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Sample records for bifenthrin cyfluthrin cypermethrin

  1. Comparative sensitivity of field and laboratory populations of Hyalella azteca to the pyrethroid insecticides bifenthrin and cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen L; Ogle, R Scott; Gantner, Andrew; Hall, Lenwood W; Mitchell, Gary; Giddings, Jeffrey; McCoole, Matthew; Dobbs, Michael; Henry, Kevin; Valenti, Ted

    2015-10-01

    Hyalella azteca are epibenthic invertebrates that are widely used for toxicity studies. They are reported to be more sensitive to pyrethroid insecticides than most other test species, which has prompted considerable use of this species in toxicity testing of ambient surface waters where the presence of pyrethroids is suspected. However, resident H. azteca have been found in some ambient water bodies reported to contain surface water and/or sediment pyrethroid concentrations that are toxic to laboratory reared H. azteca. This observation suggests differences in the sensitivities of laboratory reared and field populations of H. azteca to pyrethroids. The goal of the present study was to determine the sensitivities of laboratory reared and field populations of H. azteca to the pyrethroids bifenthrin and cypermethrin. Specimens of H. azteca were collected from resident populations at field sites that are subject to varied land-use activities as well as from laboratory populations. These organisms were exposed to bifenthrin- or cypermethrin-spiked water in 96-h water-only toxicity tests. The resulting data demonstrated that: 1) field-collected populations in urban and agricultural settings can be >2 orders of magnitude less sensitive to the pyrethroids than laboratory reared organisms; 2) field-collected organisms varied in their sensitivity (possibly based on land-use activities), with organisms collected from undeveloped sites exhibiting sensitivities similar to laboratory reared organisms; and 3) the sensitivity of field-collected "tolerant" organisms increased in subsequent generations reared under laboratory conditions. Potential mechanisms for these differences are discussed. © 2015 SETAC.

  2. Microbial detoxification of bifenthrin by a novel yeast and its potential for contaminated soils treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available Bifenthrin is one the most widespread pollutants and has caused potential effect on aquatic life and human health, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. A novel yeast strain ZS-02, isolated from activated sludge and identified as Candida pelliculosa based on morphology, API test and 18S rDNA gene analysis, was found highly effective in degrading bifenthrin over a wide range of temperatures (20-40 °C and pH (5-9. On the basis of response surface methodology (RSM, the optimal degradation conditions were determined to be 32.3 °C and pH 7.2. Under these conditions, the yeast completely metabolized bifenthrin (50 mg · L(-1 within 8 days. This strain utilized bifenthrin as the sole carbon source for growth as well as co-metabolized it in the presence of glucose, and tolerated concentrations as high as 600 mg · L(-1 with a q(max, K(s and K(i of 1.7015 day(-1, 86.2259 mg · L(-1 and 187.2340 mg · L(-1, respectively. The yeast first degraded bifenthrin by hydrolysis of the carboxylester linkage to produce cyclopropanecarboxylic acid and 2-methyl-3-biphenylyl methanol. Subsequently, 2-methyl-3-biphenylyl methanol was further transformed by biphenyl cleavage to form 4-trifluoromethoxy phenol, 2-chloro-6-fluoro benzylalcohol, and 3,5-dimethoxy phenol, resulting in its detoxification. Eventually, no persistent accumulative product was detected by gas chromatopraphy-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. This is the first report of a novel pathway of degradation of bifenthrin by hydrolysis of ester linkage and cleavage of biphenyl in a microorganism. Furthermore, strain ZS-02 degraded a variety of pyrethroids including bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, fenvalerate, cypermethrin, and fenpropathrin. In different contaminated soils introduced with strain ZS-02, 65-75% of the 50 mg · kg(-1 bifenthrin was eliminated within 10 days, suggesting the yeast could be a promising candidate for remediation of environments affected

  3. Microbial detoxification of bifenthrin by a novel yeast and its potential for contaminated soils treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaohua; Luo, Jianjun; Hu, Meiying; Geng, Peng; Zhang, Yanbo

    2012-01-01

    Bifenthrin is one the most widespread pollutants and has caused potential effect on aquatic life and human health, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. A novel yeast strain ZS-02, isolated from activated sludge and identified as Candida pelliculosa based on morphology, API test and 18S rDNA gene analysis, was found highly effective in degrading bifenthrin over a wide range of temperatures (20-40 °C) and pH (5-9). On the basis of response surface methodology (RSM), the optimal degradation conditions were determined to be 32.3 °C and pH 7.2. Under these conditions, the yeast completely metabolized bifenthrin (50 mg · L(-1)) within 8 days. This strain utilized bifenthrin as the sole carbon source for growth as well as co-metabolized it in the presence of glucose, and tolerated concentrations as high as 600 mg · L(-1) with a q(max), K(s) and K(i) of 1.7015 day(-1), 86.2259 mg · L(-1) and 187.2340 mg · L(-1), respectively. The yeast first degraded bifenthrin by hydrolysis of the carboxylester linkage to produce cyclopropanecarboxylic acid and 2-methyl-3-biphenylyl methanol. Subsequently, 2-methyl-3-biphenylyl methanol was further transformed by biphenyl cleavage to form 4-trifluoromethoxy phenol, 2-chloro-6-fluoro benzylalcohol, and 3,5-dimethoxy phenol, resulting in its detoxification. Eventually, no persistent accumulative product was detected by gas chromatopraphy-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. This is the first report of a novel pathway of degradation of bifenthrin by hydrolysis of ester linkage and cleavage of biphenyl in a microorganism. Furthermore, strain ZS-02 degraded a variety of pyrethroids including bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, fenvalerate, cypermethrin, and fenpropathrin. In different contaminated soils introduced with strain ZS-02, 65-75% of the 50 mg · kg(-1) bifenthrin was eliminated within 10 days, suggesting the yeast could be a promising candidate for remediation of environments affected by

  4. 76 FR 34937 - Amitraz, Bentazon, Bifenthrin, Chlorfenapyr, Cyfluthrin, Deltamethrin, et al

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... production (NAICS code 112). Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532... food/feed handling establishments (including food service, manufacturing and processing establishments... ingredient; and contamination of food/ feed or food/feed contact surfaces shall be avoided. Compliance with...

  5. Detection of Reduced Susceptibility to Chlorfenapyr- and Bifenthrin-Containing Products in Field Populations of the Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Aaron R; Scharf, Michael E; Bennett, Gary W; Gondhalekar, Ameya D

    2017-06-01

    Insecticide resistance is a major impediment for effective control of Cimex lectularius L. Previous resistance detection studies with bed bugs have focused on certain pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbamate insecticides. Within the pyrethroid class, resistance studies have mostly been limited to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and alpha- and beta-cyfluthrin. The goal of this study was to develop diagnostic concentration bioassays for assessing bed bug susceptibility levels to chlorfenapyr- and bifenthrin-containing products. First, glass vial and filter paper bioassay methods were compared for their utility in susceptibility monitoring. Statistical comparison of toxicity data between bioassays indicated that the vial assay was less confounded by assay susbtrate effects, required less insecticide, and was faster, especially for chlorfenapyr. Next, using vial diagnostic concentrations (LC99) for each insecticide, 10 laboratory-adapted field strains and the Harlan lab-susceptible strain were screened for susceptibility to chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin. The results of this study reveal recent bed bug susceptibility levels to certain chlorfenapyr- and bifenthrin-containing products. Reduced susceptibility was detected in three and five field strains to chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin, respectively. Detection of reduced susceptibility suggests that certain strains may be segregating toward greater chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin resistance. These results merit continuous resistance monitoring efforts to detect chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin susceptibility shifts. Additionally, to reduce insecticide selection pressures and delay resistance development, adoption of integrated bed bug control strategies that combine chemical and nonchemical methods is recommended. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Insecticidal efficacy of Lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, orange peel oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mortality effects of lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, orange peel oil and Platostoma sp. leaves extracts on adult Anopheles mosquitoes were compared in the laboratory at room temperature of 30± 2oC. Thirty adult Anopheles mosquitoes of age 2-4 days were exposed to the four formulations at concentrations ranging from ...

  7. Bifenthrin longevity at the termiticidal application rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Chris J

    2012-01-01

    The longevity, mobility and insecticidal activity of bifenthrin at the termiticidal application rate for perimeter treatment were investigated in packed-soil columns in the laboratory and greenhouse. Bifenthrin was not detected in the eluates of packed-soil cones over a period of 6 months. In larger pipe plots incorporating bifenthrin into the top 15 cm of the soil, the compound degraded in a biphasic fashion. Within the treated soil, the effect of vegetation on the amount of bifenthrin remaining in the soil depended on soil depth and time, and soil half-lives were longer in non-vegetated soil. Bifenthrin residues were higher in the top 7.5 cm of soil and declined over time. Movement of bifenthrin into the top untreated soil depth was observed, but much less was observed in lower depths. The soil remained toxic to termites in 3 day and 7 day forced exposure bioassays for the 30 month duration of the study. Concentrations of bifenthrin will remain in the soil at levels sufficient to kill termites for more than 30 months. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat and oral and intravenous administration. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Hughes , M., D. Ross...

  9. The potential acute and chronic toxicity of cyfluthrin on the soil model organism, Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingling; Yang, Da; Song, Yufang; Shi, Yi; Huang, Bin; Bitsch, Annette; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the acute (72h and 14 d) and chronic (28 d and 8 weeks) effects of cyfluthrin on earthworms were evaluated across different endpoints, which are mortality, growth, reproduction and enzyme activities. Cyfluthrin was rated as moderately toxic in 72-h filter paper test and low toxic in 14-day soil test. The exposure of earthworms to cyfluthrin-polluted soil for 8 weeks showed that growth of earthworms was inhibited by cyfluthrin, cocoon production and hatching were inhibited by 20-60mg/kg cyfluthrin. Moreover, 28-day soil test on the responses of enzymes associated with antioxidation and detoxification showed that the activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S- transferase (GST) were initially increased by cyfluthrin at 5-20mg/kg, but reduced at 30-60mg/kg, peroxidase (POD) was increased by 26-102% by cyfluthrin in the early period, except 5mg/kg on day 7, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) was increased by 29-335% by cyfluthrin after 3 days. Cyfluthrin degraded with a half-life of 24.8-34.8 d, showing the inconsistency between the continuous toxic responses of earthworms and degradation of cyfluthrin in soil. The variable responses of these indexes indicated that different level endpoints should be jointly considered for better evaluation of the environmental risk of contaminants in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immobilisation of bifenthrin for termite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yan-Qing; Chen, Jia Mei; Li, Zhi Bin; Feng, Qi Li; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Termites are worldwide pests causing considerable damage to agriculture, forestry and buildings. While various approaches have been tried to eliminate termite populations, the relevant toxicants are associated with certain risks to the environment and human health. In this study, to combine the merits of effective chemical control by bifenthrin and a drug photoimmobilisation technique, silk fibroin was used as a carrier to embed bifenthrin, which was then photoactively immobilised by ultraviolet treatment on the surface of wood (cellulose). The immobilised bifenthrin embedded in the photoactive silk fibroin was characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (UV), fluorescence measurement and CHN analysis. The surface structures and biological activity were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and bioassays respectively. The results indicate that the embedded and immobilised bifenthrin has been very well protected from free release and has a long-term stability allowing slow release with a high efficiency against termites at a low dose of 1.25 µg cm(-2). This study provides a novel and environmentally benign technique for termite control by photoimmobilising silk-fibroin-embedded bifenthrin on the surface of materials that are otherwise easily attacked by termites. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. DISSIPATION PATTERN OF BIFENTHRIN IN TOMATO

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Kumar Katroju; Sreenivasa Rao Cherukuri; Shashi Bushan Vemuri; Narasimha Reddy K

    2014-01-01

    Field experiment carried out during kharif, 2012 to evaluate the dissipation pattern of most commonly used insecticide bifenthrin 10 EC @ 100 g a.i. ha-1 with two sprays of insecticide first given after fruit initiation and the second spray 10 days later and collecting the fruits at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 days after last spray, and analysed for residues using the validated QuEChERS method. The initial deposits of bifenthrin were 0.85 mg kg-1 which dissipated to 0.39, 0.15 mg kg-1 by 1st an...

  12. Effect of cypermethrin toxicity on enzyme activities in the freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ALT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were increased in all the tissues with an increase in exposure time of cypermethrin. Though, under sublethal concentration of cypermethrin for 14, 21 and 28 days, a decreasing trend was observed in all ...

  13. Bifenthrin activates homotypic aggregation in human T-cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nataly; Tran, Van; Daniyan, Anthony; Ojugbele, Olutosin; Pryor, Stephen C; Bonventre, Josephine A; Flynn, Katherine; Weeks, Benjamin S

    2006-03-01

    Here, we addressed the concern that, despite the lack of overt toxicity, exposure to low levels of the common household pyrethroid pesticide, bifenthrin, could cause harm to the immune system. To do this, we measure the effect of bifenthrin on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of homotypic aggregation in human T-cell lines. The human CD4+ H9, and Jurkat cell lines and the human promonocyte U937 cell line, were exposed to varying concentrations of bifenthrin. Cell viability was determined using the AlmarBlue Toxicity Assay. Concentrations of bifenthrin which did not reduce cell viability were determined and these concentrations were tested for the effect of bifenthrin on PHA-mediated homotypic aggregation. Blocking antibodies to ICAM and LFA-1 were used to disrupt aggregation and a nonspecific IgG was used as a control. Bifenthrin was found to be nontoxic at concentrations ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-13) M. Bifenthrin did not inhibit PHA induced cell aggregation in all cell lines tested. However, at 10(-4) M, bifenthrin to form aggregates stimulated homotypic aggregation in the H9 and Jurkat T-cell lines. The bifenthrin-induced aggregate formation, like that seen with PHA, was blocked by treating the cells with antibodies to either LFA-1 or ICAM. The results here show that bifenthrin activates T-cell function by stimulating ICAM/LFA-1 mediated homotypic aggregation. This data suggests that exposure to bifenthrin, even at "acceptable" limits, can increase the risk for and frequency of inflammatory responses and diseases such as asthma.

  14. 77 FR 72975 - Zeta Cypermethrin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... for quantifying risks, there is no increase in hazard with increasing dosing duration. Therefore, the... exposure models in the dietary exposure analysis and risk assessment for zeta-cypermethrin in drinking... the dietary exposure model. For acute dietary risk assessment, the water concentration value of 3.77...

  15. Efficacy of a combination of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid and beta-cyfluthrin alone for control of stored-product insects on concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    The insecticidal effect of Temprid®, a formulation that contains beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid, was tested on concrete for control of seven stored-product insect species: the rusty grain beetle, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens); the sawtoothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (L.); the ...

  16. Bifenthrin inhibits neurite outgrowth in differentiating PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van; Hoffman, Natalie; Mofunanaya, Adaobi; Pryor, Stephen C; Ojugbele, Olutosin; McLaughlin, Ashlea; Gibson, Lydia; Bonventre, Josephine A; Flynn, Katherine; Weeks, Benjamin S

    2006-02-01

    Bifenthrin is a third generation member of the synthetic pyrethroid family of insecticides. As a new pesticide within a relatively new class of pesticides, bifenthrin is considered relatively safe. Here, we used the PC12 neuronal cell line to examine the effect of bifenthrin on the formation of neurites and the potential developmental neurotoxicity of this pesticide. PC12 cells were exposed to varying concentrations of technical grade bifenthrin or Ortho Home Defense. Cell viability was determined using the AlmarBlue Toxicity Assay. Nontoxic concentrations of these chemicals were concomitantly with nerve growth factor and neurite outgrowth was assessed. Ortho Home Defense preparation reduced PC12 cell viability by approximately 50% and 70% at dilutions that correlate to bifenthrin concentrations of 10(-5) M and 10(-4) M, respectively. In contrast, technical grade bifenthrin, was not toxic to PC12 cells at 10(-3) M, which was the highest concentration tested that was soluble. At "nontoxic" concentrations of 10(-7) M and 10(-6) M, the Ortho Home Defense inhibited nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth by 30% and 55% respectively. Furthermore the nontoxic concentrations of technical grade bifenthrin of 10(-6) M and 10(-3) M inhibited neurite outgrowth by approximately 35% and 75% respectively. These data suggest that the toxicity of the Ortho Home Defense preparation was due to the "inert" additives in the preparation and not the bifenthrin itself. Further, these data suggest that, even in the absence of overt toxicity, bifenthrin may have deleterious effects to developing nervous system.

  17. Dissipation and residue of bifenthrin in wheat under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xiangwei; Jiang, Naiwen; Liu, Fengmao; Liu, Congyun; Wang, Suli

    2013-02-01

    Field trials were carried out to investigate the dissipation and residue levels of bifenthrin in wheat. After extraction with acetonitrile, the samples were cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction and detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The half-lives of bifenthrin in wheat seedlings ranged from 2.4 to 10.5 days. At harvest time, the terminal residues of bifenthrin were below the maximum residue limit (0.5 mg/kg) set by Codex Alimentarius Committee or European Union in wheat grain, which suggested that the use of this pesticide was safe for humans. However, the relatively high residue levels of bifenthrin in wheat straw should be paid attention to.

  18. Bioavailability and nervous tissue distribution of pyrethroid insecticide cyfluthrin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José-Luis; Ares, Irma; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2018-05-08

    Toxicokinetics of cyfluthrin after single oral [20 mg/kg body weight (bw)] and intravenous (IV) (3 mg/kg bw) doses were studied in rats. Serial blood samples were obtained after oral and IV administration. Brain tissue samples were also collected after oral administration. Cyfluthrin concentrations in plasma and brain tissues (hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus and frontal cortex) were quantified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Cyfluthrin disposition was best described by the use of a two-compartment open model. When given orally, plasma kinetics showed an extensive oral absorption of cyfluthrin and a slow elimination. The area under the concentration-time curve [AUC (0-24h) ] and maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) were 6.11 ± 1.06 mg h/L and 0.385 ± 0.051 μg/mL, respectively; β phase elimination half-life (T 1/2 β) was (17.15 ± 1.67 h). Oral bioavailability was found to be 71.60 ± 12.36%. After oral administration, cyfluthrin was widely distributed to brain tissues. AUC (0-24h) was significant higher in all tested brain tissues than in plasma. The largest discrepancy was found for hypothalamus. AUC (0-24h) , Cmax and T 1/2 β in hypothalamus were 19.36 ± 2.56 mg h/L, 1.21 ± 0.11 μg/g and 22.73 ± 1.60 h, respectively. Assuming the identified toxicokinetics parameters, this study serves to better understand mammalian toxicity of pyrethroid cyfluthrin and to design further studies to characterize its neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biochemical investigation of cypermethrin toxicity in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahamna, S; Harzallah, D; Guemache, A; Sekfali, N

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroids are the most frequently used pesticides in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, hospitals public health, homes and textile industry. Cypermethrin, a composite pyrethroid is moderately toxic to mammals. Exposure to the pyrethroids occurs by inhalation, dermal and oral routes both accidentally as well as from the environment. Cypermethrin and DDT have been detected in human breast milk from malaria endemic area in South Africa. The WHO has recommended that the level of permethrin in drinking water not exceed 20 micrograms per liter (microg/L). The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits, habits and whether other chemicals are present. Pyrethroids are often combined commercially with other chemicals called synergists, which enhance the insecticidal activity of the pyrethrins and pyrethroids. The synergists prevent some enzymes from breaking down the pyrethrins and pyrethroids, thus increasing their toxicity. Because these compounds are broken down in the body quickly, there are several ways to measure the metabolites of these chemicals in human blood and urine. In this study the pyrethroid cypermethrin Sherpa 25% (active substance 250 g/l cypermethrin) was used, rabbits (1 kg weight), were gavaged by 1/20 LD50 for 3 weeks (one dose every week). Blood was collected before dosing and after 24, 72, 144 hours after the treatment. Enzyme activities were assayed in the plasma samples obtained. GOT, GPT, ALPH, CREA, GGT, Glucose and Total Pro were measured. Rabbits showed depression, decrease in feed intake, body weight and loose faeces. Livers exhibited fatty change, necrosis, lesions in kidney included tubular necrosis and pink homogeneous tubular casts. Serum ALT and creatinine concentrations increased while those of total proteins, albumin, serum cholesterol and triglycerides decreased.The results showed a decrease in RBC; WBC and Hb. This probably explained by the effect of

  20. Utilization of Cypermethrin by bacteria isolated from irrigated soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil bacteria capable of utilizing Cypermethrin as a source of carbon were isolated using enrichment technique. The bacteria were Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Serratia spp Micrococcus sp, Staphylococci and Streptococcus sp. Growth of P. aeruginosa was determined in the presence of 1:106 and 1:105 Cypermethrin in ...

  1. The role of P450 metabolism in the estrogenic activity of bifenthrin in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Breanna C; Brander, Susanne M

    2014-11-01

    Bifenthrin, a pyrethroid pesticide, is estrogenic in vivo in fishes. However, bifenthrin is documented to be anti-estrogenic in vitro, in the ER-CALUX (estrogen receptor) cell line. We investigated whether metabolite formation is the reason for this incongruity. We exposed Menidia beryllina (inland silversides) to 10ng/l bifenthrin, 10ng/l 4-hydroxy bifenthrin, and 10ng/l bifenthrin with 25μg/l piperonyl butoxide (PBO) - a P450 inhibitor. Metabolite-exposed juveniles had significantly higher estrogen-mediated protein levels (choriogenin) than bifenthrin/PBO-exposed, while bifenthrin alone was intermediate (not significantly different from either). This suggests that metabolites are the main contributors to bifenthrin's in vivo estrogenicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of dosing volume on the neurotoxicity of bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolansky, M J; McDaniel, K L; Moser, V C; Crofton, K M

    2007-01-01

    Pyrethroids are pesticides with high insecticidal activity and relatively low potency in mammals. The influence of dosing volume on the neurobehavioral syndrome following oral acute exposure to the Type-I pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in corn oil was evaluated in adult male Long Evans rats. We tested bifenthrin effects at 1 and 5 ml/kg, two commonly used dose volumes in toxicological studies. Two testing times (4 and 7 h) were used in motor activity and functional observational battery (FOB) assessments. Four to eight doses were examined at either dosing condition (up to 20 or 26 mg/kg, at 1 and 5 ml/kg, respectively). Acute oral bifenthrin exposure produced toxic signs typical of Type I pyrethroids, with dose-related increases in fine tremor, decreased motor activity and grip strength, and increased pawing, head shaking, click response, and body temperature. Bifenthrin effects on motor activity and pyrethroid-specific clinical signs were approximately 2-fold more potent at 1 ml/kg than 5 ml/kg. This difference was clearly evident at 4 h and slightly attenuated at 7 h post-dosing. Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling estimated similar 2-fold potency differences in motor activity and pyrethroid-specific FOB data. These findings demonstrate that dose volume, in studies using corn oil as the vehicle influences bifenthrin potency. Further, these data suggest that inconsistent estimates of pyrethroid potency between laboratories are at least partially due to differences in dosing volume.

  3. Risk assessment of a synthetic pyrethroid, bifenthrin on pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Irani; Singh, Ranbir; Govil, J N

    2010-03-01

    This work was undertaken to determine the pre-harvest interval of bifenthrin and to minimize its residues in pulses and thereby ensure consumer safety and avoid non-compliance in terms of residues violations in export market. Furthermore the residue dynamics in the soil under pulses was explored to assess the environmental safety. The residues of bifenthrin dissipated following first order kinetics. The residues in harvest time grains were below the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.02 mg/kg applicable for European Union. In soil the degradation rate was fast with a half life of 2-3 days. This work is of high practical significance to the domestic and export pulse industry of India to ensure safety compliance in respect of bifenthrin residues, keeping in view the requirements of international trade.

  4. Risk Assessment of a Synthetic Pyrethroid, Bifenthrin on Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Irani; Singh, Ranbir; Govil, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    This work was undertaken to determine the pre-harvest interval of bifenthrin and to minimize its residues in pulses and thereby ensure consumer safety and avoid non-compliance in terms of residues violations in export market. Furthermore the residue dynamics in the soil under pulses was explored to assess the environmental safety. The residues of bifenthrin dissipated following first order kinetics. The residues in harvest time grains were below the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.02?mg/kg a...

  5. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallur, Preeti N; Megadi, Veena B; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2008-02-01

    A bacterium capable of utilizing pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin as sole source of carbon was isolated from soil and identified as a Micrococcus sp. The organism also utilized fenvalerate, deltamethrin, perimethrin, 3-phenoxybenzoate, phenol, protocatechuate and catechol as growth substrates. The organism degraded cypermethrin by hydrolysis of ester linkage to yield 3-phenoxybenzoate, leading to loss of its insecticidal activity. 3-Phenoxybenzoate was further metabolized by diphenyl ether cleavage to yield protocatechuate and phenol as evidenced by isolation and identification of metabolites and enzyme activities in the cell-free extracts. Protocatechuate and phenol were oxidized by ortho-cleavage pathway. Thus, the organism was versatile in detoxification and complete mineralization of pyrethroid cypermethrin.

  6. Formulated Beta-Cyfluthrin Shows Wide Divergence in Toxicity among Bird Species

    OpenAIRE

    Addy-Orduna, Laura M.; Zaccagnini, María-Elena; Canavelli, Sonia B.; Mineau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides to birds is negligible, though few species have been tested. The oral acute toxicity of formulated beta-cyfluthrin was determined for canaries (Serinus sp.), shiny cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis), and eared doves (Zenaida auriculata). Single doses were administered to adults by gavage. Approximate lethal doses 50 (LD50) and their confidence intervals were determined by approximate D-optimal design. Canaries were found to be...

  7. Behavior of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid in/on mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Deepa, M; Jagadish, G K

    2011-08-01

    Residue persistence of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid on mango was carried out after giving spray application of the combination formulation, beta cyfluthrin 9% + imidacloprid 21% (Solomon 300 OD) 3 times at the fruit formation stage. The treatments were, untreated control, standard dose of 75 g a.i. ha(-1) and double dose of 150 g a.i. ha(-1). Initial residues of beta cyfluthrin on mango fruits were 0.04 and 0.12 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. The residues dissipated with the half-life of 2.4 and 2.6 days and persisted for 5 days only. Initial residues of imidacloprid on mango fruits were 0.14 and 0.18 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. Imidacloprid residues degraded with the half-life of 3.06 and 4.16 days, respectively and persisted for 10 days. Mature mango fruits at harvest were free from residues of both insecticides. A safe pre-harvest interval of 8 days is recommended for consumption of mango fruits after treatment of the combination formulation.

  8. Effects of Cypermethrin on Condition factor and Organosomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KAMAL

    Keywords: Pollution, Fish, Organosomatic-index, Cypermethrin, Sublethal ... related to muscle and livers energy content (Jones et al., 1999; Lizama et al., 2002; Hasan .... physiology (Yi et al., 2007; Ozer et al., 2008; Mlamboo et al., 2009).

  9. 40 CFR 180.442 - Bifenthrin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... application of bifenthrin in food handling establishments, including food service, manufacturing and... ingredient. Contamination of food/feed or food/feed contact surfaces shall be avoided. (B) To assure safe use...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances...

  10. Toxicity of Bifenthrin and Mixtures of Bifenthrin Plus Acephate, Imidacloprid, Thiamethoxam, or Dicrotophos to Adults of Tarnished Plant Bug (Hemiptera: Miridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Moneen M; Duckworth, Jessica L; Robertson, Jacqueline

    2018-04-02

    To assess the toxicity of bifenthrin and four mixtures of insecticides to tarnished plant bug, we used an insecticide dip method of green bean to treat adults of a laboratory colony; mortality was assessed after 48 h. LC50s for imidacloprid, bifenthrin, acephate, thiamethoxam, and dicrotophos were 0.12, 0.39, 0.62, 0.67, and 3.96 ppm, respectively. LC75s for imidacloprid, bifenthrin, acephate, thiamethoxam, and dicrotophos were 0.61, 4.22, 5.10, 2.65, and 7.86 ppm, respectively. Based on the LC50s and LC75s, dicrotophos was much less toxic than the other chemicals tested. PoloMix software was used to determine syngerism, antagonism, or addition effects of the mixtures. Three out of four analyses of the joint action of bifenthrin plus imidacloprid or acephate or dicrotophos showed that toxicity was not independent and not correlated. For bifenthrin plus dicrotophos, observed mortality was greater than expected mortality at most concentrations suggesting synergism. Mixtures of bifenthrin plus imidacloprid and bifenthrin plus acephate showed observed mortality significantly less than expected, suggesting antagonism. LC50s for bifenthrin plus dicrotophos, acephate, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam were 0.38, 1.06, 0.17, and 0.26 ppm, respectively. LC75s for bifenthrin plus dicrotophos, acephate, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam were 13.61, 13.18, 0.67, and 0.80 ppm, respectively. Based on the LC50s and LC75s, bifenthrin plus acephate was 3- to 10-fold less toxic than the other chemicals tested. Bifenthrin plus acephate is frequently used in tank mixes to control tarnished plant bug and other cotton pests, and the effectiveness of each individual chemical appears to be reduced in one to one ratio mixtures.

  11. Adsorption behavior of alpha -cypermethrin on cork and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Valentina F; Priolo, Giuseppe; Alves, Arminda C; Cabral, Miguel F; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2007-08-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the adsorption behavior of alpha -cypermethrin [R)-alpha -cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl(1S)-cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate, and (S)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R)-cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in solutions on granules of cork and activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption studies were carried out using a batch equilibrium technique. A gas chromatograph with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to analyze alpha -cypermethrin after solid phase extraction with C18 disks. Physical properties including real density, pore volume, surface area and pore diameter of cork were evaluated by mercury porosimetry. Characterization of cork particles showed variations thereby indicating the highly heterogeneous structure of the material. The average surface area of cork particles was lower than that of GAC. Kinetics adsorption studies allowed the determination of the equilibrium time - 24 hours for both cork (1-2 mm and 3-4 mm) and GAC. For the studied alpha -cypermethrin concentration range, GAC revealed to be a better sorbent. However, adsorption parameters for equilibrium concentrations, obtained through the Langmuir and Freundlich models, showed that granulated cork 1-2 mm have the maximum amount of adsorbed alpha-cypermethrin (q(m)) (303 microg/g); followed by GAC (186 microg/g) and cork 3-4 mm (136 microg/g). The standard deviation (SD) values, demonstrate that Freundlich model better describes the alpha -cypermethrin adsorption phenomena on GAC, while alpha -cypermethrin adsorption on cork (1-2 mm and 3-4 mm) is better described by the Langmuir. In view of the adsorption results obtained in this study it appears that granulated cork may be a better and a cheaper alternative to GAC for removing alpha -cypermethrin from water.

  12. Evaluation of Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Presence of Bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đorđević, Tijana M; Đurović-Pejčev, Rada D

    2016-06-01

    This work describes the effect of insecticide bifenthrin on Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growths of used microorganisms in growth media supplemented with pesticide were studied. Determination of bacterial and yeast fermentation efficiency in wheat supplemented with bifenthrin was conducted. Additionally, investigation of bifenthrin dissipation during microbiological activity was performed. Experiments applying bifenthrin in different concentrations highlighted a negligible impact of the pesticide on the growth of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae. This insecticide overall negatively affected the yeast fermentation of wheat, while its presence in wheat had a slight negative impact on lactic acid fermentation. The results of bifenthrin dissipation during lactic acid and yeast fermentations of wheat showed that activities of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae caused lower pesticide reductions. Average bifenthrin residue reduction within samples fermented with L. plantarum was 5.4 % (maximum ~16 %), while within samples fermented with S. cerevisiae, it was 11.6 % (maximum ~17 %).

  13. Correlation of tissue concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin with neurotoxicity in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Scollon, Edward J.; Starr, James M.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Wolansky, Marcelo J.; DeVito, Michael J.; Hughes, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for human exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has prompted pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic research to better characterize risk. This work tested the hypothesis that blood and brain concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin are predictive of neurotoxic effects. Adult male Long Evans rats received a single oral dose of bifenthrin dissolved in corn oil. Using figure-eight mazes, motor activity was measured for 1 h at 4- and 7-h following exposure to bifenthrin (0–16 mg/kg or 0...

  14. Nanomolar Bifenthrin Alters Synchronous Ca2+ Oscillations and Cortical Neuron Development Independent of Sodium Channel Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Nguyen, Hai M.; Jenkins, David Paul; Wulff, Heike; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2014-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a relatively stable type I pyrethroid that causes tremors and impairs motor activity in rodents, is broadly used. We investigated whether nanomolar bifenthrin alters synchronous Ca 2+ oscillations (SCOs) necessary for activity-dependent dendritic development. Primary mouse cortical neurons were cultured 8 or 9 days in vitro (DIV), loaded with the Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4, and imaged using a Fluorescence Imaging Plate Reader Tetra. Acute exposure to bifenthrin rapidly increased the fr...

  15. Bifenthrin causes neurite retraction in the absence of cell death: a model for pesticide associated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Avishek; Chandil, Daljit; Lechesal, Rethabile; Pryor, Stephen C; McLaughlin, Ashlea; Bonventre, Josephine A; Flynnx, Katherine; Weeks, Benjamin S

    2006-05-01

    Bifenthrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide derivative of naturally occurring pyrethrins from chrysanthemum flowers. Bifenthrin is considered relatively safe and therefore incorporated as the active ingredient in preparations sold over the counter for household use. Recent studies have raised concern that chronic exposure to pesticides in the home setting may increase the risk for neurodegenerative diseases. To address this concer, in the present study, bifenthrin is added to pre-differentiated PC12 and effect of bifenthrin on the retraction of existing neurites is observed a model for neurodegeneration. PC12 cells were differentiated with nerve growth factor for twenty-four hours and then treated with what was determined to be a sublethal dose of bifenthrin for up to an additional 48 hours. The percent of cells with neurites was assessed at various times before and after nerve growth factor treatment. Bifenthrin toxicity was determined using trypan blue exclusion. Bifenthrin was not toxic to PC12 cells at concentrations ranging from 1 x 10(-10) M to 1 x 10(-4) M. Twenty-four hours after nerve growth factor treatment, a maximum percent of cells had formed neurites and with a treatment of 1 x 10(-5) M bifenthrin, approximately 80% of these neurites retracted in within 12 additional hours and almost all neurites had retracted within 48 hours. Trypan exclusion showed that these cells were viable. These data show that bifenthrin can stimulate the retraction of neurites in the absence of frank toxicity.

  16. Impact of bifenthrin on honeybees and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Whitney A; Xue, Rui-De; Zhong, He

    2010-06-01

    The impact of bifenthrin on honeybees, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) was evaluated in both laboratory and semifield assays. Ten serial dilutions of bifenthrin and an acetone control using the bottle bioassay protocol were used in the laboratory to determine killing time after 15-, 30-, and 60-min honeybee exposure. Both dose and exposure time significantly affected honeybee mortality (df = 6, F = 10.9, P Bifenthrin was applied at 9.7 ml/liter, 19.5 ml/liter, and 29.5 ml/liter of water to common landscape vegetation, Melampodium paludosum Melanie (show star) and Duranta erecta L. (golden dewdrop); a water control was also used. Bee mortality was significantly higher (P < 0.05, df = 2, F = 20.8) at 29.5 ml/liter compared to the mortality at 19.5-ml/liter and 9.7-ml/liter application rates after 24-h exposure to the treated vegetation. Mortality of Culex quinquefasciatus exposed to treated vegetation was significantly (P < 0.05, df = 10, F = 114) different by week and by application rate.

  17. Formulated Beta-Cyfluthrin Shows Wide Divergence in Toxicity among Bird Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Addy-Orduna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally assumed that the toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides to birds is negligible, though few species have been tested. The oral acute toxicity of formulated beta-cyfluthrin was determined for canaries (Serinus sp., shiny cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis, and eared doves (Zenaida auriculata. Single doses were administered to adults by gavage. Approximate lethal doses 50 (LD50 and their confidence intervals were determined by approximate D-optimal design. Canaries were found to be substantially more sensitive to formulated beta-cyfluthrin (LD50=(170±41 mg/kg than the other two species tested (LD50=(2234±544 mg/kg and LD50=(2271±433 mg/kg, resp.. The LD50 obtained for canaries was also considerably lower than typical toxicity values available in the literature for pyrethroids. This study emphasizes the need for testing a broader range of species with potentially toxic insecticides, using modern up and down test designs with minimal numbers of birds.

  18. Formulated Beta-Cyfluthrin Shows Wide Divergence in Toxicity among Bird Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy-Orduna, Laura M; Zaccagnini, María-Elena; Canavelli, Sonia B; Mineau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides to birds is negligible, though few species have been tested. The oral acute toxicity of formulated beta-cyfluthrin was determined for canaries (Serinus sp.), shiny cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis), and eared doves (Zenaida auriculata). Single doses were administered to adults by gavage. Approximate lethal doses 50 (LD(50)) and their confidence intervals were determined by approximate D-optimal design. Canaries were found to be substantially more sensitive to formulated beta-cyfluthrin (LD(50) = (170 ± 41) mg/kg) than the other two species tested (LD(50) = (2234 ± 544) mg/kg and LD(50) = (2271 ± 433) mg/kg, resp.). The LD(50) obtained for canaries was also considerably lower than typical toxicity values available in the literature for pyrethroids. This study emphasizes the need for testing a broader range of species with potentially toxic insecticides, using modern up and down test designs with minimal numbers of birds.

  19. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sudip Parajuli

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound ‘cypermethrin’. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like hyosciane and chlorpheniramine maleate in the treatment of cypermethrin poisoning.

  20. Dissipation kinetics of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid in tea and their transfer from processed tea to infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, M; Deepa, M; Selvi, C; Chandrasekaran, S

    2017-10-01

    Dissipation kinetics of mixed formulation consisting beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid in tea crop under an open field ecosystem was investigated. The mixed formulation was applied on tea plant at recommended (27 + 63) and double the recommended (54 + 126g a.i./ha) dose and residues were determined using gas chromatography-electron capture detector and high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector for beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid, respectively. The limit of quantification of analytical method was 0.05µg/g and the average recoveries were ranged from 88.36% to 103.49% with relative standard deviations of less than 6% at three spiked levels. The experimental results showed that in the green tea leaves imidacloprid dissipated faster than beta-cyfluthrin with the half-life ranging between 1.20-1.39 and 2.89-3.15days, respectively. The beta-cyfluthrin residues present in the processed tea not transferred into the tea infusion during the infusion process and imidacloprid transferred in the range 43.12-49.7%. On the basis of the transfer of residues from processed tea to infusion, a waiting period of 17 days for tea plucking after pesticide application at recommended dose may be suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Earthworm (Eisenia andrei Avoidance of Soils Treated with Cypermethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara M. de Andréa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin is used for agricultural and public health campaigns. Its residues may contaminate soils and the beneficial soil organisms, like the earthworms, that may ingest the contaminated soil particles. Due to its ecological relevance, earthworms Eisenia andrei/fetida have been used in different ecotoxicological tests. The avoidance of soils treated with cypermethrin by compost worms Eisenia andrei was studied here as a bioindicator of the influence of treatment dosage and the pesticide formulation in three different agricultural soils indicated by the Brazilian environmental authorities for ecotoxicological tests. This earthworms’ behavior was studied here as a first attempt to propose the test for regulation purposes. The two-compartment test systems, where the earthworms were placed for a two-day exposure period, contained samples of untreated soil alone or together with soil treated with technical grade or wettable powder formulation of cypermethrin. After 48 h, there was no mortality, but the avoidance was clear because all earthworms were found in the untreated section of each type of soil (p < 0.05. No differences were found by the Fisher’s exact test (p ≤ 1.000 for each soil and treatment, demonstrating that the different soil characteristics, the cypermethrin concentrations and formulation, as well as the smaller amounts of soil and earthworms did not influence the avoidance behavior of the earthworms to cypermethrin. The number and range of treatments used in this study do not allow a detailed recommendation of the conditions applied here, but to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to identify the avoidance of pesticide treated tropical soils by earthworms.

  2. Microbial flora analysis for the degradation of beta-cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhang; Wei, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    In the Xinjiang region of Eurasia, sustained long-term and continuous cropping of cotton over a wide expanse of land is practiced, which requires application of high levels of pyrethroid and other classes of pesticides-resulting in high levels of pesticide residues in the soil. In this study, soil samples were collected from areas of long-term continuous cotton crops with the aim of obtaining microbial resources applicable for remediation of pyrethroid pesticide contamination suitable for the soil type and climate of that area. Soil samples were first used to culture microbial flora capable of degrading beta-cypermethrin using an enrichment culture method. Structural changes and ultimate microbial floral composition during enrichment were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. Four strains capable of degrading beta-cypermethrin were isolated and preliminarily classified. Finally, comparative rates and speeds of degradation of beta-cypermethrin between relevant microbial flora and single strains were determined. After continuous subculture for 3 weeks, soil sample microbial flora formed a new type of microbial flora by rapid succession, which showed stable growth by utilizing beta-cypermethrin as the sole carbon source (GXzq). This microbial flora mainly consisted of Pseudomonas, Hyphomicrobium, Dokdonella, and Methyloversatilis. Analysis of the microbial flora also permitted separation of four additional strains; i.e., GXZQ4, GXZQ6, GXZQ7, and GXZQ13 that, respectively, belonged to Streptomyces, Enterobacter, Streptomyces, and Pseudomonas. Under culture conditions of 37 °C and 180 rpm, the degradation rate of beta-cypermethrin by GXzq was as high as 89.84% within 96 h, which exceeded that achieved by the single strains GXZQ4, GXZQ6, GXZQ7, and GXZQ13 and their derived microbial flora GXh.

  3. Activity of bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam against Argentine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltz, B A; Suiter, D R; Gardner, W A

    2009-12-01

    Bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam were evaluated for activity against the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Mobility impairment and lethal times were determined after topical treatments. Ants were immobilized most quickly by bifenthrin, followed by chlorfenapyr and thiamethoxam. After 2 h, the number of fipronil-treated ants unable to walk out of test arenas did not differ from control ants. Median lethal time (LT50) after topical treatment was lowest in the bifenthrin treatment, followed by thiamethoxam, chlorfenapyr, and then fipronil. Mortality due to horizontal exposure was evaluated at 10, 20, or 30 degrees C, with topically treated ant corpses serving as donors. There was low to moderate horizontal activity in bifenthrin and chlorfenapyr treatments, with no temperature effect in bifenthrin treatments and a positive temperature effect in chlorfenapyr treatments. Mortality in the fipronil treatments was highest and was positively correlated with temperature. Thiamethoxam treatments did not differ from controls at 10 degrees C, but mortality increased with temperature. To evaluate contact activity, either all of 20% of the ants in a cohort were exposed to insecticide-treated pine needles. In both tests, mortality was highest in fipronil and bifenthrin treatments, followed by thiamethoxam, with lowest mortality in chlorfenapyr treatments. Effectiveness as a barrier was evaluated by providing a choice between bridges treated with insecticide or water. Although bifenthrin did not provide an impenetrable barrier, it was the only treatment having fewer ants than its paired control. Mortality data suggest that lack of recruitment rather than repellency account for this result.

  4. Evaluation of bifenthrin barrier spray on foliage in a suburban eastern North Carolina neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDusen, Amberlynne E; Richards, Stephanie L; Balanay, Jo Anne G

    2016-05-01

    Mosquitoes can transmit pathogens through blood feeding. Mosquito control programs conduct surveillance and source reduction, treat mosquito oviposition sites and spray adulticides to protect public health. In some areas, homeowners may contract with private mosquito control companies to address mosquito-related issues. We evaluated the efficacy of barrier sprays by comparing weekly host-seeking mosquito abundance at treatment and control properties in a residential neighborhood. The chemical concentration of bifenthrin residue on foliage was quantified, and field-collected mosquitoes, primarily Aedes albopictus, were tested for bifenthrin resistance using bottle bioassays. Mosquito abundance at treatment properties was significantly (P bifenthrin detected on foliage from treatment properties was not correlated with mosquito abundance. No bifenthrin resistance was detected in captured mosquitoes. Based on the rate of application, we expected that chemical analysis of bifenthrin residue would show similar concentrations of bifenthrin on foliage in treatment areas. Although mosquitoes were not bifenthrin resistant, further studies are needed to evaluate the extent to which resistance changes over time with repeated applications. Findings from this study provide insight into control methods commonly used by mosquito control companies and could potentially be used to guide future mosquito management strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Persistence of bifenthrin in sandy loam soil as affected by microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2012-06-01

    Soil was fortified with bifenthrin at the level of 10 μg g(-1) soil. Soil samples were drawn at regular intervals of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 days. For extraction of bifenthrin, soil was extracted with acetone. Clean up was done by liquid-liquid partitioning with dichloromethane after diluting with brine solution. Quantification of bifenthrin residues was done by GC using mega bore column and ECD detector. Recovery of bifenthrin in soil ranged between 92.6 % and 93.8 % at 0.5 and 1.0 μg g(-1). The instrumental limit of detection of bifenthrin was 0.005 μg mL(-1) and LOQ for soil by this method was found to be 0.05 μg g(-1). The calibration curve was found to be linear within range the range of 0.01 and 0.10 μg mL(-1) concentration. The DT(50) (disappearance time for 50 % loss) of bifenthrin at the level of 10 μg g(-1) in sterile and non sterile soil were found to be 330 and 147 days, respectively. A vast difference in the half life of sterile and non sterile soil indicated the presence of potential microbes for bifenthrin degradation.

  6. Bifenthrin-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in vitro and protective effect of selected flavonols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska-Woda, Izabela; Popowicz, Diana; Karowicz-Bilińska, Agata

    2010-03-01

    Bifenthrin is a synthetic pyrethroid with a broad spectrum of insecticidal and acaricidal activity used to control wide range of insect pests in a variety of applications. This investigation was designed to examine (1) bifenthrin as an inducer of oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in vitro through effects on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and (2) the role of the flavonoids quercetin (Q, 40 and 80microM) and rutin (R, 80microM) in alleviating the effects of bifenthrin. Erythrocytes were divided into portions. The first portion was incubated for 4h at 37 degrees C with different concentrations (0, 42.2, 211, 1055ppm) of bifenthrin. The other portions were preincubated with Q or R for 30min, followed incubation with bifenthrin for 4h. The influence of solvent (ethanol) was also checked on the parameters studied. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, CAT and SOD activities were measured in all treatment portions of erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that bifenthrin-induced oxidative stress causes enhanced lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidative enzyme activities in human peripheral blood. R pretreated erythrocytes were protected against the increase of MDA induced by bifenthrin. Q (80microM) and R pretreated erythrocytes were protected against the inhibition of CAT activity induced by bifenthrin. The protective action against the inhibition of SOD activity of Q was greater than that of R at the same concentration. These results suggest that Q and R may play a role in reducing bifenthrin-induced oxidative stress in vitro. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of bifenthrin on some haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velisek, J; Svobodova, Z; Machova, J

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bifenthrin on common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The 96-h LC50 value of Talstar EC 10 (active substance 100 g l(-1) bifenthrin) was found to be 57.5 microg l(-1). Examination of haematological and biochemical profiles and histological tissue examination was performed on common carp after 96 h of exposure to Talstar EC 10 (57.5 microg l(-1)). The experimental group showed significantly higher (P bifenthrin-based Talstar EC 10 pesticide preparation was classified as a substance strongly toxic for fish.

  8. Nanomolar bifenthrin alters synchronous Ca2+ oscillations and cortical neuron development independent of sodium channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Nguyen, Hai M; Jenkins, David Paul; Wulff, Heike; Pessah, Isaac N

    2014-04-01

    Bifenthrin, a relatively stable type I pyrethroid that causes tremors and impairs motor activity in rodents, is broadly used. We investigated whether nanomolar bifenthrin alters synchronous Ca(2+) oscillations (SCOs) necessary for activity-dependent dendritic development. Primary mouse cortical neurons were cultured 8 or 9 days in vitro (DIV), loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4, and imaged using a Fluorescence Imaging Plate Reader Tetra. Acute exposure to bifenthrin rapidly increased the frequency of SCOs by 2.7-fold (EC50 = 58 nM) and decreased SCO amplitude by 36%. Changes in SCO properties were independent of modifications in voltage-gated sodium channels since 100 nM bifenthrin had no effect on the whole-cell Na(+) current, nor did it influence neuronal resting membrane potential. The L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine failed to ameliorate bifenthrin-triggered SCO activity. By contrast, the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)5 antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine] normalized bifenthrin-triggered increase in SCO frequency without altering baseline SCO activity, indicating that bifenthrin amplifies mGluR5 signaling independent of Na(+) channel modification. Competitive [AP-5; (-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and noncompetitive (dizocilpine, or MK-801 [(5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate]) N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists partially decreased both basal and bifenthrin-triggered SCO frequency increase. Bifenthrin-modified SCO rapidly enhanced the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Subacute (48 hours) exposure to bifenthrin commencing 2 DIV-enhanced neurite outgrowth and persistently increased SCO frequency and reduced SCO amplitude. Bifenthrin-stimulated neurite outgrowth and CREB phosphorylation were dependent on mGluR5 activity since MPEP normalized both responses. Collectively these data identify a new mechanism by which bifenthrin potently alters Ca(2

  9. Impact of Cypermethrin on Selected Enzymes in Tissues of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heterobranchus bidorsalis (mean total length 31.50 ± 2.32 cm SD; mean weight 241.25 ± 30.39 g SD) was exposed to cypermethrin (0.005, 0.0075, 0.010, 0.125 and 0.0150 p.p.m.) for 23 days to determine the activity of transaminases (alanine transaminase, ALT; aspartate transaminase, AST) the phosphatase, alkaline ...

  10. Residues of cypermethrin and endosulfan in soils of Swat valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nafees

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Swat Valley was studied for two widely used pesticides; cypermethrin and endosulfan. A total of 63 soil samples were collected from 27 villages selected for this purpose. The collected soil samples were extracted with n-hexane, pesticides were separated, identified and quantified by a GC-ECD system. Endosulfan was 0.24 - 1.51 mg kg-1 and 0.13 - 12.67 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. The residual level of cypermethrin was comparatively high with a level of0.14 to 27.62 mg kg-1 and 0.05 to 73.75 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. For assessing the possible causes of pesticide residues in soil, 360 farmers were interviewed. It was found that both, cypermethrin and endosulfan, apart from agriculture were also widely misused for fishing in the entire stretch of River Swat and its tributaries. River Swat is used for irrigation in Swat Valley and this wide misuse of pesticides can also contribute to pesticide residue in soil.

  11. [Potential endocrine disrupting effects of bifenthrin in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanjun; Wang, Hengjuan; Song, Yan; Yang, Hui; Jia, Xudong; Li, Ning

    2012-05-01

    To study the potential endocrine disrupting effects of bifenthrin (BIF) by using uterotrophic assay and Hershberger assay. In uterotrophic assay, 60 female SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, 10 rats per group. Rats in bifenthrin-treated groups were given different doses of bifenthrin (1.47, 4.41 and 13.23 mg/kg BW by gavage for 3 consecutive days). Rats in negative control groups were given corn oil by gavage. Rats in ethinyl estradiol (EE) oral positive control groups were given EE 1.0 microg/kg BW by gavage. Rats in EE injected positive groups were given 0.6 microg/kg BW EE by subcutaneously injection while given corn oil by gavage. At necropsy, the wet and blotted uteri were weighed. The relative uteri weights were calculated, and the histology of uteri was observed. In Hershberger assay, 60 castrated male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in BIF-treated groups were given different doses of BIF (1.4, 4.2 and 12.6 mg/kg BW) by gavage. Flutamide (3.0 mg/kg BW) were given to animals in the positive control group by gavage. Rats in the negative control group and testosterone propionate group were given corn oil by gavage for 10 consecutive days. Rats in all groups except the negative control group were also treated with testosterone propionate (TP, 0.2 mg/kg BW) by subcutaneous injection. At necropsy, ventral prostate (VP), seminal vesicle plus fluids and coagulating glands (SVCG), levator ani-bulbocavernosus muscle (LABC), paired Cowper's glands (COW) and the glands penis (GP), liver, kidneys, adrenals were weighed. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were determined. In uterotrophic assay, compared with the negative control group, the mean relative wet weight and relative blotted weight of uterine were increased significantly in the female rats given by BIF at 13.23 mg/kg BW for 3 days (P < 0.05). BIF resulted in a significant increase of epithelial cell heights of uteri at 4.41 and 13.23 mg/kg BW

  12. Age dependent in vitro metabolism of bifenthrin in rat and human hepatic microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallani, Gopinath C; Chandrasekaran, Appavu; Kassahun, Kelem; Shen, Li; ElNaggar, Shaaban F; Liu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, undergoes oxidative metabolism leading to the formation of 4'-hydroxy-bifenthrin (4'-OH-BIF) and hydrolysis leading to the formation of TFP acid in rat and human hepatic microsomes. In this study, age-dependent metabolism of bifenthrin in rats and humans were determined via the rates of formation of 4'-OH-BIF and TFP acid following incubation of bifenthrin in juvenile and adult rat (PND 15 and PND 90) and human (18years) liver microsomes. Furthermore, in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearance (CL int ) of bifenthrin was determined by substrate consumption method in a separate experiment. The mean V max (±SD) for the formation of 4'-OH-BIF in juvenile rat hepatic microsomes was 25.0±1.5pmol/min/mg which was significantly lower (pbifenthrin occurs primarily via oxidative pathway with relatively lesser contribution (~30%) from hydrolytic pathway in both rat and human liver microsomes. The CL int values for bifenthrin, determined by monitoring the consumption of substrate, in juvenile and adult rat liver microsomes fortified with NADPH were 42.0±7.2 and 166.7±20.5μl/min/mg, respectively, and the corresponding values for human liver microsomes were 76.0±4.0 and 21.3±1.2μl/min/mg, respectively. The data suggest a major species difference in the age dependent metabolism of bifenthrin. In human liver microsomes, bifenthrin is metabolized at a much higher rate in juveniles than in adults, while the opposite appears to be true in rat liver microsomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin

    OpenAIRE

    Brander, Susanne M.; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L.; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. We evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Men...

  14. Synthesis of AzPhchitosan-bifenthrin-PVC to protect cables against termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingkun; Cai, Weiwei; Chen, Wu-Ya; Zhang, Li; Hu, Kaikai; Guan, Yan-Qing

    2016-03-30

    The destruction of PVC cables by termites is a continuing and long-standing problem, which can lead to power leakage and power cut. Given the environmental demerits of insecticide overuse, alternative methods of addressing this problem are a highly desirable goal. In this study, we used photo-immobilization to develop a chitosan carrier system to help bifenthrin immobilize on the surface of the PVC substrate. The immobilization was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), UV absorption, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), Raman absorption spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The surface structure and biological activity of the embedded and immobilized bifenthrin were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photon-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Its efficacy was assessed in pest experiments. The results indicate a successful embedding and immobilization of bifenthrin. Furthermore, the chemical bonding network between AzPhchitosan, bifenthrin, and PVC is stable, guaranteeing no environmental release of bifenthrin, and also providing more efficacious protection against termites. The evidence suggests that this photo-immobilization of bifenthrin-embedded chitosan on the surface of PVC substrates is a novel and environmentally friendly technique for termite control. This paper also reports a modification of chitosan with respect to its novel application in environmental protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Actions of the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin on sodium channels expressed in rat cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are important sites for the neurotoxic actions of pyrethroid insecticides in mammals. Here, we studied the mode of action of bifenthrin on the native sodium channels in cerebral cortical neurons prepared from newborn rat brain, where the toxic effects are largely generated. Bifenthrin caused a pronounced late current that persisted at the end of a depolarizing pulse, a slowly-decaying tail current following repolarization and significant resting modification (25.3% modification at 10 μM). No significant bifenthrin-induced effect was observed at the peak current. Bifenthrin also caused a concentration-dependent hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state activation and inactivation as well as slowed recovery from channel inactivation. Repetitive depolarization increased the potency of bifenthrin with high frequency. There was approximately 64% inhibition of modification upon repetitive activation by 10-Hz trains of depolarizing pulses. These results suggest that bifenthrin binds to and modifies sodium channels in both the closed and open states and exhibits the behavior between type I and type II.

  16. Longevity of a mixture of acetamiprid and bifenthrin (Transport(TM) ) at the termiticidal application rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Chris J

    2012-07-01

    The 30 month longevity, mobility and insecticidal activity of a combination of acetamiprid and bifenthrin currently marketed in the United States for the prevention of termite infestation in buildings was investigated in greenhouse and laboratory studies. Acetamiprid dissipated to below the limit of detection within 7 months of application, while bifenthrin remained in the soil at levels sufficient to kill termites for the duration of the study. Acetamiprid was detected in decreasing amounts in eluates of treated soil from months 1 to 4, while no bifenthrin was detected in eluates at any time. The treated soil remained toxic to termites for the 30 month duration of the study. Two indices of synergy between technical-grade acetamiprid and bifenthrin demonstrated that it is unlikely that there would be any synergism between the two active ingredients in the field. The presence of vegetation did not have a significant effect on the longevity of bifenthrin, except at intermediate times, where residues in the treated soil were higher in vegetated plots, depending on depth and time. Acetamiprid has a short residual time in soil, and this formulation's effectiveness beyond about 7 months against subterranean termites is due to the bifenthrin content. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BIFENTHRIN CATABOLIZING BACTERIAL STRAIN BACILLUS CIBI FROM SOIL FOR PYRETHROIDS BIODEGRADATION

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Pandey; Geetika Pant; G. Sibi

    2014-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used in most parts of the world and are reported to have potential health risks. Bifenthrin, a third generation pyrethroid used as insecticide has caused potential effect on aquatic life and human health. Bioremediation is a practical approach to reduce pesticide in the environment and reports of microbial degradation of bifenthrin are meagre. This study was aimed at isolating and characterizing bacterial isolates for the efficient removal of bifenthrin residues in th...

  18. Effect of repeated oral administration of bifenthrin on lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant parameters in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Muneer Ahmad; Khan, Adil Mehraj; Raina, Rajinder; Verma, Pawan Kumar; Sultana, Mudasir

    2013-07-01

    The oxidative stress-inducing potential of the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, was evaluated in rats at 5.8 mg/kg body weight once daily for 20 or 30 days. Bifenthrin treated animals showed significantly increased lipid peroxidation, evidenced by increased blood malondialdehyde levels. Blood glutathione levels and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase decreased significantly in the bifenthrin treated animals after both 20 and 30 days of treatment, whereas, the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase decreased significantly only on the 30th day. In conclusion, bifenthrin has a potential to induce severe oxidative stress in rats exposed to sublethal concentrations.

  19. Toxicity of cypermethrin on the embryo and larvae of Gangetic mystus, Mystus cavasius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Md Haider; Sumon, Kizar Ahmed; Sultana, Marin; Rashid, Harunur

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effects of cypermethrin on the embryo and the larvae of Gangetic mystus, Mystus cavasius. Therefore, fertilized eggs (n = 100) and 1-day-old larvae (n = 100) were exposed to six different concentrations of cypermethrin (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μg

  20. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  1. Effects of bifenthrin exposure on the estrogenic and dopaminergic pathways in zebrafish embryos and juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotto, Luísa Becker; Richards, Jaben; Gan, Jay; Volz, David Christopher; Schlenk, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used in urban and agricultural applications. Previous studies have shown that environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin increased plasma concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) and altered the expression of dopaminergic pathway components. The dopaminergic neurons can indirectly regulate E2 biosynthesis, suggesting that bifenthrin may disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Because embryos do not have a complete HPG axis, the hypothesis that bifenthrin impairs dopamine regulation was tested in embryonic and 1-mo-old juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) with exposure to measured concentrations of 0.34 and 3.1 µg/L bifenthrin for 96 h. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate transcripts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine receptor 1 (DR1) and 2A (DR2A), dopamine active transporter (DAT), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ1, ERβ2, luteinizing hormone β (LHβ), follicle-stimulating hormone β (FSHβ), vitellogenin (VTG), cytochrome P450 cyp19a1a, and cyp19a1b. Levels of E2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations were measured by liquid chromatrography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Significant decreases in TH and DR1 transcripts and HVA levels, as well as ratios of HVA/dopamine and HVA+DOPAC/dopamine, in zebrafish embryos were observed after bifenthrin treatment. In juveniles, a significant increase in the expression of ERβ1 and the DOPAC to dopamine ratio was noted. These results show a possible antiestrogenic effect of bifenthrin in embryos, and estrogenicity in juveniles, indicating life-stage-dependent toxicity in developing fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:236-246. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  2. Development of Environment-Friendly Insecticides Based on Enantioselectivity: Bifenthrin as a Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; Zhou, Peixue; Zhang, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Chiral insecticides significantly contribute to the environmental pollutions recently. As the development of industry and agriculture, increasing number of chiral insecticides are to be introduced into the market. However, their enantioselective toxicology to ecosystem still remains uncertain. In this review, we embarked on a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed articles regarding the enantioselective effects of bifenthrin, a typical chiral insecticide, on both target and non-target species. With this enantioselective property of chiral insecticides, they often exhibit adverse effects on non-target species enantioselectively. Specifically, the enantioselective effects of bifenthrin on target and non-target organisms were discussed. In target species, R-bifenthrin exerts more significant activities in deinsectization, compared with S-bifenthrin. On the other hand, Sbifenthrin is more toxic to non-target species than R-bifenthrin, which suggests that the application of sole enantiomer is more efficient and environment-friendly than that of racemate. This review confirms the choice of environment-friendly insecticides from the perspective of the enantioselectivity of chiral insecticides. To make insecticides more efficient to target species and less toxic to non-target species, further research should be done to investigated the potential effects of targetactive enantiomers on non-target organisms as well as the enantioselective fate of enantiomers in multiple environmental matrix.

  3. Chronic and acute risk assessment of human exposed to novaluron-bifenthrin mixture in cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kaiwei; Li, Li; Li, Wei; Yuan, Longfei; Liu, Fengmao

    2016-09-01

    Based on the dissipation and residual level in cabbage determined by gas chromatography coupled with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD), chronic and acute risk assessments of the novaluron and bifenthrin were investigated. At different spiked levels, mean recoveries were between 81 and 108 % with relative standard deviations (RSDs) from 1.1 to 6.8 %. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.01 mg kg(-1), and good linearity with correlation coefficient (>0.9997) were obtained. The half-lives of novaluron and bifenthrin in cabbage were in the range of 3.2~10 days. Based on the consumption data in China, the risk quotients (RQs) of novaluron and bifenthrin were all below 100 %. The chronic and acute risk of novaluron in cabbage was relatively low, while bifenthrin exerts higher acute risk to humans than chronic risk. The obtained results indicated that the use of novaluron-bifenthrin mixture does not seem to pose any chronic or acute risk to humans even if cabbages are consumed at high application dosages and short preharvest interval (PHI).

  4. Assessment of occupational exposure to malathion and bifenthrin in mosquito control sprayers through dermal contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Sasrisuk, Somnuek; Preklang, Smart; Yoosook, Witaya; Sujirarat, Dusit

    2013-12-01

    To assess occupational exposure of malathion and bifenthrin concentrations by dermal contact and urinary 3-(2-chloro-3, 3, 3-trifluoro-1-propenyl)-2, 2-dimethyl-cyclopropanecarboxylic (TFP) acid, health symptoms developed and the relationship between bifenthrin concentrations and TFP acid in urine of the mosquito control sprayers. The aerosols of these two pesticides were collected using 100 cm2 cotton patches attached on the skin of upper legs of 54 volunteer of mosquito control sprayers. Their urine samples were also collected before and after application. These subjects exposed to average malathion and bifenthrin concentrations of 0.18 and 0.32 microg/cm2, respectively After application, the average concentration of urinary TFP acid in the sprayers was 39.22 +/- 0.77 mg/g creatinine ranging from 0.58 to 261.19 mg/g creatinine. A significant difference was found between urinary TFP acid levels before and after application (p bifenthrin concentrations through dermal contact and urinary TFP acid levels were not significantly correlated (p > 0.05). The mosquito control sprayers had dermal contact with smoke of malathion and bifenthrin and some sprayers developed health symptoms after exposure. They should use protective clothing made ofplastic, nylon or polyester to protect sprayers from skin contact.

  5. Bifenthrin causes trophic cascades and alters insect emergence in mesocosms: implication for small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Holly; Schmidt, Travis S.; Dabney, Brittanie L.; Hladik, Michelle; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Direct and indirect ecological effects of the widely used insecticide bifenthrin on stream ecosystems are largely unknown. To investigate such effects, a manipulative experiment was conducted in stream mesocosms that were colonized by aquatic insect communities and exposed to bifenthrin-contaminated sediment; implications for natural streams were interpreted through comparison of mesocosm results to a survey of 100 Midwestern streams, USA. In the mesocosm experiment, direct effects of bifenthrin exposure included reduced larval macroinvertebrate abundance, richness, and biomass at concentrations (EC50s ranged 197.6 – 233.5 ng bifenthrin/ g organic carbon) previously thought safe for aquatic life. Indirect effects included a trophic cascade in which periphyton abundance increased after macroinvertebrate scrapers decreased. Adult emergence dynamics and corresponding terrestrial subsidies were altered at all bifenthrin concentrations tested. Extrapolating these results to the Midwestern stream assessment suggests pervasive ecological effects, with altered emergence dynamics likely in 40% of streams and a trophic cascade in 7% of streams. This study provides new evidence that a common pyrethroid might alter aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem function at the regional scale.

  6. Characteristics of suspended solids affect bifenthrin toxicity to the calanoid copepods Eurytemora affinis and Pseudodiaptomus forbesi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Emily; Lesmeister, Sarah; Teh, Swee; Young, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid pesticide that is highly toxic to aquatic invertebrates. The dissolved concentration is generally thought to be the best predictor of acute toxicity. However, for the filter-feeding calanoid copepods Eurytemora affinis and Pseudodiaptomus forbesi, ingestion of pesticide-bound particles could prove to be another route of exposure. The present study investigated bifenthrin toxicity to E. affinis and P. forbesi in the presence of suspended solids from municipal wastewater effluent and surface water of the San Francisco (CA, USA) Estuary. Suspended solids mitigated the toxicity of total bifenthrin to E. affinis and P. forbesi, but mortality was higher than what would be predicted from dissolved concentrations alone. The results indicate that the toxicity and bioavailability of particle-associated bifenthrin was significantly correlated with counts of 0.5-µm to 2-µm particle sizes. Potential explanations could include direct ingestion of bifenthrin-bound particles, changes in food consumption and feeding behavior, and physical contact with small particles. The complex interactions between pesticides and particles of different types and sizes demonstrate a need for future ecotoxicological studies to investigate the role of particle sizes on aquatic organisms. © 2015 SETAC.

  7. Effective Subcritical Butane Extraction of Bifenthrin Residue in Black Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As a natural and healthy beverage, tea is widely enjoyed; however, the pesticide residues in tea leaves affect the quality and food safety. To develop a highly selective and efficient method for the facile removal of pesticide residues, the subcritical butane extraction (SBE technique was employed, and three variables involving temperature, time and extraction cycles were studied. The optimum SBE conditions were found to be as follows: extraction temperature 45 °C, extraction time 30 min, number of extraction cycles 1, and in such a condition that the extraction efficiency reached as high as 92%. Further, the catechins, theanine, caffeine and aroma components, which determine the quality of the tea, fluctuated after SBE treatment. Compared with the uncrushed leaves, pesticide residues can more easily be removed from crushed leaves, and the practical extraction efficiency was 97%. These results indicate that SBE is a useful method to efficiently remove the bifenthrin, and as appearance is not relevant in the production process, tea leaves should first be crushed and then extracted in order that residual pesticides are thoroughly removed.

  8. Effective Subcritical Butane Extraction of Bifenthrin Residue in Black Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yating; Gu, Lingbiao; Wang, Fei; Kong, Lingjun; Qin, Guangyong

    2017-03-30

    As a natural and healthy beverage, tea is widely enjoyed; however, the pesticide residues in tea leaves affect the quality and food safety. To develop a highly selective and efficient method for the facile removal of pesticide residues, the subcritical butane extraction (SBE) technique was employed, and three variables involving temperature, time and extraction cycles were studied. The optimum SBE conditions were found to be as follows: extraction temperature 45 °C, extraction time 30 min, number of extraction cycles 1, and in such a condition that the extraction efficiency reached as high as 92%. Further, the catechins, theanine, caffeine and aroma components, which determine the quality of the tea, fluctuated after SBE treatment. Compared with the uncrushed leaves, pesticide residues can more easily be removed from crushed leaves, and the practical extraction efficiency was 97%. These results indicate that SBE is a useful method to efficiently remove the bifenthrin, and as appearance is not relevant in the production process, tea leaves should first be crushed and then extracted in order that residual pesticides are thoroughly removed.

  9. Multilevel evaluations of potential liver injury of bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lu, Meiya; Zhou, Peixue; Wang, Cui; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of pesticides, such as pyrethroids, increases health risks to non-target organisms. The potential toxicity of pyrethroids to the liver remains unclear and could be easily overlooked if only the common clinical indicators of liver disease are examined. In the present study, BALB/c mice were given intraperitoneal injections of 0, 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg bifenthrin (BF) for 7 days. The potential liver injury of BF and its underlying mechanism were then investigated through multilevel evaluations. Histological analyses and serum enzyme activities showed no obvious clinical evidence of liver damage. Oxidative stress was induced and caspases were activated in response to increased BF concentrations. Exposure to BF also significantly altered the expression levels of mitochondrial apoptosis-related genes in dose-dependent relationships. The microarray results showed that BF could disturb the metabolic profile and extensively induce genes related to oxidative stress, including the cytochrome P450 family, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione s-transferases and kinases. In the in vivo model, BF induced liver injury through caspase-mediated mitochondrial-dependent cell death, a process that is closely related to oxidative stress, even in the absence of classical clinical biomarkers of liver dysfunction. The results of this study suggest that classical evaluations are not adequate for liver toxicity of pyrethroids, and highlight the need for more comprehensive assessment of health risks of these widely used pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative metabolism of the pyrethroids bifenthrin and deltamethrin in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzo, L.O.; Cohen, E.; Capua, S.

    1988-01-01

    The fate of 14 C-radiolabeled bifenthrin and deltamethrin was studied in the mite, Rhizoglyphus robini. Administered either by ingestion or by contact, both pyrethroids were efficiently metabolized, but deltamethrin was degraded to a much greater extent. The identified metabolites arise from a combination of ester cleavage, oxidation, and conjugation reactions. With 14 C-acid- and 14 C-alcohol-labeled bifenthrin, the free metabolites detected were the 4'-hydroxy derivative of the ester, the primary ester cleavage products, the acid, and its 4'-hydroxy derivative from the alcohol moiety, as well as several unidentified metabolites. Using 14 C-alcohol-labeled deltamethrin, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and its 4'-hydroxylated product and several unknown metabolites were detected. Conjugates comprised the bulk of total pyrethroid metabolites. In addition to ester cleavage products, the 4'-hydroxylated bifenthrin was also identified. For the first time in invertebrates, a conjugated pyrethroid ester was observed

  11. The effect of bifenthrin on the dopaminergic pathway in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crago, Jordan; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Bifenthrin is a type I pyrethroid pesticide, which has been shown to increase plasma estrogen concentrations in several fish models. The mechanism of action by which bifenthrin alters 17β-estradiol (E2) is unclear. E2 biosynthesis is regulated through pituitary follicle stimulating hormone, which is directly controlled by hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH2). Since dopaminergic signaling significantly influences GnRH2 release in fish, the goal of the study was to determine the effect of a 96 h and 2 weeks exposure to bifenthrin on dopaminergic signaling in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (RT). Our results indicated that a decrease in dopamine receptor 2A (DR2A) expression was associated with a trend toward an increase in plasma E2 following exposure at 96 h and 2 weeks, and a significant increase in the relative expression of vitellogenin mRNA at 2 weeks. DR2A mRNA expression decreased 426-fold at 96 h and 269-fold at 2 weeks in the brains of 1.5 ppb (3.55 pM) bifenthrin treated RT. There was an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase transcript levels at 96 h, which is indicative of dopamine production in the brains of the 1.5 ppb (3.55 pM) bifenthrin treated RT. A significant increase in the relative expression of GnRH2 was observed at 96 h but a significant decrease was noted after 2 weeks exposure indicating potential feedback loop activation. These results indicate that the estrogenic-effects of bifenthrin may result in part from changes in signaling within the dopaminergic pathway, but that other feedback pathways may also be involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Photodegradation of bifenthrin and deltamethrin-effect of copper amendment and solvent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Saadia Rashid; Ahmed, Dildar; Farooq, Amna; Rasheed, Sonia; Mansoor, Mubarkah

    2017-02-01

    The photodegradation of bifenthrin and deltamethrin was studied in the presence of Cu salts and two different solvents, methanol and acetonitrile. Results of the study showed that in the absence of any metal salt, the two pesticides degraded more rapidly in acetonitrile than in methanol. After 24 h of UV irradiation, 70% of deltamethrin had degraded in acetonitrile, while only 41% bifenthrin degraded in this solvent. In methanol, bifenthrin degraded at a much enhanced rate than in acetonitrile while the rate of degradation of deltamethrin was comparable to that in acetonitrile. The photodegradation was further enhanced by the addition of copper to the solution of bifenthrin and deltamethrin in acetonitrile. The rate of photodegradation of deltamethrin increased from 2.4 × 10 -2 to 3.5 × 10 -2  h -1 in acetonitrile and 2.5 × 10 -2 to 3.4 × 10 -2  h -1 in methanol after the addition of copper. Similarly, the rate of photodegradation of bifenthrin was increased from 5.0 × 10 -3 to 9.0 × 10 -3  h -1 in acetonitrile and 7.0 × 10 -3 to 9.05 × 10 -3  h -1 in methanol with the addition of copper. Thus, copper has the potential to enhance the photodegradation of bifenthrin and deltamethrin in both the solvents.

  13. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L; Denison, Michael S; Cherr, Gary N

    2012-12-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. The authors evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid-contaminated aquatic habitats. The authors then compared the in vivo response with an in vitro assay--chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX). Juvenile M. beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100 ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10 µg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50 ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. Though Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. Whereas the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. The results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  14. Relationship between bifenthrin sediment toxic units and benthic community metrics in urban California streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to use ecologically relevant field measurements for determining the relationship between bifenthrin sediment toxic units (TUs) (environmental concentrations/Hyalella acute LC50 value) and 15 benthic metrics in four urban California streams sampled from 2006 to 2011. Data from the following four California streams were used in the analysis: Kirker Creek (2006, 2007), Pleasant Grove Creek (2006, 2007, and 2008), Arcade Creek (2009, 2010, and 2011), and Salinas streams (2009, 2010, and 2011). The results from univariate analysis of benthic metrics versus bifenthrin TU calculations for the four California streams with multiple-year datasets combined by stream showed that there were either nonsignificant relationships or lack of metric data for 93 % of cases. For 7 % of the data (4 cases) where significant relationships were reported between benthic metrics and bifenthrin TUs, these relationships were ecologically meaningful. Three of these significant direct relationships were an expression of tolerant benthic taxa (either % tolerant taxa or tolerance values, which are similar metrics), which would be expected to increase in a stressed environment. These direct significant tolerance relationships were reported for Kirker Creek, Pleasant Grove Creek, and Arcade Creek. The fourth significant relationship was an inverse relationship between taxa richness and bifenthrin TUs for the 3-year Pleasant Grove Creek dataset. In summary, only a small percent of the benthic metric × bifenthrin TU relationships were significant for the four California streams. Therefore, the general summary conclusion from this analysis is that there is no strong case for showing consistent meaningful relationships between various benthic metrics used to characterize the status of benthic communities and bifenthrin TUs for these four California streams.

  15. Microbial Detoxification of Bifenthrin by a Novel Yeast and Its Potential for Contaminated Soils Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shaohua; Luo, Jianjun; Hu, Meiying; Geng, Peng; Zhang, Yanbo

    2012-01-01

    Bifenthrin is one the most widespread pollutants and has caused potential effect on aquatic life and human health, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. A novel yeast strain ZS-02, isolated from activated sludge and identified as Candida pelliculosa based on morphology, API test and 18S rDNA gene analysis, was found highly effective in degrading bifenthrin over a wide range of temperatures (20-40 °C) and pH (5-9). On the basis of response surface methodology...

  16. STUDY OF THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CYPERMETHRIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

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    Syed Mehmood Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the toxic effects of a commercially available pesticide, cypermethrin (CM, on animals. This pesticide was administered in the form of aerosol spray through a nebulizer. The study was performed in four different groups and a constant dose of the pesticide was administered once, twice, thrice and four times a day to the respective group for a period of 30 days. The animals were then dissected to study the pesticide effects on different organs. The organs were preserved in 10% formalin. The tissues were processed by basic histopathological method and the slides were prepared for observation. The results were recorded on a performa and were quantified by a unique scoring system. It is concluded that the injurious effects to the mentioned organs were dose and frequency dependent.

  17. cis-Bifenthrin enantioselectively induces hepatic oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Pan, Xiuhong; Wang, Linggang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2013-09-01

    Bifenthrin (BF), as a chiral synthetic pyrethroid, is widely used to control field and household pests. In China, the commercial cis-BF contained two enantiomers including 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. However, the difference in oxidative stress induced by the two enantiomers in mice still remains unclear. In the present study, 4 week-old adolescent male ICR mice were orally administered cis-BF, 1R-cis-BF or 1S-cis-BF daily for 2, 4 and 6 weeks at doses of 5 mg/kg/day, respectively. We found that the hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, as well as the malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) content both in the serum and liver increased significantly in the 4 or 6 weeks 1S-cis-BF treated groups. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) also changed significantly in the serum and liver of 1S-cis-BF treated mice. More importantly, the significant differences in MDA content and CAT activity both in the serum and liver, and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and SOD in serum were also observed between the 1S-cis-BF and 1R-cis-BF treated groups. Moreover, the transcription of oxidative stress response related genes including Sod1, Cat and heme oxygenase-1(Ho-1) in the liver of 1S-cis-BF treated groups were also significant higher than those in 1R-cis-BF treated group. Thus, it was concluded that cis-BF induced hepatic oxidative stress in an enantiomer specific manner in mice when exposed during the puberty, and that 1S-cis-BF showed much more toxic in hepatic oxidative stress than 1R-cis-BF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicity of Cypermethrin and Chlorpyrifos Against German Cockroach [ Blattella germanica (Blattaria: Blattellidae)] Strains from Hamadan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Mansour; Motlagh, Behrouz Alipourian; Nasirian, Hassan

    German cockroach has relatively short life cycle and reproduce rapidly. It is the most common medically and public health pest. As a result, it is essential to combat this pest. Cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos are used by private companies in Hamadan to control Blattella germanica. It seems necessary to determine its susceptibility levels to these insecticides. The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility levels of B. germanica strains to cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos in Hamadan. In this study, the German cockroach strains were collected from two hospitals (Fatemiyeh and Atiyeh) in Hamadan and transfered to the insectarium. The cockroach strains were reared under the same laboratory condition. Then their sensitivity levels were considered to 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 mg m -2 for cypermethrin and 0.82, 1.65, 3.31, 6.63, 9.945 and 13.26 mg m -2 for chlorpyrifos using surface contact method. Results based on insecticide treated doses, B. germanica strains showed different percent mortality to the insecticides ranged from 13.3-100. The LD 50 and LD 90 and regression lines of the treated insecticides against German cockroach strains indicate that Fatemiyeh Hospital strain is more susceptible to the treated insecticides than Atiyeh Hospital strain. The LD 50 and LD 90 of chlorpyrifos are also lower than cypermethrin, indicated that chlorpyrifos is more effective than cypermethrin against German cockroach. As the slopes of the regression lines are observed mild in this study indicate that the population of the cockroach strains is very heterogeneous. It can be a symbol of insecticides resistance to cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos. As chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin insecticides are also used for residual spraying by private companies and the doses which provide more than 90% mortality are below the WHO recommended insecticide doses. Therefore, chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin insecticides can be used for B. germanica control in Hamadan within regular monitoring and preventive

  19. Aquatic toxicity of cartap and cypermethrin to different life stages of Daphnia magna and Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghee; Jung, Jinyong; Oh, Sorin; Choi, Kyungho

    2008-01-01

    Cartap and cypermethrin, which are among the most widely used pesticides in many countries, are considered safe because of their low mammalian toxicity and their low persistence in the environment. However, recent findings of endocrine-disrupting effects and developmental neurotoxicity have raised concerns about the potential ecological impacts of these pesticides. We evaluated the aquatic toxicity of cartap [S,S'-(2-dimethylaminotrimethylene) bis(thiocarbamate), unspecified hydrochloride] and cypermethrin [(RS)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl-(1RS,3RS,1RS,3SR)-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylate], both individually and combined, on different life stages of the freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna and a freshwater teleost, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). The 96-hr Daphnia median effective concentrations (EC50s) for cartap and cypermethrin were 91.0 microg/L and 0.00061 microg/L, respectively. Rapid recovery of Daphnia was observed after short-term pulsed exposure to cartap and cypermethrin; there were no adverse effects on reproduction or survival 20 d after a 24 hr exposure to cartap up to 1240 microg/L and cypermethrin up to 1.9 microg/L. Chronic continuous exposure (for 21 d) of 7-d-old Daphnia to cypermethrin significantly reduced the intrinsic population growth rate in a concentration-dependent manner. However, because the intrinsic population growth rates were all above zero, populations did not decrease even at the highest experimental concentration of 200 ng/L. Exposure of Daphnia neonates (cartap or 40 microg/L of cypermethrin. The mixture of both compounds showed no synergistic toxicity. The extremely high acute-to-chronic ratio suggests that the standard acute lethal toxicity assessment might not reflect the true environmental hazards of these frequently used pesticides. Ecological hazard assessments of long-term low dose or pulsed exposures to cartap and cypermethrin may reveal more realistic consequences of these compounds in

  20. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water.

  1. Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Cypermethrin in Hepatocarcinoma Cells: A Dose- and Time-Dependent Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKahtane, Abdullah A; Alarifi, Saud; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Ali, Daoud; Alomar, Suliman Y; Aleissia, Mohammed S; Alkahtani, Saad

    2018-01-01

    Most of the agricultural workers are potentially exposed to pesticides through different routes. Inhalation exposures may result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual's health and capacity to perform at work. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxic potential of cypermethrin pesticide on cultured human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. The HepG2 cells were exposed to cypermethrin (0, 5, 15, 40 ng/mL) for 24 and 48 hours. We observed that cypermethrin caused cell death of HepG2 cells using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiozolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase tests. Furthermore, cypermethrin reduced HepG2 cells viability in a time and dose dependent basis, that was probably mediated through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. An increase in ROS generation with a concomitant increase in expression of the proapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cytochrome c and decrease in the antiapoptosis protein Bax suggested that a mitochondria-mediated pathway was involved in cypermethrin-induced apoptosis. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms involved in cytotoxicity of cypermethrin in HepG2 cells.

  2. Cypermethrin-induced reproductive toxicity in the rat is prevented by resveratrol

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    Poonam Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : The current study was to assess the protective role of resveratrol in cypermethrin-induced reproductive toxicity in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods : Rats were exposed to cypermethrin (3.83 mg/kg bw for 14 days. Pre- and post-treatment of resveratrol (20 mg/kg bw for 14 days was given to cypermethrin exposed rats. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed, testis and epididymis were removed, sperm characteristics, sex hormones, and various biochemical parameters were studied. Results : Cypermethrin exposure resulted in a significant decrease in weight of testis and epididymis, testicular sperm head counts, sperm motility and live sperm counts and increase in sperm abnormalities. Serum testosterone (T, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, reduced glutathione (GSH, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and total protein (TP content were decreased and lipid peroxidation (LPO level was increased on cypermethrin exposure. Pre- and post-treatment of resveratrol increased sperm head counts, sperm motility, live sperm counts, T, FSH, LH, GSH, CAT, SOD, GST, GR, GPx and TP contents and decreased LPO. Treatment with resveratrol alone has improved sperm parameters and testicular antioxidant defence system. Conclusion : The study concluded that resveratrol ameliorated cypermethrin-induced testicular damage by reducing oxidative stress and by enhancing the level of sex hormones.

  3. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti N. Tallur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF, polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water.

  4. Tissue time course and bioavailability of the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in the Long-Evans rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid insecticide and human exposure to it can occur by oral, pulmonary and dermal routes. Pyrethroids are neurotoxic agents and it is generally believed that the parent pyrethroid is the toxic entity. This study evaluated the oral disposition and bioavaila...

  5. Evaluation of bifenthrin applications in tires to prevent Aedes mosquito breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy T; Whelan, Peter I; Shortus, Matthew S; Jacups, Susan P

    2009-03-01

    The efficacy of maximum label rates of bifenthrin applications to dry tires to prevent Aedes mosquito breeding was investigated by field colonization and bioassay trials in shaded and unshaded locations. Aedes notoscriptus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae were the most abundant species present in the field colonization trial. Colonization and survival of Ae. notoscriptus larvae to the late instar occurred significantly earlier in treated tires in shaded compared with unshaded locations (P = 0.002). Bifenthrin applications in shaded tires only prevented early instar survival for approximately 2.6 wk. Aedes notoscriptus late instars did not appear in the treated unshaded tires. Culex quinquefasciatus colonized treated tires from the 2nd wk in both shaded and unshaded treatments. In the bioassay, water from bifenthrin-treated tires, through extrapolation, was found to kill approximately 100% of late instar Ae. notoscriptus for only approximately 2.0-2.2 wk in shaded and unshaded tires. Under conditions optimal for Aedes breeding, such as shaded locations, high ambient temperatures, high relative humidity, and high amounts of leaf/organic matter accumulations, bifenthrin may not be effective as a larval control measure in tires for greater than 2.0-2.6 wk.

  6. Efficacy of residual bifenthrin applied to landscape vegetation against Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Melissa A; Kline, Daniel L; Allan, Sandra A; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2009-06-01

    The daytime biting mosquito Aedes albopictus is a nuisance pest commonly found in suburban yards. The recommended course of treatment for Ae. albopictus is to keep yards free of water-holding containers; however, infestations may require additional control methods such as residual pesticide applications to vegetation. Five plants commonly found in yards or in uncultivated areas in Gainesville, FL were chosen as substrates for evaluation of the effectiveness of residual bifenthrin against 5-7-day-old female Ae. albopictus. Knockdown of mosquitoes after 1 h of exposure was highest the day of and 7 days after treatment. Plant species clearly impacted the effectiveness of residual bifenthrin. One-hour knockdown 7 days after treatment remained high (>62%) only on azalea and holly bush vegetation. Knockdown counts 24 h after exposure demonstrated that residual efficacy of bifenthrin was highest on azalea, with >77% mortality for up to 35 days. Additional bioassays revealed significant differences in the knockdown rates of male, female, gravid, and blood-fed Ae. albopictus exposed to residual bifenthrin treatments, with the highest knockdown observed on the day of and 7 days after treatment.

  7. Activity of bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam against red imported fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltz, B A; Suiter, D R; Gardner, W A

    2010-06-01

    Bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam were evaluated for activity against the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Mobility impairment and lethal times were determined after topical treatments. Both immobilization and mortality occurred most quickly with bifenthrin, followed by thiamethoxam, chlorfenapyr, and fipronil. Mortality due to horizontal exposure was evaluated at 10, 20, or 30 degrees C, with three ratios of topically treated donor ant corpses to live recipients (5, 10, or 20% donors). Bifenthrin had the greatest horizontal activity of the chemicals tested. For chlorfenapyr, the only treatments having higher mortality than controls were the highest percentage donors at either 10 or 30 degrees C. Horizontal activity of fipronil was temperature dependent only with the highest proportion of donors and was lower than that ofbifenthrin but higher than that of chlorfenapyr or thiamethoxam. Mean mortality due to thiamethoxam was similar to that with chlorfenapyr. Significant mortality occurred in all of the 20 and 30 degrees C thiamethoxam treatments, but none of the 10 degrees C treatments. Effectiveness as a barrier was evaluated by providing a choice between bridges treated with insecticide or water. Although bifenthrin did not provide an impenetrable barrier, it was the only treatment having fewer ants than its paired control bridge. Mortality data suggest that a reduction in recruitment rather than repellency account for this result.

  8. Toxicokinetics of the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in blood and brain of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid insecticide and human exposure to it can occur by oral, pulmonary and dermal routes. Pyrethroids are neurotoxic agents and it is generally believed that the parent pyrethroid is the toxic entity. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicokinet...

  9. Relative toxicity of bifenthrin to Hyalella azteca in 10 day versus 28 day exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Petersen, Megan A; Jennings, Lydia L; Fojut, Tessa L; Vasquez, Martice E; Siegler, Catherine; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2015-04-01

    Many watersheds in the Central Valley region of California are listed as impaired due to pyrethroid-associated sediment toxicity. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board is developing numeric sediment quality criteria for pyrethroids, beginning with bifenthrin. Criteria are being developed using existing data, along with data from 10 d and 28 d toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca conducted as part of the current study. A single range-finder and 2 definitive tests were conducted for each test duration. Median lethal concentrations (LC50s), as well as LC20s and inhibition concentrations (IC20s) were calculated based on measured whole sediment bifenthrin concentrations and interstitial water concentrations. Sediment LC50s were also corrected for organic C content. Average LC50s were not significantly different in 10 d versus 28 d tests with H. azteca: 9.1 and 9.6 ng/g bifenthrin for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Average LC20 values were also similar with concentrations at 7.1 and 7.0 for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Bifenthrin inhibition concentrations (IC20s) based on amphipod growth were variable, particularly in the 28 d tests, where a clear dose-response relationship was observed in only 1 of the definitive experiments. Average amphipod growth IC20s were 3.9 and 9.0 ng/g for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Amphipod growth calculated as biomass resulted in IC20s of 4.1 and 6.3 ng/g for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Lack of a clear growth effect in the longer term test may be related to the lack of food adjustment to account for amphipod mortality in whole sediment exposures. The average C-corrected LC50s were 1.03 and 1.09 μg/g OC for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Interstitial water LC50s were determined as the measured dissolved concentration of bifenthrin relative to interstitial water dissolved organic carbon. The average LC50s for dissolved interstitial water bifenthrin were

  10. Simultaneous determination of 18 pyrethroids in indoor air by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2009-06-26

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of 18 pyrethroids (allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, cyphenothrin, deltamethrin, empenthrin, fenpropathrin, furamethrin, imiprothrin, metofluthrin, permethrin, phenothrin, prallethrin, profluthrin, resmethrin, tetramethrin and transfluthrin) in indoor air. The pyrethroids were collected for 24 h using a combination of adsorbents (quartz fiber filter disk and Empore C18 disk), with protection from light, and then extracted with acetone, concentrated, and analyzed by GC/MS. They could be determined accurately and precisely (detection limits: ca. 1 ng/m(3)). The collected pyrethroid samples could be stored for up to one month at 4 degrees C in a refrigerator.

  11. Relationship of bifenthrin sediment concentrations to grain size and total organic carbon in California waterbodies: implications for ecological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2014-12-01

    A summary analysis of data sets from six California waterbodies was conducted to determine the relationship of bifenthrin sediment concentrations to: % sand/gravel; % silt; % clay; % silt/clay and % total organic carbon (TOC). The relationship of TOC to % sand/gravel, % silt, % clay, and % silt/clay was also analyzed. Statistically significant and meaningful direct relationships were reported between bifenthrin and % TOC, % silt, % clay and % silt/clay while a significant and meaningful inverse relationship was reported between bifenthrin and % sand/gravel. A significant and meaningful inverse relationship was reported between % TOC and % sand/gravel, while a significant and meaningful direct relationship was reported between % TOC and % silt, % clay and % silt/clay. Significant bifenthrin sediment concentrations would not be expected in non-depositional (sand/gravel) areas which have been reported to be dominant in various streams in California's Central Valley and are also the preferred habitat for many benthic macroinvertebrate taxa.

  12. Effects of sublethal concentrations of bifenthrin and deltamethrin on fecundity, growth, and development of the honeybee Apis mellifera ligustica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ping-Li; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Ji-Hu; Liu, Feng; Wang, Xing; Wu, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Ting

    2010-03-01

    Bifenthrin and deltamethrin have been widely used as pesticides in agriculture and forestry and are becoming an increasing risk to honeybees. The honeybee, Apis mellifera ligustica, is widely recognized as a beneficial insect of agronomic, ecological, and scientific importance. It is important to understand what effects these chemicals have on bees. Effects of two pesticides at sublethal concentrations on fecundity, growth, and development of honeybees were examined with the feeding method for a three-year period (2006-2008). It was shown that both bifenthrin and deltamethrin significantly reduced bee fecundity, decreased the rate at which bees develop to adulthood, and increased their immature periods. The toxicity of bifenthrin and deltamethrin on workers of Apis mellifera ligustica was also assessed, and the results from the present study showed that the median lethal effects of bifenthrin and deltamethrin were 16.7 and 62.8 mg/L, respectively.

  13. Relative repellency and lethality of the neonicotinoids thiamethoxam and acetamiprid and an acetamiprid/bifenthrin combination to Reticulitermes flavipes termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph A; Pereira, Roberto M; Koehler, Philip G

    2008-12-01

    Field-collected Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) termites were placed in bioassay tubes containing soil treated with one of three termiticides: thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, or a combination of acetamiprid + bifenthrin. In the bioassay tubes, treated soil was placed in a layer centered within untreated sand between two 1.5-cm agar plugs. All termiticides were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 ppm with narrow (1 mm), medium (5 mm), and broad (50 mm) thicknesses of treated soil. Soil penetration and termite mortality were measured after 7 d, and repellency was assessed. Thiamethoxam treatments allowed the greatest soil penetration, whereas acetamiprid + bifenthrin treatments were the most inhibitory to soil penetration. Thiamethoxam treatments also caused consistently greater termite mortality than acetamiprid treatments. These data indicated that acetamiprid prevented soil penetration by termites more than thiamethoxam, although both were less repellent compared with bifenthrin alone, which causes little termite mortality at the tested doses. When there was direct contact of treated soil with the agar plugs in broad treatments, the combination of acetamiprid + bifenthrin was more toxic to R. flavipes termites than either acetamiprid or thiamethoxam alone. The combination acetamiprid + bifenthrin termiticide may be effective in keeping termites away from the treated soil, because of the combined effects of acetamiprid and bifenthrin.

  14. Cypermethrin induced reproductive toxicity in male Wistar rats: protective role of Tribulus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poonam; Huq, Amir Ul; Singh, Rambir

    2013-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate role of ethanolic extract of Tribulus terrestris (EETT) against alpha-cypermethrin induced reproductive toxicity in male Wistar rats. 24 male Wistar rats weighing about 250-300g were divided in four groups. Group-I was control. alpha-cypermethrin (3.38 mg kg-1b.wt.) was given to group-IlI for 28 days. In Group-Ill, alpha-cypermethrin and EETT (100 mg kg -1b.wt.) were administered in combination for 28 days. Rats in group-IV were given EETT for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed, testes and epididymis were removed and sperm characteristics, sex hormones and various biochemical parameters were studied. Decrease in weight of testes and epididymis, testicular sperm head count, sperm motility, live sperm count, serum testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), leutinizing hormone (LH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), total protein content and increase in sperm abnormalities and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level was observed in rats exposed to cypermethrin. In combination group-Ill, EETT treatment ameliorated alpha-cypermethrin induced damage. EETT treatment in group-IV increased testes and epididymis weight, sperm head counts, sperm motility, live sperm counts, testosterone, FSH, LH, GSH, CAT, SOD, GST, GR, GPx and total protein content. The study suggested that Tribulus terrestris plant possess reproductive system enhancement and antioxidant activity.

  15. Evaluation of Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn. Extract against Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus (Skuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn extract were evaluated against dengue vectors in the laboratory."nMethods: Both Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn crude hexane extract were bioassayed against the adults and larval stages of dengue vectors Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus(Skuse in the laboratory."nResults: The A. calamus crude hexane extract exhibited a larvicidal activity against 4th-instar Ae. aegypti larvae with LC50 and LC90 values of 0.4418 and 11.3935 ppm respectively. The plant crude extract exhibited against Ae. albopictus larvae with a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 21.2555 ppm and 36.1061 ppm, respectively. There was a significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp. Larvae (P< 0.05. However, bifenthrin showed a significant difference on larvicidal effect to that of A. calamus hexane extract on both Aedes spp (P< 0.05. In testing the adulticidal activity, this plant extract exhibited the LC50 and LC90 values of 17.4075 and 252.9458 ppm against Ae .aegypti and a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 43.9952 and 446.1365 ppm respectively on Ae. albopictus. There was no significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp adults (P> 0.05."nConclusion: Bifenthrin however showed a significant difference on both Aedes spp adults (P< 0.05. With the wide availability of A. calamus in Malaysia, it could be utilized for controlling dengue vectors. "n 

  16. Lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin and cypermethrin on Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Zahra; Saber, Moosa; Gharekhani, Gholamhossein; Mehrvar, Ali; Kamita, Shizuo George

    2014-04-01

    Habrobracon hebetor Say is an ectoparasitoid of larval stage of various lepidopteran pests. Lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin and cypermethrin were evaluated on adult and preimaginal stages of H. hebetor under laboratory conditions. Contact exposure bioassays with adults indicated that the lethal concentration (LC50) of two commercial azadirachtin-containing formulations, NeemGuard and BioNeem, were 43.5 and 10.2 microg a.i./ml, respectively. The LC50 of cypermethrin was 5.4 microg a.i./ml. When larval stage of H. hebetor was exposed to these insecticides with a field recommended concentration of NeemGuard, BioNeem, or cypermethrin by a dip protocol, the emergence rate was reduced by 39.0, 36.6, and 97.6%, respectively. To assay the sublethal effects of these insecticides, adult wasps were exposed to an LC30 concentration of the insecticides, and then demographic parameters of the surviving wasps were determined. Fecundity, fertility, and parameters including the intrinsic rate of increase (r(m)) were affected negatively. The r(m) values following exposure to NeemGuard, BioNeem, cypermethrin, or mock treatment were 0.143, 0.149, 0.160, and 0.179, respectively, female offspring per female per day, respectively. The current study showed that cypermethrin had more acute toxicity on larval and adult stages of H. hebetor compared with azadirachin. The commercial formulations of azadirachtin and cypermethrin negatively affected most of the life table parameters of the parasitoid. Semifield and field studies are needed for obtaining more applicable results on combining H. hebetor and the tested insecticides for an integrated pest management-based strategy for crop protection.

  17. Monooxygenase, a novel beta-cypermethrin degrading enzyme from Streptomyces sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available The widely used insecticide beta-cypermethrin has become a public concern because of its environmental contamination and toxic effects on mammals. In this study, a novel beta-cypermethrin degrading enzyme designated as CMO was purified to apparent homogeneity from a Streptomyces sp. isolate capable of utilizing beta-cypermethrin as a growth substrate. The native enzyme showed a monomeric structure with a molecular mass of 41 kDa and pI of 5.4. The enzyme exhibited the maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 30°C. It was fairly stable in the pH range from 6.5-8.5 and at temperatures below 10°C. The enzyme activity was significantly stimulated by Fe(2+, but strongly inhibited by Ag(+, Al(3+, and Cu(2+. The enzyme catalyzed the degradation of beta-cypermethrin to form five products via hydroxylation and diaryl cleavage. A novel beta-cypermethrin detoxification pathway was proposed based on analysis of these products. The purified enzyme was identified as a monooxygenase by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF-MS and N-terminal protein sequencing. Given that all the characterized pyrethroid-degrading enzymes are the members of hydrolase family, CMO represents the first pyrethroid-degrading monooxygenase identified from environmental microorganisms. Taken together, our findings depict a novel pyrethroid degradation mechanism and indicate that the purified enzyme may be a promising candidate for detoxification of beta-cypermethrin and environmental protection.

  18. Comparative metabolism of the pyrethroids bifenthrin and deltamethrin in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzo, L.O.; Cohen, E.; Capua, S. (The Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel))

    The fate of {sup 14}C-radiolabeled bifenthrin and deltamethrin was studied in the mite, Rhizoglyphus robini. Administered either by ingestion or by contact, both pyrethroids were efficiently metabolized, but deltamethrin was degraded to a much greater extent. The identified metabolites arise from a combination of ester cleavage, oxidation, and conjugation reactions. With {sup 14}C-acid- and {sup 14}C-alcohol-labeled bifenthrin, the free metabolites detected were the 4{prime}-hydroxy derivative of the ester, the primary ester cleavage products, the acid, and its 4{prime}-hydroxy derivative from the alcohol moiety, as well as several unidentified metabolites. Using {sup 14}C-alcohol-labeled deltamethrin, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and its 4{prime}-hydroxylated product and several unknown metabolites were detected. Conjugates comprised the bulk of total pyrethroid metabolites. In addition to ester cleavage products, the 4{prime}-hydroxylated bifenthrin was also identified. For the first time in invertebrates, a conjugated pyrethroid ester was observed.

  19. Stability of the pyrethroid pesticide bifenthrin in milled wheat during thermal processing, yeast and lactic acid fermentation, and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorđević, Tijana M; Šiler-Marinković, Slavica S; Ðurović, Rada D; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana I; Gajić Umiljendić, Jelena S

    2013-10-01

    Pesticide residues have become an unavoidable part of food commodities. In the context of increased interest for food processing techniques as a tool for reducing pesticide residues, it is interesting to study the potential loss of pesticides during lactic acid and yeast fermentation. In the present paper the effect of fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and storage on 23 °C on bifenthrin in wheat was investigated. In addition, the effect of sterilisation (applied in order to avoid contamination with wild microorganism strains, i.e. to determine the individual effects of used strains) on bifenthrin degradation was tested as well. No significant loss of bifenthrin was observed during storage, or after the sterilisation. During the lactic acid fermentation, reduction within wheat fortified with 0.5 mg kg(-1) was 42%, while quite lower within samples fortified with 2.5 mg kg(-1) , maximum 18%. In contrast, bifenthrin concentration was not reduced during yeast fermentation, as the reduction in fortified samples was in the range of spontaneous chemical degradation during incubation period. Possible bifenthrin contamination in wheat, in amounts over the maximum residue limits, could not be reduced by sterilisation or by yeast fermentation, but lactic acid fermentation could be an effective tool for minimising residual contamination. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Clinical, biochemical and haemathological effects in Rhamdia quelen exposed to cypermethrin

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    F.P. Montanha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The acute intoxication of Cypermethrin in Silver Catfish (Rhamdia quelen was evaluated. Animals weighing 56.67±4.43g and measuring 18.92±1.16cm were exposed to sublethal concentrations of Cypermethrin for the species in hydrological conditions during 96 hours. A total of 52 fish divided into three groups were used and received the following concentrations of Cypermethrin: 0 (n=12; 1.5 (n=20 and 2.5 (n=20mg/L. The intoxicated animals suffered behavioral changes such as loss of balance, swimming alteration, dyspnea, upright swimming and sudden spiral swimming movements. As soon as the 96-hour period was over, a blood collection for hematological and biochemical analyses was performed. A complete haemogram test, plasmatic protein test, albumin, alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, gamma glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were studied. The values of erythrocytes, hematocrits, haemoglobin, total number of leukocytes, thrombocyte, ALT, AST and ALP changed according to the groups. The results have shown that the environmental contamination by Cypermethrin is toxic to the species.

  1. Does cypermethrin affect enzyme activity, respiration rate and walking behavior of the maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais)?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronnie Von Santos Veloso; Eliseu José G.Pereira; Raul Narciso C.Guedes; Maria Goreti A.Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Insecticides cause a range of sub-lethal effects on targeted insects,which are frequently detrimental to them.However,targeted insects are able to cope with insecticides within sub-lethal ranges,which vary with their susceptibility.Here we assessed the response of three strains of the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera:Curculionidae) to sub-lethal exposure to the pyrethoid insecticide cypermethrin.We expected enzyme induction associated with cypermethrin resistance since it would aid the resistant insects in surviving such exposure.Lower respiration rate and lower activity were also expected in insecticide-resistant insects since these traits are also likely to favor survivorship under insecticide exposure.Curiously though,cypermethrin did not affect activity of digestive and energy metabolism enzymes,and even reduced the activity of some enzymes (particularly for cellulase and cysteine-proteinase activity in this case).There was strain variation in response,which may be (partially) related to insecticide resistance in some strains.Sub-lethal exposure to cypermethrin depressed proteolytic and mainly cellulolytic activity in the exposed insects,which is likely to impair their fitness.However,such exposure did not affect respiration rate and walking behavior of the insects (except for the susceptible strain where walking activity was reduced).Walking activity varies with strain and may minimize insecticide exposure,which should be a concern,particularly if associated with (physiological) insecticide resistance.

  2. Resistance Detection of Aedes aegypti Larvae to Cypermethrin from Endemic Area in Cimahi City West Java

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    Endang Puji Astuti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vector control programs using chemical insecticide e.g organochlorin, organophosphate, carbamate, and pyrethroid (cypermethrin. When those insecticides were applied continuously, it may lead to vector resistance. The aim of this research was to detect any resistance of Ae. aegypti to cypermethrin in endemic areas of Cimahi. This research is a laboratory study that used biochemical test which referred to Lee’s method. Larva samples were collected from 8 villages, which are endemic area. Samples of larvae were collected from 15 villages belonged to dengue endemic areas in town of Cimahi, however, villages that meet the availability of larvae were only 8 villages. To detect the activity of monooxygenase enzyme, a biochemical assay was used in this research by created a reaction between larvae homogenate and sodium acetate substrate. The results of reaction were read using ELISA reader with spectrophotometer wave length of 595 nm. Overall, the results showed that most of the larvae in eight villages of Cimahi is still susceptible to cypermethrin. However, larvae from Cibabat village were 4% resistant, 2% tolerant, and 94% susceptible. On the other hand, Cigugur village showed that 12.7% larvae were tolerant and 87.3% still susceptible. Other villages like Cimahi, Cibeureum, Melong, Baros, Cipageran, and Pasirkaliki still remains susceptible. Resistance detection using biochemical assay of cypermethrin insecticide for Ae.aegypti resulting data stated that in 6 villages were still susceptible but in 3 other villages were already tolerant and 1 village was already resistance.

  3. Comparison of Protective Effect of Green Tea and Vitamin C Against Cypermethrin Induce Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoor, S.; Mehboob, K.; Naveed, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insecticide toxicity is the problem of every person in under developed countries. It is necessary to counteract its effect by natural and cheap remedies like green tea and vitamin C. In this manner common man can also enjoy blessings of life. The current research was performed to compare the protective function of green tea and vitamin C on experimental cypermethrin provoked nephrotoxicity Method: Forty healthy Balb/C mice purchased from National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan and divided in to four groups (10 each). Group a was control which received only normal diet. Group B, group C and group D were experimental groups which were given Cypermethrin, Cypermethrin with green tea and Cypermethrin with vitamin C respectively. These groups were also given normal diet. After 1 month blood was drawn by intra-cardiac method to assess renal parameters. Results: One month research showed increase in serum urea to 6.8±.48 m.mol/l (n=3.9±.44) while green tea and vitamin C normalize them to 4.0±.83 m.mol/l and 3.4±.33 m.mol/l respectively. Serum creatinine increased to 42.90±3.28 m.mol/l (n=29.50±3.95) while green tea and vitamin C normalize them to 28.80±4.58 m.mol/l and 22.60±2.06 m.mol/l correspondingly. Conclusion The results showed that green tea and vitamin C neutralized toxicity induced by Cypermethrin in mice and their effect is comparable. (author)

  4. Comparison between the efficacy of two cleanup methods for the 1H NMR analysis of food samples contaminated with Cypermethrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.M.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D.; Aguiar, A.P.; Riehl, C.A.S.

    2004-01-01

    This work aimed to study the use of 1 H NMR for the identification of cypermethrin in cooked foods. 1 H NMR is not commonly used in these cases, because food samples ready for consumption have complex substances, mainly lipids, which usually interfere with the identification of cypermethrin. Thus, we drew a comparison between the most applied method for the treatment of those samples and an alternative route that made possible the use of 1 H NMR in the identification of cypermethrin in a matrix consisting of rice, bean, and chicken, which allows the Forensic work for such cases.(author)

  5. Evaluation of the inhibition of egg laying, larvicidal effects, and bloodfeeding success of Aedes aegypti exposed to permethrin- and bifenthrin-treated military tent fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, S P; Huggins, R L; Cooper, R D

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of treating military canvas tent fabric with bifenthrin and permethrin on the survival of the eggs and larvae of Aedes aegypti. Gravid female Ae. aegypti were able to oviposit on tent canvas treated with either bifenthrin or permethrin. However, none of the eggs laid on treated canvas hatched, and no larvae added to water in treated trays survived. Low residual concentrations of bifenthrin and permethrin on treated canvas prevented the development of eggs and larvae of Ae. aegypti. Inhibition of bloodfeeding was shown when Ae. aegypti adults were exposed to lower concentrations (10-50% of operational concentrations) of bifenthrin- and permethrin-treated canvas tent fabric. These experiments have shown that military tent canvas treated with either bifenthrin or permethrin can reduce the development of Ae. aegypti eggs and larvae and reduce bloodfeeding success of adults.

  6. Comparison of Methods for Bifenthrin Residues Determination in Fermented Wheat Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Đorđević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of three different sample preparation methods for GC/MS determinationof bifenthrin residues in wheat (Triticum spelta samples fermented by Lactobacillusplantarum was tested. The first method was based on a methanol:acetone=1:1 extractionfolowed by a purification on columns containing mixture of aluminium oxide and activatedcharcoal slurry-packed and eluted with dichlormethane, the second was based onmethanol:acetone=1:1 extraction folowed by the purification on florisil column and elutionby ethil acetate:acetone=4:1, while the third tested method was based on a combinationof the first two mentioned methods, thus methanol:acetone=1:1 extraction and clean-upthrought columns filled with a mixture of aluminum oxide and activated charcoal slurrypackedand eluted with ethil acetate:acetone=4:1. The second method was the most effectivefor obtaining satisfactory recoveries for bifenthrin in a range of 79-83% for four fortificationlevels, with good reproducibility i.e. RSD% in a range of 2.2-7.4%. The chosen methodwas further optimized by assessing the optimum volume of elution solvent used duringthe clean-up procedures. The highest recovery of 82.1% was obtained after elution with25 ml of solvent. Overall, two-step extraction with 25 ml of methanol:acetone=1:1 solventmix for 30 min, followed by clean-up procedure through a glass column with florisil coupledwith elution with 25 ml of ethyl acetate: acetone=4:1, allows simple, efficient and reliableGC/MS detection of bifenthrin residues from wheat grain fermented by L. plantarum.

  7. Transcriptomic changes underlie altered egg protein production and reduced fecundity in an estuarine model fish exposed to bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M; Jeffries, Ken M; Cole, Bryan J; DeCourten, Bethany M; White, J Wilson; Hasenbein, Simone; Fangue, Nann A; Connon, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    Pyrethroid pesticides are a class of insecticides found to have endocrine disrupting properties in vertebrates such as fishes and in human cell lines. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are environmental contaminants that mimic or alter the process of hormone signaling. In particular, EDCs that alter estrogen and androgen signaling pathways are of major concern for fishes because these EDCs may alter reproductive physiology, behavior, and ultimately sex ratio. Bifenthrin, a pyrethroid with escalating usage, is confirmed to disrupt estrogen signaling in several species of fish, including Menidia beryllina (inland silverside), an Atherinid recently established as a euryhaline model. Our main objective was to broadly assess the molecular and physiological responses of M. beryllina to the ng/L concentrations of bifenthrin typically found in the environment, with a focus on endocrine-related effects, and to discern links between different tiers of the biological hierarchy. As such, we evaluated the response of juvenile Menidia to bifenthrin using a Menidia-specific microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on specific endocrine-related genes of interest, and a Menidia-specific ELISA to the egg-coat protein choriogenin, to evaluate a multitude of molecular-level responses that would inform mechanisms of toxicity and any underlying causes of change at higher biological levels of organization. The sublethal nominal concentrations tested (0.5, 5 and 50ng/L) were chosen to represent the range of concentrations observed in the environment and to provide coverage of a variety of potential responses. We then employed a 21-day reproductive assay to evaluate reproductive responses to bifenthrin (at 0.5ng/L) in a separate group of adult M. beryllina. The microarray analysis indicated that bifenthrin influences a diverse suite of molecular pathways, from baseline metabolic processes to carcinogenesis. A more targeted examination of gene expression via q

  8. The pharmacokinetic properties of bifenthrin in the rat following multiple routes of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Derek; Liu, Zhiwei; Chandrasekaran, Appavu; ElNaggar, Shaaban

    2015-06-01

    Pyrethroids generally have relatively low oral toxicity but variable inhalation toxicity. The pharmacokinetics of bifenthrin in the rat after oral, inhalation and intravenous administration is described. Pyrethroid acute toxicity via oral and inhalation routes is also presented. Groups of male rats were dosed by oral gavage at 3.1 mg kg(-1) in 1 mL kg(-1) of corn oil (the critical, acute, oral benchmark dose lower limit, BMDL) and at an equivalent dose by inhalation (0.018 mg L(-1)) for 4 h.  At 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h after dosing initiation, blood plasma and brain bifenthrin concentrations were measured. The maximum concentrations of bifenthrin in plasma were 361 ng mL(-1) or 0.853 μM (oral) and 232 ng mL(-1) or 0.548 μM (inhalation), and in brain they were 83 and 73 ng g(-1). The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) values were 1969 h ng mL(-1) (plasma) and 763 h ng mL(-1) (brain) following oral gavage dosing, and 1584 h ng mL(-1) (plasma) and 619 h ng mL(-1) (brain) after inhalation. Intravenous dosing resulted in apparent terminal half-life (t1/2 ) values of 13.4 h (plasma) and 11.1 h (brain) and in AUC0-∞ values of 454 and 1566 h ng mL(-1) for plasma and brain. Clearance from plasma was 37 mL min(-1) kg(-1). Peak plasma nd brain concentrations were generally a little higher after oral dosing (by ca 14%). Inhalation administration of bifenthrin did not cause increases in exposure in plasma or brain by avoiding first-pass effects in the liver. The elimination t1/2 was comparable with other pyrethroids and indicated little bioaccumulation potential. These pharmokinetics data allow risks following inhalation exposure to be modeled using oral toxicity data. © 2014 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Pyrethroids in chicken eggs from commercial farms and home production in Rio de Janeiro: Estimated daily intake and diastereomeric selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Cláudio E T; Lestayo, Julliana; Guida, Yago S; Azevedo-Silva, Claudio E; Torres, João Paulo M; Meire, Rodrigo O; Malm, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    In this study, pyrethroids were determined in chicken eggs from commercial farm (n = 60) and home egg production (n = 30). These pyrethroids were investigated: bifenthrin, phenothrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin and fenvalerate, including most diastereomers. Quantification was done using GC-MS in a negative chemical ionization mode. Pyrethroids residues were found in 79% of the analyzed samples. Cypermethrin presented the highest occurrence, being quantified in 62 samples (69%) in concentrations (lipid weight - l w.) varying between 0.29 and 6408 ng g -1 , followed by phenothrin (24%), 21-3910 ng g -1 , permethrin (14%), 2.96-328 ng g -1 , and bifenthrin (11%), 3.77-16.7 ng g -1 . Cyfluthrin and fenvalerate were not detected. Home-produced eggs had a higher occurrence of pyrethroids (97%), with a greater predominance of phenothrin. In commercial production, 70% of the samples presented pyrethroid residues (predominantly cypermethrin). This is the first report about the presence of pyrethroids in home-produced eggs and the first description of a selectivity pattern with the predominance of cis diastereomers in chicken eggs. In general, estimated daily intake does not present a risk to human consumption, according to Brazilian and international standards (FAO/WHO). However, one third of the samples (30 eggs) had concentrations above the maximum residue limits (MRLs). The maximum cypermethrin concentration was 66 times the MRL, while the maximum phenothrin concentration was 11 times the limit. Further studies about transfer dynamics, bioaccumulation and metabolic degradation of stereoisomers are required, as well as determining if this selectivity pattern in food can increase consumer's health risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determining the most effective concentration of cypermethrin and the appropriate carrier particle size for fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) bait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Lekhnath; Shih, Cheng-Jen

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the most effective particle size of DDGS (distiller's dried grains with solubles) as fire ant bait carrier, as well as the most effective concentration of cypermethrin as a toxicant against the red imported fire ant (RIFA) Solenopsis invicta Buren under laboratory conditions. The DDGS particle size did not affect the fire ant's preference for the bait, but it did affect the mass of DDGS being carried back to the nest. The size of the DDGS particles and the mass of DDGS being carried back to the nest were positively correlated. The most efficient particle size of DDGS was 0.8-2 mm. The concentration of cypermethrin has a specific range for killing fire ants in an efficient manner. Neither a very low nor a very high concentration of cypermethrin was able to kill fire ants efficiently. The most effective concentration of cypermethrin was 0.13% in DDGS when mixed with 15% shrimp shell powders and 11% soybean oil. Based on its ability to kill fire ants when mixed with cypermethrin, as well as the advantage of having a larger area coverage when sprayed in the field, DDGS as the carrier and cypermethrin as the toxicant can be considered to be an efficient way to prepare fire ant bait for controlling fire ants in infested areas. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, on steroid hormone levels and gonadal development of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under hypersaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Kristy L; Riar, Navneet; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    The San Francisco Bay Estuary and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Bay-Delta) is an important breeding and nursery ground for fish. Of particular interest are salmonids that migrate through fresh and saltwater areas polluted with various contaminants including bifenthrin, a widely used pyrethroid insecticide. Male steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to bifenthrin (0.1 and 1.5μg/L) for two weeks had a lower gonadosomatic index (GSI) in freshwater but were not affected by concurrent bifenthrin exposure and saltwater acclimation. Plasma estradiol-17β (E2) levels and ovarian follicle diameter of fish exposed to bifenthrin (0.1 and 1.5μg/L) in freshwater significantly increased. Under hypersaline conditions, fish exposed to bifenthrin had significantly reduced E2 levels and smaller follicles, and unhealthy ovarian follicles were observed. Given the occurrence of bifenthrin in surface waters of the Bay Delta, understanding the impact of bifenthrin on wildlife is necessary for improving risk assessments of pyrethroids in this important ecosystem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Bifenthrin and Deltamethrin Barrier Sprays for Mosquito Control in Eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie L; Volkan, Josh K; Balanay, Jo Anne G; Vandock, Kurt

    2017-11-07

    Mosquitoes are a nuisance and potentially transmit pathogens causing numerous diseases worldwide. Homeowners and others may hire private companies to alleviate mosquito-related issues. Here, two pyrethroids (Suspend Polyzone [deltamethrin] and Bifen Insecticide/Termiticide [bifenthrin]) were evaluated on properties in North Carolina for 23 wk from 18 May through 19 October 2015. Properties were treated using backpack mist blowers every 21 d. At 17 fixed sampling locations, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention carbon dioxide-baited traps were deployed overnight once/week for the duration of the experiment. Oviposition traps were deployed weekly at the same locations. Differences were observed in mosquito abundance between neighborhoods, treatments, and weeks and differences varied between species. Mosquito abundance was generally significantly higher in traps placed on control properties (no insecticide) compared to traps placed on treatment properties. Bifenthrin and deltamethrin showed differences from each other in efficacy, but this varied between neighborhoods and species. Future studies could test the efficacy of barrier sprays at different application frequencies and/or in conjunction with weather monitoring. Coupled with regular mosquito surveillance and using integrated pest management principles, barrier sprays can be an effective tool for suppression of mosquito populations. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Gas chromatographic determination of bifenthrin in technical and selected formulated products: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikta, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    A GC method for the analysis of technical and formulated bifenthrin samples was evaluated in a collaborative study. Bifenthrin is determined by using a 50% (trifluoropropyl)-methylpolysiloxane wide-bore capillary column and flame ionization detector. Ten samples, consisting of four formulations and a technical material were analyzed by 12 collaborators using Youden pairs. The four formulation types included in this study were microemulsion (ME), wettable powder (WP), suspension concentrate (SC), and emulsifiable concentrate (EC). Variability in the analysis of two of the formulation types, SC and EC, was later found to be due to the noncommercial containers used to hold the test samples. Because of this, valid data could not be obtained for the EC and SC. For the two formulations for which valid data could be obtained, ME and WP, and the technical chemical, accuracy and variability results are typical of large data sets. For the technical chemical and the two formulations for which valid data were obtained, Official First Action is recommended.

  14. Analytical Method Development for the Determination of Α-Endosulfan and Bifenthrin Pesticide Residues in Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Styarini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of analytical method for the determination of α-endosulfan and bifenthrin residues in tea has been done. The complex matrices and also the pigment were the challenge in doing quantification of the pesticide residues in tea matrices. In order to get appropriate analysis method for the determination of pesticide residues in tea, the modification was done in the analytical method for the determination of organochlorine multiresidue in non fat matrices: seasoning and spicy that is published by Directorate General of Food Crops, Directorate of Food Plant Protection. The modification was done particularly in clean-up step to remove the interferences from the extract of tea matrices such as the pigment that usually interfere the measurement with Gas Chromatography (GC. The result showed that the MDL value for both analytes were 0.5 ng/g that were much lower than MRLs. The percent recovery obtained from the method was 78.58 and 90.19% for α-endosulfan and bifenthrin, respectively. The precision of the analysis method for both analytes were good since the % RSD values were below than the Horwitz’s value that was 19.18% at spiking level concentration of 300 ng/g.

  15. Development of Candidate Reference Materials of Endosulfan Sulfate and Bifenthrin in Black Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhani Aryana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The candidate reference materials of endosulfan sulfate and bifenthrin in black tea have been developed according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Preparation of candidate material includes grinding and sieving of the black tea leaves, spiking the black tea powder by both analytes, homogenization, and bottling. Homogeneity and short-term stability test were performed using a GC-µECD instrument. Meanwhile, the characterization was carried out by a collaborative study using both of GC-µECD and GC-MS instruments. The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample inhomogeneity, short-term instability and variability in the characterization procedure. In a dry mass fraction, endosulfan sulfate was assigned to be 491 µg kg-1 with a relative expanded uncertainty of ± 33.2%, and bifenthrin was assigned to be 937 µg kg-1 with a relative expanded uncertainty of ± 18.5%. The candidate reference materials are aimed to support the need of matrix CRM especially for the measurement of pesticide residue for quality assurance work done by laboratories in Indonesia.

  16. Dissipation and decontamination of bifenthrin residues in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Reena; Monga, Samriti; Kumari, Beena

    2012-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of CCS HAU, Hisar to study the dissipation and decontamination behavior of bifenthrin on tomato crop following the application of 25 g a.i ha(-1) (T(1)) and 50 g a.i ha(-1) (T(2)). Samples were collected periodically on the sampling days after applications. Residues were reached below detectable level of 0.005 mg kg(-1) on 10(th) day after application showing half-life period of 1.83 and 2.05 days at room temperature and 2.02 and 2.32 days under refrigerated condition for single and double dose, respectively. Processing was found effective in reducing the residues of bifenthrin in tomato fruits. Maximum reduction (42.10-45.23 %) was observed by washing + boiling followed by washing (16.66-19.04 %). Reduction was slightly less when samples were stored under refrigerated conditions as compared to room temperature conditions.

  17. Residual efficacy of cypermethrin and pirimiphos-methyl against Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier in wheat grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pražić-Golić Marijana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual efficacy of EC formulations of two insecticides: cypermethrin supplemented with the synergist piperonyl butoxide, and pirimiphos-methyl, against adults of the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier, was investigated in the laboratory (at 25±1°C and 55-60% r.h. by applying water solutions of products based either on cypermethrin (1.6 mg a.i./kg of wheat grain or pirimiphos-methyl (4 mg a.i./kg of wheat grain to wheat grain. Insect mortality on deposits of different age: 0, 7, 14, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days was estimated after 2, 7 and 14 days of insect exposure to treated wheat. After 2 day exposure, cypermethrin caused mortality of up to 46% on all deposits (age 0-180 days. After 7 days of exposure, high efficacy (94-100% was found only on deposits that were up to 90 days old, while the mortality of S. cerealella adults on all deposits following 14 days of exposure was 98-100%, and it was probably additionally enhanced by natural mortality. Pirimiphos-methyl was 98-100% effective after 2 days of exposure to deposits that were up to 30 days old, while it achieved maximum efficacy (100% after 7 days of insect exposure to deposits aging for up to 150 days, and 94% efficacy on 180 days old deposits. After 14 days of adult exposure to all deposit ages, there were no surviving insects (efficacy 100%. The results show that pirimiphos-methyl was more effective against S. cerealella adults and had a longer residual activity than cypermethrin.

  18. Ionoregulatory Impairment in African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Combined Stressors of Lead and Cypermethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omowumi O ADEWALE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of aquatic ecosystem with heavy metals and pesticides has increased dramatically over the years, and this has generated a lot of attention by environmental experts. There are reports on impacts of different single toxicants on aquatic organisms but not much has been done to investigate the impacts of mixtures of toxicants on aquatic life. In this study we investigated the effects of multiple stressors of Pb and cypermethrin on ionoregulation in the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus. Adults C. gariepinus were exposed to either borehole water (control, 2 mg/L Pb, 0.5 μg/L cypermetrin or a mixture of 2 mg/L Pb and 0.5 μg/L cypermethrin for 96 h, after which the levels of plasma Na+, Cl- and K+ were determined as a measure of branchial ionoregulatory disturbance. The exposure of C. gariepinus to 0.5 μg/L cypermethrin resulted in a significant reduction in plasma Na+ (43% decrease and Cl- (31% decrease but a 2-fold increase in plasma K+ concentrations. Exposure to a mixture of cypermethrin and Pb resulted in 53% decrease in plasma Na+, 40% decrease in plasma Cl- and a 3- fold increase in plasma K+. There was no significant difference between the control and those exposed to just only 2 mg/L Pb for all the parameters measured. The results of this study indicated that exposure of aquatic organisms to combined stressors of heavy metals pollution as well as pesticide contamination could have a serious effect on the physiology especially on ionic regulation in the exposed fish.

  19. The effects of diazinon and cypermethrin on the differentiation of neuronal and glial cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaskos, J.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Munoz, D.; Tack, J.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Diazinon and cypermethrin are pesticides extensively used in sheep dipping. Diazinon is a known anti-cholinesterase, but there is limited information regarding its molecular mechanism of action. This paper describes the effects of diazinon and cypermethrin at a morphological and molecular level on differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma and rat C6 glioma cell lines. Concentrations up to 10 μM of both compounds and their mixture had no effect on the viability of either cell line, as determined by methyl blue tetrazolium reduction and total protein assays. Microscopic analysis revealed that 1 μM and 10 μM diazinon but not cypermethrin inhibited the outgrowth of axon-like processes in N2a cells after a 24-h exposure but neither compound affected process outgrowth by differentiating C6 cells at these concentrations. Under these conditions, 10 μM diazinon inhibited AChE slightly compared to the control after a 4-h exposure but not after 24 h. Western blotting analysis showed that morphological changes were associated with reduced cross-reactivity with antibodies that recognize the neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), microtubule associated protein MAP 1B and HSP-70 compared to control cell extracts, whereas reactivity with anti-α-tubulin antibodies was unchanged. Aggregation of NFH was observed in cell bodies of diazinon-treated N2a cells, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining. These data demonstrate that diazinon specifically targets neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells and that this effect is associated with disruption of axonal cytoskeleton proteins, whereas cypermethrin has no effect on the same parameters

  20. HPLC Analysis to Determine the Half-life and Bioavailability of the Termiticides Bifenthrin and Fipronil in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, F; Pervez, M

    2017-12-05

    The aim of this study was to test the bioavailability and degradation in soil of the termiticides bifenthrin and fipronil, which are used to treat subterranean termites (Heterotermes indicola, Wasmann). Soil collected from different areas of Lahore was categorized as sandy clay loam (SCL) or sandy loam (SL). Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the bioavailability ratio of bifenthrin and fipronil in each type of soil after different periods of time. LT50 values were determined posttreatment at different time intervals. Regarding soil type, both termiticides were more effective in SL soil, compared with SCL soil posttreatment. There were significant differences in termite mortality in treated compared with untreated control samples (P bifenthrin (maximum, 1,002 and 1,262 d in SCL soil and SL soil, respectively) indicated that it persisted in both soil types at all concentrations. The maximum calculated half-life values of fipronil were 270 and 555 d in SCL and SL soil, respectively. At lower concentrations and over longer periods of time, fipronil completely degraded in SL soil, while a negligible amount was detected in SCL soil. Termiticide concentration decreased over time, as did the termiticide recovery rate. Overall, bifenthrin was more persistent than fipronil under all treatment conditions tested. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Thermal decomposition and isomerization of cis-permethrin and beta-cypermethrin in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Audino, Paola; Licastro, Susana A; Zerba, Eduardo

    2002-02-01

    The stability to heart of cis-permethrin and beta-cypermethrin in the solid phase was studied and the decomposition products identified. Samples heated at 210 degrees C in an oven in the dark showed that, in the absence of potassium chlorate (the salt present in smoke-generating formulations of these pyrethroids), cis-permethrin was not isomerized, although in the presence of that salt, decomposition was greater and thermal isomerization occurred. Other salts of the type KXO3 or NaXO3, with X being halogen or nitrogen, also led to a considerable thermal isomerization. Heating the insecticides in solution in the presence of potassium chlorate did not produce isomerization in any of the solvents assayed. Salt-catalysed thermal cis-trans isomerization was also found for other pyrethroids derived from permethrinic or deltamethrinic acid but not for those derived from chrysanthemic acid. The main thermal degradation processes of cis-permethrin and beta-cypermethrin decomposition when potassium chlorate was present were cyclopropane isomerization, ester cleavage and subsequent oxidation of the resulting products. Permethrinic acid, 3-phenoxybenzyle chloride, alcohol, aldehyde and acid were identified in both cases, as well as 3-phenoxybenzyl cyanide from beta-cypermethrin. A similar decomposition pattern occurred after combustion of pyrethroid fumigant formulations.

  2. Efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin applications to prevent Aedes breeding in tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, William J; Whelan, Peter I; McDonnell, Joseph; Jacups, Susan P

    2010-12-01

    The efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin (Cyperthor) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Demand) to prevent mosquito larval colonization of water-containing receptacles was investigated using 2 differing applications in disused car tires in Darwin, Australia. Insecticide treatments were applied uniformly to the inside surfaces of 2 categories of tires: 1) dry tires that were partially filled with water 24 h after spraying and 2) wet tires partially filled with water prior to spraying. All mosquito larvae, pupae, and dead adults were collected from the treatment and control tires weekly over the 24-wk study period and were later identified to species in the laboratory. Control tires were colonized by Aedes notoscriptus in wk 2 and by Culex quinquefasciatus in wk 4. Aedes notoscriptus failed to colonize any alpha-cypermethrin-treated tires until wk 22 and did not colonize any lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires during the 24-wk trial. Culex quinquefasciatus colonized alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires from wk 11 and wk 15, respectively. These results indicate both insecticides using either application method can prevent colonization of Ae. notoscriptus for at least 20 wk and demonstrate great potential for the prevention of breeding in receptacles for other receptacle-breeding Aedes species, such as the dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

  3. Efficacy of bifenthrin-impregnated bednets against Anopheles funestus and pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae in North Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouaibou Mouhamadou

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent field studies indicated that insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs maintain their efficacy despite a high frequency of the knock-down resistance (kdr gene in Anopheles gambiae populations. It was essential to evaluate ITNs efficacy in areas with metabolic-based resistance. Methods Bifenthrin was used in this experiment because it is considered a promising candidate for bednets impregnation. Nets were treated at 50 mg/m2, a dose that has high insecticidal activity on kdr mosquitoes and at 5 mg/m2, a dose that kills 95% of susceptible mosquitoes under laboratory conditions with 3 minutes exposure. Bednets were holed to mimic physical damage. The trial was conducted in three experimental huts from Pitoa, North-Cameroon where Anopheles gambiae displays metabolic resistance and cohabits with An. funestus. Results Bifenthrin at 50 mg/m2 significantly reduced anophelines' entry rate (>80%. This was not observed at 5 mg/m2. Both treatments increased exophily in An. gambiae, and to a lesser extent in An. funestus. With bifenthrin at high dosage, over 60% reduction in blood feeding and 75–90% mortality rates were observed in both vectors. Despite presence of holes, only a single An. gambiae and two An. funestus females were collected inside the treated net, and all were found dead. The same trends were observed with low dosage bifenthrin though in most cases, no significant difference was found with the untreated control net. Conclusion Bifenthrin-impregnated bednets at 50 mg/m2 were efficient in the reduction of human-vector contact in Pitoa. Considerable personal protection was gained against An. funestus and metabolic pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae populations.

  4. Effects of functionalized fullerenes on bifenthrin and tribufos toxicity to Daphnia magna: Survival, reproduction, and growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brausch, Kathryn A; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Maul, Jonathan D

    2010-11-01

    Incorporation of carbon nanomaterials into industrial and consumer products is increasing, yet their impact on aquatic ecosystems alone and in chemical mixtures is largely unknown. Carbon nanomaterials may be found in the aquatic environment as mixtures with pesticides because of their proposed use in agriculture as smart delivery systems and nanosensors. The interaction effects of a functionalized fullerene ([1,2-methanofullerene C₆₀]-61-carboxylic acid) (fC₆₀) at 52.8 µg/L and the hydrophobic pesticides bifenthrin and tribufos were examined. The test organism was Daphnia magna, and response variables included 48-h survival, reproduction (bifenthrin, 70-d; tribufos, 21-d), and 10-d growth. Both pesticides reduced D. magna survival and reproduction (p bifenthrin acute toxicity but did not significantly affect chronic endpoints or growth (p > 0.05). Median lethal concentrations (LC50s), median inhibition concentrations (IC50s) for days surviving, and IC50s for reproduction were 0.86, 0.55, and 0.49 µg/L for bifenthrin; 0.22, 0.39, and 0.77 µg/L for fC₆₀-bifenthrin mix; 6.63, 9.89, and 5.79 µg/L for tribufos; and 9.17, 8.17, and 6.59 µg/L for fC₆₀-tribufos mix. Mixtures did not affect instantaneous growth rate (p > 0.05). These results suggest that fC₆₀ had little effect on pesticide chronic toxicity but influenced acute toxicity. Given the widespread application of nanotechnology, the influence of nanomaterials on environmental contaminants is an important consideration. Thus, our results may be useful in the development and use of nanotechnology in agricultural practices. © 2010 SETAC.

  5. Multiple resistance to pirimiphos-methyl and bifenthrin in Tribolium castaneum involves the activity of lipases, esterases, and laccase2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio, Alison Henrique Ferreira; Gigliolli, Adriana Aparecida Sinópolis; Cardoso, Kátia Aparecida Kern; Drosdoski, Sandro Daniel; Kulza, Rodrigo Amaral; Seixas, Flávio Augusto Vicente; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques; Lapenta, Ana Silvia

    2017-05-01

    Several recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms that confer insecticide resistance on insect pests. However, little is known about multiple resistance in red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) at molecular level. The multiple resistance is characterized as resistance to different classes of insecticides that have different target sites, and is mediated by several enzymatic systems. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in multiple resistance of T. castaneum to bifenthrin (pyrethroid [Pyr]) and pirimiphos-methyl (organophosphate [Org]). We used artificial selection, biochemical and in silico approaches including structural computational biology. After five generations of artificial selection in the presence of bifenthrin (F5Pyr) or pirimiphos-methyl (F5Org), we found high levels of multiple resistance. The hierarchical enzymatic cluster revealed a pool of esterases (E), lipases (LIPs) and laccase2 (LAC2) potentially contributing to the resistance in different ways throughout development, after one or more generations in the presence of insecticides. The enzyme-insecticide interaction network indicated that E2, E3, LIP3, and LAC2 are enzymes potentially required for multiple resistance phenotype. Kinetic analysis of esterases from F5Pyr and F5Org showed that pirimiphos-methyl and specially bifenthrin promote enzyme inhibition, indicating that esterases mediate resistance by sequestering bifenthrin and pirimiphos-methyl. Our computational data were in accordance with kinetic results, indicating that bifenthrin has higher affinity at the active site of esterase than pirimiphos-methyl. We also report the capability of these insecticides to modify the development in T. castaneum. Our study provide insights into the biochemical mechanisms employed by T. castaneum to acquire multiple resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of bifenthrin-impregnated bednets against Anopheles funestus and pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae in North Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouaibou, Mouhamadou; Simard, Frédéric; Chandre, Fabrice; Etang, Josiane; Darriet, Frédéric; Hougard, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent field studies indicated that insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) maintain their efficacy despite a high frequency of the knock-down resistance (kdr) gene in Anopheles gambiae populations. It was essential to evaluate ITNs efficacy in areas with metabolic-based resistance. Methods Bifenthrin was used in this experiment because it is considered a promising candidate for bednets impregnation. Nets were treated at 50 mg/m2, a dose that has high insecticidal activity on kdr mosquitoes and at 5 mg/m2, a dose that kills 95% of susceptible mosquitoes under laboratory conditions with 3 minutes exposure. Bednets were holed to mimic physical damage. The trial was conducted in three experimental huts from Pitoa, North-Cameroon where Anopheles gambiae displays metabolic resistance and cohabits with An. funestus. Results Bifenthrin at 50 mg/m2 significantly reduced anophelines' entry rate (>80%). This was not observed at 5 mg/m2. Both treatments increased exophily in An. gambiae, and to a lesser extent in An. funestus. With bifenthrin at high dosage, over 60% reduction in blood feeding and 75–90% mortality rates were observed in both vectors. Despite presence of holes, only a single An. gambiae and two An. funestus females were collected inside the treated net, and all were found dead. The same trends were observed with low dosage bifenthrin though in most cases, no significant difference was found with the untreated control net. Conclusion Bifenthrin-impregnated bednets at 50 mg/m2 were efficient in the reduction of human-vector contact in Pitoa. Considerable personal protection was gained against An. funestus and metabolic pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae populations. PMID:16961938

  7. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin, on a freshwater community studied under field conditions. I. Direct and indirect effects on abundance measures of organisms at different trophic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friberg-Jensen, Ursula; Wendt-Rasch, Lina; Woin, Per; Christoffersen, Kirsten

    2003-05-29

    The effects of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on a natural freshwater community were studied in small in situ enclosures over an 11-day period. The experiment was conducted in a eutrophic lake using a regression design that included three untreated controls and a gradient of six unreplicated cypermethrin concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 6.1 {mu}g/l. This paper is the first in a series of two, and describes the fate of cypermethrin and its effects on the abundance of crustaceans, rotifers, protozoans (cilliates and heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF)) and bacteria and the biomass of periphytic and planktonic algae. The concentration of cypermethrin decreased quickly during the experiment, with a half-life of 48 h for the total and 25 h for the dissolved fractions of cypermethrin, respectively. Cypermethrin proved to be acutely toxic to crustaceans in enclosures receiving nominal cypermethrin concentrations of {>=}0.13 {mu}g/l. No Effect Concentration (NEC) and median Effect Concentration (EC{sub 50}) for the total crustacean community and cladoceran and copepod subgroups ranged between 0.02-0.07 and 0.04-0.17 {mu}g/l, respectively, with copepods being less sensitive than cladocerans. The abundance of rotifers, protozoans and bacteria and the chlorophyll-a concentration of planktonic and periphytic algae was significantly related to the concentration of cypermethrin. All groups proliferated within 2-7 days after the cypermethrin application in those enclosures where the abundance of crustaceans was seriously affected by cypermethrin (i.e. {>=}0.13 {mu}g/l). We hypothesise that the proliferation of rotifers, protozoans, bacteria and algae was due to a reduced grazer control from crustaceans and thereby mediated indirectly by cypermethrin. The results of this experiment provide knowledge on how an entire microplankton community may respond to pyrethroids in nature, and the indirect effects observed on the community clearly demonstrates the necessity of

  8. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin, on a freshwater community studied under field conditions. I. Direct and indirect effects on abundance measures of organisms at different trophic levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friberg-Jensen, Ursula; Wendt-Rasch, Lina; Woin, Per; Christoffersen, Kirsten

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on a natural freshwater community were studied in small in situ enclosures over an 11-day period. The experiment was conducted in a eutrophic lake using a regression design that included three untreated controls and a gradient of six unreplicated cypermethrin concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 6.1 μg/l. This paper is the first in a series of two, and describes the fate of cypermethrin and its effects on the abundance of crustaceans, rotifers, protozoans (cilliates and heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF)) and bacteria and the biomass of periphytic and planktonic algae. The concentration of cypermethrin decreased quickly during the experiment, with a half-life of 48 h for the total and 25 h for the dissolved fractions of cypermethrin, respectively. Cypermethrin proved to be acutely toxic to crustaceans in enclosures receiving nominal cypermethrin concentrations of ≥0.13 μg/l. No Effect Concentration (NEC) and median Effect Concentration (EC 50 ) for the total crustacean community and cladoceran and copepod subgroups ranged between 0.02-0.07 and 0.04-0.17 μg/l, respectively, with copepods being less sensitive than cladocerans. The abundance of rotifers, protozoans and bacteria and the chlorophyll-a concentration of planktonic and periphytic algae was significantly related to the concentration of cypermethrin. All groups proliferated within 2-7 days after the cypermethrin application in those enclosures where the abundance of crustaceans was seriously affected by cypermethrin (i.e. ≥0.13 μg/l). We hypothesise that the proliferation of rotifers, protozoans, bacteria and algae was due to a reduced grazer control from crustaceans and thereby mediated indirectly by cypermethrin. The results of this experiment provide knowledge on how an entire microplankton community may respond to pyrethroids in nature, and the indirect effects observed on the community clearly demonstrates the necessity of multispecies

  9. Enantioselective apoptosis induced by individual isomers of bifenthrin in Hep G2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huigang; Li, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Bifenthrin (BF) has been used in racemate for agricultural purposes against soil insects, leading to increased inputs into soil environments. However, most of the studies about the toxicology research on BF were performed in its racemic form. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the enantiomer-specific cis-BF-induced apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation on human hepatocarcinoma cells (Hep G2). The results of cell viability assay and cytoflow assay indicated an obvious enantioselective hepatocyte toxicity of 1S-cis-BF in Hep G2 cells. 1S-cis-BF also induced ROS production, up-regulated Bax protein expression and down-regulated Bcl-2 expression levels. The present study suggested that enantioselective toxicity should be evaluated on currently used chiral pesticides, such as synthetic pyrethroids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. EFFECTS OF SALINITY ACCLIMATION ON THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION AND ACUTE TOXICITY OF BIFENTHRIN IN FRESHWATER AND EURYHALINE STRAINS OF ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS

    OpenAIRE

    Riar, Navneet; Crago, Jordan; Jiang, Weiying; Maryoung, Lindley A.; Gan, Jay; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin is frequently detected at ng/L concentrations in tributaries of the San Francisco Bay Delta. The estuary is also experiencing increasing salinity through climate change and water redirection. To evaluate the impacts of hypersaline conditions on bifenthrin toxicity in anadromous salmonids of the San Francisco Bay Delta (CA, USA), a 14-d laboratory exposure was performed using 2 strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) acclimated to fres...

  11. Bifenthrin causes transcriptomic alterations in mTOR and ryanodine receptor-dependent signaling and delayed hyperactivity in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daniel F; Miller, Galen W; Harvey, Danielle J; Brander, Susanne M; Geist, Juergen; Connon, Richard E; Lein, Pamela J

    2018-04-18

    Over the last few decades, the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin has been increasingly employed for pest control in urban and agricultural areas, putting humans and wildlife at increased risk of exposure. Exposures to nanomolar (nM) concentrations of bifenthrin have recently been reported to alter calcium oscillations in rodent neurons. Neuronal calcium oscillations are influenced by ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity, which modulates calcium-dependent signaling cascades, including the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. RyR activity and mTOR signaling play critical roles in regulating neurodevelopmental processes. However, whether environmentally relevant levels of bifenthrin alter RyR or mTOR signaling pathways to influence neurodevelopment has not been addressed. Therefore, our main objectives in this study were to examine the transcriptomic responses of genes involved in RyR and mTOR signaling pathways in zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to low (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin, and to assess the potential functional consequences by measuring locomotor responses to external stimuli. Wildtype zebrafish were exposed for 1, 3 and 5 days to 1, 10 and 50 ng/L bifenthrin, followed by a 14 d recovery period. Bifenthrin elicited significant concentration-dependent transcriptional responses in the majority of genes examined in both signaling cascades, and at all time points examined during the acute exposure period (1, 3, and 5 days post fertilization; dpf), and at the post recovery assessment time point (19 dpf). Changes in locomotor behavior were not evident during the acute exposure period, but were observed at 19 dpf, with main effects (increased locomotor behavior) detected in fish exposed developmentally to bifenthrin at 1 or 10 ng/L, but not 50 ng/L. These findings illustrate significant influences of developmental exposures to low (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin on neurodevelopmental processes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2018

  12. Variation in susceptibility of laboratory and field strains of three stored-grain insect species to beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to concrete surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to clean, concrete floors of empty bins prior to grain storage against field strains of stored-grain insects is unknown. We exposed adults of 16 strains of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst); 8 strains ...

  13. Development of a candidate certified reference material of cypermethrin in green tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sin, Della W.M.; Chan, Pui-kwan; Cheung, Samuel T.C.; Wong, Yee-Lok; Wong, Siu-kay; Mok, Chuen-shing; Wong Yiuchung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cypermethrin CRM in green tea was developed. ► Using two isotope dilution mass spectrometry techniques for characterization. ► Certified value of 148 μg kg −1 with expanded uncertainty of ±9.2%. ► Support quality assurance of pesticide residue analysis in tea to testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the preparation of a candidate certified reference material (CRM) of cypermethrin in green tea, GLHK-11-01a according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Certification of the material was performed using a newly developed isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) approach, with gas chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (GC–HRMS) and gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) showed excellent agreement of the analytical data sets generated from the two mass spectrometric detections. The characterization methods have also been satisfactorily applied in an Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) interlaboratory comparison study. Both the GC–HRIDMS and GC–IDMS/MS methods proved to be sufficiently reliable and accurate for certification purpose. The certified value of cypermethrin in dry mass fraction was 148 μg kg −1 and the associated expanded uncertainty was 14 μg kg −1 . The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample in homogeneity, long-term and short-term stability and variability in the characterization procedure. GLHK-11-01a is primarily developed to support the local and wider testing community on need basis in quality assurance work and in seeking accreditation.

  14. Baseline susceptibility to alpha-cypermethrin in Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva, 1912) from Lapinha Cave (Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Grasielle Caldas Davila; Lopes, Josiane Valadão; Rocha, Marília Fonseca; Pinheiro, Letícia C; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Michalsky, Érika Monteiro; Dias, Edelberto Santos

    2015-09-17

    Given the increase in cases of visceral leishmaniasis in recent years, associated with the socio-economic impact of this disease, as well as the wide distribution of Lutzomyia longipalpis in Brazil and the likelihood that this vector may develop resistance to insecticides used for control, the Ministry of Health considers as crucial the creation of a network in order to study and monitor the resistance of this vector to insecticides used for control. In this sense, this study aimed: 1) to characterize the susceptibility of L. longipalpis from Lapinha Cave (Lagoa Santa, MG - Brazil) to Alfateck SC200 in field bioassays, and 2) to define the susceptibility baseline to alpha-cypermethrin in laboratory bioassays, checking the possibility of using it as susceptibility reference lineage (SRL). The field bioassays revealed that the tested population was highly susceptible to alpha-cypermethrin in all time periods with high mortality (~100 %) in all treated surfaces before six months after spraying. In the laboratory bioassays, the studied population presented LD50, LD95 and LD99 to 0.78013, 10.5580 and 31.067 mg/m(2), respectively. The slope was 1.454121. The studied population of L. longipalpis was considered as adequate for SRL according criterion recommended by Pan-American Health Organization and has proven susceptibility to tested insecticide in the field. One cannot rule out the possibility of finding populations of L. longipalpis more susceptible to alpha-cypermethrin; therefore, further research is necessary on other populations with potential use as a SRL.

  15. Response of soil microbial activity and biodiversity in soils polluted with different concentrations of cypermethrin insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Manuel; García, Carlos; Hernández, Teresa; Gómez, Isidoro

    2015-07-01

    We performed a laboratory study into the effect of cypermethrin insecticide applied to different concentrations on biological properties in two soils [Typic Xerofluvent (soil A) and Xerollic Calciorthid (soil B)]. Two kg of each soil were polluted with cypermethrin at a rate of 60, 300, 600, and 1,200 g ha(-1) (C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments). A nonpolluted soil was used as a control (C0 treatment). For all treatments and each experimental soil, soil dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase, phosphatase, and arylsulphatase activities and soil microbial community were analysed by phospholipid fatty acids, which were measured at six incubation times (3, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days). The behavior of the enzymatic activities and microbial population were dependent on the dose of insecticide applied to the soil. Compared with the C0 treatment, in soil A, the maximum inhibition of the enzymatic activities was at 15, 30, 45, and 90 days for the C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments, respectively. However, in soil B, the maximum inhibition occurred at 7, 15, 30, and 45 days for the C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments, respectively. These results suggest that the cypermethrin insecticide caused a negative effect on soil enzymatic activities and microbial diversity. This negative impact was greater when a greater dose of insecticide was used; this impact was also greater in soil with lower organic matter content. For both soils, and from these respective days onward, the enzymatic activities and microbial populations progressively increased by the end of the experimental period. This is possibly due to the fact that the insecticide or its breakdown products and killed microbial cells, subsequently killed by the insecticide, are being used as a source of energy or as a carbon source for the surviving microorganisms for cell proliferation.

  16. Adsorption behavior of α-cypermethrin on cork and activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Valentina F.; Priolo, Giuseppe; Alves, Arminda; Cabral, Miguel; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the adsorption behavior of α-cypermethrin [R)-α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl(1S)-cis- 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate, and (S)-α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R)-cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2- dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in solutions on granules of cork and activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption studies were carried out using a batch equilibrium technique. A gas chromatograph with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to...

  17. Anti-androgen effects of cypermethrin on the amino- and carboxyl-terminal interaction of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jin-xia; Li, Yan-fang; Pan, Chen; Zhang, Jin-peng; Wang, Hong-mei; Li, Jing; Xu, Li-chun

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Both the known AR antagonist nilutamide and the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction in the mammalian two-hybrid assay. However, cypermethrin was a weaker androgen antagonist than nilutamide. Highlights: ► We have developed the mammalian two-hybrid assay. ► The assay displayed appropriate response to DHT and nilutamide. ► The N/C interaction was induced by DHT in a dose-dependent manner. ► Nilutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction. ► Cypermethrin exhibits inhibitory effects on DHT-induced AR N/C interaction. -- Abstract: The pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin has been demonstrated to be an environmental anti-androgen in the androgen receptor (AR) reporter gene assay. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal (N/C) interaction is required for transcription potential of the AR. In order to characterize the anti-androgen effects of cypermethrin involved in the N/C interaction of AR, the mammalian two-hybrid assay has been developed in the study. The fusion vectors pVP16-ARNTD, pM-ARLBD and the pG5CAT Reporter Vector were cotransfected into the CV-1 cells. The assay displayed appropriate response to the potent, classical AR agonist 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and known AR antagonist nilutamide. The N/C interaction was induced by DHT from 10 −11 M to 10 −5 M in a dose-dependent manner. Nilutamide did not activate N/C interaction, while inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction at the concentrations from 10 −7 M to 10 −5 M. Treatment of CV-1 cells with cypermethrin alone did not activate the reporter CAT. Cypermethrin significantly decreased the DHT-induced reporter CAT expression at the higher concentration of 10 −5 M. The mammalian two-hybrid assay provides a promising tool both for defining mechanism involved in AR N/C interaction of EDCs and for screening of chemicals with androgen agonistic and antagonistic activities. Cypermethrin exhibits inhibitory effects on the DHT-induced AR N

  18. Susceptibilidade de Aedes aegypti aos inseticidas temephos e cipermetrina, Brasil Susceptibility of Aedes aegypti to temephos and cypermethrin insecticides, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny E Duque Luna

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizaram-se bioensaios para detectar a susceptibilidade de Aedes aegypti aos inseticidas químicos, temefós e cipermetrina. Os resultados mostraram que esta espécie é suscetível a temefós e apresenta resistência a cipermetrinae.Bioassays were performed in order to detect the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti to the chemical insecticides temephos and cypermethrin. The results showed that this species is susceptible to temephos and presents resistance to cypermethrin.

  19. IPM-compatibility of foliar insecticides for citrus: Indices derived from toxicity to beneficial insects from four orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Michaud

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of compounds representing four major pesticide groups were tested for toxicity to beneficial insects representing four different insect orders: Coleoptera (Coccinellidae, Hemiptera (Anthocoridae, Hymenoptera (Aphelinidae, and Neuroptera (Chrysopidae. These materials included organophosphates (methidathion, esfenvalerate and phosmet, carbamates (carbofuran, methomyl and carbaryl, pyrethroids (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, zeta-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin and permethrin and the oxadiazine indoxacarb. Toxicity to coccinellid and lacewing species was assessed by treating 1st instar larvae with the recommended field rate of commercial products, and two 10 fold dilutions of these materials, in topical spray applications. Adult Aphytis melinus Debach and 2nd instar Orius insidiosus (Say were exposed to leaf residues of the same concentrations for 24 h. ANOVA performed on composite survival indices derived from these data resolved significant differences among materials with respect to their overall toxicity to beneficial insects. Cyfluthrin, fenpropathrin and zeta-cypermethrin all increased the developmental time of the lacewing and one or more coccinellid species for larvae that survived topical applications. Bifenthrin increased developmental time for two coccinellid species and decreased it in a third. Indoxacarb (Avaunt® WG, DuPont Corp. ranked highest overall for safety to beneficial insects, largely because of its low dermal toxicity to all species tested. Zeta-cypermethrin (Super Fury®, FMC Corporation received the second best safety rating, largely because of its low toxicity as a leaf residue to A. melinus and O. insidiosus. Phosmet (Imidan® 70W, Gowan Co. and methidathion (Supracide® 25W, Gowan Co. ranked high for safety to coccinellid species, but compounds currently recommended for use in citrus such as fenpropathrin (Danitol® 2.4EC, Sumimoto Chem. Co. and carbaryl (Sevin® XLR EC, Rhone Poulenc Ag. Co. ranked very low for IPM

  20. Comparing the impacts of sediment-bound bifenthrin on aquatic macroinvertebrates in laboratory bioassays and field microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Rhianna L; Hoak, Molly N; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Long, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two laboratory bioassays and two field microcosm exposures with bifenthrin (a synthetic pyrethroid) in order to evaluate the capacity of single-species laboratory bioassays to predict lethal and sublethal impacts on aquatic invertebrates in microcosms. For the laboratory species, Chironomus tepperi, larval survival was reduced by 24% at 53.66µg/g OC, while adult emergence was reduced at concentrations of 33.33µg/g OC and higher, with a 61% decrease at 77.78µg/g OC and no emergence at 126.67µg/g OC. The abundance of several other microcosm taxa was reduced in the microcosms at a similar concentration range (33.33µg/g OC and above), however there was no impact on the abundance of the congeneric species, Chironomus oppositus. The differences in impacts between test systems were potentially due to both differing species sensitivity and the interaction of ambient temperature with bifenthrin toxicity. Bifenthrin also was associated with early emergence of Chironomus sp. in both test systems, at concentrations of 10µg/g OC and higher (laboratory) and 43.90µg/g OC (microcosm), and with a significant decrease in the proportion of C. oppositus males in a microcosm. These findings indicate that while laboratory bioassays accurately predict many impacts in the field, there are some limitations to the predictive capacity of these tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of salinity acclimation on the endocrine disruption and acute toxicity of bifenthrin in freshwater and euryhaline strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riar, Navneet; Crago, Jordan; Jiang, Weiying; Maryoung, Lindley A; Gan, Jay; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin is frequently detected at ng/L concentrations in tributaries of the San Francisco Bay Delta. The estuary is also experiencing increasing salinity through climate change and water redirection. To evaluate the impacts of hypersaline conditions on bifenthrin toxicity in anadromous salmonids of the San Francisco Bay Delta (CA, USA), a 14-d laboratory exposure was performed using 2 strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) acclimated to freshwater and to 8 g/L and 17 g/L salinity. The fish were then exposed to nominal concentrations of 0 µg/L, 0.1 µg/L, and 1.5 µg/L bifenthrin. Rainbow trout exhibited significant mortality following exposure to 1.5 µg/L (1.07 ± 0.35 µg/L measured) bifenthrin in freshwater. Elevated levels of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase α1A mRNA subunit expression was observed in the gill of rainbow trout acclimated to hypersaline conditions relative to freshwater animals. No significant difference was noted in Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunit levels in brains of either strain in freshwater or hypersaline conditions. Likewise, significant differences were not observed in plasma vitellogenin or steroid hormone concentrations in either strain whether maintained in freshwater or saltwater. Saltwater acclimation significantly reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-catalyzed biotransformation of bifenthrin in liver microsomes of rainbow trout but not of steelhead. The present study showed that, relative to steelhead, rainbow trout have different responses to bifenthrin acute toxicity as well as different rates of hepatic bifenthrin biotransformation and regulation of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunits in gills. These data indicate that significant differences exist between the strains and that animal life history may have important effects on the susceptibility of each strain to environmental contaminants. © 2013 SETAC.

  2. The resistance map of Aedes aegypti (Linn. to cypermethrin and malathion in Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Ikawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of Dengue Haemmorhaegic Fever (DHF is spread through all districts in Indonesia. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Control such as vector control, focussing to break DHF transmission. Some research about Ae. aegypti resistance had been done in DHF endemic area in Central Java. Resistance status of Ae. aegypti against insecticide programme promoted by health government in middle and low endemic DHF in Central Java was investigated in this research. Sample collected from 100 houses selected purposively in every village, at every District there were 3 villages selected. Samples consisted of egg, larvae and adult mosquitoes of Ae. aegypti, and reared to get F1. Resistance test of Ae. aegypti done by using WHO susceptibility impregnated paper test procedure. This research showed that Ae. aegypti in all research location had been resistance to malathion 0.8% with mosquitoes mortality average between 13.80%-61.67% and almost all sample is resistance to cypermethrin 0.05% with mosquitoes mortality between 10.00%-63.33% except with sample from Banjarnegara District which has mosquitoes mortality of 84.20%. The conclusion of this research is that Ae. aegypti in all research location had been resistance to malathion. Almost all location resistant to cypermethrin except Banjarnegara District sample which has tolerance level.

  3. Distribution, Metabolism and Toxic Effects of Beta-Cypermethrin in Lizards (Eremias argus) Following Oral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Xu, Peng; Diao, Jinling; Di, Shanshan; Li, Ruiting; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-05

    Beta-cypermethrin (BCYP), a synthetic pyrethriod (PYR) pesticide which is a mixture of the alpha- and theta- cypermethrin, have been reported various toxicological profiles to non-target organisms. But little is known about assimilation, accumulation and toxic effects of BCYP in reptiles. The present study firstly elucidated absorption, tissue distribution, excretion of BCYP in Eremias argus . Treated group were administered orally with BCYP 20mg/kg body weight (bw) dissolved in corn oil. Neurotoxicity was observed at 24h after gavage, and the poisoning symptom ameliorated at 72h. The changes of BCYP concentration depended on degradation time and tissues. Lizards had a strong capacity to eliminate BCYP with different tissue distribution. The tissues concentration of BCYP from high to low were intestine, stomach, heart, kidney, blood, lung, liver and brain. Bimodal phenomena were observed in lung, liver and kidney. These results may be due to the activities of enzymes, circadian rhythm, and enterohepatic circulation in lizards. Based on the results of organ coefficient and histopathology analysis in liver, the liver was confirmed as the main target organ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of cypermethrin on the ligand-independent interaction between androgen receptor and steroid receptor coactivator-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chen; Liu, Ya-Peng; Li, Yan-Fang; Hu, Jin-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wang, Hong-Mei; Li, Jing; Xu, Li-Chun

    2012-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin has been considered as an environmental anti-androgen by interfering with the androgen receptor (AR) transactivation. In order to clarify the effects of cypermethrin on the ligand-independent interaction between the AR and SRC-1, the mammalian two-hybrid assay has been developed in the study. The AR N-terminal domain 1–660 amino acid residues were subcloned into the plasmid pVP16 to construct the vector pVP16-ARNTD. The SRC-1 C-terminal domain 989–1240 amino acid residues were subcloned into the plasmid pM to construct the vector pM-SRC-1. The fusion vectors pVP16-ARNTD, pM-SRC-1 and the pG5CAT Reporter Vector were cotransfected into the CV-1 cells. The AR AF1 interacted with SRC-1 in the absence of exogenous ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Furthermore, DHT did not enhance the interaction between AR AF-1 and SRC-1 at the concentrations from 10 −10 M to 10 −8 M. Cypermethrin inhibited the interaction between the AR AF1 and SRC-1, and the significant reduction was detected at the concentration of 10 −5 M. It is suggested that the interaction between the AR AF1 and SRC-1 is ligand-independent. Cypermethrin inhibits AR activity by disrupting the ligand-independent AR–SRC-1 interaction.

  5. A comparison of the fate and effects of two pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin) in pond mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, D; Hill, I R; Maund, S J

    1995-08-01

    : The fate and effects of two pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin) were investigated in replicated 25 m(3) pond mesocosms. Three pesticide treatments which simulated spray drift deposition were examined: 0.7 g a.i. ha(-1) cypermethrin and 0.17 and 1.7 g a.i. ha(-1) lambda-cyhalothrin. Based on the use rate and pesticidal activity of the chemicals, the cypermethrin and lower lambda-cyhalothrin rates were approximately equivalent. After applications, pyrethroid residues in the water column declined rapidly. Treatment-related effects were observed on some macroinvertebrate taxa, most notably the Asellidae and Gammaridae. Surfacedwelling insects also suffered initial knock-down, particularly in the 1.7 g a.i. ha(-1) lambda-cyhalothrin treatment, but there was recovery after the spray period. No adverse effects occurred on algae, macrophytes or zooplankton, but there were occasional enhancements (e.g. algal biomass and abundances of copepod nauplii and Rotifera) which may have been indirect effects. An overall comparison of the treatments indicated that the higher lambda-cyhalothrin rate had the greatest effects, whilst the cypermethrin application had a somewhat greater impact than the lower lambda-cyhalothrin treatment rate (due to effects on peracarid crustaceans). The study indicated that should spray drift occur at the levels expected for either pyrethroid's normal use patterns, potential impacts on natural aquatic ecosystems would be minor and transient.

  6. Simultaneous biodegradation of bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos by Pseudomonas sp. CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Li, Shuhuai; Ma, Chen; Wu, Nancun; Li, Chunli; Yang, Xinfeng

    2018-05-04

    The degradation of bifenthrin (BF) and chlorpyrifos (CP), either together or individually, by a bacterial strain (CB2) isolated from activated sludge was investigated. Strain CB2 was identified as belonging to genus Pseudomonas based on the morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics and a homological analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence. Strain CB2 has the potential to degrade BF and CP, either individually or in a mixture. The optimum conditions for mixture degradation were as follows: OD 600nm = 0.5; incubation temperature = 30°C; pH = 7.0; BF-CP mixture (10 mg L -1 of each). Under these optimal conditions, the degradation rate constants (and half-lives) were 0.4308 d -1 (1.61 d) and 0.3377 d -1 (2.05 d) for individual BF and CP samples, respectively, and 0.3463 d -1 (2.00 d) and 0.2931 d -1 (2.36 d) for the BF-CP mixture. Major metabolites of BF and CP were 2-methyl-3-biphenylyl methanol and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, respectively. No metabolite bioaccumulation was observed. The ability of CB2 to efficiently degrade BF and CP, particularly in a mixture, may be useful in bioremediation efforts.

  7. Study of DNA interactions with bifenthrin by spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; Zhang, Guowen; Ma, Yadi; Zhang, Yepeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between bifenthrin (BF) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. It was found that BF molecular could intercalate into the base pairs of ctDNA as evidenced by significant increases in absorption intensity, fluorescence polarization and relative viscosity of ctDNA, decrease in iodide quenching effect, and induced CD spectral changes. The association constant of BF with ctDNA was evaluated to be in the order of 104 L mol-1. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was primarily driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces, as the values of the enthalpy change (ΔH) and the entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be -31.13 ± 1.89 kJ mol-1 and -22.79 ± 1.21 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. The results of FT-IR spectra and molecular docking showed that a specific binding mainly existed between BF and adenine and guanine bases.

  8. Cis-bifenthrin induces immunotoxicity in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Gao, Xingli; He, Bingnan; Zhu, Jiawei; Lou, Huihui; Hu, Qinglian; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF) is an important synthetic pyrethroid. Previous studies have demonstrated that cis-BF exhibits toxic effects on development, the neurological, reproductive and endocrine system. In this study, we evaluated the immunotoxicity caused by cis-BF in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were exposed orally to 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks. The results showed that body weight, spleen weight, and splenic cellularity decreased in mice exposed to 20 mg/kg/d cis-BF. Additionally, we found that the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, and TNF-α, in peritoneal macrophages, the spleen, and the thymus were inhibited in the cis-BF-treated groups. Moreover, MTT assays demonstrated that cis-BF inhibited splenocyte proliferation stimulated by LPS or Con A, as well as the secretion of IFN-γ on Con A stimulation. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that exposure to cis-BF has the potential to induce immunotoxicity in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparison between the efficacy of two cleanup methods for the {sup 1}H NMR analysis of food samples contaminated with Cypermethrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.M.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D.; Aguiar, A.P. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Riehl, C.A.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica]. E-mail: riehl@iq.ufrj

    2004-07-01

    This work aimed to study the use of {sup 1}H NMR for the identification of cypermethrin in cooked foods. {sup 1}H NMR is not commonly used in these cases, because food samples ready for consumption have complex substances, mainly lipids, which usually interfere with the identification of cypermethrin. Thus, we drew a comparison between the most applied method for the treatment of those samples and an alternative route that made possible the use of {sup 1}H NMR in the identification of cypermethrin in a matrix consisting of rice, bean, and chicken, which allows the Forensic work for such cases.(author)

  10. Structure-activity relationships for the action of 11 pyrethroid insecticides on rat Nav1.8 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-S.; Soderlund, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting nerve function. This paper describes the action of 11 structurally diverse commercial pyrethroid insecticides on the rat Na v 1.8 sodium channel isoform, the principal carrier of the tetrodotoxin-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive sodium current of sensory neurons, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. All 11 compounds produced characteristic sodium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse that ranged from rapidly-decaying monoexponential currents (allethrin, cismethrin and permethrin) to persistent biexponential currents (cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin). Tail currents for the remaining compounds (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and tefluthrin) were monoexponential and decayed with kinetics intermediate between these extremes. Reconstruction of currents carried solely by the pyrethroid-modified subpopulation of channels revealed two types of pyrethroid-modified currents. The first type, found with cismethrin, allethrin, permethrin and tefluthrin, activated relatively rapidly and inactivated partially during a 40-ms depolarization. The second type, found with cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin and fenvalerate, activated more slowly and did not detectably inactivate during a 40-ms depolarization. Only bifenthrin did not produce modified currents that fit clearly into either of these categories. In all cases, the rate of activation of modified channels was strongly correlated with the rate of tail current decay following repolarization. Modification of Na v 1.8 sodium channels by cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin was enhanced 2.3- to 3.4-fold by repetitive stimulation; this effect appeared to result from the accumulation of persistently open channels rather than preferential binding to open channel states. Fenpropathrin was the most effective compound against Na v 1

  11. Determining the Residual Cypermethrin, Permethrin, Indoxacarb and Mancozeb in Tomato Produced in Bushehr Province Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimanat Tobeh Khak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Food is necessary for a healthy lifestyle, but it’s an important way of spreading many pathogens and toxic chemicals. The food contamination may happen during planting, harvesting, storing, processing or transporting. Hence, the food quality monitoring is necessary. Plants constitute the main source of food for human being. Fighting against pests and plant diseases in some cases, prevents product loss. It is obvious that the pest control is crucial for the future agriculture, industry and hygiene. Despite the current discussions and critics in scientific conventions about the adverse effects of pesticide use on human life, chemical based methods of pest control are still the most common among the farmers. Pesticide residues in agricultural products due to inappropriate and excessive consumption of pesticides is a worldwide problem that has overshadowed the health of human societies (1. Bushehr province, according to its weather conditions, is one of the major tomato growers in the country in autumn and winter. In this study, the residues of 9 toxins (Cypermethrin, Permethrin, Indoxacarb And Mancozeb, Chlorothalonil, Iprodione, Thiophanate methyl, Carbendazim Golsam, and Abamectin has been investigated in 37 Tomato samples from the farms of Jam, Dashtestan, Dashti, Deir and kangan cities, and Except Abamectin other toxins were detected. Cypermethrin rate was higher than standard in 2.8% of the samples. The residues of Permethrin, Indoxacarb, Mancozeb, Chlorothalonil, Iprodione and Thiophanate methyl was lower than the allowed limits in all the samples. The amount of Carbendazim was determined to be higher than the allowed limits in 4.8% of the samples.

  12. Comet assay in gill cells of Prochilodus lineatus exposed in vivo to cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletta, G L; Gigena, F; Loteste, A; Parma, M J; Kleinsorge, E C; Simoniello, M F

    2013-11-01

    Agricultural chemicals can induce genetic alterations on aquatic organisms that have been associated with effects on growth, reproduction and population dynamics. The evaluation of DNA damage in fish using the comet assay (CA) frequently involves the utilization of erythrocytes. However, epithelial gill cells (EGC) can be more sensitive, as they are constantly dividing and in direct contact with potentially stressing compounds from the aquatic environment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate (1) the sensitivity and suitability of epithelial gill cells of Prochilodus lineatus in response to different genotoxic agents through the application of the CA, (2) the induction of DNA damage in this cell population after in vivo exposure to cypermethrin. Baseline value of the CA damage index (DI) for EGC of juvenile P. lineatus was 144.68±5.69. Damage increased in a dose-dependent manner after in vitro exposure of EGC to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and H2O2, two known genotoxic agents. In vivo exposure of fish to cypermethrin induced a significant increase in DNA DI of EGC at 0.150μg/l (DI: 239.62±6.21) and 0.300μg/l (270.63±2.09) compared to control (150.25±4.38) but no effect was observed at 0.075μg/l (168.50±10.77). This study shows that EGC of this species are sensitive for the application of the CA, demonstrating DNA damage in response to alkylation (MMS), oxidative damage (H2O2), and to the insecticide cypermethryn. These data, together with our previous study on DNA damage induction on erythrocytes of this species, provides useful information for future work involving biomonitoring in regions where P. lineatus is naturally exposed to pesticides and other genotoxic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of horses with cypermethrin against the biting flies Culicoides nubeculosus, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, E; Rowlinson, M; Bartram, D; Carpenter, S; Mellor, P; Wall, R

    2010-04-19

    An in vitro assay was used to assess the efficacy of the proprietary pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin applied to horses (Deosect spray, 5.0%, w/v Fort Dodge Animal Health) against the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti Linneaus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). Hair was collected from the back, belly and legs of the horses immediately prior to treatment and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after treatment, and also from untreated controls. In laboratory assays groups of 10 adult female C. nubeculosus, Ae. aegypti or C. quinquefasciatus were exposed to 0.5g of hair for 3min. In all cases, little or no mortality was observed in insects kept in contact with the pre-treatment samples or the untreated controls. With post-treatment samples for C. nubeculosus, mortality was close to 80% 7 days after treatment and then declined gradually; mean mortality was still at around 50% for hair collected 35 days after treatment. In general, Ae. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus appeared to be less susceptible to cypermethrin than C. nubeculosus and the attenuation of the toxic effect declined more quickly with time after treatment. There were differences in the toxicity of hair from different body regions, with hair from the back consistently inducing the highest mortality and hair from the legs the lowest; this effect was more pronounced for C. nubeculosus than Ae. aegypti or C. quinquefasciatus. The results demonstrate the potential for topical insecticide treatment to offer protection to horses against biting flies; but highlight the major differences that exist in susceptibility between different insect species.

  14. Total effects of contact and residual exposure of bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin on the predatory mite Galendromus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, Kelly A; Alifano, Jesse A; Zalom, Frank G

    2013-10-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are generally regarded as acutely toxic to predatory phytoseiid mites; however, persistence of hull split spray pyrethroid residues on almond trees and their effects on phytoseiids have not been quantified over time. Hull split, the separation of the almond hull along the suture, exposes the new crop nuts to infestation by Amyelois transitella (Walker) larvae, and is the preferred timing for insecticides applied for their control. Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) is the most important phytoseiid biocontrol agent for web-spinning spider mites in California (USA) almond orchards, and the impact of bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin pyrethroid residue on their survival, fertility, and fecundity was determined. The total effects of direct contact with esfenvalerate, permethrin, bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin were also evaluated for comparison. The total effects (E) of direct contact treatments of the four pyrethroids ranged from 77.8 % for esfenvalerate to 98.8 % for bifenthrin. Both bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin twig residue would be considered harmful (IOBC class 4) following field application at hull split timing. Bifenthrin twig residue would be considered slightly harmful (IOBC class 2) for up to 3.5 months and harmless (IOBC class 1) after 6 months. λ-cyhalothrin residue would be considered moderately harmful (IOBC class 3) for up to 3.5 months following application and harmless (IOBC class 1) after 6 months. Bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin twig residue on treated trees significantly reduced G. occidentalis female survival for up to 6 months post-treatment, however total effects (E) classify these residues as harmless (IOBC class 1) after 6 months. Harmful effects of direct and residual exposure following application have implications for the use of these pyrethroids in an integrated mite management program for perennial crops.

  15. Enantioselective cytotoxicity of the insecticide bifenthrin on a human amnion epithelial (FL) cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huigang; Zhao Meirong; Zhang Cong; Ma Yun; Liu Weiping

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) are used in preference to organochlorines and organophosphates due to their high efficiency, low toxicity to mammals, and ready biodegradability. Previous studies reported that enantioselective toxicity of SPs occurs in aquatic toxicity. Several studies have indicated that SPs could lead to oxidative damage in humans or animals which was associated with their toxic effects. Little is known about the differences in the effects of chronic toxicity induced by individual stereoisomers of chiral SPs. The present study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the enantioselectivity in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity caused by bifenthrin (BF) on human amnion epithelial (FL) cell lines and pesticidal activity on target organism. The cell proliferation and cytoflow analysis indicated that 1S-cis-BF presented more toxic effects than 1R-cis-BF above the concentration of 7.5 mg L -1 (p > 0.05). FL cells incubated with 1S-cis-BF exhibited a dose-dependent accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the comet assay, the number of cells with damaged DNA incubated with 1S-cis-BF was more than that with 1R-cis-BF (p 50 values of enantiomer to the target pest on Pieris rapae L. show that 1R-cis-BF was 300 times more active than 1S-cis-BF. These results indicate that the enantioselective toxicity and activity of BF between non-target organism and target organism was reversal. These implications together suggest that assessment of the environmental safety and new pesticides development with chiral centers should consider enantioselectivity

  16. Enantioselective disruption of the endocrine system by Cis-Bifenthrin in the male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Pan, Xiuhong; Miao, Wenyu; Lin, Xiaojian; Wang, Linggang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF), as a chiral pyrethroid, is widely used to control field and household pests in China. At present, the commercial BF is a mixed compound containing cis isomers (cis-BF) including two enantiomers of 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. In the present study, the two individual cis-BF enantiomers were separated by a preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. Then, four week-old adolescent male ICR mice were orally administered 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF separately daily for 3 weeks at doses of 0, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively. Results showed that the transcription status of some genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and transport as well as testosterone (T) synthesis in the testes were influenced by cis-BF enantiomers. Especially, we observed that the transcription status of key genes on the pathway of T synthesis including cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P45017α)) were selectively altered in the testis of mice when treated with 1S-cis-BF, suggesting that it is the possible reason to explain why the lower serum T concentration in 1S-cis-BF treated group. Taken together, it concluded that both of the cis-BF enantiomers have the endocrine disruption activities, while 1S-cis-BF was higher than 1R-cis-BF in mice when exposed during the puberty. The data was helpful to understand the toxicity of cis-BF in mammals under enantiomeric level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of metals on enantioselective toxicity and biotransformation of cis-bifenthrin in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Ji, Dapeng; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Jianyun; Liu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Co-occurrence of pyrethroids and metals in watersheds previously has been reported to pose great risk to aquatic species. Pyrethroids are a class of chiral insecticides that have been shown to have enantioselective toxicity and biotransformation. However, the influence of metals on enantioselectivity of pyrethroids has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, the effects of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) on the enantioselective toxicity and metabolism of cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF) were investigated in zebrafish at environmentally relevant concentrations. The addition of Cd, Cu, or Pb significantly increased the mortality of zebrafish in racemate and R-enantiomer of cis-BF-treated groups. In rac-cis-BF- or 1R-cis-BF-treated groups, the addition of Cd, Cu, or Pb caused a decrease in enantiomeric fraction (EF) and an increased ratio of R-enantiomer residues in zebrafish. In 1S-cis-BF-treated groups, coexposure to Cd led to a lower EF and decreased residue levels of S-enantiomer. In addition, coexposure to the 3 metals resulted in different biodegradation characteristics of each enantiomer accompanied with differential changes in the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1, CYP2, and CYP3 genes, which might be responsible for the enantioselective biodegradation of cis-BF in zebrafish. These results suggest that the influence of coexistent metals should be considered in the ecological risk assessment of chiral pyrethroids in aquatic environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2139-2146. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  18. Effects of pyrethroid pesticide cis-bifenthrin on lipogenesis in hepatic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dandan; Chu, Tianyi; Li, Meng; Wang, Qiangwei; Zhu, Guonian

    2018-06-01

    Mounting evidence suggests there is a link between exposure to synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) and the development of obesity. The information presented in this study suggests that cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF) could activate pregnane X receptor (PXR) mediated pathway and lead to the lipid accumulation of human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. Cells were incubated in the control or different concentrations of cis-BF for 24 h. The 1 × 10 -7  M and 1 × 10 -6  M cis-BF exposure were found to induce cellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation significantly. This phenomenon was further supported by Oil Red O Staining assay. The cis-BF exposure caused upregulation of PXR gene and protein. Correspondingly, we also observed the increased expression of downstream genes involved in lipid formation and the inhibition of the expression of β-oxidation. As chiral pesticide,cis-BF was further conformed to behave enantioselectivity in the lipid metabolism. Rather than 1R-cis-BF, HepG2 cells incubated with 1S-cis-BF exhibited a significant TG accumulation. 1S-cis-BF also showed a higher binding level, of which the KD value was 9.184 × 10 -8  M in the SPR assay, compared with 1R-cis-BF (3.463 × 10 -6  M). In addition, the molecular docking simulation analyses correlated well with the KD values measured by the SPR, indicating that 1S-cis-BF showed a better binding affinity with PXR. The results in this study also elucidates the differences between the two enantiomers of pyrethroid-induced toxicity in lipid metabolism of non-target organism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exposure to bifenthrin causes immunotoxicity and oxidative stress in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Pan, Xiuhong; Fu, Zhengwei

    2014-09-01

    Bifenthrin (BF) is one of the most commonly used pesticides among the synthetic pyrethroids. The effects of BF exposure on the induction of immunotoxicity and oxidative stress were studied both in adolescent and adult male ICR mice. Both the weights of the spleen and thymus decreased significantly in the adolescent mice when they were treated with 20 mg/kg BF for 3 weeks. We found that the 3-week oral administration of BF during puberty increased the transcriptional levels of the genes TNF and IL2 in the spleen and IL2 as well as IL4 in the thymus. The effect of BF exposure on the induction of oxidative stress was also studied in serum and liver samples. The total antioxidant capacity and activity of superoxide dismutase were altered significantly in the serum of the 20 mg/kg BF-treated adolescent mice, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) decreased significantly in the serum of adolescent and adult mice after 3 weeks of oral administration of 20 mg/kg BF. Compared to serum, hepatic GSH content increased significantly in both the adolescent and adult mice exposed to 20 mg/kg BF; hepatic CAT and GPX activities were altered significantly, even in adolescent mice, after treatment with 10 mg/kg BF. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that exposure to BF, especially during puberty, has the potential to induce immunotoxicity accompanied by oxidative stress in male mice. These findings will help in elucidating the mechanism of toxicity induced by BF in mice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  20. Ibuprofen abates cypermethrin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and mitogen-activated protein kinases and averts the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish; Tripathi, Pratibha; Prakash, Om; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2016-12-01

    Cypermethrin induces oxidative stress, microglial activation, inflammation and apoptosis leading to Parkinsonism in rats. While ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, relieves from inflammation, its efficacy against cypermethrin-induced Parkinsonism has not yet been investigated. The study aimed to explore the protective role of ibuprofen in cypermethrin-induced Parkinsonism, an environmentally relevant model of Parkinson's disease (PD), along with its underlying mechanism. Animals were treated with/without cypermethrin in the presence/absence of ibuprofen. Behavioural, immunohistochemical and biochemical parameters of Parkinsonism and expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic proteins along with mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were determined. Ibuprofen resisted cypermethrin-induced behavioural impairments, striatal dopamine depletion, oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal tissues and loss of the nigral dopamine producing cells and increase in microglial activation along with atypical expression of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic proteins that include cyclooxygenase-2, tumour necrosis factor-α, MAPKs (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase), B cell lymphoma 2-associated protein X, tumour suppressor protein p53, cytochrome c and caspase-3 in the nigrostriatal tissue. The results obtained thus demonstrate that ibuprofen lessens inflammation and regulates MAPKs expression thereby averts cypermethrin-induced Parkinsonism.

  1. The effects of epoxiconazole and α-cypermethrin on Daphnia magna growth, reproduction, and offspring size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottardi, Michele; Birch, Michala Rosa; Dalhoff, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    of sublethal concentrations of epoxiconazole and α-cypermethrin and their mixture on growth, reproduction, and in vivo cytochrome P450 activity of the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna over 42 d. Continuous exposure to nonlethal concentrations of α-cypermethrin at 20 ng/L negatively affected adult growth...... and number and size of neonates within the first 14 d of exposure. Exposure to epoxiconazole at 25 μg/L increased protein content of adults within 1 to 3 d after initiating exposure and increased cumulative number of offspring at exposure times >31 d. Epoxiconazole enhanced the negative effect of α...... with other stressors such as food scarcity, predation, and pathogens, posing an additional hazard for the organisms at the beginning of their life cycle. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-12. © 2017 SETAC....

  2. Modeling of the residue transport of lambda cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, malathion and endosulfan in three different environmental compartments in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Senoro, Delia B.; Maravillas, Sharon L.; Ghafari, Nima; Rivera, Clarissa C.; Quiambao, Erwin C.; Lorenzo, Maria Carmina M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the environmental transport and fate of the residue of four Philippines priority chemicals; i.e., lambda cyhalothrin (L-cyhalothrin), cypermethrin, endosulfan and malathion, in three different environmental compartments (air, water and soil). In the Philippines, pesticide application is the most common method of controlling pests and weeds in rice and vegetable farming. This practice aided the agricultural industry to minimize losses and increase yield. However, i...

  3. Degradation of bifenthrin and pirimiphos-methyl residues in stored wheat grains (Triticum aestivum L.) by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Geovana D; Piacentini, Karim C; Bortolotto, Tiago; Scussel, Vildes M

    2016-07-15

    Pesticide insecticides are used on wheat grains in storage units but their efficiency is hindered by persistent residues in the grains. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of ozone (O3) gas treatment on the degradation of residual bifenthrin and pirimiphos-methyl insecticides commonly used in storage wheat grains, as well as to evaluate degradation of their by-products. The residues of bifenthrin decreased after 180 min of exposure in a concentration of 60 μmol/mol (a 37.5 ± 7.4% reduction) with 20% moisture content and 0.9 water activity. On the other hand, under the same experimental conditions, the pirimiphos-methyl residues significantly decreased in the wheat grains (71.1 ± 8.6%) after 30 min of exposure. After O3 gas treatment, three by-products of pirimiphos-methyl (m/z=306.1) containing different molecular mass to charge ratios (m/z=278.1, 301.1 and 319.2) were identified by LC-MS. O3 is a strong oxidizer that has shown the potential to reduce pesticide residues in stored grain in order to ensure food quality and safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling of the residue transport of lambda cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, malathion and endosulfan in three different environmental compartments in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia B. Senoro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the environmental transport and fate of the residue of four Philippines priority chemicals; i.e., lambda cyhalothrin (L-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, endosulfan and malathion, in three different environmental compartments (air, water and soil. In the Philippines, pesticide application is the most common method of controlling pests and weeds in rice and vegetable farming. This practice aided the agricultural industry to minimize losses and increase yield. However, indiscriminate use of pesticides resulted to adverse effects to public health and environment. Studies showed that 95% of the applied pesticides went to non-target species. Data from previous studies in Pagsanjan Laguna, Philippines were used as input data. Dispersion, Gaussian plume, and regression equations were employed to simulate the behavior of L-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, endosulfan and malathion in air, water and soil. Substance decay was calculated using first order reaction. This study showed how L-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, endosulfan, and malathion behaved in the environment after release from nozzle spray, and its possible duration of stay in the environment. It will also show a tool in determining the percolation depth through soil by endosulfan. This tool can be utilized in determining the depth of contaminated soil during remediation strategic planning and project implementation of similar environmental condition.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF A SUPERFICIAL TREATMENT USING BIFENTHRIN TO PROTECT RADIATA PINE FRAMING FROM DAMAGE BY SUBTERRANEAN AND DRYWOOD TERMITES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paimin Sukartana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Various experimental testing procedures were undertaken in Indonesia to determine the effectiveness of a patented superficial (envelope treatment using bifenthrin to protect radiata pine framing material from damage by two species of subterranean termites (Macrotermes gilvus and Coptotermes curvignathus and one species of drywood termite (Cryptotermes cynocephalus. Lengths of framing material (Pinus radiata sapwood were commercially treated to the targeted retention of 0.02% m/m of bifenthrin in the outer 2 mm depth penetration zone of the material. The treated and untreated materials were subsequently cut into test specimens and exposed to M. gilvus in the field and a semi-laboratory trial, to C. curvignathus in the laboratory and a semi-laboratory trial and to C. cynocephalus in a laboratory trial. No supplementary treatment was performed on the exposed cut ends of the treated test specimens. The results from the trials clearly demonstrated that the superficial treatment of bifenthrin seemed effective in protecting test specimens of radiata pine framing material from significant damage by Indonesia’s most notorious termite species that often causes serious economic loss to the timbers. Termites were unable to damage any of the bifenthrin-treated surfaces of test specimens. Any obser ved damage by termites, albeit minor, was in all cases confined to the exposed cut ends of test specimens. In contrast, attack by termites on the untreated control test specimens caused damage of the samples ranging from light to heavy.

  6. Irritant and repellent responses of Anopheles harrisoni and Anopheles minimus upon exposure to bifenthrin or deltamethrin using an excito-repellency system and a live host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmee, Monthathip; Boonyuan, Wasana; Achee, Nicole L; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Lerdthusnee, Kriangkrai; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2012-03-01

    Feeding responses of Anopheles harrisoni and An. minimus were evaluated following exposure to 2 pyrethroid insecticides, bifenthrin or deltamethrin, using an excito-repellency test system in the presence and absence of live host cues. The results demonstrated that contact irritancy was the primary action of bifenthrin or deltamethrin in both mosquito species. There was no noncontact repellency effect elicited by either insecticide. Anopheles minimus showed rapid escape response with high mortality rates following direct contact with deltamethrin in the absence of a host and delayed escape responses when a host was present. Similarly, exposure of An. minimus to bifenthrin also elicited a delayed escape response in the presence of a host but with lower mortality rates. In experiments using An. harrisoni, the presence or absence of a host had no significant effect on behavioral responses to either insecticide (P > 0.05). We conclude that deltamethrin elicited stronger irritant chemical effects than bifenthrin but that behavioral responses in vector populations are dampened in the presence of an available host. This information is useful for estimating probability of pathogen transmission when using irritant chemicals in proximity to a blood-meal source.

  7. IN VITRO ESTIMATES OF METABOLIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR USE IN PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING (PBPK) OF THE TYPE I PYRETHROIDS PERMETHRIN AND BIFENTHRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides that are used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Hepatic clearance of the Type I pyrethroids permethrin and bifenthrin may be a critical determinant of their toxic effect. Rat LD50s reported in the literatur...

  8. Synergism between demethylation inhibitor fungicides or gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators and bifenthrin in a pyrethroid-resistant population of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoutar, D; Cowles, R S; Requintina, E; Alm, S R

    2010-10-01

    In 2007-2008, the "annual bluegrass weevil," Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a serious pest of Poa annua L. (Poales: Poaceae) on U.S. golf courses, was shown to be resistant to two pyrethroids, bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. In 2008, we showed that bifenthrin resistance was principally mediated by oxidase detoxification (cytochrome P450 [P450]). P450s can be inhibited by demethylation inhibitor fungicides and gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators, both of which are commonly used on golf courses. We tested these compounds for synergistic activity with bifenthin against a pyrethroid-resistant population of L. maculicollis. The LD50 value for bifenthrin was significantly reduced from 87 ng per insect (without synergists) to 9.6-40 ng per insect after exposure to the fungicides fenarimol, fenpropimorph, prochloraz, propiconazole, and pyrifenox and the plant growth regulators flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl. Simulated field exposure with formulated products registered for use on turf revealed enhanced mortality when adult weevils were exposed to bifenthrin (25% mortality, presented alone) combined with field dosages of propiconizole, fenarimol, flurprimidol, or trinexapac-ethyl (range, 49-70% mortality).

  9. Residential runoff as a source of pyrethroid pesticides to urban creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, D.P. [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Building, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States)], E-mail: dweston@berkeley.edu; Holmes, R.W. [Water Branch, California Department of Fish and Game, 830 S Street, Sacramento, CA 95811 (United States)], E-mail: rholmes@dfg.ca.gov; Lydy, M.J. [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, 171 Life Sciences II, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)], E-mail: mlydy@siu.edu

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid pesticides occur in urban creek sediments at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive aquatic life. To better understand the source of these residues, runoff from residential neighborhoods around Sacramento, California was monitored over the course of a year. Pyrethroids were present in every sample. Bifenthrin, found at up to 73 ng/L in the water and 1211 ng/g on suspended sediment, was the pyrethroid of greatest toxicological concern, with cypermethrin and cyfluthrin of secondary concern. The bifenthrin could have originated either from use by consumers or professional pest controllers, though the seasonal pattern of discharge from the drain was more consistent with professional use as the dominant source. Stormwater runoff was more important than dry season irrigation runoff in transporting pyrethroids to urban creeks. A single intense storm was capable of discharging as much bifenthrin to an urban creek in 3 h as that discharged over 6 months of irrigation runoff. - Pyrethroid insecticides regularly detected in residential runoff at toxicologically significant concentrations.

  10. A probabilistic risk assessment for deployed military personnel after the implementation of the "Leishmaniasis Control Program" at Tallil Air Base, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J; Davis, Ryan S; Barber, Loren M; Macedo, Paula A; Peterson, Robert K D

    2009-05-01

    Leishmaniasis has been of concern to the U.S. military and has re-emerged in importance because of recent deployments to the Middle East. We conducted a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during the "Leishmaniasis Control Plan" (LCP) undertaken in 2003 at Tallil Air Base, Iraq. We estimated acute and subchronic risks from resmethrin, malathion, piperonyl butoxide (PBO), and pyrethrins applied using a truck-mounted ultra-low-volume (ULV) sprayer and lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated environmental exposure/toxic endpoint) and set the RQ level of concern (LOC) at 1.0. Acute RQs for truck-mounted ULV and residual sprays ranged from 0.00007 to 33.3 at the 95th percentile. Acute exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and chlorpyrifos exceeded the RQ LOC. Subchronic RQs for truck-mounted ULV and residual sprays ranged from 0.00008 to 32.8 at the 95th percentile. Subchronic exposures to lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos exceeded the LOC. However, estimated exposures to lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and chlorpyrifos did not exceed their respective no observed adverse effect levels.

  11. Residential runoff as a source of pyrethroid pesticides to urban creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, D.P.; Holmes, R.W.; Lydy, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticides occur in urban creek sediments at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive aquatic life. To better understand the source of these residues, runoff from residential neighborhoods around Sacramento, California was monitored over the course of a year. Pyrethroids were present in every sample. Bifenthrin, found at up to 73 ng/L in the water and 1211 ng/g on suspended sediment, was the pyrethroid of greatest toxicological concern, with cypermethrin and cyfluthrin of secondary concern. The bifenthrin could have originated either from use by consumers or professional pest controllers, though the seasonal pattern of discharge from the drain was more consistent with professional use as the dominant source. Stormwater runoff was more important than dry season irrigation runoff in transporting pyrethroids to urban creeks. A single intense storm was capable of discharging as much bifenthrin to an urban creek in 3 h as that discharged over 6 months of irrigation runoff. - Pyrethroid insecticides regularly detected in residential runoff at toxicologically significant concentrations

  12. Tissue-specific bioconcentration and biotransformation of cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos in a native fish (Jenynsia multidentata) exposed to these insecticides singly and in mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonansea, Rocío Inés; Marino, Damián J G; Bertrand, Lidwina; Wunderlin, Daniel A; Amé, María Valeria

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accumulation of cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos when the fish Jenynsia multidentata was exposed to these pesticides singly and in technical and commercial mixtures. Adult female fish were exposed over 96 h to 0.04 μg/L of cypermethrin; 0.4 μg/L of chlorpyrifos; 0.04 μg/L of cypermethrin + 0.4 μg/L of chlorpyrifos in a technical mixture; and 0.04 μg/L of cypermethrin + 0.4 μg/L of chlorpyrifos in a mixture of commercial products. Fish exposed to cypermethrin accumulated this compound only in muscle, probably because of the low biotransformation capacity of this organ and the induction of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) expression in the liver. The accumulation of chlorpyrifos occurred in fish exposed to the insecticide (intestine > liver > gills) even when these fish had higher gluthatione-S-transferase (GST) activity in gills and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in the liver, compared with the control. Fish exposed to the technical mixture showed cypermethrin accumulation (liver > intestine > gills) with higher levels than those measured in fish after only cypermethrin exposure. Higher expression levels of CYP1A1 in the liver were also observed compared with the Control. Fish exposed to the commercial mixture accumulated both insecticides (cypermethrin: intestine > gills and chlorpyrifos: liver > intestine > gills > muscle). In the organs where accumulation occurred, biotransformation enzymes were inhibited. Consequently, the commercial formulation exposure provoked the highest accumulation of cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos in J. multidentata, possibly associated with the biotransformation system inhibition. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1764-1774. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Purification and Characterization of a Novel β-Cypermethrin-Degrading Aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa GF31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ai-Xing; Liu, Hu; Liu, You-Yan; Li, Qing-Yun; Qing, Yi-Ming

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading enzyme was isolated and purified by 32.8 fold from the extracellular cell-free filtrate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa GF31with the protein recovery of 26.6%. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined to be 53 kDa. The optimum temperature for the activity was surprisingly 60 °C, and moreover, the purified enzyme showed a good pH stability, maintaining over 85% of its initial activity in the pH 5.0-9.0 range. Most of the common metal ions exhibited little influence on the activity except for Hg 2+ , Ag + , and Cu 2+ . After the complete gene sequence of the degrading enzyme was obtained by subcloning, sequence analyses as well as enzymatic properties demonstrated that the islolated enzyme should be an aminopeptidase. This is the first reported aminopeptidase for pyrethroid hydrolase, providing new potential enzyme resources for the degradation of this type of pesticide.

  14. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sorption of lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and fenvalerate to quartz, corundum, kaolinite and montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudou, H Chaaieri; Hansen, H C Bruun

    2002-12-01

    Sorption to mineral surfaces may be important for retention and degradation of hydrophobic pesticides in subsoils and aquifers poor in organic matter. In this work the title pyrethroids have been used to investigate selective interactions with the surfaces of four minerals. Sorption of the four pyrethroids was quantified in batch experiments with initial pyrethroid concentrations of 1-100 microg/l. Sorption to centrifuge tubes used in the batch experiments accounted for 25-60% of total sorption. Net sorption was obtained from total sorption after subtracting the amounts of pyrethroids sorbed to centrifuge tubes used. All isotherms could be fitted by the Freundlich equation with n ranging between 0.9 and 1.1. Bonding affinities per unit surface area decreased in the order: corundum > quartz > montmorillonite approximately equal kaolinite. A similar sequence as found for the total surface tension of the minerals. All minerals showed the same selectivity order with respect to sorption affinity of the four pyrethroids: lambda-cyhalothrin > deltamethrin > cypermethrin > fenvalerate, which shows that the most hydrophobic compound is sorbed most strongly. Stereochemical properties of the four pyrethroid formulations may also contribute to the selectivity pattern.

  16. Topical treatment of calves with synthetic pyrethroids: effects on the non-target dung fly Neomyia cornicina (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, C.; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Jespersen, Jørgen B.

    2001-01-01

    from calves dosed with topical preparations of deltamethrin, flumethrin, cyfluthrin, and - cypermethrin. Larval mortality was significantly increased in dung collected up to at least seven days after treatment with deltamethrin, -cypermethrin and cyfluthrin. Alpha-cypermethrin caused significant......). Fluctuating asymmetry of a wing vein character did not reflect the anticipated levels of exposure. The study strongly indicated that the use of synthetic pyrethroids affected the insect dung fauna and that such use may reduce dung decomposition....

  17. MSPD procedure combined with GC-MS for the determination of procymidone, bifenthrin, malathion and pirimicarb in honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Santos Silva Bezerra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine procymidone, malathion, bifenthrin and pirimicarb in honey is described. The best results were obtained using 1.0 g of honey, 1.0 g of silica-gel as dispersant sorbent and acetonitrile as eluting solvent. The method was validated by fortified honey samples at three concentration levels (0.2, 0.5 to 1.0 mg kg-1. Average recoveries (n=7 ranged from 54 to 84%, with relative standard deviations between 3.7 and 8.5%. Detection and quantification limits attained by the developed method ranged from 0.02 to 0.08 mg kg-1 and 0.07 to 0.25 mg kg-1 for the honey, respectively.

  18. Physical and chemical properties of pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Dennis A

    2002-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of the pyrethroids bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin (also zetacypermethrin), deltamethrin, esfenvalerate (also fenvalerate), fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin (also cyhalothrin), permethrin, and tralomethrin have been reviewed and summarized in this paper. Physical properties included molecular weight, octanol-water partition coefficient, vapor pressure, water solubility, Henry's law constant, fish biocencentration factor, and soil sorption, desorption, and Freundlich coefficients. Chemical properties included rates of degradation in water as a result of hydrolysis, photodecomposition, aerobic or anaerobic degradation by microorganisms in the absence of light, and also rates of degradation in soil incubated under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Collectively, the pyrethroids display a highly nonpolar nature of low water solubility, low volatility, high octanol-water partition coefficients, and have high affinity for soil and sediment particulate matter. Pyrethroids have low mobility in soil and are sorbed strongly to the sediments of natural water systems. Although attracted to living organisms because of their nonpolar nature, their capability to bioconcentrate is mitigated by their metabolism and subsequent elimination by the organisms. In fish, bioconcentration factors (BCF) ranged from 360 and 6000. Pyrethroids in water solution tend to be stable at acid and neutral pH but [table: see text] become increasingly susceptible to hydrolysis at pH values beyond neutral. Exceptions at higher pH are bifenthrin (stable), esfenvalerate (stable), and permethrin (half-life, 240 d). Pyrethroids vary in susceptibility to sunlight. Cyfluthrin and tralomethrin in water had half-lives of 0.67 and 2.5 d; lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, deltamethrin, permethrin, and cypermethrin were intermediate with a range of 17-110 d; and bifenthrin and fenpropathrin showed the least susceptibility with half-lives of 400 and 600 d, respectively

  19. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on a freshwater community studied under field conditions. II. Direct and indirect effects on the species composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt-Rasch, Lina; Friberg-Jensen, Ursula; Woin, Per

    2003-01-01

    species were calculated using inverse regression and revealed that copepod nauplii were the most sensitive (NEC=0.01 microg/l) of the crustacean groups examined. The observed alterations of the species composition of the autotrophic communities as well as of the rotifers were most likely caused indirectly...... cypermethrin concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 6 microg/l. This paper is the second in a series of two and describes the effects on the species composition of the crustacean, rotifer, periphyton and phytoplankton communities. Multivariate ordination technique (redundancy analysis (RDA) combined with Monte...... Carlo permutation tests) showed that exposure to cypermethrin caused significant changes in the species composition of the communities. Changes in the structure of the communities were observed following exposure to a nominal concentration of 0.13 microg cypermethrin per litre above. The direct acute...

  20. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide Cypermethrin on the locomotor activity of the wolf spider Pardosa amentata: quantitative analysis employing computer-automated video tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Bayley, M

    1993-01-01

    Pardosa amentata was quantified in an open field setup, using computer-automated video tracking. Each spider was recorded for 24 hr prior to pesticide exposure. After topical application of 4.6 ng of Cypermethrin, the animal was recorded for a further 48 hr. Finally, after 9 days of recovery, the spider...... paresis, the effects of Cypermethrin were evident in reduced path length, average velocity, and maximum velocity and an increase in the time spent in quiescence. Also, the pyrethroid disrupted the consistent distributions of walking velocity and periods of quiescence seen prior to pesticide application...

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF A SUPERFICIAL TREATMENT USING BIFENTHRIN TO PROTECT RADIATA PINE FRAMING FROM DAMAGE BY SUBTERRANEAN AND DRYWOOD TERMITES IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Paimin Sukartana; Jim W. Creffield; Agus Ismanto; Neo E. Lelana; Rusti Rushelia

    2010-01-01

    Various experimental testing procedures were undertaken in Indonesia to determine the effectiveness of a patented superficial (envelope) treatment using bifenthrin to protect radiata pine framing material from damage by two species of subterranean termites (Macrotermes gilvus and Coptotermes curvignathus) and one species of drywood termite (Cryptotermes cynocephalus). Lengths of framing material (Pinus radiata sapwood) were commercially treated to the targeted retention of 0.02% m/m of bifent...

  2. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Adriano E; Wang, Haichuan; Zukoff, Sarah N; Meinke, Lance J; French, B Wade; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99) was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial). For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99) were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed.

  3. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano E Pereira

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99 was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial. For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99 were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed.

  4. Changes in gene transcription and whole organism responses in larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) following short-term exposure to the synthetic pyrethroid bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggel, Sebastian; Connon, Richard; Werner, Inge; Geist, Juergen

    2011-09-01

    The combination of molecular and whole-organism endpoints in ecotoxicology provides valuable information about the ecological relevance of sublethal stressor effects in aquatic ecosystems such as those caused by the use of insecticides and translocation of their residues into surface waters. This study contributes knowledge about the sublethal effects of a common use insecticide, the synthetic pyrethroid bifenthrin, on larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Transcriptomic responses, assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, combined with individual effects on swimming performance were used to estimate the ecological relevance of insecticide impacts. Significant transcriptomic responses were observed at 0.07 μg L(-1) bifenthrin (lowest observed effect concentration, LOEC) but mostly followed a biphasic rather than a linear dose-response with increasing concentration. Transcript patterns for genes involved in detoxification, neuromuscular function and energy metabolism were linked to an impairment of swimming performance at ≥0.14 μg L(-1) bifenthrin. With increasing treatment concentration, a significant down-regulation was observed for genes coding for cyp3a, aspartoacylase, and creatine kinase, whereas metallothionein was up-regulated. Additionally, bifenthrin induced endocrine responses as evident from a significant up-regulation of vitellogenin and down-regulation of insuline-like growth factor transcripts. Recovery occurred after 6 days and was dependent on the magnitude of the initial stress. During the recovery period, down-regulation of vitellogenin was observed at lowest exposure concentrations. The data presented here emphasize that links can be made between gene transcription changes and behavioral responses which is of great value for the evaluation and interpretation of biomarker responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pesticide residue levels in green beans cultivated in Souss Masa valley (Morocco) after multiple applications of bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouri, M; Salghi, R; Bazzi, Lh; Zarrouk, A; Rios, A; Zougagh, M

    2012-09-01

    Dissipation of bifenthrin and λ-cyhalothrin pyrethroid insecticides, under environmental conditions, was evaluated on green beans grown in experimental greenhouses (Souss Massa valley, Morocco). Pesticide residues were determined by gas chromatography with micro electron-capture detector (GC-μECD) after dichloromethane extraction and cleanup on florisil phase cartridges. In the case of field experiments, a random block scheme was employed. Each block contained 25 plants in a single row and tests were carried out in triplicates applying pesticides at the recommended doses by the manufacturers. Fruit samples were periodically taken until the end of the preharvest interval (p.i.). The results obtained showed that the p.i of bifenthrin in green bean were 4 days in the winter and 3.5 days in the spring, whereas that for λ-cyhalothrin 8 days was found in the winter and 7.5 days in the spring. Consequently, it is possible to consider the European Union maximum residue limit (EU MRL) values compatible with the proper agricultural practices used for growing green bean in the plastic greenhouse of Souss Massa valley in South Morocco. Bifenthrin had a degradation of first-order kinetics, whereas that of levels for λ-cyhalothrin residue can not be interpreted by the use of a first order model.

  6. Longevity and efficacy of bifenthrin treatment on desert-pattern US military camouflage netting against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britch, Seth C; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Wynn, Willard W; Aldridge, Robert L; Walker, Todd W; Farooq, Muhammad; Dunford, James C; Smith, Vincent L; Robinson, Cathy A; Lothrop, Branka B; Snelling, Melissa; Gutierrez, Arturo; Wittie, Jeremy; White, Gregory

    2011-09-01

    The current Department of Defense pest management system does not provide adequate protection from arthropod disease vectors to personnel deployed in support of US military operations. We hypothesized that military camouflage netting, ubiquitous around living and working areas in current US military operations in Africa and the Middle East, treated with a residual pesticide such as bifenthrin may reduce the presence of biting insects and improve the military pest management system. In this study, we examined the longevity and efficacy of bifenthrin applied to camouflage netting material at the maximum label rate of 0.03 liter formulation (7.9% AI) per 92.9 m2 against field populations of mosquitoes in southern California in a hot-arid environment similar to regions of Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Horn of Africa. We showed that bifenthrin treatment of camouflage netting was effective at reducing mosquito populations, predominantly Psorophora columbiae and Aedes vexans, by an average of up to 46% for 56 days, and could cause as much as 40% mortality in Culex quinquefasciatus in laboratory bioassays for nearly 2 months postapplication. These population reductions could translate to commensurate reductions in risk of exposure to mosquito-borne pathogens, and could potentially be effective against sand flies and filth flies.

  7. Protective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Grape Pomace against the Adverse Effects of Cypermethrin on Weanling Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Tawab H. Mossa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effect of cypermethrin on the liver and kidney of weanling female rats and the protective effect of ethanolic extract of grape pomace were investigated in the present study. Weanling female rats were given cypermethrin oral at a dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight for 28 consecutive days. An additional two Cyp-trated groups received extract at a dose of 100 and 200 mg kg−1 body weight, respectively, throughout the experimental duration. Three groups more served as extract and control groups. Administration of Cyp resulted in a significant increase in serum marker enzymes, for example, aminotransferases (AST and ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, and increases the level of urea nitrogen and creatinine. In contrast, Cyp caused significant decrease in levels of total protein and albumin and caused histopathological alterations in liver and kidneys of female rats. Coadministration of the extract to Cyp-treated female rats restored most of these biochemical parameters to within normal levels especially at high dose of extract. However, extract administration to Cyp-treated rats resulted in overall improvement in liver and kidney damage. This study demonstrated the adverse biohistological effects of Cyp on the liver and kidney of weanling female rats. The grape pomace extract administration prevented the toxic effect of Cyp on the above serum parameters. The present study concludes that grape pomace extract has significant antioxidant and hepatorenal protective activity.

  8. Stereoselective Degradation and Molecular Ecological Mechanism of Chiral Pesticides Beta-Cypermethrin in Soils with Different pH Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Ji, Guo-Dong

    2015-12-15

    For decades, pesticides have been widely used for agricultural activities around the world, and the environmental problems caused by these compounds have raised widespread concern. However, the different enantioselective behaviors of chiral pesticide enantiomers are often ignored. Here, the selective degradation patterns and mechanisms of chiral pesticide enantiomers were successfully investigated for the first time in the soils of three cultivation areas with different pH values. Beta-cypermethrin was chosen as the target analyte. We found that the degradation rates of the four isomers of beta-cypermethrin were different. We used stepwise regression equations between degradation rates and functional genes to quantitatively study their relationships. Quantitative response analysis revealed that different isomers have different equations even under identical conditions. The results of path analysis showed that a single functional gene can make different direct and indirect contributions to the degradation of different isomers. Finally, the high-throughput technology was used to analysis the genome of the three tested soils and then compared the main microbial communities in them. We have successfully devised a method to investigate the molecular biological mechanisms of the selective degradation behavior of chiral compounds, thus enabling us to better understand these mechanisms.

  9. The current status of resistance to alpha-cypermethrin, ivermectin, and amitraz of the cattle tick (Rhipicephalus microplus) in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Carrera, Sandra; Vanwambeke, Sophie O.; Madder, Maxime; Benítez-Ortiz, Washington

    2017-01-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical areas of the world where livestock is a principal activity with great veterinary and economic importance. In Ecuador, this hematophagous ectoparasite has been observed between 0 and 2600 masl. One of the main tick control measures is the use of acaricides, which have been indiscriminately used worldwide and in Ecuador. In this country, no studies on acaricide resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus have been published. The current study aims to characterise the level of resistance of R. microplus against three main acaricides commonly used in Ecuador i.e. amitraz, alpha-cypermethrin and ivermectin to determine the level and pattern of dose-responses for R. microplus in 12 field populations (farms). The level of acaricide resistance was evaluated using three different bioassays: adult immersion test (AIT), larval package test (LPT) and larval immersion test (LIT), as recommended by the FAO. The predictive dose-responses were analysed by binomial logistics regression of the larval survival rate (resistance). In general, we found resistance of 67% for amitraz; 50% for alpha-cypermethrin and from 25 to 42% for ivermectin in the twelve field populations analysed. Resistance levels were studied in larval and adult bioassays, respectively, which were slightly modified for this study. For larval bioassays based on corrected mortality i.e. high (above 51%), medium (21–50%) and low (11–20%) resistance, percentages less than 10% were considered as susceptible. For the adult test, two resistance levels were used i.e. high (more than 76%) and medium (51 to 75%) resistance. Percentages lower than 50% were considered as susceptible. In this context, for larval bioassays, amitraz showed 21%, 38% and 8% for high, medium and low resistance, respectively. Alpha-cypermethrin presented 8%, 4 and 38% for high, medium and low resistance, respectively. Ivermectin presented 8%, 25% and 8% for high, medium and low

  10. β-Cypermethrin and its metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid exhibit immunotoxicity in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; He, Bingnan; Kong, Baida; Wei, Lai; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Chenqian; Shao, Yiyan; Lin, Jiajia; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-12-01

    β-Cypermethrin (β-CYP), one of most important pyrethroids, is widely used to control insects, and has been detected in organisms, including human. Pyrethroids have been shown to pose neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, endocrine disruption and reproductive risks in mammals. However, research in immunotoxicity of pyrethroids, especially their metabolites, is limited. A common metabolite of pyrethroids is 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in mammals. Thus, in this study, we evaluated the immunotoxicity of β-CYP and 3-PBA in mouse macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells. MTT assays showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry with Annexin-V/PI staining demonstrated that both β-CYP and 3-PBA induced RAW 264.7 cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results also showed that N-acetylcysteine partially blocked β-CYP- and 3-PBA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Intrinsic apoptotic pathway was stimulated by both β-CYP and 3-PBA exposure. In addition, we found that β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines with or without LPS stimulation. Phagocytosis assay showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited phagocytic ability of macrophages. Moreover, it was also found that both β-CYP and 3-PBA increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in RAW 264.7 cells. Accordingly, both β-CYP and 3-PBA were found to regulate the mRNA levels of oxidative stress-related genes in RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, the results obtained in this study demonstrated that β-CYP and 3-PBA may have immunotoxic effect on macrophages and that elevated ROS may underlie the mechanism. The present study will help to understand the health risks caused by β-CYP and other pyrethroids. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  11. The use of self-reported symptoms as a proxy for acute organophosphate poisoning after exposure to chlorpyrifos 50 % plus cypermethrin 5 % among Nepali farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Dea Haagensen; Jørs, Erik; Varma, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    in response to occupational acute organophosphate exposure. Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial among 42 Nepali commercial vegetable farmers. The farmers were randomly assigned (ratio 1:1) to a 2-h organophosphate (chlorpyrifos 50% plus cypermethrin 5...

  12. Implications of sequence and timing of exposure for synergy between the pyrethroid insecticide alpha-cypermethrin and the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyling, Nicolai V; Arthur, Samuel; Pedersen, Kathrine E; Dhakal, Suraj; Cedergreen, Nina; Fredensborg, Brian L

    2018-03-30

    Combining low doses of chemical insecticides with entomopathogens constitutes a sustainable pest control method, but the significance of the timing and sequence of exposures needs clarification. We studied lethal effects of combinations of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (KVL03-122) and the pyrethroid alpha-cypermethrin on the beetle Tenebrio molitor under varying timing and sequence of exposure. Synergy over time was evaluated in relation to the model of independent action (IA). We expected that increased progression of disease caused by B. bassiana would make beetles more susceptible to the insecticide, leading to enhanced synergy. Synergistic effects between B. bassiana and alpha-cypermethrin were observed when B. bassiana was applied first, but only when the interval between applications was >48 h. With 72 h between exposures, mortality had increased to 100% after 8 days, in contrast to the 60% mortality expected. No synergy was observed when the insecticide was applied prior to fungal exposure within 24 h. The sequence and timing of exposure do matter to achieve synergistic mortality by combining B. bassiana and alpha-cypermethrin, and the IA model proved to be a strong tool with which to evaluate the interactions of the two stressors over time. Pest control strategies could include B. bassiana followed by low-dose exposures to alpha-cypermethrin after 2-3 days. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. The use of self-reported symptoms as a proxy for acute organophosphate poisoning after exposure to chlorpyrifos 50% plus cypermethrin 5% among Nepali farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Dea Haagensen; Jørs, Erik; Varma, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    in response to occupational acute organophosphate exposure. Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial among 42 Nepali commercial vegetable farmers. The farmers were randomly assigned (ratio 1:1) to a 2-h organophosphate (chlorpyrifos 50% plus cypermethrin 5...

  14. Identification and characterization of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase gene and cytochrome b₅ gene from Plutella xylostella: possible involvement in resistance to beta-cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi'en; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-03-10

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5 (b5) are essential for cytochrome P450 mediated biological reactions. CPR and b5 in several insects have been found to be associated with insecticide resistance. However, CPR and b5 in the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, are not characterized and their roles remain undefined. A full-length cDNA of CPR encoding 678 amino acids and a full-length cDNA of b5 encoding 127 amino acids were cloned from DBM. Their deduced amino acid sequences shared high identities with those of other insects and showed characteristics of classical CPRs and b5s, respectively. The mRNAs of both genes were detectable in all developmental stages with the highest expression levels occurring in the 4th instar larvae. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that their transcripts were most abundant in gut. Transcripts of CPR and b5 in the beta-cypermethrin resistant DBM strain were 13.2- and 2.84-fold higher than those in the beta-cypermethrin susceptible strain, respectively. The expression levels of CPR and b5 were enhanced by beta-cypermethrin at the concentration of 12 mg L(-1) (~LC10). The results indicate that CPR and b5 may play essential roles in the P450 mediated resistance of DBM to beta-cypermethrin or even other insecticides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Upper respiratory tract nociceptor stimulation and stress response following acute and repeated Cyfluthrin inhalation in normal and pregnant rats: Physiological rat-specific adaptions can easily be misunderstood as adversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Juergen

    2018-01-05

    This paper reviews the results from past regulatory and mechanistic inhalation studies in rats with the type II pyrethroid Cyfluthrin. Apart from many chemical irritants, Cyfluthrin was shown to be a neuroexcitatory agent without any inherent tissue-destructive or irritant property. Thus, any Cyfluthrin-induced neuroexcitatory afferent sensory stimulus from peripheral nociceptors in the upper respiratory tract is likely to be perceived as a transient stimulus triggering annoyance and/or avoidance by both rats and humans. However, while thermolabile rats respond to such stresses reflexively, homeothermic humans appear to respond psychologically. With this focus in mind, past inhalation studies in rats and human volunteers were reevaluated and assessed to identify common denominators to such neuroexcitatory stimuli upon inhalation exposure. This analysis supports the conclusion that the adaptive physiological response occurring in rats secondary to such chemosensory stimuli requires inhalation exposures above the chemosensory threshold. Rats, a species known to undergo adaptively a hibernation-like physiological state upon environmental stresses, experienced reflexively-induced bradypnea, bradycardia, hypothermia, and changes in acid-base status during inhalation exposure. After cessation of the sensory stimulus, rapid recovery occurred. Physiological data of male and female rats from a 4-week repeated inhalation study (exposure 6-h/day, 5-times/week) were used to select concentration for a 10-day developmental inhalation toxicity study in pregnant rats. Maternal hypothermia and hypoventilation were identified as likely cause of fetal and placental growth retardations because of a maternal adaptation-driven reduced feto-placental transfer of oxygen. In summary, maternal reflex-hypothermia, reduced cardiac output and placental perfusion, and disruption of the gestation-related hyperventilation are believed to be the maternally mediated causes for developmental

  16. Adsorption of lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin on two typical Chinese soils as affected by copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lü, Xiaomeng; Xie, Jimin; Chu, Yafei; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Qian

    2009-06-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals pollution in soil environment has become a serious problem in many countries including China. Repeated applications of bordeaux mixture (a blend of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide) and pyrethroid (Pys) insecticides have led to elevated copper (Cu) and Pys concentrations in vineyard surface soils. However, few studies focused on the interaction of Pys and heavy metals in the soil environment. Our previous studies had indicated the combined effect of cypermethrin (CPM) and Cu on soil catalase activity. Also, we had suggested that the addition of Cu could catalyze photo-degradation of CPM and lambda-cyhalothrin (lambda-CHT) in aqueous solution and restrain their degradation in soil. To better understand the potential influence of Cu on the fate of Pys in the soil environment, the aim of the present work was to examine the effect of Cu on the adsorption of lambda-CHT and CPM on two typical Chinese soils with different soil characteristics, which was one of the key processes controlling the fate of Pys, and to provide more information about the potential ecological risk of chemicals on the soil ecosystem. Fourier transform infrared and point charges analysis using the MOPAC program of the Gaussian system were also used to reveal the probable adsorption mechanism of lambda-CHT and CPM on soils. Two vineyard soils with different properties were chosen as experimental samples. They were sampled from 0 to 10 cm, dried, and sieved to 2 mm. Each soil was spiked with copper sulfate solution to obtain the following total soil Cu concentrations: 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,600 mg.kg(-1). The treated soils were incubated for 2 weeks and then dried at 20 degrees C. For each soil sample and at each soil Cu concentration, the adsorption of lambda-CHT and CPM was measured using a batch equilibrium method. The concentration of lambda-CHT was determined by HPLC, and the amount of lambda-CHT and CPM adsorbed by the soil sample at equilibrium was determined

  17. Effect of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycete), Cypermethrin, and D-Limonene, Alone and Combined, on Larval Mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar Francisco; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Lezama-Gutiérrez, Roberto; García-Márquez, Luis Jorge; Minchaca-Llerenas, Yureida B; Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Tellez, Guillermo; Hargis, Billy; Skoda, Steven R; Foster, John E

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae Ma14 strain, D-limonene, and cypermethrin, alone and combined, on the mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille larvae was evaluated. Eight separate groups with 25 tick larvae were inoculated with the fungus, cypermethrin, and D-limonene, and four groups were used as untreated controls. The groups were inoculated with serial dilutions of each treatment material: for example, conidial concentrations were 1 × 101, 1 × 102, 1 × 103, 1 × 104, 1 × 105, 1 × 106, 1 × 107, and 1 × 108. A complete randomized experimental design was used. Significant differences were obtained between fungal concentrations, with larval mortalities ranging from 29 to 100%; the D-limonene concentrations showed significant differences, with mortalities that ranged from 47.9 to 82.6%, and cypermethrin mortalities ranged from 69.9 to 89.9% when each was applied alone. In the combined application, the serial dilution of the Ma14 fungus plus cypermethrin at 0.1% concentration caused mortalities ranging from 92.9 to 100%; the mix of serially diluted Ma14 plus D-limonene at 0.1% caused mortalities from 10.3 to 100%; and the mix consisting of serially diluted D-limonene plus cypermethrin at 0.1% caused mortalities from 7.4 to 35.9%. Further laboratory and field research could show that these materials, alone and in combinations, are useful in future tick management and control programs. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. MSPD procedure for determining buprofezin, tetradifon, vinclozolin, and bifenthrin residues in propolis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Thaíse Fernanda Santana; Aquino, Adriano; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira; Navickiene, Sandro

    2008-03-01

    A simple and effective extraction method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) was developed to determine bifenthrin, buprofezin, tetradifon, and vinclozolin in propolis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode (GC-MS, SIM). Different method conditions were evaluated, for example type of solid phase (C(18), alumina, silica, and Florisil), the amount of solid phase and eluent (n-hexane, dichloromethane, dichloromethane-n-hexane (8:2 and 1:1, v/v) and dichloromethane-ethyl acetate (9:1, 8:2 and 7:3, v/v)). The best results were obtained using 0.5 g propolis, 1.0 g silica as dispersant sorbent, 1.0 g Florisil as clean-up sorbent, and dichloromethane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v) as eluting solvent. The method was validated by analysis of propolis samples fortified at different concentration levels (0.25 to 1.0 mg kg(-1)). Average recoveries (four replicates) ranged from 67% to 175% with relative standard deviation between 5.6% and 12.1%. Detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.05 to 0.10 mg kg(-1) and 0.15 to 0.25 mg kg(-1) propolis, respectively.

  19. Persistence of α-cypermethrin residues in milk of lactating donkeys (Equus asinus) using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirollo, Claudia; Radovnikovic, Anita; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Marrone, Raffaele; Pepe, Tiziana; Danaher, Martin; Anastasio, Aniello

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the persistence of residues of the pyrethroid insecticide α-cypermethrin (ACYP) in the milk of lactating donkeys following pour-on treatment. Milk was collected from animals (n = 7) before the treatment and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 84 h post-treatment. The last sampling was taken 7 days post-treatment (168 h). Milk samples were analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The analytical method was validated following requirements of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. All samples showed levels of ACYP below the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 20 μg kg(-1) established for bovine milk (Commission Regulation (EU) No. 37/2010). The results demonstrate that there is minimal partitioning of ACYP into milk in lactating donkeys from pour-on treatment.

  20. Determination of Pyrethroids in Tea Brew by GC-MS Combined with SPME with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Coated Fiber

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    Dongxia Ren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method has been developed to simultaneously determine 7 pyrethroid residues in tea brew using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs coated fiber. The MWCNTs coated fiber of SPME was homemade by using stainless steel wire as coating carrier and polyacrylonitrile (PAN solution as adhesive glue. Under the optimized conditions, a good linearity was shown for bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, permethrin, and cyfluthrin in 1–50 ng mL−1 and for cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in 5–50 ng mL−1. The correlation coefficients were in the range of 0.9948–0.9999. The average recoveries of 7 pyrethroids were 94.2%–107.3% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs were less than 15%. The detection limit of the method ranged from 0.12 to 1.65 ng mL−1. The tea brew samples made from some commercial tea samples were analyzed. Among them, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, and permethrin were found. The results show that the method is rapid and sensitive and requires low organic reagent consumption, which can be well used for the detection of the pyrethroids in tea brew.

  1. Determination of Pyrethroids in Tea Brew by GC-MS Combined with SPME with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Coated Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dongxia; Sun, Chengjun; Ma, Guanqun; Yang, Danni; Zhou, Chen; Xie, Jiayu; Li, Yongxin

    2018-01-01

    A new method has been developed to simultaneously determine 7 pyrethroid residues in tea brew using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated fiber. The MWCNTs coated fiber of SPME was homemade by using stainless steel wire as coating carrier and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution as adhesive glue. Under the optimized conditions, a good linearity was shown for bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, permethrin, and cyfluthrin in 1-50 ng mL -1 and for cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in 5-50 ng mL -1 . The correlation coefficients were in the range of 0.9948-0.9999. The average recoveries of 7 pyrethroids were 94.2%-107.3% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 15%. The detection limit of the method ranged from 0.12 to 1.65 ng mL -1 . The tea brew samples made from some commercial tea samples were analyzed. Among them, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, and permethrin were found. The results show that the method is rapid and sensitive and requires low organic reagent consumption, which can be well used for the detection of the pyrethroids in tea brew.

  2. Enantioselective effect of bifenthrin on antioxidant enzyme gene expression and stress protein response in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xianting

    2013-07-01

    Enantioselectivity in toxicology and the health risk of chiral xenobiotics have become frontier topics interfacing chemistry and toxicology. Our previous results showed that cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF) induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in vitro in an enantioselective manner. However, the exact molecular mechanisms of synthetic pyrethroid-induced enantioselective apoptosis and cytotoxicity have so far received limited research attention. In the present study, the expression patterns of different genes encoding heat shock protein and antioxidant enzymes were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR in rat adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to cis-BF and its enantiomers. The results showed that exposure to 1S-cis-BF resulted in increased transcription of HSP90, HSP70, HSP60, Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-s-transferase at a concentration of 5 µm and above, while exposure to 1R-cis-BF and rac-cis-BF exhibited these effects to lesser degrees. In addition, induction of antioxidant enzyme gene expression produced by 1S-cis-BF might occur, at least in part, through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and extracellular regulated kinases, while increase in stress protein response produced by 1S-cis-BF might occur through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results not only suggest that enantioselectivity should be considered in evaluating the ecotoxicological effects and health risk of chiral contaminants, but also will improve the understanding of molecular mechanism for chiral chemical-induced cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of subacute poisoning with bifenthrin on locomotor activity, memory retention, haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieradko-Iwanicka, B; Borzecki, A; Jodlowska-Jedrych, B

    2015-02-01

    Bifenthrin (BIF) is a pyrethroid (PYR) insecticide. The target point for PYR's toxic action are voltage sensitive sodium channels in the central nervous system (CNS). Intoxication with PYRs results in motor activity impairment and death in insects. Although PYRs are considered to be safe for mammals, there were numerous cases of pyrethroid poisoning in humans, animals and pets described. The general population is chronically exposed to PYRs via grain products, dust and indoor air. Therefore new questions arise: whether PYRs act in a dose-additive fashion in the course of subacute poisoning, are there other target organs (but brain) for BIF and if there is one common mechanism of its' toxic action in different organs. The objective of this work was to characterize the effect of BIF at the doses of 4 or 8 mg/kg injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) daily for 28 consecutive days on memory and motor activity, hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters in mice. BIF at the doses of 8 mg/kg or 4 mg/kg of body mass was administered i.p. daily to the mice for 28 consecutive days. Motor function was measured on day 1, 7, 14 and 28 and memory retention was tested in a passive avoidance task on day 2, 7, 14 and 28. BIF significantly impaired memory retention on day 2. BIF decreased locomotor activity at every stage of the experiment in a single dose depending manner. No behavioral cumulative effect was observed. Subacute poisoning with the higher dose of BIF caused anaemia, elevated white blood cell count (WBC), elevated alanine transaminase (ALT), superoxide dismuthase (SOD), and decreased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Lymphocyte infiltrates were visualized in the livers. subacute poisoning with BIF decreases locomotor activity in a single dose proportionate manner. BIF damages also the liver and alters blood morphology. The possible common mechanism of these effects can be oxidative stress.

  4. A rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of 14 pyrethroids in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, M L; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D

    2010-04-09

    A simple, efficient and environmentally friendly analytical methodology is proposed for extracting and preconcentrating pyrethroids from water samples prior to gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) analysis. Fourteen pyrethroids were selected for this work: bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenvalerate, fenpropathrin, tau-fluvalinate, permethrin, phenothrin, resmethrin, tetramethrin and tralomethrin. The method is based on ultrasound-assisted emulsification-extraction (UAEE) of a water-immiscible solvent in an aqueous medium. Chloroform was used as extraction solvent in the UAEE technique. Target analytes were quantitatively extracted achieving an enrichment factor of 200 when 20 mL aliquot of pure water spiked with pyrethroid standards was extracted. The method was also evaluated with tap water and river water samples. Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.03 to 35.8 ng L(-1) with RSDs values or =0.998. Recovery values were in the range of 45-106%, showing satisfactory robustness of the method for analyzing pyrethroids in water samples. The proposed methodology was applied for the analysis of river water samples. Cypermethrin was detected at concentration levels ranging from 4.94 to 30.5 ng L(-1). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the time-concentration-mortality responses of Plutella xylostella larvae to the interaction of Isaria fumosorosea with the insecticides beta-cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Xiao-ge; He, Yu-rong; Lu, Li-hua; Zhao, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are potential candidates for controlling Plutella xylostella, a cosmopolitan pest of crucifers. In this study, bioassays were conducted to evaluate the interaction between Isaria fumosorosea and sublethal doses of two insecticides, beta-cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis, against P. xylostella. Data of each assay were in good agreement with the time-concentration-mortality model, indicating a strong dependence of the fungus and insecticide interaction on both concentration and post-exposure time. Using beta-cypermethrin 58-116 µg mL(-1) or B. thuringiensis 222.5-890 µg mL(-1) with the fungus significantly enhanced fungal efficacy. The LC50 values of the fungus declined over a 1-7 day period after exposure, and the LT50 values decreased with increasing concentration. Based on LC50 or LC90 estimates, synergism between the fungus and beta-cypermethrin resulted in a 2.7-28.3-fold reduction in LC50 values and a 12.1-19.6-fold reduction in LC90 values, while synergism of the fungus with B. thuringiensis led to a 2.4-385.0-fold reduction in LC50 values and a 4.4-151.7-fold reduction in LC90 values. Results show that sublethal doses of B. thuringiensis and beta-cypermethrin can synergise I. fumosorosea activity on P. xylostella, suggesting that combination of I. fumosorosea with the two insecticides might offer an integrated approach to controlling P. xylostella in practice. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. An independent occurrence of the chimeric P450 enzyme CYP337B3 of Helicoverpa armigera confers cypermethrin resistance in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Akhtar; Joußen, Nicole; Lorenz, Sybille; Ellinger, Renate; Schneider, Bernd; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Heckel, David G

    2014-10-01

    The increasing resistance level of insect pest species is a major concern to agriculture worldwide. The cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, is one of the most important pest species due to being highly polyphagous, geographically widespread, and resistant towards many chemical classes of insecticides. We previously described the mechanism of fenvalerate resistance in Australian populations conferred by the chimeric cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP337B3, which arose by unequal crossing-over between CYP337B1 and CYP337B2. Here, we show that this mechanism is also present in the cypermethrin-resistant FSD strain from Pakistan. The Pakistani and the Australian CYP337B3 alleles differ by 18 synonymous and three nonsynonymous SNPs and additionally in the length and sequence of the intron. Nevertheless, the activity of both CYP337B3 proteins is comparable. We demonstrate that CYP337B3 is capable of metabolizing cypermethrin (trans- and especially cis-isomers) to the main metabolite 4'-hydroxycypermethrin, which exhibits no intrinsic toxicity towards susceptible larvae. In a bioassay, CYP337B3 confers a 7-fold resistance towards cypermethrin in FSD larvae compared to susceptible larvae from the Australian TWB strain lacking CYP337B3. Linkage analysis shows that presence of CYP337B3 accounts for most of the cypermethrin resistance in the FSD strain; up-regulation of other P450s in FSD plays no detectable role in resistance. The presence or absence of CYP337B3 can be easily detected by a simple PCR screen, providing a powerful tool to rapidly distinguish resistant from susceptible individuals in the field and to determine the geographical distribution of this resistance gene. Our results suggest that CYP337B3 evolved twice independently by unequal crossing-over between CYP337B2 and two different CYP337B1 alleles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The residual efficacy of a cypermethrin pour-on formulation applied on goats on the mortality and blood intake of Triatoma infestans

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    Ivana Amelotti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco region of South America. As a frequent blood meal source for triatomine bugs, domestic goats play a key role in the eco-epidemiology of Chagas disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mortality and blood intake of T. infestans fed on goats that had been treated with different doses of pour-on insecticide. Third-instar nymphs were fed on goats that had been treated with 0 cc, 5 cc, 10 cc or 15 cc of a pour-on formulation of cypermethrin. The exposure of T. infestans to animals treated at different post-application intervals revealed a residual activity of the insecticide. The mortality rate in the treated groups was higher than in the control groups until 30 days post-insecticide application (p = 0.03, except in the group treated with 5 cc, in which no mortality was detected after seven days of insecticide application. Rainfall affected the triatomicide effect, reducing the time of residual activity. The cypermethrin pour-on treatment decreased the blood intake of T. infestans. Thirty days after the cypermethrin application, nymph mortality was 16% (± 13 with both doses (10 cc and 15 cc. The 15 cc dose did not result in higher insect mortality or increased persistence compared to the 10 cc dose.

  8. Efficacy of a long-lasting bifenthrin-treated net against horticultural pests and its compatibility with the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii and the parasitic wasp Eretmocerus mundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Maria Del Mar; Colomer, Ignacio; Medina, Pilar; Fereres, Alberto; Del Estal, Pedro; Viñuela, Elisa

    2017-08-01

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) have been investigated recently for their use in agriculture. Depending on the insecticide, the hole size and the way they are produced, these nets can target different pests and therefore they could be interesting options for use in integrated pest management (IPM). As the information on their compatibility with beneficial fauna is practically negligible, in this work we have tested the compatibility of an experimental bifenthrin long-lasting insecticide-treated net (LLITN) with Amblyseius swirskii and Eretmocerus mundus, important natural enemies of whiteflies and thrips, under laboratory, semi-field and commercial greenhouse conditions. In the laboratory, the treated net was very deleterious to adults of both natural enemies, after 72 h exposure. However, in choice tests with Y-tubes, both natural enemies were neither attracted nor repelled by the treated net and no short-term mortality was detected in individuals that had crossed it. No deleterious effects on the E. mundus beneficial capacity were detected in semi-field trials. In field trials, the LLITN proved to be compatible with A. swirskii while decreasing pest densities. Bifenthrin LLITN studied could be a valuable method for reducing pest population infestations in IPM programmes while being compatible with biocontrol agents. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. The relationship of metals, bifenthrin, physical habitat metrics, grain size, total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen and conductivity to Hyalella sp. abundance in urban California streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between Hyalella sp. abundance in four urban California streams and the following parameters: (1) 8 bulk metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Zn) and their associated sediment Threshold Effect Levels (TELs); (2) bifenthrin sediment concentrations; (3) 10 habitat metrics and total score; (4) grain size (% sand, silt and clay); (5) Total Organic Carbon (TOC); (6) dissolved oxygen; and (7) conductivity. California stream data used for this study were collected from Kirker Creek (2006 and 2007), Pleasant Grove Creek (2006, 2007 and 2008), Salinas streams (2009 and 2010) and Arcade Creek (2009 and 2010). Hyalella abundance in the four California streams generally declined when metals concentrations were elevated beyond the TELs. There was also a statistically significant negative relationship between Hyalella abundance and % silt for these 4 California streams as Hyalella were generally not present in silt areas. No statistically significant relationships were reported between Hyalella abundance and metals concentrations, bifenthrin concentrations, habitat metrics, % sand, % clay, TOC, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. The results from this study highlight the complexity of assessing which factors are responsible for determining the abundance of amphipods, such as Hyalella sp., in the natural environment.

  10. Effects of Myrtus communis leaves decoction on biochemical and hematological disorders induced by Cypermethrin-chronic toxicity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Berroukche

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncontrolled and an excessive uses of insecticides, in agriculture, will expose the human and animal health to a high risk of chemical toxicity. Objective: This study aimed to assess Myrtus communis (MC effects against the toxicity induced by the Cypermethrin (CYP in Wistar rat. Methods : The experimental period was 30 days, carried out on 50 rats, divided into 5 groups; group I (controls, group II orally administered with 20 mg / kg of CYP ( < 1/10 LD50 dissolved in corn oil (CO, a group III orally administered with CYP and treated with 1 mL of MC leaves decoction (50 g /L, a group IV receiving 1 mL MC and a group V received 1 mL CO. Results : A decrease in mean body weight was observed in group II (178 g compared to group III (190.66 g. Biochemical parameters were insignificant. Mean blood glucose and urea levels were respectively 0.94 ± 0.03 and 0.65 ± 0.06 g / L (group II and 0.72 ± 0.06 and 0.68 ± 0.05 g / L (group III. Furthermore, liver transaminase activities as GPT was 93 ± 38.7 (group II and 36.6 ± 8.0 IU / L (group III but GOT and ALP were respectively 188.3 ± 55.1 and 73.3 ± 47.7 (II and 210.3 ± 33.8 and 207 ± 5.1 IU / L (III. The hematological parameters (blood cells and Hb were respectively 6.16 ± 0.26 ×105 / mm3 and 13.52 ± 2.9 g / dL( II and 7.37 ± 0.41×105 / mm3 and 14.14 ± 0.87 g / dL (III. Conclusion: The medicinal plant Myrtus communis showed limited and partial beneficial effects against Cypermethrine negative effects in animal model. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(4.000: 385-390

  11. Timing clorpirifos + cypermethrin and indoxacarb applications to control European corn borer damage and fumonisin contamination in maize kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Massimo; Peila, Alessandro; Reyneri, Amedeo

    2010-02-01

    European corn borer (ECB) is the main maize pest in central and southern Europe and it promotes the infection of maize with Fusarium verticillioides, which is able to produce fumonisins. Field experiments were performed from 2006 to 2007 in northwestern Italy to determine the effects of the timing of insecticide applications on maize fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination in natural infection conditions. Four application timings and two insecticides (clorpirifos + cypermethrin and indoxacarb) were compared each year. In both years, the treatments applied at the beginning of a consistent ECB flight activity and at the flight peak showed the best efficacy to control the insect damage on ears. Fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination were clearly affected by ECB control. The efficacy of the best application timing to control fumonisin occurrence was 73% in 2006 and 84% in 2007. Earlier insecticide applications showed lower fumonisin contamination than treatments applied after the adult flight peak. The production of maize and maize-based foods with a low fumonisin content may be enhanced through correct insecticide application against the second ECB generation. The optimum timing of insecticides is between the beginning of a consistent adult flight activity and the flight peak.

  12. Effectiveness of the compound chlorpyrifos+ cypermethrin+citronellal against Alphitobius diaperinus: laboratory analysis and residue determination in carcasses

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    GS Silva

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness, biological security and the absence of residues in meat and/or eggs must be considered when recommending options for the control Alphitobius diaperinus in poultry production environments. This research study evaluated the effectiveness of cypermethrin+ chlorpyrifos+citronellal in the control of A. diaperinus, including analysis for the presence of residues of this compound in poultry carcasses (experimental farm. Two studies were carried out under laboratory conditions. One used paper filters a four dilutions of the compound, and the other used a container including with pulverized broiler litter and the compound. The analysis of carcasses for residues was conducted in broilers that raised in a broiler house treated (floor and/or litter with the compound at a dilution of 1:800. Birds were regularly sacrificed, submitted to necropsy, and liver, muscle and fat fragments were collected. Gas chromatography was used to identify the possible presence of any chemical residue in these samples. High effectiveness rates against A.diaperinus were observed in the two laboratory studies, as well as the absence of residues in the carcasses. This compound, used in the studied concentrations, can be recommended as a valuable alternative for the control and treatment of A. diaperinus.

  13. Behavior of pyrimethanil, pyraclostrobin, boscalid, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos residues on raspberry fruit and leaves of Laszka variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadło, Stanisław; Szpyrka, Ewa; Stawarczyk, Michał; Piechowicz, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research conducted was to investigate and evaluate the behavior of pyrimethanil, pyraclostrobin, boscalid, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos, the active ingredients of selected fungicides and insecticides, on ripe fruit and in fully developed leaves of raspberry of the Laszka variety. The field trial was carried out in the period of one month starting from the first fruit picking. The results obtained indicated that residue levels on the day of the first crop picking did not even approximate the corresponding EU-MRLs (http://ec.europa.eu/sanco_pesticides). Individual substances in raspberry fruits and leaves disappeared at a similar rate. As a result of chlorpyrifos application to the soil, its residue in fruits and leaves occurred for the whole period of fruit bearing, though in fruit they dropped successively. To produce raspberries with residues below or equal to 0.01 μg g(-1), the application of pesticides should be stopped at least 2-3 weeks before the first crop picking, and on condition that an appropriate preparation (active in low doses) is applied to the last treatments.

  14. Histopathological effects of cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis on midgut of Chironomus calligraphus larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavarías, Sabrina; Arrighetti, Florencia; Siri, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Pesticides are extensively used for the control of agricultural pests and disease vectors, but they also affect non-target organisms. Cypermethrin (CYP) is a synthetic pyrethroid used worldwide. Otherwise, bioinsecticides like Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) have received great attention as an environmentally benign and desirable alternative. In order to evaluate the toxicity of those pesticides, Chironomus calligraphus was selected due to its high sensitivity to some toxicants. Third and fourth instars larvae were exposed to serial dilutions of CYP and Bti to determine LC 50 values. In order to evaluate the potentially histopathological alterations as biomarkers, after 96-h of exposure, live larvae were fixed for histological analysis of the mid region of digestive tract. The 96-h LC 50 values were 0.52 and 1.506μg/L for CYP and Bti, respectively. Midgut histological structure of the control group showed a single layer of cubical cells with microvilli in their apical surface and a big central nucleus. The midgut epithelium of larvae exposed to a low concentration of CYP (0.037μg/L) showed secretion activity and vacuolization while at high concentration (0.3μg/L) cells showed a greater disorganization and a more developed fat body. On the other hand, Bti caused progressive histological damage in this tissue. Chironomus calligraphus is sensitive to Bti and CYP toxicity like other Chironomus species. The histopathological alterations could be a valuable tool to assess toxicity mechanism of different pesticides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Two Surfactants and Beta-Cyclodextrin on Beta-Cypermethrin Degradation by Bacillus licheniformis B-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiayuan; Chi, Yuanlong; Liu, Fangfang; Jia, Dongying; Yao, Kai

    2015-12-23

    The biodegradation efficiency of beta-cypermethrin (β-CY) is low especially at high concentrations mainly due to poor contact between this hydrophobic pesticide and microbial cells. In this study, the effects of two biodegradable surfactants (Tween-80 and Brij-35) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the growth and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Bacillus licheniformis B-1 were studied. Furthermore, their effects on the solubility, biosorption, and degradation of β-CY were investigated. The results showed that Tween-80 could slightly promote the growth of the strain while Brij-35 and β-CD exhibited little effect on its growth. The CSH of strain B-1 and the solubility of β-CY were obviously changed by using Tween-80 and Brij-35. The surfactants and β-CD could enhance β-CY biosorption and degradation by the strain, and the highest degradation was obtained in the presence of Brij-35. When the surfactant or β-CD concentration was 2.4 g/L, the degradation rate of β-CY in Brij-35, Tween-80, and β-CD treatments was 89.4%, 50.5%, and 48.1%, respectively. The half-life of β-CY by using Brij-35 was shortened by 69.1 h. Beta-CY content in the soil with both strain B-1 and Brij-35 decreased from 22.29 mg/kg to 4.41 mg/kg after incubation for 22 d. This work can provide a promising approach for the efficient degradation of pyrethroid pesticides by microorganisms.

  16. Cypermethrin-induced histopathological, ultrastructural and biochemical changes in liver of albino rats: The protective role of propolis and curcumin

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    Manal Abdul-Hamid

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cypermethrin (CYP, an insecticide belongs to a synthetic pyrethroid, is used for agriculture and household applications. The present study aimed to examine the toxic effects of CYP on rat liver and to clarify the hepatoprotective effects of propolis (PRO and curcumin (CUR against CYP. This study was assessed in male albino rats, each weighting (120–150 g. The rats were equally divided into six groups as follow; the 1st control group, 2nd PRO group (100 mg/kg/day and 3rd CUR group (100 mg/kg/day. While 4th, 5th and 6th groups were orally treated with CYP (30 mg/kg/day, CYP plus PRO and CYP plus CUR, respectively for 28 days. The present study revealed that CYP-induced significant increase in hepatic markers enzymes (ALT, AST and ALP and elevation in MDA concomitant with significant decrease of SOD and GPx levels. Histological and histochemical results revealed extensive vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes, fatty change, blood vessel congestion and fibrosis in the liver of CYP- treated group and depletion of glycogen, protein and DNA. Moreover, ultrastructural observations showed vacuolation, damage of mitochondria and nuclear changes. On the other hand, treatment with PRO and CUR led to an obvious improvement of the injured liver tissues and ameliorating the damaging effects of CYP. In conclusion, PRO is markedly effective than CUR in protecting rats against CYP-induced histopathological, ultrastructural and biochemical changes. This protection may be due to its antioxidant properties and scavenging abilities against active free radicals.

  17. Comparative study of different clean-up techniques for the determination of λ-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin in palm oil matrices by gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Halimah; Zainudin, Badrul Hisyam; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini

    2012-10-15

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) and dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) were compared and evaluated for the determination of λ-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin in palm oil matrices by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Several SPE sorbents such as graphitised carbon black (GCB), primary secondary amine (PSA), C(18), silica, and florisil were tested in order to minimise fat residues. The results show that mixed sorbents using GCB and PSA obtained cleaner extracts than a single GCB and PSA sorbents. The average recoveries obtained for each pesticide ranged between 81% and 114% at five fortification levels with the relative standard deviation of less than 7% in all cases. The limits of detection for these pesticides were ranged between 0.025 and 0.05 μg/g. The proposed method was applied successfully for the residue determination of both λ-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin in crude palm oil samples obtained from local mills throughout Malaysia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluación de la b-cipermetrina para el control de Triatoma infestans Evaluation of beta-cypermethrin for control of Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nicolás Zerba

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se evaluó en el laboratorio y en el campo el efecto insecticida sobre Triatoma infestans, vector de la enfermedad de Chagas, del nuevo piretroide ß-cipermetrina, y se comparó con el de la deltametrina. La comparación de las dosis letales 50 (DL50 de ambos piretroides indicó que la ß-cipermetrina es más efectiva en ninfas y la deltametrina, en adultos. La evaluación de la concentración letal 50 (CL50 de las dos formulaciones floables de ambos insecticidas depositados sobre distintos soportes mostró que su efectividad en vidrio es similar. En cerámica, la deltametrina es ligeramente más efectiva. Los dos insecticidas floables se evaluaron en 100 viviendas infestadas de la provincia de Santiago del Estero, Argentina. La deltametrina floable se aplicó a una concentración superficial de 25 mg/m² y la ß-cipermetrina, de 50 mg/m². Las concentraciones superficiales reales de ambos productos se analizaron por medio de papeles de filtro colocados en paredes y techos. El análisis por cromatografía de gases mostró buena coincidencia con las concentraciones previstas. Asimismo, se realizaron evaluaciones entomológicas 60, 90, 180 y 365 días después de los tratamientos. Solo en la última evaluación se encontró 10% de infestación en peridomicilios de viviendas tratadas con ß-cipermetrina y 7% en las viviendas tratadas con deltametrina (6% en el peridomicilio y 1% en el domicilio. Los resultados indican que la efectividad de la ß-cipermetrina para controlar a T. infestans cuando se aplica a una concentración de 50 mg/m² es similar a la de la deltametrina cuando esta se administra a una concentración de 25 mg/m².This study assessed the insecticidal effect in the laboratory and in the field of the new pyrethroid ß-cypermethrin against Triatoma infestans, the vector of Chagas' disease, and compared it with that of deltamethrin. Comparison of the 50% lethal dosis (LD50 of both pyrethroids showed that ß-cypermethrin

  19. Eficácia biológica de bifentrina aplicado em milho armazenado sob diferentes temperaturas Biological efficacy of applied bifenthrin in stored corn under different temperatures

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    Marco A. G. Pimentel

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerando-se as altas temperaturas nos graneleiros junto à esteira transportadora de grãos objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar a influência da temperatura no momento da pulverização, sobre a eficácia biológica do bifentrina. Para isso, pulverizou-se o inseticida sobre grãos de milho dentro de uma câmara climática nas temperaturas de 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 e 50 ºC, com umidade relativa em torno de 55%. Após a pulverização e a cada 15 dias, até completar 90 dias, foram feitas as análises da eficácia biológica utilizando-se os insetos Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae e Tribolium castaneum (Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. Observou-se tendência decrescente da eficácia biológica do bifentrina com o aumento da temperatura do ar ambiente, no momento da pulverização e com o maior tempo de armazenamento dos grãos de milho, resultando em menor mortalidade dos insetos-praga.Considering the high temperatures in the granary ships alongwith the transporting mat, the objective of this paper was to evaluate the influence of the temperature at the moment of spraying on the biological effectiveness of the bifenthrin. For the purpose the insecticide was sprayed on maize grains inside a climatic chamber maintained at the temperatures of 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 ºC with relative humidity around 55%. After the spraying and every fifteen days up to 90 days, analyses of the biological effectiveness were made by using insects of the Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. A decreasing tendency of the biological effectiveness of the bifenthrin was observed with the increase of the air temperature at the moment of spraying and with the increased time of maize storage, resulting in a smaller mortality of the insect-pest.

  20. Molecular cloning and preliminary function study of iron responsive element binding protein 1 gene from cypermethrin-resistant Culex pipiens pallens

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    Tan Wenbin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance jeopardizes the control of mosquito populations and mosquito-borne disease control, which creates a major public health concern. Two-dimensional electrophoresis identified one protein segment with high sequence homology to part of Aedes aegypti iron-responsive element binding protein (IRE-BP. Method RT-PCR and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA end were used to clone a cDNA encoding full length IRE-BP 1. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate the transcriptional level changes in the Cr-IRE strain Aedes aegypti compared to the susceptible strain of Cx. pipiens pallens. The expression profile of the gene was established in the mosquito life cycle. Methyl tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR was used to observe the cypermethrin resistance changes in C6/36 cells containing the stably transfected IRE-BP 1 gene of Cx. pipiens pallens. Results The complete sequence of iron responsive element binding protein 1 (IRE-BP 1 has been cloned from the cypermethrin-resistant strain of Culex pipiens pallens (Cr-IRE strain. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the IRE-BP 1 transcription level was 6.7 times higher in the Cr-IRE strain than in the susceptible strain of 4th instar larvae. The IRE-BP 1 expression was also found to be consistently higher throughout the life cycle of the Cr-IRE strain. A protein of predicted size 109.4 kDa has been detected by Western blotting in IRE-BP 1-transfected mosquito C6/36 cells. These IRE-BP 1-transfected cells also showed enhanced cypermethrin resistance compared to null-transfected or plasmid vector-transfected cells as determined by 3H-TdR incorporation. Conclusion IRE-BP 1 is expressed at higher levels in the Cr-IRE strain, and may confer some insecticide resistance in Cx. pipiens pallens.

  1. Exposure of maternal mice to cis-bifenthrin enantioselectively disrupts the transcription of genes related to testosterone synthesis in male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Sun, Xueqing; Ye, Yang; Xu, Minjie; Wang, Jianai; Chen, Shaoping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2013-12-01

    The commercial bifenthrin (BF) contains two cis isomers. In the present study, a dose of 15mg/kg of 1R-cis-BF or 1S-cis-BF was orally administered for 3 weeks to female mice before or during pregnancy. Then, the expression of steroidogenesis related genes which were considered as effective biomarkers of endocrine disruption were analyzed in the male offspring. Maternal exposure to 1S-cis-BF during pregnancy significantly reduced the mRNA levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the testes of 3- or 6-week old male offspring. In addition, a significant decrease of cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P450-17α) was also observed in the testes of 6-week old male offspring when dams were treated with 1S-cis-BF during pregnancy but not before pregnancy. Moreover, the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SRB1) and cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) decreased significantly in the testes of 6-week old male offspring when dams were treated with 1S-cis-BF during and before pregnancy. Thus, oral administration of the maternal mice to cis-BF for 3 weeks, particularly during pregnancy, resulted in endocrine disruption in the male offspring, with the 1S-cis-BF causing more significant alterations than the 1R-cis-BF form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Photodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin in aqueous solution as affected by humic acid and/or copper: intermediates and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jimin; Wang, Pingli; Liu, Jun; Lv, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Deli; Sun, Cheng

    2011-11-01

    The influence of coexisting humic acids (HA) or Cu²⁺ on the photodegradation of pesticides lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-CHT) and cypermethrin (CPM) in aqueous solution was studied under xenon lamp irradiation. The removal efficiency of pesticides λ-CHT and CPM were enhanced in the presence of either Cu²⁺ or HA but restrained in the presence of both Cu²⁺ and HA. The photodegradation of λ-CHT and CPM followed first-order reaction kinetics. The photodegradation intermediates of λ-CHT and CPM were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Possible photodegradation pathways included decarboxylation, ester bond cleavage, dechlorination, and phenyl group removal. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  3. Method development for the analysis of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides at low parts per trillion levels in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongli; Weston, Donald P; Lydy, Michael J

    2009-06-15

    In the current study, organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides including diazinon, chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, permethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, esfenvalerate and deltamethrin were analyzed in laboratory and field-collected water samples. Water samples were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography/electron capture detector (GC/ECD) and gas chromatography/nitrogen-phosphorous detector (GC/NPD). Comparison of results from liquid-liquid extraction and subsequent normal phase solid-phase extraction cleanup (LLE-NPSPE), and reversed phase solid-phase extraction (RPSPE) showed that LLE-NPSPE was the better choice to extract trace amounts of pesticides from water. Pesticide recoveries from four spiked water samples using LLE-NPSPE ranged from 63.2 to 148.8% at four spiking concentrations. Method detection limits were 0.72-1.69 ng/L using four different water sources. The stability of the target pesticides in lake water was investigated at 4 degrees C for 1h, 1d, 4d, and 7d under three conditions: (1) water samples only; (2) with 20 mL hexane used as a keeper solvent; and (3) with acidification to pH 2 with HCl. Results showed that water storage without treatment resulted in slow degradation of some pesticides with storage time, storage using water acidification led to significant degradation and loss of diazinon and chlorpyrifos, while water storage with hexane as a keeper solvent showed good stability for all of the target pesticides over the 7d storage period.

  4. Elevated expression of esterase and cytochrome P450 are related with lambda-cyhalothrin resistance and lead to cross resistance in Aphis glycines Matsumura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jinghui; Pan, Yiou; Bi, Rui; Gao, Xiwu; Chen, Xuewei; Peng, Tianfei; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Hua; Hu, Xiaoyue; Shang, Qingli

    2015-02-01

    A resistant strain of the Aphis glycines Matsumura (CRR) has developed 76.67-fold resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin compared with the susceptible (CSS) strain. Synergists piperonyl butoxide (PBO), S,S,S-Tributyltrithiophosphate (DEF) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dramatically increased the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to the resistant strain. Bioassay results indicated that the CRR strain had developed high levels of cross-resistance to chlorpyrifos (11.66-fold), acephate (8.20-fold), cypermethrin (53.24-fold), esfenvalerate (13.83-fold), cyfluthrin (9.64-fold), carbofuran (14.60-fold), methomyl (9.32-fold) and bifenthrin (4.81-fold), but did not have cross-resistance to chlorfenapyr, imidacloprid, diafenthiuron, abamectin. The transcriptional levels of CYP6A2-like, CYP6A14-like and cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit 9-like increased significantly in the resistant strain than that in the susceptible. Similar trend were observed in the transcripts and DNA copy number of CarE and E4 esterase. Overall, these results demonstrate that increased esterase hydrolysis activity, combined with elevated cytochrome P450 monooxygenase detoxicatication, plays an important role in the high levels of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance and can cause cross-resistance to other insecticides in the CRR strain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Embryonic exposure to cis-bifenthrin enantioselectively induces the transcription of genes related to oxidative stress, apoptosis and immunotoxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Pan, Xiuhong; Cao, Limin; Ma, Bufang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2013-02-01

    Cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF) is used widely for agricultural and non-agricultural purpose. Thus, cis-BF is one of the most frequently detected insecticides in the aquatic ecosystem. As a chiral pesticide, the commercial cis-BF contained two enantiomers including 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. However, the difference in inducing oxidative stress, apoptosis and immunotoxicity by the two enantiomers in zebrafish still remains unclear. In the present study, the zebrafish were exposed to environmental concentrations of cis-BF, 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF during the embryos developmental stage. We observed that the mRNA levels of the most genes related to oxidative stress, apoptosis and immunotoxicity including Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-Sod), catalase (Cat), P53, murine double minute 2 (Mdm2), B-cell lymphoma/leukaemia-2 gene (Bcl2), Bcl2 associated X protein (Bax), apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf1), Caspase 9 (Cas9), Caspase 3 (Cas3), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-8(Il-8) were much higher in 1S-cis-BF treated group than those in cis-BF or 1R-cis-BF treated ones, suggesting that 1S-cis-BF has higher risk to induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and immunotoxicity than 1R-cis-BF in zebrafish. The information presented in this study will help with elucidating the differences and environmental risk of the two enantiomers of cis-BF-induced toxicity in aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  7. A new tactic for Triatoma infestans control: fabrics impregnated with beta-cypermethrin Telas impregnadas de beta-cipermetrina: una nueva táctica para el control de Triatoma infestans

    OpenAIRE

    Edgardo Wood; Susana A. de Licastro; Norma Casabé; María Inés Picollo; Raúl Alzogaray; Eduardo Nicolás Zerba

    1999-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the most important vector of Chagas’ disease in Argentina. Experiences from Argentine national campaigns have shown indoor spraying to control triatomine bugs is both expensive and difficult. An alternative control method may be the use of pyrethroid- impregnated fabrics (PIFs), which could be both a practical and cheap complement to conventional control measures. In this study, a formulation of emulsifiable concentrate of beta-cypermethrin [a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl-...

  8. Antioxidant-enzyme reaction to the oxidative stress due to alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahid, Karim; Laglaoui, Amin; Zantar, Said; Ennabili, Abdeslam

    2015-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) becomes one of the world's foremost vegetables, and its world production and consumption have increased fairly quickly. The capacity to induce oxidative stress in tomato plant, exposed to three xenobiotics such as alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb, was investigated by the evaluation of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) rate; also, we studied the response of tomato to this stress by assessing the response of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). The effect of the insecticides was observed using four concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) for germinating seeds and only the recommended concentration in agriculture (100%) for growing plants. Our results show an important accumulation of MDA, demonstrating the increase of lipid peroxidation in consequence of the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to insecticide treatment. In response to this oxidative stress in tomato seedlings and plants, the activities of antioxidant-enzyme system were generally enhanced. The electrophoretic analysis showed also the apparition of new isoenzymes as the case for CAT and POD.

  9. Cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin induced in vivo alterations in nucleic acids and protein contents in a freshwater catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus; Family-Clariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Bechan; Pandey, Ravi S

    2009-08-01

    The fresh water fish, Clarias batrachus, were exposed to sub-acute concentrations of cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin for 96 h to assess their impact on the levels of nucleic acids and protein in different organs of fish. DNA content was found almost unchanged with a single exception of liver, which showed significant increment in the levels of DNA in response to the separate treatments of both compounds. Both RNA and protein contents declined in brain, liver, and muscle while sharp increase was observed in gills. However, in kidney, RNA contents depicted significant enhancement only at higher concentrations, with initial decline at lower concentrations. The trends of alterations in RNA/DNA and protein/DNA ratios were quite similar to the corresponding results explained above for RNA and protein. The results clearly indicated that both of these pyrethroids exerted their effects at transcriptional and translational levels while DNA synthesis was found to be unaffected by these compounds with an exception of liver.

  10. Effect of Dursban 480 EC (chlorpyrifos) and Talstar 10 EC (bifenthrin) on the physiological and genetic diversity of microorganisms in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medo, Juraj; Maková, Jana; Kovácsová, Silvia; Majerčíková, Kamila; Javoreková, Soňa

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the impact of the insecticides Dursban 480 EC (with organophosphate compound chlorpyrifos as the active ingredient) and Talstar 10 EC (with pyrethroid bifenthrin as the active ingredient) on the respiration activity and microbial diversity in a sandy loam luvisol soil. The insecticides were applied in two doses: the maximum recommended dose for field application (15 mg kg(-1) for Dursban 480 EC and 6 mg kg(-1) for Talstar 10 EC) and a 100-fold higher dose for extrapolation of their effect. Bacterial and fungal genetic diversity was analysed in soil samples using PCR DGGE and the functional diversity (catabolic potential) was studied using BIOLOG EcoPlates at 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 112 days after insecticide application. Five bacterial groups (α, β, γ proteobacteria, firmibacteria and actinomycetes) and five groups of fungi or fungus-like microorganisms (Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Oomycota and Zygomycota) were analysed using specific primer sets. This approach provides high resolution of the analysis covering majority of microorganisms in the soil. Only the high-dose Dursban 480 EC significantly changed the community of microorganisms. We observed its negative effect on α- and γ-proteobacteria, as the number of OTUs (operational taxonomic units) decreased until the end of incubation. In the β-proteobacteria group, initial increase of OTUs was followed by strong decrease. Diversity in the firmibacteria, actinomycetes and Zygomycota groups was minimally disturbed by the insecticide application. Dursban 480 EC, however, both positively and negatively affected certain species. Among negatively affected species Sphingomonas, Flavobacterium or Penicillium were detected, but Achromobacter, Luteibacter or Aspergillus were supported by applied insecticide. The analysis of BIOLOG plates using AWCD values indicated a significant increase in metabolic potential of microorganisms in the soil after the high

  11. 40 CFR 180.436 - Cyfluthrin and the isomer beta-cyfluthrin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., grain 0.15 Mustard greens 7.0 Nut, tree, group 14 0.01 Oat, bran 0.5 Oat, grain 0.15 Pea and bean, dried... Tomato 0.20 Tomato, dry pomace 5.0 Tomato, paste 0.5 Tomato, wet pomace 5.0 Triticale, grain 0.15 Turnip..., grain 0.15 Mustard greens 7.0 Nut, tree, group 14 0.01 Oat, bran 0.5 Oat, grain 0.15 Pea and bean, dried...

  12. Co-Metabolic Degradation of β-Cypermethrin and 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid by Co-Culture of Bacillus licheniformis B-1 and Aspergillus oryzae M-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiayuan; Chi, Yuanlong; Xu, Yingchao; Jia, Dongying; Yao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The degradation efficiency of organic contaminants and their associated metabolites by co-culture of microbes is mainly limited by toxic intermediates from co-metabolic degradation. In this study, we investigated the degradation of β-cypermethrin (β-CY) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) by co-culture of Bacillus licheniformis B-1 and Aspergillus oryzae M-4, as well as the influences of β-CY and 3-PBA metabolites on their degradation and the growth of strains B-1 and M-4. Our results indicated that 100 mg/L β-CY was degraded by 78.85%, and 3-PBA concentration was 0.05 mg/L after 72 h. Compared with using only strain B-1, the half-life (t1/2) of β-CY by using the two strains together was shortened from 84.53 h to 38.54 h, and the yield coefficient of 3-PBA was decreased from 0.846 to 0.001. At 100 mg/L of 3-PBA and gallic acid, β-CY and 3-PBA degradation were only 17.68% and 40.45%, respectively. As the toxic intermediate derived from co-metabolic degradation of β-CY by strain B-1, 3-PBA was efficiently degraded by strain M-4, and gallic acid, as the toxic intermediate from co-metabolic degradation of 3-PBA by strain M-4, was efficiently degraded by strain B-1. These results provided a promising approach for efficient biodegradation of β-CY and 3-PBA.

  13. Co-Metabolic Degradation of β-Cypermethrin and 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid by Co-Culture of Bacillus licheniformis B-1 and Aspergillus oryzae M-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The degradation efficiency of organic contaminants and their associated metabolites by co-culture of microbes is mainly limited by toxic intermediates from co-metabolic degradation. In this study, we investigated the degradation of β-cypermethrin (β-CY and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA by co-culture of Bacillus licheniformis B-1 and Aspergillus oryzae M-4, as well as the influences of β-CY and 3-PBA metabolites on their degradation and the growth of strains B-1 and M-4. Our results indicated that 100 mg/L β-CY was degraded by 78.85%, and 3-PBA concentration was 0.05 mg/L after 72 h. Compared with using only strain B-1, the half-life (t1/2 of β-CY by using the two strains together was shortened from 84.53 h to 38.54 h, and the yield coefficient of 3-PBA was decreased from 0.846 to 0.001. At 100 mg/L of 3-PBA and gallic acid, β-CY and 3-PBA degradation were only 17.68% and 40.45%, respectively. As the toxic intermediate derived from co-metabolic degradation of β-CY by strain B-1, 3-PBA was efficiently degraded by strain M-4, and gallic acid, as the toxic intermediate from co-metabolic degradation of 3-PBA by strain M-4, was efficiently degraded by strain B-1. These results provided a promising approach for efficient biodegradation of β-CY and 3-PBA.

  14. Curcumin and Quercetin Ameliorated Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin-Induced Reproductive System Impairment in Male Wistar Rats by Upregulating The Activity of Pituitary-Gonadal Hormones and Steroidogenic Enzymes

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    Poonam Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Dietary antioxidants protect tissues and organs against insecticides/xenobiotic-induced damage. In the present study, we evaluated the results of exposure to synthetic pyrethroid insecticides, cypermethrin (Cyp and deltamethrin (Del and possible protective effects of curcumin and quercetin on reproductive system in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods In this controlled experimental study, 42 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 7 groups of 6 animals. Group A served as control, group B was exposed to Cyp (2 mg/kg.bw, group C was exposed to Del (2 mg/kg.bw, group D was exposed to Cyp+Del (2 mg/kg.bw each, group E was exposed to Cyp+Del and treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg.bw, group F was exposed to Cyp+Del and treated with quercetin (100 mg/kg.bw and group G was exposed to Cyp+Del and treated with quercetin+curcumin for 45 days. Results Exposure to Cyp and Del caused decreases in reproductive organs weight, sperm count, sperm motility, level of sex hormones viz. testosterone (T, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH, steroidogenic enzymes viz. 3β-hydroxyl steroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD and 17β-HSD, non-enzymatic antioxi- dant glutathione (GSH and enzymatic antioxidants viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and glutathione reductase (GR activity and increases in sperm abnormalities and lipid peroxidation (LPO. The exposure also adversely affected the histo-achitecture of testes. Single and combined treatment with curcumin and quercetin significantly ameliorated Cyp and Del-induced damage in reproductive system. Conclusion Curcumin and quercetin protected against Cyp and Del-induced reproductive system toxicity and oxidative damage in rats. The increases in activities of 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD with concomitant increases in testosterone were mainly responsible for ameliorating effects of curcumin and quercetin. Curcumin showed slightly

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION DETERMINATION OF CYPERMETHRIN ...

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  16. Resistance to cypermethrin and amitraz in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus on the Santa Catarina Plateau, Brazil Situação da resistência do Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus à cipermetrina e amitraz no Planalto Catarinense, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Paula Haubold Neis Veiga

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of evaluating Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus resistance to cipermetrina and amitraz, were collected engorged tick females from cattle on 20 farms on the Santa Catarina Plateau, in southern Brazil, between January of 2004 and May of 2006. Were also received 20 groups of engorged R. (B. microplus females, collected by cattle farmers requesting acaricidal efficacy (AE testing. Were performed in vitro tests, which consisted of immersing engorged females in cypermethrin (0.015% and in amitraz (0.025%. An AE >95% was considered indicative of effectiveness. Of the 20 collected groups, 18 (90% showed cypermethrin resistance and 1 (5% showed amitraz resistance. Of the 20 received groups, 19 (95% showed cypermethrin resistance and 2 (10% showed amitraz resistance. The AE of cypermethrin was found to be >95%, 85-94%, and 55-64%, respectively, in 4 (57.1%, 2 (28.6%, and 1 (14.3% of 7 reference groups, collected in the 1997-2001 period. The AE of amitraz was >95% in all of those groups. Among the groups of specimens received for analysis in that period, the AE of amitraz was >95% in 6 (85.71% and 75-84% in 1 (14.28%. R. (B. microplus resistance to acaricides is increasing on the Santa Catarina Plateau.Com os objetivos de avaliar a resistência do Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus à cipermetrina e ao amitraz no Planalto Catarinense, no período de janeiro de 2004 a maio de 2006, foram coletadas teleóginas em bovinos de 20 propriedades onde os produtores autorizaram a coleta (amostras por conveniência e recebidas teleóginas de mais 20 propriedades com objetivo de diagnóstico de eficácia. Os testes in vitro foram realizados por imersão de teleóginas em cipermetrina (0,015% e amitraz (0,025%. Considerando a eficácia igual ou superior a 95%, das 20 propriedades amostradas, 18 (90% apresentaram resistência à cipermetrina e uma (5% ao amitraz. Das 20 propriedades com teleóginas para diagnóstico, 19 (95% apresentaram resist

  17. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs), their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although, pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces, and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium, and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the cleavage of

  18. Microwave-assisted extraction of pyrethroid insecticides from semi permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) used to indoor air monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A.; Pastor, Agustin; Guardia, Miguel de la

    2006-01-01

    A rapid and environmentally friendly methodology was developed for the extraction of pyrethroid insecticides from semi permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), in which they were preconcentrated in gas phase. The method was based on gas chromatography mass-mass spectrometry determination after a microwave-assisted extraction, in front of the widely employed dialysis method. SPMDs were extracted twice with 30 mL hexane:acetone, irradiated with 250 W power output, until 90 deg. C in 10 min, this temperature being held for another 10 min. Clean-up of the extracts was performed by acetonitrile-hexane partitioning and solid-phase extraction (SPE) with a combined cartridge of 2 g basic-alumina, deactivated with 5% water, and 500 mg C 18 . Pyrethroids investigated were Allethrin, Prallethrin, Tetramethrin, Bifenthrin, Phenothrin, λ-Cyhalothrin, Permethrin, Cyfluthrin, Cypermethrin, Flucythrinate, Esfenvalerate, Fluvalinate and Deltamethrin. The main pyrethroid synergist compound, Pyperonyl Butoxide, was also studied. Limit of detection values ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 ng/SPMD and repeatability data, as relative standard deviation, from 2.9 to 9.4%, were achieved. Pyrethroid recoveries, for spiked SPMDs, with 100 ng of each one of the pyrethroids evaluated, were from 61 ± 8 to 103 ± 7% for microwave-assisted extraction, versus 54 ± 4 to 104 ± 3% for dialysis reference method. Substantial reduction of solvent consumed (from 400 to 60 mL) and analysis time (from 48 to 1 h) was achieved by using the developed procedure. High concentration levels of pyrethroid compounds, from 0.14 to 7.3 μg/SPMD, were found in indoor air after 2 h of a standard application

  19. Microwave-assisted extraction of pyrethroid insecticides from semi permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) used to indoor air monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A. [Analytical Chemistry Department, University of Valencia, Edifici Jeroni Munoz, 50th Dr. Moliner, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Pastor, Agustin [Analytical Chemistry Department, University of Valencia, Edifici Jeroni Munoz, 50th Dr. Moliner, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: agustin.pastor@uv.es; Guardia, Miguel de la [Analytical Chemistry Department, University of Valencia, Edifici Jeroni Munoz, 50th Dr. Moliner, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2006-02-23

    A rapid and environmentally friendly methodology was developed for the extraction of pyrethroid insecticides from semi permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), in which they were preconcentrated in gas phase. The method was based on gas chromatography mass-mass spectrometry determination after a microwave-assisted extraction, in front of the widely employed dialysis method. SPMDs were extracted twice with 30 mL hexane:acetone, irradiated with 250 W power output, until 90 deg. C in 10 min, this temperature being held for another 10 min. Clean-up of the extracts was performed by acetonitrile-hexane partitioning and solid-phase extraction (SPE) with a combined cartridge of 2 g basic-alumina, deactivated with 5% water, and 500 mg C{sub 18}. Pyrethroids investigated were Allethrin, Prallethrin, Tetramethrin, Bifenthrin, Phenothrin, {lambda}-Cyhalothrin, Permethrin, Cyfluthrin, Cypermethrin, Flucythrinate, Esfenvalerate, Fluvalinate and Deltamethrin. The main pyrethroid synergist compound, Pyperonyl Butoxide, was also studied. Limit of detection values ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 ng/SPMD and repeatability data, as relative standard deviation, from 2.9 to 9.4%, were achieved. Pyrethroid recoveries, for spiked SPMDs, with 100 ng of each one of the pyrethroids evaluated, were from 61 {+-} 8 to 103 {+-} 7% for microwave-assisted extraction, versus 54 {+-} 4 to 104 {+-} 3% for dialysis reference method. Substantial reduction of solvent consumed (from 400 to 60 mL) and analysis time (from 48 to 1 h) was achieved by using the developed procedure. High concentration levels of pyrethroid compounds, from 0.14 to 7.3 {mu}g/SPMD, were found in indoor air after 2 h of a standard application.

  20. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sebastian Cycoń

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs, their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the

  1. Fenpropathrin biodegradation pathway in Bacillus sp. DG-02 and its potential for bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaohua; Chang, Changqing; Deng, Yinyue; An, Shuwen; Dong, Yi Hu; Zhou, Jianuan; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2014-03-12

    The widely used insecticide fenpropathrin in agriculture has become a public concern because of its heavy environmental contamination and toxic effects on mammals, yet little is known about the kinetic and metabolic behaviors of this pesticide. This study reports the degradation kinetics and metabolic pathway of fenpropathrin in Bacillus sp. DG-02, previously isolated from the pyrethroid-manufacturing wastewater treatment system. Up to 93.3% of 50 mg L(-1) fenpropathrin was degraded by Bacillus sp. DG-02 within 72 h, and the degradation rate parameters qmax, Ks, and Ki were determined to be 0.05 h(-1), 9.0 mg L(-1), and 694.8 mg L(-1), respectively. Analysis of the degradation products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to identification of seven metabolites of fenpropathrin, which suggest that fenpropathrin could be degraded first by cleavage of its carboxylester linkage and diaryl bond, followed by degradation of the aromatic ring and subsequent metabolism. In addition to degradation of fenpropathrin, this strain was also found to be capable of degrading a wide range of synthetic pyrethroids including deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin, β-cypermethrin, β-cyfluthrin, bifenthrin, and permethrin, which are also widely used insecticides with environmental contamination problems with the degradation process following the first-order kinetic model. Bioaugmentation of fenpropathrin-contaminated soils with strain DG-02 significantly enhanced the disappearance rate of fenpropathrin, and its half-life was sharply reduced in the soils. Taken together, these results depict the biodegradation mechanisms of fenpropathrin and also highlight the promising potentials of Bacillus sp. DG-02 in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils.

  2. A new tactic for Triatoma infestans control: fabrics impregnated with beta-cypermethrin Telas impregnadas de beta-cipermetrina: una nueva táctica para el control de Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Wood

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the most important vector of Chagas’ disease in Argentina. Experiences from Argentine national campaigns have shown indoor spraying to control triatomine bugs is both expensive and difficult. An alternative control method may be the use of pyrethroid- impregnated fabrics (PIFs, which could be both a practical and cheap complement to conventional control measures. In this study, a formulation of emulsifiable concentrate of beta-cypermethrin [a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl-3- (2,2-dichlorovinyl -2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxilate] pyrethroid was used to impregnate different fabrics. The fabrics were then tested for their efficacy and persistence in killing Triatoma infestans. Insects attempting to penetrate or grasp the fabric in search of blood meals were poisoned by the exposure to the absorbed pyrethroid. Laboratory bioassays showed that the insecticidal effect of the PIFs with a dosage of 0.2 g/m² lasted longer on wool than on cotton or rayon. Eight months after impregnation, a residual efficacy of 100% was found for wool, 80% for rayon-cotton fabrics, and 50% for rayon- polyester fabrics. In addition, beta-cypermethrin-impregnated fabrics showed a better repellency effect than did fabrics impregnated with either deltamethrin or cypermethrin. For field trials, fabrics were impregnated either in the laboratory or "in situ" at a dosage of 1 g beta-cypermethrin/m² and then dried. The PIFs were placed inside homes, either under the roof or under the bed mattress. The field trials showed the PIF approach to be very effective in keeping dwellings free of triatomine bugs for at least one year and found a high degree of acceptability among the houses’ residents.Triatoma infestans es el principal vector de la enfermedad de Chagas en Argentina. La experiencia adquirida en las campañas nacionales de este país ha demostrado que la fumigación de los domicilios para controlar los triatómidos es cara y difícil. Un método de control

  3. Impact of heavy repeated long term pesticide applications on soil properties in a cotton agroecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Altaf; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Iqbal, Zafar; Chaudhry, Jamil Anwar

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted under field conditions to investigate the effects of heavy repeated long term pesticide applications, at their recommended doses, on some biological properties in relation to the cotton agroecosystem at NIAB, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Control, test and treated soils before (BPA) and after pesticide applications (APA) were collected and analyzed at different stages of pesticide applications. The selective tests were measurements of microbial numbers, basal as well as substrate-induced respiration, nitrification, Fe-III reduction and the activities, of dehydrogenase and arginine deaminase. Endosulfan, profenophos + alphamethrin and methamidophos inhibited while monocrotophos and bifenthrin + acetamiprid enhanced the bacterial population numbers. The fungal population was depressed with endosulfan while monocrotophos, profenophos and methamidophos stimulated it. All other applied pesticides did not cause any appreciable change in total bacterial and fungal populations throughout the study period. Monocrotophos, propargite, endosulfan alone or with dimethoate and profenophos with cypermethrin or with ethion inhibited the respiration and hence affected the biomass. All other pesticides had no effect in test and treated soils compared to control soil. No pronounced inhibition or stimulation was seen in respiration after several weeks following the applications of pesticide. Endosulfan, endosulfan with dimethoate, methamidophos stimulated while profenophos + cypermethrin and bifenthrin + endosulfan inhibited the nitrification. All other pesticide applications showed similar nitrification rates in test and treated soils compared to control soil. Iron reduction capacity was stimulated by dimethoate + endosulfan and propenophos + cypermethrin and profenphos, methamidophos, propargite and diafenthiuron + profenophos reduced it. Soil dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by methamidophos, fenpropathrin, endosulfan + dimethoate and bifenthrin + ethion

  4. Insecticide Resistance in Eggs and First Instars of the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E. Campbell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two strains of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., eggs and first instars collected from pyrethroid-resistant adults were evaluated for insecticide resistance and compared to a susceptible strain. Dose-response bioassays were conducted using two insecticide formulations (Temprid: imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin, and Transport: acetamiprid/ bifenthrin. The lethal concentration (LC50 for the two resistant egg strains exposed to imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin ranged from 3 to 5-fold higher than susceptible strain eggs. Resistant strain eggs dipped into formulations of acetamiprid/bifenthrin had LC50 values which were significantly greater (39 to 1,080-fold than susceptible strain eggs. Similar to eggs, resistant strain first instars exposed to residual applications of imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin had LC50 values ranging from 121 to 493-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. When resistant strain first instars were treated with acetamiprid/bifenthrin, they had LC50 values that were 99 to >1,900-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. To determine differences between egg and first instar resistance, stage resistance ratios (SRR were compared between the two stages. There was little difference between the egg and first instar stages, indicated by small SRR values ranging from 1.1 to 10.0. This study suggests that insecticide resistance is expressed early during bed bug development.

  5. 77 FR 56782 - Bifenthrin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... the most sensitive neurotoxicity endpoint used for quantifying risks, there is no increase in hazard... endpoint used for quantifying risks, there is no increase in hazard with increasing dosing duration... Agency used screening level water exposure models in the dietary exposure analysis and risk assessment...

  6. Remediation of Aqueous Solution of Cypermethrin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Curcas can be effective in the adsorption of these two pesticides from water bodies. Equilibrium experiment results ... and electro-Fenton , combined ultrasound and Fenton. (Ma et al, 2010), ..... Desalination, 250, 450-455 492. Chang, K; Lin, J ...

  7. 40 CFR 180.418 - Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... commodities (other than those covered by a higher tolerance as a result of use on growing crops) in food/feed... fractions 10.0 Grape 2 Grass, forage, fodder, and hay, group 17, forage 10 Grass, forage, fodder and hay... 1, except sugar beet 0.1 Vernonia, refined oil 0.4 Vernonia, seed 0.2 Wheat, forage 3.0 Wheat, grain...

  8. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in a resistant dairy population of Musca domestica L [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Azhar Ali Khan

    Full Text Available House flies, Musca domestica L., are important pests of dairy operations worldwide, with the ability to adapt wide range of environmental conditions. There are a number of insecticides used for their management, but development of resistance is a serious problem. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in resistant insect pests, thus resulting as a potential resistance management tool. The toxicity of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin benzoate and fipronil were assessed separately, and in mixtures against house flies. A field-collected population was significantly resistant to all the insecticides under investigation when compared with a laboratory susceptible strain. Most of the insecticide mixtures like one pyrethroid with other compounds evaluated under two conditions (1∶1-"A" and LC50: LC50-"B" significantly increased the toxicity of pyrethroids in the field population. Under both conditions, the combination indices of pyrethroids with other compounds, in most of the cases, were significantly below 1, suggesting synergism. The enzyme inhibitors, PBO and DEF, when used in combination with insecticides against the resistant population, toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and emamectin were significantly increased, suggesting esterase and monooxygenase based resistance mechanism. The toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin in the resistant population of house flies could be enhanced by the combination with chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin and fipronil. The findings of the present study might have practical significance for resistance management in house flies.

  9. Insecticide Mixtures Could Enhance the Toxicity of Insecticides in a Resistant Dairy Population of Musca domestica L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Lee, Jong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    House flies, Musca domestica L., are important pests of dairy operations worldwide, with the ability to adapt wide range of environmental conditions. There are a number of insecticides used for their management, but development of resistance is a serious problem. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in resistant insect pests, thus resulting as a potential resistance management tool. The toxicity of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin benzoate and fipronil were assessed separately, and in mixtures against house flies. A field-collected population was significantly resistant to all the insecticides under investigation when compared with a laboratory susceptible strain. Most of the insecticide mixtures like one pyrethroid with other compounds evaluated under two conditions (1∶1-“A” and LC50: LC50-“B”) significantly increased the toxicity of pyrethroids in the field population. Under both conditions, the combination indices of pyrethroids with other compounds, in most of the cases, were significantly below 1, suggesting synergism. The enzyme inhibitors, PBO and DEF, when used in combination with insecticides against the resistant population, toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and emamectin were significantly increased, suggesting esterase and monooxygenase based resistance mechanism. The toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin in the resistant population of house flies could be enhanced by the combination with chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin and fipronil. The findings of the present study might have practical significance for resistance management in house flies. PMID:23613758

  10. Effects of an environmentally-relevant mixture of pyrethroid insecticides on spontaneous activity in primary cortical networks on microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Andrew F M; Strickland, Jenna D; Crofton, Kevin M; Gennings, Chris; Shafer, Timothy J

    2017-05-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides exert their insecticidal and toxicological effects primarily by disrupting voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) function, resulting in altered neuronal excitability. Numerous studies of individual pyrethroids have characterized effects on mammalian VGSC function and neuronal excitability, yet studies examining effects of complex pyrethroid mixtures in mammalian neurons, especially in environmentally relevant mixture ratios, are limited. In the present study, concentration-response functions were characterized for five pyrethroids (permethrin, deltamethrin, cypermethrin, β-cyfluthrin and esfenvalerate) in an in vitro preparation containing cortical neurons and glia. As a metric of neuronal network activity, spontaneous mean network firing rates (MFR) were measured using microelectorde arrays (MEAs). In addition, the effect of a complex and exposure relevant mixture of the five pyrethroids (containing 52% permethrin, 28.8% cypermethrin, 12.9% β-cyfluthrin, 3.4% deltamethrin and 2.7% esfenvalerate) was also measured. Data were modeled to determine whether effects of the pyrethroid mixture were predicted by dose-addition. At concentrations up to 10μM, all compounds except permethrin reduced MFR. Deltamethrin and β-cyfluthrin were the most potent and reduced MFR by as much as 60 and 50%, respectively, while cypermethrin and esfenvalerate were of approximately equal potency and reduced MFR by only ∼20% at the highest concentration. Permethrin caused small (∼24% maximum), concentration-dependent increases in MFR. Effects of the environmentally relevant mixture did not depart from the prediction of dose-addition. These data demonstrate that an environmentally relevant mixture caused dose-additive effects on spontaneous neuronal network activity in vitro, and is consistent with other in vitro and in vivo assessments of pyrethroid mixtures. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus in Texas to permethrin- and beta-cyfluthrin-treated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lesser mealworm is an insect pest of great economic importance in the poultry industry. In this study, insecticide resistance to commonly used control products were tested in adult lesser mealworms collected from three farms in each of two regions, Mt. Pleasant and Franklin, TX, USA. Filter pa...

  12. Residual pyrethroids in fresh horticultural products in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, Maria L; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana I; Silveira-Gramont, Maria I; Rodríguez-Olibarría, Guillermo; Grajeda-Cota, Patricia; Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G; Miller, Marion G

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the presence of cyhialothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in vegetables produced and consumed in Sonora, Mexico. A total of 345 samples were collected from cluster sampling of markets and fields. Approximately 9% of the samples tested positive for pyrethroids (residue range 0.004-0.573 mg kg(-1)). Based on the results, the potential toxicological risk of human exposure to the pyrethroid insecticides measured in vegetables appears to be minimal, with the estimated exposure being 1,000 times lower than admissible levels. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  13. Effect of cypermethrin toxicity on enzyme activities in the freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shahid

    2014-03-05

    Mar 5, 2014 ... ... and floods to large water bodies like ponds and rivers and change the water ... from the processing of sheep skin, wood industry and knitwear ... there is little information on the comprehensive effects of ... deep freezer prior to analysis. ..... insecticide monocrotophas and its effects on behaviour of an air-.

  14. 78 FR 7266 - Alpha-Cypermethrin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... exposure, EPA used food consumption information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1994-1996... data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture/National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA/NASS... > 6 years. For exposures from birth to Based on an evaluation of over 70 guideline toxicity studies...

  15. Toxicity of seven foliar insecticides to four insect parasitoids attacking citrus and cotton pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhaker, Nilima; Morse, J G; Castle, S J; Naranjo, S E; Henneberry, T J; Toscano, N C

    2007-08-01

    Laboratory studies were carried out to compare the toxicity of seven foliar insecticides to four species of adult beneficial insects representing two families of Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae (Aphytis melinus Debach, Eretmocerus eremicus Rose & Zolnerowich, and Encarsiaformosa Gahan) and Mymaridae (Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault) that attack California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell); sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (both E. eremicus and E. formosa); and glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), respectively. Insecticides from four pesticide classes were evaluated using a petri dish bioassay technique across a range of concentrations to develop dosage-mortality regressions. Insecticides tested included acetamiprid (neonicotinoid); chlorpyrifos (organophosphate); bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, and fenpropathrin (pyrethroids); and buprofezin and pyriproxyfen (insect growth regulators [IGRs]). Chlorpyrifos was consistently the most toxic pesticide to all four species of beneficial insects tested based on LC50 values recorded 24 h posttreatment compared with 48-h LC50 values with the neonicotinoid and pyrethroids or 96 h with the IGRs. Among the three pyrethroids, fenpropathrin was usually less toxic (except similar toxicity to A. melinus) than was cyfluthrin, and it was normally less toxic (except similar toxicity with E. formosa) than was bifenthrin. Acetamiprid was generally less toxic than bifenthrin (except similar toxicity with G. ashmeadi). The IGRs buprofezin and pyriproxyfen were usually less toxic than the contact pesticides, but we did not test for possible impacts on female fecundity. For all seven pesticides tested, A. melinus was the most susceptible parasitoid of the four test species. The data presented here will provide pest managers with specific information on the compatibility of select insecticides with natural enemies attacking citrus and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., pests.

  16. Pesticide pollution in agricultural areas of Northern Vietnam: Case study in Hoang Liet and Minh Dai communes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoai, Pham Manh; Sebesvari, Zita; Minh, Tu Binh; Viet, Pham Hung; Renaud, Fabrice G.

    2011-01-01

    Soils and agricultural products from the Red River basin in Northern Vietnam were reported to be contaminated by agrichemicals. To assess potential exposure of local farmers and consumers to these contaminants, pesticide use and management practices of local farmers were surveyed and residue concentrations were determined for recently used as well as for banned pesticides in water, soil, vegetables, and fish samples in two communes of Northern Vietnam. DDTs, HCHs, and Drin compounds still persist at relatively high concentrations in soil and occur in vegetable and fish samples. Recently used pesticides, such as fenobucarb, trichlorfon, cyfluthrin, and cypermethrin were detected in vegetable and fish samples. Thresholds for acceptable daily intake levels (ADI) were frequently reached in the analyzed food products pointing to the fact that current pesticide management practices do not only result in a pollution of the environment but also pose threats to human health. - Highlights: → Pesticide use and residue concentrations in the environment and biota was investigated. → Cypermethrin, trichlorfon, fenobucarb, cyfluthrin were frequently detected in biota. → Acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels were repeatedly exceeded in fish and vegetables. → Banned organochlorine pesticides still persist in the environment. → Better information-sharing is required to improve farmers' pesticide management. - Pollution with recently used and banned pesticides was observed in the environment and food products in Northern Vietnam and is discussed in context of human exposure.

  17. TOXICITY OF INSECTICIDES USED IN MUSKMELON ON FIRST-INSTAR LARVAE OF Chrysoperla genanigra FREITAS (NEUROPTERA: CHRYSOPIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BÁRBARA KARINE DE ALBUQUERQUE SILVA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is one of the world's largest producers of melon (Cucumis melo L., and Rio Grande do Norte and Ceará are the largest producers states of the country (99% of exports. This crop had great socio- economic importance in the Brazilian Northeast, however, it is affected by insect pests and consequently, large amounts of pesticides are applied to it, which greatly affect beneficial organisms, such as Chrysopidae. This bioassay evaluated the toxicity of nine insecticides used in commercial crops of muskmelon, applied to first- instar larvae of Chrysoperla genanigra of up to 24-hour-old, from mass rearing cultures. Sublethal effects were evaluated, classifying the insecticides into the toxicity classes recommended by the IOBC. A completely randomized design was used, consisting of ten treatments (clothianidin, pymetrozine, lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorantraniliprole, indoxacarb, pyriproxyfen, beta-cyfluthrin+imidacloprid, imidacloprid, beta-cypermethrin and a control consisted of distilled water. The treatments consisted of exposure of thirty larvae to dry residues of each product in Petri dishes, assessing their mortality, duration of instars, sex ratio, fecundity and viability of eggs from adults of the insects evaluated. The products were classified in toxicity classes as harmful (Class 4 (clothianidin, pymetrozine, indoxacarb, lambda-cyhalothrin, beta-cyfluthrin+imidacloprid, imidacloprid, beta- cypermethrin and pyriproxyfen and innocuous (Class 1 (chlorantraniliprole to first -instar larvae of C. genanigra, by calculate their total effect. Based on this work, chlorantraniliprole is the only recommended insecticide for use in integrated pest management (IPM programs in muskmelon crops.

  18. Evaluation of various soaking agents as a novel tool for pesticide residues mitigation from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Asghar, Ali; Pasha, Imran; Usman, Rabia; Shamoon, Muhammad; Bhatti, Muhammad Arslan; Irshad, Muhammad Asim; Ahmad, Naveed

    2016-08-01

    The increasing use of pesticides for boosting the yield of agricultural crops also impart toxic residues which ultimately extend to numerous physiological disorders upon consumption. The present study was designed as an effort to assess the reduction potential of various chemical solutions and to minimize the pesticide residues in cauliflower ( Brassica oleracea var. botrytis ). The samples were soaked in various solutions along with tap water to mitigate pesticide residues. Afterwards, the extracted supernatant was passed through column containing anhydrous sodium sulfate trailed by activated carbon for clean-up. Eluents were first evaporated and then completely dried under gentle stream of Nitrogen. Finally, the residues were determined using gas chromatography equipped with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Results revealed the highest reduction of endosulfan, bifenthrin and cypermethrin residues with acetic acid (10 %) was 1.133 ± 0.007 (41 %), 0.870 ± 0.022 (60 %) and 0.403 ± 0.003 (75 %), respectively among the tested solutions. However, simple tap water treatment also resulted in 0.990 ± 0.02 (12 %), 1.323 ± 0.015 (14 %) and 1.274 ± 0.002 (21 %) elimination of endosulfan, bifenthrin and cypermethrin residues, respectively. Moreover, among various solutions, acetic acid depicted maximum reduction potential followed by citric acid, hydrogen peroxide, sodium chloride and sodium carbonate solutions. The percent reduction by various solutions ranged from 12 to 41, 14 to 60 and 21 to 75 % for the elimination of endosulfan, bifenthrin and cypermethrin residues, respectively.

  19. Efficacy of Different Insecticides in Controlling Pollen Beetle (Meligethes aeneus F. in Rapeseed Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Milovanović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since pollen beetle, M. aeneus, is usually controlled by insecticides, the efficacy of several compounds with different modes of action against adult beetles was studied in a threeyear field study. The selected insecticides were: three pyrethroids (lambda-cyhalothrin, alpha-cypermethrin and bifenthrin, an oganophosphate (pirimiphos-methyl, a combination of an organophosphate and a pyrethroid (chlorpyrifos + cypermethrin and a neonicotinoid (thiacloprid. The insecticides were applied at label rates to winter rapeseed crops at the moment of visible but still closed flower buds (BBCH 55-57. In all experiments, the efficacy of pyrethroids and the organophosphate ranged from 90-100%, while the efficacy of the neonicotinoid was 85-95%. Therefore, they can be recommended for control of pollen beetle in Serbia.

  20. The protection of the poppy plant (Papaver somniferum L. against poppy weevil (Stenocarus ruficornis Stephens by foliar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Sikora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Poppy seed (Papaver somniferum L. is an annual autumn or spring plant. This crop is cultivated generally for seed which is used as a foodstuff in food processing industry. The biological efficacy of different tested active ingredients (lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, aplha-cypermethrin, DE-225 and combination chlorpyrifos + cypermethrin on poppy weevil (Stenocarus ruficornis S. was evaluated in comparison with reference active ingredient (carbofuran used as a standard treatment. The active ingredients were applied against the mentioned pest once in the season and were used in doses which were similar to those used against stem weevils in winter oil seed rape. Reference active ingredient was used in the dose which was authorised in the Czech Republic as standard ones against the poppy weevil. All active ingredients revealed efficacy which was measured (as a size of injuries both on leaves and roots. Two trials were performed in 2001–2002 in which efficacy and selectivity were assessed.

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Insecticides for Use Against the House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae): Determination of Resistance Levels on a Malaysian Poultry Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Jaal, Zairi; Rus, Adanan Che

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicology of two commercial larvicides--cyromazine (Neporex 50SP) and ChCy (combination of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, Naga 505)--and five commercial adulticides--thiamethoxam (Agita 10WG), cyfluthrin (Responsar WP), lambda-cyhalothrin (Icon 2.8EC), fipronil (Regent 50SC), and imidacloprid (Toxilat 10WP)--was examined against the WHO/VCRU (World Health Organization/ Vector Control Research Unit) susceptible strain and the AYTW (Ayer Tawar) field strain of house fly, Musca domestica L. These pesticides were administered topically, in the diet, or as a dry residue treatment on plywood. Probit analysis using at least five concentrations and the concentration that was lethal to 50% (LC(50)) of the organisms was applied to compare the toxicology and resistance levels of the AYTW population to different insecticides. In the larvicide laboratory study, ChCy was more effective than cyromazine, with a significantly lower LC(50) value when administered topically or in the diet, although the AYTW population was susceptible to both larvicides with a resistance ratio (RR) <10. For the adulticide laboratory study, cyfluthrin and fipronil exhibited the lowest LC50 values of the adulticides, indicating that they are both effective at controlling adult flies, although lambda-cyhalothrin showed moderate resistance (RR = 11.60 by topical application; 12.41 by plywood treatment). Further investigation of ChCy, cyromazine, cyfluthrin, and fipronil under field conditions confirmed that ChCy and cyromazine strikingly reduced larval density, and surprisingly, ChCy also exhibited adulticidal activity, which significantly reduced adult fly numbers compared with the control group. Cyfluthrin and fipronil were also confirmed to be effective, with a significant reduction in adult fly numbers compared with the control group. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  2. Global occurrence of pyrethroid insecticides in sediment and the associated toxicological effects on benthic invertebrates: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizhen; Cheng, Fei; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2017-02-15

    Pyrethroids are the third most applied group of insecticides worldwide and are extensively used in agricultural and non-agricultural applications. Pyrethroids exhibit low toxicity to mammals, but have extremely high toxicity to fish and non-target invertebrates. Their high hydrophobicity, along with pseudo-persistence due to continuous input, indicates that pyrethroids will accumulate in sediment, pose long-term exposure concerns to benthic invertebrates and ultimately cause significant risk to benthic communities and aquatic ecosystems. The current review synthesizes the reported sediment concentrations of pyrethroids and associated toxicity to benthic invertebrates on a global scale. Geographically, the most studied area was North America, followed by Asia, Europe, Australia and Africa. Pyrethroids were frequently detected in both agricultural and urban sediments, and bifenthrin and cypermethrin were identified as the main contributors to toxicity in benthic invertebrates. Simulated hazard quotients (HQ) for sediment-associated pyrethroids to benthic organisms ranged from 10.5±31.1 (bifenthrin) to 41.7±204 (cypermethrin), suggesting significant risk. The current study has provided evidence that pyrethroids are not only commonly detected in the aquatic environment, but also can cause toxic effects to benthic invertebrates, and calls for better development of accurate sediment quality criteria and effective ecological risk assessment methods for this emerging class of insecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pyrethroid resistance discovered in a major agricultural pest in southern Australia: the redlegged earth mite Halotydeus destructor (Acari: Penthaleidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umina, Paul A

    2007-12-01

    The redlegged earth mite (Halotydeus destructor Tucker) is an important pest of field crops and pastures. Control of this pest relies heavily on chemicals, with few genuine alternatives presently available. Pesticide responses of H. destructor from the field with reported chemical control failures were compared with mites from susceptible 'control' populations. Toxicology bioassays were conducted on adult mites across multiple generations. Very high levels of resistance to two synthetic pyrethroids, bifenthrin and alpha-cypermethrin, were detected in this species for the first time. For bifenthrin, LC(50) estimates showed a difference in resistance of greater than 240 000-fold. Resistance to alpha-cypermethrin was almost 60 000-fold. This resistance was shown to be heritable, persisting after several generations of culturing. There was no evidence that resistance to organophosphorus chemicals had evolved, which is likely to be a direct consequence of the history of chemical applications these mites have experienced. These results highlight the need for more judicious management decisions in order to control pest species in a sustainable manner. The implications of these findings in regard to the management and future research of the redlegged earth mite are discussed. Copyright (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Impacts of Dietary Phytochemicals in the Presence and Absence of Pesticides on Longevity of Honey Bees (Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Hsiu Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Because certain flavonols and phenolic acids are found in pollen and nectar of most angiosperms, they are routinely ingested by Apis mellifera, the western honey bee. The flavonol quercetin and the phenolic acid p-coumaric acid are known to upregulate detoxification enzymes in adult bees; their presence or absence in the diet may thus affect the toxicity of ingested pesticides. We conducted a series of longevity assays with one-day-old adult workers to test if dietary phytochemicals enhance longevity and pesticide tolerance. One-day-old bees were maintained on sugar syrup with or without casein (a phytochemical-free protein source in the presence or absence of quercetin and p-coumaric acid as well as in the presence or absence of two pyrethroid insecticides, bifenthrin and β-cyfluthrin. Dietary quercetin (hazard ratio, HR = 0.82, p-coumaric acid (HR = 0.91 and casein (HR = 0.74 were associated with extended lifespan and the two pyrethroid insecticides, 4 ppm bifenthrin (HR = 9.17 and 0.5 ppm β-cyfluthrin (HR = 1.34, reduced lifespan. Dietary quercetin enhanced tolerance of both pyrethroids; p-coumaric acid had a similar effect trend, although of reduced magnitude. Casein in the diet appears to eliminate the life-prolonging effect of p-coumaric acid in the absence of quercetin. Collectively, these assays demonstrate that dietary phytochemicals influence honey bee longevity and pesticide stress; substituting sugar syrups for honey or yeast/soy flour patties may thus have hitherto unrecognized impacts on adult bee health.

  5. Mechanism of Resistance Acquisition and Potential Associated Fitness Costs in Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Exposed to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkovich, Mark; Siegel, Joel P; Higbee, Bradley S; Berenbaum, May R

    2015-06-01

    The polyphagous navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive pest of nut crops, including almonds and pistachios, in California orchards. Management of this insect has typically been a combination of cultural controls and insecticide use, with the latter increasing substantially along with the value of these commodities. Possibly associated with increased insecticide use, resistance has been observed recently in navel orangeworm populations in Kern County, California. In studies characterizing a putatively pyrethroid-resistant strain (R347) of navel orangeworm, susceptibility to bifenthrin and β-cyfluthrin was compared with that of an established colony of susceptible navel orangeworm. Administration of piperonyl butoxide and S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate in first-instar feeding bioassays with the pyrethroids bifenthrin and β-cyfluthrin produced synergistic effects and demonstrated that cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and carboxylesterases contribute to resistance in this population. Resistance is therefore primarily metabolic and likely the result of overexpression of specific cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and carboxylesterase genes. Resistance was assessed by median lethal concentration (LC50) assays and maintained across nine generations in the laboratory. Life history trait comparisons between the resistant strain and susceptible strain revealed significantly lower pupal weights in resistant individuals reared on the same wheat bran-based artificial diet across six generations. Time to second instar was greater in the resistant strain than the susceptible strain, although overall development time was not significantly different between strains. Resistance was heritable and may have an associated fitness cost, which could influence the dispersal and expansion of resistant populations in nut-growing areas in California. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological

  6. Potential of contact insecticides to control Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a vector of laurel wilt disease in avocados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Daniel; Crane, Jonathan H; Peña, Jorge E

    2013-12-01

    Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is an invasive ambrosia beetle that vectors laurel wilt, a new disease that threatens avocado and other species in the Lauraceae Family. The lethal concentrations (LC50 & 90) of nine commercial insecticides to X. glabratus were determined by using a bolt-dip bioassay. Different formulations of bifenthrin, permethrin, fenpropathrin, z-cypermethrin + bifenthrin, 1-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam, malathion, chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and methomyl were tested. Four concentrations of each insecticide were tested (0.5, 0.1, 0.03, and 0.01 of the label rate) and with water as a control. Beetles were exposed to treated bolts and mortality registered 48 h later. After 2 wk, bolts were destructively sampled to determine the number of beetles that constructed galleries and were alive inside the wood. Probit analysis was used to determine the LC50 & 90. Six pesticides were applied directly to the trunk and limbs of avocado trees in a commercial grove. Limbs of treated trees were cut weekly after the application and exposed to X. glabratus to determine the number of beetles boring into the logs. The toxicity of pesticides to X. glabratus was greatly reduced 2 wk after application. Among the tested pesticides, malathion and z-cypermethrin + bifenthrin provided the best suppression of X. glabratus. Among the insecticides registered for use in avocado, fenpropathrin and malathion were the most effective in protecting trees from attack by X. glabratus. Other pesticides that are currently not registered for use in avocados could be useful for managing this ambrosia beetle.

  7. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms involving metabolic changes and insensitive target sites selected in anopheline vectors of malaria in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunaratne SHP Parakrama

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance and the underlying resistance mechanisms were studied in the major vector of malaria, Anopheles culicifacies, and the secondary vector, Anopheles subpictus in five districts (Anuradhapura, Kurunegala, Moneragala, Puttalam and Trincomalee of Sri Lanka. Eight other anophelines, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles jamesii, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles tessellatus, Anopheles vagus and Anopheles varuna from Anuradhapura district were also tested. Methods Adult females were exposed to the WHO discriminating dosages of DDT, malathion, fenitrothion, propoxur, λ-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and etofenprox. The presence of metabolic resistance by esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST and monooxygenase-based mechanisms, and the sensitivity of the acetylcholinesterase target site were assessed using synergists, and biochemical, and metabolic techniques. Results All the anopheline species had high DDT resistance. All An. culicifacies and An. subpictus populations were resistant to malathion, except An. culicifacies from Kurunegala, where there was no malathion carboxylesterase activity. Kurunegala and Puttalam populations of An. culicifacies were susceptible to fenitrothion. All the An. culicifacies populations were susceptible to carbamates. Both species were susceptible to the discriminating dosages of cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, but had different levels of resistance to other pyrethroids. Of the 8 other anophelines, only An. nigerrimus and An. peditaeniatus were resistant to all the insecticides tested, probably due to their high exposure to the insecticides used in agriculture. An. vagus showed some resistance to permethrin. Esterases, GSTs and monooxygenases were elevated in both An. culicifacies and An. subpictus. AChE was most sensitive to insecticides in Kurunegala and Trincomalee An. culicifacies

  8. Environmentally relevant pyrethroid mixtures: A study on the correlation of blood and brain concentrations of a mixture of pyrethroid insecticides to motor activity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael F; Ross, David G; Starr, James M; Scollon, Edward J; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Crofton, Kevin M; DeVito, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Human exposure to multiple pyrethroid insecticides may occur because of their broad use on crops and for residential pest control. To address the potential health risk from co-exposure to pyrethroids, it is important to understand their disposition and toxicity in target organs such as the brain, and surrogates such as the blood when administered as a mixture. The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between blood and brain concentrations of pyrethroids and neurobehavioral effects in the rat following an acute oral administration of the pyrethroids as a mixture. Male Long-Evans rats were administered a mixture of β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and cis- and trans-permethrin in corn oil at seven dose levels. The pyrethroid with the highest percentage in the dosing solution was trans-permethrin (31% of total mixture dose) while deltamethrin and esfenvalerate had the lowest percentage (3%). Motor activity of the rats was then monitored for 1h. At 3.5h post-dosing, the animals were euthanized and blood and brain were collected. These tissues were extracted and analyzed for parent pyrethroid using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were the predominate pyrethroids detected in blood and brain, respectively, at all dosage levels. The relationship of total pyrethroid concentration between blood and brain was linear (r=0.93). The pyrethroids with the lowest fraction in blood were trans-permethrin and β-cyfluthrin and in brain were deltamethrin and esfenvalerate. The relationship between motor activity of the treated rats and summed pyrethroid blood and brain concentration was described using a sigmoidal Emax model with the Effective Concentration50 being more sensitive for brain than blood. The data suggests summed pyrethroid rat blood concentration could be used as a surrogate for brain concentration as an aid to study the neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids administered as a mixture under the conditions

  9. The impact of pesticides use on surface water and groundwater: a case study in the Kadjebi District, Volta Region, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraj, S. I.

    2015-07-01

    The Kadjebi district is predominantly made up of farming communities, hence, the major economic activities in the area are the cultivation of cocoa, ginger, maize, vegetables. The extensive use of organochlorines, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroids have raised concerns about potential adverse effect on human health and the environment. This study aims at assessing the impact of pesticide use on surface water and groundwater in the Kadjebi District of the Volta Region of Ghana. Results of the study revealed that about 92.6% of farmers used one or more pesticides obtained from agro-chemical shops, Cocoa Marketing Board, cooperative societies and relatives in labelled and unlabeled containers. Of these numbers, 62% admitted not having access to services of the extension officers on the use and application of pesticides, hence, believe that, the more the chemical applied the faster and better the result. 18% of the farmers reported positively to the use of protective gears to cover the whole body during pesticide application, 12% cover only the face while 45% do not use any protective gear. On the disposal of the pesticide containers, 51% indicated that, they re-use the containers for food and water storage after thoroughly washing with soap and water. The data obtained also showed a high risk of pesticide poisoning and occupational exposure, about 68% of the respondents reported clinical symptoms of pesticide poisoning such as nausea, headache, blurred vision, eye irritation, dizziness, vomiting and skin irritation. About 51% of water samples analyzed showed positive detections of pesticide residues while all sediments samples showed positive detections of pesticides residues varying from one to five different types of pesticides residues. The common pesticides residues found in the samples were Deltamethrine, Cyfluthrin, Cypermethrin, Dieldrin, Fenvaerate, Lambda-cyhal, p,p’ DDT. Synthetic pyrethroids (72%) were the dominant residues detected. Deltamethrine

  10. Correlation of tissue concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin with neurotoxicity in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household products. Due to the phase-out oforganophosphate pesticides, the use of pyrethroids has increased. The potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacodynamic and pharmacokine...

  11. BLOOD AND BRAIN CONCENTRATIONS OF BIFENTHRIN CORRELATE WITH DECREASED MOTOR ACTIVITY INDEPENDENT OF TIME OF EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Due to the phase-out of organophosphate pesticides, the use of pyrethroids has increased. The potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacodynamic and pharmac...

  12. In vitro and in vivo experimental data for pyrethroid pharmacokinetic models: the case of bifenthrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic synthetic pesticides. Exposure to pyrethroids has increased due to declining use of other classes of pesticides. Our studies are focused on generating in vitro and in vivo data for the development of pharmacokinetic models for pyrethroids. Us...

  13. Extração em fase sólida (SPE e micro extração em fase sólida (SPME de piretróides em água Solid-phase extraction (SPE and solid-phase microextraction of pyrethroids in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Regina Barrionuevo

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The pyrethroids bifenthrin, permethrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin were extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE and solid phase microextraction (SPME. The analysis were performed on a gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD. Octadecil Silano-C18, Florisil and Silica stationary phases were studied for SPE. Better results were obtained for Florisil which gave recoveries from 80% to 108%. Pyrethroids extraction by SPME showed a linear response and a detection limit of 10 pg ml-1. Although the data showed that the two extraction methods were able to isolate the pesticide residues from water samples, the best results were obtained by using SPME which is more sensitive, faster, cheeper, being a more useful technique for the analysis of pyrethroids in drinking water.

  14. A case study on toxicological aspects of the pest and disease control in the production of the high-quality raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadło, Stanisław; Szpyrka, Ewa; Piechowicz, Bartosz; Grodzicki, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The field studies on the residue levels of the fungicides and insecticides used in commercial raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plantation have been performed. Starting on the first day of harvesting (on June 19), 20 laboratory samples of fruit, 10 laboratory samples of leaves and 4 samples of soil were analyzed and the residue levels were compared to the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) and Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADI). All analyses were carried out using extraction method and gas chromatography technique. Esfenwalerate (Sumi-alpha 050 EC) and beta-cyfluthrin (Bulldock 025 EC), the insecticides belonging to the group of synthetic pyrethroids, were not found in harvested ripe fruits, while cypermethrin residues (Cyperkill 25 EC) applied on May 24, 25 days later was still found on low levels in fruits (0.026 mg kg(-1)) and in leaves (2.58 mg kg(-1)). In turn, residues of chlorpyrifos (Dursban 480 EC), applied to the soil on May 15 against the cockchafers Melolontha melolontha and Otiorhynchus sp., were found at the level 0.004 mg kg(-1). The content of pesticides in ripe fruits depended mainly on the dose and on the time that has elapsed from the date of their application and were as follows: boscalid -0.950, pyrimethanil -0.917, pyraclostrobin -0.253 cypermethrin -0.026 and chlorpyrifos -0.004 mg kg(-1) while in leaves: boscalid -30.64, pyrimethanil -8.13, pyraclostrobin -15.82, cypermethrin -2.58 and chlorpyrifos -0.15 mg kg(-1). The highest average daily intake was in the case of boscalid, and in fruits and leaves reached the levels 0.205 and 6.63, in total 0.33% and 12.18% of ADI, respectively.

  15. Relative efficacy of some insecticides against the sucking insect pest complex of cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asif, M.U.; Muhammad, R.; Tofique, M.

    2016-01-01

    The comparative efficacy of some conventional and neonicotinoid insecticides for the management of sucking insect pests of cotton (whitefly, jassid and thrips) was determined. Six insecticides viz., Confidor 200 SL (imidacloprid) at the rate acre /sup -1/, Karate 1.5 EC (lambda cyhalothrin) at the rate 330 ml acre /sup -1/, Nockout 25 SP (nitenpyram) at the rate 100 gm acre /sup -1/, Polytrin-C 44 EC (profenofos+cypermethrin) at the rate 600 ml acre /sup -1/, Talstar 10 EC (bifenthrin) at the rate 250 ml acre /sup -1/ and Advantage 20 EC (carbosulfan) at the rate of 1000 ml acre /sup -1/ were sprayed twice in order to ascertain the reduction of the pests population on Sadori variety of cotton sown at experimental area of Nuclear Institute of Agriculture, Tandojam. All the tested insecticides caused significant reduction of whitefly, jassid and thrips at 24 hours, 72 hours and even 7 days after application. Imidacloprid followed by the nitenpyram proved to be most effective for bringing about a significant reduction in the populations of whitefly and thrips. Nitenpyram had the highest percentage reduction (73.80%) against jassid at 7th day after application but that was nonsignificantly different from imidacloprid(63.49%). Whereas, the conventional insecticides i.e. lambda cyhalothrin, profenofos+cypermethrin, bifenthrin and carbosulfan showed 57.93%, 52.38%, 47.61% and 42.06% reduction, respectively. Maximum extrapolated yield (2.99 tons ha /sup -1/) was also obtained in imidacloprid treated plots followed by nitenpyram (2.66 tons ha /sup -1/). Thus, these two insecticides were most effective for the sucking pests and in increasing seed cotton yield as compared to the conventional ones. (author)

  16. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Resistance in the Lady Beetle Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Confers Tolerance to Other Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J B; Rodrigues, A R S; Barros, E M; Santos, D S

    2015-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely recommended to control insect defoliators but lack efficacy against most aphid species. Thus, conserving aphid predators such as the lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) is important to pest management in crop ecosystems that require pyrethroid sprays. In a greenhouse, early fourth-instar larvae and 5-day-old adults from susceptible (S) and resistant (R) E. connexa populations were caged on lambda-cyhalothrin-treated cotton plants, after which survival and egg production (for those caged at adult stage) were assessed. In the laboratory, similar groups were subjected to dried residues and topical treatment with one of eight pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, permethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), the organophosphate methidathion, or water and wetting agent. After caging on treated cotton terminals, 66% of the R-population larvae survived to adulthood, compared with 2% of those from the S-population. At 12 d after caging at adult stage under the same conditions, 64% of the females from the R-population survived and laid eggs, compared with 100% mortality and no oviposition for the S-females. In trials involving dried insecticide residues, gain in survival based on the survival difference (percentage for R-population minus percentage for S-population) across all tested pyrethroids varied from 3 to 63% for larvae and from 3 to 70% for adults. In trials involving topical sprays of the tested pyrethroids, survival differences ranged from 36 to 96% for larvae and from 21 to 82% for adults. Fenpropathrin and bifenthrin were the least and most toxic, respectively. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Determining the Residual Cypermethrin, Permethrin, Indoxacarb and Mancozeb in Tomato Produced in Bushehr Province Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Maimanat Tobeh Khak; Abdolmohammad Khajehian; Mohammad Mehdi Khajheian; Masoomeh Esmaeili; Akram Ansarifar; Ahmad Ebrahimi; Kourosh Nakhaii

    2016-01-01

    Food is necessary for a healthy lifestyle, but it’s an important way of spreading many pathogens and toxic chemicals. The food contamination may happen during planting, harvesting, storing, processing or transporting. Hence, the food quality monitoring is necessary. Plants constitute the main source of food for human being. Fighting against pests and plant diseases in some cases, prevents product loss. It is obvious that the pest control is crucial for the future agriculture, industry and hyg...

  18. In vitro toxicity of selected pesticides on RTG-2 and RTL-W1 fish cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babin, M.M.; Tarazona, J.V.

    2005-01-01

    The rainbow trout fish cell lines RTG-2 and RTL-W1 were used to determine the cytotoxic effects of the pesticides bifenthrin, cypermethrin, cyhalothrin, λ-cyhalothrin, quinalphos and chlorpyrifos. Cytotoxicity was measured by EROD and β-Gal enzymatic activities, the neutral red (NR) uptake assay, and the FRAME KB protein (KBP) assay. The β-Gal activity was unaffected by the pesticide exposure. The EROD activity was induced by cyhalothrin and λ-cyhalothrin (RTG-2 and RTL-W1) and by bifenthrin (RTL-W1). Dose dependent inhibition responses were observed for EROD activity in cells exposed to quinalphos (RTL-W1) and chlorpyrifos (RTG-2 and RTL-W1). RTL-W1 offered a better response for EROD induction. The EC50 values on EROD endpoint were more sensitive than NR and KBP. The acute fish toxicity of chlorpyrifos and quinalphos depends highly on the species; the species sensitivity distributions cover several orders of magnitude and the values obtained for EROS were within the lowest part of the reported ranges. - In vitro cell cultures can provide sensitive indicators for pesticide effects on biota

  19. In vitro toxicity of selected pesticides on RTG-2 and RTL-W1 fish cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babin, M.M. [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of the Environment, INIA, Crta. de La Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: babin@inia.es; Tarazona, J.V. [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of the Environment, INIA, Crta. de La Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    The rainbow trout fish cell lines RTG-2 and RTL-W1 were used to determine the cytotoxic effects of the pesticides bifenthrin, cypermethrin, cyhalothrin, {lambda}-cyhalothrin, quinalphos and chlorpyrifos. Cytotoxicity was measured by EROD and {beta}-Gal enzymatic activities, the neutral red (NR) uptake assay, and the FRAME KB protein (KBP) assay. The {beta}-Gal activity was unaffected by the pesticide exposure. The EROD activity was induced by cyhalothrin and {lambda}-cyhalothrin (RTG-2 and RTL-W1) and by bifenthrin (RTL-W1). Dose dependent inhibition responses were observed for EROD activity in cells exposed to quinalphos (RTL-W1) and chlorpyrifos (RTG-2 and RTL-W1). RTL-W1 offered a better response for EROD induction. The EC50 values on EROD endpoint were more sensitive than NR and KBP. The acute fish toxicity of chlorpyrifos and quinalphos depends highly on the species; the species sensitivity distributions cover several orders of magnitude and the values obtained for EROS were within the lowest part of the reported ranges. - In vitro cell cultures can provide sensitive indicators for pesticide effects on biota.

  20. Screening of different insecticides against maize shoot fly atherigona soccata (Rond.) and maize borer. chilo partellus (swinh.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.A.; Rana, Z.A.; Haq, I.; Tariq, H.

    2010-01-01

    Field studies were carried out in the research area of the Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad to determine the most effective maize seed treatment against maize shoot fly Atherigona soccata (Rond.) and insecticide against maize borer Chilo partellus (Swinh.) Trials were conducted following RCBD and replicated three times during 2005-2006. Two seed treatments Confider (imidacloprid) 70 WS and pensidor 72% WP (5 and 7 mg/kg seed) along with Confider (imidaclorid) 200 SC at the rate 40 ml/acre in the trial against maize shoot fly whereas, flubendiamide 48%, emamection 1.9 EC, spinosad 240 EC. carbofuran 3 G, indoxacarb 150 SC, alphacypermethrine 20 EC, monomehypo 5 G, bifenthrin 10 EC, cartap 4G, cyhalothrine 2.5 EC, cypermethrin 10 EC at the rate 20 ml, 150 ml, 40 ml, 8 kg, 150 ml, 200 ml, 5 kg, 150 ml, 6 kg. 250 ml and 300 ml per acre against maize borer were treated keeping one plo ast untreated check. Treatments were repeated as borer infestation reached above 5% level. All the seed treatments showed significant control of maize shoot fly in spite of dose 5 or 7 mg/kg seed along with foliar spray of confider 200 SC. The insecticides viz. flubendiamide 48% SC. emamectin 1.9 EC, spinosad 240 EC and carbofuran 3 G. indoxacarb 150 SC. alpha cypermethrin 20 EC, not only responded highest yield 5765, 5294, 5289, 5215, 5168 and 5025 kg/ha respectively but also manage the maize borer below ETL. (author)

  1. Impact Of anthropogenic activities on the water quality of Songor Lagoon, Ada, Greater Accra Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackey, Justice

    2014-06-01

    waters. The hydrogen sulphide like smell of the sediment in the lagoon may be due to the levels of the sulphate levels (65.8 to 190mg/L). The concentration (in ranges, mg/L) of trace metals in water samples were: Cd (<0.001 to 0.09 mg/L); Pb (< 0.001 to 0.42 mg/L); Ni (<0.001 to 0.18 mg/L); Cr (<0.001 to 0.03 mg/L ); Mn (<0.001 to 0.14 mg/L). The concentration (in ranges, mg/Kg) of trace metals in sediment samples were: Cd (<0.001 to 0.44 mg/Kg); Pb (<0.001 to 3.83 mg/Kg); Ni (<0.001 to 1.60 mg/ Kg ); Cu (<0.001 to to 0.21 mg/ Kg ); Cr (<0.001 to 0.17 mg/Kg); Mn (<0.001 to 0.14 mg/L); Zn (<0.001 to 1.19 mg/Kg); Fe (134 to 1429 mg/Kg). The following elemental associations were obtained from Principal Component and Hierarchical Cluster Analyses (PC A and HCA): Mg-Mn-As-Pb, Cd-Ni and K. This could be linked to usage of agrochemicals by farmers and dumping of domestic waste. Cd and Ni occur as important anthropogenic markers in the lagoon. Enrichment Factor indicated high enrichment of the metals (especially Cd and Pb). Six (6) different types of organochlorine pesticide residues and metabolites (β -HCH, γ -HCH, σ-HCH, heptachlor, aldrin and β-endosulfan) were detected in the sediment (0.001-0.101 μg/g). 12 different types of organophosphorous [0.004 and 7.494 μg/g] (diazinon, fonofos, dimethoate, pirimiphos, chlorpyrifos, malathion, fenitrothion, parathion, chlorfenvinphos, profenofos, phorate, ethoprophos) were identified in the sediment. Six (6) synthetic pyrethroids residues and metabolites (cypermethrin, bifenthrin, permethrin, fenvalerate, deltametrin, cyfluthrin and alethrin) were detected in the sediment [0.001- 0.014 μg/g ]. The Principal Component Analysis, supported by Custer Analysis identified anthropogenic and natural/geogenic sources as responsible for controlling the variability of pollutants in surface water and sediment. (au)

  2. Evaluation of a New Spraying Machine for Barrier Treatment and Penetration of Bifenthrin on Vegetation Against Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Biology and Control, State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China. 4 Entomology...one at the University of Florida Veterinary Entomology Laboratory (UF- VEL). Leaf samples for both laboratories were collected together. All samples...their technical help. We thank the University of Florida’s veterinary entomology laboratory for providing adult mosquitoes to the study. This is a

  3. Efficacy of Selected Insecticide Sprays and Aerosols against the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the residual efficacy of four liquid sprays and four ready-to-use aerosols that are commonly used in the U.S. against a field-collected bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., strain with moderate resistance level to pyrethroids. The four liquid sprays were: Tandem (0.1% thiamethoxam, 0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin, Temprid SC (0.05% imidacloprid, 0.025% cyfluthrin, Transport GHP (0.05% acetamiprid, 0.06% bifenthrin, and Demand CS (0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin. The four aerosols were: Alpine (0.5% dinotefuran, Bedlam (0.4% sumithrin, 1.6% MGK 264, Bedlam Plus (0.4% sumithrin, 1% MGK 264, 0.05% imidacloprid, and Phantom (0.5% chlorfenapyr. Bed bugs were confined for 4 h to treated substrates (aged 24 h. Four substrates were tested: fabric, unpainted wood, painted wood, and vinyl. Bedlam, Demand CS, and Temprid SC resulted in ≤70% mortality on all tested substrates. Among the other five products, substrate type significantly affected their residual efficacy, except for Transport GHP, which caused ≥89.7% mortality regardless of the substrate. The effect of exposure time (5 min, 4 h, and 24 h on the efficacy of Transport GHP and Phantom aerosol also was evaluated. A 4 h continuous exposure to Phantom aerosol or Transport GHP residue caused similar mortality to 24 h exposure and higher mortality than 5 min exposure.

  4. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam, Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid, and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid. No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8–10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray.

  5. Tracking pyrethroid toxicity in surface water samples: Exposure dynamics and toxicity identification tools for laboratory tests with Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2018-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging as a result of their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the analytical methods detection limits (MDLs). Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod Hyalella azteca and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In the present study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and presented a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) cubitainers (Fisher Scientific) at 4 °C of 5 pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, and esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:462-472. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  6. Characterization of cell-free extracts from fenpropathrin-degrading strain Bacillus cereus ZH-3 and its potential for bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Wenwen; Han, Haitao; She, Changchun; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroid fenpropathrin has received increasing attention because of its environmental contamination and toxic effects on non-target organisms including human beings. Here we report the degradation characteristics of cell-free extracts from fenpropathrin-degrading strain Bacillus cereus ZH-3 and its potential for pyrethroid bioremediation in soils. 50mg·L(-1) of fenpropathrin was decreased to 20.6mg·L(-1) by the enzymatic extracts (869.4mg·L(-1)) within 30min. Kinetic constants Km and Vm were determined to be 1006.7nmol·L(-1) and 56.8nmol·min(-1), respectively. Degradation products were identified as 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde, α-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-benzeneacetonitrile and phenol by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition to degradation of fenpropathrin, the cell-free extracts could degrade other pyrethroids including beta-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin and cypermethrin. Additionally, the reaction conditions were optimized. In the sterile and non-sterile soils, 50mg·kg(-1) of fenpropathrin was reduced to 15.3 and 13.9mg·L(-1) in 1d, respectively. Sprayed 100 and 300mg·kg(-1) of fenpropathrin emulsifiable concentrate (EC), up to 84.6% and 92.1% of soil fenpropathrin were removed from soils within 7d, respectively. Taken together, our results depict the biodegradation characteristics of cell-free extracts from B. cereus ZH-3, highlight its promising potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils and also provide new insights into the utilization of degrading microbes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Chromatographical Analysis of Amino Acids in Sepia Mutant of Drosophila melanogaster under Stress of Cypermethrin and Alphamethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Rana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Insects are invertebrates that are taxonomically referred to as the class Insecta. They are the most numerous and most widespread terrestrial taxon within the phylum Arthropoda, and indeed the most diverse group of animals on the earth, with around 925,000 species described—more than all other animal groups combined. Insects may be found in nearly all environments on the planet, although only a small number of species have adapted to life in the oceans where crustaceans tend to predominate instead. HPTLC is a method commonly applied for the identification, assay and the testing for purity, stability, dissolution or content uniformity of raw materials (herbal and animal extracts, fermentation mixtures, drugs and excipients and formulated products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutrients. These flexible and cost-effective techniques present the advantage of the simultaneous processing of standards and samples with versatile detection possibilities, including a great variety of post-chromatographic derivatization reagents.

  8. Degradation of Organophosphorus and Pyrethroid Insecticides in Beverages: Implications for Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A. Radford

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since urinary insecticide metabolites are commonly used as biomarkers of exposure, it is important that we quantify whether insecticides degrade in food and beverages in order to better perform risk assessment. This study was designed to quantify degradation of organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides in beverages. Purified water, white grape juice, orange juice, and red wine were fortified with 500 ng/mL diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, and deltamethrin, and aliquots were extracted several times over a 15-day storage period at 2.5 °C. Overall, statistically significant loss of at least one insecticide was observed in each matrix, and at least five out of seven insecticides demonstrated a statistically significant loss in all matrices except orange juice. An investigation of an alternative mechanism of insecticide loss—adsorption onto the glass surface of the storage jars—was carried out, which indicated that this mechanism of loss is insignificant. Results of this work suggest that insecticides degrade in these beverages, and this degradation may lead to pre-existing insecticide degradates in the beverages, suggesting that caution should be exercised when using urinary insecticide metabolites to assess exposure and risk.

  9. Clean-up of aqueous acetone vegetable extracts by solid-matrix partition for pyrethroid residue determination by gas chromatography-electron-capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muccio, A; Barbini, D A; Generali, T; Pelosi, P; Ausili, A; Vergori, F; Camoni, I

    1997-03-21

    Disposable, ready-to-use cartridges filled with macroporous diatomaceous material are used to carry out a partition clean-up that, in a single step, is capable of transferring pesticide residues from aqueous acetone extracts into light petroleum-dichloromethane (75:25, v/v). This procedure takes the place of some functions (such as separatory-funnel partition, drying over anhydrous sodium sulphate and partial adsorption clean-up) usually performed by separate steps in classical schemes. Fourteen pyrethroid pesticides, including tefluthrin, tetramethrin, cyphenothrin, cyfluthrin, flucythrinate, tau-fluvalinate, deltamethrin, bioallethrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, esfenvalerate and tralomethrin were determined using the described procedure with satisfactory recoveries for most of them, at spiking levels ranging from 0.08 to 0.82 mg/kg for the different compounds. Crops subjected to the described procedure included strawberry, apple, and orange gave extracts containing a mass of co-extractives that was between 5 and 30 mg. Compared with classical schemes, the described procedure is simple, less labour intensive, allows parallel handling of several extracts and does not require the preparation and maintenance of equipment. Troublesome emulsions such as those frequently observed in separation funnel partitioning do not occur.

  10. Simultaneous presence of DDT and pyrethroid residues in human breast milk from a malaria endemic area in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouwman, H. [School for Environmental Sciences and Development, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)]. E-mail: drkhb@puk.ac.za; Sereda, B. [Agricultural Research Council, Plant Protection Research Institute, Private Bag X134 Queenswood, Pretoria 0121 (South Africa); Meinhardt, H.M. [South African Bureau of Standards, Testing and Conformity Services (Pty) Ltd, Private Bag X191, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2006-12-15

    DDT and pyrethroids were determined in 152 breast-milk samples from three towns in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, one of which had no need for DDT for malaria control. All compounds were found present in breast milk. Primiparae from one town had the highest mean {sigma}DDT whole milk levels (238.23 {mu}g/l), and multiparae from the same town had the highest means for permethrin (14.51 {mu}g/l), cyfluthrin (41.74 {mu}g/l), cypermethrin (4.24 {mu}g/l), deltamethrin (8.39 {mu}g/l), and {sigma}pyrethroid (31.5 {mu}g/l), most likely derived from agriculture. The ADI for DDT was only exceeded by infants from one town, but the ADI for pyrethroids was not exceeded. Since the ADI for DDT was recently reduced from 20 to 10 {mu}g/kg/bw, we suggest that this aspect be treated with concern. We therefore raise a concern based on toxicant interactions, due to the presence of four different pyrethroids and DDT. Breastfeeding however, remains safe under prevailing conditions. - The simultaneous presence of DDT and pyrethroid residues in breast milk raises the question of infant exposure and safety.

  11. Pesticides in persimmons, jujubes and soil from China: Residue levels, risk assessment and relationship between fruits and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Li, Shiliang; Ni, Zhanglin; Qu, Minghua; Zhong, Donglian; Ye, Caifen; Tang, Fubin

    2016-01-15

    Extreme and uncontrolled usage of pesticides produces a number of problems for vegetation and human health. In this study, the existence of organophosphates (OPs), organochlorines (OCs), pyrethroids (PYs) and fungicides (FUs) were investigated in persimmons/jujubes and their planted soils, which were collected from China. One OP (dimethoate), three OCs (DDT, quintozene and aldrin), six PYs (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin) and two FUs (triadimefon and buprofezin) were found in 36.4% of persimmons and 70.8% of jujubes, with concentrations from 1.0 μg/kg to 2945.0 μg/kg. The most frequently detected pesticides in the two fruits were fenpropathrin in persimmons and cypermethrin in jujubes, with the detection frequencies of 30.0% and 22.7%, respectively. The residues of 4.5% (persimmon) and 25.0% (jujube) of samples were higher than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of China. Compared with the fruits, more types of pesticides and higher residues were observed in their planted soils. The most frequently detected pesticides were HCH in persimmon soil and DDT in jujube soil, with the detection frequencies of 10.9% and 12.7%, respectively. For the tested samples, 39.1% of fruit samples and 63.0% of soil samples with multiple residues (containing more than two pesticides) were noted, even up to 8 residues in fruits and 14 residues in soils. Except for cyhalothrin, the other short-term risks for the tested pesticides in the fruits were below 10%, and the highest long-term risk was 14.13% for aldrin and dieldrin. There was no significant health risk for consumers via consumption of the two fruits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Compatibility between the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and insecticides used in coffee plantations Compatibilidade entre o fungo entomopatogênico Beauveria bassiana e inseticidas usados na cultura do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Natali de Oliveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial control in integrated pest management (IPM programs of coffee plantations is an important factor for the reduction of pest population densities. The use of selective pesticides can be associated with entomopathogens, increasing the efficiency of the control and reducing the use of required insecticides. The in vitro fungitoxic effect of insecticide formulations of Thiamethoxam, Cyfluthrin, Deltamethrin, Alpha-Cypermethrin, Triazophos, Chlorpyrifos, Fenpropathrin and Endosulfan and Beauveria bassiana (CG 425 strain was evaluated at three concentrations (FR = average field recommendation; 0.5 ´ FR and 2 ´ FR. Effects of these products on conidia germination, vegetative growth and sporulation were compared. Only five insecticides, at the FR concentration, promoted conidia viability higher than 60%. Viability should be considered the most important factor to be evaluated since it is the first step of the infection process. The insecticide formulations of Alpha-Cypermethrin, Thiamethoxam and Cyfluthrin caused the lower inhibition level on conidia germination at the two lower concentrations, with no difference in relation to the control. With respect to vegetative growth analysis, Thiamethoxam at the two lower concentrations was not found to cause radial growth inhibition. Thiamethoxam caused the smallest inhibition level with regard to conidia production. The use of Alpha-Cypermethrin and Thiamethoxam formulations in coffee IPM programs for a B. bassiana inoculum conservation strategy are recommended, since these products were compatible with the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (CG 425, an important natural control agent of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei.Em programas de Manejo integrado de pragas (MIP deve-se considerar o controle microbiano como um importante fator de redução da densidade populacional de pragas. A utilização de produtos seletivos quando associados a patógenos, pode aumentar a eficiência de

  13. Multiresidue levels of pesticides in selected fruits in Ghana; a preliminary study in the Yilo and Lower Manya Krobo Districts of the Eastern Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokroko, W.

    2011-01-01

    Locally produced fruits (mango, pineapple and banana) were sampled and purchased from farms and markets with the Yilo and Lower Manya Krobo districts and analyzed for pesticide residues by gas chromatography equipped with an Electron Capture Detector (GC-ECD). In all, 80 samples made up of 40 mango samples and 20 samples each of pineapples and bananas were extracted and analyzed for mainly organochlorine residues (γ-HCH, δ-HCH, aldrin, dieldein, heptachlor, γ-chlordane, endosulfan s, p, p'-DDE etc.) and synthetic pyrethroid residues (allethrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, etc.). Analysis indicates that about 88% of the mangoes sampled from the farms contained one or more of these pesticide residues. 75% and 65% of the pineapples and bananas respectively from farms and markets had one or more of the analyzed pesticide residues. The data revealed that about 6.2% of the fruit samples analyzed contained organochlorine pesticide residues of γ-HCH (0.013mg/kg and 0.038mg/kg respectively in mangoes and pineapples); δ-HCH [0.014mg/kg (mango) and 0.024mg/kg (pineapple)]; methoxychlor [0.027 mg/kg (mango) and 0.048mg/kg (pineapple)]. Synthetic pyrethoid residues of cyfluthrin [0.078mg/kg (mango) and 0.059 mg/kg (pineapple) and fenvalerate [0.025 mg/kg and 0.028 mg/kg respectively for mango and pineapple] were also found above their respective maximum residue limits (Table 4.8) whereas 78.2% of detected pesticide residues were below the MRLs. Nonetheless, the continuous consumption of these fruits with even the modest pesticide levels can result in accumulation that could result in deadly chronic effects. In assessing the consumers' perception of pesticide residues in fruits, about 69% of the respondents were aware of pesticide residues in fruits and the corresponding adverse effect on human health. Some have experienced pesticide poising after fruit consumption. Thus many wish pesticide usage in fruit and crop cultivation in general is curbed or

  14. Design of a compressed air modulator to be used in comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography and its application in the determination of pesticide residues in grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; Vreuls, René J J; de Kok, André; Roehrs, Rafael; Martel, Samile; Friggi, Caroline A; Zanella, Renato

    2009-04-10

    In this study, a new modulator that is simple, robust and presents low operation costs, was developed. This modulator uses compressed air to cool two small portions in the first centimeters of the second chromatographic column of a comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) system. The results show a variation in the peak area less than 3 and 5% to alkanes and pesticides, respectively. The standard deviations for the retention times in the first and second dimension are around 0.05 min and 0.05s for all the compounds. The system was optimized with n-alkanes. The GCxGC system proposed was applied in the determination of pyrethroid pesticides (bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenvalerate, esfenvalerate, cis- and trans-permethrin) in grape samples. Samples were extracted by the mini-Luke modified method and pesticides were quantified by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography with micro electron-capture detection (microECD). The values of method limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.01-0.02 mg kg(-1) for all studied pyrethroid and the values of recovery were between 94.3 and 115.2%, with good precision (RSDcompressed air has the potential for application in the analysis of a wider range of pesticide residues in other commodities since it provides low values of LOQ with acceptable accuracy and precision.

  15. Polymer-coated magnetic nanospheres for preconcentration of organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides prior to their determination by gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Genggeng; He, Zeying; Liu, Xueke; Liu, Chang; Zhan, Jing; Liu, Donghui; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic polymer nanospheres were prepared and used as adsorbents for the extraction of organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides from water samples. The adsorbents were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization of N-vinylimidazole and divinylbenzene and simultaneous encapsulation of oleic acid-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Following desorption with ethyl acetate, the target analytes β-hexachlorocyclohexane, δ-hexachlorocyclohexane, p,p’-DDE, heptachlor, trans-chlordan, cis-chlordan, bifenthrin, β-cypermethrin, δ-methrin, λ-cyhalothrin and esfenvalerate were determined by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Desorption conditions, extraction times and sample volume were screened by Plackett-Burman design and optimized by Box-Behnken design. Under the optimum conditions, the organochlorines can be quantified in the 20 to 400 ng L −1 concentration range, and the pyrethroids in the 400 to 4000 ng L −1 concentration range. The recoveries of organochlorines and pyrethroids from spiked real water samples are between 77.6 and 97.3 %, with relative standard deviations between 0.9 and 10.0 %. The method for magnetic solid phase extraction described here is fast, simple and friendly to the environment. (author)

  16. Susceptibility of geographically isolated populations of the Tomato red spider mite (Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard to commonly used acaricides on tomato crops in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Toroitich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Farmers in Kenya continue to raise concerns of difficulty in managing Tetranychus evansi, the most widespread pest species of tomato applying the most commonly used acaricides. This invasive pest species is not only found in Kenya, but in Eastern and Southern Africa, as well as parts of Europe and Asia. In the current study, populations of T. evansi were collected from farms in the four major tomato-growing areas of Kenya (Loitoktok, Kibwezi, Athi-River and Subukia and their susceptibility compared to a laboratory culture (ICIPE that had been maintained for three years without exposure to acaricides. Susceptibility of T. evansi eggs and adults (contact and residual to Brigade (bifenthrin, Dimethoate (dimethoate, Karate (lambdacyhalothrin, Kelthane (dicofol, Omite (propargite and Polytrin (profenofos+ cypermethrin was tested in the laboratory using respective manufacturer’s recommended concentrations. Dimethoate resulted in variable ovicidal mortality while Kelthane, Brigade, Karate, Omite and Polytrin had high mortality across all populations. Similarly, adult contact and residual mortality was lower than that of the other chemicals when exposed to Dimethoate regardless of the location. Furthermore, it also had no residual effect on the mites from ICIPE and Kibwezi. On the other hand, Kelthane was most lethal against the mites from all locations followed by Brigade and Polytrin in that order. Omite caused significantly lower mortality on mites from Subukia while Karate produced variable effects on mites from Kibwezi, Loitoktok and Subukia. The implications of these findings are further discussed.

  17. Removal of six pesticide residues in cowpea with alkaline electrolysed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongtao; Song, Le; An, Quanshun; Pan, Canping

    2017-06-01

    Reduction of six pesticide residues (isoprocarb, chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin, beta-cypermethrin, difenoconazole and azoxystrobin) in cowpea by alkaline electrolysed water (AlEW) solutions with different pH was investigated. The commonly used washing treatments in household processing were used for comparison. The residue magnitudes were determined by gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Results showed that the removal effect of AlEW solution on the six pesticides was superior to tap water, 5% sodium chloride, 5% sodium carbonate and 5% acetic acid solution. AlEW with pH 12.2 had more potential to eliminate the six pesticides in cowpeas. Moreover, the reduction of pesticide residues gradually increased with the increase of washing time. This study demonstrated that AlEW solution with pH of 12.2 could be used to reduce pesticide residues on fresh cowpea samples. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Toxicity of insecticides to the sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and its natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Leandro; Crespo, André L B; Galvan, Tederson L; Pereira, Eliseu J G; Picanço, Marcelo C; Silva, Gerson A; Chediak, Mateus

    2007-07-01

    Efficient chemical control is achieved when insecticides are active against insect pests and safe to natural enemies. In this study, the toxicity of 17 insecticides to the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and the selectivity of seven insecticides to natural enemies of this insect pest were evaluated. To determine the insecticide toxicity, B. tabaci adults were exposed to abamectin, acephate, acetamiprid, cartap, imidacloprid, malathion, methamidophos, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenitrothion, fenpropathrin, fenthion, phenthoate, permethrin and trichlorphon at 50 and 100% of the field rate (FR), and to water (untreated control). To determine the insecticide selectivity, adults of Encarsia sp., Acanthinus sp., Discodon sp. and Lasiochilus sp. were exposed to abamectin, acephate, acetamiprid, cartap, imidacloprid, malathion and methamidophos at 50 and 100% FR, and to water. Groups of each insect species were exposed to kale leaves preimmersed in each treatment under laboratory conditions. Mortality of exposed individuals was recorded 24 h after treatment. Cartap and imidacloprid at 50 and 100% FR and abamectin and acetamiprid at 100% FR showed insecticidal activity to B. tabaci adults. Abamectin at 50 and 100% FR was the least insecticidal compound to the natural enemies Acanthinus sp., Discodon sp. and Lasiochilus sp. The present results suggest that abamectin at 100% FR may decrease B. tabaci field populations but can still be harmless to predators. Implications of these results within an integrated pest management context are discussed. Copyright (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Salinity impacts on water solubility and n-octanol/water partition coefficients of selected pesticides and oil constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranjampour, Parichehr; Vebrosky, Emily N; Armbrust, Kevin L

    2017-09-01

    Salinity has been reported to influence the water solubility of organic chemicals entering marine ecosystems. However, limited data are available on salinity impacts for chemicals potentially entering seawater. Impacts on water solubility would correspondingly impact chemical sorption as well as overall bioavailability and exposure estimates used in the regulatory assessment. The pesticides atrazine, fipronil, bifenthrin, and cypermethrin, as well as the crude oil constituent dibenzothiophene together with 3 of its alkyl derivatives, all have different polarities and were selected as model compounds to demonstrate the impact of salinity on their solubility and partitioning behavior. The n-octanol/water partition coefficient (K OW ) was measured in both distilled-deionized water and artificial seawater (3.2%). All compounds had diminished solubility and increased K OW values in artificial seawater compared with distilled-deionized water. A linear correlation curve estimated salinity may increase the log K OW value by 2.6%/1 log unit increase in distilled water (R 2  = 0.97). Salinity appears to generally decrease the water solubility and increase the partitioning potential. Environmental fate estimates based on these parameters indicate elevated chemical sorption to sediment, overall bioavailability, and toxicity in artificial seawater. These dramatic differences suggest that salinity should be taken into account when exposure estimates are made for marine organisms. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2274-2280. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  20. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: Implications for a regional risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J.; You, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air–water flux, including air–water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air–water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. - Highlights: • Transport fluxes of chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids were assessed in Guangzhou, China. • Sediment acted as a sink for chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids. • Air-to-water transport decreased the exposure risk of atmospheric chlorpyrifos. • Dynamic transport might increase the risk of pyrethroids in air and sediment. • Flux-based pesticide concentrations provide a way to estimate sediment toxicity. - Regional risk assessment could be improved by integrating dynamic flux information derived from inter-compartmental models

  1. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: implications for a regional risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air-water flux, including air-water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air-water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pesticides in shallow groundwater of Bahawalnagar, Muzafargarh, D.G. Khan and Rajan Pur districts of Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Afzal, Shahzad; Hussain, Ishtiaq

    2004-06-01

    In Pakistan there is little data on environmental contamination of rural water sources by pesticides. This study evaluated pesticide contamination of groundwater in four intensive cotton growing districts. Water samples were collected from 37 rural open wells in the areas of Bahwalnagar, Muzafargarh, D.G. Khan and Rajan Pur districts of Punjab and analysed for eight pesticides which are mostly used. Information on types of pesticide used and distance to nearest pesticide mixing area and application areas was obtained for each site. From the eight pesticides analysed, six pesticides were detected in the water samples. Only cypermethrin and cabosulfan were not detected. The percentage of detection of bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, carbofuran, endosulfan, methyl parathion and monocrotophos was, respectively 13.5%, 5.4%, 59.4%, 8%, 5.4% and 35.1% in July; 16.2%, 13.55%, 43.2%, 8%, N.D. (not detected) and 24.3% in October. Maximum contamination levels (MCLs) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water were not exceeded. The study has shown the need for monitoring pesticide contamination in rural water resources, and the development of drinking water quality standards for specific pesticides in Pakistan. The conclusions and recommendations will be disseminated to senior decision makers in central and local governments, extension agents and farmers.

  3. Susceptibility of natural enemies of pests of agriculture to commonly applied insecticides in Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante, M.; Sabillon, A.; Velasquez, C.; Ordonez, J.; Baquedano, F.

    1999-01-01

    Insecticides are commonly used by Honduran farmers to control pest insects in agricultural crops such as corn, melons and tomatoes. However, the insecticides have the potential for toxicity to the natural enemies of the pest insects also. Therefore, efforts are being made to identify insecticides which, when used within the Inegerated Pest Management (IPM) programme, are selectively more toxic to the pest insects than their natural enemies. A number of selected chemical insecticides and a biological insecticide (NPV) were tested in three different tests to determine toxicity to two beneficial insects: Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) and Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). All insecticides were toxic to T. remus which suffered high mortality. There was no significant difference in mortality of the insect due to the method of exposure to the insecticides. There were some differences in the toxicity of the insecticides to C. carnea, and abamectin, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, diafenthiuron, imidacloprid and fenpropathrin were relatively less toxic and could be used in IPM for the control of pest insects. (author)

  4. Identifying the cause of sediment toxicity in agricultural sediments: the role of pyrethroids and nine seldom-measured hydrophobic pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Donald P; Ding, Yuping; Zhang, Minghua; Lydy, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Few currently used agricultural pesticides are routinely monitored for in the environment. Even if concentrations are known, sediment LC(50) values are often lacking for common sediment toxicity testing species. To help fill this data gap, sediments in California's Central Valley were tested for nine hydrophobic pesticides seldom analyzed: abamectin, diazinon, dicofol, fenpropathrin, indoxacarb, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin. Most were detected, but rarely at concentrations acutely toxic to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus dilutus. Only abamectin, fenpropathrin, and methyl parathion were found at concentrations of potential concern, and only in one or two samples. One-quarter of over 100 samples from agriculture-affected waterways exhibited toxicity, and in three-fourths of the toxic samples, pyrethroids exceeded concentrations expected to cause toxicity. The pyrethroid Bi-fen-thrin in particular, as well as lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, esfenvalerate, permethrin, and the organophosphate chlorpyrifos, were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity, rather than the more novel analytes, despite the fact that much of the sampling targeted areas of greatest use of the novel pesticides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Toxicity of Fresh and Aged Residues of Pesticides to the Parasitoid Tamarixia radiata and to the HLB-Bacteria Vector Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloti, V H; Alves, G R; Moral, R A; Demétrio, C G B; Yamamoto, P T

    2018-06-01

    One method for controlling the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the vector of the putative causal agent of Huanglongbing, uses the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston). However, the general intensive use of insecticides has reduced the numbers of this parasitoid. This study evaluated the effect of the residual action of 24 insecticides on T. radiata and also determined the differential toxicity of insecticides to D. citri and T. radiata, using three bioassays. In the first, when adults of the parasitoid were exposed to residues of the 24 insecticides, ten were considered short-life (class 1), six slightly persistent (class 2), five moderately persistent (class 3), and three insecticides were considered persistent (class 4), under the IOBC/WPRS classification system. The second bioassay evaluated the sublethal concentrations of the persistent insecticides (formetanate, dimethoate, spinosad). Increasing the concentrations of the insecticides increased the number that were classified as persistent. In the third bioassay, evaluation of the differential toxicity of eight insecticides to the ACP and the parasitoid showed that chlorpyrifos and bifenthrin were more harmful to T. radiata. Therefore, these two insecticides are not recommended for application at the time of parasitoid release. Cypermethrin, imidacloprid, and dimethoate caused higher mortality of D. citri and are most often recommended in IPM programs. The choice of an insecticide for the control of citrus pests must be made with care, aiming to preserve the natural enemies in the ecosystem, and thereby contribute to the success of biological control.

  6. Determination of five pyrethroids in tea drinks by dispersive solid phase extraction with polyaniline-coated magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Sun, Ying; Gao, Yan; Xu, Bo; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2014-02-01

    The polyaniline-coated magnetic particles with bowl-shaped morphology (Fe3O4/C/PANI microbowls) were successfully prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared microbowls were used as the magnetic adsorbent in dispersive solid phase extraction of five pyrethroids, including cyhalothrin, beta-cypermethrin, esfenvalerate, permethrin and bifenthrin in plain tea drinks. The effects of experiment factors, including amount of Fe3O4/C/PANI microbowls, pH value, ultrasound extraction time and desorption conditions, were investigated. The extraction recoveries obtained with 8 mg of magnetic microbowls were satisfactory, and the microbowls can be reused after easy washing. Thus, a simple, selective and effective method for the determination of the pyrethroids was established successfully. The results showed that the method had good linearity (r=0.9992-0.9998), and the limits of detections (LODs) were from 0.025 to 0.032 ng mL(-1). The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 2.4-6.1% and 3.5-8.8%, respectively. Recoveries obtained by analyzing the real tea drinks were in the range of 72.1-118.4%. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Differential expression of glutathione s-transferase enzyme in different life stages of various insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi: a malaria vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanil, D; Shetty, V; Shetty, N J

    2014-06-01

    Interest in insect glutathione s-transferases (GSTs) has primarily focused on their role in insecticide resistance. These play an important role in biotransformation and detoxification of many different xenobiotic and endogenous substances including insecticides. The GST activity among 10 laboratory selected insecticide resistant and susceptible/control strains of Anopheles stephensi was compared using the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). The difference in the GST activities of different life stages of diverse insecticide resistant strains was compared and presented. About 100 larvae, pupae, adult males, adult females and eggs (100 μg in total weight) were collected and used for the experiment. The extracts were prepared from each of the insecticide-resistant strains and control. Protein contents of the enzyme homogenate and GST activities were determined. Deltamethrin and cyfluthrin-resistant strains of An. stephensi showed significantly higher GST activity. Larvae and pupae of DDT-resistant strain showed peak GST activity followed by the propoxur-resistant strain. On contrary, the GST activity was found in reduced quantity in alphamethrin, bifenthrin, carbofuran and chloropyrifos resistant strains. Adults of either sexes showed higher GST activity in mosquito strain resistant to organophosphate group of insecticides namely, temephos and chloropyrifos. The GST activity was closely associated with almost all of the insecticides used in the study, strengthening the fact that one of the mechanisms associated with resistance includes an increase of GST activity. This comparative data on GST activity in An. stephensi can be useful database to identify possible underlying mechanisms governing insecticide-resistance by GSTs.

  8. Effectiveness of bifenthrin (Onyx) and carbaryl (Sevin SL) for protecting individual, high-value conifers from bark beetle attack (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Kurt K. Allen; Robert R. Borys; John Christopherson; Christopher P. Dabney; Thomas J. Eager; Kenneth E. Gibson; Elizabeth G. Hebertson; Daniel F. Long; A. Steven Munson; Patrick J. Shea; Sheri L. Smith; Michael I. Haverty

    2006-01-01

    High-value trees, such as those located in residential, recreational, or administrative sites, are particularly susceptible to bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attack as a result of increased amounts of stress associated with drought, soil compaction, mechanical injury, or vandalism. Tree losses in these unique environments generally have a...

  9. Longevity and efficacy of bifenthrin treatment on desert-pattern U.S. military camouflage netting against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personnel deployed in support of US military operations will benefit from additions to the current Department of Defense pest management system. A recent study showed that residual insecticide treatment of woodland pattern US military camouflage netting was long lasting and effective at reducing mos...

  10. Pesticides in house dust from urban and farmworker households in California: an observational measurement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKone Thomas E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies report that residential use of pesticides in low-income homes is common because of poor housing conditions and pest infestations; however, exposure data on contemporary-use pesticides in low-income households is limited. We conducted a study in low-income homes from urban and agricultural communities to: characterize and compare house dust levels of agricultural and residential-use pesticides; evaluate the correlation of pesticide concentrations in samples collected several days apart; examine whether concentrations of pesticides phased-out for residential uses, but still used in agriculture (i.e., chlorpyrifos and diazinon have declined in homes in the agricultural community; and estimate resident children's pesticide exposures via inadvertent dust ingestion. Methods In 2006, we collected up to two dust samples 5-8 days apart from each of 13 urban homes in Oakland, California and 15 farmworker homes in Salinas, California, an agricultural community (54 samples total. We measured 22 insecticides including organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, diazinon-oxon, malathion, methidathion, methyl parathion, phorate, and tetrachlorvinphos and pyrethroids (allethrin-two isomers, bifenthrin, cypermethrin-four isomers, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, imiprothrin, permethrin-two isomers, prallethrin, and sumithrin, one phthalate herbicide (chlorthal-dimethyl, one dicarboximide fungicide (iprodione, and one pesticide synergist (piperonyl butoxide. Results More than half of the households reported applying pesticides indoors. Analytes frequently detected in both locations included chlorpyrifos, diazinon, permethrin, allethrin, cypermethrin, and piperonyl butoxide; no differences in concentrations or loadings were observed between locations for these analytes. Chlorthal-dimethyl was detected solely in farmworker homes, suggesting contamination due to regional agricultural use. Concentrations in samples collected 5-8 days apart in

  11. Characterization of a Pyrethroid-Degrading Pseudomonas fulva Strain P31 and Biochemical Degradation Pathway of D-Phenothrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available D-phenothrin is one of the most popular pyrethroid insecticides for its broad spectrum and high insecticidal activity. However, continuous use of D-phenothrin has resulted in serious environmental contamination and raised public concern about its impact on human health. Biodegradation of D-phenothrin has never been investigated and its metabolic behaviors remain unknown. Here, a novel bacterial strain P31 was isolated from active sludge, which completely degraded (100% D-phenothrin at 50 mg⋅L-1 in 72 h. Based on the morphology, 16S rRNA gene and Biolog tests, the strain was identified as Pseudomonas fulva. Biodegradation conditions were optimized as 29.5°C and pH 7.3 by utilizing response surface methodology. Strain P31 depicted high tolerance and strong D-phenothrin degradation ability through hydrolysis pathway. Strain P31 degraded D-phenothrin at inhibition constant (Ki of 482.1673 mg⋅L-1 and maximum specific degradation constant (qmax of 0.0455 h-1 whereas critical inhibitor concentration remained as 41.1189 mg⋅L-1. The 3-Phenoxybenzaldehyde and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic butyl dacyl ester were identified as the major intermediate metabolites of D-phenothrin degradation pathway through high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioaugmentation of D-phenothrin-contaminated soils with strain P31 dramatically enhanced its degradation, and over 75% of D-phenothrin was removed from soils within 10 days. Moreover, the strain illustrated a remarkable capacity to degrade other synthetic pyrethroids, including permethrin, cyhalothrin, β-cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, and bifenthrin, exhibiting great potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated environment.

  12. Kinetics and Novel Degradation Pathway of Permethrin in Acinetobacter baumannii ZH-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Persistent use of permethrin has resulted in its ubiquitous presence as a contaminant in surface streams and soils, yet little is known about the kinetics and metabolic behaviors of this pesticide. In this study, a novel bacterial strain Acinetobacter baumannii ZH-14 utilizing permethrin via partial hydrolysis pathways was isolated from sewage sludge. Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design of cultural conditions was used for optimization resulting in 100% degradation of permethrin (50 mg·L−1 within 72 h. Strain ZH-14 degraded permethrin up to a concentration of 800 mg·L−1. Biodegradation kinetics analysis indicated that permethrin degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate, half-saturation constant, and inhibition constant of 0.0454 h−1, 4.7912 mg·L−1, and 367.2165 mg·L−1, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 3-phenoxybenzenemethanol and 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde as the major intermediate metabolites of the permethrin degradation pathway. Bioaugmentation of permethrin-contaminated soils with strain ZH-14 significantly enhanced degradation, and over 85% of permethrin was degraded within 9 days with the degradation process following the first-order kinetic model. In addition to degradation of permethrin, strain ZH-14 was capable of degrading a large range of synthetic pyrethroids such as deltamethrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, and beta-cypermethrin which are also widely used pesticides with environmental contamination problems, suggesting the promising potentials of A. baumannii ZH-14 in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated terrestrial and aquatic environments.

  13. Residue levels and risk assessment of pesticides in nuts of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Shen, Danyu; Li, Shiliang; Ni, Zhanglin; Ding, Ming; Ye, Caifen; Tang, Fubin

    2016-02-01

    The pesticide residue levels of three nuts (chestnut, walnut, pinenut) collected from seven main producing areas of China were investigated. Twenty-nine pesticides, including organophosphates (OPs), organochlorines (OCs), pyrethroids (PYs) and two fungicides (triadimefon and buprofezin) were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). Four OPs (acephate, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos and parathion-methyl) were found in 11.4% samples, with the concentrations of 19.0 µg kg(-1) to 74.0 µg kg(-1). Six OCs (DDT, HCH, endosulfan, quintozene, aldrin and dieldrin) were found in 18.2% samples, with the concentrations of 2.0 µg kg(-1) to 65.7 µg kg(-1). Among OCs, p,p-DDE and α-HCH were the dominant isomer for DDT and HCH. Five PYs (fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, cypermethrin, bifenthrin and cyhalothrin) were found in 15.9% samples, with the concentrations of 2.5 µg kg(-1) to 433.0 µg kg(-1). Fenpropathrin was the most frequently detected pesticide. In addition, triadimefon and buprofezin were detected only in two samples. For the tested nuts, 25.0% samples with multiple residues (containing more than two pesticides) were noted, even up to 9.1% samples with five pesticide residues. The residue of 15.9% samples was higher than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of China. The short-term risks for the tested nuts were below 1.2%, and the highest long-term risk was 12.58%. The cumulative risk (cHI) for the tested pesticides were 8.43% (OPs), 0.42% (OCs), 12.82% (PYs) and 0.15% (fungicides), respectively. The total cHI was 21.82%. There was no significant health risk for consumers via nuts consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pesticide residues in nut-planted soils of China and their relationship between nut/soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongxiang; Mo, Runhong; Yuan, Xinyue; Zhong, Donglian; Tang, Fubin; Ye, Caifen; Liu, Yihua

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine pesticide residues in nut-planted soils from China were investigated. One organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) was detected in 5.3% soils, and the residue levels of 7.2 μg/kg to 77.2 μg/kg. The concentrations of six organochlorines (DDT, HCH, endosulfan, quintozene, aldrin and dieldrin) detected in 78.9% soils were 0.6 μg/kg to 90.1 μg/kg. The residue levels of six pyrethroids (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin) detected in 65.8% soils were 1.5 μg/kg to 884.3 μg/kg. Triadimefon and buprofezin were found in 71.1% and 52.6% samples, respectively, with the corresponding concentrations of 9.8 μg/kg to 193.7 μg/kg and 87.9 μg/kg to 807.4 μg/kg. The multiple residues were found in 76.3% soils. A significant correlation between pesticide residues in nuts and soils was observed, with the correlation coefficient (r) 0.83 (P < 0.001). In addition, the bioconcentration factor (BCF) values for the explanation of pesticides from soils into nuts were ranged from 0.8 to 16.5. The results showed that some pesticides could accumulate in nut by the uptake effect from soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMicco, Amy; Cooper, Keith R; Richardson, Jason R; White, Lori A

    2010-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used residential and agricultural insecticides. Based on the increased use of pyrethroids and recent studies showing that pregnant women and children are exposed to pyrethroids, there are concerns over the potential for developmental neurotoxicity. However, there have been relatively few studies on the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. In this study, we sought to investigate the developmental toxicity of six common pyrethroids, three type I compounds (permethrin, resmethrin, and bifenthrin) and three type II compounds (deltamethrin, cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), and to determine whether zebrafish embryos may be an appropriate model for studying the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. Exposure of zebrafish embryos to pyrethroids caused a dose-dependent increase in mortality and pericardial edema, with type II compounds being the most potent. At doses approaching the LC(50), permethrin and deltamethrin caused craniofacial abnormalities. These findings are consistent with mammalian studies demonstrating that pyrethroids are mildly teratogenic at very high doses. However, at lower doses, body axis curvature and spasms were observed, which were reminiscent of the classic syndromes observed with pyrethroid toxicity. Treatment with diazepam ameliorated the spasms, while treatment with the sodium channel antagonist MS-222 ameliorated both spasms and body curvature, suggesting that pyrethroid-induced neurotoxicity is similar in zebrafish and mammals. Taken in concert, these data suggest that zebrafish may be an appropriate alternative model to study the mechanism(s) responsible for the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides and aid in identification of compounds that should be further tested in mammalian systems.

  16. From the Cover: Vulnerability of C6 Astrocytoma Cells After Single-Compound and Joint Exposure to Type I and Type II Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Delfina M; Berardino, Bruno G; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2017-01-01

    A primary mode-of-action of all pyrethroid insecticides (PYRs) is the disruption of the voltage-gated sodium channel electrophysiology in neurons of target pests and nontarget species. The neurological actions of PYRs on non-neuronal cells of the nervous system remain poorly investigated. In the present work, we used C6 astrocytoma cells to study PYR actions (0.1-50 μM) under the hypothesis that glial cells may be targeted by and vulnerable to PYRs. To this end, we characterized the effects of bifenthrin (BF), tefluthrin (TF), α-cypermethrin (α-CYP), and deltamethrin (DM) on the integrity of nuclear, mitochondrial, and lysosomal compartments. In general, 24- to 48-h exposures produced concentration-related impairment of cell viability. In single-compound, 24-h exposure experiments, effective concentration (EC) 15 s 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) were computed as follows (in μM): BF, 16.1; TF, 37.3; α-CYP, 7.8; DM, 5.0. We found concentration-related damage in several C6-cell subcellular compartments (mitochondria, nuclei, and lysosomes) at ≥ 10 -1 μM levels. Last, we examined a mixture of all PYRs (ie, Σ individual EC 15 ) using MTT assays and subcellular analyses. Our findings indicate that C6 cells are responsive to nM levels of PYRs, suggesting that astroglial susceptibility may contribute to the low-dose neurological effects caused by these insecticides. This research further suggests that C6 cells may provide relevant information as a screening platform for pesticide mixtures targeting nervous system cells by expected and unexpected toxicogenic pathways potentially contributing to clinical neurotoxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Susceptibilidade larval de duas populações de Aedes egypti a inseticidas químicos Larval susceptibility to chemical insecticides of two Aedes egypti populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Campos

    2001-06-01

    Aedes aegypti larvae in both areas under vector control and no vector control. METHODS: World Health Organization standard bioassays for diagnostic concentration and multiple concentrations were performed in mosquito larvae collected in an area under no vector control (Campinas, SP and an area under vector chemical control (Campo Grande, MS, in Brazil. RESULTS: Potential resistance to a diagnostic concentration of temephos (DC=0.04 ppm was registered for an Ae. aegypti larval population collected in Campinas. Multiple concentration tests confirmed the larvae resistance, with 24.5% of them surviving at the 0.0125 ppm concentration. Bioassays with the organophosphate fenitrothion (DC=0.08 ppm and pyrethroid cypermethrin (DC=0.01 ppm in the same population revealed their susceptibility to these agents. Bioassays carried out in an Ae. aegypti larval population collected in Campo Grande showed their susceptibility to temephos (DC=0.04 ppm and cypermethrin (DC=0.01 ppm. LC50 and LC95 for cypermethrin (CE25, cyfluthrin (CE5, betacyfluthrin (SC1.25 and propoxur (CE20 were determined for Ae. aegypti . Using the Rockefeller standard strain values, ratios of resistance were estimated: 2.9, 2.2, 2.4 and 1.3 for LC50 and 3.5, 2.6, 3.9 and 1.3 for LC95, respectively. CONCLUSION: The findings reinforce the need for routinely monitoring pesticide efficacy as a very important step in vector control management programs.

  18. Determination of seven pyrethroids and six pyrethrins in water by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ccanccapa, alexander; Masia, Ana; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Pyrethroids are the synthetic analogues of pyrethrins which were developed as pesticides from the extracts of dried and powdered flower heads of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium. They are increasingly used in agriculture due to their broad biological activity and slow development of pest resistance. Contamination of fresh-water ecosystems appears either because of the direct discharge of industrial and agricultural effluents or as a result of effluents from sewage treatment works; residues can thus accumulate in the surrounding biosphere [1, 2]. These substances, mostly determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) can be difficult to analyse due to their volatility and degradability. The purpose of this study is, as an alternative, to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue method for the target analysis of 7 pyrethroids and the 6 natural pyrethrins currently used in water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The compounds included in the study were acrinathrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and flumethrin as pyrethroids and a commercial mix of pyrethrins containing Cinerin I, Jasmolin I, pyrethrin I, cinerin II, jasmolin II, pyrethrins II in different percentages. As a preliminary step, the ionization and fragmentation of the compounds were optimized injecting individual solutions of each analyte at 10 ppm in the system, using a gradient elution profile of water-methanol both with 10 mM ammonium formate. The ESI conditions were: capillary voltage 4000 V, nebulizer15 psi, source temperature 300◦C and gas flow 10 L min-1. [M+H]+, [M+Na]+ ,[M+NH3]+ ,[M+NH4+]+ were tested as precursor ions. The most intense signal was for ammonium adduct for all compounds. The optimal fragmentor range for product ions were between 20 to 80 ev and the collision energy ranged between 5 to 86 ev. The efficiency of the method was tested in water samples from Turia River without any known exposure to

  19. Effectiveness of bifenthrin (Onyx™) and carbaryl (Sevin® SL) for protecting individual, high-value trees from bark beetle attack (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Kurt K. Allen; Robert R. Borys; John Christopherson; Christopher P. Dabney; Thomas J. Eager; Kenneth E. Gibson; Elizabeth G. Hebertson; Daniel F. Long; A. Steven Munson; Patrick J. Shea; Sheri L. Smith; Michael I. Haverty

    2006-01-01

    High-value trees, such as those located in residential, recreational, or administrative sites, are particularly susceptible to bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attack as a result of increased amounts of stress associated with drought, soil compaction, mechanical injury, or vandalism. Tree losses in these unique environments generally have a...

  20. Susceptibility Of Mosquito Larvae To Conventional Insecticides In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 0.48, 37.09 and 0.29 μg per liter respectvely. The LD50 values for Culex quinquefasciatus of exposed to dieldrin, dichlovos and cypermethrin were 0.11 10.05 and 005 μg per liter respectively. Keywords: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, LC50, Dieldrin, Dichlovos, Cypermethrin. Animal Research International Vol.

  1. Voltametrické stanovení pesticidů na meniskem modifikované stříbrné pevné amalgamové elektrodě

    OpenAIRE

    Gajdár, Július

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to find the optimal conditions for voltammetric determination of pesticides cypermethrin, deltamethrin and difenzoquat on meniscus modified silver solid amalgam electrode using differential pulse voltammetry. Conditions under which cypermethrin and deltamethrin could be determinated were found in previously published works. These conditions were reproduced. Substances were studied in methanol and dimethylformamide solutions. The optimal conditions for determ...

  2. Health risk assessment of pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls contaminations in dairy products from selected farms in Greater Accra Region - Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoako, D.

    2013-07-01

    The residual concentrations of synthetic chemicals such as organochlorines pesticides (OCPs), pyrethroids and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in dairy products (milk, yoghurt, cheese) from selected farms in Greater Accra were analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC). A total of 50 samples of dairy products (9 cheese, 25 cow milk and 16 yogourt) were analyzed for OCPs, prethroids and PCBs. Of the numerious pesticides evaluated, detectable levels of OCPs (β-HCH, endrin, heptachlor, endosulfan, p ' p-DDT and methoxchlor); synthetic prethroids (permathrin, allethrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin) and PCBs (18, 28, 52, 101, 153, 138, and 180) were found in all the dairy product samples analysed. Milk samples were found to be the most contaminated with respect to the OCPs and the levels ranged between 0.0001µg/ml and 0.0407µg/ml. ß-HCH was the highest OCP with concentration of 0.0407µg/ml while cyfluthrin was the highest synthetic prethroids recorded in yoghurt sample (0.0318µg/ml). The highest PCB 18 (2,2,5-Trichlorobiphenyl) recorded (0.2668µg/ml) in yoghurt samples. (Data obtained from the field survey regarding safe use of pesticides, toxicity awareness and symptoms among farmers indicated that a very high proportion of animal farmers were at a high risk of pesticide poisoning from occupational exposure. More than 70% of farm workers did not practise safety precaution during pesticide mixing and application leading to considerable prevalence of pesticide related illness including nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, abdominal cramps, dizziness, diarrhoea and headaches in this agricultural community. The presence of pesticide residues in dairy products was of further concern because milk is the main protein diet for infants. The estimated dose for γ-chlordane(8.5x10 5 µ/ml), endrin(0.0114 µg/ml) p ' p ' -DDT(8.5x10 5 µg/ml), DDE(8.5x10 5 µg/ml),heptachlor(2.5x10 5 µg/ml), dieldrin(6.8x10 5 µg/ml) do not pose a direct hazard to human health, although present

  3. Susceptibilidade larval de populações de Aedes aegypti e Culex quinquefasciatus a inseticidas químicos Larval susceptibility of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus populations to chemical insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Campos

    2003-08-01

    Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, MS, and Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, MT, in Brazil, subjected to such treatments. RESULTS: Tests for Culex quinquefasciatus larvae from Campinas, SP, allowed suspicion of resistance to cypermethrin and gave evidence of resistance to cyfluthrin. Larvae of this species collected in Campo Grande, MS, and Campinas, SP, presented resistance to temephos. For the colony from the latter locality, the following resistance rates were established: RR50=6.36 and RR95=4.94, in relation to a standard susceptible strain. Moreover, tests for Aedes aegypti showed similar susceptibility to temephos for a field population from Cuiabá, MT, and a laboratory population. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate resistance of Culex quinquefasciatus to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides and make evident the need for evaluation and monitoring of the efficiency of insecticides to be used in mosquito control programs.

  4. 75 FR 51040 - Issuance of an Experimental Use Permit by the State of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Docket in Rm. S- 4400, One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of... determine if the addition of mosquito ovitrap strips (Trap-N-Kill\\TM\\), impregnated with bifenthrin to...

  5. 78 FR 38319 - Pesticide Maintenance Fee: Notice of Receipt of Requests to Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Technology and Resources Management Division (7502P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection... . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Yanchulis, Information Technology and Resources Management... Home Pest Insect Bifenthrin. Killer. 000264-00378 264 Larvin Brand DF Thiodicarb Thiodicarb...

  6. The determination of multiple resistance, inheritance and cytochrome P450 activity in bifenthrinresistant Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    OpenAIRE

    AY, Recep; YORULMAZ, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    In this study, multiple resistance, inheritance and cytochrome P450 enzyme activity were determined in Tetranychus urticae Koch (SAK) population after 20 selections for bifenthrin resistance. Selection study and LC50, 60 levels of SAK population of T. urticae were determined by dry film method. LC50 level of the SAK population selected twenty times with bifenthrin was increased from 984.49 to 11914.40 µl l-1 distiled water. Selected population showing 21.84 fold resistances was named ...

  7. Distribution of multiple pesticide residues in apple segments after home processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Hansen, H. C. B.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of washing, storing, boiling, peeling, coring and juicing on pesticide residue were investigated for field-sprayed Discovery and Jonagold apples. Residues of chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, diazinon, endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, fenitrothion, fenpropathrin, iprodione, kre...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 21, No 1 (2017), Remediation of aqueous solution of cypermethrin and ... Vol 15, No 3 (2011), Residual Effect of Lead on Early Growth of Fluted ... and Distribution of Planktonic Fauna in the Eastern Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria, Abstract PDF.

  9. Genotoxicity of hormoban and seven other pesticides to onion root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... and mildewicide, but also has some activity as a bac- tericide, microbiocide ... cause cholinesterase inhibition in humans. Carbaryl is ..... commercial formulation of a-cypermethrin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  10. Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles marajoara (Diptera: Culicidae susceptibility to pyrethroids in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Kardec Ribeiro Galardo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of Anopheles darlingi Root (1926 and Anopheles marajoara Galvão & Damasceno (1942 to pyrethroids used by the National Malaria Control Program in Brazil. METHODS: Mosquitoes from Amapá, Brazilian Amazon, were assessed for resistance to cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and alpha-cypermethrin. Insecticide-impregnated bottles were used as suggested by the CDC/Atlanta. RESULTS: Diagnostic dose for Anopheles darlingi was 12.5µg/bottle during 30 min of exposure. Concentrations for Anopheles marajoara were 20µg/bottle of cypermethrin and deltamethrin and 12.5µg/bottle of alpha-cypermethrin. CONCLUSIONS : No resistance was recorded for Anopheles darlingi , but Anopheles marajoara requires attention.

  11. UAM Journal Formatted 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A SURVEY OF WOOD PROTECTION CHEMICALS, TREE KILLERS AND SPRAYERS .... market value, decrease the tensile strength of the wood, or limit its .... 5. Cyper Force. Jubaili Agrotech. Cypermethrin10%EC. 1250/l. 6. Cypertex. Saro.

  12. Aplicação da técnica de dispersão da matriz em fase sólida (DMFS na análise de pesticidas em quiabo por CG-EM Application of the matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD technique in the analysis of pesticides in okra by GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo Silveira Dórea

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A matrix solid phase dispersion and gas chromatography-mass selective detection method for the simultaneous determination of monocrotophos, methyl parathion, cypermethrin and deltamethrin in okra is described. Analyses of 2 g of fortified okra (0.05-0.75 mg kg-1 showed an average recovery of 96.2% (71.4-128.4% and average relative standard deviation of 11.7% (1.4-37.1%. The cypermethrin recovery at the lower level was above 130%. The limit of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.15 mg kg-1. The procedure was applied to the okra samples and has found 0.56 mg kg-1 of cypermethrin-cis, 0.75 mg kg-1 of cypermethrin-trans and 2.71 mg kg-1 of deltamethrin.

  13. 88 Rama Mohana Rao Chilumuru1*, Cyril Arun Kumar Lakkineni2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-06

    Jun 6, 2013 ... (HPLC) method for the quantitative analysis of cypermethrin ... in food has been strictly regulated by government so as to .... The precision of the proposed method was evaluated by carrying ... with the pure drug (Figures 2-6).

  14. to assess the diatry transfer of pesticides to dairy milk and effect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    csu

    2014-01-15

    Jan 15, 2014 ... contaminated water or dust are also contributing to pesticide contamination in milk. Cancer potency .... Detection limit of profenofos, cypermethrin and chloropyrifos ..... accidentally because of leakage or spillage. Profenofos.

  15. 58_290 - 294_BIO 095 Yangora

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    Hence, nowadays agricultural practice uses considerable pesticides to control ... Microorganisms are of vital importance as their assemblages ... cypermethrin on aquatic organisms, and the objectives were; to ..... Bioremediation of. Insecticide.

  16. Investigation on the Use of trapping in the Management of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this 11-month study, the potential of two trap types (pseudostem and pheromone traps) to lure weevils in banana fields was determined at three different ecological sites (Clemencia, Nouvelle France and Rivière du Poste). The effect of treatment of pseudostem trap with insecticides (Imidachloprid, Cyfluthrin and ...

  17. Seed treatments for the control of insects and diseases in sugarbeet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate insect and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxa...

  18. Insecticide seed treatments for sugarbeet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pest feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate pest and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxam + 8...

  19. Treatment of Pesticide Contaminated Wastewater by Soil Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    *S. Jilani; M. A. Khan

    2011-01-01

    Cypermethrin is one of the most widely used pesticides in the country for agriculture crop production. Due to least water solubility and toxicity, its removal need especial attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be an efficient and cost effective method for decontamination of toxic pesticides from the environment. In this study, malathion degrading bacterial isolate, identified as Pseudomonas, was used to assess its biodegradation potential for cypermethrin in aqueous system. The e...

  20. Synergistic potential of dillapiole-rich essential oil with synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against fall armyworm

    OpenAIRE

    Fazolin, Murilo; Estrela, Joelma Lima Vidal; Medeiros, André Fábio Monteiro; Silva, Iriana Maria da; Gomes, Luiara Paiva; Silva, Maria Samylla de Farias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the synergy and response homogeneity of the Spodoptera frugiperda larvae population to the Piper aduncum essential oil in combination with pyrethroid insecticides (alpha-cypermethrin, beta-cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, and gamma-cyhalothrin) compared to piperonylbutoxide (PBO) as positive control. Synergism (SF) comparisons were obtained using lethal concentration (LC50) and lethal dose (LD50) ratios of insecticides individually and in thei...

  1. Synergistic Combinations of a Pyrethroid Insecticide and an Emulsifiable Oil Formulation of Beauveria bassiana to Overcome Insecticide Resistance in Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohui; Kostromytska, Olga S; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M

    2017-08-01

    The annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby), is a major pest of golf course turf in eastern North America and has become particularly problematic owing to widespread development of insecticide resistance. As an alternative option to manage resistant adult L. maculicollis, we explored combinations of the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin with an emulsifiable oil formulation of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana strain GHA (Bb ES). Combinations synergistically enhanced mortality in both insecticide-susceptible and insecticide-resistant L. maculicollis adults in the laboratory when bifenthrin was used at LC50s for each population. To determine the component behind the synergism, technical spores of B. bassiana GHA and the emulsifiable oil carrier in the fungal formulation were tested separately or in combination with bifenthrin. In both separate and combined applications, the emulsifiable oil carrier was responsible for high mortality within 3 d after treatment and interacted synergistically with bifenthrin, whereas fungus-induced mortality started later. Strong synergism was also observed in three field experiments with a relatively resistant L. maculicollis population. Combinations of Bb ES and bifenthrin hold promise as an effective L. maculicollis management tool, particularly of pyrethroid-resistant populations. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Biology and control of the raspberry crown borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKern, Jacquelyn A; Johnson, Donn T; Lewis, Barbara A

    2007-04-01

    This study explored the biology of raspberry crown borer, Pennisetia marginata (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), in Arkansas and the optimum timing for insecticide and nematode applications. The duration of P. marginata's life cycle was observed to be 1 yr in Arkansas. Insecticide trials revealed that bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, imidacloprid, metaflumizone, and metofluthrin efficacy were comparable with that of azinphosmethyl, the only labeled insecticide for P. marginata in brambles until 2005. Applications on 23 October 2003 for plots treated with bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and azinphosmethyl resulted in >88% reduction in larvae per crown. Applications on 3 November 2004 of metaflumizone, metofluthrin, and bifenthrin resulted in >89% reduction in larvae per crown. Applications on 7 April 2005 for metofluthrin, imidacloprid, bifenthrin, metaflumizone, and benzoylphenyl urea resulted in >64% reduction in the number of larvae per crown. Applications on 6 May 2004 did not reduce larval numbers. The optimum timing for treatments was found to be between October and early April, before the larvae tunneled into the crowns of plants. Applying bifenthrin with as little as 468 liters water/ha (50 gal/acre) was found to be as effective against larvae as higher volumes of spray. Nematode applications were less successful than insecticides. Nematode applications of Steinernemafeltiae, Steinernema carpocapsae, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora reduced larvae counts per plant by 46, 53, and 33%, respectively.

  3. Synergistic potential of dillapiole-rich essential oil with synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against fall armyworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Fazolin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the synergy and response homogeneity of the Spodoptera frugiperda larvae population to the Piper aduncum essential oil in combination with pyrethroid insecticides (alpha-cypermethrin, beta-cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, and gamma-cyhalothrin compared to piperonylbutoxide (PBO as positive control. Synergism (SF comparisons were obtained using lethal concentration (LC50 and lethal dose (LD50 ratios of insecticides individually and in their respective synergistic combinations with essential oil and PBO. Dose/concentration-mortality slope curves were used to establish relative toxicity increase promoted by synergism. They also determined homogeneity response. Residual contact revealed significant potentiation for commercial insecticides formulated with beta-cypermethrin (SF=9.05-0.5 and fenpropathrin (SF=34.05-49.77 when combined with the P. aduncum essential oil. For topical contact, significant potentiation occurred only for alpha-cypermethrin (SF=7.55-3.68, fenpropathrin (SF=3.37-1.21, and gamma-cyhalothrin (SF=5.79-10.48 insecticides when combined with essential oil. With the exception of fenpropathrin and gamma-cyhalothrin, insecticides synergistic combinations presented homogeneous response by topical as well as residual contact at least with essential oil. The SF significance values ​​of the P. aduncum essential oil combined with alpha-cypermethrin, beta-cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, and gamma-cyhalothrin insecticides indicated potential for this oil to be used as an alternative to PBO.

  4. Suspended particles only marginally reduce pyrethroid toxicity to the freshwater invertebrate Gammarus pulex (L.) during pulse exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes; Cedergreen, Nina; Kronvang, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Current ecotoxicological research on particle associated pyrethroids in freshwater systems focuses almost exclusively on sediment-exposure scenarios and sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrates. We studied how suspended particles influence acute effects of lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin on the epi......Current ecotoxicological research on particle associated pyrethroids in freshwater systems focuses almost exclusively on sediment-exposure scenarios and sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrates. We studied how suspended particles influence acute effects of lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin....... MM suspensions adsorbed a variable fraction of pyrethroids (10% for bifenthrin and 70% for lambda-cyhalothrin) but did not significantly change the concentration–response relationship compared to pure pyrethroid treatments. Behavioral responses and immobilisation rate of G. pulex were reduced...

  5. Seletividade de diferentes agrotóxicos usados na cultura da soja ao parasitoide de ovos Telenomus remus Selectivity of different pesticides used in soybean to the eggs parasitoid Telenomus remus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lima do Carmo

    2009-11-01

    . The viability of parasitism was evaluated and the reduction in the emergence of the parasitoids classified according to the rules of the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC. The results showed that the insect growth-regulating (IGR insecticides flufenoxuron, diflubenzuron, methoxyfenozide as well as the insecticides imidacloprid + beta-cyfluthrin and acephate were harmless to the parasitoid immature stages . Spinosad was classified as harmless for larvae of T. remus. Gama-cyhalothrin was slightly harmful to larvae and harmless to pupa of T. remus. Bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos were, respectively, slightly harmful and harmful to both stages of development of T. remus development. Regarding to the tested herbicides, 2,4-D, s-metolachlor, flumioxazin, paraquat dichloride + diuron, paraquat dichloride and glyphosate (Roundup Transorb® were harmless. However, glyphosate + imazethapyr, clomazone, glyphosate (Gliz®, glyphosate (Roundup Ready® were harmless to the larvae stage and slightly harmful (class 2 to T. remus pupae. Similar results were obtained with the fungicides flutriafol + tiofanate, carbenzadin, tebuconazol + trifloxystrobin and azoxystrobin + ciproconazol which were classified as harmless. Tiofanate-metil, tebuconazol and epoxyconazol + pyraclostrobin were slightly harmful to larvae and pupae. Inversely, epoxyconazol and azoxystrobin were harmless to larvae and slightly harmful to pupae. Flutriafol was classified as slightly harmful to both development stages of T. remus.

  6. Combining the essential oil of Piper aduncum L. with commercial insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Fazolin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synergists is important to minimize the amount of chemical insecticide required for insect control. Their use may contribute to reducing environmental contamination and preserving beneficial insects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synergy and uniformity of the response of Spodoptera frugiperda (Noctuidae larvae to doses of an essential oil of an Amazon chemotype, Piper aduncum (Piperaceae, when combinationed with the following commercial insecticides: cypermethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, permethrin and esfenvarelate, compared to piperonyl butoxide (PBO. Through the relationship between CL50 and DL50 of insecticides taken separately and their synergistic combinations with the essential oil and PBO, synergism factors (SF were obtained for comparison with each other. With residual contact, there was a significant enhancement of commercial insecticides formulated with cypermethrin (SF = 73.03, zeta-cypermethrin (SF = 16.51 and permethrin (SF = 8.46-17.22, when combined with the P. aduncum essential oil; in turn, with topical application, there was only an observed significant enhancement for zeta-cypermethrin (SF = 0.40-4.26, permethrin (SF = 2.10-4.79 and esfenvarelate (SF = 3.80 insecticides when combined with the essential oil. With the exception of esfenvarelate, the other synergistic combinations showed homogeneous responses for topical application and residual contact for at least one synergistic combination with P. aduncum essential oil. The significance of the SF values from combining P. aduncum essential oil with cypermethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, permethrin and esfenvarelate insecticides may indicate that this essential oil is an alternative option to PBO.

  7. Insecticide susceptibility tests conducted in Kamhororo, Masakadza and Chilonga villages in Zimbabwe during the 2011 malaria period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lukwa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide susceptibility tests using World Health Organization papers treated with 4% dichloro-diphenyl-trichloro-ethane (DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.05% lambda-cyhalothrin, 0.5% etofenprox, 0.15% cyfluthrin and 0.75% permethrin were conducted in Kamhororo, Masakadza and Chilonga villages, Zimbabwe. Three to 5-day old female Anopheles gambiae sensu lato adult mosquitoes were used. Deltamethrin knocked down 100% of the mosquitoes from Kamhororo, Masakadza and Chilonga at 35 min exposure. DDT did not knock down 100% of the mosquitoes from Kamhororo and Masakadza but did so in Chilonga. One hundred percent knockdown was achieved for cyfluthrin when exposed to mosquitoes from Kamhororo (60 min, Masakadza (25 min and Chilonga (25 min. Etofenprox knocked down 100% of the mosquitoes collected from Kamhororo (30 min, Masakadza (30 min and Chilonga (55 min. Knockdown of mosquitoes due to deltamethrin, DDT, cyfluthrin, permethrin; lambda-cyhalothrin and etofenprox were different at different observation times. One hundred percent mortality due to deltamethrin, DDT, etofenprox, lambdacyhalothrin and cyfluthrin was recorded for mosquitoes collected from all the 3 sites. One hundred percent mortality due to pemethrin was recorded for mosquitoes collected from Kamhororo and Chilonga but mortality was 98.5% for those collected from Masakadza. No knockdown or mortality occurred in the controls from each locality. The kd50 (knockdown of 50% of the mosquitoes values were 24.4-73.7 min (DDT, 8-13 min (pemethrin, 9.4-16.3 min (cyfluthrin, 9.4-14.4 min (etofenprox, 8.7-13 min (lambda-cyhalothrin and 12.1-15.9 min (deltamethrin. The kd90 (knockdown of 90% of the mosquitoes values were 45.6-199.5 min (DDT, 14.7-26.5 min (pemethrin, 16.5-34.9 min (cyfluthrin, 21.8-24.4 min (etofenprox, 16.3-31.6 min (lambdacyhalothrin and 21-25.3 min (deltamethrin. No insecticide resistance was recorded from the 3 sites.

  8. Addition of contaminant bioavailability and species susceptibility to a sediment toxicity assessment: Application in an urban stream in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huizhen; Sun, Baoquan; Chen, Xin; Lydy, Michael J.; You, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Sediments collected from an urban creek in China exhibited high acute toxicity to Hyalella azteca with 81.3% of sediments being toxic. A toxic unit (TU) estimation demonstrated that the pyrethroid, cypermethrin, was the major contributor to toxicity. The traditional TU approach, however, overestimated the toxicity. Reduced bioavailability of sediment-associated cypermethrin due to sequestration explained the overestimation. Additionally, antagonism among multiple contaminants and species susceptibility to various contaminants also contributed to the unexpectedly low toxicity to H. azteca. Bioavailable TUs derived from the bioavailability-based approaches, Tenax extraction and matrix-solid phase microextraction (matrix-SPME), showed better correlations with the noted toxicity compared to traditional TUs. As the first successful attempt to use matrix-SPME for estimating toxicity caused by emerging insecticides in field sediment, the present study found freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations significantly improved the prediction of sediment toxicity to H. azteca compared to organic carbon normalized and Tenax extractable concentrations. Highlights: •Over 80% sediments from an urban stream in China were acutely toxic to H. azteca. •Toxic unit analysis showed cypermethrin was the major contributor to toxicity. •The traditional toxic unit approach overestimated sediment toxicity. •Reduced bioavailability was the reason for overestimating sediment toxicity. •Freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations greatly improved toxicity prediction. -- Field sediment toxicity caused by current-use pesticides could be more accurately evaluated by incorporating bioavailability measurements into the toxic unit analysis

  9. Comparison of 3 tests to detect acaricide resistance in Boophilus decoloratus on dairy farms in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mekonnen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of the larval offspring of engorged female Boophilus decoloratus, and of the engorged females, collected from cattle on the dairy farms Brycedale, Sunny Grove and Welgevind in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, was tested against the acaricides amitraz, chlorfenvinphos and cypermethrin. Resistance was determined by means of the Shaw Larval Immersion Test (SLIT for larvae and the Reproductive Estimate Test (RET and Egg Laying Test (ELT for adults. At Brycedale the tests all indicated resistance to chlorfenvinphos, and RET and ELT indicated resistance to amitraz and emerging resistance to cypermethrin. At Sunny Grove, B. decoloratus was resistant to cypermethrin using SLIT and exhibited emerging resistance to chlorfenvinphos with SLIT and to cypermethrin with both RET and ELT. At Welgevind, resistance was recorded against chlorfenvinphos (SLIT and against cypermethrin (ELT, and emerging resistance against permethrin (RET. The results obtained with RET and ELT were generally comparable, but often differed from those obtained with SLIT. Resistance could be detected within 7 days with ELT compared to 42 days with RET and 60 days with SLIT.

  10. Study On The Procedures For Determining Of Pesticide Residues In Green Vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tat Mua; Nguyen Tien Dat; Nguyen Van Minh; Nguyen Ngoc Tuan; Le Thi Ngoc Trinh; Ta Thi Tuyet Nhung; Truong Van Tai; Tran Thanh Nha; Nguyen Thi Hong Tham

    2007-01-01

    Researches presented in this work are divided into two main parts. One part embraces the residue analytical methods. The other part comprises applying of these residue analytical methods for analysis of plant material. Part I: Residue analytical methods (Analytical procedures): Determination of Endosulphan in plant material by GC/ECD; Determination of Methamidofos in plant material by GC/FTD; Determination of Deltamethrin, Cyhalothrin, Cyfluthrin in plant material by GC/ECD; Determination of Maneb in plant material by HPLC/UV; Determination of Zineb in plant material by F-AAS; Determination of Organo-Asenic and Mercury in plant material by RNAA; The limits of detection and determination (LOD, LOQ), Recovery, Efficiency, the Calibration curve are validated. Part II: Applying of Residue Analytical Methods for analysis of endosulphan, methamidofos, maneb, zineb, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, cyfluthrin, metallo-organic compounds in Spinach, Cabbage, Pimento, Japanese Bean, Japanese Pumpkin, Tomato, Potato, Sweet Potato. The results and conclusion are present in this work. (author)

  11. Mitigation of two pyrethroid insecticides in a Mississippi Delta constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M T; Cooper, C M; Smith, S; Cullum, R F; Knight, S S; Locke, M A; Bennett, E R

    2009-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are a suggested best management practice to help mitigate agricultural runoff before entering receiving aquatic ecosystems. A constructed wetland system (180 m x 30 m), comprising a sediment retention basin and two treatment cells, was used to determine the fate and transport of simulated runoff containing the pyrethroid insecticides lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin, as well as suspended sediment. Wetland water, sediment, and plant samples were collected spatially and temporally over 55 d. Results showed 49 and 76% of the study's measured lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin masses were associated with vegetation, respectively. Based on conservative effects concentrations for invertebrates and regression analyses of maximum observed wetland aqueous concentrations, a wetland length of 215 m x 30 m width would be required to adequately mitigate 1% pesticide runoff from a 14 ha contributing area. Results of this experiment can be used to model future design specifications for constructed wetland mitigation of pyrethroid insecticides.

  12. effect of a microbial-based acaricidal product on spotted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the direct and residual effects of two miticides (abamectin and bifenthrin) at several doses in geometric progression. Firstly, the direct efficacy of the two acaricides was evaluated against T. urticae and P. persimilis. Abamectin had high ...

  13. Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Marshall

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trace organic compounds associated with human activity are now ubiquitous in the environment. As the population becomes more urbanised and the use of pesticides and person care products continues to increase, urban waterways are likely to receive higher loads of trace organic contaminants with unknown ecological consequences. To establish the extent of trace organic contamination in urban runoff, concentrations of emerging chemicals of concern were determined in sediments from 99 urban wetlands in and around Melbourne, Australia between February and April, 2015. As a preliminary estimation of potential risks to aquatic biota, we compared measured concentrations with thresholds for acute and chronic toxicity, and modelled toxic units as a function of demographic and land use trends. The synthetic pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin was common and widespread, and frequently occurred at concentrations likely to cause toxicity to aquatic life. Personal care products DEET and triclosan were common and widely distributed, while the herbicides diuron and prometryn, and the fungicides pyrimethanil and trifloxystrobin occurred less frequently. Toxic unit modelling using random forests found complex and unexpected associations between urban land uses and trace organic concentrations. Synthetic pyrethroid insecticides were identified as emerging compounds of concern, particularly bifenthrin. In contrast with previous surveys, the highest bifenthrin concentrations were associated with lower housing and population density, implicating low-density residential land use in bifenthrin contamination. We discuss the implications for pesticide regulation and urban wetland management in a global context.

  14. 75 FR 35810 - Registration Review; Pesticide Dockets Opened for Review and Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ...), Environmental Protection Agency, Rm. S-4400, One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA..., One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this... Number, E-mail Address Bifenthrin (7402) EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-03 Jacqueline Guerry, 84 (215) 814-2184, guerry...

  15. 75 FR 53692 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...), Environmental Protection Agency, Rm. S-4400, One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA... (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this Docket Facility are...: Bifenthrin. Proposed uses: Grass forage, fodder and hay group, grass grown for seed, pasture and rangeland...

  16. Effect of a microbial-based acaricidal product on spotted and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the direct and residual effects of two miticides (abamectin and bifenthrin) at several doses in geometric progression. Firstly, the direct efficacy of the two acaricides was evaluated against T. urticae and P. persimilis. Abamectin had high efficacy on T. urticae and significantly less ...

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kisinza, W N. Vol 2, No 2 (2001): Supplement - Articles Field trial of bifenthrin as an effective insecticide for the control of Malaria vectors. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1821-9241. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  18. Laboratory selection for spirodiclofen resistance and cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... chlorfenapyr, bifenthrin and amitraz, the SR-FZ strain had a slightly higher LC50, indicating that this possibly associated resistance is of only minor impor-tance. The highest cross-resistance (RR = 29.5) was observed with the tetronic acid derivate spiromesifen. The effect on the toxicity of spirodiclofen after ...

  19. A comparative analysis of resistance testing methods in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) from St. Johns County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) was tested for resistance to permethrin, bifenthrin, and malathion using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassays and topical toxicology assays on adults and larval bioassays. Eggs were collected from 3 locations across St. Johns C...

  20. 75 FR 56105 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... Products, Inc., 2625 South 158th Plaza, Omaha, NE 68130. Active ingredient: Bifenthrin. Proposed uses: Dogs... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0008; FRL-8843-5] Pesticide Products... announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently...

  1. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  2. Single and combination insecticides evaluated as regulatory immersion treatments to eliminate third-instar Japanese beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from small diameter field-grown and containerized nursery plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica Newman, are a nursery regulatory pest. Immersion of field-grown plants harvested as balled and burlapped (B&B) or container plants grown in pine bark substrates in a solution of chlorpyrifos or bifenthrin is allowed for certification in the Domestic Japanese Beet...

  3. Reducing Sand Fly Numbers in Leishmania Endemic Regions in Kenya with Insecticide Treated Camouflage Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current US military operations in deserts face persistent threats from sand flies that transmit human Leishmania. Methods to reduce the risk of human infection from leishmaniasis by reducing the number of sand fly vectors were investigated in Kenya. Bifenthrin treated and un-treated camouflage netti...

  4. Chemical Quality of Water in Anopheles stephensi Habitats and its susceptibility to different insecticides in South Eastern of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davari, B.; Vatandoost, H.

    2009-01-01

    Using of insecticides depends on the knowledge of the susceptibility levels of malaria vectors to these chemical. In this study, the chemical quality of water in the larval breeding habitats and the susceptibility levels of Anopheles stephensi to DDT 4% dieldrin 0.4% permethrin 0.75, cyfluthrin 0.15 deltamethrin 0.05% and lambdacyhalothrin 0.05% were investigated according to WHO method in south eastern of Iran. (Author)

  5. High Insecticides Resistance in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae from Tehran, Capital of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Salim-Abadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years transmission of Dirofilaria immitis (dog heart worm by Culex pipiens and West Nile virus have been reported from Iran. The present study was preformed for evaluating the susceptibility status of Cx. pipiens collected from capital city of Tehran, Iran.Methods: Four Insecticides including: DDT 4%, Lambdacyhalothrin 0.05%, Deltamethrin 0.05% and Cyfluthrin 0.15 % according to WHO standard  methods were used for evaluating the susceptibility status of Cx. pipiens from Tehran moreover  For comparison susceptibility status a Laboratory strain also was used.  Bioassay data were ana­lyzed using Probit program. The lethal time for 50% and 90% mortality (LT50 and LT90 values were calculated from regression line.Results: The susceptibility status of lab strain of Cx. pipiens revealed that it is susceptible to Lambdacyhalothrin, Deltamethrin, Cyfluthrin and resistant to DDT. Moreover cyfluthrin with LT50=36 seconds and DDT with LT50=3005 seconds had the least and most LT50s. Field population was resistance to all tested insecticides and DDT yielded no mortality.Conclusion: Highly resistance level against all WHO recommended imagicides were detected in field populations. We suggest more biochemical and molecular investigations to detect resistance mechanisms in the field population for further decision of vector control.

  6. Susceptibility of pest Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) and parasitoid Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera: Tachinidae) to selected insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P Glynn

    2006-06-01

    Susceptibility of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), and its endoparasitoid Trichopoda pennipes (F.) (Diptera: Tachinidae) to acetamiprid, cyfluthrin, dicrotophos, indoxacarb, oxamyl, and thiamethoxam was compared in residual and oral toxicity tests. In the residual toxicity test, cyfluthrin, dicrotophos, and oxamyl were highly toxic to N. viridula. Thiamethoxam was moderately toxic to these insects. Each of the four insecticides was highly toxic to T. pennipes after prolonged tarsal contact with dried residues of these chemicals. In the oral toxicity test, where N. viridula fed on food covered with insecticide residues, none of the insecticides were toxic to adults of this stink bug, but acetamiprid, dicrotophos, and thiamethoxam were moderately toxic to the nymphs. In the oral toxicity test, where N. viridula fed on a gel-food containing insecticides, cyfluthrin, dicrotophos, oxamyl, and thiamethoxam were highly toxic to this stink bug. In an oral toxicity test using contaminated sugar water, all of the insecticides were highly toxic to T. pennipes. Because insecticides were as toxic, or more toxic, to T. pennipes than to N. viridula, it is extremely important to conserve this parasitoid by applying these insecticides for control of southern green stink bugs only when the pest reaches economic threshold.

  7. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain.

  8. Clothianidin and Imidacloprid Residues in Poa annua (Poales: Poaceae) and Their Effects on Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavet, Christopher; Requintina, Matthew; Hampton, Emily; Cowles, Richard S; Byrne, Frank J; Alm, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify the amounts of the neonicotinoids clothianidin and imidacloprid in Poa annua L. clippings from treated golf course fairways. Average clothianidin residues 7 d after application ranged from 674 to 1,550 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 455-2,220 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average clothianidin residues the day of application ranged from 17,100-38,800 ng/g tissue in 2014. Average imidacloprid residues 7 d after treatment ranged from 1,950-3,030 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 7,780-9,230 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average imidacloprid residues the day of application ranged from 31,500-40,400 ng/g tissue in 2014. Neonicotinoid or bifenthrin-neonicotinoid combination products applied in field plots in 2012 did not significantly reduce the numbers of larvae relative to the untreated control. However, in 2013, statistically significant reductions in the numbers of larvae recovered from treated field plots were associated with the presence of bifenthrin alone or when used in combination with neonicotinoid active ingredients. Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby) adults caged on neonicotinoid-, bifenthrin-, and bifenthrin-neonicotinoid-treated P. annua turf plugs fed on P. annua leaves, but mortality was only highly significantly different between treated and untreated foliage when weevils were placed on treated foliage the day after treatment and allowed to feed for 7 d. The modest degree of population suppression with bifenthrin in these experiments may not be adequate to justify the continued use of these products due to the increased risk of insecticide resistance and disruption of biological control. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  9. Toxicity of some insecticides used in maize crop on Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera, Trichogrammatidae immature stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jander R Souza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is an important pest of maize (Zea mays L. crops in Brazil. The effects of beta-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, spinosad, etofenprox, triflumuron, alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam on Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae immature stages were evaluated. Eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, containing immature stages of the parasitoid were dipped in water solution pesticides, to evaluate their effects on emergence and sex ratio of F1 parasitoids. For F2 parasitoids, emergence, parasitism capacity, and sex ratio were evaluated. Beta-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, and spinosad affected the emergence success of F1 T. pretiosum. Insects exposed to etofenprox and alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron during the egg-larval period and to lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam during the pupal stage also suffered reduction in the emergence. Beta-cypermethrin affected the sex ratio of F1 T. pretiosum from host eggs treated during the egg-larval period; spinosad affected it during the egg-larval period and the pupal stage, whereas chlorpyrifos did the same when applied during the pupal stage. Chlorpyrifos also affected the sex ratio of F2 parasitoids, but only when applied during the egg-larval period, whereas chlorfenapyr reduced this trait when applied during the pre-pupal phase. Chlorpyrifos and alpha-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron affected the parasitism capacity of F1 females from eggs treated during the egg-larval period. Considering the overall effects, only etofenprox and triflumuron were selective on T. pretiosum when applied on parasitized A. kuehniella eggs. Further studies need to be carried out to verify the toxicity of the other pesticides under semi-field and field conditions.

  10. Determination of pesticide residue levels in omani and UAE vegetable farm soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukder, F.A.; Dahmani, J.H.A.; Kaakeh, W.; Deadman, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    In the investigation of 40 different vegetable growing farms of Al-Batinah (Oman) and Al - Ain (UAE) regions different pesticide residues were found to be present on all soil samples which varied in their types and levels according to the region. In Omani soil samples, cypermethrin was the most frequent pesticide, followed by chlorpyrifos, malathion, phenthoate, triazophos and deltamethrin. In UAE farm soil samples, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and deltamethrin were detected in all the regions, while phenthoate was detected in the Eastern and Northern regions only. (author)

  11. Pyrethroid toxicity in silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco P. Montanha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine both the lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cypermethrin in young Silver Catfish (Brazilian "Jundiá", Rhamdia quelen on aquatic environment during 96 hours, as well as to determine the Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin sublethal concentrations during the initial embryonic development period of Rhamdia quelen, and to verify their respective rates of fertilization, hatching and survival. Pyrethroid nowadays is a widely used insecticide, which presents a high toxicity to fish. In order to determine lethal and sublethal concentrations, 120 silver catfish were used; each one had an average weight of 59.58±4.50g and an average size of 20.33±2.34cm. Concentrations used were 0, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0mg of Cypermethrin per liter of water (mg/L. Fish were exposed to the product in 30-liter fish tanks. In each fish tank there were four fishes and the product was applied three times, i.e., a total of twelve fish were exposed to the product at each application, and a total of 120 fish during the entire experiment (n=120. In order to determine the Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin sublethal concentrations during the initial embryonic development, ovulation induction was performed on female fishes using hormones, and then and egg collection was performed. The eggs were then hydrated and fertilized in Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin in different concentrations: 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0mg/L of Cypermethrin and 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0mg/L of Deltamethrin, in addition to the control group (0mg/L. After fertilization, the eggs were kept in containers with the respective pesticides of Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin until hatching, when hatching rate was verified. Then the alevins, from the hatching, were kept on their respective concentrations of Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin so that the survival rate could be analyzed regarding the tested insecticides, during both 12-hour and 24-hour periods

  12. Problems in Ceuthorrhynchus spp. Control on Rapeseed in the Region of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušanka Inđić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A global trend of intensive rapeseed production as a sustainable source of energy has also been accepted in our region, but intensified production results have increased pest populations in that crop. Central European countries with a long tradition of rapeseed production have ample data on pest biology, control and effects of insecticide applications, but such data are almost nonexistant under our regional conditions. In the light of this fact,the objective of our study was to determine the optimal time for insecticide applications for controlling pest species of the genus Ceuthorrynchus.Trials were set up using standard OEPP methods with certain adaptations concerning the pest species. The insecticides based on chlorpyrifos + bifenthrin, applied at the rates of 0.5 l/ha and 0.75 l/ha, and deltamethrin at 0.3 l/ha, were applied a once – at maximumabundance of adults, and b twice – first at maximum abundance, and then eight days later. The trials were set up at two localities – Kać and Kovilj. Insecticide effects were evaluated based on the number of adults per 20 plants, the number of damaged plants and thenumber of larvae per plant. After single application of the insecticides chlorpyrifos + bifenthrin (0.5 and 0.75 l/ha and deltamethrin (0.3 l/ha in the locality of Kać, the percentage of infested plants was 1.25%, 36% and 75% (respectively, and 95% in untreated plots; while 75% and 22.5% of the plants were infested in the locality of Kovilj after chlorpyrifos + bifenthrin application, 95% after deltamethrin application, and 97.5% in untreated plots. Insecticide effect estimated by the number of larvae/plant was 0 and 0.4 for chlorpyrifos + bifenthrin, 1.4 for deltamethrin and 3.3 for untreated surface in the locality of Kać; while in the locality of Kovilj the effect of chlorpyrifos + bifenthrin was 1.4 and 0.1, deltamethrin 3.9, and 5.2 larvae/plant in untreated plots. After two insecticide applications in Kać, the percentage of

  13. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An appraisal of physicochemical parameters and some trace metals at the ... Remediation of aqueous solution of cypermethrin and chlorpyriphos using ... Urinary schistosomiasis in communities around Kiri Lake, Shelleng Local ... Investigation of relationship between sediment characteristics and heavy metals across ...

  14. Species composition of a soil invertebrate multi-species test system determines the level of ecotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sechi, Valentina; D'Annibale, Alessandra; Maraldo, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    A soil multi-species, SMS, experimental test system consisting of the natural microbial community, five collembolan species and a predatory mite along with either Enchytraeus crypticus or the earthworm Eisenia fetida were exposed to α-cypermethrin. A comparison of the performance of these two typ...

  15. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis strains virulent to Varroa destructor on larvae and adults of Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquisira-Ramírez, Eva Vianey; Peña-Chora, Guadalupe; Hernández-Velázquez, Víctor Manuel; Alvear-García, Andrés; Arenas-Sosa, Iván; Suarez-Rodríguez, Ramón

    2017-08-01

    The sublethal effects of two strains of Bacillus thuringiensis, which were virulent in vitro to Varroa destructor, were measured on Apis mellifera. The effects of five concentrations of total protein (1, 5, 25, 50 and 100μg/mL) from the EA3 and EA26.1 strains on larval and adult honey bees were evaluated for two and seven days under laboratory conditions. Based on the concentrations evaluated, total protein from the two strains did not affect the development of larvae, the syrup consumption, locomotor activity or proboscis extension response of adults. These same parameters were also tested for the effects of three concentrations (1, 10 and 15μg/kg) of cypermethrin as a positive control. Although no significant differences were observed after two days of treatment with cypermethrin, a dose-response relationship in syrup consumption and locomotor activity was observed. A significant reduction in the proboscis extension response of the bees treated with cypermethrin was also observed. Therefore, in contrast to cypermethrin, our results indicate that the EA3 and EA26.1 strains of B. thuringiensis can be used in beehives to control V. destructor and reduce the negative effects of this mite on colonies without adverse effects on the larvae and adults of A. mellifera. Additionally, the overuse of synthetic miticides, which produce both lethal and sublethal effects on bees, can be reduced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proficiency test on incurred and spiked pesticide residues in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Christensen, Hanne Bjerre; Herrmann, Susan Strange

    2009-01-01

    A proficiency test on incurred and spiked pesticide residues in wheat was organised in 2008. The test material was grown in 2007 and treated in the field with 14 pesticides formulations containing the active substances, alpha-cypermethrin, bifentrin, carbendazim, chlormequat, chlorpyrifos...

  17. Collembola and macroarthropod community responses to carbamate, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides: Direct and indirect effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampton, Geoff K. [Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gkf@soton.ac.uk; Brink, Paul J. van den [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Wageningen University, Department of Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 8080, 6700 DD Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    Non-target effects on terrestrial arthropod communities of the broad-spectrum insecticides chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin and the selective insecticide pirimicarb were investigated in winter wheat fields in summer. Effects of chlorpyrifos on arthropod abundance and taxonomic richness were consistently negative whereas effects of cypermethrin were negative for predatory arthropods but positive for soil surface Collembola. Pirimicarb effects were marginal, primarily on aphids and their antagonists, with no effect on the Collembola community. Collembola-predator ratios were significantly higher following cypermethrin treatment, suggesting that cypermethrin-induced increases in collembolan abundance represent a classical resurgence. Observations in other studies suggest Collembola resurgences may be typical after synthetic pyrethroid applications. Collembola responses to insecticides differed among species, both in terms of effect magnitude and persistence, suggesting that coarse taxonomic monitoring would not adequately detect pesticide risks. These findings have implications for pesticide risk assessments and for the selection of indicator species. - Direct and indirect insecticide effects differ among closely-related arthropod taxa; resurgence of Collembola may occur widely after synthetic pyrethroid insecticide applications.

  18. Insecticide contamination of the River Meuse in August 2007. Risk Assessment on the basis of MAM calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penailillo, B.R.; Morales, Y.; Meijers, E.

    2008-01-01

    On 31 July the company Chimac-Agriphar from Ougrée discharged 64 kilo chlorpyrifos and 12 kilo cypermethrin into the River Meuse, imposing risks to recreation (swimming and fishing), ecology (about 20 to 25 ton fish were killed) and drinking water production. In this study a retrospective risk

  19. Short communication Effect of pesticides applied in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Mabel Antwi

    2014-08-02

    Aug 2, 2014 ... cowpea crop, application of lambda cyhalothrin, dimethoate, and cypermethrin is recommended (Afun et al.,. 1991) and commonly practised in Ghana and other sub-Saharan African countries. Inherent problems of pesticide residue accumulation and degradation compounds in edible tissues (Laben, 1968) ...

  20. Effects of ethanol extract of Bersama engleriana leaves on oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pesticides are used to improve agricultural yields; meanwhile they have detrimental effects on human and animal reproduction. This study aimed at evaluating the protective effects of ethanol extract of Bersama engleriana leaves against cypermethrin-induced oxidative stress and reproductive toxicity. Fifty male guinea.

  1. Collembola and macroarthropod community responses to carbamate, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides: Direct and indirect effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, Geoff K.; Brink, Paul J. van den

    2007-01-01

    Non-target effects on terrestrial arthropod communities of the broad-spectrum insecticides chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin and the selective insecticide pirimicarb were investigated in winter wheat fields in summer. Effects of chlorpyrifos on arthropod abundance and taxonomic richness were consistently negative whereas effects of cypermethrin were negative for predatory arthropods but positive for soil surface Collembola. Pirimicarb effects were marginal, primarily on aphids and their antagonists, with no effect on the Collembola community. Collembola-predator ratios were significantly higher following cypermethrin treatment, suggesting that cypermethrin-induced increases in collembolan abundance represent a classical resurgence. Observations in other studies suggest Collembola resurgences may be typical after synthetic pyrethroid applications. Collembola responses to insecticides differed among species, both in terms of effect magnitude and persistence, suggesting that coarse taxonomic monitoring would not adequately detect pesticide risks. These findings have implications for pesticide risk assessments and for the selection of indicator species. - Direct and indirect insecticide effects differ among closely-related arthropod taxa; resurgence of Collembola may occur widely after synthetic pyrethroid insecticide applications

  2. New priority substances of the European Water Framework Directive: biocides, pesticides and brominated flame retardants in the aquatic environment of Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Bester, Kai; Bollmann, Ulla E; Boutrup, Susanne

    2014-02-01

    The biocides cybutryn (Irgarol) and terbutryn, the herbicides aclonifen and bifenox, the insecticides cypermethrin and heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide and the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) are new priority substances of the Water Framework Directive of the European Union. In order to gain knowledge about their presence in the aquatic environment in an off-season situation with regard to pesticide and biocide applications, these substances were analysed in freshwater, seawater and fish samples from Denmark. Aclonifen, bifenox, cypermethrin and heptachlor were below the limits of detection (LODs) in all samples. However, the LODs for cypermethrin and heptachlor exceeded the annual average environmental quality standards (AA-EQSs). Cybutryn, terbutryn, heptachlor epoxide and HBCD were detected in the majority of samples, with detection frequencies of 100% for heptachlor epoxide and HBCD in water and 90% in fish. No concentration was above maximum allowable concentration (MAC)-EQS values, but AA-EQS values were exceeded for all four compounds by several samples, including 100% of the water samples with regard to heptachlor epoxide. Methodological issues remain for cypermethrin, and to a certain extent for heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide, for which water LODs were above AA-EQSs although a water volume of 12L was combined with very sensitive high resolution mass spectrometry. © 2013.

  3. 76 FR 10026 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... address: FMC Corporation, 1735 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19103. Active ingredient: Zeta-Cypermethrin. Proposed Uses: Avocado, black sapote, canistel, mamey sapote, mango, papaya, sapodilla, star apple. Contact... Corporation, Peroxygens Division, 1735 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19103, Submitted by: Keller and Heckman...

  4. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance inHaematobia irritans (Muscidae from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Thadeu Medeiros Barros

    Full Text Available Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33 from all over the state. All populations were highly resistant to cypermethrin, with resistance factors (RF ranging from 89.4 to 1,020.6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect the knockdown resistance (kdr mutation also were performed in 16 samples. The kdr mutation was found in 75% of the tested populations, mostly with relatively low frequencies (<20%, and was absent in some highly resistant populations. Addition of TPP did not significantly reduce the LC50 in any population. However, PBO reduced LC50s above 40-fold in all tested populations, resulting in RFs ≤ 10 in most cases. Horn fly resistance to cypermethrin is widespread in the state, being primarily caused by an enhanced activity of P450 mono-oxygenases and secondarily by reduced target site sensitivity.

  5. Degradation of Insecticides in Poultry Manure: Determining the Insecticidal Treatment Interval for Managing House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Populations in Poultry Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz; Ahmad, Hamdan

    2016-04-01

    It is crucial to understand the degradation pattern of insecticides when designing a sustainable control program for the house fly, Musca domestica (L.), on poultry farms. The aim of this study was to determine the half-life and degradation rates of cyromazine, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin by spiking these insecticides into poultry manure, and then quantitatively analyzing the insecticide residue using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The insecticides were later tested in the field in order to study the appropriate insecticidal treatment intervals. Bio-assays on manure samples were later tested at 3, 7, 10, and 15 d for bio-efficacy on susceptible house fly larvae. Degradation analysis demonstrated that cyromazine has the shortest half-life (3.01 d) compared with chlorpyrifos (4.36 d) and cypermethrin (3.75 d). Cyromazine also had a significantly greater degradation rate compared with chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin. For the field insecticidal treatment interval study, 10 d was the interval that had been determined for cyromazine due to its significantly lower residue; for ChCy (a mixture of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin), the suggested interval was 7 d. Future work should focus on the effects of insecticide metabolites on targeted pests and the poultry manure environment.

  6. Species composition of a soil invertebrate multi-species test system determines the level of ecotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechi, Valentina; D'Annibale, Alessandra; Maraldo, Kristine; Johansen, Anders; Bossi, Rossana; Jensen, John; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2014-01-01

    A soil multi-species, SMS, experimental test system consisting of the natural microbial community, five collembolan species and a predatory mite along with either Enchytraeus crypticus or the earthworm Eisenia fetida were exposed to α-cypermethrin. A comparison of the performance of these two types of SMSs is given to aid the development of a standard test system. E. fetida had a positive effect on the majority of the species, reducing the negative insecticide effect. E. fetida affected the species sensitivity and decreased the degradation of the insecticide due to the organic matter incorporation of earthworm food. After 8 weeks, the EC50 was 0.76 mg kg −1 for enchytraeids and ranged between 2.7 and 18.9 mg kg −1 for collembolans, more sensitive than previously observed with single species. Changes observed in the community structure and function illustrates the strength of a multi-species test system as an ecotoxicological tool compared to single species tests. -- Highlights: • Degradation of alpha-cypermethrin was faster with enchytraeids than with earthworms. • Lumbricid castings and bioturbation explains bioavailability of α-cypermethrin. • Pesticide effects on soil arthropods alter with the community composition. • Multispecies test systems are feasible with either an enchytraeid or a lumbricid. • Collembolans are more sensitive to cypermethrin with enchytraeids than with earthworms. -- Soil ecotoxicological fate and effects in multispecies test systems are affected by earthworm activity

  7. Residue behaviour of six pesticides in button crimini during home canning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pengqiang; Liu, Xingang; Gu, Xiaojun; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Yuanbo; Zheng, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of home canning (including washing, boiling, cooling, adding solution and sterilisation) on residue levels of imidacloprid, diflubenzuron, abamectin, pyriproxyfen and β-cypermethrin and chlorothalonilin on button crimini was assessed. Residues of imidacloprid, diflubenzuron, abamectin and pyriproxyfen were measured by UPLC-MS/MS; the residues of β-cypermethrin and chlorothalonil were measured by GC. Results showed that washing resulted in a 3.8% reduction of the initial residue level of imidacloprid (p ≤ 0.05). From washing to sterilisation the processing effect was significant compared with raw crimini (p ≤ 0.05), but processing through cooling and adding solution had no effect. For diflubenzuron, from raw crimini to sterilisation the processing effect was significant by comparison with the initial level (p ≤ 0.05); the processing effect was not obvious between two sequential steps, and the sequential steps have list: washing and boiling, boiling and cooling, boiling and adding of solution, cooling and adding solution. The changes in abamectin levels were also significant from raw crimini to sterilisation compared with raw crimini (p ≤ 0.05), but the changes were not obvious from boiling to adding solution and amongst them. For pyriproxyfen, washing resulted in a 39% reduction, but changes were not obvious from washing to sterilisation, p ≤ 0.05 between two consecutive steps. The whole procedure could significantly decrease residues of β-cypermethrin (p ≤ 0.05); washing could significantly reduce residues of β-cypermethrin; the effects of last procedures were complicated, and p ≤ 0.05 between two consecutive steps. Washing resulted in an 80% reduction of chlorothalonil; after washing there were no detectable residues. After the whole process, the processing factors for imidacloprid, diflubenzuron, abamectin, pyriproxyfen, β-cypermethrin and chlorothalonil were 0.40, 0.22, 0.04, 0.85, 0.28 and 0, respectively.

  8. Imaginal and ovicidal effect of some insecticides against Bruchus pisorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrisomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolova I. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trials were conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Institute of Forage Crops, Pleven, Bulgaria, in order to study the imaginal and possible ovicidal effect of some insecticides against Bruchus pisorum under field conditions. Treatments with insecticides were started after the appearance of the first pea weevils eggs on pods located on the bottom two nodes. It was found that treatment with acetamiprid; thiacloprid; thiacloprid+deltamethrin; 50 g cypermethrin+480 g chlorpyrifosethyl, 50 g cypermethrin+500 g chlorpyrifosethyl and zeta-cypermethrin resulted in the cessation of additional oviposition on the lower nodes by Bruchus pisorum, due to the toxic effect of the insecticides on the pea weevil. It was found that spraying with acetamiprid and zeta-cypermethrin was the most effective. These insecticides significantly reduced the proportion of infected pods in comparison with the proportion of pods with eggs before the treatment by 30.2 and 27.4% and by 15.8 and 24.0% in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The use of acetamiprid and zeta-cypermethrin was also associated with the lowest percentage of infected seeds (21.7 and 23.6%, respectively, with the lowest percentage of infected seed in infected pods (40.5 and 42.5%, respectively and the highest weight of 1000 infected seeds (161.94 and 182.04 g, respectively. It was concluded that the management of pea weevils in the crop with acetamiprid and zetacypermethrin can lead to satisfactory results when spray timing is chosen when the first eggs are visible.

  9. Identification of a novel cytochrome P450 CYP321B1 gene from tobacco cutworm (Spodoptera litura) and RNA interference to evaluate its role in commonly used insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Long; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Baerson, Scott R; Xin, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jun; Su, Yi-Juan; Zeng, Ren-Sen

    2017-04-01

    Insect cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs or P450s) play an important role in detoxifying insecticides leading to resistance in insect populations. A polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura, has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides. In the present study, a novel P450 gene, CYP321B1, was cloned from S. litura. The function of CYP321B1 was assessed using RNA interference (RNAi) and monitoring resistance levels for three commonly used insecticides, including chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and methomyl. The full-length complementary DNA sequence of CYP321B1 is 1814 bp long with an open reading frame of 1 488 bp encoding 495 amino acid residues. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses during larval and pupal development indicated that CYP321B1 expression was highest in the midgut of fifth-instar larvae, followed by fat body and cuticle. The expression of CYP321B1 in the midgut was up-regulated by chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and methomyl with both lethal concentration at 15% (LC 15 ) (50, 100 and 150 μg/mL, respectively) and 50%(LC 50 ) dosages (100, 200 and 300 μg/mL, respectively). Addition of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) significantly increased the toxicity of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and methomyl to S. litura, suggesting a marked synergism of the three insecticides with PBO and P450-mediated detoxification. RNAi-mediated silencing of CYP321B1 further increased mortality by 25.6% and 38.9% when the fifth-instar larvae were exposed to chlorpyrifos and β-cypermethrin, respectively, at the LC 50 dose levels. The results demonstrate that CYP321B1 might play an important role in chlorpyrifos and β-cypermethrin detoxification in S. litura. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Insecticide toxicity to oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is influenced by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuying; Jin, Tao; Zeng, Ling; Lu, Yongyue

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of environmental factors (temperature, dose, dietary source, and feeding density) on the insecticide tolerance of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). The results indicated that the toxicities of trichlorphon and abamectin to B. dorsalis increased with an increase in temperature. At 15-35 degrees C, the toxicity of beta-cypermethrin decreased with an increase in temperature at low doses (0.82 and 1.86 mg/L), but was similar at a high dose (4.18 mg/L). These results demonstrated that the temperature coefficient of beta-cypermethrin was related to both temperature and dosage. The insecticide sensitivity of B. dorsalis reared on different dietary sources was significantly different. Trichlorphon sensitivity of B. dorsalis fed on banana was the highest with an LC50 of 1.61 mg/L, followed by on apple, carambola, semiartificial diet, pear, mango, guava, orange, and papaya. With an increasing feeding density, the sensitivity of B. dorsalis adults to trichlorphon increased, while the sensitivities of B. dorsalis adults to abamectin and beta-cypermethrin decreased. The differences between LC50 values of insects reared at densities of 10 and 13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet to trichlorphon, abamectin and beta-cypermethrin were not significant. This result suggested that representative toxicity could be obtained by using adults developed at a feeding density between 10-13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet. Adult body weight was positively correlated with the LC50 value of trichlorphon, but was negatively correlated with the toxicities of abamectin and beta-cypermethrin. These results suggested that the effects of adult body weight on the toxicity of insecticides were different among different chemicals.

  11. Histopathological changes in the liver and kidney tissues of marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus induced by the action of Talstar 10EC insecticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina PĂUNESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological biomarkers of toxicity in frog organs are a useful indicator of environmental pollution. The frogs were experimentally exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (0.5mg bifenthrin/g of body weight of Talstar 10EC for 3 weeks. The present study proves its toxic potential in terms of the damages in liver and kidney level. Tissues were normal in the control group. Hepatic lesions in frog exposed to bifenthrin were characterized by vacuolation of hepatocytes and nuclear pycnosis, perisinusoidal and periportal fibrosis, dilatation of Disse space and sinusoid capillaries, presence of cellular infiltrates. Kidney lesions consisted of dilation of Bowman’s space, tubular necrosis, and epithelial cells shows pycnotic nuclei, discrete degree of interstitial edema.

  12. Desenvolvimento do método de extração sólido-líquido com partição em baixa temperatura para determinação de inseticidas em grãos de milho ozonizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romenique da Silva de Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to optimize and validate a solid-liquid extraction method with low-temperature partitioning (SLE/LTP for the analysis of pesticides. This method was coupled with gas chromatography (GC/ECD and used to evaluate the degradation of bifenthrin and pirimiphos-methyl in maize grains on exposure to ozone. The optimized SLE/LTP-GC/ECD method is simple, effective and consumes low quantities of the solvent. It can be routinely used for the determination of bifenthrin and pirimiphos-methyl in maize samples. The use of this method of analysis determined that the levels of the insecticides in maize grains were reduced on exposure of the grains to the ozone gas. The observed reduction in the levels of insecticide was directly proportional to the increase in the concentration of the ozone gas.

  13. The importance of pesticide exposure duration and mode on the foraging of an agricultural pest predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caitlyn; Hanna, Chadwick J; Hanna, Catherine J B

    2015-02-01

    The striped lynx spider (Oxyopes salticus), is a natural predator of crop pests and therefore frequently encounters pesticides on its substrate and its prey. While pesticide exposure may negatively impact the lifespan of spiders, sublethal effects can also alter their normal behaviors. This study examined how prey capture was affected when spiders and their prey were exposed to bifenthrin and malathion. When spiders were continually exposed to bifenthrin residues, prey capture decreased over time, but mortality was not affected. Malathion exposed spiders, however, showed increased mortality, but their ability to catch prey was unaltered. When spiders encountered pesticide dosed prey, predation was unaffected, implying that spiders are unable to detect residues on prey. These results improve the understanding of how pesticides affect natural pest control and raise questions about the functional roles that spiders play when exposed to different chemicals.

  14. Assessment of human health risk associated with the presence of pesticides in chicken eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almas HAMID

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of pesticides in the environment is highly toxic to environment and human health. Aim of the study was determination, quantification and assessment of associated health risk due to presence of pesticide residues in chicken eggs using high pressure liquid chromatography. HPLC method was successfully employed and validated. From collected samples pesticides were extracted in presence of petroleum ether and acetonitrile. Bifenthrin and Difenoconazole residues were found in all samples with different concentration exceeding maximum residue limits (MRL of Codex Alimentarius Commission. However imidacloprid was not detected in any sample. Concentration of bifenthrin in house egg samples ranged from 0.256206 to 4.112387 mg/kg while in poultry farm samples it varied from 1.5862 to 5.80796 mg/kg. Difenoconazole was found in concentration of 0.02835 mg/kg, 1.7668 mg/kg, 3.7205 mg/kg, 21.8937 mg/kg 21.9835 mg/kg, 19.26407 mg/kg in samples collected from houses while and in poultry farm samples its detected concentration was 10.939 mg/kg, 12.3296 mg/kg, 29.3617 mg/kg, 18.6116 mg/kg, 40.0523 mg/kg and 19.2335 mg/kg. Concentrations of both pesticides Bifenthrin and Difenoconazole exceeded the MRLs (0.05 mg/kg. Health risk index surpassed 1 (the cut off value for Difenoconazole in seven samples while for Bifenthrin values were less than 1, indicating the possibility of potential medium to long term health risk associated with ingestion of contaminated eggs.

  15. Vegetated agricultural drainage ditches for the mitigation of pyrethroid-associated runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Erin R; Moore, Matthew T; Cooper, Charles M; Smith, Sammie; Shields, F Douglas; Drouillard, Ken G; Schulz, Ralf

    2005-09-01

    Drainage ditches are indispensable components of the agricultural production landscape. A benefit of these ditches is contaminant mitigation of agricultural storm runoff. This study determined bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin (two pyrethroid insecticides) partitioning and retention in ditch water, sediment, and plant material as well as estimated necessary ditch length required for effective mitigation. A controlled-release runoff simulation was conducted on a 650-m vegetated drainage ditch in the Mississippi Delta, USA. Bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin were released into the ditch in a water-sediment slurry. Samples of water, sediment, and plants were collected and analyzed for pyrethroid concentrations. Three hours following runoff initiation, inlet bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin water concentrations ranged from 666 and 374 microg/L, respectively, to 7.24 and 5.23 microg/L at 200 m downstream. No chemical residues were detected at the 400-m sampling site. A similar trend was observed throughout the first 7 d of the study where water concentrations were elevated at the front end of the ditch (0-25 m) and greatly reduced by the 400-m sampling site. Regression formulas predicted that bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin concentrations in ditch water were reduced to 0.1% of the initial value within 280 m. Mass balance calculations determined that ditch plants were the major sink and/or sorption site responsible for the rapid aqueous pyrethroid dissipation. By incorporating vegetated drainage ditches into a watershed management program, agriculture can continue to decrease potential non-point source threats to downstream aquatic receiving systems. Overall results of this study illustrate that aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the retention and distribution of pyrethroids in vegetated agricultural drainage ditches.

  16. Determination of Pesticide Residues in Cannabis Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Sullivan; Sytze Elzinga; Jeffrey C. Raber

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to quantify to what extent cannabis consumers may be exposed to pesticide and other chemical residues through inhaled mainstream cannabis smoke. Three different smoking devices were evaluated in order to provide a generalized data set representative of pesticide exposures possible for medical cannabis users. Three different pesticides, bifenthrin, diazinon, and permethrin, along with the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, which are readily available...

  17. Concentration-Response and Residual Activity of Insecticides to Control Herpetogramma phaeopteralis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in St. Augustinegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofangsazi, Nastaran; Cherry, Ron H; Beeson, Richard C; Arthurs, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    Tropical sod webworm, Herpetogramma phaeopteralis Guenée, is an important pest of warm-season turfgrass in the Gulf Coast states of the United States, the Caribbean Islands, and Central America. Current control recommendations rely on topical application of insecticides against caterpillars. The objective of this study was to generate resistance baseline data of H. phaeopteralis to six insecticide classes. Residual activity of clothianidin, chlorantraniliprole, and bifenthrin was also compared under field conditions in Central Florida. Chlorantraniliprole was the most toxic compound tested (LC50 value of 4.5 ppm), followed by acephate (8.6 ppm), spinosad (31.1 ppm), clothianidin (46.6 ppm), bifenthrin (283 ppm) and Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, (342 ppm). In field tests, all compounds at label rates were effective (≥94% mortality of larvae exposed to fresh residues). However, a more rapid decline in activity of clothianidin and bifenthrin was observed compared with chlorantraniliprole. Clothianidin had no statistically detectable activity after 4 wk post-application in spring and the fall, and bifenthrin had no detectable activity after 3 wk in the spring and the fall. However, chlorantraniliprole maintained significant activity (≥84% mortality) compared with other treatments throughout the 5-wk study period. This study provides new information regarding the relative toxicities and persistence of current insecticides used for H. phaeopteralis and other turfgrass caterpillars. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. H:\\PMKER 25(3)\\HALA.xps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    plus fréquemment utilisées contre les cochenilles appartiennent au groupe des organophosphorés. Le chlorpyrifos-éthyl a montré une bonne efficacité comparativement aux pyréthrinoïdes tels que la bifenthrine et la lamdacyhalothrine (Dembélé, 2001). Toutes les formulations à base de chlorpyriphos- éthyl (Dursban 4 E, ...

  19. Toxicity of several contact insecticides to Tribolium castaneum (Herbst populations after selection with pirimiphos-methyl and deltamethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Andrić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory bioassays were conducted to detect possible alteration in susceptibility of two field Tribolium castaneum (Herbst populations (sampled in a warehouse in Nikinci and a silo in Jakovo to dichlorvos, malathion, chlorpyrifos-methyl, pirimiphos-methyl, deltamethrin and bifenthrin after previous selection with the LD80 of pirimiphos-methyl and deltamethrin. Data from the topical application bioassays show that chlorpyrifos-methyl was the most toxic insecticide to T. castaneum adults of the Nikinci population selected with pirimiphosmethyl and deltamethrin, while malathion was the weakest, and both selection procedures changed/reduced significantly only the toxicity of deltamethrin and bifenthrin, increasing their resistance ratios (RR at the LD50 from 1.1 to 1.8 (bifenthrin and from 0.9 to 2.2 (deltamethrin. Deltamethrin was the most toxic insecticide for Jakovo adults selected with the LD80 of pirimiphosmethyl, while malathion was again the least toxic. Selection of that population had no effect on insecticide toxicity, except of malathion, which had a rise in RR at the LD50 from 26.0 to 29.8.

  20. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction in Pesticide Residues Analysis:1. Optimisation of Extraction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of headspace solid phase microextraction (HS/SPME was successfully used in a simultaneous multicomponent analysis of hexachlorobenzene (HCB, tefluthrin, heptachlor, aldrin, chlorpyrifos, fenthion and bifenthrin in aqueous medium. Measurementswere performed using a nonpolar polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS fiber. Detection and quantification were done by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS.Optimal conditions for HS/SPME were determined both by performing extraction at different temperatures and examining extraction time profiles at constant temperature. Optimal extraction temperature for each pesticide studied was determined as follows: 60°C for HCB and for heptachlor, 80°C for aldrin and for chlorpyrifos, fenthion and tefluthrin, and temperature exceeding 80°C for bifenthrin. For the pesticide mixture studied, 60°C was identified as the optimum extraction temperature.Based on the time profiles obtained, it was confirmed that satisfactory extraction sensitivity can be obtained even for extraction times shorter than the time required to reach a sorption equilibrium. This conclusion was confirmed by linear concentration profiles obtained for the following ranges: 0.05-10 ng/ml (HCB, 0.05-25 ng/ml (tefluthrin, 0.05-40 ng/ml (heptachlor, 0.05-40 ng/ml (aldrin, 0.05-25 ng/ml (chlorpyrifos, 0.05-25 ng/ml (fenthionand 0.05-25 ng/ml (bifenthrin.Relative standard deviation (RSD values for triplicate measurements did not exceed 15%.

  1. Environmental modeling and exposure assessment of sediment-associated pyrethroids in an agricultural watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhou Luo

    Full Text Available Synthetic pyrethroid insecticides have generated public concerns due to their increasing use and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. A modeling system was developed in this study for simulating the transport processes and associated sediment toxicity of pyrethroids at coupled field/watershed scales. The model was tested in the Orestimba Creek watershed, an agriculturally intensive area in California' Central Valley. Model predictions were satisfactory when compared with measured suspended solid concentration (R(2 = 0.536, pyrethroid toxic unit (0.576, and cumulative mortality of Hyalella azteca (0.570. The results indicated that sediment toxicity in the study area was strongly related to the concentration of pyrethroids in bed sediment. Bifenthrin was identified as the dominant contributor to the sediment toxicity in recent years, accounting for 50-85% of predicted toxicity units. In addition, more than 90% of the variation on the annual maximum toxic unit of pyrethroids was attributed to precipitation and prior application of bifenthrin in the late irrigation season. As one of the first studies simulating the dynamics and spatial variability of pyrethroids in fields and instreams, the modeling results provided useful information on new policies to be considered with respect to pyrethroid regulation. This study suggested two potential measures to efficiently reduce sediment toxicity by pyrethroids in the study area: [1] limiting bifenthrin use immediately before rainfall season; and [2] implementing conservation practices to retain soil on cropland.

  2. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction in Pesticide Residues Analysis: 2. Apple Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Milinović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Headspace solid phase microextraction method (HS/SPME, optimised previously for pesticide water solutions, was applied to trace residues of the pesticides chlorpyrifos, fenthion and bifenthrin in apple samples. One-hour extraction procedure was performed at 60oC extraction temperature. Nonpolar polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS fiber was used. Detection and quantification were carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A non-pesticide treated apple sample was fortified with the pesticides over a 0.025-1.25 mg/kg concentration range in order to determine analytical parameters of the method applied. Linearity with regression coefficient (R values higher than 0.99 were obtained over the whole concentration range investigated for chlorpyrifos and fenthion, while linear dependence was observed in the 0.1-1.25 mg/kg range for bifenthrin. Relative recovery values for samples fortified at different levels were in the 56.68-82.91% range. Limit of detection (LOD values were determined as follows: 0.014 mg/kg for chlorpyrifos, 0.021 mg/kg for fenthion and 0.053 mg/kg for bifenthrin. Relative standard deviation (RSD values obtained for multiple analysis of the sample fortified at 0.6 mg/kg level were not higher than 20%.

  3. Reduced risk insecticides to control scale insects and protect natural enemies in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven D

    2012-04-01

    Armored scale insects are among the most difficult to manage and economically important arthropod pests in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants. This is because of morphological traits that protect them from contact insecticides. I compared initial and season-long control of euonymus scale, Unaspis euonymi Comstock (Hemiptera: Diaspidae), by reduced-risk insecticides (insect growth regulators [IGRs], neonicotinoids, spirotetramat) to determine if they controlled scale as well as more toxic insecticides such as the organophosphate, acephate, and pyrethroid, bifenthrin. I also evaluated how these insecticides affected natural enemy abundance on experimental plants and survival when exposed to insecticide residue. All insecticides tested reduced first generation euonymus scale abundance. In 2009, reinfestation by second generation euonymus scale was highest on plants treated with acetamiprid and granular dinotefuran. In 2010, systemic neonicotinoids and spirotetramat prevented cottony cushion scale infestation 133 d after treatment whereas scale readily infested plants treated with bifenthrin and horticultural oil. Encarsia spp. and Cybocephalus spp. abundance was related to scale abundance. These natural enemies were generally less abundant than predicted by scale abundance on granular dinotefuran treated plants and more abundant on granular thiamethoxam treated plants. Bifenthrin residue killed 90-100% of O. insidiosus and E. citrina within 24 h. My results indicate that reduced risk insecticides can provide season-long scale control with less impact on natural enemies than conventional insecticides. This could have economic and environmental benefits by reducing the number of applications necessary to protect nursery and landscape plants from scale.

  4. Application of isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants sorbed to dissolved organic matter (DOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura, E-mail: laura.delgado@eez.csic.es; Wu, Laosheng; Gan, Jay

    2015-08-15

    Natural waters such as surface water and sediment porewater invariably contain dissolved organic matter (DOM). Association of strongly hydrophobic contaminants (HOCs) with DOM leads to decreased toxicity and bioavailability, but bioavailability of DOM-sorbed HOCs is difficult to measure. Current methods to estimate bioavailability of HOCs in water are based on only the freely dissolved concentration (C{sub free}). The ignorance of the exchangeable fraction of HOCs sorbed on DOM may result in an underestimation of the toxicity potential of HOCs to aquatic organisms. Here we explore the applicability of an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measuring the desorption fraction of DOM-sorbed pyrene and bifenthrin and determining their exchangeable pool (E) as an approximation of bioavailability. E values, expressed as percentage of the total concentration, ranged between 0.80 and 0.92% for pyrene and 0.74 and 0.85% for bifenthrin, depending primarily on the amount of chemical in the freely dissolved form. However, between 34 and 78% of the DOM-sorbed pyrene was exchangeable. This fraction ranged between 23% and 82% for bifenthrin. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a significant relationship (r{sup 2} > 0.72, P < 0.0001) between E and bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna. Therefore, IDM may be used to improve the bioavailability measurement and risk assessment of HOCs in aquatic systems.

  5. Application of isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants sorbed to dissolved organic matter (DOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Wu, Laosheng; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Natural waters such as surface water and sediment porewater invariably contain dissolved organic matter (DOM). Association of strongly hydrophobic contaminants (HOCs) with DOM leads to decreased toxicity and bioavailability, but bioavailability of DOM-sorbed HOCs is difficult to measure. Current methods to estimate bioavailability of HOCs in water are based on only the freely dissolved concentration (C free ). The ignorance of the exchangeable fraction of HOCs sorbed on DOM may result in an underestimation of the toxicity potential of HOCs to aquatic organisms. Here we explore the applicability of an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measuring the desorption fraction of DOM-sorbed pyrene and bifenthrin and determining their exchangeable pool (E) as an approximation of bioavailability. E values, expressed as percentage of the total concentration, ranged between 0.80 and 0.92% for pyrene and 0.74 and 0.85% for bifenthrin, depending primarily on the amount of chemical in the freely dissolved form. However, between 34 and 78% of the DOM-sorbed pyrene was exchangeable. This fraction ranged between 23% and 82% for bifenthrin. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a significant relationship (r 2 > 0.72, P < 0.0001) between E and bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna. Therefore, IDM may be used to improve the bioavailability measurement and risk assessment of HOCs in aquatic systems

  6. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part I: distribution in relation to urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Phillips, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Organic contaminants and trace elements were measured in bed sediments collected from streams in seven metropolitan study areas across the United States to assess concentrations in relation to urbanization. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin, and several trace elements were significantly related to urbanization across study areas. Most contaminants (except bifenthrin, chromium, nickel) were significantly related to the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the sediments. Regression models explained 45–80 % of the variability in individual contaminant concentrations using degree of urbanization, sediment-TOC, and study-area indicator variables (which represent the combined influence of unknown factors, such as chemical use or release, that are not captured by available explanatory variables). The significance of one or more study-area indicator variables in all models indicates marked differences in contaminant levels among some study areas, even after accounting for the nationally modeled effects of urbanization and sediment-TOC. Mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQs) were significantly related to urbanization. Trace elements were the major contributors to mean PECQs at undeveloped sites, whereas organic contaminants, especially bifenthrin, were the major contributors at highly urban sites. Pyrethroids, where detected, accounted for the largest share of the mean PECQ. Part 2 of this series (Kemble et al. 2012) evaluates sediment toxicity to amphipods and midge in relation to sediment chemistry.

  7. Toxicity and Residual Activity of Insecticides Against Tamarixia triozae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a Parasitoid of Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Cruz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Leyva, Esteban; Lomeli-Flores, J Refugio; Ortega-Arenas, Laura D; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor; Pineda, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is one of the most economically important pests of potato, tomato, and peppers in Central America, Mexico, the United States, and New Zealand. Its control is based on the use of insecticides; however, recently, the potential of the eulophid parasitoid Tamarixia triozae (Burks) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) for population regulation has been studied. Because T. triozae is likely to be exposed to insecticides on crops, the objective of this study was to explore the compatibility of eight insecticides with this parasitoid. The toxicity and residual activity (persistence) of spirotetramat, spiromesifen, beta-cyfluthrin, pymetrozine, azadirachtin, imidacloprid, abamectin, and spinosad against T. triozae adults were assessed using a method based on the residual contact activity of each insecticide on tomato leaf discs collected from treated plants growing under greenhouse conditions. All eight insecticides were toxic to T. triozae. Following the classification of the International Organization of Biological Control, the most toxic were abamectin and spinosad, which could be placed in toxicity categories 3 and 4, respectively. The least toxic were azadirachtin, pymetrozine, spirotetramat, spiromesifen, imidacloprid, and beta-cyfluthrin, which could be placed in toxicity category 2. In terms of persistence, by day 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 24, and 41 after application, spirotetramat, azadirachtin, spiromesifen, pymetrozine, imidacloprid, beta-cyfluthrin, abamectin, and spinosad could be considered harmless, that is, placed in toxicity category 1 (<25% mortality of adults). The toxicity and residual activity of some of these insecticides allow them to be considered within integrated pest management programs that include T. triozae. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Large-scale monitoring of effects of clothianidin-dressed oilseed rape seeds on pollinating insects in northern Germany: residues of clothianidin in pollen, nectar and honey

    OpenAIRE

    Rolke, Daniel; Persigehl, Markus; Peters, Britta; Sterk, Guido; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This study was part of a large-scale monitoring project to assess the possible effects of Elado® (10 g clothianidin & 2 g β-cyfluthrin/kg seed)-dressed oilseed rape seeds on different pollinators in Northern Germany. Firstly, residues of clothianidin and its active metabolites thiazolylnitroguanidine and thiazolylmethylurea were measured in nectar and pollen from Elado®-dressed (test site, T) and undressed (reference site, R) oilseed rape collected by honey bees confined within tunnel tents. ...

  9. The influence of multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors on benthic communities in a mid-west agricultural stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Killen, Willian D; Anderson, Ronald D; Alden, Raymond W

    2017-08-24

    The objective of this 3-year study was to characterize benthic communities and physical habitat in an agricultural stream in the mid-west area of the United States (Big Bureau Creek, Illinois). Concurrent basic water quality parameters and seven nutrients were measured in the water column. Sediment measurements from depositional areas were conducted for bifenthrin, Total Organic Carbon, grain size, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and eight metals. All parameters were measured at 12 sites annually during the late summer for a 3-year period (2014, 2015 and 2016). Univariate regressions, stepwise multiple regressions and canonical correlation statistical analyses were used to determine the relationship between various benthic metrics (i.e., taxa richness and abundance) and all the measured parameters for the 3-year database. Benthic communities comprising 108-110 taxa were collected annually, and were generally dominated by sensitive caddisflies and mayflies. These communities were rated as good to exceptional using the Ohio Invertebrate Community Index. Physical habitat for the various sites was rated as good using the Ohio Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index, thus suggesting that habitat is not a significant stressor that would likely impact resident benthic communities. Based on a comparison of measured in-stream total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations and criterion value exceedances, it appears that the in-stream nutrient concentrations could be potentially stressful to resident benthic biota. Metal concentrations were below established NOAA Threshold Effects Levels at all sites. Measured PCB concentrations were below levels of detection at all sites. Toxic units' (TUs) calculations based on using sensitive laboratory strains of Hyalella were less than 0.1 for bifenthrin, thus suggesting that bifenthrin sediment toxicity was unlikely. Thirty significant relationships reported between benthic metrics and the various environmental variables based on the

  10. Selection of sorption material for tests of pesticide permeation through protective clothing fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Nazimek, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies on selecting a solid sorption material for absorbing liquid crop protection agents which permeate samples of protective clothing fabrics. The sorption materials were investigated and selected with an assumption that they should have a high recovery coefficient for biologically active substances, used as active ingredients in crop protection agents, at a presumed, acceptably high level. The selected substances were determined with a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (dichlorvos, cypermethrin and 2,4-D) and a nitrogen-phosphorus detector (carbofuran). The tests demonstrated that polypropylene melt-blown type unwoven cloth had high recovery coefficients for all 4 active ingredients proposed for the study. The highest recovery coefficient, -.97, was obtained for carbofuran. The recovery coefficients obtained for the 3 remaining substances were lower: .89 for cypermethrin and 2,4-D, and .84 for dichlorvos.

  11. Evaluation of new tools for malaria vector control in Cameroon: focus on long lasting insecticidal nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etang, Josiane; Nwane, Philippe; Piameu, Michael; Manga, Blaise; Souop, Daniel; Awono-Ambene, Parfait

    2013-01-01

    From 2006 to 2011, biological activity of insecticides for Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS), conventional treatment of nets (CTNs) or long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) was evaluated before their approval in Cameroon. The objective of the study was to select the best tools for universal malaria vector control coverage. Bioassays were performed using WHO cones and the Kisumu susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae s.s.. Among tested products, residual activity and wash resistance of Alpha-cypermethrin LLINs (Interceptor) and CTNs (Fendona) were assessed during 5 months in the Ntougou neighborhood. All the 14 tested products were found effective (95-100% knockdown and mortality rates), although a significant decrease of efficacy was seen with lambda-cyhalothrinWP IRS, alpha-cypermethrin CTNs and LLINs (peducation toward universal coverage of malaria vector control in Cameroon.

  12. Comparison of susceptibility of pest Euschistus servus and predator Podisus maculiventris (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) to selected insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P Glynn; Mullinix, Benjamin G

    2004-06-01

    Susceptibility of the brown stink bug, Euschistus serous (Say), and the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say), to acetamiprid, cyfluthrin, dicrotophos, indoxacarb, oxamyl, and thiamethoxam, was compared in residual and oral toxicity tests. Generally, susceptibility of P. maculiventris to insecticides was significantly greater than or not significantly different from that of E. servus. Cyfluthrin and oxamyl were more toxic to the predator than to E. servus in residual and feeding tests, respectively. Dicrotophos is the only compound that exhibited both good residual and oral activity against E. servus, but even this toxicant was more toxic to the predator than to the pest in oral toxicity tests. Feeding on indoxacarb-treated food caused high mortality for both nymphs and adults of P. maculiventris. In contrast, E. servus was unaffected by feeding on food treated with this compound. Insecticide selectivity to P. maculiventris was detected only with acetamiprid for adults in residual toxicity tests and for nymphs in oral toxicity tests. Because insecticide selectivity to P. maculiventris was limited, it is extremely important to conserve P. maculiventris in cotton fields by applying these insecticides for control of brown stink bugs only when the pest reaches economic threshold.

  13. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in house flies, Musca domestica L., (Diptera: Muscidae) collected from urban areas in Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem; Fatima, Ammara

    2017-12-01

    House flies are one of the major public health pests in urban settings. People usually use insecticides containing pyrethroids for the management of house flies; however, there is a lack of information on pyrethroid resistance in house flies from urban areas. In the present study, resistance to four pyrethroids (beta-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, transfluthrin) was assessed in house flies collected from urban areas of Punjab, Pakistan. Significant levels of resistance to all the pyrethroids were found in different strains of house flies. The resistance ratios (RRs) at the median lethal dose (LD 50 ) level were in the range of 5.25- to 11.02-fold for beta-cyfluthrin, 7.22- to 19.31-fold for deltamethrin, 5.36- to 16.04-fold for permethrin, and 9.05- to 35.50-fold for transfluthrin. Pairwise comparison of the log LD 50 s revealed a highly significant correlation (p house flies from urban areas of Punjab. Regular resistance monitoring surveys and integrated approaches for the management of house flies are needed to retain the efficacy of these insecticides for a longer period of time.

  14. Mitigation of two pyrethroid insecticides in a Mississippi Delta constructed wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, M.T. [USDA Agricultural Research Service National Sedimentation Laboratory, Water Quality and Ecology Research Unit, PO Box 1157, 598 McElroy Drive, Oxford, MS 38655 (United States)], E-mail: matt.moore@ars.usda.gov; Cooper, C.M.; Smith, S.; Cullum, R.F.; Knight, S.S.; Locke, M.A.; Bennett, E.R. [USDA Agricultural Research Service National Sedimentation Laboratory, Water Quality and Ecology Research Unit, PO Box 1157, 598 McElroy Drive, Oxford, MS 38655 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Constructed wetlands are a suggested best management practice to help mitigate agricultural runoff before entering receiving aquatic ecosystems. A constructed wetland system (180 m x 30 m), comprising a sediment retention basin and two treatment cells, was used to determine the fate and transport of simulated runoff containing the pyrethroid insecticides lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin, as well as suspended sediment. Wetland water, sediment, and plant samples were collected spatially and temporally over 55 d. Results showed 49 and 76% of the study's measured lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin masses were associated with vegetation, respectively. Based on conservative effects concentrations for invertebrates and regression analyses of maximum observed wetland aqueous concentrations, a wetland length of 215 m x 30 m width would be required to adequately mitigate 1% pesticide runoff from a 14 ha contributing area. Results of this experiment can be used to model future design specifications for constructed wetland mitigation of pyrethroid insecticides. - A wetland length of 215 m x 30 m mitigated pyrethroid runoff from a 14 ha field.

  15. Mitigation of two pyrethroid insecticides in a Mississippi Delta constructed wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.T.; Cooper, C.M.; Smith, S.; Cullum, R.F.; Knight, S.S.; Locke, M.A.; Bennett, E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are a suggested best management practice to help mitigate agricultural runoff before entering receiving aquatic ecosystems. A constructed wetland system (180 m x 30 m), comprising a sediment retention basin and two treatment cells, was used to determine the fate and transport of simulated runoff containing the pyrethroid insecticides lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin, as well as suspended sediment. Wetland water, sediment, and plant samples were collected spatially and temporally over 55 d. Results showed 49 and 76% of the study's measured lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin masses were associated with vegetation, respectively. Based on conservative effects concentrations for invertebrates and regression analyses of maximum observed wetland aqueous concentrations, a wetland length of 215 m x 30 m width would be required to adequately mitigate 1% pesticide runoff from a 14 ha contributing area. Results of this experiment can be used to model future design specifications for constructed wetland mitigation of pyrethroid insecticides. - A wetland length of 215 m x 30 m mitigated pyrethroid runoff from a 14 ha field

  16. LABORATORY PROTECTION RATE OF TORN BEDNETS TREATED WITH THREE DOSAGES OF PYRETHROIDE AGAINST ANOPHELES CULICIFACIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Babaee

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluated under laboratory condition. The objective of the present study was to observe the effect of impregnated torn bednets on the number of bites by An. culicifacies A glass made tunnel test was designed to The effect of torn bednets treated with three dosages of cyfluthrin 5% EW, were induce hungry female mosquitoes to pass through holes cut in the pyrethroid treated nets. A guinea pig used as bait to attract mosquitoes through circular holes in the netting. With untreated netting, 72-87% of laboratory-reared females passed through the holes overnight, 64-92% blood-fed successfully and 0.3/9-4/3% died. When the netting was treated with cyfluthrin at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg a.i./m2, the entry Index (the proportions that passed through the holes overnight were 43.37%, 42.82% and 24.72%; mortality rates were 66.31%, 81.45% and 95.99%; and the feeding rate were 45%, 27% and 3%. In conclusion it should be stressed that efficacy of pyrethroid impregnated bednets using “Tunnel Tests” showing acceptable protection rate both in lower and higher dosages as well as cause dead in the blood-fed mosquitoes. In addition, the higher dosages of these three dosages pyrethroid provided good levels of protection against An. culicifacies.

  17. Effect of deltamethrin on the biochemical profile of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velíšek, J.; Dobšíková, R.; Svobodová, Z.; Modrá, H.; Lusková, Věra

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 6 (2006), s. 992-998 ISSN 0007-4861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD523/03/H076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : fish * metabolism * cypermethrin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.505, year: 2006 http://www.springerlink.com/content/e974g87836848876/fulltext.pdf

  18. Quantitative structure activity relationship and risk analysis of some pesticides in the goat milk

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Faqir; Awais, Mian Muhammad; Akhtar, Masood; Anwar, Muhammad Irfan

    2013-01-01

    The detection and quantification of different pesticides in the goat milk samples collected from different localities of Faisalabad, Pakistan was performed by HPLC using solid phase microextraction. The analysis showed that about 50% milk samples were contaminated with pesticides. The mean+/-SEM levels (ppm) of cyhalothrin, endosulfan, chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin were 0.34+/-0.007, 0.063+/-0.002, 0.034+/-0.002 and 0.092+/-0.002, respectively; whereas, methyl parathion was not detected in an...

  19. Efficacy of Chemicals for the Potential Management of the Queensland Fruit Fly Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Olivia L.; Osborne, Terrence J.; Barchia, Idris

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated alternative in-field chemical controls against Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt). Bioassay 1 tested the mortality of adults exposed to fruit and filter paper dipped in insecticide, and the topical application of insecticide to adults/fruit. Bioassay 2 measured the mortality of adults permitted to oviposit on fruit dipped in insecticide and aged 0, 1, 3, or 5 days, plus the production of offspring. Bioassay 3 tested infested fruit sprayed with insecticide. The field bioassay trialed the mortality of adults exposed to one- and five-day insecticide residues on peaches, and subsequent offspring. Abamectin, alpha-cypermethrin, clothianidin, dimethoate (half-label rate), emamectin benzoate, fenthion (half- and full-label rate), and trichlorfon were the most efficacious in bioassay 1, across 18 tested insecticide treatments. Overall, the LT50 value was lowest for fenthion (full-label rate), clothianidin, and alpha-cypermethrin. Fenthion, emamectin benzoate, and abamectin had the greatest effect on adult mortality and offspring production. Infested fruit treated with acetamiprid, fenthion, and thiacloprid produced no/very few offspring. Alpha-cypermethrin demonstrated good field efficacy against adults (one day post treatment: 97.2% mortality, five day post treatment: 98.8% mortality) and subsequent offspring (100% across one and five day post treatments), comparable to that of fenthion (full-label rate) (100% mortality for offspring and adults across both post treatments). Alpha-cypermethrin is a possible alternative to fenthion against B. tryoni; as a pyrethroid, it may not be desirable if adjunct biological control is imperative. Thiacloprid and Acetamiprid may be useful as a post-harvest treatment. PMID:28486404

  20. Efficacy of Chemicals for the Potential Management of the Queensland Fruit Fly Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia L. Reynolds

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated alternative in-field chemical controls against Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt. Bioassay 1 tested the mortality of adults exposed to fruit and filter paper dipped in insecticide, and the topical application of insecticide to adults/fruit. Bioassay 2 measured the mortality of adults permitted to oviposit on fruit dipped in insecticide and aged 0, 1, 3, or 5 days, plus the production of offspring. Bioassay 3 tested infested fruit sprayed with insecticide. The field bioassay trialed the mortality of adults exposed to one- and five-day insecticide residues on peaches, and subsequent offspring. Abamectin, alpha-cypermethrin, clothianidin, dimethoate (half-label rate, emamectin benzoate, fenthion (half- and full-label rate, and trichlorfon were the most efficacious in bioassay 1, across 18 tested insecticide treatments. Overall, the LT50 value was lowest for fenthion (full-label rate, clothianidin, and alpha-cypermethrin. Fenthion, emamectin benzoate, and abamectin had the greatest effect on adult mortality and offspring production. Infested fruit treated with acetamiprid, fenthion, and thiacloprid produced no/very few offspring. Alpha-cypermethrin demonstrated good field efficacy against adults (one day post treatment: 97.2% mortality, five day post treatment: 98.8% mortality and subsequent offspring (100% across one and five day post treatments, comparable to that of fenthion (full-label rate (100% mortality for offspring and adults across both post treatments. Alpha-cypermethrin is a possible alternative to fenthion against B. tryoni; as a pyrethroid, it may not be desirable if adjunct biological control is imperative. Thiacloprid and Acetamiprid may be useful as a post-harvest treatment.

  1. Dissipation and leaching of 14C-monocrotophos in soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vig, K.; Singh, D.K.; Agarwal, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    Dissipation and leaching of 14 C-monocrotophos was studied in the field. Two sets of PVC cylinders were used - one set received only 14 C monocrotophos and the other received 14 C-monocrotophos along with dimethoate, deltamethrin, endosulfan, cypermethrin and 1.06 mg unlabelled monocrotophos. Both setups showed a similar pattern of dissipation with a half-life of 277.2 days. Leaching of monocrotophos was observed into the 30cm soil layer. (author)

  2. De-contamination of pesticide residues in food by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Mohamed, Khaled A.; Al-Saqer, Omar A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of gamma irradiation on removal of pesticides in aqueous solutions or in vegetables and fruits was investigated. Radiation - induced decontamination of pesticides is generally greater in aqueous solutions than in selected vegetables and fruits. Residues of malathion (0.5 ppm in potatoes, 8 ppm in onions and dates), pirimiphos-methyl (1 ppm in onions and grapes) and cypermethrin (0.05 ppm in potatoes and 0.1 ppm in onions) were not reduced to below maximum residue limits (MRLs) for irradiation doses up to 1 kGy. The same trend was observed when irradiation was performed for grapes fortified with malathion (8 ppm) and cypermethrin (2 ppm) for absorbed doses up to 2 kGy. Ionizing radiation reduced the residues of pirimiphos-methyl (0.05 ppm in potatoes at1 kGy, 1 ppm in grapes at 2 kGy and 0.1 ppm in dates at1 kGy), malathion (8 ppm in grapes at 7 kGy) and cypermethrin (2 ppm in grapes at 7 kGy) to below maximum residue limits (MRLs). - Highlights: ► The role of irradiation on removal of pesticides in aqueous solutions or in food products was investigated. ► Radiation-induced removal of pesticides is generally greater in aqueous solutions than in food products. ► Radiation can reduce the pirimiphos-methyl in potatoes, grapes and dates to below MRLs. ► Radiation can reduce the malathion and cypermethrin in grapes to below MRLs. ► Radiation is used for dual objectives of reducing pesticide residues and improving food safety.

  3. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie, E-mail: ebj@mil.au.dk

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [{sup 3}H]{sub 2}O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks

  4. Management of Mango Hopper, Idioscopus clypealis, Using Chemical Insecticides and Neem Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan, S. M.; Uddin, M. M.; Alam, M. J.; Islam, M. S.; Kashem, M. A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in Field Laboratory, Department of Entomology at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, during 2013 to manage the mango hopper, Idioscopus clypealis L, using three chemical insecticides, Imidacloprid (0.3%), Endosulfan (0.5%), and Cypermethrin (0.4%), and natural Neem oil (3%) with three replications of each. All the treatments were significantly effective in managing mango hopper in comparison to the control. Imidacloprid showed the highest efficacy in pe...

  5. Impact of insecticides used to control Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith in corn on survival, sex ratio, and reproduction of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jander R Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Corn (Zea mays L. is cultivated in large areas and considered one of the world's major cereal crops. There are several arthropod pests that can reduce its production such as the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lep.: Noctuidae, which is considered to be the main pest for corn. Fall armyworm is primarily controlled by insecticides. The use of biological control agents to manage this pest is growing with an emphasis on the egg parasitoid Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hym.: Trichogrammatidae. Thus, the aim of this research was to evaluate the impact of the following insecticides (g ai L-1 beta-cypermethrin (0.03, chlorfenapyr (0.60, chlorpyrifos (0.96, spinosad (0.16, etofenprox (0.10, triflumuron (0.08, alfa-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron (0.0425/0.0425, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam (0.11/0.083 on survival, sex ratio, reproduction, and T. pretiosum offspring. Distilled water was used as a control. Commercial insecticide formulations were diluted in distilled water. Bioassays used Anagasta kuehniella eggs treated with insecticides which were afterwards exposed to parasitism. Bioassays were conducted under controlled conditions at 25 ± 2 °C, 70 ± 10% RH, and 12:12 h photoperiod. Alfa-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron, beta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenapyr, spinosad, etofenprox, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam reduced parasitism capacity of maternal generation females as well as the percentage of insect emergence from the F1 generation. Only triflumuron was selective for T. pretiosum and can be recommended along with this parasitoid in fall armyworm management programs in corn.

  6. IN VITRO EFFICACY OF COMMERCIAL ACARICIDES INDICATE RESISTANT POPULATIONS OF RHIPICEPHALUS (BOOPHILUS MICROPLUS IN NORTHERN REGION OF MATO GROSSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Eckstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are responsible for high economic and production losses on cattle production, and the use of acaricides is the main form of control applied. In recent decades, the resistance of ticks to acaricides was exacerbated by incorrect use of products, compromising the effectiveness of treatments. This study aimed to determine in vitro effectiveness of commercial acaricides in six populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus in northern region of Mato Grosso. On average 100 engorged females were collected from each herd, which were selected and separated into homogeneous groups, sanitized, and immersed to acaricide diluted according to the manufacturer's statement, on sequence there was incubated. After the incubation was obtained from female reproductive efficiency and effectiveness of the tested acaricides. The association cypermethrin+ chlorpyrifos + citronellal showed satisfactory efficiency (> 95% in all the properties (mean 99.86% in properties, followed by trichlorfon (83.45%, amitraz (72.33%, neem oil (67.23% and cypermethrin (22.97%, which was not effective in any property. It indicates the use of the association cypermethrin +chlorpyrifos+ citronellal on evaluated properties for control of cattle tick effectively.

  7. Health Risk Assessment of Pesticide Residues via Dietary Intake of Market Vegetables from Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shakhaoat Hossain

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess the health risk of pesticide residues via dietary intake of vegetables collected from four top agro-based markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh. High performance liquid chromatography with a photo diode array detector (HPLC-PDA was used to determine six organophosphorus (chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, parathion, ethion, acephate, fenthion, two carbamate (carbaryl and carbofuran and one pyrethroid (cypermethrin pesticide residues in twelve samples of three common vegetables (tomato, lady’s finger and brinjal. Pesticide residues ranged from below detectable limit (<0.01 to 0.36 mg/kg. Acephate, chlorpyrifos, ethion, carbaryl and cypermethrin were detected in only one sample, while co-occurrence occurred twice for fenitrothion and parathion. Apart from chlorpyrifos in tomato and cypermethrin in brinjal, all pesticide residues exceeded the maximum residue limit (MRL. Hazard risk index (HRI for ethion (10.12 and carbaryl (1.09 was found in lady’s finger and tomato, respectively. Rest of the pesticide residues were classified as not a health risk. A continuous monitoring and strict regulation should be enforced regarding control of pesticide residues in vegetables and other food commodities.

  8. Determination of pesticide residue in selected fruits and vegetable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabbasum, R.; Aman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Food contamination due to indiscriminate use of pesticides has become a serious problem. Fruits samples of tomato, grapes, musk melon, parsimen and vegetable samples of potato, pea, spinach, cabbage and pumpkin ere collected from local market of Peshawar, coming from different regions. All samples were extracted, purified and analyzed for the commonly used pesticides. Dichlorovas, BHC, Atrazine, Daizinon, Methadiathion and Cypermethrin were detected by Gas Chromatography. These pesticides were detected in vegetable samples Id Atrazine were found in potato sample and not detected in other samples. Large concentration of Cypermethrin (44.6) was detected in the pea sample. All the vegetables samples have maximum concentration of pesticides, which is higher than their MRLs, but in pumpkin no one of the above pesticides were detected. In fruits samples, dichlorovas, atrazine, diazinon, methadiathion. Cypermethrin were detected. BHC was not present in fruits samples. All these pesticides were above the MRLs. The study concluded that agriculture crops are highly contaminated due to the uncontrolled use of pesticides in project area and suggested that pesticides should be applied in calculated dose to avoid resistance and persistence due to over and under dose application. (author)

  9. Side-effects of pesticides used in irrigated rice areas on Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazini, Juliano de Bastos; Pasini, Rafael Antonio; Seidel, Enio Júnior; Rakes, Matheus; Martins, José Francisco da Silva; Grützmacher, Anderson Dionei

    2017-08-01

    Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) is an important agent for the biological control of stink bug eggs in irrigated rice areas and the best strategy for its preservation is the use of selective pesticides. The aim of this study was to know the side-effects of pesticides used in Brazilian irrigated rice areas on egg parasitoid T. podisi. We evaluated, under laboratory conditions, 13 insecticides, 11 fungicides, 11 herbicides, and a control (distilled water) in choice and no-choice tests. In the no-choice tests, the pesticides were sprayed at pre and post-parasitism stages (egg and larval stages of T. podisi). In the choice tests, sprays were conducted only at pre-parasitism stages. For all tests, we prepared cards with 25 eggs of the alternative host Euschistus heros (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) non-parasitized (pre-parasitism) and parasitized (post-parasitism), which were subjected to pesticide sprays. The parasitism and emergence rates of T. podisi were determined classifying the pesticides in terms of the reduction of parasitism or emergence rates compared to the control. The neurotoxic insecticide cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, zeta-cypermethrin, etofenprox, thiamethoxam, thiamethoxam + lambda-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid + alpha-cypermethrin, and bifenthrin + alpha-cypermethrin + carbosulfan were more harmful to T. podisi and, therefore, are less suitable for the integrated management of insect pests in irrigated rice areas.

  10. Assessment of pesticide residues on selected vegetables of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.; Shah, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the pesticide residues on selected summer vegetables. Five vegetables were grown with three replicates in a split plot randomized complete block design. Pesticides were sprayed on vegetables thrice at regular intervals each after 15 days. At maturity the pesticides residues were extracted from edible and leaf portions using anhydrous sodium sulfate and ethyl acetate while adsorption chromatography technique was used for cleanup. The extracts were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and analysis of the compounds. Significant differences (p<0.05) were found in the pesticides residues on edible portions whereas highly significant differences (p<0.001) were observed for the leafy portions. The residual level of cypermethrin was highest (16.2 mg kg/sup -1/) in edible portion of bitter gourd, while Lambdacyhalothrin and Mancozeb residues were detected high (4.50 mg kg/sup -1/, 6.26 mg kg/sup -1/) in edible portion of bitter gourd and Cucumber respectively. Cypermethrin residues were high (1.86 mg kg/sup -1/) in Okra leaves. Mancozeb and Lambdacyhalothrin residual level was high (1.23 mg kg/sup -1/, and 0.0002 mg kg/sup -1/) in chili and tomato leaves. Cypermethrin residues were readily detected in edible and leaf portion of the selected vegetables. (author)

  11. Effects of a naturally occurring and a synthetic synergist on toxicity of three insecticides and a phytochemical to navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guodong; Pollock, Henry S; Lawrance, Allen; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2012-04-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive lepidopteran pest of almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb] and pistachios (Pistacia vera L.) in California and is a serious problem in figs (Ficus carica L.) and walnuts (Juglans spp.). In addition to direct damage, larval feeding leaves nuts vulnerable to infection by Aspergillus spp., fungi that produce toxic aflatoxins. A potentially safe and sustainable approach for managing navel orangeworm in orchards may be to use natural essential oil synergists to interfere with this insect's ability to detoxify insecticides and phytochemicals. We tested the effects of a naturally occurring plant-derived chemical, myristicin, and a synthetic inhibitor of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), piperonyl butoxide, on the toxicity of three insecticides (alpha-cypermethrin, tau-fluvalinate, and methoxyfenozide [Intrepid]) and a phytochemical (xanthotoxin) to A. transitella. Piperonyl butoxide significantly synergized alpha-cypermethrin and tau-fluvalinate, whereas myristicin synergized only alpha-cypermethrin. Piperonyl butoxide synergized the toxicity of xanthotoxin as early as 72 h after exposure, whereas myristicin synergized xanthotoxin after 120 h. In view of these findings and the limited availability of environmentally safe synthetic insecticides for sustainable management, particularly in organic orchards, myristicin is a potential field treatment in combination with insecticides to reduce both navel orangeworm survival and aflatoxin contamination of nuts. In addition, this study demonstrates that in A. transitella the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide is not detoxified by P450s.

  12. Effects of combining microbial and chemical insecticides on mortality of the Pecan Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Cottrell, Ted E; Wood, Bruce W

    2011-02-01

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Current control recommendations are based on chemical insecticide applications. Microbial control agents such as the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin occur naturally in southeastern U.S. pecan orchards and have shown promise as alternative control agents for C. caryjae. Conceivably, the chemical and microbial agents occur simultaneously within pecan orchards or might be applied concurrently. The objective of this study was to determine the interactions between two chemical insecticides that are used in commercial C. caryae control (i.e., carbaryl and cypermethrin applied below field rates) and the microbial agents B. bassiana and S. carpocapsae. In laboratory experiments, pecan weevil larval or adult mortality was assessed after application of microbial or chemical treatments applied singly or in combination (microbial + chemical agent). The nature of interactions (antagonism, additivity, or synergy) in terms of weevil mortality was evaluated over 9 d (larvae) or 5 d (adults). Results for B. bassiana indicated synergistic activity with carbaryl and antagonism with cypermethrin in C. caryae larvae and adults. For S. carpocapsae, synergy was detected with both chemicals in C. caryae larvae, but only additive effects were detected in adult weevils. Our results indicate that the chemical-microbial combinations tested are compatible with the exception of B. bassiana and cypermethrin. In addition, combinations that exhibited synergistic interactions may provide enhanced C. caryae control in commercial field applications; thus, their potential merits further exploration.

  13. Efficacy of Insecticide and Bioinsecticide Ground Sprays to Control Metisa plana Walker (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) in Oil Palm Plantations, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Hasber; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of the synthetic insecticides trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin emulsion concentrated (EC) and cypermethrin emulsion water based (EW) and a bio-insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk), was evaluated at 3, 7, 14 and 30 days after treatment (DAT) for the control of Metisa plana larvae in an oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation in Malaysia. Although all synthetic insecticides effectively reduced the larval population of M. plana, trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin EC were the fastest-acting. The larval population dropped below the economic threshold level (ETL) 30 days after a single application of the synthetic insecticides. Application of Btk, however, gave poor results, with the larval population remaining above the ETL post treatment. In terms of operational productivity, ground spraying using power spray equipment was time-consuming and resulted in poor coverage. Power spraying may not be appropriate for controlling M. plana infestations in large fields. Using a power sprayer, one man could cover 2-3 ha per day. Hence, power spraying is recommended during outbreaks of infestation in areas smaller than 50 ha.

  14. Ethylene vinyl acetate polymer as a tool for passive sampling monitoring of hydrophobic chemicals in the salmon farm industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucca, Felipe; Moya, Heriberto; Barra, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The samplers allow the detection of hydrophobic chemicals in the marine environment. • The samplers reach equilibrium quickly, with days of deployment in the field. • The samplers have low costs and easy manipulation for monitoring programs. • A way to collect chemicals in the aquatic environment without human effort. - Abstract: Current monitoring programs are focused on hydrophobic chemicals detection in aquatic systems, which require the collection of high volumes of water samples at a given time. The present study documents the preliminary use of the polymer ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as a passive sampler for the detection of a hydrophobic chemical used by salmon industries such as cypermethrin. Initially, an experimental calibration in laboratory was performed to determine the cypermethrin equilibrium between sampler and aquatic medium, which was reached after seven days of exposure. A logarithm of partitioning coefficient EVA–water (log K EVA–W ) of 5.6 was reported. Field deployment of EVA samplers demonstrated average concentrations of cypermethrin in water to be 2.07 ± 0.7 ng L −1 close to salmon cages, while near-shore was 4.39 ± 0.8 ng L −1 . This was a first approach for assessing EVA samplers design as a tool of monitoring in water for areas with salmon farming activity

  15. Identification and expression profiles of nine glutathione S-transferase genes from the important rice phloem sap-sucker and virus vector Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Wu; Li, Xi-Wang; Quan, Yin-Hua; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Gurr, Geoff; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2012-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) have received considerable attention in insects for their roles in insecticide resistance. Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén) is a serious rice pest. L. striatellus outbreaks occur frequently throughout eastern Asia. A key problem in controlling this pest is its rapid adaptation to numerous insecticides. In this research, nine cDNAs encoding GSTs in L. striatellus were cloned and characterised. The cloned GSTs of L. striatellus belonged to six cytosolic classes and a microsomal subgroup. Exposure to sublethal concentrations of each of the six insecticides, DDT, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, imidacloprid, buprofezin and beta-cypermethrin, quickly induced (6 h) up-expression of LsGSTe1. The expression of LsGSTs2 was increased by chlorpyrifos, fipronil and beta-cypermethrin. Furthermore, exposure of L. striatellus to fipronil, imidacloprid, buprofezin and beta-cypermethrin increased the expression of the LsGSTm gene after 24 or 48 h. This work is the first identification of GST genes from different GST groups in Auchenorrhyncha species and their induction characteristics with insecticide types and time. The elevated expression of GST genes induced by insecticides might be related to the enhanced tolerance of this insect to insecticides and xenobiotics. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Occurrence, compositional distribution, and toxicity assessment of pyrethroid insecticides in sediments from the fluvial systems of Chaohu Lake, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Zhong; Bai, Ya-Shu; Wu, Yakton; Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Tian-Hu; Peng, Shu-Chuan; Xie, Yu-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Surface sediment-associated synthetic pyrethroid insecticides (SPs) are known to pose high risks to the benthic organisms in Chaohu Lake, a shallow lake of Eastern China. However, the pollution status of the lake's tributaries and estuaries is still unknown. The present study was conducted to investigate the occurrence, compositional distribution, and toxicity of 12 currently used SPs in the surface sediments from four important tributaries, as well as in the sediment cores at their estuaries, using GC-MS for quantification. All SPs selected were detectable, with cypermethrin, es/fenvalerate, and permethrin dominant in both surface and core sediments, suggesting that these compounds were extensively applied. Urban samples contained the highest summed concentrations of the 12 SPs analyzed (Σ12SP) in both surface and core sediments compared with rural samples, suggesting that urban areas near aquatic environments posed high risks for SPs. The mean concentration of Σ12SP in surface sediments of each river was generally higher than that found in core sediments from its corresponding estuary, perhaps implying recent increases in SP usage. Surface sediments were significantly dominated by cypermethrin and permethrin, whereas core sediments were dominated by permethrin and es/fenvalerate. The compositional distributions demonstrated a spatial variation for surface sediments because urban sediments generally contained greater percentages of permethrin and cypermethrin, but rural sediments had significant levels of es/fenvalerate and cypermethrin. In all sediment cores, the percentage of permethrin gradually increased, whereas es/fenvalerate tended to decrease, from the bottom sediments to the top, indicating that the former represented fresh input, whereas the latter represented historical residue. Most urban samples would be expected to be highly toxic to benthic organisms due to the residue of SPs based on a calculation of toxic units (TUs) using toxicity data of the

  17. Effects of Insecticides and Fungicides Commonly Used in Tomato Production on Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phtyoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditillo, J L; Kennedy, G G; Walgenbach, J F

    2016-12-01

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an important pest of tomatoes in North Carolina. Resident populations of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis have recently been detected on field-grown tomatoes in central North Carolina, and potentially can be a useful biological control agent against T. urticae Laboratory bioassays were used to assess lethal and reproductive effects of 10 insecticides and five fungicides commonly used in commercial tomato production (chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, permethrin, imidacloprid, dimethoate, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, boscalid, cyazofamid, and mancozeb) on P. persimilis adult females and eggs. Insecticides were tested using concentrations equivalent to 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of the recommended field rates. Fungicides were tested at the 1× rate only. Dimethoate strongly impacted P. persimilis with high adult mortality, reduced fecundity, and reduced hatch of eggs laid by treated adults, particularly at high concentrations. The pyrethroids lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and fenpropathrin were associated with repellency and reproductive effects at high concentrations. Bifenthrin additionally caused increased mortality at high concentrations. Chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and permethrin did not significantly affect mortality or reproduction. Imidacloprid significantly reduced fecundity and egg viability, but was not lethal to adult P. persimilis Thiamethoxam negatively impacted fecundity at the 1× rate. There were no negative effects associated with fungicide exposure with the exception of mancozeb, which impacted fecundity. Field trials were conducted to explore the in vivo impacts of screened insecticides on P. persimilis populations in the field. Field trials supported the incompatibility of dimethoate with P. persimilis populations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  18. Assessment of resistance risk to lambda-cyhalothrin and cross-resistance to four other insecticides in the house fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Naeem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2015-07-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin, a sodium channel modulator insecticide, has been used frequently for the control of house flies, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) worldwide, including Pakistan. This experiment was performed to determine the selection and assessment of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance evolution along with four other insecticides. After 26 generations of selection, the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected population developed 445-fold resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin compared to the susceptible population. There was low cross-resistance to bifenthrin and very low cross-resistance to methomyl, imidacloprid, and fipronil in the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected population compared to the field population (G1). Realized heritability (h (2)) of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, methomyl, imidacloprid, and fipronil was 0.07, 0.05, 0.01, 0.08, and 0.08, respectively. The projected rate of resistance development revealed that if 90 % house flies were selected, then a tenfold increase in lethal concentration 50 occurred after 17, 20, 159, 13, and 14 generations for lambda-cyhalothrin (h (2) = 0.07, slope = 2.09), bifenthrin (h (2) = 0.05, slope = 1.73), methomyl (h (2) = 0.01, slope = 2.52), imidacloprid (h (2) = 0.08, slope = 1.89), and fipronil (h (2) = 0.08, slope = 2.03), respectively. The results of our study concluded that the house fly has the potential to develop multiple insecticide resistances following continued selection pressure with lambda-cyhalothrin. This study will be helpful for assisting the development of resistance management strategies.

  19. Lethal and sublethal effects of selected insecticides and an insect growth regulator on the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) ectoparasitoid Catolaccus grandis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzen, G W; Maldonado, S N; Rojas, M G

    2000-04-01

    A laboratory culture of Catolaccus grandis (Burks), an ectoparasitoid of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, was exposed to lethal and sublethal doses of insecticides and an insect growth regulator using a spray chamber bioassay. Materials tested were azinphos-methyl, endosulfan, fipronil, malathion, cyfluthrin, dimethoate, spinosad, methyl parathion, acephate, oxamyl, and tebufenozide. At full rates, spinosad was significantly less toxic to female C. grandis than other treatments except endosulfan. Fipronil and malathion were significantly more toxic to females than other treatments. Most of the chemicals tested were highly toxic to male C. grandis; spinosad was least toxic. At reduced rates, most of 4 selected chemicals tested were low in toxicity to C. grandis; however, a reduced rate of malathion was significantly more toxic to females than other treatments. No C. grandis pupae developed from parasitism during a 24-h treatment period with malathion or spinosad. The sex ratio of progeny from sprayed adults appeared to be unaffected by the treatments.

  20. Enhanced Tolerance of House Mosquito to Different Insecticides due to Agricultural and Household Pesticides in Sewage System of Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Vatandoost, L Ezeddinloo, A H Mahvi, M R Abai, EB Kia, I Mobedi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Different insecticides are being used for household and agricultural pest control in the capital city of Iran, Tehran. An investigation was carried out in order to evaluate the susceptibility level of laboratory and field collected mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatusin to different insecticides. Field strain was collected from sewage system of the city. Adult females were subjected to the diagnostic dose of different insecticides as recommended by WHO. Results showed that laboratory strains only exhibit resistant to DDT 4%, and susceptible to other insecticides. By using WHO criteria, field strain is resistant to DDT 4%, bendiocarb 0.1%, and tolerant to malathion 5%, permethrin 0.75%, deltamethrin 0.05%, lambdacyhalothrin 0.05% and etofenprox 5%. The field strain is still susceptible to cyfluthrin 0.15%.This findings indicate that routine use of pesticides in household and agricultural pest control may cause resistant in the wastewater mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus.

  1. Kompatibilitas Jamur Entomopatogenik Paecilomyces fumosoroseus dengan Beberapa Bahan Aktif Pestisida Secara In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Fauziah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Untuk mengurangi penggunaan pestisida di perkebunan teh, maka salah satu upaya pengendalian hama yang dapat dilakukan adalah mengkombinasikan aplikasi pestisida dengan jamur entomopatogenik. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kompatibilitas antara jamur P. fumosoroseus  dengan beberapa bahan aktif pestisida di laboratorium. Perlakuan dirancang dengan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL terdiri dari 5 jenis bahan aktif yaitu metomil, bifentrin, imidakloprid, tembaga oksida dan metidation pada taraf konsentrasi sesuai rekomendasi lapang (RL, 0,5x RL dan 2x RL. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan bahwa diantara kelima jenis bahan aktif pestisida yang diuji, metidation memiliki tingkat toksisitas yang paling tinggi. Persentase produksi spora tertinggi sebesar 13,77% ditunjukkan oleh perlakuan bifentrin 2x RL. Combining application of pesticides and entomopathogenic fungi is an alternative way for controlling pest in order to reduce pesticides application in the tea field. This research was aimed toexamine the compatibility of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus tosome active agents of pesticide in laboratory. Completely Randomized Block Designed (CRBD with 5 active agents: methomyl, bifenthrin, imidacloprid, copper oxide and metidation in three different concentration was employed in this study, which was based on the existing field recommendation (FR: 0,5x FR and 2x FR. The results showed that among the five tested pesticides, metidation appeared to be the most toxic agentto P. fumosoroseus. Meanwhile, the highest percentage of spore production was counted in bifenthrin 2x RL (13,77%.

  2. Occurrence and potential toxicity of pyrethroids and other insecticides in bed sediments of urban streams in central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzen, Emily P. [Department of Environmental Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Lydy, Michael J. [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62091 (United States); Belden, Jason B. [Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, 430 Life Science West, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)], E-mail: jbelden@okstate.edu

    2009-01-15

    Despite heavy insecticide usage in urban areas, only a few studies have investigated the impact of current-use insecticides on benthic invertebrates in urban streams. The objective of this study was to measure the presence and concentration of current-use pesticides in sediments of residential streams in central Texas. Additionally, toxicity of these sediments to Hyalella azteca was evaluated. Sediment samples were collected from several sites in urban streams over the course of a year, of which, 66% had greater than one toxic unit (TU) of insecticide. Bifenthrin was the greatest contributor accounting for 65% of the TUs, and sediment toxicity to H. azteca correlated with the magnitude of total insecticides and bifenthrin TUs. The results of this study further raise concerns over the environmental consequences posed by many current-use insecticides, especially pyrethroids, in urban settings. - This study examined the presence of insecticides in Texas stream sediments as a model for evaluating the potential impact of urban insecticide use in the Southern United States.

  3. Pyrethroid insecticides in urban salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, D.P., E-mail: dweston@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Asbell, A.M., E-mail: aasbell@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Hecht, S.A., E-mail: scott.hecht@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources, 510 Desmond Drive S.E., Lacey, WA 98503 (United States); Scholz, N.L., E-mail: nathaniel.scholz@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112 (United States); Lydy, M.J., E-mail: mlydy@siu.edu [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, 171 Life Sciences II, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Urban streams of the Pacific Northwest provide spawning and rearing habitat for a variety of salmon species, and food availability for developing salmon could be adversely affected by pesticide residues in these waterbodies. Sediments from Oregon and Washington streams were sampled to determine if current-use pyrethroid insecticides from residential neighborhoods were reaching aquatic habitats, and if they were at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive invertebrates. Approximately one-third of the 35 sediment samples contained measurable pyrethroids. Bifenthrin was the pyrethroid of greatest concern with regards to aquatic life toxicity, consistent with prior studies elsewhere. Toxicity to Hyalella azteca and/or Chironomus dilutus was found in two sediment samples at standard testing temperature (23 deg. C), and in one additional sample at a more environmentally realistic temperature (13 deg. C). Given the temperature dependency of pyrethroid toxicity, low temperatures typical of northwest streams can increase the potential for toxicity above that indicated by standard testing protocols. - Highlights: > Salmon-bearing creeks can be adversely impacted by insecticides from urban runoff. > Pyrethroid insecticides were found in one-third of the creeks in Washington and Oregon. > Two creeks contained concentrations acutely lethal to sensitive invertebrates. > Bifenthrin was of greatest concern, though less than in prior studies. > Standard toxicity testing underestimates the ecological risk of pyrethroids. - Pyrethroid insecticides are present in sediments of urban creeks of Oregon and Washington, though less commonly than in studies elsewhere in the U.S.

  4. Insecticide mixtures for mosquito net impregnation against malaria vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel V.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Insecticides belonging to the pyrethroid family are the only compounds currently available for the treatment of mosquito nets. Unfortunately, some malaria vector species have developed resistance to pyrethroids and the lack of alternative chemical categories is a great concern. One strategy for resistance management would be to treat mosquito nets with a mixture associating two insecticides having different modes of action. This study presents the results obtained with insecticide mixtures containing several proportions of bifenthrin (a pyrethroid insecticide and carbosulfan (a carbamate insecticide. The mixtures were sprayed on mosquito net samples and their efficacy were tested against a susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae, the major malaria vector in Africa. A significant synergism was observed with a mixture containing 25 mg/m2 of bifenthrin (half the recommended dosage for treated nets and 6.25 mg/m2 of carbosulfan (about 2 % of the recommended dosage. The observed mortality was significantly more than expected in the absence of any interaction (80 % vs 41 % and the knock-down effect was maintained, providing an effective barrier against susceptible mosquitoes.

  5. Occurrence and potential toxicity of pyrethroids and other insecticides in bed sediments of urban streams in central Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzen, Emily P.; Lydy, Michael J.; Belden, Jason B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite heavy insecticide usage in urban areas, only a few studies have investigated the impact of current-use insecticides on benthic invertebrates in urban streams. The objective of this study was to measure the presence and concentration of current-use pesticides in sediments of residential streams in central Texas. Additionally, toxicity of these sediments to Hyalella azteca was evaluated. Sediment samples were collected from several sites in urban streams over the course of a year, of which, 66% had greater than one toxic unit (TU) of insecticide. Bifenthrin was the greatest contributor accounting for 65% of the TUs, and sediment toxicity to H. azteca correlated with the magnitude of total insecticides and bifenthrin TUs. The results of this study further raise concerns over the environmental consequences posed by many current-use insecticides, especially pyrethroids, in urban settings. - This study examined the presence of insecticides in Texas stream sediments as a model for evaluating the potential impact of urban insecticide use in the Southern United States

  6. Efficacy of mosquito nets treated with a pyrethroid-organophosphorous mixture against Kdr- and Kdr+ malaria vectors (Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darriet F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent the resistance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to pyrethroids from spreading too quickly and to lengthen the effectiveness of insecticide impregnated mosquito nets, it has recently been suggested to use mixtures of insecticides that have different modes of action. This study presents the results obtained with tulle mosquito nets treated with bifenthrin (a pyrethroid] and chlorpyrifos-methyl (an organophosphorous both separately and in mixture on two strains of An. gambiae, one sensitive to all insecticides, and the other resistant to pyrethroids. The values of KDt50 and KDt95 and the mortality induced with the mixture of bifenthrin (25 mg/m2 and chlorpyrifos-methyl (4.5 mg/m2 show a significant synergistic effect on the strain of An. gambiae susceptible to insecticides. However, the tested combination does not induce any synergistic effect on the VKPR strain selected with permethrin, but only enhances the effectiveness of the two insecticides taken separately.

  7. Pyrethroid insecticides in urban salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, D.P.; Asbell, A.M.; Hecht, S.A.; Scholz, N.L.; Lydy, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Urban streams of the Pacific Northwest provide spawning and rearing habitat for a variety of salmon species, and food availability for developing salmon could be adversely affected by pesticide residues in these waterbodies. Sediments from Oregon and Washington streams were sampled to determine if current-use pyrethroid insecticides from residential neighborhoods were reaching aquatic habitats, and if they were at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive invertebrates. Approximately one-third of the 35 sediment samples contained measurable pyrethroids. Bifenthrin was the pyrethroid of greatest concern with regards to aquatic life toxicity, consistent with prior studies elsewhere. Toxicity to Hyalella azteca and/or Chironomus dilutus was found in two sediment samples at standard testing temperature (23 deg. C), and in one additional sample at a more environmentally realistic temperature (13 deg. C). Given the temperature dependency of pyrethroid toxicity, low temperatures typical of northwest streams can increase the potential for toxicity above that indicated by standard testing protocols. - Highlights: → Salmon-bearing creeks can be adversely impacted by insecticides from urban runoff. → Pyrethroid insecticides were found in one-third of the creeks in Washington and Oregon. → Two creeks contained concentrations acutely lethal to sensitive invertebrates. → Bifenthrin was of greatest concern, though less than in prior studies. → Standard toxicity testing underestimates the ecological risk of pyrethroids. - Pyrethroid insecticides are present in sediments of urban creeks of Oregon and Washington, though less commonly than in studies elsewhere in the U.S.

  8. Direct Detection of Potential Pyrethroids in Yangtze River via an Imprinted Multilayer Phosphorescence Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Lv, Xiaodong; Dai, Jiangdong; Sun, Lin; Huo, Pengwei; Li, Chunxiang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2018-01-01

    A novel tailored multilayer probe for monitoring potential pyrethroids in the Yangtze River was proposed. The room-temperature phosphorescence method was applied to realize a detection strategy that is superior to the fluorescence method. Efficient Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots with uniform size of 4.6 nm were firstly coated with a mesoporous silica to obtain a suitable intermediate transition layer, then an imprinted layer containing bifenthrin specific recognition sites was anchored. Characterizations verified the multilayer structure convincingly and the detection process relied on the electron transfer-induced fluorescence quenching mechanism. Optional detection time and standard detection curve were obtained within a concentration range from 5.0 to 50 μmol L -1 . The stability was verified to be good after 12 replicates. Feasibility of the probe was proved by monitoring water samples from the Zhenjiang reach of the Yangtze River. The probe offers promise for direct bifenthrin detection in unknown environmental water with an accurate and stable phosphorescence analysis strategy.

  9. Evaluation of diamide insecticides co-applied with other agrochemicals at various times to manage Ostrinia nubilalis in processing snap bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseth, Anders S; Groves, Russell L; Chapman, Scott A; Nault, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    Multiple applications of pyrethroid insecticides are used to manage European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner, in snap bean, but new diamide insecticides may reduce application frequency. In a 2 year small-plot study, O. nubilalis control was evaluated by applying cyantraniliprole (diamide) and bifenthrin (pyrethroid) insecticides at one of three phenological stages (bud, bloom and pod formation) of snap bean development. Co-application of these insecticides with either herbicides or fungicides was also examined as a way to reduce the total number of sprays during a season. Cyantraniliprole applications timed either during bloom or during pod formation controlled O. nubilalis better than similar timings of bifenthrin. Co-applications of insecticides with fungicides controlled O. nubilalis as well as insecticide applications alone. Insecticides applied either alone or with herbicides during bud stage did not control this pest. Diamides are an alternative to pyrethroids for the management of O. nubilalis in snap bean. Adoption of diamides by snap bean growers could improve the efficiency of production by reducing the number of sprays required each season. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Avaliação da sensibilidade de adultos de Culex quinquefasciatus Say a inseticidas químicos de contato Evaluation of the sensitivity of the adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say to chemical insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando S. de Andrade

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available A sensibilidade de adultos do pernilongo doméstico Culex quinquefasciatus a 5 inseticidas químicos foi avaliada sob condições de laboratório pelo critério de Tempo Letal Mediano (TL50. Foram utilizados o organofosforado Malathion e quatro piretróides: Bifenthrin, Deltamethrin, Esfenvalerate e Alfamethrin. Foi sugerida uma técnica simples e eficiente para se avaliar adultos de um dia de idade incluindo 5 repetições para cada tratamento. Os resultados obtidos mostraram ser o método bastante adequado para avaliações rotineiras. Não ocorreu resistência a esses 5 princípios ativos, na população natural de Culex quinquefasciatus estudada.The sensitivity of the adult house mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus to 5 chemical insecticides was evaluated under laboratory condictions, based on the Median Lethal Time (LT50 criterion. The organophosphorous Malathion and four pyrethroids: Bifenthrin, Deltamethrin, Esfenvalerate and Alfamethrin were utilized. An easy and efficient technique was suggested for the testing of one-day-old adults, including five repetitions for each treatment. The results revealed the full adequacy of this method for routine use. Further, no resistance to the 5 chemical compounds was detected among this natural population of Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  11. Comparison of Insecticide Susceptibilities of Empoasca vitis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) from Three Main Tea-Growing Regions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi; Yu, Hua-Yang; Niu, Chun-Dong; Yao, Rong; Wu, Shun-Fan; Chen, Zhuo; Gao, Cong-Fen

    2015-06-01

    Empoasca vitis (Göthe) is an important insect pest in tea-growing areas of China, and chemical control is the main tactic for the management of this pest. Due to the pressure of increasing insecticide resistance and more stringent food safety regulations, development of sound IPM strategies for E. vitis is an urgent matter. This study comparatively evaluated four field populations of E. vitis from three different tea-growing regions in China for their susceptibilities to eight insecticides using a simple leaf-dip methodology. E. vitis was found to be most sensitive to indoxacarb (LC505 mg/liter) and sophocarpidine (LC50>95 mg/liter, a botanical pesticide) regardless of populations. Population (geographical) variations were higher for indoxacarb and imidacloprid than other compounds. Judging by the 95% fiducial limits of LC50 values, all populations had similar susceptibilities to chlorfenapyr, bifenthrin, and acetamiprid or imidacloprid. Correlation analysis suggested that chlorfenapyr and indoxacarb or isoprocarb may have a high risk of cross resistance. Considering potency (LC50) and maximum residual levels, chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin are good insecticide options followed by acetamiprid and indoxacarb. These results provide valuable information to intelligently select insecticides for IPM programs that are efficacious against E. vitis while also managing insecticide resistance and maximum residual levels for tea production in China. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Suspended particles only marginally reduce pyrethroid toxicity to the freshwater invertebrate Gammarus pulex (L.) during pulse exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Cedergreen, Nina; Kronvang, Brian; Andersen, Maj-Britt Bjergager; Nørum, Ulrik; Kretschmann, Andreas; Strobel, Bjarne Westergaard; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2016-04-01

    Current ecotoxicological research on particle-associated pyrethroids in freshwater systems focuses almost exclusively on sediment-exposure scenarios and sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrates. We studied how suspended particles influence acute effects of lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin on the epibenthic freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) using brief pulse exposures followed by a 144 h post exposure recovery phase. Humic acid (HA) and the clay mineral montmorillonite (MM) were used as model sorbents in environmentally realistic concentrations (5, 25 and 125 mg L(-1)). Mortality of G. pulex was recorded during the post exposure recovery phase and locomotor behavior was measured during exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin. We found that HA in concentrations ≥25 mg L(-1) adsorbed the majority of pyrethroids but only reduced mortality of G. pulex up to a factor of four compared to pyrethroid-only treatments. MM suspensions adsorbed a variable fraction of pyrethroids (10% for bifenthrin and 70% for lambda-cyhalothrin) but did not significantly change the concentration-response relationship compared to pure pyrethroid treatments. Behavioral responses and immobilisation rate of G. pulex were reduced in the presence of HA, whereas behavioral responses and immobilisation rate were increased in the presence of MM. This indicates that G. pulex was capable of sensing the bioavailable fraction of lambda-cyhalothrin. Our results imply that suspended particles reduce to only a limited extent the toxicity of pyrethroids to G. pulex and that passive uptake of pyrethroids can be significant even when pyrethroids are adsorbed to suspended particles.

  13. Enantiomeric separation of type I and type II pyrethroid insecticides with different chiral stationary phases by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Yu, Qian; He, Xiulong; Qian, Kun; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Zhifeng; Li, Tian; He, Lin

    2018-04-01

    The enantiomeric separation of type I (bifenthrin, BF) and type II (lambda-cyhalothrin, LCT) pyrethroid insecticides on Lux Cellulose-1, Lux Cellulose-3, and Chiralpak IC chiral columns was investigated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Methanol/water or acetonitrile/water was used as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The effects of chiral stationary phase, mobile phase composition, column temperature, and thermodynamic parameters on enantiomer separation were carefully studied. Bifenthrin got a partial separation on Lux Cellulose-1 column and baseline separation on Lux Cellulose-3 column, while LCT enantiomers could be completely separated on both Lux Cellulose-1 and Lux Cellulose-3 columns. Chiralpak IC provided no separation ability for both BF and LCT. Retention factor (k) and selectivity factor (α) decreased with the column temperature increasing from 10°C to 40°C for both BF and LCT enantiomers. Thermodynamic parameters including ∆H and ∆S were also calculated, and the maximum R s were not always obtained at lowest temperature. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis methods for BF and LCT enantiomers in soil and water were also established. Such results provide a new approach for pyrethroid separation under reversed-phase condition and contribute to environmental risk assessment of pyrethroids at enantiomer level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Detection of resistance, cross-resistance, and stability of resistance to new chemistry insecticides in Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Muhammad; Saeed, Shafqat; Saleem, Mushtaq Ahmad; Denholm, Ian; Shah, Maqbool

    2013-06-01

    Resistance levels in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) collections from cotton and sunflower (up to four districts) for five neonicotinoids and two insect growth regulators (IGRs) were investigated for two consecutive years. Based on the LC50(s), all collections showed slight to moderate levels of resistance for the tested insecticides compared with the laboratory susceptible population. The data also indicated that cotton and sunflower collections had similar resistance levels. In comparison (four collections), Vehari collections showed higher resistance for acetamiprid, thiacloprid, and nitenpyram compared with those of others. Average resistance ratios for acetamiprid, thiacloprid, and nitenpyram ranged from 5- to 13-, 4- to 8-, and 9- to 13-fold, respectively. Multan and Vehari collections also exhibited moderate levels (9- to 16-fold) of resistance to buprofezin. Furthermore, toxicity of neonicotinoids against immature stages was equal to that of insect growth regulators. The data also suggested that resistance in the field populations was stable. After selection for four generations with bifenthrin (G1 to G4), resistance to bifenthrin increased to 14-fold compared with the laboratory susceptible population. Selection also increased resistance to fenpropathrin, lambdacyhalothrin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and diafenthuron. Cross-resistance and stability of resistance in the field populations is of some concern. Rotation of insecticides having no cross-resistance and targeting the control against immature stages may control the resistant insects, simultaneously reducing the selection pressure imposed.

  15. Two-dimensional coordination polymer matrix for solid-phase extraction of pesticide residues from plant Cordia salicifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Pedro Henrique Viana; Barreto, Alysson Santos; Rodrigues, Marcelo O; Prata, Vanessa de Menezes; Alves, Péricles Barreto; de Mesquita, Maria Eliane; Alves, Severino; Navickiene, Sandro

    2009-06-01

    The 2D coordination polymer (infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)]) was tested for extraction of acephate, chlorpropham, pirimicarb, bifenthrin, tetradifon, and phosalone from the medicinal plant Cordia salicifolia, whose extracts are commercialized in Brazil as diuretic, appetite suppressant, and weight loss products, using GC/MS, SIM. Considering that there are no Brazilian regulations concerning maximum permissible pesticide residue concentrations in medicinal herbs, recovery experiments were carried out (seven replicates), at two arbitrary fortification levels (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg), resulting in recoveries in range of 20 to 107.7% and SDRSDs were between 5.6 and 29.1% for infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] sorbent. Detection and quantification limits for herb ranged from 0.10 to 0.15 mg/kg and from 0.15 to 0.25 mg/kg, respectively, for the different pesticides studied. The developed method is linear over the range assayed, 0.5-10.0 microg/mL, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9975 to 0.9986 for all pesticides. Comparison between infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] sorbent and conventional sorbent (neutral alumina) showed similar performance of infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] polymeric sorbent for three (bifenthrin, tetradifon, and phosalone) out of six pesticides tested.

  16. Effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Erik R; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, pest management of greenhouse crops relies on the use of biological control agents; however, pesticides are also widely used, especially when dealing with multiple arthropod pests and attempting to maintain high esthetic standards. As such, there is interest in using biological control agents in conjunction with chemical control. However, the prospects of combining natural enemies and pesticides are not well known in many systems. The rove beetle, Atheta coriaria (Kraatz), is a biological control agent mainly used against fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). This study evaluated the effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on A. coriaria adult survival, development, and prey consumption under laboratory conditions. Rove beetle survival was consistently higher when adults were released 24 h after rather than before applying pesticides. The pesticides acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin were harmful to rove beetle adults, whereas Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, azadirachtin, and organic oils (cinnamon oils, rosemary oil, thyme oil, and clove oil) were nontoxic to A. coriaria adults. Similarly, the plant growth regulators acymidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole were not harmful to rove beetle adults. In addition, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, kinoprene, organic oils, and the plant growth regulators did not negatively affect A. coriaria development. However, B. bassiana did negatively affect adult prey consumption. This study demonstrated that A. coriaria may not be used when applying the pesticides, acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin, whereas organic oils, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, and the plant growth regulators evaluated may be used in conjunction with A. coriaria adults. As such, these compounds may be used in combination with A. coriaria in greenhouse production systems.

  17. Antifeedant activity of Jatropha gossypifolia and Melia azedarach senescent leaf extracts on Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and their potential use as synergists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullangpoti, Vasakorn; Wajnberg, Eric; Audant, Pascaline; Feyereisen, René

    2012-09-01

    To reduce rates of synthetic insecticide applications, natural product alternatives and synergists are needed. A study has been made of the toxicity of ethanolic senescent leaf extracts (SLEs) of Jatropha gossypifolia and Melia azedarach on larvae of the noctuid pest Spodoptera frugiperda. Their effects as syngergists and inhibitors of several enzyme activities are also reported. When added to the diet, M. azedarach SLE showed lower toxicity than J. gossypifolia SLE. However, after 2 weeks on the diet, the M. azedarach SLE proved to be lethal to 100% of the larval population. Artificial diets with both SLEs have an antifeedant effect on armyworm larvae. Acute toxicity after topical application in a dipping assay was relatively low for both J. gossypifolia and M. azedarach SLEs (LC(50) of 2.6 and 1.4 g L(-1), respectively, after 24 h). However, mixtures of the SLEs of M. azedarach and J. gossypifolia had a strong synergistic effect with cypermethrin. Synergism was higher with the J. gossypifolia SLE, perhaps because it contains several natural products with a methylenedioxyphenyl moiety. Both extracts inhibited P450, general esterase and acetylcholinesterase activities in vitro and in vivo. Both J. gossypifolia and M. azedarach SLEs are antifeedants to armyworm larvae when present in the food, and also have a synergistic effect with cypermethrin in topical assays. Although the synergistic effect is less than with piperonyl butoxide, both SLEs have some inhibitor activity against detoxification enzymes and acetylcholinesterase. Thus J. gossypifolia and M. azedarach SLEs may be considered as ecofriendly approaches for the control of S. frugiperda in order to reduce cypermethrin usage. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Variability of pesticide residues in cauliflower units collected from a field trial and market places in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodhan, M D H; Papadakis, Emmanouil-N; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the variability of pesticide residue levels present in cauliflower units, a total of 142 samples were collected from a field trial of a cooperative farmer, and 120 samples were collected from different market places in Thessaloniki, Greece. The collected samples were extracted using the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) extraction technique, and the residues were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The developed method was validated by evaluating the accuracy, precision, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantification (LOQ). The average recoveries for all the analytes, derived from the data of control samples fortified at 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/kg, ranged from 74 to 110% with a relative standard deviation of ≤8%. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) was ≥0.997 for all the analytes using matrix-matched calibration standards. The LOD values ranged from 0.001 to 0.003 mg/kg, and the LOQ was determined at 0.01 mg/kg for all the sought analytes. The matrix effect was found to be at a considerable level, especially for cypermethrin and deltamethrin, amounting to +90% and +145%, respectively. For the field samples, the unit-to-unit variability factors (VFs) calculated for cypermethrin and deltamethrin were 2.38 and 2.32, respectively, while the average VF for the market basket samples was 5.11. In the market basket samples, residues of cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, and indoxacarb were found at levels ≥LOQ and their respective VFs were 7.12, 5.67, 5.28, and 2.40.

  19. Acute toxicities and sublethal effects of some conventional insecticides on Trichogramma chilonis (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Sen; He, Yu-Rong; Guo, Xiang-Ling; Luo, Yong-Li

    2012-08-01

    The acute toxicity of 10 conventional insecticides to adult of Trichogramma chilonis Ishii (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) was bioassayed by membrane method, and then their sublethal effects on the parasitoid were evaluated in the laboratory. Based on sublethal concentration (LC30) values at 8 h after treatment, we determined that adult T. chilonis were the most susceptible to chlorfenapyr, followed by fipronil, spinosad, avermectins, beta-cypermethrin, and cartap, with lethal concentration (LC)30 values of 0.3133, 0.3269, 1.5408, 3.2961, 6.1469, and 9.021 mg/liter, respectively. The field-recommended concentrations of chlorfluazuron, indoxacarb, Bacillus thuringiensis, and tebufenozide caused Cartap and spinosad also reduced longevity (8 and 7.9 d) and fecundity (110.77 and 117.2) of treated adults, but cartap enhanced the female percentage of F1 offspring (61.6%), resulting a statistical higher R0, r(m), and lambda of treated T. chilonis. In contrast, chlorfluazuron and tebufenozide increased longevity (16.4 and 15.4 d) and fecundity (248 and 256.9) of treated adults but slightly decreased the female percentage of F1 offspring (31.4 and 38.1%). Although chlorfenapyr showed no adverse influence on longevity and fecundity, it remarkably reduced the female percentage of F1 offspring (13.5%), leading to a lower R0, r(m), and lambda of treated T. chilonis. Indoxacarb, B. thuringiensis, and beta-cypermethrin had no obvious sublethal effects on the longevity and fecundity of treated adults. Based on these results, we consider B. thuringienesis, chlorfluazuron, indoxacarb, beta-cypermethrin, and tebufenozide safe to T. chilonis, suggesting that these insecticides are compatible with this parasitoid when being used in the field. However, fipronil, chlorfenapyr, spinosad, and avermectins were very harmful to T. chilonis. Timing of application of these insecticides was critical.

  20. Effects of of habitats and pesticides on aerobic capacity and survival of soil fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, G; Sharma, B M

    2005-06-01

    Faunal health is largely dependent on their soil environment and available litter quality. So the effects of different soil habitats and pesticides on citrate synthase (CS) activity of soil fauna and its population were studied. The soil animals were collected from different pedoecosystems for habitat study. Whereas Vigna radiata based system was selected for pesticidal observations. The field was divided into five equal plots for control and treatment of gamma-BHC, quinalphos, carbaryl and cypermethrin. Soil fauna was collected by quadrat method and extracted by Tullgren funnel. Individuals of a species having similar sizes were collected for the estimation of CS activity. They were homogenized and fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation. The activity of CS was assayed spectrophotometrically. Citrate synthase (CS) activity of beetle (Rasphytus fregi), woodlouse (Porcellio laevis) and centipede (Scolopendra morsitans) varied significantly with respect to changes in different soil habitats. Though the CS activity of R. fregi, P. laevis, and S. morsitans differed among themselves but the highest activity of CS in these animals was in V. radiata and lowest in A. nilotica based pedoecosystem. The aerobic capacity of centipede was maximum followed by woodlouse and beetle. The treatment of gamma-BHC, quinalphos, carbaryl and cypermethrin significantly reduced the CS activity of these animals. Gamma-BHC showed maximum reduction in CS activity indicating highly toxic effect of organochlorine on aerobic metabolism of soil fauna. However, minimum reduction was observed in response to carbaryl (in beetle) or cypermethrin (in woodlouse/centipede) leading to impairment of aerobic capacity. The differences in pesticide effects might be assigned to the differences in chemical nature of pesticides and their interactions with below-ground fauna. Treatment of gamma-BHC and quinalphos reduced the population of Acari, Coleoptera, Collembola, other arthropods as well as

  1. Determination of pesticide residues in fruits of Nawabshah district, Sindh, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, T.; Ahmad, I.; Tahir, S.

    2011-01-01

    Eight fruit samples of apple, guava, orange, grapes, pear, persimmon, banana and pear purchased from the local markets of Nawabshah district, Sindh and residues of pesticide of organophosphate (OP), pyrethroid and organochlorine (OC) (i.e., dichlorvos, fenvalerate, dimethoate, methyl parathion, fenitrothion, cypermethrin, endosulfan, deltamethrin, mevinphos, chlorpyriphos, profenofos and dicofol) were monitored in fruit samples by Gas Chromatography (GC). All the fruit samples were found contaminated except banana and among these only apple samples were found exceeding the maximum residue limits (MRL) of Codex Alimentarius Commission. (author)

  2. Quantitative Structure activity relationship and risk analysis of some pesticides in the cattle milk

    OpenAIRE

    Faqir Muhammad*, Ijaz Javed, Masood Akhtar1, Zia-ur-Rahman, Mian Muhammad Awais1, Muhammad Kashif Saleemi2 and Muhammad Irfan Anwar3

    2012-01-01

    Milk of cattle was collected from various localities of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Pesticides concentration was determined by HPLC using solid phase microextraction. The residue analysis revealed that about 40% milk samples were contaminated with pesticides. The mean±SE levels (ppm) of cyhalothrin, endosulfan, chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin were 0.38±0.02, 0.26±0.02, 0.072±0.01 and 0.085±0.02, respectively. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models were used to predict the residues...

  3. Pesticide Residues in Commercial Lettuce, Onion, and Potato Samples From Bolivia—A Threat to Public Health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Renjel, Susana; Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2017-01-01

    lettuce samples from La Paz were sampled on August 15, 2015 at a local market and screened for 283 pesticides. Residues of cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, difenoconazol, or/and λ-cyhalothrin were detected in 50% of the lettuce samples, whereas no pesticides were found in potatoes and onions. In 20......% of the lettuce samples, the measurements were above the maximum residue limits, and 2 or 3 pesticides were identified simultaneously. Washing almost halved the pesticide levels, but still 20% of the samples showed measurements above the limits. No samples contained concentrations of pesticides which alone...

  4. Toxic effect of single and binary treatments of synthetic and plant-derived molluscicides against Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, I G; Singh, D K

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effect of single and binary treatments of synthetic and plant-derived molluscicides was studied against the harmful terrestrial snail Achatina fulica. In single treatments, among the synthetic molluscicides Snail Kill and cypermethrin were potent, whereas Cedrus deodara oil was more toxic among molluscicides of plant origin against A. fulica. In binary treatments, a combination of Cedrusdeodara + Alliumsativum was more toxic. The toxicities of these single and binary treatments of synthetic and plant-derived molluscicides were dose and time dependent. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effects of currently used pesticides and their mixtures on the function of thyroid hormone and aryl hydrocarbon receptor in cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghisari, Mandana; Long, Manhai; Tabbo, Agnese; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie, E-mail: ebj@mil.au.dk

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggest that exposure to pesticides can interfere with the endocrine system by multiple mechanisms. The endocrine disrupting potential of currently used pesticides in Denmark was analyzed as single compounds and in an equimolar mixture of 5 selected pesticides. The pesticides were previously analyzed for effects on the function of estrogen and androgen receptors, the aromatase enzyme and steroidogenesis in vitro. In this study, the effect on thyroid hormone (TH) function and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivity was assessed using GH3 cell proliferation assay (T-screen) and AhR responsive luciferase reporter gene bioassay, respectively. Thirteen pesticides were analyzed as follows: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb and its metabolite ethylene thiourea, cypermethrin, tau-fluvalinate, and malathion (currently banned in DK). In the T-screen, prothioconazole, malathion, tau-fluvalinate, cypermethrin, terbuthylazine and mancozeb significantly stimulated and bitertanol and propiconazole slightly reduced the GH3 cell proliferation. In the presence of triiodothyronine (T3), prothioconazole, tau-fluvalinate, propiconazole, cypermethrin and bitertanol significantly antagonized the T3-induced GH3 cell proliferation. Eleven of the tested pesticides agonized the AhR function, and bitertanol and prothioconazole inhibited the basal AhR activity. Bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole and cypermethrin antagonized the TCDD-induced AhR transactivation at the highest tested concentration. The 5-component mixture had inducing effect but the combined effect could not be predicted due to the presence of bitertanol eliciting inhibitory effect. Upon removal of bitertanol from the mixture, the remaining four pesticides acted additively. In conclusion, our data suggest that pesticides currently used in Denmark

  6. Use of a trypanosomal antigen ELISA to monitor tsetse and trypanosomosis control programmes in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaho-Mukani, W; Munga, L K; Nyanga` O, J N.M.; Ouma, J O; Masika, P; Okech, G; Ndungu, J M [Kenya Trypanosomiasis Research Inst., Kikuyu (Kenya)

    1997-02-01

    The capture Antigen-ELISA was used to monitor serum samples originating from three study areas in Kenya. At the Galana ranch the test was used to assess re-invasion of an area previously cleared of Glossina pallidipes. In Busia district the Ag-ELISA is being used to monitor the progress of a tsetse and trypanosomosis control programme. At Taita and Tara ranches the capture Antigen ELISA and the buffy coat technique (BCT) were used to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial Cypermethrin dip for the control of Glossina pallidipes. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. Insecticide residues in stored grains in Sonora, Mexico: quantification and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, M L; Valdez-Hurtado, S; Vargas-Valdez, N D; Salazar-Lopez, N J; Silveira-Gramont, M I; Loarca-Piña, F G; Rodríguez-Olibarria, G; Wong-Corral, F J; Borboa-Flores, J; Burgos-Hernández, A

    2008-02-01

    Food safety has acquired great attention by food importer and exporters. Food rejection or acceptance across international borders is based on the compliance with international food regulations. Due to the lack of recent data on pesticide residues in Mexican grains, this study focused on detecting and quantifying insecticide residues in stored wheat, corn, chickpeas, and beans, as well as to determine their mutagenic potential. Grains were sampled from primary storage sites in Sonora, Mexico. Malathion, chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin, cypermethrin, 4,4-DDE, 4,4-DDD and 4,4-DDT were analyzed in 135 samples. Grain samples were not mutagenic and most pesticide levels were within regulation limits.

  8. Insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti populations from Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulart Marilia OF

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organophosphates and pyrethroids are used widely in Brazil to control Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue viruses, under the auspices of the National Programme for Dengue Control. Resistance to these insecticides is widespread throughout Brazil. In Ceará the vector is present in 98% of districts and resistance to temephos has been reported previously. Here we measure resistance to temephos and the pyrethroid cypermethrin in three populations from Ceará and use biochemical and molecular assays to characterise resistance mechanisms. Results Resistance to temephos varied widely across the three studied populations, with resistance ratios (RR95 of 7.2, 30 and 192.7 in Juazeiro do Norte, Barbalha and Crato respectively. The high levels of resistance detected in Barbalha and Crato (RR95 ≥ 30 imply a reduction of temephos efficacy, and indeed in simulated field tests reduced effectiveness was observed for the Barbalha population. Two populations (Crato and Barbalha were also resistant to cypermethrin, whilst Juazeiro do Norte showed only an altered susceptibility. The Ile1011Met kdr mutation was detected in all three populations and Val1016Ile in Crato and Juazeiro do Norte. 1011Met was significantly associated with resistance to cypermethrin in the Crato population. Biochemical tests showed that only the activity of esterases and GSTs, among the tested detoxification enzymes, was altered in these populations when compared with the Rockefeller strain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that two A. aegypti populations from Ceará are under strong selection pressure by temephos, compromising the field effectiveness of this organophosphate. Our results also provide evidence that the process of reducing resistance to this larvicide in the field is difficult and slow and may require more than seven years for reversal. In addition, we show resistance to cypermethrin in two of the three populations studied, and for the first time

  9. Can toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic modeling be used to understand and predict synergistic interactions between chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    including synergists. The aim of the present study is to develop a mechanistic toxicokinetic (TK) and toxicodynamic (TD) model for the synergistic mixture of the azole fungicide, propiconazole (the synergist), and the insecticide, α-cypermethrin, on the mortality of the crustacean Daphnia magna. The study...... by their effect on the biotransformation rate but that this effect could only partly be explained by the effect of the two azoles on cytochrome P450 activity, measured on D. magna in vivo. TKTD models of interacting mixtures seem to be a promising tool to test mechanisms of interactions between chemicals...

  10. Tea saponin reduces the damage of Ectropis obliqua to tea crops, and exerts reduced effects on the spiders Ebrechtella tricuspidata and Evarcha albaria compared to chemical insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Tea is one of the most economically important crops in China. However, the tea geometrid (Ectropis obliqua, a serious leaf-feeding pest, causes significant damage to tea crops and reduces tea yield and quality. Spiders are the most dominant predatory enemies in the tea plantation ecosystem, which makes them potentially useful biological control agents of E. obliqua. These highlight the need for alternative pest control measures. Our previous studies have shown that tea saponin (TS exerts insecticidal activity against lepidopteran pests. Here, we investigate whether TS represents a potentially new alternative insecticide with no harm to spiders. Methods We investigated laboratory bioactivities and the field control properties of TS solution against E. obliqua. (i A leaf-dip bioassay was used to evaluate the toxicity of TS to 3rd-instar E. obliqua larvae and effects of TS on the activities of enzymes glutathione-S-transferase (GST, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, carboxylesterase (CES and peroxidase (POD of 3rd-instar E. obliqua larvae in the laboratory. (ii Topical application was used to measure the toxicity of 30% TS (w/v and two chemical insecticides (10% bifenthrin EC and 50% diafenthiuron SC to two species of spider, Ebrechtella tricuspidata and Evarcha albaria. (iii Field trials were used to investigate the controlling efficacy of 30% TS against E. obliqua larvae and to classify the effect of TS to spiders in the tea plantation. Results The toxicity of TS to 3rd-instar E. obliqua larvae occurred in a dose-dependent manner and the LC50 was 164.32 mg/mL. Activities of the detoxifying-related enzymes, GST and POD, increased in 3rd-instar E. obliqua larvae, whereas AChE and CES were inhibited with time by treatment with TS. Mortalities of E. tricuspidata and E. albaria after 48 h with 30% TS treatment (16.67% and 20%, respectively were significantly lower than those with 10% bifenthrin EC (80% and 73.33%, respectively and 50

  11. Potential for sublethal insecticide exposure to impact vector competence of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae for dengue and Zika viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards SL

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie L Richards, Avian V White, Jo Anne G Balanay Department of Health Education and Promotion, College of Health and Human Performance, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Abstract: Chikungunya, dengue, and Zika viruses (CHIKV, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus; DENV and ZIKV, family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus are arboviruses that cause human epidemics. Due to the lack of vaccines for many mosquito-borne diseases, there is a need for mosquito control. In the US and other regions, residual barrier insecticide sprays are applied to foliage where female mosquitoes rest and/or sugar feed between blood meals. Residual sprays are an important control method for anthropogenic day-active sylvan mosquitoes such as Aedes albopictus (vector of CHIKV, DENV, and ZIKV that are difficult to control using ultralow-volume sprays applied only at dusk or dawn when these mosquitoes are not active. In this exploratory study, we analyzed the extent to which ingestion of a sublethal dose of the active ingredient bifenthrin affected vector competence (i.e., infection, dissemination, and transmission of Ae. albopictus for DENV and ZIKV. Two incubation periods (IPs; 7 and 14 d were tested at 28°C for insecticide-fed and sugar-fed mosquitoes. We show that mosquitoes that were fed bifenthrin (0.128 µg/mL mixed with sucrose solution exhibited significantly lower DENV infection rates and body titers after a 14-d IP. During the 7-d IP, one mosquito (sugar group transmitted ZIKV. During the 14-d IP, 100% of mosquitoes showed body and leg ZIKV infections, and one mosquito (sugar+bifenthrin group transmitted ZIKV. This is a preliminary communication, and more studies will be required to further investigate these findings. We expect the findings of this small-scale study to spur larger-scale investigations of the impacts of insecticides on mechanisms regulating vector competence, and exposure to other active ingredients, and aid in development of new

  12. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part II—sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemble, Nile E.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Sibley, Paul K.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between sediment toxicity and sediment chemistry were evaluated for 98 samples collected from seven metropolitan study areas across the United States. Sediment-toxicity tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28 day exposures) and with the midge Chironomus dilutus (10 day exposures). Overall, 33 % of the samples were toxic to amphipods and 12 % of the samples were toxic to midge based on comparisons with reference conditions within each study area. Significant correlations were observed between toxicity end points and sediment concentrations of trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), or organochlorine (OC) pesticides; however, these correlations were typically weak, and contaminant concentrations were usually below sediment-toxicity thresholds. Concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin exceeded an estimated threshold of 0.49 ng/g (at 1 % total organic carbon) in 14 % of the samples. Of the samples that exceeded this bifenthrin toxicity threshold, 79 % were toxic to amphipods compared with 25 % toxicity for the samples below this threshold. Application of mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQs) based on measures of groups of contaminants (trace elements, total PAHs, total PCBs,OCpesticides, and pyrethroid pesticides [bifenthrin in particular]) improved the correct classification of samples as toxic or not toxic to amphipods compared with measures of individual groups of contaminants. Sediments are a repository for many contaminants released into surface waters. Because of this, organisms inhabiting sediments may be exposed to a wide range of contaminants (United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) United States Environmental Protection Agency 2000; American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] American Society for Testing and Materials International 2012). Contaminants of potential concern in sediments typically include trace elements (metals

  13. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haron, S. H., E-mail: ismail@ukm.edu.my; Ismail, B. S., E-mail: sthumaira@yahoo.com [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  14. Evaluation of Some Pesticide Residues in Fruits import by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamees Munef Abdul-Latef

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide residues have been found in various fruits and vegetables.  This studycollected 24 samples and reported a method based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. For determination of pesticide residues used in Some fruits which were collected from different markets of Baghdad city to make 24 samples from (peel , core, mixture for each type of fruits markets as:  Oranges( Egypt , Africa, Pomegranate ( Egypt, Mango ( Kenya , Pears (China,  Plum fruits ( Africa , Kiwi (Turkey .That detective of ( 5 different  pesticides (diazinon,  malathion, chlorpyrifos ,parathion  and cypermethrin. The results were detected of multi-residues of  pesticides on the fruit in ( peel , core , mixture may be in the limit of Maximum residue limits(MRL or higher of it   . The pesticides detected that exceeding the limits are: cypermethrin  in Kiwi (peel, core and mixtureat(0.204,0.038, 0.537, in pomegranate detected in (peel and mixture at (0.509,0.189 mg/kg , Diazinondetccted in Egyptian orange in (peel ,core and mixture at (0.031,0.207, 0.099 mg/kg . Malathion and Parathion was not detected at any type of fruits and  that results was compared with codex of FAO/WHO(2013. That data is important to monitor residues in food and to fill gaps in current knowledge would be helpful in assessing human exposure risks from ingestion of contaminated Fruits Imported to our country .

  15. Thin layer chromatographic analyses of pesticides in a soil ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afful, S.; Dogbe, S.A.; Ahmad, K.; Ewusie, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Silica gel 60, silica gel 60 F 254 , and aluminium oxide as adsorbents were used to investigate their suitability for the analysis and detection of the pesticides: nitrofen, atrazine, diuron, dioxacarb, propoxur, propanil, carbaryl and cypermethrin in soil ecosystem using ethyl acetate, chloroform, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate/chloroform (1:1) as developing solvents. O-tolidine and potassium iodide reagent were used for the detection of pesticides. R f values obtained for the pesticides using the silica gel 60-ethyl acetate. silica gel 60F 254 -ethyl acetate, silica gel 60 chloroform, silica gel 60 F 254 - chloroform, silica gel 60 - (1:1) ethyl acetate/chloroform and silica gel 60 F 254 - (1:1) ethyl acetate/chloroform systems generally were within the stipulated range of 0.4-0.8. R f values obtained for the pesticides using silica gel 60-dichloromethane systems were very low except for cypermethrin and nitrofen. Analysis with aluminium oxide coated plates gave a heavy yellow background with the detection reagent making visualization of spots difficult. Aluminium oxide coated plate is, therefore, not recommended when o-tolidine plus potassium iodide is used as detection reagent. (au)

  16. Novel nanoscale pheromone dispenser for more accurate evaluation of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attract-and-kill strategies in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnobai De Jorge, Bruna; Bisotto-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Pereira, Cláudio Nunes; Sant'Ana, Josué

    2017-09-01

    Nanotechnology has recently allowed the production of formulations for controlled release of active ingredients. In the present study, the electrospinning technique was used to produce nanoscale dispensers for attract-and-kill strategies. Non-woven nanofibres containing insecticide (cypermethrin) and (E)-8,(Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate and (Z)-8-dodecanol (0.87 mg L -1 ), the main components of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) (Busck) pheromone, were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Male electroantennographic (EAG) responses and mortality (tarsal-contact and attract-and-kill behavioural cages) bioassays were performed for nanofibres (with and without insecticide) exposed for different periods (21, 42, 63 and 84 days) in controlled and non-exposed conditions. There were no significant differences in G. molesta male EAG responses based on the time of exposure within treatments. Nanofibres with pheromone only and with pheromone plus insecticide elicited equal EAG responses. Mortality in tarsal-contact bioassays was greater than 87% after exposure for 84 days. In the attract-and-kill bioassays, mortality ranged from 28.4 to 56.6%, although no difference was observed on insect mortalities over time (24, 48 and 72 h). Incorporation of cypermethrin in nanofibres did not interfere with G. molesta attractiveness. Both aspects of the strategy, the attractant and killing effects, were recorded using innovative nanofibres, and long-term effects suggest a controlled release of pheromone and insecticide. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haron, S. H.; Ismail, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively

  18. Quantitative Structure activity relationship and risk analysis of some pesticides in the cattle milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqir Muhammad*, Ijaz Javed, Masood Akhtar1, Zia-ur-Rahman, Mian Muhammad Awais1, Muhammad Kashif Saleemi2 and Muhammad Irfan Anwar3

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk of cattle was collected from various localities of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Pesticides concentration was determined by HPLC using solid phase microextraction. The residue analysis revealed that about 40% milk samples were contaminated with pesticides. The mean±SE levels (ppm of cyhalothrin, endosulfan, chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin were 0.38±0.02, 0.26±0.02, 0.072±0.01 and 0.085±0.02, respectively. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR models were used to predict the residues of unknown pesticides in the milk of cattle using their known physicochemical properties such as molecular weight (MW, melting point (MP, and log octanol to water partition coefficient (Ko/w as well as the milk characteristics such as pH, % fat, and specific gravity (SG in this species. The analysis revealed good correlation coefficients (R2 = 0.91 for cattle QSAR model. The coefficient for Ko/w for the studied pesticides was higher in cattle milk. Risk analysis was conducted based upon the determined pesticide residues and their provisional tolerable daily intakes. The daily intake levels of pesticide residues including cyhalothrin, chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin in present study were 3, 11, 2.5 times higher, respectively in cattle milk. This intake of pesticide contaminated milk might pose health hazards to humans in this locality.

  19. Pesticide-mediated interspecific competition between local and invasive thrips pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyin; Reitz, Stuart R.; Yuan, Huiguo; Lei, Zhongren; Paini, Dean Ronald; Gao, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    Competitive interactions between species can be mitigated or even reversed in the presence of anthropogenic influences. The thrips species Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci are highly invasive and damaging agricultural pests throughout the world. Where the species co-occur, one species tends to eventually predominate over the other. Avermectin and beta-cypermethrin are commonly used insecticides to manage thrips in China, and laboratory bioassays demonstrated that F. occidentalis is significantly less susceptible than T. tabaci to these insecticides. In laboratory cage trials in which both species were exposed to insecticide treated cabbage plants, F. occidentalis became the predominant species. In contrast, T. tabaci completely displaced F. occidentalis on plants that were not treated with insecticides. In field trials, the species co-existed on cabbage before insecticide treatments began, but with T. tabaci being the predominant species. Following application of avermectin or beta-cypermethrin, F. occidentalis became the predominant species, while in plots not treated with insecticides, T. tabaci remained the predominant species. These results indicate that T. tabaci is an intrinsically superior competitor to F. occidentalis, but its competitive advantage can be counteracted through differential susceptibilities of the species to insecticides. These results further demonstrate the importance of external factors, such as insecticide applications, in mediating the outcome of interspecific interactions and produce rapid unanticipated shifts in the demographics of pest complexes. PMID:28084404

  20. Toxicity of nine insecticides on four natural enemies of Spodoptera exigua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongqiang; Li, Xiangying; Zhou, Chao; Liu, Feng; Mu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Spodoptera exigua, which feeds on various crops worldwide, has natural enemies that are susceptible to the insecticides used against S. exigua. We investigate the toxicity and residue risk of 9 insecticides on the development of H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus. S. manilae and T. remus adults were sensitive to all 9 insecticides (LC50 less than 2.75 mg a.i. liter−1), while H. axyridis and C. sinica adults were less sensitive (LC50 between 6 × 10−5 mg a.i. liter−1 and 78.95 mg a.i. liter−1). Emamectin benzoate, spinosad, indoxacarb, alpha-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr and chlorantraniliprole showed no toxicity on H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus pupae with the recommended field concentrations. The risk analysis indicated that chlorantraniliprole is harmless to larvae of four natural enemies and adult of H. axyridis, C. sinica and S. manilae. Emamectin benzoate and spinosad had higher safety to the development of H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus with the risk duration less than 4d. Indoxacarb, tebufenozide, chlorfenapyr, methomyl, alpha-cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos showed dangerously toxic and long risk duration on S. manilae and T. remus adults. PMID:27958333

  1. Do antiparasitic medicines used in aquaculture pose a risk to the Norwegian aquatic environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Katherine H; Øxnevad, Sigurd; Schøyen, Merete; Thomas, Kevin V

    2014-07-15

    Aquaculture production is an important industry in many countries and there has been a growth in the use of medicines to ensure the health and cost effectiveness of the industry. This study focused on the inputs of sea lice medication to the marine environment. Diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron, emamectin benzoate, cypermethrin, and deltamethrin were measured in water, sediment, and biota samples in the vicinity of five aquaculture locations along the Norwegian coast. Deltamethrin and cypermethrin were not detected above the limits of detection in any samples. Diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron, and emamectin benzoate were detected, and the data was compared the UK Environmental Quality Standards. The concentrations of emamectin benzoate detected in sediments exceed the environmental quality standard (EQS) on 5 occasions in this study. The EQS for teflubenzuron in sediment was exceeded in 67% of the samples and exceeded for diflubenzuron in 40% of the water samples collected. A crude assessment of the concentrations detected in the shrimp collected from one location and the levels at which chronic effects are seen in shrimp would suggest that there is a potential risk to shrimp. It would also be reasonable to extrapolate this to any species that undergoes moulting during its life cycle.

  2. Correlation between Pesticide Resistance and Enzyme Activity in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ya-Jun; Wang, Ze-Hua; Shi, Bao-Cai; Kang, Zong-Jiang; Zhu, Liang; Jin, Gui-Hua; Weig, Shu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is one of the most important pests that has developed high pesticide resistance. The resistances of five Chinese populations of this moth, four resistant strains (from Beijing, Henan, Fujian, and Guangdong) and one susceptible strain, to five pesticides were determined, and the activities of carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, and acetylcholine esterase were tested in all five populations. The correlations between pesticide resistance and enzyme activity were analyzed. The results showed that the resistance status to the five pesticides was different among the five populations. The resistance ratios of the Beijing and Henan populations to spinosad were 5.84 and 8.22, respectively, and those to beta-cypermethrin were 4.91 and 4.98, respectively. These ratios were higher than those for the Fujian and Guangdong populations. The Fujian population was more sensitive to abamectin and chlorpyrifos than the susceptible population (the resistance ratios were 0.14 and 0.91, respectively); in fact, the median lethal concentration for P. xylostella was significantly higher for chlorpyrifos than that for any of the other four pesticides. The carboxylesterase activity in P. xylostella showed positive correlations with the resistance to spinosad, beta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, and abamectin, but no correlation was observed between the carboxylesterase activity and resistance to emamectin benzoate, between glutathione S-transferase activity and resistance to any of the five pesticides tested, or between acetylcholine esterase activity and any of the pesticides except for emamectin benzoate. PMID:24766444

  3. Toxicity of nine insecticides on four natural enemies of Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongqiang; Li, Xiangying; Zhou, Chao; Liu, Feng; Mu, Wei

    2016-12-13

    Spodoptera exigua, which feeds on various crops worldwide, has natural enemies that are susceptible to the insecticides used against S. exigua. We investigate the toxicity and residue risk of 9 insecticides on the development of H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus. S. manilae and T. remus adults were sensitive to all 9 insecticides (LC 50 less than 2.75 mg a.i. liter -1 ), while H. axyridis and C. sinica adults were less sensitive (LC 50 between 6 × 10 -5  mg a.i. liter -1 and 78.95 mg a.i. liter -1 ). Emamectin benzoate, spinosad, indoxacarb, alpha-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr and chlorantraniliprole showed no toxicity on H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus pupae with the recommended field concentrations. The risk analysis indicated that chlorantraniliprole is harmless to larvae of four natural enemies and adult of H. axyridis, C. sinica and S. manilae. Emamectin benzoate and spinosad had higher safety to the development of H. axyridis, C. sinica, S. manilae and T. remus with the risk duration less than 4d. Indoxacarb, tebufenozide, chlorfenapyr, methomyl, alpha-cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos showed dangerously toxic and long risk duration on S. manilae and T. remus adults.

  4. Management of mango hopper, Idioscopus clypealis, using chemical insecticides and Neem oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, S M; Uddin, M M; Alam, M J; Islam, M S; Kashem, M A; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in Field Laboratory, Department of Entomology at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, during 2013 to manage the mango hopper, Idioscopus clypealis L, using three chemical insecticides, Imidacloprid (0.3%), Endosulfan (0.5%), and Cypermethrin (0.4%), and natural Neem oil (3%) with three replications of each. All the treatments were significantly effective in managing mango hopper in comparison to the control. Imidacloprid showed the highest efficacy in percentage of reduction of hopper population (92.50 ± 9.02) at 72 hours after treatment in case of 2nd spray. It also showed the highest overall percentage of reduction (88.59 ± 8.64) of hopper population and less toxicity to natural enemies including green ant, spider, and lacewing of mango hopper. In case of biopesticide, azadirachtin based Neem oil was found effective against mango hopper as 48.35, 60.15, and 56.54% reduction after 24, 72, and 168 hours of spraying, respectively, which was comparable with Cypermethrin as there was no statistically significant difference after 168 hours of spray. Natural enemies were also higher after 1st and 2nd spray in case of Neem oil.

  5. Induced tolerance from a sublethal insecticide leads to cross-tolerance to other insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jessica; Jones, Devin K; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-04-01

    As global pesticide use increases, the ability to rapidly respond to pesticides by increasing tolerance has important implications for the persistence of nontarget organisms. A recent study of larval amphibians discovered that increased tolerance can be induced by an early exposure to low concentrations of a pesticide. Since natural systems are often exposed to a variety of pesticides that vary in mode of action, we need to know whether the induction of increased tolerance to one pesticide confers increased tolerance to other pesticides. Using larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus), we investigated whether induction of increased tolerance to the insecticide carbaryl (AChE-inhibitor) can induce increased tolerance to other insecticides that have the same mode of action (chlorpyrifos, malathion) or a different mode of action (Na(+)channel-interfering insecticides; permethrin, cypermethrin). We found that embryonic exposure to sublethal concentrations of carbaryl induced higher tolerance to carbaryl and increased cross-tolerance to malathion and cypermethrin but not to chlorpyrifos or permethrin. In one case, the embryonic exposure to carbaryl induced tolerance in a nonlinear pattern (hormesis). These results demonstrate that that the newly discovered phenomenon of induced tolerance also provides induced cross-tolerance that is not restricted to pesticides with the same mode of action.

  6. Management of Mango Hopper, Idioscopus clypealis, Using Chemical Insecticides and Neem Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, S. M.; Uddin, M. M.; Alam, M. J.; Islam, M. S.; Kashem, M. A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in Field Laboratory, Department of Entomology at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, during 2013 to manage the mango hopper, Idioscopus clypealis L, using three chemical insecticides, Imidacloprid (0.3%), Endosulfan (0.5%), and Cypermethrin (0.4%), and natural Neem oil (3%) with three replications of each. All the treatments were significantly effective in managing mango hopper in comparison to the control. Imidacloprid showed the highest efficacy in percentage of reduction of hopper population (92.50 ± 9.02) at 72 hours after treatment in case of 2nd spray. It also showed the highest overall percentage of reduction (88.59 ± 8.64) of hopper population and less toxicity to natural enemies including green ant, spider, and lacewing of mango hopper. In case of biopesticide, azadirachtin based Neem oil was found effective against mango hopper as 48.35, 60.15, and 56.54% reduction after 24, 72, and 168 hours of spraying, respectively, which was comparable with Cypermethrin as there was no statistically significant difference after 168 hours of spray. Natural enemies were also higher after 1st and 2nd spray in case of Neem oil. PMID:25140344

  7. Management of tick infestation in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasani Ayodhya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out during the month of January 2014 when a total of 148 dogs with history of various diseases were presented to the Campus Veterinary Hospital, Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex, College of Veterinary Science, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, India. Out of 148 dogs that were presented to the hospital, 48 dogs had the clinical signs of loss of hair, itching, and reduced food intake. The dogs were restless and continuously rubbed their bodies against the walls in the houses, and scratching with their legs. Clinical examination of the dogs revealed presence of alopecia, pruritus, and the formation of small crusts. All 48 dogs were treated with ivermectin by subcutaneous injection dosed at 0.02 mL/kg body weight at a weekly interval for 2 to 3 weeks. All dogs were bathed with cypermethrin shampoo weekly once for 2-3 weeks. In the present study, it was observed that ivermectin/cypermethrin combination therapy was effective for the management of tick infestation in dogs.

  8. Effect of Environmental Conditions and Toxic Compounds on the Locomotor Activity of Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Insaurralde, I; Toloza, A C; Gonzalez-Audino, P; Mougabure-Cueto, G A; Alvarez-Costa, A; Roca-Acevedo, G; Picollo, M I

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we evaluated the effect of environmental variables such as temperature, humidity, and light on the locomotor activity of Pediculus humanus capitis. In addition, we used selected conditions of temperature, humidity, and light to study the effects of cypermethrin and N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) on the locomotor activity of head lice. Head lice increased their locomotor activity in an arena at 30°C compared with activity at 20°C. When we tested the influence of the humidity level, the locomotor activity of head lice showed no significant differences related to humidity level, both at 30°C and 20°C. Concerning light influence, we observed that the higher the intensity of light, the slower the movement of head lice. We also demonstrated that sublethal doses of toxics may alter locomotor activity in adults of head lice. Sublethal doses of cypermethrin induced hyperactivated responses in adult head lice. Sublethal doses of DEET evocated hypoactivated responses in head lice. The observation of stereotyped behavior in head lice elicited by toxic compounds proved that measuring locomotor activity in an experimental set-up where environmental conditions are controlled would be appropriate to evaluate compounds of biological importance, such as molecules involved in the host-parasite interaction and intraspecific relationships. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Management of Mango Hopper, Idioscopus clypealis, Using Chemical Insecticides and Neem Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in Field Laboratory, Department of Entomology at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, during 2013 to manage the mango hopper, Idioscopus clypealis L, using three chemical insecticides, Imidacloprid (0.3%, Endosulfan (0.5%, and Cypermethrin (0.4%, and natural Neem oil (3% with three replications of each. All the treatments were significantly effective in managing mango hopper in comparison to the control. Imidacloprid showed the highest efficacy in percentage of reduction of hopper population (92.50 ± 9.02 at 72 hours after treatment in case of 2nd spray. It also showed the highest overall percentage of reduction (88.59 ± 8.64 of hopper population and less toxicity to natural enemies including green ant, spider, and lacewing of mango hopper. In case of biopesticide, azadirachtin based Neem oil was found effective against mango hopper as 48.35, 60.15, and 56.54% reduction after 24, 72, and 168 hours of spraying, respectively, which was comparable with Cypermethrin as there was no statistically significant difference after 168 hours of spray. Natural enemies were also higher after 1st and 2nd spray in case of Neem oil.

  10. Synergistic interactions between a variety of insecticides and an ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide in dietary exposures of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimets, Risto; Karise, Reet; Mänd, Marika; Kaart, Tanel; Ponting, Sally; Song, Jimao; Cresswell, James E

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, concern has been raised over honey bee colony losses, and also among wild bees there is evidence for extinctions and range contractions in Europe and North America. Pesticides have been proposed as a potential cause of this decline. Bees are exposed simultaneously to a variety of agrochemicals, which may cause synergistically detrimental impacts, which are incompletely understood. We investigated the toxicity of the fungicide imazalil in mixture with four common insecticides: fipronil (phenylpyrazoid), cypermethrin (pyrethroid), thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid (neonicotinoids). Ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor (EBI) fungicides like imazalil can inhibit P450 detoxification systems in insects and therefore fungicide - insecticide co-occurrence might produce synergistic toxicity in bees. We assessed the impact of dietary fungicide - insecticide mixtures on the mortality and feeding rates of laboratory bumble bees (Bombus terrestris L.). Regarding mortality, imazalil synergised the toxicity of fipronil, cypermethrin and thiamethoxam, but not imidacloprid. We found no synergistic effects on feeding rates. Our findings suggest that P450-based detoxification processes are differentially important in mitigating the toxicity of certain insecticides, even those of the same chemical class. Our evidence that cocktail effects can arise in bumble bees should extend concern about the potential impacts of agrochemical mixtures to include wild bee species in farmland. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Pesticide-mediated interspecific competition between local and invasive thrips pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyin; Reitz, Stuart R; Yuan, Huiguo; Lei, Zhongren; Paini, Dean Ronald; Gao, Yulin

    2017-01-13

    Competitive interactions between species can be mitigated or even reversed in the presence of anthropogenic influences. The thrips species Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci are highly invasive and damaging agricultural pests throughout the world. Where the species co-occur, one species tends to eventually predominate over the other. Avermectin and beta-cypermethrin are commonly used insecticides to manage thrips in China, and laboratory bioassays demonstrated that F. occidentalis is significantly less susceptible than T. tabaci to these insecticides. In laboratory cage trials in which both species were exposed to insecticide treated cabbage plants, F. occidentalis became the predominant species. In contrast, T. tabaci completely displaced F. occidentalis on plants that were not treated with insecticides. In field trials, the species co-existed on cabbage before insecticide treatments began, but with T. tabaci being the predominant species. Following application of avermectin or beta-cypermethrin, F. occidentalis became the predominant species, while in plots not treated with insecticides, T. tabaci remained the predominant species. These results indicate that T. tabaci is an intrinsically superior competitor to F. occidentalis, but its competitive advantage can be counteracted through differential susceptibilities of the species to insecticides. These results further demonstrate the importance of external factors, such as insecticide applications, in mediating the outcome of interspecific interactions and produce rapid unanticipated shifts in the demographics of pest complexes.

  12. Evaluation of new tools for malaria vector control in Cameroon: focus on long lasting insecticidal nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Etang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: From 2006 to 2011, biological activity of insecticides for Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS, conventional treatment of nets (CTNs or long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs was evaluated before their approval in Cameroon. The objective of the study was to select the best tools for universal malaria vector control coverage. METHODOLOGY: Bioassays were performed using WHO cones and the Kisumu susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae s.s.. Among tested products, residual activity and wash resistance of Alpha-cypermethrin LLINs (Interceptor and CTNs (Fendona were assessed during 5 months in the Ntougou neighborhood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All the 14 tested products were found effective (95-100% knockdown and mortality rates, although a significant decrease of efficacy was seen with lambda-cyhalothrinWP IRS, alpha-cypermethrin CTNs and LLINs (p< 0.05. However, the efficacy of Interceptor nets did not decrease during the 5 months evaluation, even after 25 washes (0.07

  13. Screening Test for Detection of Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say Sensitivity to Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušanka Inđić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the sensitivity of 15 field populations of Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsadecemlineata Say. - CPB was assessed to chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, thiamethoxam and fipronil,four insecticides which are mostly used for its control in Serbia. Screening test that allows