. They use a Reach with a relatively open hand to locate the target and then they use touch cues to shape the fingers to Grasp. After a V1 lesion, the rhesus monkey, Helen, learned to make near-normal visual discriminations based on size and brightness but displayed visual agnosia. She also learned to reach for food with her mouth and her hands. The present analysis of film of her reaching behavior shows that she dissociated the Reach and the Grasp, as do unsighted human participants reaching for a food target at a fixed location. Her rapid and direct Reach was made with an open hand and extended fingers to contact the food with the palm whereas her Grasp was initiated after she touched the food. She also visually fixated the target during the Reach and visually disengaged after target contact, as do sighted human participants. In contrast, Helen did integrate the Reach and the Grasp to take food from her mouth, demonstrating that she could integrate the movements using online tactile cues. The finding that extrastriate pathways can direct the hand toward extrinsic target properties (location) but not intrinsic target properties (size and shape) is discussed as a novel addition to dual visuomotor channel theory. PMID:27056084

  12. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  13. MOVEMENT DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujitnath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary movements of different types are associated with many diseases in children. Movement disorders in adult have been published in different journals, but in children these disorders have been ignored, even in most of the paediatric neurology books. Here is a brief attempt to describe different types of movement disorders and their various names in different diseases. Possible investigations and treatment of the disorders have been described in short.

  14. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  15. Assessment of the haptic robot as a new tool for the study of the neural control of reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusa, Martin; Hribar, Ales; Koritnik, Blaz; Munih, Marko; Battaglni, Piero Paolo; Belic, Ales; Zidar, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Current experimental methods for the study of reaching in the MRI environment do not exactly mimic actual reaching, due to constrains in movement which are imposed by the MRI machine itself. We tested a haptic robot (HR) as such a tool. Positive results would also be promising for combined use of fMRI and EEG to study reaching. Twenty right-handed subjects performed reaching tasks with their right hand with and without the HR. Reaction time, movement time (MT), accuracy, event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related desynchronisation/synchronisation (ERD/ERS) were studied. Reaction times and accuracies did not differ significantly between the two tasks, while the MT was significantly longer in HR reaching (959 vs. 447 ms). We identified two positive and two negative ERP peaks across all leads in both tasks. The latencies of the P1 and N2 peaks were significantly longer in HR reaching, while there were no significant differences in the P3 and N4 latencies. ERD/ERS topographies were similar between tasks and similar to other reaching studies. Main difference was in ERS rebound which was observed only in actual reaching. Probable reason was significantly larger MT. We found that reaching with the HR engages similar neural structures as in actual reaching. Although there are some constrains, its use may be superior to other techniques used for reaching studies in the MRI environment, where freedom of movement is limited. PMID:23474640

  16. Heterogeneous neural coding of corrective movements in motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Adam S.; Amit, Yali; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    During a reach, neural activity recorded from motor cortex is typically thought to linearly encode the observed movement. However, it has also been reported that during a double-step reaching paradigm, neural coding of the original movement is replaced by that of the corrective movement. Here, we use neural data recorded from multi-electrode arrays implanted in the motor and premotor cortices of rhesus macaques to directly compare these two hypotheses. We show that while a majority of neurons display linear encoding of movement during a double-step, a minority display a dramatic drop in firing rate that is predicted by the replacement hypothesis. Neural activity in the subpopulation showing replacement is more likely to lag the observed movement, and may therefore be involved in the monitoring of the sensory consequences of a motor command. PMID:23576955

  17. Encoding Redundancy for Task-dependent Optimal Control : A Neural Network Model of Human Reaching

    OpenAIRE

    Herbort, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    The human motor system is adaptive in two senses. It adapts to the properties of the body to enable effective control. It also adapts to different situational requirements and constraints. This thesis proposes a new neural network model of both kinds of adaptivity for the motor cortical control of human reaching movements, called SURE_REACH (sensorimotor unsupervised learning redundancy resolving control architecture). In this neural network approach, the kinematic and sensorimotor redundancy...

  18. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. M. Lima

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT. Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8, and non-dominant group (n=14 for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and the Motor Activity Log (MAL, whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS. Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0, however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1. Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance.

  19. Single trial prediction of self-paced reaching directions from EEG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Yi Lee Lew

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of movement intention could possibly minimize the delays in the activation of neuroprosthetic devices. As yet, single trial analysis using non-invasive approaches for understanding such movement preparation remains a challenging task. We studied the feasibility of predicting movement directions in self-paced upper limb center-out reaching tasks, i.e., spontaneous movements executed without an external cue that can better reflect natural motor behavior in humans. We reported results of non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG recorded from mild stroke patients and able-bodied participants. Previous studies have shown that low frequency EEG oscillations are modulated by the intent to move and therefore, can be decoded prior to the movement execution. Motivated by these results, we investigated whether slow cortical potentials (SCPs preceding movement onset can be used to classify reaching directions and evaluated the performance using 5-fold cross-validation. For able-bodied subjects, we obtained an average decoding accuracy of 76% (chance level of 25% at 62.5ms before onset using the amplitude of on-going SCPs with above chance level performances between 875ms to 437.5ms prior to onset. The decoding accuracy for the stroke patients was on average 47% with their paretic arms. Comparison of the decoding accuracy across different frequency ranges (i.e., SCPs, delta, theta, alpha and gamma yielded the best accuracy using SCPs filtered between 0.1 to 1 Hz. Across all the subjects, including stroke subjects, the best selected features were obtained mostly from the fronto-parietal regions, hence consistent with previous neurophysiological studies on arm reaching tasks. In summary, we concluded that SCPs allow the possibility of single trial decoding of reaching directions at least 312.5ms before onset of reach.

  20. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used...... circular camera movement. Keywords: embodied perception, embodied style, explicit narration, interpretation, style pattern, television style...

  1. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  2. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Bart H.F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  3. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and preparation of visually-guided reaching movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Busan

    2012-08-01

    The neural system highlighted by TMS/EEG experiments is wider with respect to the one disclosed by the TMS behavioral approach. Further studies are needed to unravel this paucity of overlap. Moreover, the understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for the comprehension of response inhibition and changes in prepared actions, which are common behaviors in everyday life.

  5. The Development of Coordinated Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Silvana Quattrocchi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses stages of movement in the first 3 years of life with a philosophical dimension regarding evolutionary aspects of movement as first manifestation of "will." Describes how the early childhood environment is prepared to allow for movement and the connection between movement and brain development. Discusses the contribution of movement to…

  6. There May Be More to Reaching than Meets the Eye: Re-Thinking Optic Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen R.; Newport, Roger; Husain, Masud; Fowlie, Jane E.; O'Donoghue, Michael; Bajaj, Nin

    2009-01-01

    Optic ataxia (OA) is generally thought of as a disorder of visually guided reaching movements that cannot be explained by any simple deficit in visual or motor processing. In this paper we offer a new perspective on optic ataxia; we argue that the popular characterisation of this disorder is misleading and is unrepresentative of the pattern of…

  7. Music and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Nasev, Lence

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is one of the fundamental elements without which music would not exist. In plays with singing, a child learns to synchronize its movements with the rhythm of music from a very early age. The skill of movement plays a major role in the learning of music and thus deserves an important place in the school curriculum. In this paper, an overview is made of the most important music pedagogues who introduced movement, and at the same time perceived its importance in learning musical conte...

  8. The Irish Women's Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Ireland’s long history of patriarchy is matched by the ongoing evolution of its women’s movements. Today’s complex, transnational feminism finds its precursor in the colonial era. The first wave of the Irish women’s movement dates from the mid-19th century, with the franchise secured for women in 1918 while still under British colonial rule. First-wave feminists played a role in the nationalist movement, but their demands were sidelined later, during the construction of a conserva...

  9. NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    SURAJ KUMAR SUMAN

    2013-01-01

    Several of the new religious movements (NRMs) of modern times have become global movements. Among these are the Soka Gakkai of Japan; the Brahma Kumaris, Sathya Sai Baba, and Hare Krishna of India; the Tzu Chi Buddhist Compassion and Relief Society of Taiwan; and Scientology, which began in the United States in the early 1950s. In order to become global movements, NRMs must often depend heavily on one particular ethnic group as they expand beyond their home base. On arrival in new cultural co...

  10. Mapping population and pathogen movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    For most of human history, populations have been relatively isolated from each other, and only recently has there been extensive contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both old and new worlds. The reach, volume and speed of modern travel are unprecedented, with human mobility increasing in high income countries by over 1000-fold since 1800. This growth is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases, and from completely new diseases, while ever more cases of the movement of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are being seen. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Equally however, we now have access to the most detailed and comprehensive datasets on human mobility and pathogen distributions ever assembled, in order to combat these threats. This short review paper provides an overview of these datasets, with a particular focus on low income regions, and covers briefly approaches used to combine them to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of population and pathogen movements. PMID:24480992

  11. Hanford Reach - Snively Basin Rye Field Rehabilitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Snively Basin area of the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve within the Hanford Reach National Monument was historically used to farm cereal rye (Secale cereale), among...

  12. Hanford Reach - Ringold Russian Knapweed Treatment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Increase the diversity of the seed mix on approximately 250 acres in the Ringold Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument (Monument) treated with aminopyralid as...

  13. Improving exposure scenario definitions within REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jihyun; Pizzol, Massimo; Thomsen, Marianne

    instruments to support a precautionary chemicals management system and to protect receptor’s health have also been increasing. Since 2007, the European Union adopted REACH (the Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals): REACH makes industry responsible for assessing...... environment which varies in different regions. It is also needed to include information about the sustainable level of industrial emissions in REACH reporting system; this is in order to prevent chemicals from accumulating in the environmental media and biota. New approaches and frameworks are therefore...... needed to accomplish the goals of REACH, these at the same time can decrease historical background exposure for humans and ecosystem. A comparative review about the environmental management system such as quality goals, relevant organizations and environmental monitoring systems of hazardous chemicals in...

  14. Reaching the Overlooked Student in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esslinger, Keri; Esslinger, Travis; Bagshaw, Jarad

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the use of live action role-playing, or "LARPing," as a non-traditional activity that has the potential to reach students who are not interested in traditional physical education.

  15. The French ecological movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the ecological Movement in France is presented: its organisation, its topics, its position with respect to the main political trends. The accent is put in particular on the antinuclear contestation

  16. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with normal activity or have the potential to cause bodily harm. ... Stereotypic movement disorder is more common among boys than ... occur with other conditions, is unknown. Stimulant drugs such ...

  17. Movement and Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Action Medical Editor & Editorial Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Movement and Coordination Page Content Article Body At this age, your child will seem to be continually on the go— ...

  18. REACH, animal testing, and the precautionary principle

    OpenAIRE

    Menache, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Andre Menache,1 Candida Nastrucci21Antidote Europe, Perpignan, France; 2University of Rome, "Tor Vergata", Rome, ItalyAbstract: Relatively little is known about the toxicity of the many chemicals in existence today. This has prompted European Union regulatory authorities to launch a major chemicals testing program, known as Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Although the driving force behind REACH is ostensibly based on the precauti...

  19. Sequential control signals determine arm and trunk contributions to hand transport during reaching in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elena; Mitnitski, Arnold; Feldman, Anatol G

    2002-01-15

    When reaching towards objects placed outside the arm workspace, the trunk assumes an active role in transport of the hand by contributing to the extent of movement while simultaneously maintaining the direction of reach. We investigated the spatial-temporal aspects of the integration of the trunk motion into reaching. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the efficiency ('gain') of the arm-trunk co-ordination determining the contribution of the trunk to the extent of hand movement may vary substantially with the phase of reaching. Sitting subjects made fast pointing movements towards ipsi- and a contralateral targets placed beyond the reach of the right arm so that a forward trunk motion was required to assist in transporting the hand to the target. Sight of the arm and target was blocked before the movement onset. In randomly selected trials, the trunk motion was unexpectedly prevented by an electromagnet. Subjects were instructed to make stereotypical movements whether or not the trunk was arrested. In non-perturbed trials, most subjects began to move the hand and trunk simultaneously. In trunk-blocked trials, it was impossible for the hand to cover the whole pointing distance but the hand trajectory and velocity profile initially matched those from the trials in which the trunk motion was free, approximately until the hand reached its peak velocity. The arm inter-joint co-ordination substantially changed in response to the trunk arrest at a minimal latency of 40 ms after the perturbation onset. The results suggest that when the trunk was free, the influence of the trunk motion on the hand trajectory and velocity profile was initially neutralized by appropriate changes in the arm joint angles. Only after the hand had reached its peak velocity did the trunk contribute to the extent of pointing. Previous studies suggested that the central commands underlying the transport component of arm movements are completed when the hand reaches peak velocity. These

  20. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses to and ...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  1. Organizations, coalitions, and movements

    OpenAIRE

    Diani, Mario; Bison, Ivano

    2004-01-01

    This article uses empirical evidence on networks of voluntary organizations mobilizing on ethnic minority, environmental, and social exclusion issues in two British cities, to differentiate between social movement processes and other, cognate collective action dynamics. Social movement processes are identified as the building and reproducing of dense informal networks between a multiplicity of actors, sharing a collective identity, and engaged in social and/or political conflict. They are con...

  2. The development of goal-directed reaching in infants: hand trajectory formation and joint torque control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konczak, J; Borutta, M; Topka, H; Dichgans, J

    1995-01-01

    Nine young infants were followed longitudinally from 4 to 15 months of age. We recorded early spontaneous movements and reaching movements to a stationary target. Time-position data of the hand (endpoint), shoulder, and elbow were collected using an optoelectronic measurement system (ELITE). We analyzed the endpoint kinematics and the intersegmental dynamics of the shoulder and elbow joint to investigate how changes in proximal torque control determined the development of hand trajectory formation. Two developmental phases of hand trajectory formation were identified: a first phase of rapid improvements between 16 and 24 weeks of age, the time of reaching onset for all infants. During that time period the number of movement units per reach and movement time decreased dramatically. In a second phase (28-64 weeks), a period of "fine-tuning" of the sensorimotor system, we saw slower, more gradual changes in the endpoint kinematics. The analysis of the underlying intersegmental joint torques revealed the following results: first, the range of muscular and motion-dependent torques (relative to body weight) did not change significantly with age. That is, early reaching was not confined by limitations in producing task-adequate levels of muscular torque. Second, improvements in the endpoint kinematics were not accomplished by minimizing amplitude of muscle and reactive torques. Third, the relative timing of muscular and motion-dependent torque peaks showed a systematic development toward an adult timing profile with increasing age. In conclusion, the development toward invariant characteristics of the hand trajectory is mirrored by concurrent changes in the control of joint forces. The acquisition of stable patterns of intersegmental coordination is not achieved by simply regulating force amplitude, but more so by modulating the correct timing of joint force production and by the system's use of reactive forces. Our findings support the view that development of reaching

  3. Drug treatment and familiar music aids an attention shift from vision to somatosensation in Parkinson's disease on the reach-to-eat task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Travis, Scott G; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2011-03-01

    Sensory control of the natural skilled movement of reaching for a food target to eat (reach-to-eat) is closely coupled to the successive phases of the movement. Control subjects visually fixate the target from hand movement onset to the point that the digits contact the food, at which point they look away. This relationship between sensory attention and limb movement suggests that whereas limb advance is under visual control, grasping, limb withdrawal, and releasing the food to the mouth is guided by somatosensation. The pattern of sensory control is altered in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD subjects may visually fixate the target for longer durations prior to movement initiation, during the grasp, and during the initial portion of hand withdrawal suggesting that vision compensates for a somatosensory impairment. Because both medication and listening to favorite musical pieces have been reported to normalize some movements in subjects with PD, the present study compared the effect of medication and listening to preferred musical pieces on sensory attention shifts from vision to somatosensation during the reach-to-eat movement. Biometric measures of eye movement and the movement of the reaching limb were collected from PD subjects and aged-matched control subjects in four conditions in their own homes: off medication, off medication with music, on medication, and on medication with music. Unmedicated PD subjects were slower to visually disengage the target after grasping it. Their disengage latency was shortened by both music and medication. Medication and music did not improve other aspects of reaching, including reaching duration and the ratings of the movement elements of limb advance, grasping, and limb withdrawal. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that one way in which medication and music may aid movement in PD by normalizing somatosensory control of forelimb movement thus reducing compensatory visual monitoring. PMID:21073905

  4. Short-Duration and Intensive Training Improves Long-Term Reaching Performance in Individuals With Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeshin; Kim, Sujin; Winstein, Carolee J; Gordon, James; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that multiple sessions of reach training lead to long-term improvements in movement time and smoothness in individuals post-stroke. Yet such long-term training regimens are often difficult to implement in actual clinical settings. In this study, we evaluated the long-term and generalization effects of short-duration and intensive reach training in 16 individuals with chronic stroke and mild to moderate impairments. Participants performed 2 sessions of unassisted intensive reach training, with 600 movements per session, and with display of performance-based feedback after each movement. The participants' trunks were restrained with a belt to avoid compensatory movements. Training resulted in significant and durable (1 month) improvements in movement time (20.4% on average) and movement smoothness (22.7% on average). The largest improvements occurred in individuals with the largest initial motor impairments. In addition, training induced generalization to nontrained targets, which persisted in 1-day and in 1-month retention tests. Finally, there was a significant improvement in the Box and Block test from baseline to 1-month retention test (23% on average). Thus, short-duration and intensive reach training can lead to generalized and durable benefits in individuals with chronic stroke and mild to moderate impairments. PMID:26405046

  5. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether...... the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. METHODS: We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector. The...... workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership to...

  6. NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURAJ KUMAR SUMAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several of the new religious movements (NRMs of modern times have become global movements. Among these are the Soka Gakkai of Japan; the Brahma Kumaris, Sathya Sai Baba, and Hare Krishna of India; the Tzu Chi Buddhist Compassion and Relief Society of Taiwan; and Scientology, which began in the United States in the early 1950s. In order to become global movements, NRMs must often depend heavily on one particular ethnic group as they expand beyond their home base. On arrival in new cultural contexts, movements are most likely to appeal to first- or second-generation economic migrants from the same ethnic background as the missionaries who brought the movement to the region in the first place. While being themselves part of the process of ever-increasing globalization, NRMs also throw light on the dynamics and mechanics of this process, on how it plays itself out. This article discusses the globalization and “glocalization” of NRMs, as well as NRMs as vehicles of a new spirituality.

  7. Contribution of different body segments in Sit and Reach Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Perin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the contributions of the hip joint, lumbar and thoracic spine in the execution of Sit and Reach (SR in young Brazilians. Subjects were 195 boys from 18 to 19 years., Sit and Reach  was evaluated with angular kinematic analysis through of Photogrammetry to identify the contribution of body segments in trunk flexion.  A protocol was developed for evaluating reference angles that were transformed into percentage contribution of the segments. Based on the results, it was possible to create a table of classification of angles and percentages, which allowed the identification of compensation movement. It was possible to conclude that the contributions of the thoracic spine, lumbar spine and hip in performing the SR are 46.01±7.32%, 12.68±5.12% and 41.31±7.19% respectively. It is recommended that evaluations of flexion of the hip joint, thoracic and lumbar spine are performed separately by photogrammetry.

  8. REACH. Analytical characterisation of petroleum UVCB substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graaff, R.; Forbes, S.; Gennart, J.P.; Gimeno Cortes, M.J.; Hovius, H.; King, D.; Kleise, H.; Martinez Martin, C.; Montanari, L.; Pinzuti, M.; Pollack, H.; Ruggieri, P.; Thomas, M.; Walton, A.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of this report is to summarise the findings of the scientific and technical work undertaken by CONCAWE to assess the feasibility and potential benefit of characterising petroleum UVCB substances (Substances of Unknown or Variable Composition, Complex reaction products or Biological Materials) beyond the recommendations issued by CONCAWE for the substance identification of petroleum substances under REACH. REACH is the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use (EC 1907/2006). It deals with the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical substances. The report is based on Member Company experience of the chemical analysis of petroleum UVCB substances, including analysis in support of REACH registrations undertaken in 2010. This report is structured into four main sections, namely: Section 1 which provides an introduction to the subject of petroleum UVCB substance identification including the purpose of the report, regulatory requirements, the nature of petroleum UVCB substances, and CONCAWE's guidance to Member Companies and other potential registrants. Section 2 provides a description of the capabilities of each of the analytical techniques described in the REACH Regulation. This section also includes details on the type of analytical information obtained by each technique and an evaluation of what each technique can provide for the characterisation of petroleum UVCB substances. Section 3 provides a series of case studies for six petroleum substance categories (low boiling point naphthas, kerosene, heavy fuel oils, other lubricant base oils, residual aromatic extracts and bitumens) to illustrate the value of the information derived from each analytical procedure, and provide an explanation for why some techniques are not scientifically necessary. Section 4 provides a summary of the conclusions reached from the technical investigations undertaken by CONCAWE Member Companies, and summarising the

  9. Generalization patterns for reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration differ after visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressman, Erin K; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2015-07-01

    Visuomotor learning results in changes in both motor and sensory systems (Cressman EK, Henriques DY. J Neurophysiol 102: 3505-3518, 2009), such that reaches are adapted and sense of felt hand position recalibrated after reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand. Moreover, visuomotor learning has been shown to generalize such that reach adaptation achieved at a trained target location can influence reaches to novel target directions (Krakauer JW, Pine ZM, Ghilardi MF, Ghez C. J Neurosci 20: 8916-8924, 2000). We looked to determine whether proprioceptive recalibration also generalizes to novel locations. Moreover, we looked to establish the relationship between reach adaptation and changes in sense of felt hand position by determining whether proprioceptive recalibration generalizes to novel targets in a similar manner as reach adaptation. On training trials, subjects reached to a single target with aligned or misaligned cursor-hand feedback, in which the cursor was either rotated or scaled in extent relative to hand movement. After reach training, subjects reached to the training target and novel targets (including targets from a second start position) without visual feedback to assess generalization of reach adaptation. Subjects then performed a proprioceptive estimation task, in which they indicated the position of their hand relative to visual reference markers placed at similar locations as the trained and novel reach targets. Results indicated that shifts in hand position generalized across novel locations, independent of reach adaptation. Thus these distinct sensory and motor generalization patterns suggest that reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration arise from independent error signals and that changes in one system cannot guide adjustments in the other. PMID:25972587

  10. Movement as utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination. PMID:20027697

  11. An explorative, cross-sectional study into abnormal muscular coupling during reach in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stienen Arno HA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many stroke patients arm function is limited, which can be related to an abnormal coupling between shoulder and elbow joints. The extent to which this can be translated to activities of daily life (ADL, in terms of muscle activation during ADL-like movements, is rather unknown. Therefore, the present study examined the occurrence of abnormal coupling on functional, ADL-like reaching movements of chronic stroke patients by comparison with healthy persons. Methods Upward multi-joint reaching movements (20 repetitions at a self-selected speed to resemble ADL were compared in two conditions: once facilitated by arm weight compensation and once resisted to provoke a potential abnormal coupling. Changes in movement performance (joint angles and muscle activation (amplitude of activity and co-activation between conditions were compared between healthy persons and stroke patients using a repeated measures ANOVA. Results The present study showed slight changes in joint excursion and muscle activation of stroke patients due to shoulder elevation resistance during functional reach. Remarkably, in healthy persons similar changes were observed. Even the results of a sub-group of the more impaired stroke patients did not point to an abnormal coupling between shoulder elevation and elbow flexion during functional reach. Conclusions The present findings suggest that in mildly and moderately affected chronic stroke patients ADL-like arm movements are not substantially affected by abnormal synergistic coupling. In this case, it is implied that other major contributors to limitations in functional use of the arm should be identified and targeted individually in rehabilitation, to improve use of the arm in activities of daily living.

  12. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  13. Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Drewes, Line

    The conference report Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace constitutes the primary outcome of the conference It is based on excerpts from the conference presenters and workshop discussions. Furthermore, the report contains policy recommendations and key findings, with the ambition of...

  14. Project: "Teach 'n' Reach" Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Arleen

    The first of five volumes for Project Teach 'n' Reach, designed to help teachers of grades 1-6 in regular classrooms to teach about various kinds of handicapping conditions, is a teacher's guide. Performance objectives, activities, worksheets, and resources are listed for the use of these teachers in the implementation of their social-science and…

  15. Fort St. Vrain reaches full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort St. Vrain reached full power on 6 November 1981, and marks a milestone in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. A review is given of its features and modifications from its construction in 1968 to the present day. It is suggested that Fort St. Vrain demonstrates the performance and safety of the HTGR concept. (U.K.)

  16. Reliability of the Advanced REACH Tool (ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, J.; Fransman, W.; McDonnell, P.E.; Entink, R.K.; Tielemans, E.; Kromhout, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) by (i) studying interassessor agreement of the resulting exposure estimates generated by the ART mechanistic model, (ii) studying interassessor agreement per model parameters of the ART mechanistic model

  17. The site selection law and the anti-atom movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti atom movement has reached many of their political claims with the German nuclear power phaseout. At the same time the government has regained the interpretive dominance with the in radioactive waste management with the new search for possible final repository sites. He anti-atom movement refuses most parts of the actual law but cannot abdicate from the responsibility of the process of site selection. The contribution shows using three actual research approaches that such a convergence is probable to occur in the future. A cooperation of anti-atom movement and the government is of high probability in the long term, but is not necessarily identical to a political acceptance.

  18. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E

    2008-12-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. "Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever." (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.). PMID:19060196

  19. Behavioral evaluation of movement cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Mark M G; Gandhi, Neeraj J

    2006-10-01

    The countermanding saccade task has been used in many studies to investigate the neural mechanisms that underlie the decision to execute or restrain rapid eye movements. In this task, the presentation of a saccade target is sometimes followed by the appearance of a stop cue that indicates that the subject should cancel the planned movement. Performance has been modeled as a race between motor preparation and cancellation processes. The signal that reaches its activation threshold first determines whether a saccade is generated or cancelled. In these studies, an important parameter is the time required to process the stop cue, referred to as the stop signal reaction time (SSRT). The SSRT is estimated using statistical approaches, the validity of which has not been unequivocally established. A more direct measure of this parameter might be obtainable if a method was available to "unmask" the developing motor command. This can be accomplished by air-puff-evoked blinks, which inhibit pontine omnipause neurons that serve as an inhibitory gate for the saccadic system. In the present study, brief puffs of air were used to elicit blinks at various times while rhesus monkeys performed a countermanding saccade task. If the developing motor command has not yet been cancelled, this should trigger a saccade. When blinks occurred between approximately 50 and 200 ms after target onset, saccades were often evoked. Saccades were rarely evoked more than approximately 70 ms after stop cue onset; this value represents a behavioral evaluation of SSRT and was comparable to the estimates obtained using standard statistical approaches. When saccades occurred near the SSRT on blink trials, they were often hypometric. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to model the effects of blink time on the race model. Overall, the study supports the validity of the statistical methods currently in use. PMID:16760340

  20. Mungiki as Youth Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Like many other African countries, Kenya has a large and growing youth population. Some of the youths are mobilized into militant and political networks; one of these is the Mungiki movement. The article explores Mungiki’s combination of politics, religion and Kikuyu traditions. Using the examples...

  1. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  2. Posture and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  3. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  4. Movement: A Clinical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Dalaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One major drawback of orthodontic treatment is its long duration due to slow tooth movement and the pain at the onset of treatment following application of forces. There is controversy regarding the efficacy of laser for decreasing the treatment time and pain of orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low level diode laser on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated pain.Materials and Methods: In this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 12 or- thodontic patients referring to Shahid Beheshti School of Dentistry for first premolar ex- traction were randomly selected and allocated to gallium aluminum-arsenide laser (Ga,Al,As diode laser, 880 nm, 100 mW, 5 j/cm2, 8 points, 80 seconds, continuous mode or control group. The patients initially underwent leveling and alignment using the sectional system. Force (150 gr was applied to each canine tooth via sectional closing loops. The loops were activated every month. The rate of tooth movement and pain were monitored over the treatment period and recorded on days 1, 3, 7, 30, 33, 37, 60, 63 and 67. Two-way ANOVA was used for comparison of groups.Results: There was no significant difference in terms of tooth movement and pain scores between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides at any time point (P>0.05.Conclusion: Although laser enhanced orthodontic tooth movement in the upper jaw, we failed to provide solid evidence to support the efficacy of laser for expediting tooth move- ment or reducing the associated pain.

  5. Long-term follow-up for bimanual microincision cataract surgery: comparison of results obtained by surgeons in training and experienced surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Gian Maria; Verdina, Tommaso; Forlini, Matteo; Volante, Veronica; De Maria, Michele; Torlai, Giulio; Benatti, Caterina; Delvecchio, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of bimanual microincision cataract surgery (B-MICS) performed by surgeons in training, evaluating clinical results, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) incidence, and clear corneal incision (CCI) architecture in a long-term follow-up and comparing results with those obtained by experienced surgeons. Patients and methods Eighty eyes of 62 patients operated on by three surgeons in training who used B-MICS technique for the first time were included in the study (Group A). Eighty eyes of 59 patients who underwent B-MICS by three experienced surgeons were included as a control group (Group B). Best corrected visual acuity, astigmatism, corneal pachymetry, and endothelial cell count were evaluated before surgery and at 1 month and 18 months after surgery. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography images were obtained to study the morphology of CCIs. PCO incidence was evaluated using EPCO2000 software. Results Out of 160 surgeries included in the study, mean best-corrected visual acuity improvement at 18 months was 0.343±0.246 logMAR for Group A, and 0.388±0.175 logMAR for Group B, respectively. We found no statistically significant induced astigmatism nor corneal pachymetry changes in either group, while we noticed a statistically significant endothelial cell loss postoperatively in both groups (P<0.05). In Group A, mean PCO score was 0.163±0.196, while for Group B, it was 0.057±0.132 (P=0.0025). Mean length and inclination of the CCIs for Group A and Group B were, respectively, 1,358±175 µm and 1,437±256 µm and 141.8°±6.4° and 148.7°±5.1°. As regards corneal architecture in the 320 CCIs considered, we found posterior wound retractions and endothelial gaps, respectively, 9.8% and 11.6% for Group A and 7.8% and 10.8% for Group B. Conclusion B-MICS performed by surgeons in training is an effective surgical technique even when assessed after a long-term follow-up. PCO incidence resulted in being higher for less

  6. Performance Reach in the LHC for 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, G

    2012-01-01

    Based on the 2011 experience and Machine Development study results the performance reach of the of the LHC with 25 and 50 ns beams will be addressed for operation at 3.5 and 4 TeV. The possible scrubbing scenarios and potential intensity limitations resulting from vacuum, heating will be taken into account wherever possible. The paper mainly covers the performance of the two high luminosity regions in IR1 and IR5.

  7. A case of uterus didelphys reached term

    OpenAIRE

    Gün, İsmet; MESTEN, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    A Case Of Uterus Didelphys Reached Term and Management Abstract It is important to diagnose early in gestation the uterine abnormalities which are rarely seen or may leed to several obstetrics complications. Despite the real incidence of congenital uterine abnormalities not known so well, the incidence is 0.001 % to 10 % in whole population. The incidence of uterus didelphys is estimated as 2-8 % between them. In this case, report a pregnant with uterus didelphys who had a healthy pregnancy p...

  8. Performance reach in the LHC for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the 2011 experience and Machine Development study results, the performance reach of the LHC with 25 and 50 ns beams will be addressed for operation at 3.5 and 4 TeV. The possible scrubbing scenarios and potential intensity limitations resulting from vacuum, heating will be taken into account wherever possible. The paper mainly covers the performance of the two high luminosity regions in IR1 and IR5. (author)

  9. Has Athletic Performance Reached its Peak?

    OpenAIRE

    Berthelot, Geoffroy,; Sedeaud, Adrien; Marck, Adrien; Antero-Jacquemin, Juliana; Schipman, Julien; Saulière, Guillaume; Marc, Andy; Desgorces, François-Denis; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Limits to athletic performance have long been a topic of myth and debate. However, sport performance appears to have reached a state of stagnation in recent years, suggesting that the physical capabilities of humans and other athletic species, such as greyhounds and thoroughbreds, cannot progress indefinitely. Although the ultimate capabilities may be predictable, the exact path for the absolute maximal performance values remains difficult to assess and relies on technical innovations, sport ...

  10. Project Outreach: Organizations Unified to Reach Youth.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunnington, B C; Hayes, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    Youths of today are forced to deal with the external pressures of alcohol and drug abuse on all levels-from the older youngsters across the street pressuring them to be "cool," to the "cute dog" enticing them with the glamour of being the original "party animal." Through today's mass communications, young people are exposed to negative, self-destructive attitudes. It is important, therefore, to expose them to a more positive influence and try to reach them through parental guidance, personal ...

  11. Reaching Travelers Through Digital Marketing Channels

    OpenAIRE

    RATIU, Monica Paula; PURCAREA, Ioan Matei

    2015-01-01

    It is time for going beyond tourist experience by offering the necessary transformations, better understanding a digital marketplace more centered on a complex consumer journey, monitoring travel and digital trends and ensuring an adequate experience across all channels and interactions. Travel organizations need to have an adequate infrastructure and to offer this engagement experience in the traveler’s language and on the device of their choosing, reaching travelers through digital marketin...

  12. Dimensionality of joint torques and muscle patterns for reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eRusso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle activities underlying many motor behaviors can be generated by a small number of basic activation patterns with specific features shared across movement conditions. Such low-dimensionality suggests that the central nervous system (CNS relies on a modular organization to simplify control. However, the relationship between the dimensionality of muscle patterns and that of joint torques is not fixed, because of redundancy and non-linearity in mapping the former into the latter, and needs to be investigated. We compared the torques acting at four arm joints during fast reaching movements in different directions in the frontal and sagittal planes and the underlying muscle patterns. The dimensionality of the non-gravitational components of torques and muscle patterns in the spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal domains was estimated by multidimensional decomposition techniques. The spatial organization of torques was captured by two or three generators, indicating that not all the available coordination patterns are employed by the CNS. A single temporal generator with a biphasic profile was identified, generalizing previous observations on a single plane. The number of spatiotemporal generators was equal to the product of the spatial and temporal dimensionalities and their organization was essentially synchronous. Muscle pattern dimensionalities were higher than torques dimensionalities but also higher than the minimum imposed by the inherent non-negativity of muscle activations. The spatiotemporal dimensionality of the muscle patterns was lower than the product of their spatial and temporal dimensionality, indicating the existence of specific asynchronous coordination patterns. Thus, the larger dimensionalities of the muscle patterns may be required for CNS to overcome the non-linearities of the musculoskeletal system and to flexibly generate endpoint trajectories with simple kinematic features using a limited number of building blocks.

  13. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discip...

  14. Evidence for a reference frame transformation of vestibular signal contributions to voluntary reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau-Debord, Ian; Martin, Christophe Z; Landry, Marianne; Green, Andrea M

    2014-05-01

    To contribute appropriately to voluntary reaching during body motion, vestibular signals must be transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame. We quantitatively investigated the evidence for this transformation during online reach execution by using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to simulate rotation about a head-fixed, roughly naso-occipital axis as human subjects made planar reaching movements to a remembered location with their head in different orientations. If vestibular signals that contribute to reach execution have been transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame, the same stimulation should be interpreted as body tilt with the head upright but as vertical-axis rotation with the head inclined forward. Consequently, GVS should perturb reach trajectories in a head-orientation-dependent way. Consistent with this prediction, GVS applied during reach execution induced trajectory deviations that were significantly larger with the head forward compared with upright. Only with the head forward were trajectories consistently deviated in opposite directions for rightward versus leftward simulated rotation, as appropriate to compensate for body vertical-axis rotation. These results demonstrate that vestibular signals contributing to online reach execution have indeed been transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame. Reach deviation amplitudes were comparable to those predicted for ideal compensation for body rotation using a biomechanical limb model. Finally, by comparing the effects of application of GVS during reach execution versus prior to reach onset we also provide evidence that spatially transformed vestibular signals contribute to at least partially distinct compensation mechanisms for body motion during reach planning versus execution. PMID:24523527

  15. Reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration following terminal visual feedback of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eBarkley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that when subjects reach with continuous, misaligned visual feedback of their hand, their reaches are adapted and proprioceptive sense of hand position is recalibrated to partially match the visual feedback (Salomonczyk et al., 2011. It is unclear if similar changes arise after reaching with visual feedback that is provided only at the end of the reach (i.e., terminal feedback, when there are shorter temporal intervals for subjects to experience concurrent visual and proprioceptive feedback. Subjects reached to targets with an aligned hand-cursor that provided visual feedback at the end of each reach movement across a 99-trial training block, and with a rotated cursor over 3 successive blocks of 99 trials each. After each block, no cursor reaches, to measure aftereffects, and felt hand positions were measured. Felt hand position was determined by having subjects indicate the position of their unseen hand relative to a reference marker. We found that subjects adapted their reaches following training with rotated terminal visual feedback, yet slightly less (i.e., reach aftereffects were smaller, than subjects from a previous study who experienced continuous visual feedback. Nonetheless, current subjects recalibrated their sense of felt hand position in the direction of the altered visual feedback, but this proprioceptive change increased incrementally over the three rotated training blocks. Final proprioceptive recalibration levels were comparable to our previous studies in which subjects performed the same task with continuous visual feedback. Thus, compared to reach training with continuous, but altered visual feedback, subjects who received terminal altered visual feedback of the hand produced significant but smaller reach aftereffects and similar changes in hand proprioception when given extra training. Taken together, results suggest that terminal feedback of the hand is sufficient to drive motor adaptation, and also

  16. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  17. COMBINING MODULES FOR MOVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzi, E; Cheung, V.C.K.; d’Avella, A.; Saltiel, P.; Tresch, M.

    2007-01-01

    We review experiments supporting the hypothesis that the vertebrate motor system produces movements by combining a small number of units of motor output. Using a variety of approaches such as microstimulation of the spinal cord, NMDA iontophoresis, and an examination of natural behaviors in intact and deafferented animals we have provided evidence for a modular organization of the spinal cord. A module is a functional unit in the spinal cord that generates a specific motor output by imposing ...

  18. Anti-nuclear movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, heralded in the years after World War II as the answer to the world's energy needs, has in more recent times become the focus of intense ecological, political and economic debate. In this study, the current worldwide opposition to nuclear power is examined from its origins in expert dissent to the widespread development of grassroots activity. Chapter headings include: Social Movements: A Theoretical Framework; Creating the Preconditions for Public Protest; Local and Regional Opposition: Mobilizing the Grass Roots; Local Opposition and the Politicization of Nuclear Power; The Use of Local Opposition as a Political Resource; Local Opposition and Social Movement Analysis; The Removal of Political Stimuli: The Unpolitics of Nuclear Siting; Analyzing Host Community Attitudes: The Survey Evidence; Attitudes and Political Action of Nuclear Host Communities: Approaches and Explanations; Novel Siting Approaches and their Political Implications; Siting and Social Movement Analysis; Patterns and Outcomes of Nuclear Energy Conflicts; The Future of the Nuclear Energy Conflict. Throughout the text, analysis and theory are blended with detailed accounts of the growth and activities of individual anti-nuclear organizations in different countries. (author)

  19. Monitoring underground movements

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 16 September 2015 at 22:54:33 (UTC), an 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Chile. 11,650 km away, at CERN, a new-generation instrument – the Precision Laser Inclinometer (PLI) – recorded the extreme event. The PLI is being tested by a JINR/CERN/ATLAS team to measure the movements of underground structures and detectors.   The Precision Laser Inclinometer during assembly. The instrument has proven very accurate when taking measurements of the movements of underground structures at CERN.    The Precision Laser Inclinometer is an extremely sensitive device capable of monitoring ground angular oscillations in a frequency range of 0.001-1 Hz with a precision of 10-10 rad/Hz1/2. The instrument is currently installed in one of the old ISR transfer tunnels (TT1) built in 1970. However, its final destination could be the ATLAS cavern, where it would measure and monitor the fine movements of the underground structures, which can affect the precise posi...

  20. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002

  1. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    OpenAIRE

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 2...

  2. Optimally Investing to Reach a Bequest Goal

    OpenAIRE

    Erhan Bayraktar; Virginia R. Young

    2015-01-01

    We determine the optimal strategy for investing in a Black-Scholes market in order to maximize the probability that wealth at death meets a bequest goal $b$, a type of goal-seeking problem, as pioneered by Dubins and Savage (1965, 1976). The individual consumes at a constant rate $c$, so the level of wealth required for risklessly meeting consumption equals $c/r$, in which $r$ is the rate of return of the riskless asset. Our problem is related to, but different from, the goal-reaching problem...

  3. Credit assignment in movement-dependent reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Samuel D; Boggess, Matthew J; Crossley, Matthew J; Parvin, Darius; Ivry, Richard B; Taylor, Jordan A

    2016-06-14

    When a person fails to obtain an expected reward from an object in the environment, they face a credit assignment problem: Did the absence of reward reflect an extrinsic property of the environment or an intrinsic error in motor execution? To explore this problem, we modified a popular decision-making task used in studies of reinforcement learning, the two-armed bandit task. We compared a version in which choices were indicated by key presses, the standard response in such tasks, to a version in which the choices were indicated by reaching movements, which affords execution failures. In the key press condition, participants exhibited a strong risk aversion bias; strikingly, this bias reversed in the reaching condition. This result can be explained by a reinforcement model wherein movement errors influence decision-making, either by gating reward prediction errors or by modifying an implicit representation of motor competence. Two further experiments support the gating hypothesis. First, we used a condition in which we provided visual cues indicative of movement errors but informed the participants that trial outcomes were independent of their actual movements. The main result was replicated, indicating that the gating process is independent of participants' explicit sense of control. Second, individuals with cerebellar degeneration failed to modulate their behavior between the key press and reach conditions, providing converging evidence of an implicit influence of movement error signals on reinforcement learning. These results provide a mechanistically tractable solution to the credit assignment problem. PMID:27247404

  4. Motor cortex guides selection of predictable movement targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Philip J.W.; Strauss, Soeren; Sami, Saber A.; Heinke, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The present paper asks whether the motor cortex contributes to prediction-based guidance of target selection. This question was inspired by recent evidence that suggests (i) recurrent connections from the motor system into the attentional system may extract movement-relevant perceptual information and (ii) that the motor cortex cannot only generate predictions of the sensory consequences of movements but may also operate as predictor of perceptual events in general. To test this idea we employed a choice reaching task requiring participants to rapidly reach and touch a predictable or unpredictable colour target. Motor cortex activity was modulated via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In Experiment 1 target colour repetitions were predictable. Under such conditions anodal tDCS facilitated selection versus sham and cathodal tDCS. This improvement was apparent for trajectory curvature but not movement initiation. Conversely, where no predictability of colour was embedded reach performance was unaffected by tDCS. Finally, the results of a key-press experiment suggested that motor cortex involvement is restricted to tasks where the predictable target colour is movement-relevant. The outcomes are interpreted as evidence that the motor system contributes to the top-down guidance of selective attention to movement targets. PMID:25835319

  5. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.;

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  6. Creativity and Embodied Fluid Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Broadhead, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that the embodiment of certain movements can stimulate creative idea formation. Embodied Creativity suggests that embodying particular movements, often fluid, free movements can improve creative thinking over the embodiment of nonfluid movements. In the first of two experiments participants were required to navigate a character through a bespoke virtual environment while (a) following a fluid, free flowing pathway, (b) a nonfluid pathway, or ...

  7. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    OpenAIRE

    Emily eHiggins; Mallorie eLeinenger; Keith eRayner

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind ...

  8. How Social Movements Do Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, William G.

    2010-01-01

    While much social science literature has analyzed the cultural bases of social movement, activity, and the content of cultural production by social movements, relatively little has been written about the concrete social relations within which social movements do culture. This paper addresses the issue of what social movements are doing when they produce culture. Four dimensions of social relations within which culture is enacted are identified: the division of labor, the relations of power, t...

  9. New European policy on chemical products. REACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Fernández Sánchez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In February 2001 the European Commission issued a White Paper on a “Strategy for a future Chemicals Policy” based on a review of the current European Union system for regulating the dangerous substances and preparations. As a result, on 29 October 2003, the Commission endorsed a Proposal for a Regulation concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH. This proposal creates a European Chemicals Agency and establishes the REACH system with the following elements:Registration requires industry to obtain relevant information on their substances and to use data to manage them safely.Evaluation provides confidence that industry is meeting its obligations and prevents unnecessary testing.Authorisation of substances with properties of very high concern (CMRs, PBTs, endocrine disrupters for particular uses.Restriction as a safety net to manage risks that have not been addressed previously in the system.This system will provide information in several phases in order to know and reduce the risks derived from use of around 30,000 chemical substances that are manufactured/imported in the European Union in quantities over one ton per year. The information will be saved in a database after validation and may be used to establish a causal relationship between the environmental factors and the negative effects on health associated to the production and use of chemical products.

  10. NASA's Astronomy Education Program: Reaching Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise Anne; Hertz, Paul; Meinke, Bonnie

    2015-08-01

    An overview will be given of the rich programs developed by NASA to inject the science from it's Astrophysics missions into STEM activities targeted to diverse audiences. For example, Astro4Girls was started as a pilot program during IYA2009. This program partners NASA astrophysics education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families, and has been executed across the country. School curricula and NASA websites have been translated in Spanish; Braille books have been developed for the visually impaired; programs have been developed for the hearing impaired. Special effort has been made to reach underrepresented minorities. Audiences include students, teachers, and the general public through formal and informal education settings, social media and other outlets. NASA Astrophysics education providers include teams embedded in its space flight missions; professionals selected though peer reviewed programs; as well as the Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Education forum. Representative examples will be presented to demonstrate the reach of NASA education programs, as well as an evaluation of the effectiveness of these programs.

  11. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, M, beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, M / √(s), as √(s) increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, ∝s, in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a ∝50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with √(s) = 100 TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, αs, that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met. (orig.)

  12. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer. PMID:23720533

  13. Action without awareness: reaching to an object you do not remember seeing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Heath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous work by our group has shown that the scaling of reach trajectories to target size is independent of obligatory awareness of that target property and that "action without awareness" can persist for up to 2000 ms of visual delay. In the present investigation we sought to determine if the ability to scale reaching trajectories to target size following a delay is related to the pre-computing of movement parameters during initial stimulus presentation or the maintenance of a sensory (i.e., visual representation for on-demand response parameterization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants completed immediate or delayed (i.e., 2000 ms perceptual reports and reaching responses to different sized targets under non-masked and masked target conditions. For the reaching task, the limb associated with a trial (i.e., left or right was not specified until the time of response cuing: a manipulation that prevented participants from pre-computing the effector-related parameters of their response. In terms of the immediate and delayed perceptual tasks, target size was accurately reported during non-masked trials; however, for masked trials only a chance level of accuracy was observed. For the immediate and delayed reaching tasks, movement time as well as other temporal kinematic measures (e.g., times to peak acceleration, velocity and deceleration increased in relation to decreasing target size across non-masked and masked trials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that speed-accuracy relations were observed regardless of whether participants were aware (i.e., non-masked trials or unaware (i.e., masked trials of target size. Moreover, the equivalent scaling of immediate and delayed reaches during masked trials indicates that a persistent sensory-based representation supports the unconscious and metrical scaling of memory-guided reaching.

  14. Postural adjustments to support surface perturbations during reaching depend upon body-target reference frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilderley, Alicia J; Leonard, Julia A; Green, Andrea; Ouckama, Ryan; Stapley, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether target position relative to the body modifies the postural adjustments produced when reaching movements are perturbed by unexpected displacements of the support surface. Eleven healthy participants reached to a target located at their midline, acromion height and at 130% their outstretched arm length. They stood on two force plates mounted on a moveable platform, capable of delivering horizontal forward ramp-and-hold perturbations. Three types of trial were given: reach only (R), perturbations only (P) and reaching movements during which a perturbation was given at a random delay after reach onset (RP). The target could be mounted either on a frame suspended from the ceiling such that it remained world-fixed (exocentric target, RP/X) or at an equivalent position on the moving platform so that it moved with the body (egocentric target, RP/E). Arm and body 3D kinematics and muscle activity from the right tibialis anterior (rTA) and soleus (rSOL) muscles were recorded. Normalised rTA activity was significantly lower in RP than in P trials. Furthermore, long-latency rTA muscle activity was lower in RP/E than in RP/X conditions when perturbations were given during either the arm deceleration phase of reaching. The rSOL muscle activity was lowest for the RP/E (arm deceleration) condition. When balance is perturbed during reaching, the manner in which the target moves relative to the body determines the muscle activity produced in the lower-limb muscles. Furthermore, a target that moves with the body requires a different regulation of muscle activity compared with one that moves independently of the body. PMID:25294498

  15. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca2+-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca2+ transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11583.001 PMID:26742087

  16. Risky visuomotor choices during rapid reaching in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Tessa M; Nardini, Marko

    2016-05-01

    Many everyday actions are implicit gambles because imprecisions in our visuomotor systems place probabilities on our success or failure. Choosing optimal action strategies involves weighting the costs and gains of potential outcomes by their corresponding probabilities, and requires stable representations of one's own imprecisions. How this ability is acquired during development in childhood when visuomotor skills change drastically is unknown. In a rewarded rapid reaching task, 6- to 11-year-old children followed 'risk-seeking' strategies leading to overly high point-loss. Adults' performance, in contrast, was close to optimal. Children's errors were not explained by distorted estimates of value or probability, but may reflect different action selection criteria or immature integration of value and probability information while planning movements. These findings provide a starting point for understanding children's risk-taking in everyday visuomotor situations when suboptimal choices can be dangerous. Moreover, children's risky visuomotor decisions mirror those reported for non-motor gambles, raising the possibility that common processes underlie development across decision-making domains. PMID:26190343

  17. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY

  18. Reach and get capability in a computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2012-06-05

    A reach and get technique includes invoking a reach command from a reach location within a computing environment. A user can then navigate to an object within the computing environment and invoke a get command on the object. In response to invoking the get command, the computing environment is automatically navigated back to the reach location and the object copied into the reach location.

  19. Energy and movement

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Energy and Movement, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabular

  20. Energy and Movement

    CERN Document Server

    90, Sol

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, Energy and Movement, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  1. Knowledge through movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kjær; Moser, T.

    2003-01-01

    In: Children and adolescents in movement - perspectives and ideas. The Danish Ministry of Culture, pages 150 - 162. 2003 Short description: the article debunks a lot of the myths surrounding body and learning, and replace them with a vision about another kind of learning. The aim is to reintroduce...... the bodily aspect to the educational system in a highly effective and useful way. Abstract: Children and adolescents are raised to passivity. Lack of motion in kindergartens and schools promote obesity and life style-related diseases, but another and just as dire consequence is the impact on learning...

  2. The Evidence Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Foss; Rieper, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    The evidence movement and the idea of systematic reviews, defined as summaries of the results of already existing evaluation and research projects, have gained considerable support in recent years as many international as well as national evidence-producing organizations have been established. This...... article analyses how the idea is practised in the areas of health, social welfare and education and shows that evidence-producing organizations work differently. Some subscribe to the hierarchy of evidence, others to a typology of evidence. The consequences of these variations are discussed....

  3. Revisiting constraint-induced movement therapy: are we too smitten with the mitten? Is all nonuse "learned"? and other quandaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven L

    2007-09-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has gained considerable popularity as a valuable treatment for a hemiparetic upper extremity. This approach is compatible with the emerging notion that task-oriented or functionally oriented retraining of the impaired limb provides evidence to support its utility. This article first provides a historical perspective on the development of CIMT. An overview model of how learned nonuse of the hemiparetic limb occurs and can be overcome with CIMT is discussed, and then a more detailed model that incorporates critical issues requiring considerably more basic and applied scientific exploration is described. Among the issues considered are the extent to which hemiparetic limb nonuse and subsequent modes of delivery to overcome it are governed by structure-function deficits rather than being attributable primarily to behavioral phenomena; the relative importance of the intensity of training; the need to better balance unimanual and bimanual upper-extremity task practice; the role of psychosocial and cultural factors in fostering patient compliance; the optimization of modes of delivery; and the reevaluation of the constellation of components contributing to successful outcomes with this treatment. Finally, the strengths, uncertainties, and limitations associated with CIMT are examined. PMID:17609329

  4. Long-term follow-up for bimanual microincision cataract surgery: comparison of results obtained by surgeons in training and experienced surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallini GM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gian Maria Cavallini, Tommaso Verdina, Matteo Forlini, Veronica Volante, Michele De Maria, Giulio Torlai, Caterina Benatti, Giancarlo Delvecchio Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Purpose: To determine the efficacy of bimanual microincision cataract surgery (B-MICS performed by surgeons in training, evaluating clinical results, posterior capsule opacification (PCO incidence, and clear corneal incision (CCI architecture in a long-term follow-up and comparing results with those obtained by experienced surgeons. Patients and methods: Eighty eyes of 62 patients operated on by three surgeons in training who used B-MICS technique for the first time were included in the study (Group A. Eighty eyes of 59 patients who underwent B-MICS by three experienced surgeons were included as a control group (Group B. Best corrected visual acuity, astigmatism, corneal pachymetry, and endothelial cell count were evaluated before surgery and at 1 month and 18 months after surgery. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography images were obtained to study the morphology of CCIs. PCO incidence was evaluated using EPCO2000 software. Results: Out of 160 surgeries included in the study, mean best-corrected visual acuity improvement at 18 months was 0.343±0.246 logMAR for Group A, and 0.388±0.175 logMAR for Group B, respectively. We found no statistically significant induced astigmatism nor corneal pachymetry changes in either group, while we noticed a statistically significant endothelial cell loss postoperatively in both groups (P<0.05. In Group A, mean PCO score was 0.163±0.196, while for Group B, it was 0.057±0.132 (P=0.0025. Mean length and inclination of the CCIs for Group A and Group B were, respectively, 1,358±175 µm and 1,437±256 µm and 141.8°±6.4° and 148.7°±5.1°. As regards corneal architecture in the 320 CCIs considered, we found posterior wound retractions and endothelial gaps, respectively

  5. Quantitative Assessment of ADL: A Pilot Study of Upper Extremity Reaching Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective telerehabilitation technologies enable patients with certain physiological disabilities to engage in rehabilitative exercises for performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs. Therefore, training and assessment scenarios for the performance of ADLs are vital for the promotion for telerehabilitation. In this paper we investigate quantitatively and automatically assessing patient’s kinematic ability to perform functional upper extremity reaching tasks. The shape of the movement trajectory and the instantaneous acceleration of kinematically crucial body parts, such as wrists, are used to compute the approximate entropy of the motions to represent stability (smoothness in addition to the duration of the activity. Computer simulations were conducted to illustrate the consistency, sensitivity and robustness of the proposed method. A preliminary experiment with kinematic data captured from healthy subjects mimicking a reaching task with dyskinesia showed a high degree of correlation (Cohen’s kappa 0.85 with p<0.05 between a human observer and the proposed automatic classification tool in terms of assigning the datasets to various levels to represent the subjects’ kinematic abilities to perform reaching tasks. This study supported the use of Microsoft Kinect to quantitatively evaluate the ability of individuals with involuntary movements to perform an upper extremity reaching task.

  6. Behavioral investigation on the frames of reference involved in visuomotor transformations during peripheral arm reaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Ambrosini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several psychophysical experiments found evidence for the involvement of gaze-centered and/or body-centered coordinates in arm-movement planning and execution. Here we aimed at investigating the frames of reference involved in the visuomotor transformations for reaching towards visual targets in space by taking target eccentricity and performing hand into account. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined several performance measures while subjects reached, in complete darkness, memorized targets situated at different locations relative to the gaze and/or to the body, thus distinguishing between an eye-centered and a body-centered frame of reference involved in the computation of the movement vector. The errors seem to be mainly affected by the visual hemifield of the target, independently from its location relative to the body, with an overestimation error in the horizontal reaching dimension (retinal exaggeration effect. The use of several target locations within the perifoveal visual field allowed us to reveal a novel finding, that is, a positive linear correlation between horizontal overestimation errors and target retinal eccentricity. In addition, we found an independent influence of the performing hand on the visuomotor transformation process, with each hand misreaching towards the ipsilateral side. CONCLUSIONS: While supporting the existence of an internal mechanism of target-effector integration in multiple frames of reference, the present data, especially the linear overshoot at small target eccentricities, clearly indicate the primary role of gaze-centered coding of target location in the visuomotor transformation for reaching.

  7. CONTROLS ON CAPITAL MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petris Sorina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, capital mobility was encouraged across national borders, because it was considered that such capital can seek the highest rate of return. However, recent global financial developments have shown that, due to contagion, the mobility of capital flows can cause severe financial imbalances. In the context of globalization, liberalization or maintaining controls on capital flows is a current topic, more debated by economists. This topic is very important, due to the impact of liberalization decision or maintaining controls on capital flows has on the overall macroeconomic framework. The paper analyzes the relationship between capital flows’ control and the income per capita, the degree of central bank independence, democracy country, the foreign exchange regime. Also, it analyzes the effectiveness in time of capital controls, taking account of financial system development and potential risks of instability. Over time, it was observed that a period in which they have imposed restrictions on capital movements was followed by a removal of such restrictions, and vice versa. Cyclic change of capital movements regime corresponds to the cyclic evolution of the global economy. Full capital account liberalization led to the emergence of currency and financial crises, so that the idea of maintaining controls on capital is not rejected by economists. After a full liberalization of capital flows, there is a change in the mentality of an increasing number of economists, who support the maintenance of controls, in a gradual liberalization.

  8. Gender differences in non-standard mapping tasks: A kinematic study using pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley-Mills, Freya; Connolly, Jason D; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana

    2016-09-01

    Comparison between real and pantomimed actions is used in neuroscience to dissociate stimulus-driven (real) as compared to internally driven (pantomimed) visuomotor transformations, with the goal of testing models of vision (Milner & Goodale, 1995) and diagnosing neuropsychological deficits (apraxia syndrome). Real actions refer to an overt movement directed toward a visible target whereas pantomimed actions refer to an overt movement directed either toward an object that is no longer available. Although similar, real and pantomimed actions differ in their kinematic parameters and in their neural substrates. Pantomimed-reach-to-grasp-actions show reduced reaching velocities, higher wrist movements, and reduced grip apertures. In addition, seminal neuropsychological studies and recent neuroimaging findings confirmed that real and pantomimed actions are underpinned by separate brain networks. Although previous literature suggests differences in the praxis system between males and females, no research to date has investigated whether or not gender differences exist in the context of real versus pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions. We asked ten male and ten female participants to perform real and pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions toward objects of different sizes, either with or without visual feedback. During pantomimed actions participants were required to pick up an imaginary object slightly offset relative to the location of the real one (which was in turn the target of the real reach-to-grasp actions). Results demonstrate a significant difference between the kinematic parameters recorded in male and female participants performing pantomimed, but not real reach-to-grasp tasks, depending on the availability of visual feedback. With no feedback both males and females showed smaller grip aperture, slower movement velocity and lower reach height. Crucially, these same differences were abolished when visual feedback was available in male, but not in female participants

  9. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    CERN Document Server

    Madjarska, M S; Doyle, J G

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 km/s. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas, respectively. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, show no presence in spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. The present paper brings out the analysis of three Ca II H large spicules which are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in EUV lower resolution images. We found no coronal counte...

  10. LEP Dismantling Reaches Half-Way Stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP's last superconducting module leaves its home port... Just seven months into the operation, LEP dismantling is forging ahead. Two of the eight arcs which form the tunnel have already been emptied and the last of the accelerator's radiofrequency (RF) cavities has just been raised to the surface. The 160 people working on LEP dismantling have reason to feel pleased with their progress. All of the accelerator's 72 superconducting RF modules have already been brought to the surface, with the last one being extracted on 2nd May. This represents an important step in the dismantling process, as head of the project, John Poole, explains. 'This was the most delicate part of the project, because the modules are very big and they could only come out at one place', he says. The shaft at point 1.8 through which the RF cavity modules pass is 18 metres in diameter, while each module is 11.5 metres long. Some modules had to travel more than 10 kilometres to reach the shaft. ... is lifted up the PM 1.8 shaft, after a m...

  11. CAST reaches milestone but keeps on searching

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Courier (september 2011 issue)

    2011-01-01

    After eight years of searching for the emission of a dark matter candidate particle, the axion, from the Sun, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has fulfilled its original physics programme.   Members of the CAST collaboration in July, together with dipole-based helioscope. CAST, the world’s most sensitive axion helioscope, points a recycled prototype LHC dipole magnet at the Sun at dawn and dusk, looking for the conversion of axions to X-rays. It incorporates four state-of-the-art X-ray detectors: three Micromegas detectors and a pn-CCD imaging camera attached to a focusing X-ray telescope that was recovered from the German space programme (see CERN Courier April 2010).  Over the years, CAST has operated with the magnet bores - the location of the axion conversion - in different conditions: first in vacuum, covering axion masses up to 20 meV/c2, and then with a buffer gas (4He and later 3He) at various densities, finally reaching the goal of 1.17 eV/c2 on 22 ...

  12. Media perspective - new opportunities for reaching audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Katy

    2007-08-01

    The world of media is experiencing a period of extreme and rapid change with the rise of internet television and the download generation. Many young people no longer watch standard TV. Instead, they go on-line, talking to friends and downloading pictures, videos, music clips to put on their own websites and watch/ listen to on their laptops and mobile phones. Gone are the days when TV controllers determined what you watched and when you watched it. Now the buzzword is IPTV, Internet Protocol Television, with companies such as JOOST offering hundreds of channels on a wide range of subjects, all of which you can choose to watch when and where you wish, on your high-def widescreen with stereo surround sound at home or on your mobile phone on the train. This media revolution is changing the way organisations get their message out. And it is encouraging companies such as advertising agencies to be creative about new ways of accessing audiences. The good news is that we have fresh opportunities to reach young people through internet-based media and material downloaded through tools such as games machines, as well as through the traditional media. And it is important for Europlanet to make the most of these new and exciting developments.

  13. Has Athletic Performance Reached its Peak?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Geoffroy; Sedeaud, Adrien; Marck, Adrien; Antero-Jacquemin, Juliana; Schipman, Julien; Saulière, Guillaume; Marc, Andy; Desgorces, François-Denis; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Limits to athletic performance have long been a topic of myth and debate. However, sport performance appears to have reached a state of stagnation in recent years, suggesting that the physical capabilities of humans and other athletic species, such as greyhounds and thoroughbreds, cannot progress indefinitely. Although the ultimate capabilities may be predictable, the exact path for the absolute maximal performance values remains difficult to assess and relies on technical innovations, sport regulation, and other parameters that depend on current societal and economic conditions. The aim of this literature review was to assess the possible plateau of top physical capabilities in various events and detail the historical backgrounds and sociocultural, anthropometrical, and physiological factors influencing the progress and regression of athletic performance. Time series of performances in Olympic disciplines, such as track and field and swimming events, from 1896 to 2012 reveal a major decrease in performance development. Such a saturation effect is simultaneous in greyhound, thoroughbred, and frog performances. The genetic condition, exhaustion of phenotypic pools, economic context, and the depletion of optimal morphological traits contribute to the observed limitation of physical capabilities. Present conditions prevailing, we approach absolute physical limits and endure a continued period of world record scarcity. Optional scenarios for further improvements will mostly depend on sport technology and modification competition rules. PMID:26094000

  14. Important ATLAS Forward Calorimeter Milestone Reached

    CERN Multimedia

    Loch, P.

    The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter working group has reached an important milestone in the production of their detectors. The mechanical assembly of the first electromagnetic module (FCal1C) has been completed at the University of Arizona on February 25, 2002, only ten days after the originally scheduled date. The photo shows the University of Arizona FCal group in the clean room, together with the assembled FCal1C module. The module consists of a stack of 18 round copper plates, each about one inch thick. Each plate is about 90 cm in diameter, and has 12260 precision-drilled holes in it, to accommodate the tube/rod electrode assembly. The machining of the plates, which was done at the Science Technology Center (STC) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, required high precision to allow for easy insertion of the electrode copper tube. The plates have been carefully cleaned at the University of Arizona, to remove any machining residue and metal flakes. This process alone took about eleven weeks. Exactly 122...

  15. An inverse dynamic analysis on the influence of upper limb gravity compensation during reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essers, J M N Hans; Meijer, Kenneth; Murgia, Alessio; Bergsma, Arjen; Verstegen, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Several studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of arm supports in an attempt to restore arm function. Lowering the load allows the user to employ the residual muscle force for movement as well as for posture stabilization. In this pilot study three conditions were investigated during a reaching task performed by three healthy subjects and three MD subjects: a control condition involving reaching; a similar movement with gravity compensation using braces to support the forearm; an identical reaching movement in simulated zero-gravity. In the control condition the highest values of shoulder moments were present, with a maximum of about 6 Nm for shoulder flexion and abduction. In the gravity compensation and zero gravity conditions the maximum shoulder moments were decreased by more than 70% and instead of increasing during reaching, they remained almost unvaried, fluctuating around an offset value less than 1 Nm. Similarly, the elbow moments in the control condition were the highest with a peak around 3.3 Nm for elbow flexion, while the moments were substantially reduced in the remaining two conditions, fluctuating around offset values between 0 to 0.5 Nm. In conclusion, gravity compensation by lower arm support is effective in healthy subjects and MD subjects and lowers the amount of shoulder and elbow moments by an amount comparable to a zero gravity environment. However the influence of gravity compensation still needs to be investigated on more people with MDs in order to quantify any beneficial effect on this population. PMID:24187187

  16. Useful properties of spinal circuits for learning and performing planar reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsianos, George A.; Goodner, Jared; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. We developed a detailed model of the spinal circuitry plus musculoskeletal system (SC + MS) for the primate arm and investigated its role in sensorimotor control, learning and storing of movement repertoires. Approach. Recently developed models of spinal circuit connectivity, neurons and muscle force/energetics were integrated and in some cases refined to construct the most comprehensive model of the SC + MS to date. The SC + MS’s potential contributions to center-out reaching movement were assessed by employing an extremely simple model of the brain that issued only step commands. Main results. The SC + MS was able to generate physiological muscle dynamics underlying reaching across different directions, distances, speeds, and even in the midst of strong dynamic perturbations (i.e. viscous curl field). For each task, there were many different combinations of brain inputs that generated physiological performance. Natural patterns of recruitment and low metabolic cost emerged for about half of the learning trials when a purely kinematic cost function was used and for all of the trials when an estimate of metabolic energy consumption was added to the cost function. Solutions for different tasks could be interpolated to generate intermediate movement and the range over which interpolation was successful was consistent with experimental reports. Significance. This is the first demonstration that a realistic model of the SC + MS is capable of generating the required dynamics of center-out reaching. The interpolability observed is important for the feasibility of storing motor programs in memory rather than computing them from internal models of the musculoskeletal plant. Successful interpolation of command programs required them to have similar muscle recruitment patterns, which are thought by many to arise from hard-wired muscle synergies rather than learned as in our model system. These properties of the SC + MS along with its tendency to generate

  17. Material and Affective Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2014-01-01

    This chapter offers a study of life at school as remembered by groups of people who finished secondary school in the 1950s, 1970s and 1990s. The article draws up three generational portraits based on in-depth interviews that demonstrate how school life is remembered in complex and textural ways....... The chapter traces the former pupil’s memories of physical and affective movements within the larger context of school and discovers surprisingly diverse modes of knowing, relating, and attending to things, teachers and classmates among and between the three generations. It thus taps into the rich...... demonstrates how the use of spoken memories is a rewarding source for the writing about school from the pupils’ perspective....

  18. Planning of the Extended Reach well Dieksand 2; Planung der Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, U.; Berners, H. [RWE-DEA AG, Hamburg (Germany). Drilling Team Mittelplate und Dieksand; Hadow, A.; Klop, G.; Sickinger, W. [Wintershall AG Erdoelwerke, Barnstdorf (Germany); Sudron, K.

    1998-12-31

    The Mittelplate oil field is located 7 km offshore the town of Friedrichskoog. Reserves are estimated at 30 million tonnes of oil. At a production rate of 2,500 t/d, it will last about 33 years. The transport capacity of the offshore platform is limited, so that attempts were made to enhance production by constructing the extended reach borehole Dieksand 2. Details are presented. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Erdoelfeld Mittelplate liegt am suedlichen Rand des Nationalparks Schleswig Holsteinisches Wattenmeer, ca. 7000 m westlich der Ortschaft Friedrichskoog. Die gewinnbaren Reserven betragen ca. 30 Millionen t Oel. Bei einer Foerderkapazitaet von 2.500 t/Tag betraegt die Foerderdauer ca. 33 Jahre. Aufgrund der begrenzten Transportkapazitaeten von der Insel, laesst sich durch zusaetzliche Bohrungen von der kuenstlichen Insel Mittelplate keine entscheidende Erhoehung der Foerderkapazitaet erzielen. Ab Sommer 1996 wurde erstmals die Moeglichkeit der Lagerstaettenerschliessung von Land untersucht. Ein im Mai 1997 in Hamburg etabliertes Drilling Team wurde mit der Aufgabe betraut, die Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2 zu planen und abzuteufen. Die Planungsphasen fuer die Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2 wurden aufgezeigt. Die fuer den Erfolg einer Extended Reach Bohrung wichtigen Planungsparameter wurden erlaeutert. Es wurden Wege gezeigt, wie bei diesem Projekt technische und geologische Risiken in der Planung mit beruecksichtigt und nach Beginn der Bohrung weiter bearbeitet werden koennen. (orig.)

  19. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Hydrogeomorphic Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  20. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Air movement - good or bad? The question can only be answered by those who are exposed when they are exposed. Human perception of air movement depends on environmental factors including air velocity, air velocity fluctuations, air temperature, and personal factors such as overall thermal sensation...... and activity level. Even for the same individual, sensitivity to air movement may change from day to day as a result of e.g. different levels of fatigue. Based on existing literature, the current paper summarizes factors influencing the human perception of air movement and attempts to specify in...... general terms when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation...

  1. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    OpenAIRE

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, Grant; Blackwell, Paul; Goodall, Victoria; King, Ruth; Niu, Mu; Patterson, Toby; Pedersen, Martin; Skarin, Anna; Schick, Robert Schilling

    2013-01-01

    1). Group dynamics are a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognized, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However, to date, practical statistical methods, which can include group dynamics in animal movement models, have been lacking. 2). We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level ...

  3. Arousal facilitates involuntary eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGirolamo, Gregory J; Patel, Neha; Blaukopf, Clare L

    2016-07-01

    Attention plays a critical role in action selection. However, the role of attention in eye movements is complicated as these movements can be either voluntary or involuntary, with, in some circumstances (antisaccades), these two actions competing with each other for execution. But attending to the location of an impending eye movement is only one facet of attention that may play a role in eye movement selection. In two experiments, we investigated the effect of arousal on voluntary eye movements (antisaccades) and involuntary eye movements (prosaccadic errors) in an antisaccade task. Arousal, as caused by brief loud sounds and indexed by changes in pupil diameter, had a facilitation effect on involuntary eye movements. Involuntary eye movements were both significantly more likely to be executed and significantly faster under arousal conditions (Experiments 1 and 2), and the influence of arousal had a specific time course (Experiment 2). Arousal, one form of attention, can produce significant costs for human movement selection as potent but unplanned actions are benefited more than planned ones. PMID:26928432

  4. Immigration and freedom of movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hosein

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I focus on one very influential argument for open borders, the freedom of movement argument, which says that if we value freedom of movement we must demand open borders. I begin the paper the paper by discussing Joseph Carens’ well known version of the argument. I then consider, and reject, David Miller's response to that argument. Finally, I develop my own reply to Carens. Both Carens and Miller, I argue, are mistaken about the proper grounds for freedom of movement. Once we see this, it is clear how we can value freedom of movement without being committed to open borders.

  5. Co-movement in Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Inflation rates across countries tend to exhibit a degree of co-movement. In this paper we use a panel vector autoregression (panel VAR) model to investigate possible explanations of this co-movement for the G7 economies. Shocks to commodity prices are found to be more important than common movements in real activity as a driver of 'global inflation' dynamics. However, commodity prices and common real activity cannot explain all of the co-movement in inflation. Even when controlling for these...

  6. The Explanatory Range of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Drawing a distinction between systemic and functional explanations of movement in general, I shall argue that the Chomskyan view of movement in language is originally functional. With the advent of the Minimimalist Program, however, it has become systemic, but no argument for this change has been...... forthcoming. I'll then present data (from Danish) to sustain the view that only functional type explanations of movement can be empirically motivated, and these only if movement is reinterpreted as transition states between representations of different kinds....

  7. Reaching remote areas in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes, R

    1994-01-01

    Poor communities in remote and inaccessible areas tend to not only be cut off from family planning education and services, but they are also deprived of basic primary health care services. Efforts to bring family planning to such communities and populations should therefore be linked with other services. The author presents three examples of programs to bring effective family planning services to remote communities in Central and South America. Outside of the municipal center in the Tuxtlas region of Mexico, education and health levels are low and people live according to ancient customs. Ten years ago with the help of MEXFAM, the IPPF affiliate in Mexico, two social promoters established themselves in the town of Catemaco to develop a community program of family planning and health care offering education and prevention to improve the quality of people's lives. Through their health brigades taking health services to towns without an established health center, the program has influenced an estimated 100,000 people in 50 villages and towns. The program also has a clinic. In Guatemala, the Family Welfare Association (APROFAM) gave bicycles to 240 volunteer health care workers to facilitate their outreach work in rural areas. APROFAM since 1988 has operated an integrated program to treat intestinal parasites and promote family planning in San Lucas de Toliman, an Indian town close to Lake Atitlan. Providing health care to more than 10,000 people, the volunteer staff has covered the entire department of Solola, reaching each family in the area. Field educators travel on motorcycles through the rural areas of Guatemala coordinating with the health volunteers the distribution of contraceptives at the community level. The Integrated Project's Clinic was founded in 1992 and currently carries out pregnancy and Pap tests, as well as general lab tests. Finally, Puna is an island in the middle of the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Women on the island typically have 10

  8. Social-movement analysis of the American antinuclear movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing data from a survey of participants at the May 6, 1979 antinuclear rally in Washington, DC (N = 420), this dissertation explored some of the major structural and ideological characteristics of the American Antinuclear Movement. By organizing the data around three of the key analytical concepts in the study of social movements - mobilization, recruitment, and ideology - the author was able to derive from the demonstration sample a descriptive and illustrative analysis of those individuals, organizations, and processes involved in the national antinuclear crusade. Given that few researchers have actively studied the antinuclear movement beyond the scope of local or regional protests, this work constitutes the only empirical study to date examining a cross section of the movement's participants from a sociological perspective. It is also one of the few attempts to use a national demonstration as a social laboratory for the study of a social movement in general. In terms of the mobilization variables examined in the study, it was found that organizational networks, past movement activism, and individual resources were important factors in the May 6 mobilization effort. While less than one-half of the demonstrators were part of the antinuclear organizational network per se, most of them had been active in the major protest movements of the 1960's and 1970's. The demonstrators were relatively high in socio-economic resources and had occupational or educational schedules conducive to creating the necessary discretionary time for movement participation

  9. Coarse electrocorticographic decoding of ipsilateral reach in patients with brain lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Hotson

    Full Text Available In patients with unilateral upper limb paralysis from strokes and other brain lesions, strategies for functional recovery may eventually include brain-machine interfaces (BMIs using control signals from residual sensorimotor systems in the damaged hemisphere. When voluntary movements of the contralateral limb are not possible due to brain pathology, initial training of such a BMI may require use of the unaffected ipsilateral limb. We conducted an offline investigation of the feasibility of decoding ipsilateral upper limb movements from electrocorticographic (ECoG recordings in three patients with different lesions of sensorimotor systems associated with upper limb control. We found that the first principal component (PC of unconstrained, naturalistic reaching movements of the upper limb could be decoded from ipsilateral ECoG using a linear model. ECoG signal features yielding the best decoding accuracy were different across subjects. Performance saturated with very few input features. Decoding performances of 0.77, 0.73, and 0.66 (median Pearson's r between the predicted and actual first PC of movement using nine signal features were achieved in the three subjects. The performance achieved here with small numbers of electrodes and computationally simple decoding algorithms suggests that it may be possible to control a BMI using ECoG recorded from damaged sensorimotor brain systems.

  10. Adaptation to Coriolis force perturbation of movement trajectory; role of proprioceptive and cutaneous somatosensory feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, James R.; DiZio, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Subjects exposed to constant velocity rotation in a large fully-enclosed room that rotates initially make large reaching errors in pointing to targets. The paths and endpoints of their reaches are deviated in the direction of the transient lateral Coriolis forces generated by the forward velocity of their reaches. With additional reaches, subjects soon reach in straighter paths and become more accurate at landing on target even in the absence of visual feedback about their movements. Two factors contribute to this adaptation: first, muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ feedback interpreted in relation to efferent commands provide information about movement trajectory, and second, somatosensory stimulation of the fingertip at the completion of a reach provides information about the location of the fingertip relative to the torso.

  11. Feedforward control strategies of subjects with transradial amputation in planar reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Metzger, MBE

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The rate of upper-limb amputations is increasing, and the rejection rate of prosthetic devices remains high. People with upper-limb amputation do not fully incorporate prosthetic devices into their activities of daily living. By understanding the reaching behaviors of prosthesis users, researchers can alter prosthetic devices and develop training protocols to improve the acceptance of prosthetic limbs. By observing the reaching characteristics of the nondisabled arms of people with amputation, we can begin to understand how the brain alters its motor commands after amputation. We asked subjects to perform rapid reaching movements to two targets with and without visual feedback. Subjects performed the tasks with both their prosthetic and nondisabled arms. We calculated endpoint error, trajectory error, and variability and compared them with those of nondisabled control subjects. We found no significant abnormalities in the prosthetic limb. However, we found an abnormal leftward trajectory error (in right arms in the nondisabled arm of prosthetic users in the vision condition. In the no-vision condition, the nondisabled arm displayed abnormal leftward endpoint errors and abnormally higher endpoint variability. In the vision condition, peak velocity was lower and movement duration was longer in both arms of subjects with amputation. These abnormalities may reflect the cortical reorganization associated with limb loss.

  12. Cognitive constraints on motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Stephan F; Rieger, Martina

    2016-03-01

    Executed bimanual movements are prepared slower when moving to symbolically different than when moving to symbolically same targets and when targets are mapped to target locations in a left/right fashion than when they are mapped in an inner/outer fashion [Weigelt et al. (Psychol Res 71:238-447, 2007)]. We investigated whether these cognitive bimanual coordination constraints are observable in motor imagery. Participants performed fast bimanual reaching movements from start to target buttons. Symbolic target similarity and mapping were manipulated. Participants performed four action conditions: one execution and three imagination conditions. In the latter they indicated starting, ending, or starting and ending of the movement. We measured movement preparation (RT), movement execution (MT) and the combined duration of movement preparation and execution (RTMT). In all action conditions RTs and MTs were longer in movements towards different targets than in movements towards same targets. Further, RTMTs were longer when targets were mapped to target locations in a left/right fashion than when they were mapped in an inner/outer fashion, again in all action conditions. RTMTs in imagination and execution were similar, apart from the imagination condition in which participants indicated the start and the end of the movement. Here MTs, but not RTs, were longer than in the execution condition. In conclusion, cognitive coordination constraints are present in the motor imagery of fast (motor imagery. PMID:25758054

  13. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    general terms when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation...

  14. Eye Movements in Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hansen, John Paulin; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaze as a sole input modality must support complex navigation and selection tasks. Gaze interaction combines specific eye movements and graphic display objects (GDOs). This paper suggests a unifying taxonomy of gaze interaction principles. The taxonomy deals with three types of eye movements...

  15. Development of postural adjustments during reaching in typically developing infants from 4 to 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Balen, Lieke C; Dijkstra, Linze Jaap; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2012-07-01

    Knowledge on the development of postural adjustments during infancy, in particular on the development of postural muscle coordination, is limited. This study aimed at the evaluation of the development of postural control during reaching in a supported sitting condition. Eleven typically developing infants participated in the study and were assessed at the ages of 4, 6, 10 and 18 months. We elicited reaching movements by presenting small toys at an arm's length distance, whilst activity of multiple arm, neck and trunk muscles was recorded using surface EMG. A model-based computer algorithm was used to detect the onset of phasic muscle activity. The results indicated that postural muscle activity during reaching whilst sitting supported is highly variable. Direction-specific postural activity was inconsistently present from early age onwards and increased between 10 and 18 months without reaching a 100 % consistency. The dominant pattern of activation at all ages was the 'complete pattern', in which all direction-specific muscles were recruited. At 4 months, a slight preference for top-down recruitment existed, which was gradually replaced by a preference for bottom-up recruitment. We conclude that postural control during the ecological task of reaching during supported sitting between 4 and 18 months of age is primarily characterized by variation. Already from 4 months onwards, infants are-within the variation-sometimes able to select muscle recruitment strategies that are optimal to the task at hand. PMID:22623096

  16. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR as a Neurorehabilitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Zarghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   A variety of nervous system components such as medulla, pons, midbrain, cerebellum, basal ganglia, parietal, frontal and occipital lobes have role in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR processes. The eye movement is done simultaneously for attracting client's attention to an external stimulus while concentrating on a certain internal subject. Eye movement guided by therapist is the most common attention stimulus. The role of eye movement has been documented previously in relation with cognitive processing mechanisms. A series of systemic experiments have shown that the eyes’ spontaneous movement is associated with emotional and cognitive changes and results in decreased excitement, flexibility in attention, memory processing, and enhanced semantic recalling. Eye movement also decreases the memory's image clarity and the accompanying excitement. By using EMDR, we can reach some parts of memory which were inaccessible before and also emotionally intolerable. Various researches emphasize on the effectiveness of EMDR in treating and curing phobias, pains, and dependent personality disorders. Consequently, due to the involvement of multiple neural system components, this palliative method of treatment can also help to rehabilitate the neuro-cognitive system.

  17. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.;

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...... in an encamped state. Though the attraction to the group centroid is relatively weak, our model successfully captures group-influenced movement dynamics. Specifically, as compared to a regular mixture of correlated random walks, the group dynamic model more accurately predicts the non-diffusive behaviour...

  18. Impact of Parkinson's disease on proprioceptively based on-line movement control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeon, David; Blanchet, Pierre; Bergeron, Stéphanie; Messier, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients produce large spatial errors when reaching to proprioceptively defined targets. Here, we examined whether these movement inaccuracies result mainly from impaired use of proprioceptive inputs for movement planning mechanisms or from on-line movement guidance. Medicated and non-medicated PD patients and healthy controls performed three-dimensional reaching movements in four sensorimotor conditions that increase proprioceptive processing requirements. We assessed the influence of these sensorimotor conditions on the final accuracy and initial kinematics of the movements. If the patterns of final errors are primarily determined by planning processes before the initiation of the movement, the initial kinematics of reaching movements should show similar trends and predict the pattern of final errors. Medicated and non-medicated PD patients showed a greater mean level of final 3D errors than healthy controls when proprioception was the sole source of information guiding the movement, but this difference reached significance only for medicated PD patients. However, the pattern of initial kinematics and final spatial errors were markedly different both between sensorimotor conditions and between groups. Furthermore, medicated and non-medicated PD patients were less efficient than healthy controls in compensating for their initial spatial errors (hand distance from target location at peak velocity) when aiming at proprioceptively defined compared to visually defined targets. Considered together, the results are consistent with a selective deficit in proprioceptively based movement guidance in PD. Furthermore, dopaminergic medication did not improve proprioceptively guided movements in PD patients, indicating that dopaminergic dysfunction within the basal ganglia is not solely responsible for these deficits. PMID:26055990

  19. Coarse-scale movement patterns of a small-bodied fish inhabiting a desert stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzul, M.C.; Quist, M.C.; Dinsmore, S.J.; Gaines, D.B.; Bower, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Located on the floor of Death Valley (CA, USA), Salt Creek harbors a single fish species, the Salt Creek pupfish, Cyprinodon salinus salinus, which has adapted to this extremely harsh environment. Salt Creek is fed by an underground spring and is comprised of numerous pools, runs, and marshes that exhibit substantial variability in temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentrations. In addition, the wetted area of Salt Creek is reduced throughout the summer months due to high rates of evaporation, with some reaches drying completely. Therefore, it seems logical that short- and long-term movement patterns may play an important role in Salt Creek pupfish population dynamics. The objective of this study was to describe coarse-scale movements of Salt Creek pupfish in Salt Creek during their breeding season from March to May. Sex ratios and length–frequency distributions varied spatially within Salt Creek, suggesting population segregation during the breeding season. Long-distance movements were generally rare, although two fish moved more than 1.2 km. Movement in upstream reaches was rare or absent, in contrast to the greater movement observed in downstream reaches (29% of recaptures). Temporal trends and demographic patterns in movement were not observed. Because the two most downstream habitats dry up in the summer, our results indicate that coarse-scale movements that re-populate downstream reaches likely occur during other times of year. Consequently, the importance of small- and large-scale movements is influenced by season. Further assessment of Salt Creek movement patterns conducted during other times of year may better illuminate long-distance movement patterns and source-sink dynamics.

  20. The role of compensatory movements patterns in spontaneous recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Post-stroke motor recovery consists of both true recovery and compensatory movements. Although compensatory movements are learned more quickly early after stroke, the role of compensatory movement patterns in functional recovery is controversial. We investigated the role of compensatory movement patterns in the long-term functional motor recovery after stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Male Wistar rats were subjected to photothrombotic infarction to induce motor and sensorimotor cortex lesions. The rats were given task-specific training. Behavior tests and analyses of compensatory movement patterns (head lift, limb withdrawal impairment, phantom grasps, and pellet chasing) during the single-pellet reaching test were performed 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days post stroke. [Results] Successful retrieval during the single-pellet reaching test was significantly correlated with compensatory movement patterns in stroke groups. Motor cortex stroke showed significant correlation in limb withdrawal impairment and pellet chasing. But, sensorimotor cortex stroke was significant correlation in pellet chasing. [Conclusion] The data suggest that compensatory movements after stroke are correlated with spontaneous recovery. Since some compensatory movement patterns are detrimental to functional recovery, the correct timing of training and control of compensatory movement patterns might be important. PMID:26504266

  1. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent. PMID:26438508

  2. Method for eye movements study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Mario Alfredo

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quantitative analysis of eye movements in Digital Domain, has permitted to increase the amount of physiological information extracted form oculographic signals. In the Neuroscience field, it allows to deepen on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying oculomotor dysfunctions. Objectives: The main goal of this work is to obtain quantitative methods able to reduce subjective components introduced by researchers during visual description or qualifications of neural signals, also reducing the experience required to successfully identify normal or abnormal electrophysiological patterns. Methods: Smooth pursuit eye movements were evaluated in 27 normal subjects by applying quantitative analysis methods in both time and frequency domains. A set of variables was determined which acted as quantitative descriptors of oculomotor response during task performance. Results: The results clearly shown that quantitative variables could be of great value in order to increase the sensitivity of eye movements analysis, also increasing the power of eye movements exploration to assess the neurophysiological basis underlying eye movements execution in either motor and cognitive contexts. The amount of information extracted from eye movement’s signals through this method exceeds the 80% of the total information available. Conclusions: Further studies must be conducted to evaluate how these variables behave in such disorders of central nervous system where eye movement’s dysfunctions appear.

  3. Cortex commands the performance of skilled movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Zhong; Graves, Austin R; Guo, Wendy W; Zheng, Jihong; Lee, Allen; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Li, Nuo; Macklin, John J; Phillips, James W; Mensh, Brett D; Branson, Kristin; Hantman, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cerebral cortex is accepted as being critical for voluntary motor control, but what functions depend on cortex is still unclear. Here we used rapid, reversible optogenetic inhibition to test the role of cortex during a head-fixed task in which mice reach, grab, and eat a food pellet. Sudden cortical inhibition blocked initiation or froze execution of this skilled prehension behavior, but left untrained forelimb movements unaffected. Unexpectedly, kinematically normal prehension occurred immediately after cortical inhibition, even during rest periods lacking cue and pellet. This 'rebound' prehension was only evoked in trained and food-deprived animals, suggesting that a motivation-gated motor engram sufficient to evoke prehension is activated at inhibition's end. These results demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of cortical activity for enacting a learned skill. PMID:26633811

  4. Jellyfish movement data - Determining Movement Patterns of Jellyfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is to determine horizontal and vertical movement patterns of two jellyfish species in Hood Canal, in relation to environmental variables. It is being...

  5. Movement Strategy Discovery during Training via Haptic Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibo, Tricia L; Abbink, David A

    2016-01-01

    Haptic guidance has previously been investigated to facilitate motor skill training, whereupon a robotic device assists a trainee in executing the desired movement. However, many studies have reported a null or even detrimental effect of haptic guidance on training compared to unassisted practice. While prior studies have focused on using haptic guidance to refine a movement strategy, our study explores its effect on the discovery of a new strategy. Subjects learned to manipulate a virtual under-actuated system via a haptic device either with or without haptic guidance (and without haptic feedback of system dynamics). The guidance enabled subjects to experience a range of successful movements, rather than strictly enforcing one trajectory. Subjects who trained with guidance adopted a strategy that involved faster reaches, required greater control of the system's degrees of freedom, and increased the potential for faster task completion. However, overall improvement of task performance was limited with the new strategy. PMID:26766379

  6. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  7. ERF1 -- Enhanced River Reach File 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's River Reach File 1 (RF1)to ensure the hydrologic integrity of the digital reach traces and to quantify the mean water time of...

  8. Bewitched - The Tea Party Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2011-01-01

    has also been shaped and energised by institutional arrangements. In particular, it argues that there are significant numbers of independent or ‘detached’ conservatives and that the institutional architecture draws them towards political engagement but at the same time imposes constraints. The...... political friction that this creates has contributed to the anger that has characterised the movement. While the Tea Party movement may, as such, have only an ephemeral existence, independent conservatives are likely to remain a significant and potent constituency and will, within the institutional...... structures that define the American political process, give rise to other movements and protests....

  9. Seasonal movement of brown trout in the Clinch River, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, J.M.; Bettoli, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to monitor the seasonal movements of trophy-size brown trout Salmo trutta in the Clinch River below Norris Dam, Tennessee, to determine whether establishing a special-regulation reach to reduce fishing mortality was a viable management option. Fifteen brown trout (size range, 430-573 mm total length) collected from the river were implanted with radio transmitters between November 1997 and May 1998. Forty-seven percent of these fish died or expelled their transmitters within 50 d postsurgery. The range of movement for surviving brown trout was significantly larger in fall (geometric mean range = 5,111 m) than in any other season. Four brown trout that were monitored for more than 1 year exhibited a limited range of movement (5 km) during the fall season, presumably to spawn. Brown trout also moved more during the fall than in any other season. Harvest restrictions applied to a specific reach of the Clinch River would reduce the exploitation of brown trout in that reach for most of the year but not during the fall, when many fish undertake extensive spawning migrations.

  10. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  11. Neuroimaging findings in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Neuroimaging methods are of great importance for the differential diagnostic delimitation of movement disorders associated with structural damage (neoplasms, ischemic lesions, neuroinfections) from those associated with specific pathophysiological mechanisms (dysmetabolic disorders, neurotransmitter disorders). Learning objective: Presentation of typical imaging findings contributing to nosological differentiation in groups of movement disorders with similar clinical signs. In this presentation are discussed neuroimaging findings in Parkinson‘s disease, atypical parkinsonian syndromes (multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration), parkinsonism in genetically mediated diseases (Wilson’s disease, pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration – PKAN), vascular parkinsonism, hyperkinetic movement disorders (palatal tremor, Huntington‘s chorea, symptomatic chorea in ischemic stroke and diabetes, rubral tremor, ballismus, hemifacial spasm). Contemporary neuroimaging methods enable support for diagnostic and differential diagnostic precision of a number of hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders, which is essential for neurological clinical practice

  12. Eye movements when viewing advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  13. Eye Movements When Viewing Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eHiggins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads, before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet. Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  14. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  15. IDEOLOGY OF MODERN COSSACK MOVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Matsievsky German Olegovitch

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: to consider the main ideas of the Cossack movement which have defined a place and a role of the modern Cossacks in the Russian society. Methodology: methodological basis of research are the standard principles of a historicism and the objectivity, assuming the concrete historical approach to the analysis of events in their dialectic development. Results: some substantial directions of development of ideology of modern Cossack movement are revealed: use of traditions of Cossack democr...

  16. Movement dynamics in office environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rassia, Stamatina T.; Hay, Simon; Beresford, Alastair; Baker, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    This research explores the relationship between the indoor environment and physical activity and sets out to highlight how motion inside buildings can be described as a dynamic system that may be prescribed by design. Our work builds on an exploratory study carried out in a cellular workplace at the Computer Laboratory of the University of Cambridge in order to identify the energy cost of movement in different office spaces. Movement has been recorded using an accurate indoor location system ...

  17. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Alphen, Adriaan

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection of visual surround would slip across the retina and retinal slip of more than only a few degrees per second would cause blurring of the projected image and reduce visual acuity (Westheimer and McKe...

  18. Social Movements, Protest, and Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Silva

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of Latin American social groups to mobilize has excited the imagination of students of the region since the birth of Latin American studies itself. Alongside the cultural turn, many social movement organizations continue to engage directly with politics. Aspirational goals notwithstanding, in order to improve conditions they devote much of their energy to influencing policy. Although scholars have begun to address the policy impact of Latin American social movements, we have limi...

  19. Occupy Movements in the Media

    OpenAIRE

    Iranzo, Amador; Farné, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    In this century, the year 2011 will be remembered as a historical landmark for mass demonstrations for social change. Starting with the so-called Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, followed by the 15M Indignant movement in Spain and Occupy movements in the USA and other countries, these rallies quickly and heterogeneously spread around the world. Despite their distinctive features, they share some common characteristics. On the one hand, there is a general feeling of indignation toward ...

  20. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  1. Both Your Intention and Mine Are Reflected in the Kinematics of My Reach-to-Grasp Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchio, Cristina; Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to ascertain whether in a social context the kinematic parameters are influenced by the stance of the participants. In particular, we consider two basic modes of social cognition, namely cooperation and competition. Naive subjects were asked either to cooperate or to compete with a partner (a professional female…

  2. Reprogramming movements: Extraction of motor intentions from cortical ensemble activity when movement goals change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter James Ifft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit unwanted movements and change motor plans is essential for behaviors of advanced organisms. The neural mechanisms by which the primate motor system rejects undesired actions have received much attention during the last decade, but it is not well understood how this neural function could be utilized to improve the efficiency of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs. Here we employed linear discriminant analysis (LDA and a Wiener filter to extract motor plan transitions from the activity of ensembles of sensorimotor cortex neurons. Two rhesus monkeys, chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays in primary motor (M1 and primary sensory (S1 cortices, were overtrained to produce reaching movements with a joystick towards visual targets upon their presentation. Then, the behavioral task was modified to include a distracting target that flashed for 50, 150 or 250 ms (25% of trials each followed by the true target that appeared at a different screen location. In the remaining 25% of trials, the initial target stayed on the screen and was the target to be approached. M1 and S1 neuronal activity represented both the true and distracting targets, even for the shortest duration of the distracting event. This dual representation persisted both when the monkey initiated movements towards the distracting target and then made corrections and when they moved directly towards the second, true target. The Wiener filter effectively decoded the location of the true target, whereas the LDA classifier extracted the location of both targets from ensembles of 50-250 neurons. Based on these results, we suggest developing real-time BMIs that inhibit unwanted movements represented by brain activity while enacting the desired motor outcome concomitantly.

  3. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  4. Intermittent visual feedback can boost motor learning of rhythmic movements: evidence for error feedback beyond cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tsuyoshi; Hirashima, Masaya; Osu, Rieko; Nozaki, Daichi

    2012-01-11

    Movement error is a driving force behind motor learning. For motor learning with discrete movements, such as point-to-point reaching, it is believed that the brain uses error information of the immediately preceding movement only. However, in the case of continuous and repetitive movements (i.e., rhythmic movements), there is a ceaseless inflow of performance information. Thus, an accurate temporal association of the motor commands with the resultant movement errors is not necessarily guaranteed. We investigated how the brain overcomes this challenging situation. Human participants adapted rhythmic movements between two targets to visuomotor rotations, the amplitudes of which changed randomly from cycle to cycle (the duration of one cycle was ∼400 ms). A system identification technique revealed that the motor adaptation was affected not just by the preceding movement error, but also by a history of errors from the previous cycles. Error information obtained from more than one previous cycle tended to increase, rather than decrease, movement error. This result led to a counterintuitive prediction: providing visual error feedback for only a fraction of cycles should enhance visuomotor adaptation. As predicted, we observed that motor adaptation to a constant visual rotation (30°) was significantly enhanced by providing visual feedback once every fourth or fifth cycle rather than for every cycle. These results suggest that the brain requires a specific processing time to modify the motor command, based on the error information, and so is unable to deal appropriately with the overwhelming flow of error information generated during rhythmic movements. PMID:22238101

  5. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations. PMID

  6. Mindful Movement and Skilled Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dav eClark

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel mind-body connection has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage higher-order inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from mindlessness to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  7. Antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a social anthropological analysis of the antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee. This social movement was determined to halt the construction of proposed nuclear power plants in Tennessee, especially one the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) intended to build in Middle Tennessee. The data for the study were gathered by participant-observation interviewing, and the examination of documents from February 1973 through March 1975. The treatment of the data is based on transactional analysis and portions of the network model. This social movement was composed of a series of informally organized cells connected by a loose network of people who visited and talked with one another. Individual cells tended to be organized on a geographical basis, as was communication. Activity-initiators, however, often contacted antinuclear personnel in other Middle Tennessee cells. Movement activity for many of the antinuclear activists was short-lived. The strategic maneuvers of the movement utilized all the structurally and legally possible alternatives and the nuclear opponents hoped that the public would pressure public officials to oppose nuclear plants. Although the antinuclear activists worked very hard, they did not succeed in halting the planned construction of the Middle Tennessee nuclear plant. Indeed, they had not succeeded in the summer of 1977

  8. Reach/frequency for printed media: Personal probabilities or models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    2000-01-01

    The author evaluates two different ways of estimating reach and frequency of plans for printed media. The first assigns reading probabilities to groups of respondents and calculates reach and frequency by simulation. the second estimates parameters to a model for reach/frequency. It is concluded...... that, in order to prevent bias, ratings per group must be used as reading probabilities. Nevertheless, in most cases, the estimates are still biased compared with panel data, thus overestimating net ´reach. Models with the same assumptions as with assignments of reading probabilities are presented and...

  9. Movement in aesthetic form creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the good practice based experiences found when movement is used to strengthen form creation and to create flow in the process of artistic education. Faced with the design engineering students’ problems with creating forms with aesthetic statements, the experiences with movement...... lens to assess the students’ development of mind-body skills, known as ‘The Three Soma’. The Somatechne model also helps to identify the activity that gives the students the opportunity to develop their sensibility and thus aesthetic attention....... inspired the thesis that the design engineers’ training in aesthetic form creation can be improved by integrating the movement potential into their education. The paper documents the on-going work on developing a model for embodied creation of form called ‘Somatechne model’. The study also identifies a...

  10. Sustainability of natural movement activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Metzgar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a focus on reducing energy consumption in commercial buildings as a means of increasing their sustainability. As part of this trend, various health clubs and fitness centers have been designed to lower consumption of resources such as electricity and water. However, energy consumption is just one part of sustainability, with human health and economic health also paramount. When all components of sustainability are analyzed, other forms of physical activity may possess higher levels of sustainability than traditional gym exercise. Natural movement activity consists of outdoor activity that replicates movements performed by ancient humans during the Paleolithic era. A full analysis of sustainability shows that natural movement activity consumes fewer resources and provides unique psychological and physical benefits compared with traditional indoor exercise.

  11. Parametric HMMs for Movement Recognition and Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker

    2009-01-01

    A common problem in human movement recognition is the recognition of movements of a particular type (semantic). E.g., grasping movements have a particular semantic (grasping) but the actual movements usually have very different appearances due to, e.g., different grasping directions. In this paper...

  12. Integration of egocentric and allocentric information during memory-guided reaching to images of a natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja eFiehler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available When interacting with our environment we generally make use of egocentric and allocentric object information by coding object positions relative to the observer or relative to the environment, respectively. Bayesian theories suggest that the brain integrates both sources of information optimally for perception and action. However, experimental evidence for egocentric and allocentric integration is sparse and has only been studied using abstract stimuli lacking ecological relevance. Here, we investigated the use of egocentric and allocentric information during memory-guided reaching to images of naturalistic scenes. Participants encoded a breakfast scene containing six objects on a table (local objects and three objects in the environment (global objects. After a 2s delay, a visual test scene reappeared for 1s in which one local object was missing (=target and of the remaining, one, three or five local objects or one of the global objects were shifted to the left or to the right. The offset of the test scene prompted participants to reach to the target as precisely as possible. Only local objects served as potential reach targets and thus were task-relevant. When shifting objects we predicted accurate reaching if participants only used egocentric coding of object position and systematic shifts of reach endpoints if allocentric information were used for movement planning. We found that reaching movements were largely affected by allocentric shifts showing an increase in endpoint errors in the direction of object shifts with the number of local objects shifted. No effect occurred when one local or one global object was shifted. Our findings suggest that allocentric cues are indeed used by the brain for memory-guided reaching towards targets in naturalistic visual scenes. Moreover, the integration of egocentric and allocentric object information seems to depend on the extent of changes in the scene.

  13. Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.

    2006-10-31

    Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods are described. In one aspect, a wireless communication device includes a housing, wireless communication circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to communicate wireless signals, movement circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to provide movement data regarding movement sensed by the movement circuitry, and event processing circuitry coupled with the housing and the movement circuitry, wherein the event processing circuitry is configured to process the movement data, and wherein at least a portion of the event processing circuitry is configured to operate in a first operational state having a different power consumption rate compared with a second operational state.

  14. Coordinated Alpha and Gamma Control of Muscles and Spindles in Movement and Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that both α and γ motoneurons are active during movement and posture, but how does the central motor system coordinate the α-γ controls in these tasks remains sketchy due to lack of in vivo data. Here a computational model of α-γ control of muscles and spindles was used to investigate α-γ integration and coordination for movement and posture. The model comprised physiologically realistic spinal circuitry, muscles, proprioceptors, and skeletal biomechanics. In the model, we divided the cortical descending commands into static and dynamic sets, where static commands (static α and γ were for posture maintenance and dynamic commands (dynamic α and γ were responsible for movement. We matched our model to human reaching movement data by straightforward adjustments of descending commands derived from either minimal-jerk trajectories or human EMGs. The matched movement showed smooth reach-to-hold trajectories qualitatively close to human behaviors, and the reproduced EMGs showed the classic tri-phasic patterns. In particular, the function of dynamic γ was to gate the αd command at the propriospinal neurons (PN such that antagonistic muscles can accelerate or decelerate the limb with proper timing. Independent control of joint position and stiffness could be achieved by adjusting static commands. Deefferentation in the model indicated that accurate static commands of static α and γ are essential to achieve stable terminal posture precisely, and that the dynamic γ command is as important as the dynamic α command in controlling antagonistic muscles for desired movements. Deafferentation in the model showed that losing proprioceptive afferents mainly affected the termination position of movement, similar to the abnormal behaviors observed in human and animals. Our results illustrated that tuning the simple forms of α-γ commands can reproduce a range of human reach-to-hold movements, and it is necessary to

  15. Alterations of Eye Movement Control in Neurodegenerative Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gorges

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the fovea centralis, the most central part of the retina and the area of the highest visual accuracy, requires humans to shift their gaze rapidly (saccades to bring some object of interest within the visual field onto the fovea. In addition, humans are equipped with the ability to rotate the eye ball continuously in a highly predicting manner (smooth pursuit to hold a moving target steadily upon the retina. The functional deficits in neurodegenerative movement disorders (e.g., Parkinsonian syndromes involve the basal ganglia that are critical in all aspects of movement control. Moreover, neocortical structures, the cerebellum, and the midbrain may become affected by the pathological process. A broad spectrum of eye movement alterations may result, comprising smooth pursuit disturbance (e.g., interrupting saccades, saccadic dysfunction (e.g., hypometric saccades, and abnormal attempted fixation (e.g., pathological nystagmus and square wave jerks. On clinical grounds, videooculography is a sensitive noninvasive in vivo technique to classify oculomotion function alterations. Eye movements are a valuable window into the integrity of central nervous system structures and their changes in defined neurodegenerative conditions, that is, the oculomotor nuclei in the brainstem together with their directly activating supranuclear centers and the basal ganglia as well as cortical areas of higher cognitive control of attention.

  16. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  17. Motor equivalence and self-motion induced by different movement speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, J. P.; Dwight-Higgin, T.; Lynch, J. E.; Tseng, Y. W.; Martin, V.; Schöner, G.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated pointing movements in 3D asking two questions: (1) Is goal-directed reaching accompanied by self-motion, a component of the joint velocity vector that leaves the hand’s movement unaffected? (2) Are differences in the terminal joint configurations among different speeds of reaching motor equivalent (i.e., terminal joint configurations differ more in directions of joint space that do not produce different pointer-tip positions than in directions that do) or non-motor equ...

  18. Kinematic analysis of dopaminergic effects on skilled handwriting movements in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucha, O; Mecklinger, L; Thome, J; Reiter, A; Alders, G L; Sartor, H; Naumann, M; Lange, K W

    2006-05-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit impairments in the execution of highly practiced and skilled motor actions such as handwriting. The analysis of kinematic aspects of handwriting movements has demonstrated that size, speed, acceleration and stroke duration are affected in PD. Although beneficial effects of dopaminergic therapy in regard to execution of movements have been reported, the effects of pharmacological therapy on these measures have not been examined in detail. The present study has compared kinematic aspects of handwriting movements of 27 healthy subjects and 27 patients with PD both on their usual dopaminergic treatment and following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. Healthy subjects were matched with PD patients according to age, sex, handedness and education level. A digitising tablet was used for the assessment of handwriting movements. Subjects were asked to perform a simple writing task. Movement time, distance, velocity, acceleration and measures of fluency of handwriting movements were measured. Compared with healthy subjects, the kinematics of handwriting movements in PD patients were markedly disturbed following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. Although dopaminergic treatment in PD patients resulted in marked improvements in the kinematics of handwriting movements, PD patients did not reach an undisturbed level of performance. The results suggest that dopamine medication results in partial restoration of automatic movement execution. PMID:16082511

  19. RACIAL AND ETHNIC APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY HEALTH (REACH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 is the cornerstone of CDC's efforts to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health. Launched in 1999, REACH 2010 is designed to eliminate disparities in the following six priority areas: cardiovascular disease, i...

  20. Guaranteed performance in reaching mode of sliding mode controlled systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G K Singh; K E Holé

    2004-02-01

    Conventionally, the parameters of a sliding mode controller (SMC) are selected so as to reduce the time spent in the reaching mode. Although, an upper bound on the time to reach (reaching time) the sliding surface is easily derived, performance guarantee in the state/error space needs more consideration. This paper addresses the design of constant plus proportional rate reaching law-based SMC for second-order nonlinear systems. It is shown that this controller imposes a bounding second-order error-dynamics, and thus guarantees robust performance during the reaching phase. The choice of the controller parameters based on the time to reach a desirable level of output tracking error (OTE), rather than on the reaching time is proposed. Using the Lyapunov theory, it is shown that parameter selections, based on the reaching time criterion, may need substantially larger time to achieve the OTE. Simulation results are presented for a nonlinear spring-massdamper system. It is seen that parameter selections based on the proposed OTE criterion, result in substantially quicker tracking, while using similar levels of control effort.

  1. Learning to control a brain-machine interface for reaching and grasping by primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaching and grasping in primates depend on the coordination of neural activity in large frontoparietal ensembles. Here we demonstrate that primates can learn to reach and grasp virtual objects by controlling a robot arm through a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMIc that uses multiple mathematical models to extract several motor parameters (i.e., hand position, velocity, gripping force, and the EMGs of multiple arm muscles from the electrical activity of frontoparietal neuronal ensembles. As single neurons typically contribute to the encoding of several motor parameters, we observed that high BMIc accuracy required recording from large neuronal ensembles. Continuous BMIc operation by monkeys led to significant improvements in both model predictions and behavioral performance. Using visual feedback, monkeys succeeded in producing robot reach-and-grasp movements even when their arms did not move. Learning to operate the BMIc was paralleled by functional reorganization in multiple cortical areas, suggesting that the dynamic properties of the BMIc were incorporated into motor and sensory cortical representations.

  2. Head movement during walking in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Humza N; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sun, Hai; Marlinski, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20-90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40-90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ∼1.5cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ∼3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ∼1cm and 1.5-3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10-30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5-1m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ∼0.05 and ∼0.1m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ∼0.05m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20-50°/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3-0.5cm taller and held their head 0.5-2cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25-100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ∼20°/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  3. Blacks and the Women's Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiacono, Stephanie

    1989-01-01

    Although Black female leaders were influential in creating the modern women's movement, feminism has evolved differently for both Black and White women. Suggests that, although Black women have struggled largely against racial and economic inequalities, women of all colors and backgrounds should embrace their diversity and unite to oppose racism…

  4. Movement Opens Pathways to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppo, Marjorie; Davis, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a framework for movement activities upon which physical educators and early childhood teachers can build appropriate learning activities that reinforce the connection between the mind and body for children between the ages of two and seven. The authors discuss Piaget's stages of cognitive development. The authors hope that…

  5. Torsional eye movements in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van Rijn

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIf one has to give a description of eye movements, what first comes to mind is the possibility of the eyes to rotate in horizontal and vertical directions. It is generally less obvious that the eyes are capable of moving in a third. namely the torsional. direction. This capability is by

  6. Social Movements in Political Science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Císař, Ondřej

    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 - (Della Porta, D.; Diani, M.), s. 50-67 ISBN 978-0-19-967840-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29032S Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : political science * social movements * democracy Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences

  7. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  8. Action Research and Social Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Kemmis

    1993-01-01

    Large-scale policy research on topics of concern to teachers may assist in changing educational theory, policy and practice, as may educational action research. This article discusses different traditions of action research in relation to their views about the connection of research and social movement, touching on the so-called "macro-micro" problem which bedevils conceptualizations of this relationship.

  9. Ketotic hyperglycemia with movement disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Awasthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chorea, hemichorea-hemiballismus and severe partial seizures may be the presenting features of nonketotic hyperglycemia in older adults with type 2 diabetes, but cases in young adults with type 1 diabetes are rare. We hereby report a very rare case of diabetic ketosis with movement disorder in a young patient.

  10. THE INTERNATIONAL WALDORF SCHOOL MOVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VON BARAVALLE, HERMANN

    AN HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE WALDORF SCHOOL PLAN TRACES THE MOVEMENT FROM ITS FOUNDING IN STUTTGART, GERMANY IN 1919, BY THE WALDORF ASTORIA COMPANY AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF RUDOLF STEINER, TO ITS INTRODUCTION INTO SWITZERLAND, OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, THE AMERICAS, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND SOUTH AFRICA, A TOTAL OF 175 SCHOOLS AS OF 1963. THE…

  11. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective k...

  12. Eventful places in the 2011 movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Bjarke Skærlund

    is dialectical and mutually constitutive: the physical and symbolic characteristics of place influence the formation of the movement and its actions while the latter re-creates the place. This is a corrective to a dominant approach in social movement studies to see movements as a ‘dependent variable......Inspired by the Occupy movement, the Egyptian revolutionaries and other of the 2011 social movements, this paper investigates the relationship between social movement and place. Drawing on first-hand accounts from these movements, I argue that the relationship between movement and place......’ that is to be explained (della Porta 2008) instead of a political subject with the ability to affect itself and society; and a corrective to the growing body of literature on the geographies of social movements that often has a too static and state-centred approach. Using John Agnew’s (1987) conceptualisation of place...

  13. The Jamaah Tabligh Movement in Indonesia: Peaceful Fundamentalist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The birth of Jamaah Tabligh was in fact a direct reaction to the emergence of aggressive Hindu proselytization movement, such as the Shuddhi (Purifying and Sangathan (Consolidation movement, which made wide-reaching attempt in the early 20th century to "return" to Hinduism those who had "left" the religion and converted to Islam during the period of Muslim political power in India. The main target of these right-wing Hindu movements were those they called "borderline Muslims" who still maintained many beliefs and cultural habit that had come from Hinuism. Maulana Muhammad Ilyas, founder of Jamaah Tabligh, believed that only a grass-roots Islamic movement could challenge the effort of Shuddhi and Sangathan, thought "purifying" these "borderline" Muslims and educating them about basic faith and worship in order to save them from the process of Hindunisation.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v11i3.596

  14. Movement Synchrony Forges Social Bonds across Group Divides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçgenç, Bahar; Cohen, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Group dynamics play an important role in the social interactions of both children and adults. A large amount of research has shown that merely being allocated to arbitrarily defined groups can evoke disproportionately positive attitudes toward one's in-group and negative attitudes toward out-groups, and that these biases emerge in early childhood. This prompts important empirical questions with far-reaching theoretical and applied significance. How robust are these inter-group biases? Can biases be mitigated by behaviors known to bond individuals and groups together? How can bonds be forged across existing group divides? To explore these questions, we examined the bonding effects of interpersonal synchrony on minimally constructed groups in a controlled experiment. In-group and out-group bonding were assessed using questionnaires administered before and after a task in which groups performed movements either synchronously or non-synchronously in a between-participants design. We also developed an implicit behavioral measure, the Island Game, in which physical proximity was used as an indirect measure of interpersonal closeness. Self-report and behavioral measures showed increased bonding between groups after synchronous movement. Bonding with the out-group was significantly higher in the condition in which movements were performed synchronously than when movements were performed non-synchronously between groups. The findings are discussed in terms of their importance for the developmental social psychology of group dynamics as well as their implications for applied intervention programs. PMID:27303341

  15. REACH Basics for Chinese Producers of Electric Household Appliances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr.Klaus W.Mehl

    2008-01-01

    The following article explains the EU chemical regulation "REACH', explicates the requirements that Chinese producers are facing, and shows how they can fulfill the requirements and secure their access to the EU market. The consequences of failing to fulfill REACH requirements are given in REACH Article 5: No data, no market: ... substances ... in articles ... shall not be ... placed on the market unless they have been registered In other words: Without registration of chemicals Chinese producers of electric household appliances may loose their EU market.

  16. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Horsley

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest movements that formed in response to Jesus’ mission exhibit similar features and patterns. Jesus is not treated as separate from social roles and political-economic relationships. Viewing Jesus against the background of village communities in which people lived, the Gospels are understood as genuine communication with other people in historical social contexts. The article argues that the net effect of these interrelated factors of theologically determined New Testament interpretation is a combination of assumptions and procedures that would be unacceptable in the regular investigation of history. Another version of the essay was published in Horsley, Richard A (ed, A people’s history of Christianity, Volume 1: Christian origins, 23-46. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress.

  17. OrbitView: Eye movement visualization software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Simon; Optican, Lance M.; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Zee, David S.; Shaikh, Aasef G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of eye movements often helps to diagnose ocular motor disorders in the clinic, and is also used as a research tool in ocular motor, vision and vestibular research. Eye movements, however, are usually recorded without simultaneous video recordings, making offline interpretation difficult. We developed a tool that converts the measured eye movement data into a three-dimensional (3D) movie of eye movements. Having useful functions such as slow-play, pause and exaggeration of the movements, this new software provides a research and teaching tool to aid interpretation of the recorded eye movements. PMID:21689683

  18. Hanford Reach - Strategic Control of Phragmites Within Saddle Mountain Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Saddle Lakes Fire of 2015 burned 14,200 acres of habitat on Saddle Mountain National Wildlife Refuge, part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Within the...

  19. Stream Habitat Reach Summary - North Coast [ds63

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The shapefile is based on habitat unit level data summarized at the stream reach level. The database represents salmonid stream habitat surveys from 645 streams of...

  20. Monitoring Weather Station Fire Rehabilitation Treatments: Hanford Reach National Monument

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Weather Station Fire (July, 2005) burned across 4,918 acres in the Saddle Mountain Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument, which included parts of the...

  1. Helping the Library Reach Out to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Helping the Library Reach Out to the Future Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Encouraging future medical researchers: (l-r) NLM Director Dr. Donald ...

  2. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k Watercourses (arcs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the ARC features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes are also...

  3. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k Waterbodies (polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the POLYGON waterbody features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes...

  4. Hanford Reach - Snively Basin Rye Field Rehabilitation 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Snively Basin area of the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) within the Hanford Reach National Monument was historically used to farm cereal rye, among other...

  5. Reach tracking reveals dissociable processes underlying cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Christopher D; Moher, Jeff; Sobel, David M; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    The current study uses reach tracking to investigate how cognitive control is implemented during online performance of the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and the Eriksen flanker task (Experiment 2). We demonstrate that two of the measures afforded by reach tracking, initiation time and reach curvature, capture distinct patterns of effects that have been linked to dissociable processes underlying cognitive control in electrophysiology and functional neuroimaging research. Our results suggest that initiation time reflects a response threshold adjustment process involving the inhibition of motor output, while reach curvature reflects the degree of co-activation between response alternatives registered by a monitoring process over the course of a trial. In addition to shedding new light on fundamental questions concerning how these processes contribute to the cognitive control of behavior, these results present a framework for future research to investigate how these processes function across different tasks, develop across the lifespan, and differ among individuals. PMID:27045465

  6. Guerrilla Marketing : Reaching the customer in an untraditional way

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Per; Stierna, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: One is under continuous influence of commercials and advertisements each day, it has reached to such a level that the end customer are blocking today’s channels. Therefore the authors of this thesis argue that mainstream marketing approaches are getting old, TV commercials and traditional advertisements are not as effective as it has been. For instance, in 1965 one could reach 80% of a mainstream target audience with three advertisements spots. Accordingly, in 2002, one needed 1...

  7. Characterising physical habitat at the reach scale: River Tern, Shropshire

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Gemma

    2006-01-01

    Characterisation of the complex geomorphological and ecological structure of river channels into workable units of instream habitat is a key step in enabling the assessment of habitat for river management purposes. The research presented in this thesis uses a range of methodological approaches at a variety of spatial scales in order to improve the conceptual basis of habitat characterisation at the reach and sub-reach scale. An appraisal of published works is used in conjunction with an ext...

  8. Optical technologies in extended-reach access networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Elaine; Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    The merging of access and metro networks has been proposed as a solution to lower the unit cost of customer bandwidth. This paper reviews some of the recent advances and challenges in extended-reach optical access networks.......The merging of access and metro networks has been proposed as a solution to lower the unit cost of customer bandwidth. This paper reviews some of the recent advances and challenges in extended-reach optical access networks....

  9. III. Reaching an International Agreement – The Negotiations: Level I

    OpenAIRE

    Nagelmackers-Voinov, Misha

    2014-01-01

    The main objective is two folded: ease the pressure mounting against Switzerland to adopt automatic exchange of information and resolve taxation of foreign assets in Swiss banks, while obtaining access to the German financial market. Considering Switzerland’s position, a credible, proactive and creative strategy became necessary. Credibility could be reached by seeking cooperation and agreement with powerful partners – such as Germany and the United Kingdom. Proactivity could be reached by ma...

  10. Threat affects risk preferences in movement decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. O'Brien

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Emotional states such as sadness, anger, and threat have been shown to play a critical role in decision-making processes. Here we addressed the question of whether risk preferences are influenced by postural threat and whether this influence generalizes across motor tasks. We examined risk attitudes in the context of arm-reaching and whole-body leaning movements, expecting that increased postural threat would lead to proportionally similar changes in risk-sensitivity for each motor task. Healthy young adults were shown a series of two-alternative forced-choice lotteries, where they were asked to choose between a riskier lottery and a safer lottery on each trial. Our lotteries consisted of different monetary rewards and target sizes. Subjects performed each choice task at ground level and atop an elevated platform. In the presence of this postural threat, increased physiological arousal was correlated with decreased movement variability. To determine risk-sensitivity, we quantified the frequency with which a subject chose the riskier lottery and fit lottery responses to a choice model based on cumulative prospect theory. Subjects exhibited idiosyncratic changes in risk-sensitivity between motor tasks and between elevations. However, we found that overweighting of small probabilities increased with postural threat in the whole-body task, indicating a more cautious, risk-averse strategy is ascribed to the possibility of a fall. Subjects were also more risk-seeking in the whole-body movements than in arm-reaching at low elevation; this behavior does not seem to derive from consistent distortions in utility or probability representations but may be explained by subjects’ inaccurate estimation of their own motor variability. Overall, our findings suggest that implicit threat can modify risk attitudes in the motor domain, and the threat may induce risk-aversion in salient movement tasks.

  11. Trajectory Indexing Using Movement Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    -the-shelf database management systems typically do not offer higher-dimensional indexing, this reduction in dimensionality allows us to use existing DBMSes to store and index trajectories. Moreover, we argue that, given the right circumstances, indexing these dimensionality-reduced trajectories can be more efficient......With the proliferation of mobile computing, the ability to index efficiently the movements of mobile objects becomes important. Objects are typically seen as moving in two-dimensional (x,y) space, which means that their movements across time may be embedded in the three-dimensional (x,y,t) space...... than using a three-dimensional index. A decisive factor here is the fractal dimension of the network.the lower, the more efficient is the proposed approach. This hypothesis is verified by an experimental study that incorporates trajectories stemming from real and synthetic road networks....

  12. Stochastic modelling of animal movement

    OpenAIRE

    Smouse, Peter E.; Focardi, Stefano; Moorcroft, Paul R.; Kie, John G.; Forester, James D.; Morales, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Modern animal movement modelling derives from two traditions. Lagrangian models, based on random walk behaviour, are useful for multi-step trajectories of single animals. Continuous Eulerian models describe expected behaviour, averaged over stochastic realizations, and are usefully applied to ensembles of individuals. We illustrate three modern research arenas. (i) Models of home-range formation describe the process of an animal ‘settling down’, accomplished by including one or more focal poi...

  13. International Capital Movements Under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the determinants of international movements of physical capital in a model with uncertainty and international trade in goods and securities.In our model, the world allocation of capital is governed, to some extent, by the asset preferences of risk averse consumer-investors. In a one-good variant in the spirit of the MacDougall model, we find that relative factor abundance, relative labor force size and relative production riskiness have separate but interrelated infl...

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery for movement disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Frighetto, Leonardo; Bizzi, Jorge; Annes, Rafael D’Agostini; Silva, Rodrigo dos Santos; Oppitz, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Initially designed for the treatment of functional brain targets, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has achieved an important role in the management of a wide range of neurosurgical pathologies. The interest in the application of the technique for the treatment of pain, and psychiatric and movement disorders has returned in the beginning of the 1990s, stimulated by the advances in neuroimaging, computerized dosimetry, treatment planning software systems, and the outstanding results of radiosurg...

  15. Principles of the Olympic movement

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to clarify, review and reflect on the importance of the Olympic movement main principles on nowadays sporting society. For this purpose, the paper goes through the contents of the Olympic Charter, the threats to humanist thinking, the Olympic Games history and the most recent contributions to the Olympic philosophy. Similarly, this article goes deep on the figure of Pierre de Coubertin as the precursor of modern Olympic Games leading to the development of a relation...

  16. Plasticity in eye movement control

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Chongde

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum plays an important role in the recalibration and adaptive adjustment of movements, as well as learning new motor skills and motor related associations. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying cerebellar motor learning. To obtain a better understanding, in how the cerebellum processes and stores information, we used specific perturbations that affected the information processing of the cerebellum. Signal transduction pathways were affected that were...

  17. Eye movements reset visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Michael A; Meshi, Dar; Pisarcik, Jordan; Levine, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Human vision uses saccadic eye movements to rapidly shift the sensitive foveal portion of our retina to objects of interest. For vision to function properly amidst these ballistic eye movements, a mechanism is needed to extract discrete percepts on each fixation from the continuous stream of neural activity that spans fixations. The speed of visual parsing is crucial because human behaviors ranging from reading to driving to sports rely on rapid visual analysis. We find that a brain signal associated with moving the eyes appears to play a role in resetting visual analysis on each fixation, a process that may aid in parsing the neural signal. We quantified the degree to which the perception of tilt is influenced by the tilt of a stimulus on a preceding fixation. Two key conditions were compared, one in which a saccade moved the eyes from one stimulus to the next and a second simulated saccade condition in which the stimuli moved in the same manner but the subjects did not move their eyes. We find that there is a brief period of time at the start of each fixation during which the tilt of the previous stimulus influences perception (in a direction opposite to the tilt aftereffect)--perception is not instantaneously reset when a fixation starts. Importantly, the results show that this perceptual bias is much greater, with nearly identical visual input, when saccades are simulated. This finding suggests that, in real-saccade conditions, some signal related to the eye movement may be involved in the reset phenomenon. While proprioceptive information from the extraocular muscles is conceivably a factor, the fast speed of the effect we observe suggests that a more likely mechanism is a corollary discharge signal associated with eye movement. PMID:23241264

  18. Gender and Awa Dance Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Hisako; 中村, 久子

    2000-01-01

    At around the period when Japanese women began to seek the liberation from sexual segregation, the sex diffreence in the movements of the Awa Dance gradually widened, due to obtaining more attractive performance as tourism resources. Women danced a female dance and men danced a male dance. Despite clear differences in movements,some women came to challenge the male dance.This article attempts to make clear,through interviews, who began to dance the male dance and when and...

  19. Organizational Knowledge Management Movement Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Alen Badal

    2013-01-01

    Organizational behaviour is often dependent on the strategic movement of internal knowledge for success. Organizational knowledge management methodologies require the involvement of stakeholders. In large organizations, involved stakeholders shall be selected by the entire membership. Key involvement roles and considerations should be offered to/involve the ‘least likely to participate’. Suck stakeholders often possess the most influential power to move the stakeholders; if not, they demonstr...

  20. Social Movements, Protest, and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of Latin American social groups to mobilize has excited the imagination of students of the region since the birth of Latin American studies itself. Alongside the cultural turn, many social movement organizations continue to engage directly with politics. Aspirational goals notwithstanding, in order to improve conditions they devote much of their energy to influencing policy. Although scholars have begun to address the policy impact of Latin American social movements, we have limited systematized understanding of the conditions and mechanisms by which social movement protest affects policy outcomes. This essay argues that a policy process approach offers a useful first cut into more systematic analysis of social movements, protest, and their policy consequences in Latin America. Resumen: Movimientos Sociales, Protesta y Políticas de Gobierno La capacidad de movilización social que evidencia América Latina ha captado el imaginario de investigadores desde los albores de los estudios latinoamericanos. A pesar del giro cultural sobre el tema, muchos movimientos sociales siguen entablando la política de forma directa. Amén de sus metas aspiracionales, en pos de mejorar sus condiciones dedican una cantidad apreciable de sus esfuerzos a influenciar políticas de gobierno. Si bien es cierto que una cantidad no menospreciable de investigadores consideran esos impactos aún hace falta conocimiento sistematizado sobre las condiciones y los mecanismos a través de los cuales la protesta social afecta las políticas del estado. Este ensayo argumenta que enfoques centrados en los procesos de la política pública ofrecen una buena entrada al análisis más sistemático sobre los movimientos sociales, protesta, y sus consecuencias para políticas de gobierno.

  1. Modeling Mass Movements on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, M. H.; Glaze, L.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Murphy, W.; Neumann, G.

    2002-05-01

    Slope failure and the resulting movement of material downslope on Mars has never been witnessed, making careful data analyses combined with physical modeling the only way to understand their emplacement process. Evidence exists for varying types of landsliding on Mars. They are a significant geomorphic agent in the modification of the surface of Mars and their emplacement style remains contentious. Furthermore, little is known about the slope forming materials and the processes that govern the triggering, failure, and deposition of landslides. We are examining the emplacement of a range of mass movement types in varying geologic settings on Mars by building on detailed landslide field and modeling studies we have conducted on Earth. We have identified a spectrum of different landslide types on Mars ranging from small gully failures such as those in Nirgal Vallis, lobate debris aprons, to large rock avalanches such as those in Ganges Chasma. The deposits associated with gullies and small debris aprons have characteristics analogous to alluvial fans, rock chutes, talus slopes, and debris flows on Earth. The large landslides on Mars have similar attributes to terrestrial rock avalanches and rockslides. Detailed studies on Earth have shown unique topographic and morphological differences between these mass movement types, which have been well documented and that we have examined. We are using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data to conduct new geomorphic, topographic and theoretical modeling studies on the emplacement of landslides on Mars at resolutions comparable to those on Earth.

  2. Movement of global warming issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), and the movement of the global warming issues as seen from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Conference of the Parties: COP) and the policy discussions in Japan. From the Fifth Assessment Report published by IPCC, it shows the following items: (1) increasing trends of greenhouse effect gas emissions during 1970 and 2010, (2) trends in world's greenhouse effect gas emissions according to income segment, and (3) factor analysis of changes in greenhouse effect gas emissions. Next, it takes up the greenhouse gas emission scenario of IPCC, shows the scenario due to temperature rise pattern, and introduces the assumption of emission reduction due to BECCS. Regarding the 2 deg. scenario that has become a hot topic in international negotiations, it describes the reason for difficulties in its implementation. In addition, as the international trends of global warming, it describes the agreement of numerical targets for emissions at COP3 (Kyoto Conference) and the subsequent movements. Finally, it introduces Japan's measures against global warming, as well as the future movement. (A.O.)

  3. Salt movement in disturbed soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review is presented of information on salt movement in disturbed soils, particularly in soils that have been disturbed by pipeline construction. The review has two main objectives: to assess climatic and soil conditions under which salts will move out of the root zone in a disturbed soil and to determine the rate at which salts will move in disturbed soils. A literature base was established using computer database and library searches, and a number of studies were reviewed. Many studies, dealing specifically with salt movement over time in disturbed soils under climatic and salt conditions similar to those found in Alberta, are summarized in tabular form. Data found in the literature tend to be sparse and incomplete, making firm conclusions about rates of salt movement difficult. In the brown soil zone, 5 years may be sufficient time for sodium absorption ratio and electrical conductivity levels, elevated during construction, to return to pre-construction conditions in coarse to moderately coarse textured soils. In medium to moderately fine textured soils, 10-26 years may be required. In the dark brown soil zone, 5 years is marginal for return to pre-construction conditions. Data in the black soil zone are limited and results inconsistent. 37 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. PMID:26599117

  5. Communication Theory and the Consumer Movement-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Defines and traces the origins of the consumer movement and uses communication theories to explain the effects of the movement. Available from: Public Relations Review, Ray Hiebert, Dean, College of Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. (MH)

  6. The dynamics of sensorimotor cortical oscillations during the observation of hand movements: an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Avanzini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The observation of action done by others determines a desynchronization of the rhythms recorded from cortical central regions. Here, we examined whether the observation of different types of hand movements (target directed, non-target directed, cyclic and non-cyclic elicits different EEG cortical temporal patterns. METHODOLOGY: Video-clips of four types of hand movements were shown to right-handed healthy participants. Two were target directed (grasping and pointing motor acts; two were non-target directed (supinating and clenching movements. Grasping and supinating were performed once, while pointing and clenching twice (cyclic movements. High-density EEG was recorded and analyzed by means of wavelet transform, subdividing the time course in time bins of 200 ms. The observation of all presented movements produced a desynchronization of alpha and beta rhythms in central and parietal regions. The rhythms desynchronized as soon as the hand movement started, the nadir being reached around 700 ms after movement onset. At the end of the movement, a large power rebound occurred for all bands. Target and non-target directed movements produced an alpha band desynchronization in the central electrodes at the same time, but with a stronger desynchronization and a prolonged rebound for target directed motor acts. Most interestingly, there was a clear correlation between the velocity profile of the observed movements and beta band modulation. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the observation of motor acts determines a modulation of cortical rhythm analogous to that occurring during motor act execution. In particular, the cortical motor system closely follows the velocity of the observed movements. This finding provides strong evidence for the presence in humans of a mechanism (mirror mechanism mapping action observation on action execution motor programs.

  7. Velocity neurons improve performance more than goal or position neurons do in a simulated closed-loop BCI arm-reaching task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yu-Chang Liao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs that convert brain-recorded neural signals into intended movement commands could eventually be combined with Functional Electrical Stimulation to allow individuals with Spinal Cord Injury to regain effective and intuitive control of their paralyzed limbs. To accelerate the development of such an approach, we developed a model of closed-loop BCI control of arm movements that (1 generates realistic arm movements (based on experimentally measured, visually-guided movements with real-time error correction, (2 simulates cortical neurons with firing properties consistent with literature reports, and (3 decodes intended movements from the noisy neural ensemble. With this model we explored (1 the relative utility of neurons tuned for different movement parameters (position, velocity, and goal and (2 the utility of recording from larger numbers of neurons – critical issues for technology development and for determining appropriate brain areas for recording. We simulated arm movements that could be practically restored to individuals with severe paralysis, i.e., movements from an armrest to a volume in front of the person. Performance was evaluated by calculating the smallest movement endpoint target radius within which the decoded cursor position could dwell for one second. Our results show that goal, position, and velocity neurons all contribute to improve performance. However, velocity neurons enabled smaller targets to be reached in shorter amounts of time than goal or position neurons. Increasing the number of neurons also improved performance, although performance saturated at 30-50 neurons for most neuron types. Overall, our work presents a closed-loop BCI simulator that models error corrections and the firing properties of various movement-related neurons that can be easily modified to incorporate different neural properties. We anticipate that this kind of tool will be important for development of future BCIs.

  8. Velocity neurons improve performance more than goal or position neurons do in a simulated closed-loop BCI arm-reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James Y; Kirsch, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) that convert brain-recorded neural signals into intended movement commands could eventually be combined with Functional Electrical Stimulation to allow individuals with Spinal Cord Injury to regain effective and intuitive control of their paralyzed limbs. To accelerate the development of such an approach, we developed a model of closed-loop BCI control of arm movements that (1) generates realistic arm movements (based on experimentally measured, visually-guided movements with real-time error correction), (2) simulates cortical neurons with firing properties consistent with literature reports, and (3) decodes intended movements from the noisy neural ensemble. With this model we explored (1) the relative utility of neurons tuned for different movement parameters (position, velocity, and goal) and (2) the utility of recording from larger numbers of neurons-critical issues for technology development and for determining appropriate brain areas for recording. We simulated arm movements that could be practically restored to individuals with severe paralysis, i.e., movements from an armrest to a volume in front of the person. Performance was evaluated by calculating the smallest movement endpoint target radius within which the decoded cursor position could dwell for 1 s. Our results show that goal, position, and velocity neurons all contribute to improve performance. However, velocity neurons enabled smaller targets to be reached in shorter amounts of time than goal or position neurons. Increasing the number of neurons also improved performance, although performance saturated at 30-50 neurons for most neuron types. Overall, our work presents a closed-loop BCI simulator that models error corrections and the firing properties of various movement-related neurons that can be easily modified to incorporate different neural properties. We anticipate that this kind of tool will be important for development of future BCIs. PMID:26236225

  9. Alternative Tourism: A Social Movement Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    McGehee, Nancy Gard

    1999-01-01

    This study develops and tests a theoretical model drawing on social psychological and resource-mobilization perspectives of social movement theory to explain changes in social movement participation and support for activism among Earthwatch Expedition volunteers. The social psychological perspective of social movements recognizes the role of self-efficacy and consciousness-raising for the participation in and success of social movement organizations. The resou...

  10. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  11. Humans use visual and remembered information about object location to plan pointing movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.-M.; Knill, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether humans use a target's remembered location to plan reaching movements to targets according to the relative reliabilities of visual and remembered information. Using their index finger, subjects moved a virtual object from one side of a table to the other, and then went back to

  12. Strategic Directions of the Movement Disorder Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Hallett, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) is the international not-for-profit organization representing and serving clinicians, other health professionals, researchers and policy makers interested in the area of movement disorders. The Society is represented in 68 countries by approximately 1,500 members. The Society has developed regional sections and welcomes affiliation of regional Movement Disorder groups.

  13. The flexible nature of verb movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeneman, O.N.C.J.

    2001-01-01

    This study offers a new theory of verb movement parametrization. The author proposes to look upon verb movement as an operation that the verb undertakes in order to protect one or more of its features. It is no longer a movement to a prefabricated position but a structure-creating operation. Output

  14. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  15. Transformers: Movement Experiences for Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagovic, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Transformers are simple movement experiences for the classroom that engage the mind and body, focus energy, and help children transition to the next activity. Teachers can use them throughout the day, every day. The author explains the basic movements and suggests ways to build on them. They range from deep breathing to gentle wake-up movements to…

  16. Mixed movements/performance-based drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. As one in a series working with architectonic implementation in relation to body and movements, the actual project relates body-movement and dynamic drawing and presents the material as interactive ‘space-time-tables’....

  17. Long-range temporal correlations, multifractality, and the causal relation between neural inputs and movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eHu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the causal relation between neural inputs and movements is very important for the success of brain machine interfaces (BMIs. In this study, we analyze 104 neurons’ firings using statistical, information theoretic, and fractal analysis. The latter include Fano factor analysis, multifractal adaptive fractal analysis (MF-AFA, and wavelet multifractal analysis. We find neuronal firings are highly nonstationary, and Fano factor analysis always indicates long-range correlations in neuronal firings, irrespective of whether those firings are correlated with movement trajectory or not, and thus does not reveal any actual correlations between neural inputs and movements. On the other hand, MF-AFA and wavelet multifractal analysis clearly indicate that when neuronal firings are not well correlated with movement trajectory, they do not have or only have weak temporal correlations. When neuronal firings are well correlated with movements, they are characterized by very strong temporal correlations, up to a time scale comparable to the average time between two successive reaching tasks. This suggests that neurons well correlated with hand trajectory experienced a re-setting effect at the start of each reaching task, in the sense that within the movement correlated neurons the spike trains’ long range dependences persisted about the length of time the monkey used to switch between task executions. A new task execution re-sets their activity, making them only weakly correlated with their prior activities on longer time scales. We further discuss the significance of the coalition of those important neurons in executing cortical control of prostheses.

  18. Trial-by-Trial Adaptation of Movements during Mental Practice under Force Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nabeel Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human nervous system tries to minimize the effect of any external perturbing force by bringing modifications in the internal model. These modifications affect the subsequent motor commands generated by the nervous system. Adaptive compensation along with the appropriate modifications of internal model helps in reducing human movement errors. In the current study, we studied how motor imagery influences trial-to-trial learning in a robot-based adaptation task. Two groups of subjects performed reaching movements with or without motor imagery in a velocity-dependent force field. The results show that reaching movements performed with motor imagery have relatively a more focused generalization pattern and a higher learning rate in training direction.

  19. Aspectual Coercion in Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehension includes interpreting sentences in terms of aspectual categories such as processes ("Harry climbed") and culminations ("Harry reached the top"). Adding a verbal modifier such as "for many years" to a culmination coerces its interpretation from one to many culminations. Previous studies have found that coercion increases lexical…

  20. Motor Cortex Activity During Functional Motor Skills: An fNIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyori, Ryota; Bisconti, Silvia; Ulrich, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of brain activity during motor task performance have been limited to fine motor movements due to technological constraints presented by traditional neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) offers a promising method by which to overcome these constraints and investigate motor performance of functional motor tasks. The current study used fNIRS to quantify hemodynamic responses within the primary motor cortex in twelve healthy adults as they performed unimanual right, unimanual left, and bimanual reaching, and stepping in place. Results revealed that during both unimanual reaching tasks, the contralateral hemisphere showed significant activation in channels located approximately 3 cm medial to the C3 (for right-hand reach) and C4 (for left-hand reach) landmarks. Bimanual reaching and stepping showed activation in similar channels, which were located bilaterally across the primary motor cortex. The medial channels, surrounding Cz, showed significantly higher activations during stepping when compared to bimanual reaching. Our results extend the viability of fNIRS to study motor function and build a foundation for future investigation of motor development in infants during nascent functional behaviors and monitor how they may change with age or practice. PMID:26243304

  1. What makes a movement a gesture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Miriam A; Wakefield, Elizabeth M; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Theories of how adults interpret the actions of others have focused on the goals and intentions of actors engaged in object-directed actions. Recent research has challenged this assumption, and shown that movements are often interpreted as being for their own sake (Schachner & Carey, 2013). Here we postulate a third interpretation of movement-movement that represents action, but does not literally act on objects in the world. These movements are gestures. In this paper, we describe a framework for predicting when movements are likely to be seen as representations. In Study 1, adults described one of three scenes: (1) an actor moving objects, (2) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them) or (3) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants systematically described the movements as depicting an object-directed action when the actor moved objects, and favored describing the movements as depicting movement for its own sake when the actor produced the same movements in the absence of objects. However, participants favored describing the movements as representations when the actor produced the movements near, but not on, the objects. Study 2 explored two additional features-the form of an actor's hands and the presence of speech-like sounds-to test the effect of context on observers' classification of movement as representational. When movements are seen as representations, they have the power to influence communication, learning, and cognition in ways that movement for its own sake does not. By incorporating representational gesture into our framework for movement analysis, we take an important step towards developing a more cohesive understanding of action-interpretation. PMID:26513354

  2. Full monitoring for long-reach TWDM passive optical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Min; Chen, Jiajia; Moeyaert, Véronique; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents a novel and simple fiber monitoring system based on multi-wavelength transmission-reflection analysis for long-reach time and wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks. For the first time, the full localization functionality of long-reach passive optical networks is possible with the proposed monitoring scheme, including supporting fault detection, identification, and localization in both feeder and distribution fiber segments. By measuring the transmitted and reflected/backscattered optical powers launched by an unmodulated continuous-wave optical source, the proposed solution is able to supervise the network with good spatial accuracy, a high detection speed and a low impact on data traffic. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental validation show that the proposed scheme is capable of providing an accurate fault monitoring functionality for long-reach time and wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks. PMID:27410849

  3. Should these potential CMR substances have been registered under REACH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Dybdahl, Marianne;

    2013-01-01

    (Q)SAR models were applied to screen around 68,000 REACH pre-registered substances for CMR properties (carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction). Predictions from 14 relevant models were combined to reach overall calls for C, M and R. Combining predictions may reduce “noise” and increase...... accuracy in the overall call. The Nordic substance register database (SPIN) was used to identify not registered substances where human exposure is likely to be significant. The Danish EPA may use the results for future priority setting for e.g. proposals for (harmonized) CMR-classification or targeted...

  4. Integrated testing strategy (ITS) for bioaccumulation assessment under REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfentati, Emilio;

    2014-01-01

    REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) regulation requires that all the chemicals produced or imported in Europe above 1 tonne/year are registered. To register a chemical, physicochemical, toxicological and ecotoxicological information needs to be reported in a...... dossier. REACH promotes the use of alternative methods to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal (eco)toxicity testing. Within the EU OSIRIS project, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) have been developed for the rational use of non-animal testing approaches in chemical hazard assessment. Here we...

  5. Study on New Approaches for extended chemical management and REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    existing chemical regulations in view of protecting vulnerable populations from “excessive total risk” and to explore the possibilities for improvement. Firstly, the completeness of the REACH exposure scenario was reviewed with the finding that the current scenario does not take into account territorial...... without controlling the quality of recycled materials, increased recycling of resources in a circular economy might increase undesirable recycling of micro-pollutants. Finally, a systemic approach based on sustainable resource flows was proposed for extended chemical management and the role of REACH in a...

  6. Visually Guided Control of Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Walter W. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The papers given at an intensive, three-week workshop on visually guided control of movement are presented. The participants were researchers from academia, industry, and government, with backgrounds in visual perception, control theory, and rotorcraft operations. The papers included invited lectures and preliminary reports of research initiated during the workshop. Three major topics are addressed: extraction of environmental structure from motion; perception and control of self motion; and spatial orientation. Each topic is considered from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Implications for control and display are suggested.

  7. Brownian movement and molecular reality

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, Jean

    2005-01-01

    How do we know that molecules really exist? An important clue came from Brownian movement, a concept developed in 1827 by botanist Robert Brown, who noticed that tiny objects like pollen grains shook and moved erratically when viewed under a microscope. Nearly 80 years later, in 1905, Albert Einstein explained this ""Brownian motion"" as the result of bombardment by molecules. Einstein offered a quantitative explanation by mathematically estimating the average distance covered by the particles over time as a result of molecular bombardment. Four years later, Jean Baptiste Perrin wrote Brownia

  8. Movement of the diaphragm during radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movement of the target volume during the exposure to radiation results in decreased accuracy in radiotherapy. We carried out the quantitative evaluation of the movement of the diaphragm during the radiation therapy. Seventy seven patients, who received radiation therapy for lung cancer from December 1988 to February 1990 at the Osaka-prefectural Habikino Hospital, were studied. The movement was recorded with a sonoprinter at the time of treatment planning for radiotherapy, and the length of movement was evaluated at 6 points on the diaphragm. In a study of 402 points in 77 patients, the average movement was 12 mm, and the maximum movement was 40 mm. At the 17% of the points, the movement exceeded 20 mm. The largest movement was observed at the outer point of the right lung. Movement was greater in men than in women. Performance status was not related to the degree of movement. We concluded that in chest and abdominal irradiation, movement caused by respiration is not negligible, and synchronized radiotherapy should be developed in the future. (author)

  9. Schizophrenia: The micro-movements perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jillian; Majmudar, Ushma; Papathomas, Thomas V; Silverstein, Steven M; Torres, Elizabeth B

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally conceived of and studied as a disorder of cognitive and emotional functioning, schizophrenia (SZ) is also characterized by alterations in bodily sensations. These have included subjective reports based on self-evaluations and/or clinical observations describing motor, as well as sensory-based corporeal anomalies. There has been, however, a paucity of objective methods to capture and characterize bodily issues in SZ. Here we present a new research method and statistical platform that enables precise evaluation of peripheral activity and its putative contributions to the cognitive control of visuomotor actions. Specifically, we introduce new methods that facilitate the individualized characterization of the function of sensory-motor systems so as to detect if subjects perform outside of normal limits. In this paper, we report data from a cohort of patients with a clinical diagnosis of SZ. First, we characterize neurotypical subjects performing a visually guided pointing task that requires visuomotor transformations, multi-joint coordination, and the proper balance between different degrees of intent, among other factors. Then we measure SZ patients against the normative statistical ranges empirically determined. To this end, we examine the stochastic signatures of minute fluctuations in motor performance (micro-movements) of various velocity- and geometric-transformation-dependent trajectory parameters from the hand motions. These include the motions en-route to the target as well as spontaneous (without instructions) hand-retractions to rest. The comparisons reveal fundamental differences between SZ patients and controls. Specifically, velocity-dependent signatures show that SZ patients move significantly slower than controls with more noise and randomness in their moment-by-moment hand micro-motions. Furthermore, the normative geometric-dependent signatures of deliberateness are absent from the goal-directed reaches in SZ, but present within normative

  10. Strategies for Engaging Men as Anti-Violence Allies: Implications for Ally Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Casey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As ally movements become an increasingly prevalent element of social justice efforts, research is needed that illuminates effective strategies to initially engage members of privileged social groups in anti-oppression work. This study presents descriptive findings regarding ally engagement strategies and barriers from a qualitative study of a particular ally movement – male anti-violence against women activism. Twenty-seven men who recently initiated involvement in an organization or event dedicated to ending sexual or domestic violence were interviewed regarding their perceptions of effective approaches to reaching and engaging other men in anti-violence work. Participants viewed tailored engagement strategies that tap into existing social networks, that allow men to see themselves reflected in anti-violence movements, and that help men make personal, emotional connections to the issue of violence as most effective. Implications for engaging men in the project of ending violence against women, and for ally movements more generally are discussed.

  11. Effect of tonic pain on motor acquisition and retention while learning to reach in a force field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Lamothe

    Full Text Available Most patients receiving intensive rehabilitation to improve their upper limb function experience pain. Despite this, the impact of pain on the ability to learn a specific motor task is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of experimental tonic pain interferes with the acquisition and retention stages of motor learning associated with training in a reaching task. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were randomized to either a Control or Pain Group (receiving topical capsaicin cream on the upper arm during training on Day 1. On two consecutive days, subjects made ballistic movements towards two targets (NEAR/FAR using a robotized exoskeleton. On Day 1, the task was performed without (baseline and with a force field (adaptation. The adaptation task was repeated on Day 2. Task performance was assessed using index distance from the target at the end of the reaching movement. Motor planning was assessed using initial angle of deviation of index trajectory from a straight line to the target. Results show that tonic pain did not affect baseline reaching. Both groups improved task performance across time (p<0.001, but the Pain group showed a larger final error (under-compensation than the Control group for the FAR target (p = 0.030 during both acquisition and retention. Moreover, a Group x Time interaction (p = 0.028 was observed on initial angle of deviation, suggesting that subjects with Pain made larger adjustments in the feedforward component of the movement over time. Interestingly, behaviour of the Pain group was very stable from the end of Day 1 (with pain to the beginning of Day 2 (pain-free, indicating that the differences observed could not solely be explained by the impact of pain on immediate performance. This suggests that if people learn to move differently in the presence of pain, they might maintain this altered strategy over time.

  12. Emotion Regulation through Movement: Unique Sets of Movement Characteristics are Associated with and Enhance Basic Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Shafir, Tal; Tsachor, Rachelle P.; Welch, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that motor execution, observation, and imagery of movements expressing certain emotions can enhance corresponding affective states and therefore could be used for emotion regulation. But which specific movement(s) should one use in order to enhance each emotion? This study aimed to identify, using Laban Movement Analysis (LMA), the Laban motor elements (motor characteristics) that characterize movements whose execution enhances each of the basic emotions: anger, ...

  13. Entrainment of riparian gravel and cobbles in an alluvial reach of a regulated canyon river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliotp, J.G.; Hammack, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many canyon rivers have channels and riparian zones composed of alluvial materials and these reaches, dominated by fluvial processes, are sensitive to alterations in streamflow regime. Prior to reservoir construction in the mid-1960s, banks and bars in alluvial reaches of the Gunnison River in the Black Canyon National Monument, Colorado, USA, periodically were reworked and cleared of riparian vegetation by mainstem floods. Recent interest in maintaining near-natural conditions in the Black Canyon using reservoir releases has created a need to estimate sediment-entraining discharges for a variety of geomorphic surfaces composed of sediment ranging in size from gravel to small boulders. Sediment entrainment potential was studied at eight cross-sections in an alluvial reach of the Gunnison River in the Black Canyon in 1994 and 1995. A one-dimensional water-surface profile model was used to estimate water-surface elevations, flow depths, and hydraulic conditions on selected alluvial surfaces for discharges ranging from 57 to 570 m3/s. Onsite observations before and after a flood of 270 m3/s confirmed sediment entrainment on several surfaces inundated by the flood. Selective entrainment of all but the largest particle sizes on the surface occurred at some locations. Physical evidence of sediment entrainment, or absence of sediment entrainment, on inundated surfaces generally was consistent with critical shear stresses estimated with a dimensionless critical shear stress of 0.030. Sediment-entrainment potential over a range of discharges was summarized by the ratio of the local boundary shear stress to the critical shear stress for d50, given hydraulic geometry and sediment-size characteristics. Differing entrainment potential for similar geomorphic surfaces indicates that estimation of minimum streamflow requirements based on sediment mobility is site-specific and that there is no unique streamflow that will initiate movement of d50 at every geomorphically similar

  14. Nonisothermal moisture movement in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianjun; ZHANG Biguang; LI Wenjun; LI Yanjun

    2006-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of temperature gradient on moisture movement during highly intensive drying,such as microwave-vacuum drying,the profile of the temperature and moisture content in sealed wood whose opposite faces were subjected to temperature gradient for a short time was measured.The ratio of the moisture content (MC) gradient to the temperature gradient (dM/dT) was calculated and the factors influencing moisture movement under nonisothermal conditions were discussed.The results indicate that moisture moved in wood from the warm surface to the cold one even if opposite faces of the sealed wood assembly were exposed continuously to different but constant temperatures for a short period.The moisture content on the cold surface was higher than that on the warm surface.The moisture content gradient opposite to the temperature gradient was established,and the dM/dT was below 0.9%/℃.The temperature in the sample and the distance from the hot surface of the sample was strongly linearly correlated.With an increase in temperature,initial moisture content and experimental time,the dM/dT was significantly increased.

  15. Proteomic Characterization of Stomatal Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sixue Chen

    2012-01-01

    Stomata on leaf epidermis formed by pairs of guard cells control CO2 intake and water transpiration,and respond to different environmental conditions.Stress induced stomatal closure is mediated via an intricate hormone network in guard cells.Here we report absicic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) responsive proteins and redox sensitive proteins.Both ABA and MeJA cause stomatal movement and H2O2 production.Using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation approach,we have identified many ABA and/or MeJA responsive proteins in B.napus guard cells.Most of the genes encoding these proteins contain hormone responsive elements in the promoters,indicating that they are potentially regulated at the transcriptional level.The protein level changes were validated using Western blot analysis.We have also identified redox responsive proteins in the above signaling processes.The identification of the hormone responsive proteins and redox state changes has revealed interesting molecular mechanisms underlying guard cell functions in stomatal movement.The knowledge has great potential to be applied to crop engineering for enhanced yield and stress tolerance.

  16. Reaching the Underserved: Complementary Models of Effective Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Joseph; Moore, Audrey-Marie Schuh; Balwanz, David; Hartwell, Ash

    2007-01-01

    Many countries that have undergone expansion of access to public education still face significant disparities in school enrollment and attendance rates at sub-national levels, and fail to reach a high proportion of children who are outside of the government system. Completion and student learning have also continued to be system-wide challenges…

  17. LTRM Fish Sampling Strata, UMRS La Grange Reach

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data set includes delineation of sampling strata for the six study reaches of the UMRR Program’s LTRM element. Separate strata coverages exist for each of the...

  18. Chinalco and Jiangxi Copper Reached Consensus Regarding Sichuan Rare Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Recently,the reporter learned from Chinalco and Jiangxi Copper Group’s official website that,recently senior executives of Jiangxi Copper Group visited Chinalco,both sides and reached consensus over"how to promote bilateral cooperation",and"Sichuan province

  19. Our Global Reach: UNESCO and ICAE as Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has become a household word, permeating workplaces and communities, while internationalizing the curriculum has become common practice, not just in higher education, but also reaching into the primary grades and outward into program planning efforts in the non-formal sector. Few fields, however, can claim two international bodies…

  20. Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Visuomotor Deficits in Reaching and Grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Shelton

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA is a rare clinical syndrome characterised by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint’s syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 had participants reach out and grasp simple, rectangular blocks under visually- and memory-guided conditions. Experiment 2 explored participants’ abilities to accurately reach for objects located in their visual periphery. This investigation revealed that PCA patients demonstrate many of the same deficits that have been previously reported in other individuals with optic ataxia, such as ‘magnetic misreaching’ – a pathological reaching bias towards the point of visual fixation when grasping peripheral targets. Unlike many other individuals with optic ataxia, however, the patients in the current study also show symptoms indicative of damage to the more perceptual stream of visual processing, including abolished grip scaling during memory-guided grasping and deficits in face and object identification. These investigations are the first to perform a quantitative analysis of the visuomotor deficits exhibited by patients with Posterior Cortical Atrophy. Critically, this study helps characterize common symptoms of PCA, a vital first step for generating effective diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies for this understudied neurodegenerative disorder.

  1. Nanshan Aluminum Reached Strategic Cooperation with CSR Corporation Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    As a key supplier of aluminum profiles and aluminum plate,sheet and trip products for CSR Corporation Limited,Nanshan Aluminum will join hands with CSR Corporation Limited to reach strategic cooperation.On January 5,Nanshan Aluminum signed strategic cooperation agreement with CSR Sifang Locomotive&Rolling; Stock Co.,Ltd,both

  2. Reach for the Stars: Visions for Literacy Coaching Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFord, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This brief by the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse is about reaching for the stars--stories of vision and commitment from educators in small and large schools. Everyone knows of people who are held up as "visionaries" throughout history: Leonardo Da Vinci, Mahatma Gandhi, Jules Verne, Thomas Edison, Susan Anthony, or John Dewey, to name a few. The…

  3. EFNEP Reaches Refugee Youth Using a Mobile Van

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossett, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    New groups of refugees settled in apartments far from city services. Their children lacked access to organized after-school activities and the opportunity to practice English. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) wanted to reach and teach the young refugees but lacked the staff and budget to do so. This article discusses how…

  4. Tailoring training to the need: Reaching all the workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By developing a comprehensive concept for radiation protection training at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we are providing a complete program with easy access for additional radiation protection training upon demand. A framework for implementation of a program tailored to reach differing segments of the workforce quickly and effectively is outlined and illustrated with ORNL program experience. 10 refs

  5. Variation in reach-scale hydraulic conductivity of streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, M. J.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Pella, H.; Thommeret, N.; Valette, L.; Grant, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is an important control on flow within the hyporheic zone, affecting hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes essential to river ecosystem function. Despite many published field measurements, few empirical studies examine the drivers of spatial and temporal variations in streambed hydraulic conductivity. Reach-averaged hydraulic conductivity estimated for 119 surveys in 83 stream reaches across continental France, even of coarse bed streams, are shown to be characteristic of sand and finer sediments. This supports a model where processes leading to the accumulation of finer sediments within streambeds largely control hydraulic conductivity rather than the size of the coarse bed sediment fraction. After describing a conceptual model of relevant processes, we fit an empirical model relating hydraulic conductivity to candidate geomorphic and hydraulic drivers. The fitted model explains 72% of the deviance in hydraulic conductivity (and 30% using an external cross-validation). Reach hydraulic conductivity increases with the amplitude of bedforms within the reach, the bankfull channel width-depth ratio, stream power and upstream catchment erodibility but reduces with time since the last streambed disturbance. The correlation between hydraulic conductivity and time since a streambed mobilisation event is likely a consequence of clogging processes. Streams with a predominantly suspended load and less frequent streambed disturbances are expected to have a lower streambed hydraulic conductivity and reduced hyporheic fluxes. This study suggests a close link between streambed sediment transport dynamics and connectivity between surface water and the hyporheic zone.

  6. Anadromous salmonids of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River: 1984 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Hanford Reach, a regulated but flowing section of the Columbia River, supports spawning populations of fall chinook salmon and steelhead. It also serves as a migration route for upriver runs of chinook, coho and sockeye salmon, and of steelhead. Environmental studies conducted in association with activities on the Hanford Site provide a basis for assessing present ecological conditions in the Hanford Reach. Spawning populations of fall chinook salmon at Hanford increased dramatically after 1960, when Priest Rapids Dam was completed, and have remained relatively stable since 1969. Generally, upriver runs of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon have been depressed, but the fall run has been increasing since 1980. Habitat modification represents the greatest threat to sustained production of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach. Operations on and near the Hanford Site releases of small amounts of radioactivity from onsite operations to river and groundwater, and operation of a steam electric plant, can have negligible effects on salmonids and other aquatic resources. Possible activities with potential future impacts include development of a multi-unit power plant complex at Hanford, construction of a low-head hydroelectric dam above Richland, flow fluctuations from peaking power generation at Priest Rapids Dam, irrigation and reductions of instream flows, and dredging and commercial navigation above Hanford. If reproducing populations of fall chinook salmon and steelhead are to survive in the mid-Columbia River, the Hanford Reach must remain flowing, undeveloped for navigation, and with unimpaired water quality. 156 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. On stiffening cables of a long reach manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long reach manipulator will be used for waste remediation in large underground storage tanks. The manipulator's slenderness makes it flexible and difficult to control. A low-cost and effective method to enhance the manipulator's stiffness is proposed in this research by using suspension cables. These cables can also be used to accurately measure the position of the manipulator's wrist

  8. Linking transient storage parameters to exchange mechanisms and reach characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    A traditional way of investigating transient storage zones in streams and rivers comprises the performance of tracer tests. The information gained from the tests however, is in many ways limited by the geomorphological and hydraulic local conditions under which the test was performed. Consequently, there is a need for more general information about how reach characteristics and combined exchange mechanisms affect transient storage retention that can be expressed by scaling factors between physical, measurable parameters and the integrated total retention in a reach. A large number of tracer tests have been performed in a wide variety of reaches around the world and in this project we are taking advantage of already collected data as well as new tracer test performed within the study, to quantitatively evaluate how different geomorphic and hydraulic conditions affect the retention of solutes in rivers. By advancing existing physically based models on the local-scale with the combinations of exchange mechanisms we theoretically describe the relative magnitude of exchange mechanisms, and combinations of these, under specific hydraulic conditions and show how exchange parameters associated with different mechanisms are correlated physically. Both hyporheic transient storage zones (HTS) and surface transient storage zones (STS) are considered. Combined vertical exchange with the HTS can be evaluated by superimposing the velocity fields associated with stream features of different size described mathematically by harmonic functions, while exchange with other zones can be treated as independent and after evaluating the relative importance of the associated exchange parameters it can be added to the vertical exchange to obtain the total integrated retention. Based on the tracer tests, each tested reach is characterised in terms of its geomorphologic and hydraulic features and related statistically to reach-scale parameters evaluated from the tests with a longitudinal

  9. Reach–to-grasp movements in macaca fascicularis monkeys: the Isochrony Principle at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans show a spontaneous tendency to increase the velocity of their movements depending on the linear extent of their trajectory in order to keep execution time approximately constant. Termed the isochrony principle, this compensatory mechanism refers to the observation that the velocity of voluntary movements increases proportionally with their linear extension. Although there is a wealth of psychophysical data regarding isochrony in humans, there is none regarding non-human primates. The present study attempts to fill that gap by investigating reach-to-grasp movement kinematics in free-ranging macaques. Video footage of monkeys grasping objects located at different distances was analyzed frame-by-frame using digitalization techniques. The amplitude of arm peak velocity was found to be correlated with the distance to be covered, and total movement duration remained invariant although target distances varied. Like in humans, the ‘isochrony principle’ seems to be operative as there is a gearing down/up of movement velocity that is proportional to the distance to be covered in order to allow for a relatively constant movement duration. Based on a centrally generated temporal template, this mode of motor programming could be functional in macaques given the high speed and great instability of posture and joint kinematics characterizing their actions. The data presented here take research in the field of comparative motor control a step forward as they are based on precise measurements of spontaneous grasping movements by animals living/acting in their natural environment.

  10. End-state comfort and joint configuration variance during reaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Pazin, Nemanja; Coelho, Chase J.; Rosenbaum, David A.; Scholz, John P.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    This study joined two approaches to motor control. The first approach comes from cognitive psychology and is based on the idea that goal postures and movements are chosen to satisfy task-specific constraints. The second approach comes from the principle of motor abundance and is based on the idea that control of apparently redundant systems is associated with the creation of multi-element synergies stabilizing important performance variables. The first approach has been tested by relying on psychophysical ratings of comfort. The second approach has been tested by estimating variance along different directions in the space of elemental variables such as joint postures. The two approaches were joined here. Standing subjects performed series of movements in which they brought a hand-held pointer to each of four targets oriented within a frontal plane, close to or far from the body. The subjects were asked to rate the comfort of the final postures, and the variance of their joint configurations during the steady state following pointing was quantified with respect to pointer endpoint position and pointer orientation. The subjects showed consistent patterns of comfort ratings among the targets, and all movements were characterized by multi-joint synergies stabilizing both pointer endpoint position and orientation. Contrary to what was expected, less comfortable postures had higher joint configuration variance than did more comfortable postures without major changes in the synergy indices. Multi-joint synergies stabilized the pointer position and orientation similarly across a range of comfortable/uncomfortable postures. The results are interpreted in terms conducive to the two theoretical frameworks underlying this work, one focusing on comfort ratings reflecting mean postures adopted for different targets and the other focusing on indices of joint configuration variance. PMID:23288326

  11. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Change Management--Key Theories to Consider when Extending Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sharon Kebschull

    2012-01-01

    As schools, their teachers, and outside facilitators redesign jobs and incorporate technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students and develop an Opportunity Culture for all, choosing the right school models is just one part of the task. The human experience--and experience in education--says that even perfect design will not…

  12. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in forested stream reaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperature and provide refugia for temperature sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts, or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts, and in the absence of potentially confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland where riparian landuse transitions from open moorland to semi-natural forest. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers, three automatic weather stations and >200 hemispherical photographs, which were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model, incorporating flow-routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water column–atmosphere interface. Predominantly net energy gains occurred along the reach during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for 1h. Temperature gradients were not generated by cooling of stream water, but rather by a combination of reduced rates of heating in the woodland reach and advection of cooler (overnight and early morning water from the upstream moorland catchment. Longitudinal thermal gradients were indistinct at night and on days when net radiation gains were low (under over-cast skies, thus when changes in net energy gains or losses did not vary significantly in space and time

  13. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in forested stream reaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperature and provide refugia for temperature sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts, or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts, and in the absence of potentially confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian landuse transitions from open moorland to semi-natural forest. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers, three automatic weather stations and >200 hemispherical photographs, which were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model, incorporating flow-routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water column-atmosphere interface. Predominantly net energy gains occurred along the reach during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for 1h. Temperature gradients were not generated by cooling of stream water, but rather by a combination of reduced rates of heating in the woodland reach and advection of cooler (overnight and early morning) water from the upstream moorland catchment. Longitudinal thermal gradients were indistinct at night and on days when net radiation gains were low (under over-cast skies), thus when changes in net energy gains or losses did not vary significantly in space and time, and heat advected

  14. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution. PMID:26556065

  15. Crocodylus acutus (American Crocodile). Long distance juvenile movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Rafael; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Mazzotti, Frank; Cherkiss, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    the distance traveled ranged from 0.3 km to 90.2 km. The data showed that the smaller alligators moved greater distance than larger ones (Lance et al. 2011. Southeast Nat. 10:389–398). An ongoing 30 year mark and recapture study for Crocodylus acutus in Florida allowed us to look at long distance movement (>30 km) of juveniles (30km). Initial and most recent captures as a juvenile were used to analyze distances moved (Fig. 1). These distances were measured linearly between capture locations. Maximum linear distances of 76.3 km and 69.6 km were recorded for animals 4838 and 6662. All crocodiles moved from nesting habitat through potentially optimal nursery habitat prior to reaching their recapture locations. These juvenile long distance movements could be due to larger crocodiles facilitating their dispersal from the nest location (Lance et al. 2011. op. cit.). These data (Table 1.) support that there is exchange of individuals among the nesting colonies and our ongoing efforts to monitor this threatened species allow us to make observations of how juvenile crocodiles are moving throughout the landscape in an ecosystem currently undergoing restoration.

  16. RNA silencing movement in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Glykeria Mermigka; Frederic Verret; Kriton Kalantidis

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms, like higher plants, need to coordinate their growth and development and to cope with environmental cues. To achieve this, various signal molecules are transported between neighboring cells and distant organs to control the fate of the recipient cells and organs. RNA silencing produces cell non-autonomous signal molecules that can move over short or long distances leading to the sequence specific silencing of a target gene in a well defined area of cells or throughout the entire plant, respectively. The nature of these signal molecules, the route of silencing spread, and the genes involved in their production, movement and reception are discussed in this review. Additionally, a short section on features of silencing spread in animal models is presented at the end of this review.

  17. Free Instrument for Movement Measure

    CERN Document Server

    Peña, Norberto; Corrêa, Lorena Peixoto Nogueira Rodriguez Martinez Salles; França, Lucas Gabriel Souza; Cunha, Marcelo do Vale; de Sousa, Marcos Cavalcanti; Vieira, João Paulo Bomfim Cruz; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of a computational tool that serves to obtain continuous measurements of moving objects. The software uses techniques of computer vision, pattern recognition and optical flow, to enable tracking of objects in videos, generating data trajectory, velocity, acceleration and angular movement. The program was applied to track a ball around a simple pendulum. The methodology used to validate it, taking as a basis to compare the values measured by the program, as well as the theoretical values expected according to the model of a simple pendulum. The experiment is appropriate to the method because it was built within the limits of the linear harmonic oscillator and energy losses due to friction had been minimized, making it the most ideal possible. The results indicate that the tool is sensitive and accurate. Deviations of less than a millimeter to the extent of the trajectory, ensures the applicability of the software on physics, whether in research or in teaching topics.

  18. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes. PMID:26972261

  19. Age-related decline of peripheral visual processing: the role of eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Beurskens, Rainer; Bock, Otmar

    2011-01-01

    Earlier work suggests that the area of space from which useful visual information can be extracted (useful field of view, UFoV) shrinks in old age. We investigated whether this shrinkage, documented previously with a visual search task, extends to a bimanual tracking task. Young and elderly subjects executed two concurrent tracking tasks with their right and left arms. The separation between tracking displays varied from 3 to 35 cm. Subjects were asked to fixate straight ahead (condition FIX)...

  20. Brainstem hypoplasia presenting with mirror movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Ekmekçi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available 20 years old female patient, who had operated from congenital syndactyly on her left hand at five age, admitted to neurology policlinic with involuntary movement on her hands. We saw mirror movement (MM when she writing, catching with her left hand. This movement is had low amplitude in the right hand than left. Cervical MRG revealed no abnormality. Brain MRG revealed right middle, inferior cerebellary peduncle, olive and pyramid hypoplasia. Mirror movement shows homolog muscle activity which simulating contralateral movement, during a spesific task. This movement is seen usually upper extremity especially in the hand. Corticospinal tract dysfunction is often considered in the pathogenesis. MM may present as part of cervico medullary junction abnormality, cerebral palsy, cerebrovasculary disease, Parkinson disease. We wanted to discuss the patogenesis of MM in our patient with syndactyly and MRG abnormality.

  1. REACH, PATHOS and SIRIO: indications for managing atherothrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Atherothrombosis includes a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations (coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease and is associated with the main causes of morbility and mortality on a world-wide scale. Thus far, most of the available information on atherothrombosis has been derived especially from randomized clinical trials (RCTs. Due to their strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, RCTs not always provide an accurate view of the entire spectrum of atherosclerotic clinical syndromes and are not fully representative of the real-world situation. Recently, three important observational clinical studies performed in unselected populations (REACH, PATHOS, SIRIO have described the demographic characteristics, risk profiles, management and prognosis of a very large cohort of patients suffering from atherothrombosis. AIM OF THE STUDY In this article we focus on the description of the main results of REACH, PATHOS and SIRIO studies and we discuss about their relevance in the daily clinical practice.

  2. Key Design Requirements for Long-Reach Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-reach manipulators differ from industrial robots and teleoperators typically used in the nuclear industry in that the aspect ratio (length to diameter) of links is much greater and link flexibility, as well as joint or drive train flexibility, is likely to be significant. Long-reach manipulators will be required for a variety of applications in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. While each application will present specific functional, kinematic, and performance requirements, an approach for determining the kinematic applicability and performance characteristics is presented, with a focus on waste storage tank remediation. Requirements are identified, kinematic configurations are considered, and a parametric study of link design parameters and their effects on performance characteristics is presented

  3. Key design requirements for long-reach manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-reach manipulators differ from industrial robots and teleoperators typically used in the nuclear industry in that the aspect ratio (length to diameter) of links is much greater and link flexibility, as well as joint or drive train flexibility, is likely to be significant. Long-reach manipulators will be required for a variety of applications in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. While each application will present specific functional kinematic, and performance requirements an approach for determining the kinematic applicability and performance characteristics is presented, with a focus on waste storage tank remediation. Requirements are identified, kinematic configurations are considered, and a parametric study of link design parameters and their effects on performance characteristics is presented

  4. Bionics Solution to Learn the Arm Reaching with Collision Avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Gorce, P.; Bendahan, P.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a learning model that simulates the control of an anthropomorphic arm kinematics motion. The objective is to reach and grasp a static prototypic object placed behind different kinds of obstacle in size and position. The network, composed of two generic neural network modules, learns to combine multi-modal arm-related information (trajectory parameters) as well as obstacle-related information (obstacle size and location). Our simulation was based on the notion of Via Poin...

  5. How groups reach agreement in risky choices: an experiment.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jingjing; Casari, Marco

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies how groups resolve disagreement when they must reach unanimity after submitting individual proposals and exchanging text-form messages via a chat window in lottery choice experiments. We find that the majority proposal does not always prevail. The minority proposal prevails sometimes, especially when it is closer to risk neutrality. About one third of the groups disagrees after communication and would have got zero payoffs if disagreement remains after two more attempts wit...

  6. Developing human health exposure scenarios for petroleum substances under REACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.; De Wilde, P.; Maksimainen, K.; Margary, A.; Money, C.; Pizzella, G.; Svanehav, T.; Tsang, W.; Urbanus, J.; Rohde, A.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes the approaches that were adopted by CONCAWE to prepare the human exposure estimates in the chemical safety assessments of the REACH registration dossiers for petroleum substances based on all applicable regulatory guidance. Separate exposure estimates were developed for workers and for consumers and included inhalation and dermal routes. The complex nature of petroleum substances required various scientifically justified refinements of the regulatory guidance.

  7. Using Facebook to Reach People Who Experience Auditory Hallucinations

    OpenAIRE

    Crosier, Benjamin Sage; Brian, Rachel Marie; Ben-Zeev, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Background Auditory hallucinations (eg, hearing voices) are relatively common and underreported false sensory experiences that may produce distress and impairment. A large proportion of those who experience auditory hallucinations go unidentified and untreated. Traditional engagement methods oftentimes fall short in reaching the diverse population of people who experience auditory hallucinations. Objective The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to examine the viability of leveraging...

  8. The future of work : increasing reach through mobile technology

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Laura; Mamic, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    The world of work is changing. A major factor contributing to this is the proliferation of information and communication technologies, with mobile technology playing a central role. More and more people are able to access the Internet through their mobile devices. This has empowered them to work from anywhere but it has also led to the decline of traditional forms of employment. In the broader development context, mobile technology has been used extensively to reach beneficiaries and target a...

  9. Posterior cortical atrophy: visuomotor deficits in reaching and grasping

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, Benjamin P.; Shelton, Paul; Marotta, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint's syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 h...

  10. Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Visuomotor Deficits in Reaching and Grasping

    OpenAIRE

    Paul A Shelton; Marotta, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is a rare clinical syndrome characterised by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint’s syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 ...

  11. Prestressed Concrete Pipe Failure Jordan Aqueduct, Reach 3

    OpenAIRE

    United States Bureau of Reclamation

    1994-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation conducted failure investigations to identify the cause(s) of a catastrophic rupture of prestressed concrete pipe under impressed current cathodic protection, which occurred on Reach 3 of the Jordan Aqueduct near Salt Lake City, Utah, on August 7, 1984. The multidisciplinary analyses included corrosion, design, petrographic, structural, and metallurgical investigations. From the onset of the failure, the issue was one of reconciling cathodic overprotection and defec...

  12. Incentive Design to Enhance the Reach of Weight Loss Program

    OpenAIRE

    You, Wen; Hashemi, Ali; Boyle, Kevin J.; Christopher F. Parmeter; Kanninen, Barbara; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    This study employed stated-preference methods to elicit individuals’ program participation preference towards different financial incentive attributes. The results of this study show promise for the use of carefully designed incentive programs to raise participation in weight loss programs. Results show that a fungible payment form is important for the incentive to be effective in reach (i.e., cash and grocery gift-cards are preferred over gym passes and waivers of insurance co-payments). Fur...

  13. Has the world economy reached its globalization limit?

    CERN Document Server

    Miskiewicz, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    The economy globalization measure problem is discussed. Four macroeconomic indices of twenty among the "richest" countries are examined. Four types of "distances" are calculated.Two types of networks are next constructed for each distance measure definition. It is shown that the globalization process can be best characterised by an entropy measure, based on entropy Manhattan distance. It is observed that a globalization maximum was reached in the interval 1970-2000. More recently a deglobalization process is observed.

  14. EMDR Effects on Pursuit Eye Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoula, Zoi; Yang, Qing; Bonnet, Audrey; Bourtoire, Pauline; Sandretto, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to objectivize the quality of smooth pursuit eye movements in a standard laboratory task before and after an Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) session run on seven healthy volunteers. EMDR was applied on autobiographic worries causing moderate distress. The EMDR session was complete in 5 out of the 7 cases; distress measured by SUDS (Subjective Units of Discomfort Scale) decreased to a near zero value. Smooth pursuit eye movements were recorded by an Eyelin...

  15. Movement-based Interaction in Camera Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present three concepts that address movement-based interaction using camera tracking. Based on our work with several movement-based projects we present four selected applications, and use these applications to leverage our discussion, and to describe our three main concepts space......, relations, and feedback. We see these as central for describing and analysing movement-based systems using camera tracking and we show how these three concepts can be used to analyse other camera tracking applications....

  16. THE GREAT EXTREMISTS IN INDIAN NATIONAL MOVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa Jagadevappa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper author tried to highlight the great extremists in Indian National Movement. The first organized militant movements were in Bengal, but they later took to the political stage in the form of a mainstream movement in the then newly formed Indian National Congress (INC, with prominent moderate leaders seeking only their basic right to appear for Indian Civil Service examinations, as well as more rights, economic in nature, for the people of the soil.

  17. THE GREAT EXTREMISTS IN INDIAN NATIONAL MOVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Channappa Jagadevappa

    2014-01-01

    In this research paper author tried to highlight the great extremists in Indian National Movement. The first organized militant movements were in Bengal, but they later took to the political stage in the form of a mainstream movement in the then newly formed Indian National Congress (INC), with prominent moderate leaders seeking only their basic right to appear for Indian Civil Service examinations, as well as more rights, economic in nature, for the people of the soil.

  18. The Temporal Structure of Vertical Arm Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, Jérémie; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint) in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards) and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast). We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD), duration to peak acceleration (D PA), duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV), duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD), duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End), acceleration duration (AD), deceleration duration (DD), peak acceleration (PA), peak velocity (PV), and peak deceleration (PD). While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA) and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration

  19. Pathological basal ganglia activity in movement disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wichmann, Thomas; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, and associated changes in basal ganglia activities has significantly changed in the course of the last few decades. This process began with the development of detailed anatomical models of the basal ganglia, followed by studies of basal ganglia activity patterns in animal models of common movement disorders and electrophysiological recordings in movement disorder patients undergoing functional neurosurgical procedures. These inve...

  20. Global Social Movement(s at the Crossroads: Some Observations on the Trajectory of the Anti-Corporate Globalization Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick H. Buttel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the major structural characteristics of the anti-corporate globalization movement, its key bases and antecedents, its relationship with other global social movements (GSMs and the key challenges it faces in the post-9/11 period. We suggest that despite the potential of the anti-corporate globalization movement to usher in major social changes, the movement faces a number of major crossroads in terms of ideology, discursive approach, and overall strategy. We argue that there has been coalescence of a good many GSMs, including the international environmental movement, under the banner of the anti-corporate globalization movement. We focus primarily on the interrelations of these two GSMs, noting that over the past decade there have been trends toward both the “environmentalization” and “de-environmentalization” of the anti-corporate globalization movement. While the defection of many mainstream environmental groups fromthe “Washington consensus” and the resulting environmentalization of the trade and globalization issue were critical to the “Seattle coalition,” there has been a signi?cant decline in the movement’s embrace of environmental claims and discourses, and a corresponding increase in its use of social justice discourses. One implication of our analysis is the hypothesis that while the current vitality of the anti-corporate globalization movement can be gauged by its having adopted an increasingly coherent ideological stance in which international inequality and global corporate dominance are targeted, to be successful the movement will need to coherently ideologically integrate social justice with environmental and sustainability agendas. The amenability of the environmental GSM to such ideological integration will have important rami?cations for the future trajectory of the anti-corporate globalization movement.

  1. Why and how to make a REACH registration of combustion ash; Moejligheter vid REACH-registrering av energiaskor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Linnea; Wik, Ola

    2009-10-15

    The new chemical regulation, REACH (1997/2006/EC), Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals, took effect the 1st of June 2007. The background to this report was the introduction of REACH and the difficulties to understand the implications for ash. The most important consequence of REACH is that all chemical substances that are manufactured, handled and used above one tonne per annum per legal entity shall be registered according to this regulation. The registration includes specifying the chemical, physical, toxicity and ecotoxicity properties of the substance and risk assessing the identified areas of use. The report describes the use of ash in connection to the waste legislation and its planned end-of-waste-criteria, the chemical legislation and the Construction Products Directive. The target audience of this report is companies producing ashes and having a use or seeing a use for its ash. The report describes how to make a REACH registration of ash independent if a company did or did not pre-register ash during 2008. It describes how to change from one ash registration into another if the pre-registration was done for one type of ash but the company changes opinion during the sameness check, i.e. changing SIEF (Appendix A). Taking part in REACH registration projects during 2009-2010 can be advantageous since knowledge and financing are shared. Ash can be REACH registered also in the future but it is important to know that the registration have to be done prior the production and marketing starts. If ash is consider to be a waste the handling is covered by the community and national waste legislation. In Sweden ashes are by and large being regarded as waste, and recycling is risk assessed and permits are given case by case. End-of-waste criteria for different waste material are being elaborated within the EU. Such criteria will among other details cover chemical safety. When a material fulfils the end-of-waste criteria such material

  2. Access to expert stroke care with telemedicine: REACH MUSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Swanson Kazley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and rtPA can significantly reduce the long-term impact of acute ischemic stroke (AIS if given within 3 hours of symptom onset. South Carolina is located in the stroke belt and has a high rate of stroke and stroke mortality. Many small rural SC hospitals do not maintain the expertise needed to treat AIS patients with rtPA. MUSC is an academic medical center using REACH MUSC telemedicine to deliver stroke care to 15 hospitals in the state, increasing the likelihood of timely treatment with rtPA. The purpose of this study is to determine the increase in access to rtPA through the use of telemedicine for AIS in the general population and in specific segments of the population based on age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, urban/rural residence, poverty, and stroke mortality.We used a retrospective cross-sectional design examining Census data from 2000 and Geographic Information Systems (GIS analysis to identify South Carolina residents that live within 30 or 60 minutes of a Primary Stroke Center (PSC or a REACH MUSC site. We include all South Carolina citizens in our analysis and specifically examine the population’s age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, urban/rural residence, poverty, and stroke mortality. Our sample includes 4,012,012 South Carolinians. The main measure is access to expert stroke care at a Primary Stroke Center (PSC or a REACH MUSC hospital within 30 or 60 minutes. We find that without REACH MUSC, only 38% of the population has potential access to expert stroke care in SC within sixty minutes given that most PSCs will maintain expert stroke coverage. REACH MUSC allows 76% of the population to be within sixty minutes of expert stroke care, and 43% of the population to be within 30 minute drive time of expert stroke care. These increases in access are especially significant for groups that have faced disparities in care and high rates of AIS. The use of telemedicine can

  3. The site selection law and the anti-atom movement; Das Standortauswahlgesetz und die Anti-Atom-Bewegung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The anti atom movement has reached many of their political claims with the German nuclear power phaseout. At the same time the government has regained the interpretive dominance with the in radioactive waste management with the new search for possible final repository sites. He anti-atom movement refuses most parts of the actual law but cannot abdicate from the responsibility of the process of site selection. The contribution shows using three actual research approaches that such a convergence is probable to occur in the future. A cooperation of anti-atom movement and the government is of high probability in the long term, but is not necessarily identical to a political acceptance.

  4. Neural correlates of tactile perception during pre-, peri-, and post-movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; Heed, Tobias; Spence, Charles; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    Tactile information is differentially processed over the various phases of goal-directed movements. Here, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate the neural correlates of tactile and visual information processing during movement. Participants performed goal-directed reaches for an object placed centrally on the table in front of them. Tactile and visual stimulation (100 ms) was presented in separate trials during the different phases of the movement (i.e. preparation, execution, and post-movement). These stimuli were independently delivered to either the moving or resting hand. In a control condition, the participants only performed the movement, while omission (i.e. movement-only) ERPs were recorded. Participants were instructed to ignore the presence or absence of any sensory events and to concentrate solely on the execution of the movement. Enhanced ERPs were observed 80-200 ms after tactile stimulation, as well as 100-250 ms after visual stimulation: These modulations were greatest during the execution of the goal-directed movement, and they were effector based (i.e. significantly more negative for stimuli presented to the moving hand). Furthermore, ERPs revealed enhanced sensory processing during goal-directed movements for visual stimuli as well. Such enhanced processing of both tactile and visual information during the execution phase suggests that incoming sensory information is continuously monitored for a potential adjustment of the current motor plan. Furthermore, the results reported here also highlight a tight coupling between spatial attention and the execution of motor actions. PMID:26914480

  5. Surface Movement Regularity of Super-Wide Mining Face With Top-Coal Caving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Run-hou

    2005-01-01

    No.4326 super-wide panel of Wangzhuang Coal Mine ( in which the fully-mechanized top-coal caving longwall mining method was used) was monitored for dynamic characteristic of surface movement. The dynamic surface movement in and after mining was predicted by using the Mining Subsidence Prediction System. The results indicate that after mining, the surface above the super-wide panel reaches a state of full subsidence, making the No.309national highway above the panel be located on the flat bottom of the subsidence basin so that the influence of mining activity in both sides of 4326 panel on the national highway is the smallest.

  6. 'Reaching the hard to reach' - lessons learned from the VCS (voluntary and community Sector). A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock Beverley; Flanagan Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The notion 'hard to reach' is a contested and ambiguous term that is commonly used within the spheres of social care and health, especially in discourse around health and social inequalities. There is a need to address health inequalities and to engage in services the marginalized and socially excluded sectors of society. Methods This paper describes a pilot study involving interviews with representatives from eight Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) organisations. The p...

  7. Environmental justice: Grass roots reach the White House lawn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratch, K.

    1995-05-01

    When 500 demonstrators gathered in 1982 to protest the siting of a polychlorinated-biphenyl landfill in predominantly black Warren County, N.C., cries of environmental racism filled the air. In response, District of Columbia Congressional Delegate Walter Fauntroy requested that the General Accounting Office investigate a possible link between hazardous waste landfill siting and the racial and socio-economic mix of surrounding communities. The environmental justice movement, as it is known today, had been born. Environmental justice is conceived as the right of all people--regardless of race, ethnicity, culture or income--to live in a healthy environment, breathe clean air, drink clean water and eat uncontaminated foods. The concept assumes that everyone is entitled to fair environmental protection without any population segment bearing a disproportionate pollution burden.

  8. Dissociable contribution of the parietal and frontal cortex to coding movement direction and amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Davare

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To reach for an object, we must convert its spatial location into an appropriate motor command, merging movement direction and amplitude. In humans, it has been suggested that this visuo-motor transformation occurs in a dorsomedial parieto-frontal pathway, although the causal contribution of the areas constituting the “reaching circuit” remains unknown. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in healthy volunteers to disrupt the function of either the medial intraparietal area (mIPS or dorsal premotor cortex (PMd, in each hemisphere. The task consisted in performing step-tracking movements with the right wrist towards targets located in different directions and eccentricities; the targets were either visible for the whole trial (Target-ON or flashed for 200 ms (Target-OFF. Left and right mIPS disruption led to errors in the initial direction of movements performed towards contralateral targets. These errors were corrected online in the Target-ON condition but when the target was flashed for 200 ms, mIPS TMS manifested as a larger endpoint spreading. In contrast, left PMd virtual lesions led to higher acceleration and velocity peaks - two parameters typically used to probe the planned movement amplitude - irrespective of the target position, hemifield and presentation condition; in the Target-OFF condition, left PMd TMS induced overshooting and increased the endpoint dispersion along the axis of the target direction. These results indicate that left PMd intervenes in coding amplitude during movement preparation. The critical TMS timings leading to errors in direction and amplitude were different, namely 160-100 ms before movement onset for mIPS and 100-40 ms for left PMd. TMS applied over right PMd had no significant effect. These results indicate that, during motor preparation, direction and amplitude of goal-directed movements are processed by different cortical areas, at distinct timings, and according to a specific hemispheric

  9. Reaching with the sixth sense: Vestibular contributions to voluntary motor control in the human right parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Thielscher, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system constitutes the silent sixth sense: It automatically triggers a variety of vital reflexes to maintain postural and visual stability. Beyond their role in reflexive behavior, vestibular afferents contribute to several perceptual and cognitive functions and also support voluntary control of movements by complementing the other senses to accomplish the movement goal. Investigations into the neural correlates of vestibular contribution to voluntary action in humans are challenging and have progressed far less than research on corresponding visual and proprioceptive involvement. Here, we demonstrate for the first time with event-related TMS that the posterior part of the right medial intraparietal sulcus processes vestibular signals during a goal-directed reaching task with the dominant right hand. This finding suggests a qualitative difference between the processing of vestibular vs. visual and proprioceptive signals for controlling voluntary movements, which are pre-dominantly processed in the left posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, this study reveals a neural pathway for vestibular input that might be distinct from the processing for reflexive or cognitive functions, and opens a window into their investigation in humans. PMID:26424179

  10. Fetal eye movements on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Woitek

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. METHODS: Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17-40 GW, three age groups [17-23 GW, 24-32 GW, 33-40 GW]. Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981: Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. RESULTS: In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%. Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03, Type Ia (p = 0.031, and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033. Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3-45%. CONCLUSIONS: In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations.

  11. Molecular imaging of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-03-28

    Positron emission tomography measures the activity of radioactively labeled compounds which distribute and accumulate in central nervous system regions in proportion to their metabolic rate or blood flow. Specific circuits such as the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection can be studied with ligands that bind to the pre-synaptic dopamine transporter or post-synaptic dopamine receptors (D1 and D2). Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) measures the activity of similar tracers labeled with heavy radioactive species such as technetium and iodine. In essential tremor, there is cerebellar hypermetabolism and abnormal GABAergic function in premotor cortices, dentate nuclei and ventral thalami, without significant abnormalities in dopaminergic transmission. In Huntington's disease, there is hypometabolism in the striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. Disease progression is accompanied by reduction in striatal D1 and D2 binding that correlates with trinucleotide repeat length, disease duration and severity. In dystonia, there is hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, supplementary motor areas and cerebellum at rest. Thalamic and cerebellar hypermetabolism is seen during dystonic movements, which can be modulated by globus pallidus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Additionally, GABA-A receptor activity is reduced in motor, premotor and somatosensory cortices. In Tourette's syndrome, there is hypermetabolism in premotor and sensorimotor cortices, as well as hypometabolism in the striatum, thalamus and limbic regions at rest. During tics, multiple areas related to cognitive, sensory and motor functions become hypermetabolic. Also, there is abnormal serotoninergic transmission in prefrontal cortices and bilateral thalami, as well as hyperactivity in the striatal dopaminergic system which can be modulated with thalamic DBS. In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is asymmetric progressive decline in striatal dopaminergic tracer accumulation, which follows a caudal

  12. From Revolution to Devolution: A Social Movements Analysis of the Contemporary Women's Movement in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Linda

    1997-01-01

    This study analyses the evolution of the contemporary women's movement in the Republic of Ireland, from the foundation of the State to the present day. Drawing on a social movement's perspective, the emergence, consolidation and transformation of the Women's Movement in that period is explored. To date, there has been no systematic attempt at understanding the central processes and dynamics underlying the Irish Women's Movement. This study seeks to address that deficit by il...

  13. Performance reach of the injector complex in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Steerenberg, R; Cornelis, K; Damerau, H; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Giovannozzi, M; Goddard, B; Hancock, S; Manglunki, D; Métral, E; Mikulec, B; Wenninger, J

    2012-01-01

    At the start of the 2011 physics run quite some margin in the performance of the injectors was available and identified. Following the fast increase of the performance of the LHC itself during 2011, these margins have very much been exploited and some have even been pushed further. In view of further increase in the LHC luminosity, the 2012 performance reach of the injectors will be reviewed. One of the arising topics is satellite bunches from the injectors. Until now concerted effort went into supressing satellite bunches to a minimum, but a recent successful test with "controlled" satellites might make their routine production and characterisation an important topic in 2012.

  14. Plant movements and climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Frenne, Pieter; Coomes, David A.; De Schrijver, An;

    2014-01-01

    •Most range shift predictions focus on the dispersal phase of the colonization process. Because moving populations experience increasingly dissimilar nonclimatic environmental conditions as they track climate warming, it is also critical to test how individuals originating from contrasting therma...... performance. •Our results suggest that abiotic and biotic soil characteristics can shape climate change-driven plant movements by affecting growth of nonlocal migrants, a mechanism which should be integrated into predictions of future range shifts.......•Most range shift predictions focus on the dispersal phase of the colonization process. Because moving populations experience increasingly dissimilar nonclimatic environmental conditions as they track climate warming, it is also critical to test how individuals originating from contrasting thermal...... environments can establish in nonlocal sites. •We assess the intraspecific variation in growth responses to nonlocal soils by planting a widespread grass of deciduous forests (Milium effusum) into an experimental common garden using combinations of seeds and soil sampled in 22 sites across its distributional...

  15. Movement Precision and Amplitude as Separate Factors in the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Robert

    The purpose of this study was to assess Welford's dual controlling factor interpretation of Fitts' Law--describing movement time as being a linear function of movement distance (or amplitude) and the required precision of the movement (or target width). Welford's amplification of the theory postulates that two separate processes ought to be…

  16. Augmenting sensorimotor control using "goal-aware" vibrotactile stimulation during reaching and manipulation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzorakoleftherakis, Emmanouil; Murphey, Todd D; Scheidt, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We describe two sets of experiments that examine the ability of vibrotactile encoding of simple position error and combined object states (calculated from an optimal controller) to enhance performance of reaching and manipulation tasks in healthy human adults. The goal of the first experiment (tracking) was to follow a moving target with a cursor on a computer screen. Visual and/or vibrotactile cues were provided in this experiment, and vibrotactile feedback was redundant with visual feedback in that it did not encode any information above and beyond what was already available via vision. After only 10 minutes of practice using vibrotactile feedback to guide performance, subjects tracked the moving target with response latency and movement accuracy values approaching those observed under visually guided reaching. Unlike previous reports on multisensory enhancement, combining vibrotactile and visual feedback of performance errors conferred neither positive nor negative effects on task performance. In the second experiment (balancing), vibrotactile feedback encoded a corrective motor command as a linear combination of object states (derived from a linear-quadratic regulator implementing a trade-off between kinematic and energetic performance) to teach subjects how to balance a simulated inverted pendulum. Here, the tactile feedback signal differed from visual feedback in that it provided information that was not readily available from visual feedback alone. Immediately after applying this novel "goal-aware" vibrotactile feedback, time to failure was improved by a factor of three. Additionally, the effect of vibrotactile training persisted after the feedback was removed. These results suggest that vibrotactile encoding of appropriate combinations of state information may be an effective form of augmented sensory feedback that can be applied, among other purposes, to compensate for lost or compromised proprioception as commonly observed, for example, in stroke

  17. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  18. Biomechanical analysis of jaw-closing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, J H; van Eijden, T M

    1995-09-01

    This study concerns the complex interaction between active muscle forces and passive guiding structures during jaw-closing movements. It is generally accepted that the ligaments of the joint play a major role in condylar guidance during these movements. While these ligaments permit a wide range of motions, it was assumed that they are not primarily involved in force transmission in the joints. Therefore, it was hypothesized that muscle forces and movement constraints caused by the articular surfaces imply a necessary and sufficient condition to generate ordinary jaw-closing movements. This hypothesis was tested by biomechanical analysis. A dynamic six-degrees-of-freedom mathematical model of the human masticatory system has been developed for qualitative analysis of the contributions of the different masticatory muscles to jaw-closing movements, it was found that the normally observed movement, which includes a swing-slide condylar movement along the articular eminence, can be generated by various separate pairs of masticatory muscles, among which the different parts of the masseter as well as the medial pterygoid muscle appeared to be the most suitable to complete this action. The results seem to be in contrast to the general opinion that a muscle with a forward-directed force component may not be suitable for generating jaw movements in which the condyle moves backward. The results can be explained, however, by biomechanical analysis which includes not only muscle and joint forces as used in standard textbooks of anatomy, but also the torques generated by these forces. PMID:7560417

  19. Movement and Music Education: An Historian's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Believes that Emile Jaques-Dalcroze is not the only person who has affected movement-based instruction. Highlights the history of movement-based instruction in elementary music education by addressing the influence of Isadora Duncan and modern dance, the efforts of Francois Delsarte and Rudolph von Laban, and the role of remedial perceptual-motor…

  20. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five trends that…