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Sample records for beta4 selective subtype

  1. The nicotinic receptor in the rat pineal gland is an alpha3beta4 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Susan C; Vicini, Stefano; Xiao, Yingxian; Dávila-García, Martha I; Yasuda, Robert P; Wolfe, Barry B; Kellar, Kenneth J

    2004-10-01

    The rat pineal gland contains a high density of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We characterized the pharmacology of the binding sites and function of these receptors, measured the nAChR subunit mRNA, and used subunit-specific antibodies to establish the receptor subtype as defined by subunit composition. In ligand binding studies, [3H]epibatidine ([3H]EB) binds with an affinity of approximately 100 pM to nAChRs in the pineal gland, and the density of these sites is approximately 5 times that in rat cerebral cortex. The affinities of nicotinic drugs for binding sites in the pineal gland are similar to those at alpha3beta4 nAChRs heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In functional studies, the potencies and efficacies of nicotinic drugs to activate or block whole-cell currents in dissociated pinealocytes match closely their potencies and efficacies to activate or block 86Rb+ efflux in the cells expressing heterologous alpha3beta4 nAChRs. Measurements of mRNA indicated the presence of transcripts for alpha3, beta2, and beta4 nAChR subunits but not those for alpha2, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, or beta3 subunits. Immunoprecipitation with subunit-specific antibodies showed that virtually all [3H]EB-labeled nAChRs contained alpha3 and beta4 subunits associated in one complex. The beta2 subunit was not associated with this complex. Taken together, these results indicate that virtually all of the nAChRs in the rat pineal gland are the alpha3beta4 nAChR subtype and that the pineal gland can therefore serve as an excellent and convenient model in which to study the pharmacology and function of these receptors in a native tissue.

  2. Interactions between beta subunits of the KCNMB family and Slo3: beta4 selectively modulates Slo3 expression and function.

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    Cheng-Tao Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pH and voltage-regulated Slo3 K(+ channel, a homologue of the Ca(2+- and voltage-regulated Slo1 K(+ channel, is thought to be primarily expressed in sperm, but the properties of Slo3 studied in heterologous systems differ somewhat from the native sperm KSper pH-regulated current. There is the possibility that critical partners that regulate Slo3 function remain unidentified. The extensive amino acid identity between Slo3 and Slo1 suggests that auxiliary beta subunits regulating Slo1 channels might coassemble with and modulate Slo3 channels. Four distinct beta subunits composing the KCNMB family are known to regulate the function and expression of Slo1 Channels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine the ability of the KCNMB family of auxiliary beta subunits to regulate Slo3 function, we co-expressed Slo3 and each beta subunit in heterologous expression systems and investigated the functional consequences by electrophysiological and biochemical analyses. The beta4 subunit produced an 8-10 fold enhancement of Slo3 current expression in Xenopus oocytes and a similar enhancement of Slo3 surface expression as monitored by YFP-tagged Slo3 or biotin labeled Slo3. Neither beta1, beta2, nor beta3 mimicked the ability of beta4 to increase surface expression, although biochemical tests suggested that all four beta subunits are competent to coassemble with Slo3. Fluorescence microscopy from beta4 KO mice, in which an eGFP tag replaced the deleted exon, revealed that beta4 gene promoter is active in spermatocytes. Furthermore, quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that beta4 and Slo3 exhibit comparable mRNA abundance in both testes and sperm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results argue that, for native mouse Slo3 channels, the beta4 subunit must be considered as a potential interaction partner and, furthermore, that KCNMB subunits may have functions unrelated to regulation of the Slo1 alpha subunit.

  3. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

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    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors (m......GluRs). Within the iGluRs, five subtypes (KA1, KA2, iGluR5-7) show high affinity and express full agonist activity upon binding of the naturally occurring amino acid kainic acid (KA). Thus these receptors have been named the KA receptors. This review describes all-to our knowledge-published KA receptor agonists...

  4. Phytoestrogens from Psoralea corylifolia reveal estrogen receptor-subtype selectivity.

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    Xin, D; Wang, H; Yang, J; Su, Y-F; Fan, G-W; Wang, Y-F; Zhu, Y; Gao, X-M

    2010-02-01

    The seed of Psoralea corylifolia L. (PCL), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been applied as a tonic or an aphrodisiac agent and commonly used as a remedy for bone fracture, osteomalacia and osteoporosis in China. In our study, the estrogen receptor subtype-selective activities of the extracts and compounds derived from PCL were analyzed using the HeLa cell assay. The different fractions including petroleum ether, CH(2)Cl(2) and EtOAc fractions of the EtOH extract of PCL showed significant activity in activating either ERalpha or ERbeta whereas the n-BuOH fraction showed no estrogenic activity. Further chromatographic purification of the active fractions yielded seven compounds including the two coumarins isopsoralen and psoralen, the four flavonoids isobavachalcone, bavachin, corylifol A and neobavaisoflavone, and the meroterpene phenol, bakuchiol. In reporter gene assay, the two coumarins (10(-8)-10(-5)M) acted as ERalpha-selective agonists while the other compounds (10(-9)-10(-6)M) activated both ERalpha and ERbeta. The estrogenic activities of all compounds could be completely suppressed by the pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suggesting that the compounds exert their activities through ER. Only psoralen and isopsoralen as ERalpha agonists promoted MCF-7 cell proliferation significantly. Although all the compounds have estrogenic activity, they may exert different biological effects. In conclusion, both ER subtype-selective and nonselective activities in compounds derived from PCL suggested that PCL could be a new source for selective estrogen-receptor modulators.

  5. GABA(A) receptor subtype selective cognition enhancers.

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    Maubach, Karen

    2003-08-01

    Currently the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is largely unrealised, with no preventive or curative therapies. The marketed acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (eg. donepezil, Aricept) are directed toward temporary symptomatic relief from impaired cognition, but have prominent adverse effects with minimal efficacy. In pursuit of novel cognition enhancers, the observation that classical benzodiazepines (BZ, eg. diazepam) are amnesic, coupled with the preservation of GABA(A) receptors in brain areas most affected by AD, highlighted the GABA(A) receptor as a potential therapeutic target. In contrast to the amnesic BZ agonists, the BZ inverse agonists (eg. DMCM) which attenuate GABA(A) receptor function, have been shown to improve performance in animal models of learning and memory. Unfortunately, such non-selective ligands also induce anxiety and convulsions. More recently, novel ligands have been developed (eg. 6,6-dimethyl-3-(2-hydroxyethyl)thio-1-(thiazol-2-yl)-6,7-dihydro-2-benzothiophen-4(5H)-one) that demonstrate binding selectivity and high inverse agonism for the alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subtype, which is preferentially located in the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with learning and memory. Pre-clinical results are encouraging, since these alpha5 selective inverse agonists enhance memory in animal models, such as spatial learning in the Morris water-maze, but are devoid of the adverse effects associated with activity at other GABA(A) receptor subtypes in other brain regions. If the efficacy and safety profiles of alpha5 inverse agonists in humans prove to be similar to those seen in pre-clinical studies, these compounds would offer significant benefit to AD and MCI patients.

  6. Selective affinity of pirenzepine analogues for subtypes of muscarinic receptors

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    Stubbins, J.F.; Smith, J.D.; Liu, W.S.; Gulya, K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-05

    Pirenzepine (PZ), telenzepine (TZ) and quinuclidinyl xanthene-9-carboxylate (QNX) are antimuscarinic agents containing a tricyclic ring system and a basic side chain that have been reported to have selective affinity for the M/sub 1/ subtype of receptor. They have prepared and examined seven new PZ analogues containing modifications in either the tricyclic ring system, the side-chain, or both. Affinity for M/sub 1/ type receptors was determined by displacement of specifically-bound (/sup 3/H)PZ from rat cerebral cortex homogenates. Affinity for M/sub 2/ type receptors was measured on rat heart homogenate using (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate. The ratio of the K/sub i/'s for M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptors were calculated and compared to PZ. All of the compounds had a higher affinity for M/sub 1/ than M/sub 2/ receptors. Three of the compounds were comparable to PZ in selectivity, but the more selective compounds had a weaker affinity for M/sub 1/ receptors. TZ and QNX were less selective than PZ.

  7. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

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    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  8. GABA A/Bz receptor subtypes as targets for selective drugs.

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    Da Settimo, F; Taliani, S; Trincavelli, M L; Montali, M; Martini, C

    2007-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are the major inhibitory neuronal receptors in the mammalian brain. Their activation by GABA opens the intrinsic ion channel, enabling chloride flux into the cell with subsequent hyperpolarization. Several GABA(A) receptor subunit isoforms have been cloned, the major isoform containing alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, and a regional heterogeneity associated with distinct physiological effects has been suggested. As a variety of allosteric ligands can modulate GABA-gated conductance changes through binding to distinct sites, the development of subtype-selective ligands may lead to the selective treatment of GABA system-associated pathology. In particular, the best characterized binding site is the benzodiazepine site (BzR), localized at the alpha/gamma subunit interface, in which the alpha subunit is the main determinant of BzR ligand action selectivity. The alpha1-containing BzR have been proposed to be responsible for the sedative action; the alpha2 and/or the alpha3 subtypes have been suggested to mediate the anxiolytic activity and the myorelaxation effects, and the alpha5 subtype has been associated with cognition processes. The discovery of alpha-selective subtype ligands may help in the specific treatment of anxiety, sleep disorders, convulsions and memory deficits with fewer side effects. Selectivity may be achieved by two approaches: selective affinity or selective efficacy. Selective affinity needs a compound to bind with a higher affinity to one receptor subtype compared with another, whereas subtype-selective efficacy relies on a compound binding to all subtypes, but having different efficacies at various subtypes. The status of BzR ligands, subdivided on the basis of their main chemical structural features, is reviewed in relation to structure-activity relationships which determine their affinity or efficacy selectivity for a certain BzR subtype.

  9. Localization of thymosin beta-4 in tumors

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    Larsson, L. -I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Overexpression of thymosin beta-4 has been linked to malignant progression but the localization of this polypeptide within tumors is incompletely known. We therefore examined breast cancers for thymosin beta-4 using immunofluorescence. Reactive cells were identified with monoclonal cell marker...... in the tumor microenvironment may modulate tumor behavior....

  10. Synthesis and in vivo studies of a selective ligand for the dopamine transporter: 3{beta}-(4-[{sup 125}I]iodophenyl) tropan-2{beta}-carboxylic acid isopropyl ester ([{sup 125}I]RTI-121)

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    Lever, John R.; Scheffel, Ursula; Stathis, Marigo; Seltzman, Herbert H.; Wyrick, Christopher D.; Abraham, Philip; Parham, Karol; Thomas, Brian F.; Boja, John W.; Kuhar, Michael J.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    1996-04-01

    A selective ligand for the dopamine transporter 3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2{beta}-carboxylic acid isopropyl ester (RTI-121) has been labeled with iodine-125 by electrophilic radioiododestannylation. The [{sup 125}I]RTI-121 was obtained in good yield (86 {+-} 7%, n = 3) with high radiochemical purity (>99%) and specific radioactivity (1210-1950 mCi/{mu}mol). After i.v. administration of [{sup 125}I]RTI-121 to mice, the rank order of regional brain tissue radioactivity (striatum > olfactory tubercles >> cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebellum) was consistent with dopamine transporter labeling. Specific in vivo binding in striatum and olfactory tubercles was saturable, and was blocked by the dopamine transporter ligands GBR 12,909 and ({+-})-nomifensine. By contrast, binding was not reduced by paroxetine, a serotonin transporter inhibitor, or desipramine, a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. A variety of additional drugs having high affinities for recognition sites other than the neuronal dopamine transporter also had no effect. The [{sup 125}I]RTI-121 binding in striatum and olfactory tubercles was inhibited by d-amphetamine in dose-dependent fashion. Nonmetabolized radioligand represents 85% of the signal observed in extracts of whole mouse brain. Thus, [{sup 125}I]RTI-121 is readily prepared, and is a useful tracer for dopamine transporter studies in vivo.

  11. A novel structural framework for α(1A/D-adrenoceptor selective antagonists identified using subtype selective pharmacophores.

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    Emily S Stoddart

    Full Text Available In this study four and five-feature pharmacophores for selective antagonists at each of the three α(1-adrenoceptor (AR subtypes were used to identify novel α(1-AR subtype selective compounds in the National Cancer Institute and Tripos LeadQuest databases. 12 compounds were selected, based on diversity of structure, predicted high affinity and selectivity at the α(1D- subtype compared to α(1A- and α(1B-ARs. 9 out of 12 of the tested compounds displayed affinity at the α(1A and α(1D -AR subtypes and 6 displayed affinity at all three α(1-AR subtypes, no α(1B-AR selective compounds were identified. 8 of the 9 compounds with α(1-AR affinity were antagonists and one compound displayed partial agonist characteristics. This virtual screening has successfully identified an α(1A/D-AR selective antagonist, with low µM affinity with a novel structural scaffold of a an isoquinoline fused three-ring system and good lead-like qualities ideal for further drug development.

  12. Discovery of the first selective inhibitor of excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1

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    Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Erichsen, Mette Navy; Nielsen, Christina Wøhlk

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the first class of subtype-selective inhibitors of the human excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 (EAAT1) and its rat orthologue GLAST is reported. An opening structure-activity relationship of 25 analogues is presented that addresses the influence of substitutions at the ......- and 7-positions of the parental skeleton 2-amino-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile. The most potent analogue 1o displays high nanomolar inhibitory activity at EAAT1 and a >400-fold selectivity over EAAT2 and EAAT3, making it a highly valuable pharmacological tool....

  13. Structure-Based Prediction of Subtype Selectivity of Histamine H3 Receptor Selective Antagonists in Clinical Trials

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    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    applications, including treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.(1) However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity......–5–6 and the aliphatic ring located in TMs 2–3–7. These 3D structures for all four HRs should help guide the rational design of novel drugs for the subtype selective antagonists and agonists with reduced side effects....

  14. Structure-Based Prediction of Subtype Selectivity of Histamine H3 Receptor Selective Antagonists in Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    applications, including treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.(1) However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity...... and antagonists. We find that E2065.46 contributes most in binding H3 selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/S5.43 in both of hH3HR and hH4HR are involved in H3/ H4 subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M3786.55 in hH3HR provides...

  15. Glyceollins and dehydroglyceollins isolated from soybean act as SERMs and ER subtype-selective phytoestrogens.

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    van de Schans, Milou G M; Vincken, Jean-Paul; de Waard, Pieter; Hamers, Astrid R M; Bovee, Toine F H; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Seven prenylated 6a-hydroxy-pterocapans and five prenylated 6a,11a-pterocarpenes with different kinds of prenylation were purified from an ethanolic extract of fungus-treated soybean sprouts. The activity of these compounds toward both human estrogen receptors (hERα and hERβ) was determined in a yeast bioassay and the activity toward hERα was additionally tested in an U2-OS based hERα CALUX bioassay. In the yeast bioassay, compounds with chain prenylation showed in general an agonistic mode of action toward hERα, whereas furan and pyran prenylation led to an antagonistic mode of action. Five of these antagonistic compounds had an agonistic mode of action in the U2-OS based hERα CALUX bioassay, implying that these compounds can act as SERMs. The yeast bioassay also identified 8 ER subtype-selective compounds, with either an antagonistic mode of action or no response toward hERα and an agonistic mode of action toward hERβ. The ER subtype-selective compounds were characterized by 6a-hydroxy-pterocarpan or 6a,11a-pterocarpene backbone structure. It is suggested that either the extra D-ring or the increase in length to 12-13.5Å of these compounds is responsible for an agonistic mode of action toward hERβ and, thereby, inducing ER subtype-selective behavior.

  16. Pressure-selective modulation of NMDA receptor subtypes may reflect 3D structural differences

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    Amir eMor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Professional deep-water divers exposed to high pressure (HP above 1.1 MPa suffer from High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS, which is associated with CNS hyperexcitability. We have previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. We now report that HP (10.1 MPa differentially affects eight specific NMDAR subtypes. GluN1(1a or 1b was co-expressed with one of the four GluN2(A-D subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. HP increased ionic currents (measured by two electrode voltage clamps of one subtype, reduced the current in four others, and did not affect the current in the remaining three. 3D theoretical modeling was aimed at revealing specific receptor domains involved with HP selectivity. In light of the information on the CNS spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes, we conclude that the NMDAR’s diverse responses to HP may lead to selective HP effects on different brain regions. These discoveries call for further and more specific investigation of deleterious HP effects and suggest the need for a re-evaluation of deep-diving safety guidelines.

  17. Selectivities of dihydropyridine derivatives in blocking Ca(2+) channel subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

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    Furukawa, T; Yamakawa, T; Midera, T; Sagawa, T; Mori, Y; Nukada, T

    1999-11-01

    Some dihydropyridines (DHPs), such as amlodipine and cilnidipine, have been shown to block not only L-type but also N-type Ca(2+) channels; therefore, DHPs are no longer considered as L-type-specific Ca(2+) channel blockers. However, selectivity of DHPs for Ca(2+) channel subtypes including N-, P/Q-, and R-types are poorly understood. To address this issue at the molecular level, blocking effects of 10 DHPs (nifedipine, nilvadipine, barnidipine, nimodipine, nitrendipine, amlodipine, nicardipine, benidipine, felodipine, and cilnidipine) on four subtypes of Ca(2+) channels (L-, N-, P/Q-, and R-types) were investigated in the Xenopus oocyte expression system with the use of the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed as alpha(1C)alpha(2)beta(1a) combination were profoundly blocked by all DHPs examined, whereas blocking actions of these DHPs on R-type (alpha(1E)alpha(2)beta(1a)) channels were equally weak. In contrast, 5 of the 10 DHPs (amlodipine, benidipine, cilnidipine, nicardipine, and barnidipine) significantly blocked N-type (alpha(1B)alpha(2)beta(1a)) and P/Q-type (alpha(1A)alpha(2)beta(1a)) Ca(2+) channels. These selectivities of DHPs in blocking Ca(2+) channel subtypes would provide useful pharmacological and clinical information on the mode of action of the drugs including side effects and adverse effects.

  18. Pressure-selective modulation of NMDA receptor subtypes may reflect 3D structural differences.

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    Mor, Amir; Kuttner, Yosef Y; Levy, Shiri; Mor, Merav; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Professional deep-water divers exposed to high pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa suffer from High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS), which is associated with CNS hyperexcitability. We have previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. We now report that HP (10.1 MPa) differentially affects eight specific NMDAR subtypes. GluN1(1a or 1b) was co-expressed with one of the four GluN2(A-D) subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. HP increased ionic currents (measured by two electrode voltage clamps) of one subtype, reduced the current in four others, and did not affect the current in the remaining three. 3D theoretical modeling was aimed at revealing specific receptor domains involved with HP selectivity. In light of the information on the CNS spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes, we conclude that the NMDAR's diverse responses to HP may lead to selective HP effects on different brain regions. These discoveries call for further and more specific investigation of deleterious HP effects and suggest the need for a re-evaluation of deep-diving safety guidelines.

  19. A Molecular and Chemical Perspective in Defining Melatonin Receptor Subtype Selectivity

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    Yung Hou Wong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is primarily synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during darkness in a normal diurnal cycle. In addition to its intrinsic antioxidant property, the neurohormone has renowned regulatory roles in the control of circadian rhythm and exerts its physiological actions primarily by interacting with the G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 transmembrane receptors. The two melatonin receptor subtypes display identical ligand binding characteristics and mediate a myriad of signaling pathways, including adenylyl cyclase inhibition, phospholipase C stimulation and the regulation of other effector molecules. Both MT1 and MT2 receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system as well as many peripheral tissues, but each receptor subtype can be linked to specific functional responses at the target tissue. Given the broad therapeutic implications of melatonin receptors in chronobiology, immunomodulation, endocrine regulation, reproductive functions and cancer development, drug discovery and development programs have been directed at identifying chemical molecules that bind to the two melatonin receptor subtypes. However, all of the melatoninergics in the market act on both subtypes of melatonin receptors without significant selectivity. To facilitate the design and development of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to understand the intrinsic differences between MT1 and MT2 that determine ligand binding, functional efficacy, and signaling specificity. This review summarizes our current knowledge in differentiating MT1 and MT2 receptors and their signaling capacities. The use of homology modeling in the mapping of the ligand-binding pocket will be described. Identification of conserved and distinct residues will be tremendously useful in the design of highly selective ligands.

  20. A role for motoneuron subtype-selective ER stress in disease manifestations of FALS mice.

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    Saxena, Smita; Cabuy, Erik; Caroni, Pico

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying disease manifestations in neurodegeneration remain unclear, but their understanding is critical to devising effective therapies. We carry out a longitudinal analysis in vivo of identified motoneurons selectively vulnerable (VUL) or resistant (RES) to motoneuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS) and show that subtype-selective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses influence disease manifestations. VUL motoneurons were selectively prone to ER stress and showed gradually upregulated ER stress markers from birth on in three mouse models of familial ALS (FALS). 25-30 days before the earliest denervations, ubiquitin signals increased in both VUL and RES motoneurons, but an unfolded protein response coupled with microglial activation was initiated selectively in VUL motoneurons. This transition was followed by selective axonal degeneration and spreading stress. The ER stress-protective agent salubrinal attenuated disease manifestations and delayed progression, whereas chronic enhancement of ER stress promoted disease. Thus, whereas all motoneurons are preferentially affected in ALS, ER stress responses in specific motoneuron subtypes influence the progressive manifestations of weakening and paralysis.

  1. Feature Selection for Better Identification of Subtypes of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

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    José Hernández-Torruco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is a neurological disorder which has not been explored using clustering algorithms. Clustering algorithms perform more efficiently when they work only with relevant features. In this work, we applied correlation-based feature selection (CFS, chi-squared, information gain, symmetrical uncertainty, and consistency filter methods to select the most relevant features from a 156-feature real dataset. This dataset contains clinical, serological, and nerve conduction tests data obtained from GBS patients. The most relevant feature subsets, determined with each filter method, were used to identify four subtypes of GBS present in the dataset. We used partitions around medoids (PAM clustering algorithm to form four clusters, corresponding to the GBS subtypes. We applied the purity of each cluster as evaluation measure. After experimentation, symmetrical uncertainty and information gain determined a feature subset of seven variables. These variables conformed as a dataset were used as input to PAM and reached a purity of 0.7984. This result leads to a first characterization of this syndrome using computational techniques.

  2. Versatility or Promiscuity: The Estrogen Receptors, Control of Ligand Selectivity and an Update on Subtype Selective Ligands

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    Hui Wen Ng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptors (ERs are a group of versatile receptors. They regulate an enormity of processes starting in early life and continuing through sexual reproduction, development, and end of life. This review provides a background and structural perspective for the ERs as part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and discusses the ER versatility and promiscuity. The wide repertoire of ER actions is mediated mostly through ligand-activated transcription factors and many DNA response elements in most tissues and organs. Their versatility, however, comes with the drawback of promiscuous interactions with structurally diverse exogenous chemicals with potential for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Even when interacting with endogenous hormones, ER actions can have adverse effects in disease progression. Finally, how nature controls ER specificity and how the subtle differences in receptor subtypes are exploited in pharmaceutical design to achieve binding specificity and subtype selectivity for desired biological response are discussed. The intent of this review is to complement the large body of literature with emphasis on most recent developments in selective ER ligands.

  3. Deficient Attention Is Hard to Find: Applying the Perceptual Load Model of Selective Attention to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

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    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.; Carr, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Whether selective attention is a primary deficit in childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) remains in active debate. Methods: We used the "perceptual load" paradigm to examine both early and late selective attention in children with the Primarily Inattentive (ADHD-I) and Combined subtypes (ADHD-C) of ADHD. Results:…

  4. 4-Alkylated homoibotenic acid (HIBO) analogues: versatile pharmacological agents with diverse selectivity profiles towards metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes

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    Madsen, Ulf; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte;

    2005-01-01

    4-Alkylated analogues of homoibotenic acid (HIBO) have previously shown high potency and selectivity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR and mGluR) subtypes. Compounds with different selectivity profiles are valuable pharmacological tools for neuropharmacological studies...

  5. GABA(A) receptor subtype-selectivity of novel bicuculline derivatives.

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    Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Foppa, Verena; Thiery, Hanna; Hermange, Philippe; Janody, Simon; Berger, Michael L; Dodd, Robert H; Sieghart, Werner

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and are targets of clinically important drugs modulating GABA induced ion flux by interacting with distinct allosteric binding sites. ROD 185 is a previously investigated structural analogue of the GABA site antagonist bicuculline, and a positive allosteric modulator acting via the benzodiazepine binding site. Here, we investigated 13 newly synthesized structural analogues of ROD 185 for their interaction with rat GABA(A) receptors. Using [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding assays, we identified four compounds exhibiting a higher affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site than ROD 185. Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that most of these compounds positively modulated GABA-induced currents at these receptors. Additionally, these experiments revealed that this compound class not only interacts with the benzodiazepine binding site at αβγ receptors but also with a novel, so far unidentified binding site present in αβ receptors. Compounds with a high affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site stimulated GABA-induced currents stronger at αβγ than at αβ receptors and preferred α3β3γ2 receptors. Compounds showing equal or smaller effects at αβγ compared to αβ receptors differentially interacted with various αβ or αβγ receptor subtypes. Surprisingly, five of these compounds interacting with αβ receptors showed a strong stimulation at α6β3γ2 receptors. The absence of any direct effects at GABA(A) receptors, as well as their potential selectivity for receptor subtypes not being addressed by benzodiazepines, make this compound class to a starting point for the development of drugs with a possible clinical importance.

  6. Comparison of subtypes of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from naturally contaminated watershed samples using a combination of non-selective and selective enrichment methods

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    Two enrichment methods for Listeria monocytogenes using Immuno Magnetic Separation were tested to determine if they selected the same subtypes of isolates. Both methods included a non-selective enrichment and one included subculture in Fraser Broth. Naturally contaminated watershed samples from the ...

  7. Bioavailability Studies and in vitro Profiling of the Selective Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Subtype 1 (EAAT1) Inhibitor UCPH‐102

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    Haym, Isabell; Huynh, Tri H. V.; Hansen, Stinne W.

    2016-01-01

    Although the selective excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 (EAAT1) inhibitor UCPH‐101 has become a standard pharmacological tool compound for in vitro and ex vivo studies in the EAAT research field, its inability to penetrate the blood–brain barrier makes it unsuitable for in vivo studies...

  8. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel 9- and 10-substituted cytisine derivatives. Nicotinic ligands of enhanced subtype selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappan, Sheela K; Xiao, Yingxian; Tueckmantel, Werner; Kellar, Kenneth J; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2006-05-04

    We report the synthesis and pharmacological properties of several cytisine derivatives. Among them, two 10-substituted derivatives showed much higher selectivities for the alpha4beta2 nAChR subtype in binding assays than cytisine. The 9-vinyl derivative was found to have a very similar agonist activity profile to that of cytisine.

  9. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel 9- and 10- Substituted Cytisine Derivatives - Nicotinic Ligands of Enhanced Subtype Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappan, Sheela K.; Xiao, Yingxian; Tueckmantel, Werner; Kellar, Kenneth J.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis and pharmacological properties of several cytisine derivatives. Among them, two 10-substituted derivatives showed much higher selectivities for the α4β2 nAChR subtype in binding assays than cytisine. The 9-vinyl derivative was found to have a very similar agonist activity profile to that of cytisine. PMID:16640326

  10. Comparison of the Binding and Functional Properties of Two Structurally Different D2 Dopamine Receptor Subtype Selective Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported on the synthesis of substituted phenyl-4-hydroxy-1-piperidyl indole analogues with nanomolar affinity at D2 dopamine receptors, ranging from 10- to 100-fold selective for D2 compared to the D3 dopamine receptor subtype. More recently, we evaluated a panel of aripiprazole analogues, identifying several analogues that also exhibit D2 vs D3 dopamine receptor binding selectivity. These studies further characterize the intrinsic efficacy of the compound with the greatest binding selectivity from each chemical class, 1-((5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl)-4-(4-(methylthio)phenyl)piperidin-4-ol (SV 293) and 7-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butoxy)-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one (SV-III-130s), using an adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay, a G-protein-coupled inward-rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel activation assay, and a cell based phospho-MAPK (pERK1/2) assay. SV 293 was found to be a neutral antagonist at D2 dopamine receptors using all three assays. SV-III-130s is a partial agonist using an adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay but an antagonist in the GIRK and phospho ERK1/2 assays. To define the molecular basis for the binding selectivity, the affinity of these two compounds was evaluated using (a) wild type human D2 and D3 receptors and (b) a panel of chimeric D2/D3 dopamine receptors. Computer-assisted modeling techniques were used to dock these compounds to the human D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes. It is hoped that these studies on D2 receptor selective ligands will be useful in the future design of (a) receptor selective ligands used to define the function of D2-like receptor subtypes, (b) novel pharmacotherapeutic agents, and/or (c) in vitro and in vivo imaging agents. PMID:23259040

  11. A comparison of the effects of a subtype selective and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonist in two CO(2) models of experimental human anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J E; Papadopoulos, A; Seddon, K; Nutt, D J

    2009-03-01

    Studies in human volunteers that can demonstrate proof of concept are attractive in that possible mechanisms and potential new drug treatments can be examined. We have been developing models of anxiety disorders using the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min to model generalised anxiety disorder, as well as using the previously reported 35% CO(2) as a model for panic anxiety. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover study in 12 healthy volunteer subjects, we compared a full agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor that binds to four alpha-subtypes of the receptor (alpha-1,-2,-3,-5) (alprazolam 1 mg), with zolpidem (5 mg), an agonist selective for the alpha-1 subtype of the gamma amino butyric acid-receptor subtype A (GABA-A) receptor, which is a widely used hypnotic drug. Compared with placebo, both drugs significantly attenuated peak CO(2)-induced changes in subjective feelings after the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min. However, there were fewer significant differences after a single vital capacity inhalation of 35% CO(2), where zolpidem was less efficacious than alprazolam at reducing CO(2)-induced symptoms. In conclusion, our results show that zolpidem shows some anxiolytic efficacy in the 7.5% CO(2) model, similar to alprazolam, and this is the first report of such an effect of zolpidem in a model of anxiety. These and other studies of benzodiazepines in clinical and volunteer studies suggest a definite role of the GABA-A receptor in CO(2)-induced anxiety, and it would be of interest to examine other GABA-A receptor subtype selective drugs, which are now in early phase clinical studies and are showing selective efficacy in pharmacodynamic studies.

  12. HLA A19 subtypes and B loci related haplotype in selected caste groups from the Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankarkumar U

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian population has been broadly classified as Aryans of Northern India and Dravidians of South India. The present study was undertaken to compile available data and investigate the genetic diversity of HLA A19 subtypes in Indians and its associated B locus haplotype frequency distribution at the population level. The study revealed that A33 was common among the selected North Indian caste groups (Aryans while A31 was common among the selected South Indian caste groups (Dravidians. The haplotypes A33-B44 and A19-B35 were characteristic to Aryans while haplotypes A19-B22 and A19-B7 were characteristic to Dravidians. Further novel haplotypes such as A19-B14 and A33-B49 were unique to Parsis and Sourastran caste. A low frequency of A29 was observed among the A19 subtype repertoire. Prevalence of HLA A33 and A31 among North Indians (Aryans and South Indians (Dravidians along with their unique haplotypes may be a consequence of the founder effect, racial admixture or selection pressure due to environmental factors among this population.

  13. A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

    Four equating methods were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional mean squared error (CMSE) difference, and the equipercentile equating property. The four methods were: (1) three parameter logistic (3PL) model true score equating; (2) 3PL observed score equating; (3) beta 4 true…

  14. Modification of the anabaseine pyridine nucleus allows achieving binding and functional selectivity for the α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, Carlo; Quadri, Marta; Sciaccaluga, Miriam; Pomè, Diego Yuri; Fasoli, Francesca; De Amici, Marco; Fucile, Sergio; Gotti, Cecilia; Dallanoce, Clelia; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-01-27

    We report the design, synthesis and pharmacological screening of a group of analogues of anabaseine 2, a naturally occurring unselective nicotinic agonist. The novel nAChR ligands 5-15 were planned following a molecular modeling analysis which suggested the replacement of the pyridine ring of 2 with a 3-substituted benzene ring as a means to gain selectivity for the α3β4 nAChR subtype. Overall, from binding experiments, the synthesized compounds showed high values of α3β4 affinity and α3β4 vs α4β2 selectivity, although they poorly discriminated the homomeric α7 subtype. The three analogues 6, 12 and 13 were also evaluated in electrophysiological assays, and 12 [6-(3-iodophenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridine] emerged as a rather interesting nicotinic ligand. Indeed, in addition to a noteworthy affinity (Ki = 4.7 nM) for the α3β4 subtype and to an excellent α3β4 vs α4β2 subtype selectivity (806-fold), compound 12 selectively activated the α3β4 nAChR (EC50 = 7.4 μM) while eliciting a negligible response at the α7 subtype and no effect at the α4β2 subtype.

  15. Mimotopes selected with neutralizing antibodies against multiple subtypes of influenza A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yanwei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mimotopes of viruses are considered as the good targets for vaccine design. We prepared mimotopes against multiple subtypes of influenza A and evaluate their immune responses in flu virus challenged Balb/c mice. Methods The mimotopes of influenza A including pandemic H1N1, H3N2, H2N2 and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus were screened by peptide phage display libraries, respectively. These mimotopes were engineered in one protein as multi- epitopes in Escherichia coli (E. coli and purified. Balb/c mice were immunized using the multi-mimotopes protein and specific antibody responses were analyzed using hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The lung inflammation level was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE. Results Linear heptopeptide and dodecapeptide mimotopes were obtained for these influenza virus. The recombinant multi-mimotopes protein was a 73 kDa fusion protein. Comparing immunized infected groups with unimmunized infected subsets, significant differences were observed in the body weight loss and survival rate. The antiserum contained higher HI Ab titer against H1N1 virus and the lung inflammation level were significantly decreased in immunized infected groups. Conclusions Phage-displayed mimotopes against multiple subtypes of influenza A were accessible to the mouse immune system and triggered a humoral response to above virus.

  16. Small Cause, Great Impact: Modification of the Guanidine Group in the RGD Motif Controls Integrin Subtype Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Tobias G; Fottner, Maximilian; Maltsev, Oleg V; Kessler, Horst

    2016-01-22

    Due to its unique role as a hydrogen-bond donor and its positive charge, the guanidine group is an important pharmacophoric group and often used in synthetic ligands. The chemical modification of the guanidine group is often considered to destroy its function. Herein, we show that the N-methylation, N-alkylation, or N-acylation of the guanidine group can be used to modify the receptor subtype specificity of the integrin ligand cilengitide. Using the αvβ6/α5β1-biselective ligand c(isoDGRkphg) and the αvβ6-specific ligand c(FRGDLAFp(NMe)K(Ac) as examples, we show that the binding affinities of the ligands can be fine-tuned by this method to enhance the selectivity for αvβ6. Furthermore, we describe a new strategy for the functionalization of integrin ligands. By introducing longer N-alkylguanidine and N-acylguanidine groups, we are able to simultaneously identify a hitherto unknown anchoring point and enhance the subtype selectivity of the ligand.

  17. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists enhance the responsiveness to citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Olsen, Gunnar M; Peters, Dan; Mirza, Naheed R; Redrobe, John P

    2011-10-01

    Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. Accordingly, nicotine enhances antidepressant-like actions of reuptake inhibitors selective for serotonin or noradrenaline in the mouse forced swim test and the mouse tail suspension test. Both high-affinity α4β2 and low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are implicated in nicotine-mediated release of serotonin and noradrenaline. The present study therefore investigated whether selective agonism of α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors would affect the mouse forced swim test activity of two antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, namely the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Subthreshold and threshold doses of citalopram (3 and 10 mg/kg) or reboxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) were tested alone and in combination with the novel α4β2-selective partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, NS3956 (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) or the α7-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, PNU-282987 (10 and 30 mg/kg). Alone, NS3956 and PNU-282987 were devoid of activity in the mouse forced swim test, but both 1.0 mg/kg NS3956 and 30 mg/kg PNU-282987 enhanced the effect of citalopram and also reboxetine. The data suggest that the activity of citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test can be enhanced by agonists at either α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes may be involved in the nicotine-enhanced action of antidepressants.

  18. Predicting Subtype Selectivity for Adenosine Receptor Ligands with Three-Dimensional Biologically Relevant Spectrum (BRS-3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Song-Bing; Ben Hu; Kuang, Zheng-Kun; Wang, Dong; Kong, De-Xin

    2016-11-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are potential therapeutic targets for Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, pain, stroke and cancers. Prediction of subtype selectivity is therefore important from both therapeutic and mechanistic perspectives. In this paper, we introduced a shape similarity profile as molecular descriptor, namely three-dimensional biologically relevant spectrum (BRS-3D), for AR selectivity prediction. Pairwise regression and discrimination models were built with the support vector machine methods. The average determination coefficient (r2) of the regression models was 0.664 (for test sets). The 2B-3 (A2B vs A3) model performed best with q2 = 0.769 for training sets (10-fold cross-validation), and r2 = 0.766, RMSE = 0.828 for test sets. The models’ robustness and stability were validated with 100 times resampling and 500 times Y-randomization. We compared the performance of BRS-3D with 3D descriptors calculated by MOE. BRS-3D performed as good as, or better than, MOE 3D descriptors. The performances of the discrimination models were also encouraging, with average accuracy (ACC) 0.912 and MCC 0.792 (test set). The 2A-3 (A2A vs A3) selectivity discrimination model (ACC = 0.882 and MCC = 0.715 for test set) outperformed an earlier reported one (ACC = 0.784). These results demonstrated that, through multiple conformation encoding, BRS-3D can be used as an effective molecular descriptor for AR subtype selectivity prediction.

  19. EBIO Does Not Induce Cardiomyogenesis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells but Modulates Cardiac Subtype Enrichment by Lineage-Selective Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Jara-Avaca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Subtype-specific human cardiomyocytes (CMs are valuable for basic and applied research. Induction of cardiomyogenesis and enrichment of nodal-like CMs was described for mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs in response to 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (EBIO, a chemical modulator of small-/intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (SKs 1–4. Investigating EBIO in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, we have applied three independent differentiation protocols of low to high cardiomyogenic efficiency. Equivalent to mPSCs, timed EBIO supplementation during hPSC differentiation resulted in dose-dependent enrichment of up to 80% CMs, including an increase in nodal- and atrial-like phenotypes. However, our study revealed extensive EBIO-triggered cell loss favoring cardiac progenitor preservation and, subsequently, CMs with shortened action potentials. Proliferative cells were generally more sensitive to EBIO, presumably via an SK-independent mechanism. Together, EBIO did not promote cardiogenic differentiation of PSCs, opposing previous findings, but triggered lineage-selective survival at a cardiac progenitor stage, which we propose as a pharmacological strategy to modulate CM subtype composition.

  20. Selective Attention and Inhibitory Deficits in ADHD: Does Subtype or Comorbidity Modulate Negative Priming Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Verena E.; Neumann, Ewald; Rucklidge, Julia J.

    2008-01-01

    Selective attention has durable consequences for behavior and neural activation. Negative priming (NP) effects are assumed to reflect a critical inhibitory component of selective attention. The performance of adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) was assessed across two conceptually based NP tasks within a selective…

  1. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  2. From Pan-Reactive KV7 Channel Opener to Subtype Selective Opener/Inhibitor by Addition of a Methyl Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Sigrid Marie; Rottländer, Mario; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Schmitt, Nicole; Jensen, Henrik Sindal

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels of the KV7 family (KV7.1–5) play important roles in controlling neuronal excitability and are therefore attractive targets for treatment of CNS disorders linked to hyperexcitability. One of the main challenges in developing KV7 channel active drugs has been to identify compounds capable of discriminating between the neuronally expressed subtypes (KV7.2–5), aiding the identification of the subunit composition of KV7 currents in various tissues, and possessing better therapeutic potential for particular indications. By taking advantage of the structure-activity relationship of acrylamide KV7 channel openers and the effects of these compounds on mutant KV7 channels, we have designed and synthesized a novel KV7 channel modulator with a unique profile. The compound, named SMB-1, is an inhibitor of KV7.2 and an activator of KV7.4. SMB-1 inhibits KV7.2 by reducing the current amplitude and increasing the time constant for the slow component of the activation kinetics. The activation of KV7.4 is seen as an increase in the current amplitude and a slowing of the deactivation kinetics. Experiments studying mutant channels with a compromised binding site for the KV7.2–5 opener retigabine indicate that SMB-1 binds within the same pocket as retigabine for both inhibition of KV7.2 and activation of KV7.4. SMB-1 may serve as a valuable tool for KV7 channel research and may be used as a template for further design of better subtype selective KV7 channel modulators. A compound with this profile could hold novel therapeutic potential such as the treatment of both positive and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:24956197

  3. From pan-reactive KV7 channel opener to subtype selective opener/inhibitor by addition of a methyl group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Marie Blom

    Full Text Available The voltage-gated potassium channels of the KV7 family (KV7.1-5 play important roles in controlling neuronal excitability and are therefore attractive targets for treatment of CNS disorders linked to hyperexcitability. One of the main challenges in developing KV7 channel active drugs has been to identify compounds capable of discriminating between the neuronally expressed subtypes (KV7.2-5, aiding the identification of the subunit composition of KV7 currents in various tissues, and possessing better therapeutic potential for particular indications. By taking advantage of the structure-activity relationship of acrylamide KV7 channel openers and the effects of these compounds on mutant KV7 channels, we have designed and synthesized a novel KV7 channel modulator with a unique profile. The compound, named SMB-1, is an inhibitor of KV7.2 and an activator of KV7.4. SMB-1 inhibits KV7.2 by reducing the current amplitude and increasing the time constant for the slow component of the activation kinetics. The activation of KV7.4 is seen as an increase in the current amplitude and a slowing of the deactivation kinetics. Experiments studying mutant channels with a compromised binding site for the KV7.2-5 opener retigabine indicate that SMB-1 binds within the same pocket as retigabine for both inhibition of KV7.2 and activation of KV7.4. SMB-1 may serve as a valuable tool for KV7 channel research and may be used as a template for further design of better subtype selective KV7 channel modulators. A compound with this profile could hold novel therapeutic potential such as the treatment of both positive and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  4. Identification of three muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat lung using binding studies with selective antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, A.D.; El-Fakahany, E.E. (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptor population in the rat central and peripheral lung was found in competition binding experiments against ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB) using the selective antagonists pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pirenzepine displaced ({sup 3}H)QNB with low affinity from preparations of central airways indicating the absence of M{sub 1} receptors in the trachea and bronchi. Muscarinic receptors in the central airways are comprised of both M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} receptors since AF-DX 116, an M{sub 2}-selective antagonist, bound with high affinity to 70% of the available sites while HHSiD, an M{sub 3}-selective antagonist bound with high affinity to the remaining binding sites. In the peripheral lung, pirenzepine bound with high affinity to 14% of the receptor population, AF-DX 116 bound with high affinity 79% of the binding sites while HHSiD bound with high affinity to 18% of the binding sites. The presence of M{sub 1} receptors in the peripheral airways but not in the central airways was confirmed using ({sup 3}H)telenzepine, an M{sub 1} receptor ligand. ({sup 3}H)Telenzepine showed specific saturable binding to 8% of ({sup 3}H)QNB labeled binding sites in homogenates of rat peripheral lung, while there was no detectable specific binding in homogenates of rat trachea or heart.

  5. Nitrogen substitution modifies the activity of cytisine on neuronal nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnelle, Eric; Sparatore, Fabio; Canu-Boido, Caterina; Salvagno, Cristian; Baldani-Guerra, Barbara; Terstappen, Georg; Zwart, Ruud; Vijverberg, Henk; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2003-06-20

    Cytisine very potently binds and activates the alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 nicotinic subtypes, but only partially agonises the alpha 4 beta 2 subtype. Although with a lower affinity than cytisine, new cytisine derivatives with different substituents on the basic nitrogen (CC1-CC8) bind to both the heteromeric and homomeric subtypes, with higher affinity for brain [3H]epibatidine receptors. The cytisine derivatives were tested on the Ca(2+) flux of native or transfected cell lines expressing the rat alpha 7, or human alpha 3 beta 4 or alpha 4 beta 2 subtypes using Ca(2+) dynamics in conjunction with a fluorescent image plate reader. None elicited any response at doses of up to 30-100 microM, but all inhibited agonist-induced responses. Compounds CC5 and CC7 were also electrophysiologically tested on oocyte-expressed rat alpha 4 beta 2, alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 subtypes. CC5 competitively antagonised the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 subtypes with similar potency, whereas CC7 only partially agonised them with maximum responses of respectively 3% and 11% of those of 1 mM acetylcholine. Neither compound induced any current in the oocyte-expressed alpha 7 subtype, and both weakly inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents. Adding chemical groups of a different class or size to the basic nitrogen of cytisine leads to compounds that lose full agonist activity on the alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 subtypes.

  6. Thymosin beta 4 induces hair growth via stem cell migration and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Deborah; St-Surin, Sharleen; Cha, Hee-Jae; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Elkin, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Thymosin beta 4 is a small 43-amino-acid molecule that has multiple biological activities, including promotion of cell migration angiogenesis, cell survival, protease production, and wound healing. We have found that thymosin beta 4 promotes hair growth in various rat and mice models including a transgenic thymosin beta 4 overexpressing mouse. We have also determined the mechanism by which thymosin beta 4 acts to promote hair growth by examining its effects on follicle stem cell growth, migration, differentiation, and protease production.

  7. Benzoxazole piperidines as selective and potent somatostatin receptor subtype 5 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rainer E; Mohr, Peter; Maerki, Hans Peter; Guba, Wolfgang; Kuratli, Christoph; Gavelle, Olivier; Binggeli, Alfred; Bendels, Stefanie; Alvarez-Sánchez, Rubén; Alker, André; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Christ, Andreas D

    2009-11-01

    SAR studies of a recently described SST5R selective benzoxazole piperidine lead series are described with particular focus on the substitution pattern on the benzyl and benzoxazole side-chains. Introduction of a second meta substituent at the benzyl unit significantly lowers residual hH1 activity and insertion of substituents onto the benzoxazole periphery entirely removes remaining h5-HT2B activity. Compounds with single digit nM activity, functional antagonism and favorable physicochemical properties endowed with a good pharmacokinetic profile in rats are described which should become valuable tools for exploring the pharmacological role of the SST5 receptor in vivo.

  8. Thymosin {beta}4 promotes the migration of endothelial cells without intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmi, Anna [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Malinowski, Mariusz [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Brutkowski, Wojciech [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Bednarek, Radoslaw [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Cierniewski, Czeslaw S., E-mail: czeslaw.cierniewski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of T{beta}4 on cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation after exogenous treatment, but the mechanism by which T{beta}4 functions is still unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that incubation of endothelial cells with T{beta}4 induced synthesis and secretion of various proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and matrix metaloproteinases. We also showed that T{beta}4 interacts with Ku80, which may operate as a novel receptor for T{beta}4 and mediates its intracellular activity. In this paper, we provide evidence that T{beta}4 induces cellular processes without changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. External treatment of HUVECs with T{beta}4 and its mutants deprived of the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP (T{beta}4{sub AcSDKPT/4A}) or the actin-binding sequence KLKKTET (T{beta}4{sub KLKKTET/7A}) resulted in enhanced cell migration and formation of tubular structures in Matrigel. Surprisingly, the increased cell motility caused by T{beta}4 was not associated with the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation monitored with Fluo-4 NW or Fura-2 AM. Therefore, it is unlikely that externally added T{beta}4 induces HUVEC migration via the surface membrane receptors known to generate Ca{sup 2+} influx. Our data confirm the concept that externally added T{beta}4 must be internalized to induce intracellular mechanisms supporting endothelial cell migration.

  9. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  10. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Selective tropism of Seneca Valley virus for variant subtype small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, J T; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Moriarty, Whei F; Peacock, Craig D; Hann, Christine L; Rudin, Charles M

    2013-07-17

    We assessed the efficacy of Seneca Valley virus (SVV-001), a neuroendocrine cancer-selective oncolytic picornavirus, in primary heterotransplant mouse models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), including three lines each of classic and variant SCLC. Half-maximal effective concentrations for cell lines derived from three variant heterotransplants ranged from 1.6×10(-3) (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1×10(-3) to 2.5×10(-3)) to 3.9×10(-3) (95% CI = 2.8×10(-3) to 5.5×10(-3)). Sustained tumor growth inhibition in vivo was only observed in variant lines (two-sided Student t test, P < .005 for each). Doses of 10(14) vp/kg were able to completely and durably eradicate tumors in a variant SCLC heterotransplant model in two of six mice. Gene expression profiling revealed that permissive lines are typified by lower expression of the early neurogenic transcription factor ASCL1 and, conversely, by higher expression of the late neurogenic transcription factor NEUROD1. This classifier demonstrates a sensitivity of .89, specificity of .92, and accuracy of .91. The NEUROD1 to ASCL1 ratio may serve as a predictive biomarker of SVV-001 efficacy.

  12. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation Increases Efficacy of Etanercept in Selected Subtypes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Innovative Clinical Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Andrei Chiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, placebo-controlled study assesses the efficacy of synergic administration of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI and etanercept in selected subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Etanercept is a tumor necrosis factor alpha blocking agent with recognized importance in JIA. Laser radiation has immunomodulatory effects in animal and human studies. Fourteen patients (Group I received ILBI and 9 patients (Group II received placebo laser. ILBI was performed in addition to ongoing JIA medication, including etanercept. ILBI was administrated in 3 sets of 5 consecutive daily sessions, with a 7-week interval between every set of sessions. Evaluation was performed using ACR (American College of Rheumatology Pediatric Criteria (ACR Pedi at study enrollment and at 10 and 20 weeks, respectively. After 10 weeks, 85.7% of the patients in Group I fulfilled Pedi 30 criteria, compared to only 55.6% of the patients in Group II. After 20 weeks, all patients in both groups had a Pedi 30 response. In Group I, 92.8% of the subjects met the Pedi 50 response, compared to only 55.6% in the placebo group. One patient in Group I responded best, fulfilling Pedi 70 criteria. If applied synergistically, ILBI and etanercept would have an increased efficacy in promoting JIA remission.

  13. Identification of Subtype-Specific Prognostic Genes for Early-Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Using an Embedded Feature Selection Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Tian

    Full Text Available The existence of fundamental differences between lung adenocarcinoma (AC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in their underlying mechanisms motivated us to postulate that specific genes might exist relevant to prognosis of each histology subtype. To test on this research hypothesis, we previously proposed a simple Cox-regression model based feature selection algorithm and identified successfully some subtype-specific prognostic genes when applying this method to real-world data. In this article, we continue our effort on identification of subtype-specific prognostic genes for AC and SCC, and propose a novel embedded feature selection method by extending Threshold Gradient Descent Regularization (TGDR algorithm and minimizing on a corresponding negative partial likelihood function. Using real-world datasets and simulated ones, we show these two proposed methods have comparable performance whereas the new proposal is superior in terms of model parsimony. Our analysis provides some evidence on the existence of such subtype-specific prognostic genes, more investigation is warranted.

  14. Molecular determinants of subtype-selective efficacies of cytisine and the novel compound NS3861 at heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B; Jensen, Marianne L; Dyhring, Tino; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Ahring, Philip K

    2013-01-25

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity to heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs. However, initial data revealed that the activation patterns of the two compounds show very distinct maximal efficacy readouts at various heteromeric nAChRs. To investigate the molecular determinants behind these observations, we performed in-depth patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of efficacy levels at heteromeric combinations of α3- and α4-, with β2- and β4-subunits, and various chimeric constructs thereof. Compared with cytisine, which selectively activates receptors containing β4- but not β2-subunits, NS3861 displays the opposite β-subunit preference and a complete lack of activation at α4-containing receptors. The maximal efficacy of NS3861 appeared solely dependent on the nature of the ligand-binding domain, whereas efficacy of cytisine was additionally affected by the nature of the β-subunit transmembrane domain. Molecular docking to nAChR subtype homology models suggests agonist specific interactions to two different residues on the complementary subunits as responsible for the β-subunit preference of both compounds. Furthermore, a principal subunit serine to threonine substitution may explain the lack of NS3861 activation at α4-containing receptors. In conclusion, our results are consistent with a hypothesis where agonist interactions with the principal subunit (α) primarily determine binding affinity, whereas interactions with key amino acids at the complementary subunit (β) affect agonist efficacy.

  15. Molecular Determinants of Subtype-selective Efficacies of Cytisine and the Novel Compound NS3861 at Heteromeric Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B.; Jensen, Marianne L.; Dyhring, Tino; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø.; Peters, Dan; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S.; Ahring, Philip K.

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity to heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs. However, initial data revealed that the activation patterns of the two compounds show very distinct maximal efficacy readouts at various heteromeric nAChRs. To investigate the molecular determinants behind these observations, we performed in-depth patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of efficacy levels at heteromeric combinations of α3- and α4-, with β2- and β4-subunits, and various chimeric constructs thereof. Compared with cytisine, which selectively activates receptors containing β4- but not β2-subunits, NS3861 displays the opposite β-subunit preference and a complete lack of activation at α4-containing receptors. The maximal efficacy of NS3861 appeared solely dependent on the nature of the ligand-binding domain, whereas efficacy of cytisine was additionally affected by the nature of the β-subunit transmembrane domain. Molecular docking to nAChR subtype homology models suggests agonist specific interactions to two different residues on the complementary subunits as responsible for the β-subunit preference of both compounds. Furthermore, a principal subunit serine to threonine substitution may explain the lack of NS3861 activation at α4-containing receptors. In conclusion, our results are consistent with a hypothesis where agonist interactions with the principal subunit (α) primarily determine binding affinity, whereas interactions with key amino acids at the complementary subunit (β) affect agonist efficacy. PMID:23229547

  16. In Silico Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Subtype Binding Affinity and Selectivity Using Statistical Methods and Molecular Docking with 2-Arylnaphthalenes and 2-Arylquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Wang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years development of selective estrogen receptor (ER ligands has been of great concern to researchers involved in the chemistry and pharmacology of anticancer drugs, resulting in numerous synthesized selective ER subtype inhibitors. In this work, a data set of 82 ER ligands with ERα and ERβ inhibitory activities was built, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR methods based on the two linear (multiple linear regression, MLR, partial least squares regression, PLSR and a nonlinear statistical method (Bayesian regularized neural network, BRNN were applied to investigate the potential relationship of molecular structural features related to the activity and selectivity of these ligands. For ERα and ERβ, the performances of the MLR and PLSR models are superior to the BRNN model, giving more reasonable statistical properties (ERα: for MLR, Rtr2 = 0.72, Qte2 = 0.63; for PLSR, Rtr2 = 0.92, Qte2 = 0.84. ERβ: for MLR, Rtr2 = 0.75, Qte2 = 0.75; for PLSR, Rtr2 = 0.98, Qte2 = 0.80. The MLR method is also more powerful than other two methods for generating the subtype selectivity models, resulting in Rtr2 = 0.74 and Qte2 = 0.80. In addition, the molecular docking method was also used to explore the possible binding modes of the ligands and a relationship between the 3D-binding modes and the 2D-molecular structural features of ligands was further explored. The results show that the binding affinity strength for both ERα and ERβ is more correlated with the atom fragment type, polarity, electronegativites and hydrophobicity. The substitutent in position 8 of the naphthalene or the quinoline plane and the space orientation of these two planes contribute the most to the subtype selectivity on the basis of similar hydrogen bond interactions between binding ligands and both ER subtypes. The QSAR models built together with the docking procedure should be of great advantage for screening and designing ER ligands with improved affinity

  17. Design, synthesis, and pharmacology of a highly subtype-selective GluR1/2 agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(4-chloro-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (Cl-HIBO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Esben J; Kristensen, Anders S; Pickering, Darryl S

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of structural studies, chloro-homoibotenic acid (Cl-HIBO) was designed and synthesized. Cl-HIBO was characterized in binding and electrophysiology experiments on native and cloned subtypes of GluRs. Electrophysiological selectivities ranged from 275 to 1600 for GluR1/2 over GluR3/4. ....../4. The potent AMPA receptor activity was strongly desensitizing and the neurotoxicity similar to AMPA. Thus, Cl-HIBO is the most subtype selective agonist reported to date on GluR1/2, and offers a new standard for selectively studying subtypes of AMPA receptors....

  18. Distributed Subtyping

    OpenAIRE

    Baehni, Sébastien; Barreto, Joao; Guerraoui, Rachid

    2006-01-01

    One of the most frequent operations in object-oriented programs is the "instanceof" test, also called the "subtyping" test or the "type inclusion" test. This test determines if a given object is an instance of some type. Surprisingly, despite a lot of research on distributed object-oriented languages and systems, almost no work has been devoted to the implementation of this test in a distributed environment. This paper presents the first algorithm to implement the "subtyping" test on an obje...

  19. UCLA1 aptamer inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates in macrophages and selection of resistance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the aptamer, UCLA1, is able to inhibit HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by binding to residues in gp120. In this study we examined whether UCLA1 was effective against HIV-1 subtype C...

  20. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype.

  1. Effects of estradiol, estrogen receptor subtype-selective agonists and genistein on glucose metabolism in leptin resistant female Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Carmen; Hertrampf, Torsten; Flenker, Ulrich; Hülsemann, Frank; Kurnaz, Pinar; Fritzemeier, Karl Heinrich; Diel, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The leptin resistant Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats are hyperphagic and become obese, but whereas the males develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the females remain euglycaemic. As estrogen deficiency is known to increase the risk of developing T2DM, we evaluated the role of ER subtypes alpha and beta in the development of glucose tolerance in leptin resistant ovariectomized (OVX) ZDF rats. At least six rats per group were treated with either vehicle (OVX), 17β-estradiol (E2), ER subtype-selective agonists (Alpha and Beta), or genistein (Gen) for 17 weeks. At the end of the treatment period a glucose tolerance assay was performed and the metabolic flux of (13)C-glucose for the E2 group was investigated. OVX ZDF rats treated with E2, Alpha, Beta, and Gen tolerated the glucose significantly better than untreated controls. E2 treatment increased absorbance/flux of (13)C-glucose to metabolic relevant tissues such liver, adipose tissue, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscle. Moreover, whereas Alpha treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle, Beta treatment resulted in the largest fiber sizes of the soleus muscle. Treatment with Gen increased both the mRNA expression of GLUT 4 and the fiber sizes in the skeletal muscle. In addition, E2 and Alpha treatment decreased food intake and body weight gain. In summary, estrogen-improved glucose absorption is mediated via different molecular mechanisms: while activation of ER alpha seems to stimulate muscular GLUT4 functionality, activation of ER beta results in a hypertrophy of muscle fibers. In addition, selective activation of ER alpha decreased food intake and body weight gain. Our data further indicate that ER subtype-selective agonists and genistein improve systemic glucose tolerance also in the absence of a functional leptin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure selectively alters the expression of Gα subunit isoforms and RGS subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luessen, D J; Sun, H; McGinnis, M M; McCool, B A; Chen, R

    2017-10-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure induces pronounced changes in GPCR-mediated G-protein signaling. Recent microarray and RNA-seq analyses suggest associations between alcohol abuse and the expression of genes involved in G-protein signaling. The activity of G-proteins (e.g. Gαi/o and Gαq) is negatively modulated by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins which are implicated in drugs of abuse including alcohol. The present study used 7days of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure followed by 24h withdrawal (CIE) to investigate changes in mRNA and protein levels of G-protein subunit isoforms and RGS protein subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive deficit attributed to excessive alcohol drinking. We found that this ethanol paradigm induced differential expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes. For example, there were increased mRNA and protein levels of Gαi1/3 subunits and no changes in the expression of Gαs and Gαq subunits in ethanol-treated animals. Moreover, CIE increased the mRNA but not the protein levels of Gαo. Additionally, a modest increase in Gαi2 mRNA level by CIE was accompanied by a pronounced increase in its protein level. Interestingly, we found that CIE increased mRNA and protein levels of RGS2, RGS4, RGS7 and RGS19 but had no effect on the expression of RGS5, RGS6, RGS8, RGS12 or RGS17. Changes in the expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes could contribute to the functional alterations of certain GPCRs following chronic ethanol exposure. The present study suggests that RGS proteins may be potential new targets for intervention of alcohol abuse via modification of Gα-mediated GPCR function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Over-expression of thymosin beta 4 promotes abnormal tooth development and stimulation of hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hee-Jae; Philp, Deborah; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 has multi-functional roles in cell physiology. It accelerates wound healing, hair growth and angiogenesis, and increases laminin-5 expression in corneal epithelium. Furthermore, thymosin beta 4 stimulates tumor growth and metastasis by induction of cell migration and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis. Using a construct on the skin-specific keratin-5 promoter, we have developed thymosin beta 4 over-expressing transgenic mice to further study its functional roles. Thymosin beta 4 in adult skin and in embryonic stages of the transgenic mouse was analyzed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The over-expression of thymosin beta 4 was observed especially around hair follicles and in the teeth in the transgenic mice. We examined the phenotype of the thymosin beta 4 over-expressing mice. Hair growth was accelerated. In addition, the transgenic mice had abnormally-shaped white teeth and dull incisors. We found that the expression of laminin-5 was up-regulated in the skin of the transgenic mice. We conclude that thymosin beta 4 has an important physiological role in hair growth and in tooth development.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of the estrogen receptor subtype-selective ligands, PPT and DPN: quantification using UPLC-ES/MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Estatira; Lebl-Rinnova, Marketa; Mann, Meagan K; Pisani, Samantha L; Churchwell, Mona I; Korol, Donna L; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Doerge, Daniel R

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) subtype specific agonists, diarylpropionitrile (DPN) for ERβ and propylpyrazoletriol (PPT) for ERα, are pharmacological probes used frequently to define mechanisms for estrogen actions in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative analytical methodology was developed and validated for DPN and PPT, based on synthetic stable labeled analogs (DPN-d(4) and PPT-d(5)) using isotope dilution liquid chromatographic tandem electrospray mass spectrometric detection. The validated method produced high sensitivity, with detection limits of 0.04-0.07ng/ml serum. Serum pharmacokinetics were evaluated in Long-Evans rats following a single subcutaneous injection (2mg/kg bw) of both compounds. The role of Phase II metabolism was evaluated using β-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase hydrolysis to measure total DPN and PPT in addition to the parent compounds. The pharmacokinetic properties of DPN and PPT reported could facilitate experimental designs requiring specified levels of receptor occupancy for quantitative comparisons of ER subtype specificities for natural and synthetic estrogens in vivo. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The type I interleukin-1 receptor mediates fever in the rat as shown by interleukin-1 receptor subtype selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, D; Chai, Z; Bristulf, J; Simoncsits, A; Bartfai, T

    1995-12-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) system possesses two distinct receptors (type I and type II) which, together with the accessory protein, mediate a multitude of responses to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, including fever. So far, no receptor subtype-specific ligands have been described. Since both types of IL-1 receptors occur in the thermoregulatory areas it was unclear which IL-1 receptor type mediates fever. We report here that for a series of deletion mutants of human recombinant IL-1 beta (hrIL-1 beta), the affinity of these ligands for the type I IL-1 receptor correlates with their efficacy to evoke the fever response (hrIL-1 beta > des-SND52-54 > des-QGE48-50 > des-I56). Thus, the results suggest that agonist occupancy of the type I IL-1 receptor is essential for IL-1 beta-mediated fever.

  6. Targeting ILK and {beta}4 integrin abrogates the invasive potential of ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Kim, Baek Gil [BK21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gao, Ming-Qing; Kang, Suki [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon, E-mail: cho1988@yuhs.ac [BK21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of targeting ILK and integrins for highly aggressive ovarian cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unanticipated synergistic effect for the combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin effectively inhibited the PI3K/Akt/Rac1 cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting of {beta}4 integrin/ILK had potent inhibitory effects in ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Integrins and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are essential to cancerous invasion because they mediate physical interactions with the extracellular matrix, and regulate oncogenic signaling pathways. The purpose of our study is to determine whether deletion of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK, alone or in combination, has antitumoral effects in ovarian cancer. Expression of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 196 ovarian cancer tissue samples. We assessed the effects of depleting these molecules with shRNAs in ovarian cancer cells by Western blot, conventional RT-PCR, cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vitro Rac1 activity assays, and in vivo xenograft formation assays. Overexpression of {beta}4 integrin and ILK in human ovarian cancer specimens was found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. Depletion of these targets efficiently suppresses ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and xenograft tumor formation in vivo. We also demonstrated that single depletion of ILK or combination depletion of {beta}4 integrin/ILK inhibits phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets, p-Ser 473 Akt and p-Thr202/Tyr204 Erk1/2, and activation of Rac1, as well as reduce expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and increase expression of caspase-3 in vitro. In conclusion, targeting {beta}4 integrin combined with ILK can instigate the latent tumorigenic potential and abrogate the invasive potential in ovarian cancer.

  7. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... the tumor microenvironment produce thymosin beta4 and that such expression varies from tumor to tumor. Such heterogeneity of expression should be taken into account when the role of thymosin beta4 in tumor biology is assessed....

  8. Thymosin Beta 4 protects mice from monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a progressive vascular disease of pulmonary arteries that impedes ejection of blood by the right ventricle. As a result there is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure causing right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH and RV failure. The pathology of PAH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC proliferation. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Investigating a key molecule is required for development of new therapeutic intervention. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous G-actin sequestering protein with diverse biological function and promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. However, it remains unknown whether Tβ4 has any protective role in PH. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the whether Tβ4 can be used as a vascular-protective agent. In monocrotaline (MCT-induced PH mouse model, we showed that mice treated with Tβ4 significantly attenuated the systolic pressure and RVH, compared to the MCT treated mice. Our data revealed for the first time that Tβ4 selectively targets Notch3-Col 3A-CTGF gene axis in preventing MCT-induced PH and RVH. Our study may provide pre-clinical evidence for Tβ4 and may consider as vasculo-protective agent for the treatment of PH induced RVH.

  9. The 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold for subtype selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands. Part 2: carboxamide derivatives with different spacer motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Christoph; Munoz, Lenka; Tomassoli, Isabelle; Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (bispidine) based nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands have been synthesized and evaluated for nAChRs interaction. Diverse spacer motifs were incorporated between the hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) part and a variety of substituted (hetero)aryl moieties. Bispidine carboxamides bearing spacer motifs often showed high affinity in the low nanomolar range and selectivity for the α4β2(∗) nAChR. Compounds 15, 25, and 47 with Ki values of about 1 nM displayed the highest affinities for α4β2(∗) nAChR. All evaluated compounds are partial agonists or antagonists at α4β2(∗), with reduced or no effects on α3β4(∗) with the exception of compound 15 (agonist), and reduced or no effect at α7 and muscle subtypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  11. Activity of cytisine and its brominated isosteres on recombinant human alpha7, alpha4beta2 and alpha4beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, L M; Slater, Y; Guerra, D L; Peng, J H; Kuo, Y P; Lukas, R J; Cassels, B K; Bermudez, I

    2001-09-01

    Effects of cytisine (cy), 3-bromocytisine (3-Br-cy), 5-bromocytisine (5-Br-cy) and 3,5-dibromocytisine (3,5-diBr-cy) on human (h) alpha7-, alpha4beta2- and alpha4beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and cell lines, have been investigated. Cy and its bromo-isosteres fully inhibited binding of both [alpha-(125)I]bungarotoxin ([alpha-(125)I]BgTx) to halpha7- and [(3)H]cy to halpha4beta2- or halpha4beta4-nACh receptors. 3-Br-cy was the most potent inhibitor of both [alpha-(125)I]BgTx and [(3)H]cy binding. Cy was less potent than 3-Br-cy, but 5-Br-cy and 3,5-diBr-cy were the least potent inhibitors. Cy and 3-Br-cy were potent full agonists at halpha7-nACh receptors but behaved as partial agonists at halpha4beta2- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors. 5-Br-cy and 3,5-diBr-cy had low potency and were partial agonists at halpha7- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors, but they elicited no responses on halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. Cy and 3-Br-cy produced dual dose-response curves (DRC) at both halpha4beta2- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors, but ACh produced dual DRC only at halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. Low concentrations of cy, 3-Br-cy and 5-Br-cy enhanced ACh responses of oocytes expressing halpha4beta2-nACh receptors, but at high concentrations they inhibited the responses. In contrast, 3,5-diBr-cy only inhibited, in a competitive manner, ACh responses of halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. It is concluded that bromination of the pyridone ring of cy produces marked changes in effects of cy that are manifest as nACh receptor subtype-specific differences in binding affinities and in functional potencies and efficacies.

  12. Molecular determinants of subtype-selective efficacies of cytisine and the novel compound NS3861 at heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity...

  13. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited

  14. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited b

  15. Evidence for a common pharmacological interaction site on K(Ca)2 channels providing both selective activation and selective inhibition of the human K(Ca)2.1 subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Charlotte; Hammami, Sofia; Eriksen, Birgitte L;

    2012-01-01

    ]pyrimidines, act either as activators or as inhibitors of the human K(Ca)2.1 channel. Whereas (-)-CM-TPMF activates K(Ca)2.1 with an EC(50) value of 24 nM, (-)-B-TPMF inhibits the channel with an IC(50) value of 31 nM. In contrast, their (+)-enantiomers are 40 to 100 times less active. Both (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B......-TPMF are subtype-selective, with 10- to 20-fold discrimination toward other K(Ca)2 channels and the K(Ca)3 channel. Coapplication experiments reveal competitive-like functional interactions between the effects of (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B-TPMF. Despite belonging to a different chemical class than GW542573X, the K(Ca)2......-TPMF is 10 times more potent on K(Ca)2.1 than NS309 (6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime), an unselective but hitherto the most potent K(Ca)3/K(Ca)2 channel activator. (-)-B-TPMF is the first small-molecule inhibitor with significant selectivity among the K(Ca)2 channel subtypes. In contrast to peptide...

  16. Heterosexual Transmission of Subtype C HIV-1 Selects Consensus-Like Variants without Increased Replicative Capacity or Interferon-α Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Deymier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 is characterized by a genetic bottleneck that selects a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (TF, during most transmission events. To assess viral characteristics influencing HIV-1 transmission, we sequenced 167 near full-length viral genomes and generated 40 infectious molecular clones (IMC including TF variants and multiple non-transmitted (NT HIV-1 subtype C variants from six linked heterosexual transmission pairs near the time of transmission. Consensus-like genomes sensitive to donor antibodies were selected for during transmission in these six transmission pairs. However, TF variants did not demonstrate increased viral fitness in terms of particle infectivity or viral replicative capacity in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC. In addition, resistance of the TF variant to the antiviral effects of interferon-α (IFN-α was not significantly different from that of non-transmitted variants from the same transmission pair. Thus neither in vitro viral replicative capacity nor IFN-α resistance discriminated the transmission potential of viruses in the quasispecies of these chronically infected individuals. However, our findings support the hypothesis that within-host evolution of HIV-1 in response to adaptive immune responses reduces viral transmission potential.

  17. Commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor subtypes and other G protein-coupled receptors with acceptable selectivity in flow cytometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhishek; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Several previous reports suggested that many commercially available antibodies directed against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) lack sufficient selectivity. Accordingly, it has been proposed that receptor antibodies should be validated by at least one of several criteria, such as testing tissues or cells after knockout or silencing of the corresponding gene. Here, we tested whether 12 commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A/B/D, α2A/B/C), atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3), and vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) suffice these criteria. We detected in flow cytometry experiments with human vascular smooth muscle cells that the fluorescence signals from each of these antibodies were reduced by 46 ± 10 %-91 ± 2 % in cells treated with commercially available small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for each receptor, as compared with cells that were incubated with non-targeting siRNA. The tested antibodies included anti-ACKR3 (R&D Systems, mab42273), for which specificity has previously been demonstrated. Staining with this antibody resulted in 72 ± 5 % reduction of the fluorescence signal after ACKR3 siRNA treatment. Furthermore, staining with anti-α1A-AR (Santa Cruz, sc1477) and anti-ACKR3 (Abcam, ab38089), which have previously been reported to be non-specific, resulted in 70 ± 19 % and 80 ± 4 % loss of the fluorescence signal after α1A-AR and ACKR3 siRNA treatment, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that the tested antibodies show reasonable selectivity for their receptor target under our experimental conditions. Furthermore, our observations suggest that the selectivity of GPCR antibodies depends on the method for which the antibody is employed, the species from which cells/tissues are obtained, and on the type of specimens (cell, tissue/cell homogenate, or section) tested.

  18. Evaluation of the Biological Activity of Opuntia ficus indica as a Tissue- and Estrogen Receptor Subtype-Selective Modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byoung Ha; Jeong, Hyesoo; Zhou, Wenmei; Liu, Xiyuan; Kim, Soolin; Jang, Chang Young; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Sohn, Johann; Park, Hye-Jin; Sung, Na-Hye; Hong, Cheol Yi; Chang, Minsun

    2016-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) with potential for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to relieve peri/postmenopausal symptoms. This study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the SERM properties of the extract of Korean-grown Opuntia ficus-indica (KOFI). The KOFI extract induced estrogen response element (ERE)-driven transcription in breast and endometrial cancer cell lines and the expression of endogenous estrogen-responsive genes in breast cancer cells. The flavonoid content of different KOFI preparations affected ERE-luciferase activities, implying that the flavonoid composition likely mediated the estrogenic activities in cells. Oral administration of KOFI decreased the weight gain and levels of both serum glucose and triglyceride in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Finally, KOFI had an inhibitory effect on the 17β-estradiol-induced proliferation of the endometrial epithelium in OVX rats. Our data demonstrate that KOFI exhibited SERM activity with no uterotrophic side effects. Therefore, KOFI alone or in combination with other botanical supplements, vitamins, or minerals may be an effective and safe alternative active ingredient to HRTs, for the management of postmenopausal symptoms. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Connecting the X(5)-$\\beta^2$, X(5)-$\\beta^4$, and X(3) models to the shape/phase transition region of the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    McCutchan, E A; Zamfir, N V; Bonatsos, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The parameter independent (up to overall scale factors) predictions of the X(5)-$\\beta^2$, X(5)-$\\beta^4$, and X(3) models, which are variants of the X(5) critical point symmetry developed within the framework of the geometric collective model, are compared to two-parameter calculations in the framework of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model. The results show that these geometric models coincide with IBA parameters consistent with the phase/shape transition region of the IBA for boson numbers of physical interest (close to 10). Nuclei within the rare-earth region and select Os and Pt isotopes are identified as good examples of X(3), X(5)-$\\beta^2$, and X(5)-$\\beta^4$ behavior.

  20. Relations between soil respiration, humus quali­ty and ca­tion exchange capacity in selected subtypes of chernozem in South Moravia region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Foukalová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM undergoes short and long-term transformation in the soil. Microorganisms through their enzymes are able to mineralize organic carbon while the rate of this process is different. Biological test though referred to one of the main diagnostic methods for evaluating soil qualit­y/health. The aim of our work was to determine basal respiration, total carbon content, fractio­nal composition of humus and basic parameters of soil colloidal complex in selected subtypes of chernozem in South Moravia region. Basal respiration was measured using Vaisala GMT220 apparatus. Total carbon content was determined by oxidimetric titration and basic parameters of soil colloidal according to Mehlich. Results showed that production of carbon dioxide varied from 0.09 to 0.27 mg CO2/100g/h. Linear correlation between basal respiration and humification degree was found. Humus content varied from 2.15% to 4.6%. No correlation between quantity of humus and basal respiration was observed. Higher values of basal respiration were connected with higher quality of HS. Significant linear correlation between total carbon content (TOC and cation exchange capacity (CEC was found.

  1. Characterization of a series of anabaseine-derived compounds reveals that the 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine derivative is a selective agonist at neuronal nicotinic alpha 7/125I-alpha-bungarotoxin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Meyer, E M; Henry, J C; Muraskin, S I; Kem, W R; Papke, R L

    1995-01-01

    Investigation of the naturally occurring, nicotinic agonist anabaseine and novel derivatives has shown that these compounds have cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects. The hypothesis that these arise at least in part through actions on brain nicotinic receptors was evaluated by examining the ability of these compounds to displace the binding of nicotinic ligands and to affect the function of the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The derivative 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine anabaseine (DMAC) was found to be a selective alpha 7 receptor agonist; it was more potent than nicotine, acetylcholine, anabaseine, and other derivatives at activating the alpha 7 receptor subtype, while displaying little agonist activity at alpha 4 beta 2 and other receptor subtypes. Compared with anabaseine and the other derivatives, DMAC was the most potent at displacing 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin binding (putative alpha 7) and the least potent at displacing [3H]cytisine binding (putative alpha 4 beta 2) to brain membranes. Independently of agonist activities, all of the novel compounds displayed secondary inhibitory activity at both receptor subtypes. At the alpha 4 beta 2 receptor subtype, inhibition by the 3-(2,4)-dimethoxybenzylidene derivative was enhanced by coapplication of acetylcholine, suggesting a noncompetitive form of inhibition. Anabaseine and nicotine prolonged the time course of activation of alpha 4 beta 2 receptors, compared with acetylcholine, suggesting sequential channel-blocking activity. As selective agonists, anabaseine derivatives such as DMAC may be useful for elucidating the function of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors, including their potential role(s) in the cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects of nicotinic agents.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis implicates a threonine residue in TM6 in the subtype selectivities of UH-AH 37 and pirenzepine at muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J; Seidenberg, M

    2000-08-01

    The structural basis for the selectivity of the antagonist UH-AH 37 at human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated by expressing mutant receptors in COS-7 cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction between UH-AH 37 and [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine in equilibrium assays is competitive and that the high affinity of UH-AH 37 for the M(5) subtype, compared to M(2), is due to an epitope in the sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) or the third outer loop of the receptor. By mutating each nonconserved residue in this region of M(2) and M(5) to its counterpart in the other receptor, we identified a threonine residue in the middle of TM6 uniquely responsible for the higher affinity of the M(5) receptor (M(1), M(3), and M(4) receptors also carry a threonine at that location and also have high affinity for UH-AH 37). The mutant receptor in which the corresponding alanine of the M(2) receptor was replaced by threonine, M(2)(401)ala --> thr, expressed enhanced affinity for pirenzepine as well as for UH-AH 37. The chick M(2) receptor, which expresses anomalously high affinity for pirenzepine, differs from its mammalian counterparts by the presence of a threonine at this position. Affinities of AF-DX 116 and 4-DAMP, as well as the allosteric potency of UH-AH 37, were not sensitive to the M(2)(401) ala --> thr mutation. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  4. Radiosynthesis of (E)-N-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxybenzyl)-3-phenyl-acrylamidine, a novel subnanomolar NR2B subtype-selective NMDA receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thominiaux, Cyrille [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bruin, Beatrice de [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bramoulle, Yann [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Hinnen, Francoise [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Demphel, Stephane [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Valette, Heric [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bottlaender, Michel [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Besret, Laurent [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Departement de Recherche Medicale, URA CEA/CNRS 2210, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, 4 Place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Kassiou, Michael [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dolle, Frederic [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France)]. E-mail: frederic.dolle@cea.fr

    2006-03-15

    Recently, a novel series of amidines has been described, exhibiting high NR2B-subtype selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist activity with nanomolar or subnanomolar affinity. Within the styrylamidine subclass (E)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)-3-phenyl-acrylamidine (1), displayed the highest affinity (Ki=0.7nM versus [{sup 3}H]ifenprodil) and was considered an appropriate candidate for isotopic labelling with carbon-11 (T{sub 1/2}: 20.38min) at its methoxy group for imaging of NMDA receptors with PET. Derivative 1 has been labelled from the corresponding nor-analogue using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate and the following experimental conditions : (1) trapping at -10{sup o}C of [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate in 300{mu}L of acetone containing 0.6-0.8mg of precursor 5 (2.4-3.2{mu}mol) and 5{mu}L of a 3M solution of NaOH in water (about 5eq.); (2) concentration to dryness of the reaction mixture (at 110{sup o}C, using a helium stream for 1-2min); (3) taking up the residue with 0.5mL of the HPLC mobile phase and (4) purification using semi-preparative HPLC (SymmetryPrep{sup (}R) C-18, Waters, 300x7.8mm). Typically, starting from a 1.5 Ci (55.5GBq) [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production batch, 120-240m Ci (4.44-8.88GBq) of [{sup 11}C]-1 (20-40% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, n=5) was obtained within a total synthesis time of 25-30min. Specific radioactivities ranged from 0.8 to 1.2Ci/{mu}mol (29.6-44.4GBq/{mu}mol) at the end of radiosynthesis. No attempts were made to further optimise these reactions, as sufficient material was obtained to allow for preliminary pharmacological characterisation.

  5. Functional Impact of Allosteric Agonist Activity of Selective Positive Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 in Regulating Central Nervous System Function

    OpenAIRE

    Noetzel, Meredith J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Vinson, Paige N.; Cho, Hyekyung P.; Days, Emily; Zhou, Y.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Lavreysen, Hilde; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie K.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) have emerged as an exciting new approach for the treatment of schizophrenia and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Of interest, some mGlu5 PAMs act as pure PAMs, only potentiating mGlu5 responses to glutamate whereas others [allosteric agonists coupled with PAM activity (ago-PAMs)] potentiate responses to glutamate and have intrinsic allosteric agonist activity in mGlu5-expressing cell lines....

  6. Characterization of the 1H-cyclopentapyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione derivative (S)-CPW399 as a novel, potent, and subtype-selective AMPA receptor full agonist with partial desensitization properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campiani, G; Morelli, E; Nacci, V

    2001-01-01

    (S)-CPW399 (2b) is a novel, potent, and subtype-selective AMPA receptor full agonist that, unlike (S)-willardiine and related compounds, in mouse cerebellar granule cells, stimulated an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), and induced neuronal cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Compoun...... 2b appears to be a weakly desensitizing, full agonist at AMPA receptors and therefore represents a new pharmacological tool to investigate the role of AMPA receptors in excitotoxicity and their molecular mechanisms of desensitization....

  7. Universality in Chiral Random Matrix Theory at $\\beta =1$ and $\\beta =4$

    CERN Document Server

    Sener, M K

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the kernel for spectral correlation functions of the invariant chiral random matrix ensembles with real ($\\beta =1$) and quaternion real ($\\beta = 4$) matrix elements is expressed in terms of the kernel of the corresponding complex Hermitean random matrix ensembles ($\\beta=2$). Such identities are exact in case of a Gaussian probability distribution and, under certain smoothness assumptions, they are shown to be valid asymptotically for an arbitrary finite polynomial potential. They are proved by means of a construction proposed by Brézin and Neuberger. Microscopic universality for all three chiral ensembles then follows from universal behavior for $\\beta =2$ both at the hard edge (shown by Akemann, Damgaard, Magnea and Nishigaki) and at the soft edge of the spectrum (shown by Kanzieper and Freilikher).

  8. Thymosin beta 4 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by targeting anti-oxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. The mechanism by which Tβ4 modulates cardiac protection under oxidative stress is not known. The purpose of this study is to dissect the cardioprotective mechanism of Tβ4 on H(2O(2 induced cardiac damage. METHODS: Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes with or without Tβ4 pretreatment were exposed to H(2O(2 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in neonatal cardiomyocytes and effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced cardiac damage was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in cardiomyocytes. Tβ4 pretreatment also resulted in an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins and reduction of Bax/BCl(2 ratio in the cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment with Tβ4 resulted in stimulating the expression of antioxidant enzymes copper/zinc SOD and catalase in cardiomyocytes at both transcription and translation levels. Tβ4 treatment resulted in the increased expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Silencing of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase gene resulted in apoptotic cell death in the cardiomyocytes which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that demonstrates the effect of Tβ4 on cardiomyocytes and its capability to selectively upregulate anti-oxidative enzymes, anti-inflammatory genes, and antiapoptotic enzymes in the neonatal cardiomyocytes thus preventing cell death thereby protecting the myocardium. Tβ4 treatment resulted in decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the

  9. The 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold for subtype selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands. Part 1: the influence of different hydrogen bond acceptor systems on alkyl and (hetero)aryl substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Christoph; Tomassoli, Isabelle; Munoz, Lenka; Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane is a naturally occurring scaffold interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). When one nitrogen of the 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold was implemented in a carboxamide motif displaying a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) functionality, compounds with higher affinities and subtype selectivity for α4β2(∗) were obtained. The nature of the HBA system (carboxamide, sulfonamide, urea) had a strong impact on nAChR interaction. High affinity ligands for α4β2(∗) possessed small alkyl chains, small un-substituted hetero-aryl groups or para-substituted phenyl ring systems along with a carboxamide group. Electrophysiological responses of selected 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane derivatives to Xenopus oocytes expressing various nAChR subtypes showed diverse activation profiles. Compounds with strongest agonistic profiles were obtained with small alkyl groups whereas a shift to partial agonism/antagonism was observed for aryl substituents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  11. Beta4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuanshen; Chang, Ansi; Smith, Maria C; Won, Roy; Yin, Xinghua; Staugaitis, Susan M; Agamanolis, Dimitri; Kidd, Grahame J; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2009-06-17

    We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta4 tubulin (betaT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. betaT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, betaT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. betaT4 cells represent 95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara C. betaT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of betaT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells after transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin-deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of betaT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of betaT4 cells. We propose that betaT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.

  12. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of Tβ4 in the human adult and foetal genitourinary tract. Immunolocalization of Tβ4 was studied in autoptic samples of kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, testicle and prostate obtained from four human foetuses and four adults. Presence of the peptide was observed in cells of different origin: in surface epithelium, in gland epithelial cells and in the interstitial cells. Tβ4 was mainly found in adult and foetal bladder in the transitional epithelial cells; in the adult endometrium, glands and stromal cells were immunoreactive for the peptide; Tβ4 was mainly localized in the glands of foetal prostate while, in the adults a weak Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the stroma. In adult and foetal kidney, Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to ducts and tubules with completely spared glomeruli; a weak positivity was observed in adult and foetal oocytes; immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the interstitial cells of foetal and adult testis. In this study, we confirm that Tβ4 could play a relevant role during human development, even in the genitourinary tract, and reveal that immunoreactivity for this peptide may change during postnatal and adult life. PMID:21263742

  13. Exogenous thymosin beta4 prevents apoptosis in human intervertebral annulus cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, H; Deepe, R; Ingram, J A; Yarmola, E G; Bubb, M R; Hanley, E N; Gruber, H E

    2009-12-01

    Loss of cells in the human disc due to programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a major factor in the aging and degenerating human intervertebral disc. Our objective here was to determine if thymosin beta(4) (TB4), a small, multifunctional 5 kDa protein with diverse activities, might block apoptosis in human annulus cells cultured in monolayer or three-dimensional (3D) culture. Apoptosis was induced in vitro using hydrogen peroxide or serum starvation. Annulus cells were processed for identification of apoptotic cells using the TUNEL method. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by cell counts. Annulus cells also were treated with TB4 for determination of proliferation, and proteoglycan production was assessed using cell titer and 1,2 dimethylmethylamine (DMB) assays and histological staining. A significant reduction in disc cell apoptosis occurred after TB4 treatment. The percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis decreased significantly in TB4 treated cells in both apoptosis induction designs. TB4 exposure did not alter proteoglycan production as assessed by either DMB measurement or histological staining. Our results indicate the need for further studies of the anti-apoptotic effect of TB4 and suggest that TB4 may have therapeutic application in future biological therapies for disc degeneration.

  14. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin by squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas: possible relation to invasive potential?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, K; Dahlstrøm, K K; Mercurio, A M;

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the expression of alpha 6 beta 4 integrin, a carcinoma laminin receptor in ten squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and ten basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of the skin in order to examine whether changes in alpha 6 beta 4 integrin expression may be related to invasive and metastatic...... the expression of the alpha 6 and the beta 4 subunits paralleled each other, showing an increased intensity and loss of polarity. The BCCs, however, showed consistently decreased expression of both the alpha 6 and the beta 4 subunits. The results of our study, as well as those of other studies, support...

  15. Subtyping Stuttering II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  16. Multiple functional involvement of thymosin beta-4 in tooth germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookuma, Yukiko F; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Ieyoshi; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2013-02-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is known to be ubiquitously involved in the actin monomer sequestering on the cytoskeleton. Our previous study showed specific temporal and special in situ expression pattern of Tβ4 mRNA in dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. In this study, we examined the functional implications of Tβ4 in the developmental course of the mouse lower first molar. An inhibition assay using Tβ4 antisense sulfur-substituted oligodeoxynucleotide (AS S-ODN) in cultured embryonic day 11.0 (E11.0) mandibles showed a significant growth inhibition of the tooth germ. However, no growth arrest of the cultured E15.0 tooth germ was observed by using Tβ4 AS S-ODN. The Tβ4 knockdown led to significantly decreased expression levels of type II/III runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and nucleolin (Ncl) in the cultured E11.0 mandibles. Since our previous studies proved that the inhibition of type II/III Runx2 and Ncl translations resulted in the developmental arrest of the tooth germ in the cultured E11.0 mandible, Tβ4 appears to play roles in tooth germ development via the regulation of the type II/III Runx2 and Ncl expressions. Tβ4 knockdown also resulted in decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)-2, a reduced cell motility activity and upregulation of E-cadherin in dental epithelial mDE6 cells. These results suggest that Tβ4 plays multiple functional roles in odontogenic epithelial cells in the early stages of tooth germ development by regulating the expression of odontogenesis-related genes.

  17. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Van Eyken, P.; Cabras, T.; Cau, F.; Fanari, M.U.; Locci, A.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1). At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4. PMID:22073372

  18. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1. At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4.

  19. Cellular Trafficking of Thymosin Beta-4 in HEPG2 Cells Following Serum Starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pierpaolo; Nemolato, Sonia; Cabras, Tiziana; Fanari, Mattia Umberto; Sanna, Alice; Di Felice, Eliana; Messana, Irene; Castagnola, Massimo; Faa, Gavino

    2013-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is an ubiquitous multi-functional regenerative peptide, related to many critical biological processes, with a dynamic and flexible conformation which may influence its functions and its subcellular distribution. For these reasons, the intracellular localization and trafficking of Tβ4 is still not completely defined and is still under investigation in in vivo as well as in vitro studies. In the current study we used HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line; cells growing in normal conditions with fetal bovine serum expressed high levels of Tβ4, restricted to the cytoplasm until 72 h. At 84 h, a diffuse Tβ4 cytoplasmic immunostaining shifted to a focal perinuclear and nuclear reactivity. In the absence of serum, nuclear reactivity was localized in small granules, evenly dispersed throughout the entire nuclear envelop, and was observed as earlier as at 48 h. Cytoplasmic immunostaining for Tβ4 in HepG2 cells under starvation appeared significantly lower at 48 h and decreased progressively at 72 and at 84 h. At these time points, the decrease in cytoplasmic staining was associated with a progressive increase in nuclear reactivity, suggesting a possible translocation of the peptide from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane. The normal immunocytochemical pattern was restored when culture cells submitted to starvation for 84 h received a new complete medium for 48 h. Mass spectrometry analysis, performed on the nuclear and cytosolic fractions of HepG2 growing with and without serum, showed that Tβ4 was detectable only in the cytosolic and not in the intranuclear fraction. These data suggest that Tβ4 is able to translocate from different cytoplasmic domains to the nuclear membrane and back, based on different stress conditions within the cell. The punctuate pattern of nuclear Tβ4 immunostaining associated with Tβ4 absence in the nucleoplasm suggest that this peptide might be localized in the nuclear pores, where it could regulate the pore

  20. Thymosin Beta 4 and Thymosin Beta 10 Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, W.; Fanni, D.; Nemolato, S.; Di Felice, E.; Cabras, T.; Gerosa, C.; Van Eyken, P.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2014-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10) are two members of the beta-thymosin family involved in many cellular processes such as cellular motility, angiogenesis, inflammation, cell survival and wound healing. Recently, a role for beta-thymosins has been proposed in the process of carcinogenesis as both peptides were detected in several types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To this end, the expression pattern of both peptides was analyzed in liver samples obtained from 23 subjects diagnosed with HCC. Routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded liver samples were immunostained by indirect immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies to Tβ4 and Tβ10. Immunoreactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 was detected in the liver parenchyma of the surrounding tumor area. Both peptides showed an increase in granular reactivity from the periportal to the periterminal hepatocytes. Regarding HCC, Tβ4 reactivity was detected in 7/23 cases (30%) and Tβ10 reactivity in 22/23 (96%) cases analyzed, adding HCC to human cancers that express these beta-thymosins. Intriguing finding was seen looking at the reactivity of both peptides in tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding liver. Where Tβ10 showed a strong homogeneous expression, was Tβ4 completely absent in cells undergoing stromal invasion. The current study shows expression of both beta-thymosins in HCC with marked differences in their degree of expression and frequency of immunoreactivity. The higher incidence of Tβ10 expression and its higher reactivity in tumor cells involved in stromal invasion indicate a possible major role for Tβ10 in HCC progression. PMID:24704991

  1. Thymosin beta 4 and thymosin beta 10 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Theunissen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4 and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10 are two members of the beta-thymosin family involved in many cellular processes such as cellular motility, angiogenesis, inflammation, cell survival and wound healing. Recently, a role for beta-thymosins has been proposed in the process of carcinogenesis as both peptides were detected in several types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. To this end, the expression pattern of both peptides was analyzed in liver samples obtained from 23 subjects diagnosed with HCC. Routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded liver samples were immunostained by indirect immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies to Tβ4 and Tβ10. Immunoreactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 was detected in the liver parenchyma of the surrounding tumor area. Both peptides showed an increase in granular reactivity from the periportal to the periterminal hepatocytes. Regarding HCC, Tβ4 reactivity was detected in 7/23 cases (30% and Tβ10 reactivity in 22/23 (97% cases analyzed, adding HCC to human cancers that express these beta-thymosins. Intriguing finding was seen looking at the reactivity of both peptides in tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding liver. Where Tβ10 showed a strong homogeneous expression, was Tβ4 completely absent in cells undergoing stromal invasion. The current study shows expression of both beta-thymosins in HCC with marked differences in their degree of expression and frequency of immunoreactivity. The higher incidence of Tβ10 expression and its higher reactivity in tumor cells involved in stromal invasion indicate a possible major role for Tβ10 in HCC progression.

  2. The role of thymosin beta 4 on odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Im Lee

    Full Text Available We recently reported that overexpression of thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 in transgenic mice promotes abnormal hair growth and tooth development, but the role of Tβ4 in dental pulp regeneration was not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 on odontoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism regulating pulp regeneration in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs. Our results demonstrate that mRNA and protein expression of Tβ4 is upregulated during odontogenic differentiation in HDPCs. Transfection with Tβ4 siRNA decreases OM-induced odontoblastic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of differentiation markers, and calcium nodule formation. In contrast, Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide promotes these processes by enhancing the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP 2, BMP4, phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3, and expression of transcriptional factors such as Runx2 and Osterix, which were blocked by the BMP inhibitor noggin. The expression of integrin receptors α1, α2, α3, and β1 and downstream signaling molecules including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK, p-paxillin, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK were increased by Tβ4 peptide in HDPCs. ILK siRNA blocked Tβ4-induced odontoblastic differentiation and activation of the BMP and MAPK transcription factor pathways in HDPCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that Tβ4 plays a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs and activation of Tβ4 could provide a novel mechanism for regenerative endodontics.

  3. Different thymosin Beta 4 immunoreactivity in foetal and adult gastrointestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Nemolato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta 4 (Tbeta(4 is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of peptides that play essential roles in many cellular functions. A recent study from our group suggested a role for Tbeta(4 in the development of human salivary glands. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of Tbeta(4 in the human gut during development, and in the adult. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunolocalization of Tbeta(4 was studied in autoptic samples of tongue, oesophagus, stomach, ileum, colon, liver and pancreas obtained from two human foetuses and two adults. Tbeta(4 appeared unevenly distributed, with marked differences between foetuses and adults. In the stomach, superficial epithelium was positive in foetuses and negative in adults. Ileal enterocytes were strongly positive in the adult and weakly positive in the foetuses. An increase in reactivity for Tbeta(4 was observed in superficial colon epithelium of adults as compared with the foetuses. Striking differences were found between foetal and adult liver: the former showed a very low reactivity for Tbeta(4 while in the adult we observed a strong reactivity in the vast majority of the hepatocytes. A peculiar pattern was found in the pancreas, with the strongest reactivity observed in foetal and adult islet cells. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show a strong expression of Tbeta(4 in the human gut and in endocrine pancreas during development. The observed differential expression of Tbeta(4 suggests specific roles of the peptide in the gut of foetuses and adults. The observed heterogeneity of Tbeta(4 expression in the foetal life, ranging from a very rare detection in liver cells up to a diffuse reactivity in endocrine pancreas, should be taken into account when the role of Tbeta(4 in the development of human embryo is assessed. Future studies are needed to shed light on the link between Tbeta(4 and organogenesis.

  4. Cellular trafficking of thymosin beta-4 in HEPG2 cells following serum starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Pichiri

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is an ubiquitous multi-functional regenerative peptide, related to many critical biological processes, with a dynamic and flexible conformation which may influence its functions and its subcellular distribution. For these reasons, the intracellular localization and trafficking of Tβ4 is still not completely defined and is still under investigation in in vivo as well as in vitro studies. In the current study we used HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line; cells growing in normal conditions with fetal bovine serum expressed high levels of Tβ4, restricted to the cytoplasm until 72 h. At 84 h, a diffuse Tβ4 cytoplasmic immunostaining shifted to a focal perinuclear and nuclear reactivity. In the absence of serum, nuclear reactivity was localized in small granules, evenly dispersed throughout the entire nuclear envelop, and was observed as earlier as at 48 h. Cytoplasmic immunostaining for Tβ4 in HepG2 cells under starvation appeared significantly lower at 48 h and decreased progressively at 72 and at 84 h. At these time points, the decrease in cytoplasmic staining was associated with a progressive increase in nuclear reactivity, suggesting a possible translocation of the peptide from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane. The normal immunocytochemical pattern was restored when culture cells submitted to starvation for 84 h received a new complete medium for 48 h. Mass spectrometry analysis, performed on the nuclear and cytosolic fractions of HepG2 growing with and without serum, showed that Tβ4 was detectable only in the cytosolic and not in the intranuclear fraction. These data suggest that Tβ4 is able to translocate from different cytoplasmic domains to the nuclear membrane and back, based on different stress conditions within the cell. The punctuate pattern of nuclear Tβ4 immunostaining associated with Tβ4 absence in the nucleoplasm suggest that this peptide might be localized in the nuclear pores, where it could

  5. Thymosin beta 4 prevents oxidative stress by targeting antioxidant and anti-apoptotic genes in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with diverse functions relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. The effecter molecules targeted by Tβ4 for cardiac protection remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the molecules targeted by Tβ4 that mediate cardio-protection under oxidative stress. METHODS: Rat neonatal fibroblasts cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in presence and absence of Tβ4 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic and pro-fibrotic genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in cardiac fibroblasts and the effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced profibrotic events was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in the cardiac fibroblasts. This was associated with an increased expression of antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase and reduction of Bax/Bcl(2 ratio. Tβ4 treatment reduced the expression of pro-fibrotic genes [connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, collagen type-1 (Col-I and collagen type-3 (Col-III] in the cardiac fibroblasts. Silencing of Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase gene triggered apoptotic cell death in the cardiac fibroblasts, which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that exhibits the targeted molecules modulated by Tβ4 under oxidative stress utilizing the cardiac fibroblasts. Tβ4 treatment prevented the profibrotic gene expression in the in vitro settings. Our findings indicate that Tβ4 selectively targets and upregulates catalase, Cu/Zn-SOD and Bcl(2, thereby, preventing H(2O(2-induced profibrotic changes in the myocardium. Further studies are

  6. Design, synthesis, and subtype selectivity of 3,6-disubstituted β-carbolines at Bz/GABA(A)ergic receptors. SAR and studies directed toward agents for treatment of alcohol abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenyuan; Majumder, Samarpan; Clayton, Terry; Petrou, Steven; VanLinn, Michael L; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Ma, Chunrong; Cromer, Brett A; Roth, Bryan L; Platt, Donna M; Cook, James M

    2010-11-01

    A series of 3,6-disubstituted β-carbolines was synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro affinities at α(x)β(3)γ(2) GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor subtypes by radioligand binding assays in search of α(1) subtype selective ligands to treat alcohol abuse. Analogues of β-carboline-3-carboxylate-t-butyl ester (βCCt, 1) were synthesized via a CDI-mediated process and the related 6-substituted β-carboline-3-carboxylates 6 including WYS8 (7) were synthesized via a Sonogashira or Stille coupling processes from 6-iodo-βCCt (5). The bivalent ligands of βCCt (32 and 33) were also designed and prepared via a palladium-catalyzed homocoupling process to expand the structure-activity relationships (SAR) to larger ligands. Based on the pharmacophore/receptor model, a preliminary SAR study on 34 analogues illustrated that large substituents at position-6 of the β-carbolines were well tolerated. As expected, these groups are proposed to project into the extracellular domain (L(Di) region) of GABA(A)/Bz receptors (see 32 and 33). Moreover, substituents located at position-3 of the β-carboline nucleus exhibited a conserved stereo interaction in lipophilic pocket L(1), while N(2) presumably underwent a hydrogen bonding interaction with H(1). Three novel β-carboline ligands (βCCt, 3PBC and WYS8), which preferentially bound to α1 BzR subtypes permitted a comparison of the pharmacological efficacies with a range of classical BzR antagonists (flumazenil, ZK93426) from several different structural groups and indicated these β-carbolines were 'near GABA neutral antagonists'. Based on the SAR, the most potent (in vitro) α(1) selective ligand was the 6-substituted acetylenyl βCCt (WYS8, 7). Earlier both βCCt and 3PBC had been shown to reduce alcohol self-administration in alcohol preferring (P) and high alcohol drinking (HAD) rats but had little or no effect on sucrose self-administration.(1-3) Moreover, these two β-carbolines were orally active, and in addition, were

  7. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

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    Sabrina Bagaglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4% in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2% in 1a isolates, p = 0.040. Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1% G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5% harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001. Finally, 28 (2.3% G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs.

  8. Functional impact of allosteric agonist activity of selective positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 in regulating central nervous system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noetzel, Meredith J; Rook, Jerri M; Vinson, Paige N; Cho, Hyekyung P; Days, Emily; Zhou, Y; Rodriguez, Alice L; Lavreysen, Hilde; Stauffer, Shaun R; Niswender, Colleen M; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) have emerged as an exciting new approach for the treatment of schizophrenia and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Of interest, some mGlu(5) PAMs act as pure PAMs, only potentiating mGlu(5) responses to glutamate whereas others [allosteric agonists coupled with PAM activity (ago-PAMs)] potentiate responses to glutamate and have intrinsic allosteric agonist activity in mGlu(5)-expressing cell lines. All mGlu(5) PAMs previously shown to have efficacy in animal models act as ago-PAMs in cell lines, raising the possibility that allosteric agonist activity is critical for in vivo efficacy. We have now optimized novel mGlu(5) pure PAMs that are devoid of detectable agonist activity and structurally related mGlu(5) ago-PAMs that activate mGlu(5) alone in cell lines. Studies of mGlu(5) PAMs in cell lines revealed that ago-PAM activity is dependent on levels of mGlu(5) receptor expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, whereas PAM potency is relatively unaffected by levels of receptor expression. Furthermore, ago-PAMs have no agonist activity in the native systems tested, including cortical astrocytes and subthalamic nucleus neurons and in measures of long-term depression at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Finally, studies with pure PAMs and ago-PAMs chemically optimized to provide comparable CNS exposure revealed that both classes of mGlu(5) PAMs have similar efficacy in a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. These data suggest that the level of receptor expression influences the ability of mGlu(5) PAMs to act as allosteric agonists in vitro and that ago-PAM activity observed in cell-based assays may not be important for in vivo efficacy.

  9. The anti-inflammatory selective melanocortin receptor subtype 4 agonist, RO27-3225, fails to prevent acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiwen; McPherson, Kate; Reid, Peter; Smith, Paul F

    2015-08-15

    In preliminary studies we have observed a massive microglial activation in the cochlear nucleus following acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats, which suggests that inflammatory responses within the central auditory system may be involved in the development and maintenance of tinnitus. Recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of melanocortins (MCs), have gained increasing interest in pharmacology due to their promising therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammatory-mediated diseases. Among the five subtypes of the MC receptor, MC3 and MC4 receptors are the predominant brain receptors and are thought to play an important role in brain inflammation and neuroprotection. Importantly, MC4 receptors have been found in the mouse and rat central auditory systems. In this study we investigated whether the MC4 receptor agonist, RO27-3225, injected s.c at a dose of 90 or 180µg/kg, 30min before acoustic trauma and then every 12h for 10 days, could prevent the development of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats, using a conditioned behavioural suppression model. Although evidence of tinnitus developed in the exposed-vehicle group compared to the sham-vehicle group (P≤0.03), in response to a 32kHz tone, there were no significant drug effects from treatment with RO27-3225, indicating that it did not confer any protection against the development of tinnitus in this animal model. This result suggests that the anti-inflammatory effects of MC4 receptor agonists may not be sufficient to prevent tinnitus.

  10. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  11. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  12. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  13. Thymosin Beta-4 Suppresses Osteoclastic Differentiation and Inflammatory Responses in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Im Lee

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest that thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a key regulator for wound healing and anti-inflammation. However, the role of Tβ4 in osteoclast differentiation remains unclear.The purpose of this study was to evaluate Tβ4 expression in H2O2-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs, the effects of Tβ4 activation on inflammatory response in PDLCs and osteoclastic differentiation in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs, and identify the underlying mechanism.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Osteoclastic differentiation was assessed in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs using conditioned medium (CM from H2O2-treated PDLCs.Tβ4 was down-regulated in H2O2-exposed PDLCs in dose- and time-dependent manners. Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide attenuated the H2O2-induced production of NO and PGE2 and up-regulated iNOS, COX-2, and osteoclastogenic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17 as well as reversed the effect on RANKL and OPG in PDLCs. Tβ4 peptide inhibited the effects of H2O2 on the activation of ERK and JNK MAPK, and NF-κB in PDLCs. Furthermore, Tβ4 peptide inhibited osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast-specific gene expression, and p38, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in RANKL-stimulated BMMs. In addition, H2O2 up-regulated Wnt5a and its cell surface receptors, Frizzled and Ror2 in PDLCs. Wnt5a inhibition by Wnt5a siRNA enhanced the effects of Tβ4 on H2O2-mediated induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenic cytokines as well as helping osteoclastic differentiation whereas Wnt5a activation by Wnt5a peptide reversed it.In conclusion, this study demonstrated, for the first time, that Tβ4 was down-regulated in ROS-stimulated PDLCs as well as Tβ4 activation exhibited anti-inflammatory effects and anti-osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Thus, Tβ4 activation might be a

  14. Large-scale chromatofocusing-based method for isolating thymosin beta 4 and thymosin beta 9 from bovine tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roboti, A; Livaniou, E; Evangelatos, G P; Tsoupras, G; Tsolas, O; Ithakissios, D S

    1994-12-02

    A large-scale method for the isolation of thymosin beta 4 (up to 120 mg) and thymosin beta 9 (up to 40 mg) from bovine lung (up to 2 kg) was developed. The isolation protocol included tissue homogenization in 0.4 M HClO4, centrifugation, solid-phase extraction through LiChroprep RP-18 material, chromatofocusing on polybuffer exchanger PBE 94-modified Sepharose and dialysis against water. The isolated products were characterized by analytical isoelectric focusing, reversed-phase HPLC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. The method developed is rapid and convenient, requires no expensive equipment and can be used for the isolation of thymosin beta 4 and homologous peptides from various animal tissues.

  15. Beta4 integrin-dependent formation of polarized three-dimensionalarchitecture confers resistance to apoptosis in normal and malignantmammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Valerie M.; Lelievre, Sophie; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Jones, Jonathan C.R.; Giancotti, Filippo; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-08-27

    Tumor cells can evade chemotherapy by acquiring resistanceto apoptosis. We investigated the molecular mechanism whereby malignantand nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells become insensitive toapoptosis. We show that regardless of growth status formation ofpolarized, three-dimensional structures driven by basement membraneconfers protection to apoptosis in both nonmalignant and malignantmammary epithelial cells. By contrast, irrespective of their malignantstatus, nonpolarized structures are sensitive to induction of apoptosis.Resistance to apoptosis requires ligation of beta4 integrins, whichregulates tissue polarity, hemidesmosome formation and NFkB activation.Expression of beta4 integrin that lacks the hemidesmosome targetingdomain interferes with tissue polarity and NFkB activation and permitsapoptosis. These results indicate that integrin-induced polarity maydrive tumor cell resistance to apoptosis-inducing agents via effects onNFkB.

  16. Agonist discrimination between AMPA receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coquelle, T; Christensen, J K; Banke, T G

    2000-01-01

    The lack of subtype-selective compounds for AMPA receptors (AMPA-R) led us to search for compounds with such selectivity. Homoibotenic acid analogues were investigated at recombinant GluR1o, GluR2o(R), GluR3o and GluR1o + 3o receptors expressed in Sf9 insect cells and affinities determined in [3H...

  17. Activation of κ Opioid Receptors in Cutaneous Nerve Endings by Conorphin-1, a Novel Subtype-Selective Conopeptide, Does Not Mediate Peripheral Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Whately, Ella; Brust, Andreas; Inserra, Marco C; Asvadi, Naghmeh H; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Cabot, Peter J; Vetter, Irina

    2015-10-21

    Selective activation of peripheral κ opioid receptors (KORs) may overcome the dose-limiting adverse effects of conventional opioid analgesics. We recently developed a vicinal disulfide-stabilized class of peptides with subnanomolar potency at the KOR. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effects of one of these peptides, named conorphin-1, in comparison with the prototypical KOR-selective small molecule agonist U-50488, in several rodent pain models. Surprisingly, neither conorphin-1 nor U-50488 were analgesic when delivered peripherally by intraplantar injection at local concentrations expected to fully activate the KOR at cutaneous nerve endings. While U-50488 was analgesic when delivered at high local concentrations, this effect could not be reversed by coadministration with the selective KOR antagonist ML190 or the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone. Instead, U-50488 likely mediated its peripheral analgesic effect through nonselective inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, including peripheral sensory neuron isoforms NaV1.8 and NaV1.7. Our study suggests that targeting the KOR in peripheral sensory nerve endings innervating the skin is not an alternative analgesic approach.

  18. Design, synthesis and in vitro pharmacology of GluK1 and GluK3 antagonists. Studies towards the design of subtype-selective antagonists through 2-carboxyethyl-phenylalanines with substituents interacting with non-conserved residues in the GluK binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Niklas; Nielsen, Birgitte; Olsen, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify compounds selective for the GluK1 and GluK3 subtypes of kainate receptors we have designed and synthesized a series of (S)-2-amino-3-((2-carboxyethyl)phenyl)propanoic acid analogs with hydrogen bond donating and accepting substituents on the aromatic ring. Based on crystal st...

  19. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure......About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...

  20. Comparison of binding parameters of sigma 1 and sigma 2 binding sites in rat and guinea pig brain membranes: novel subtype-selective trishomocubanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V H; Kassiou, M; Johnston, G A; Christie, M J

    1996-09-12

    Comparisons of binding parameters of [3H](+)-pentazocine and [3H]1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) at sigma binding sites in guinea pig and rat brain membranes demonstrated that [3H](+)-pentazocine binds to a single high-affinity site, whereas [3H]DTG binds to two high-affinity sites in both species. The Kd values of the radioligands were similar in both types of membranes. However, the density of sigma 1 sites in guinea pig was significantly higher than that of rat. Novel trishomocubanes were tested for their affinities at sigma 1 and sigma 2 binding sites in guinea pig brain membranes using [3H](+)-pentazocine and [3H]DTG as the radioligands. N-(4-Phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4- azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9).0(8,11)]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest affinity for the sigma 1 site (Ki = 9.4 nM) and 19-fold sigma 1/sigma 2 selectivity, as a result of increasing the alkyl chain between the cubane moiety and the aromatic ring. N-(3'-Fluorophenyl)methyl- 3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9).0(8,11]dodeca ne (ANSTO-19), displayed the highest affinity for sigma 2 sites (Ki = 19.6 nM) and 8-fold sigma 2/sigma 1 selectivity due to a fluoro substitution in the meta position of the aromatic ring. These represent structurally novel lead compounds, especially for the development of selective sigma 2 receptor ligands.

  1. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos J Alexandrou

    Full Text Available Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7 is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  2. Oral administration of PF-01247324, a subtype-selective Nav1.8 blocker, reverses cerebellar deficits in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon D Shields

    Full Text Available Cerebellar symptoms significantly diminish quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. We previously showed that sodium channel Nav1.8, although normally restricted to peripheral somatosensory neurons, is upregulated in the cerebellum in MS, and that Nav1.8 expression is linked to ataxia and MS-like symptoms in mice. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of the Nav1.8 blocker A-803467 temporarily reversed electrophysiological and behavioral manifestations of disease in a mouse MS model; unfortunately A-803467 is not orally bioavailable, diminishing the potential for translation to human patients. In the present study, we assessed the effect of per os (p.o. dosing of a new orally bioavailable Nav1.8-selective blocker, PF-01247324, in transgenic mice expressing Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons, and in wildtype mice in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model. PF-01247324 was administered by oral gavage at 1000 mg/kg; control groups received an equal volume of vehicle. Behavioral assays of motor coordination, grip strength, and ataxia were performed. We observed significant improvements in motor coordination and cerebellar-like symptoms in mice that received PF-01247324 compared to control littermates that received vehicle. These preclinical proof-of-concept data suggest that PF-01247324, its derivatives, or other Nav1.8-selective blockers merit further study for providing symptomatic therapy for cerebellar dysfunction in MS and related disorders.

  3. New insights into the structure-activity-relationship of selective excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 (EAAT1) inhibitors UCPH-101 and UCPH-102

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stinne Wessel; Erichsen, Mette Norman; Huynh, T.H.V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we made further investigations on the structure-activity requirements of the selective excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) inhibitor, 2-amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101), by exploring 15...... (2-amino-4-([1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)-3-cyano-7-isopropyl-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene) was carried out, and in agreement with a study of a related scaffold, the R configuration at C4 was found to be mandatory for inhibitory activity, while both the C7 diastereomers were found to be active...

  4. Genotyping of Madurella mycetomatis by selective amplification of restriction fragments (amplified fragment length polymorphism) and subtype correlation with geographical origin and lesion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Wendy W J; Gorkink, Roy; Simons, Guus; Ott, Alewijn; Ahmed, Abdalla O A; Verbrugh, Henri; van Belkum, Alex

    2005-09-01

    One of the causative organisms of mycetoma is the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. Previously, extensive molecular typing studies identified Sudanese isolates of this fungus as clonal, but polymorphic genetic markers have not yet been identified. Here, we report on the selective amplification of restriction fragment (AFLP) analysis of 37 Sudanese clinical isolates of M. mycetomatis. Of 93 AFLP fragments generated, 25 were polymorphic, and 12 of these 25 polymorphic fragments were found in a large fraction of the strains. Comparative analysis resulted into a tree, composed of two main (clusters I and II) and one minor cluster (cluster III). Seventy-five percent of the strains found in cluster I originated from central Sudan, while the origin of the strains in cluster II was more heterogeneous. Furthermore, the strains found in cluster I were generally obtained from lesions larger than those from which the strains found in cluster II were obtained (chi-square test for trend, P = 0.03). Among the 12 more commonly found polymorphisms, 4 showed sequence homology with known genes. Marker A7 was homologous to an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase from Aspergillus oryzae, 97% identical markers A12 and B3 matched a hypothetical protein from Gibberella zeae, and marker B4 was homologous to casein kinase I from Danio rerio. The last marker seemed to be associated with strains originating from central Sudan (P = 0.001). This is the first report on a genotypic study where genetic markers which may be used to study pathogenicity in M. mycetomatis were obtained.

  5. Genotyping of Madurella mycetomatis by Selective Amplification of Restriction Fragments (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) and Subtype Correlation with Geographical Origin and Lesion Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; Gorkink, Roy; Simons, Guus; Ott, Alewijn; Ahmed, Abdalla O. A.; Verbrugh, Henri; van Belkum, Alex

    2005-01-01

    One of the causative organisms of mycetoma is the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. Previously, extensive molecular typing studies identified Sudanese isolates of this fungus as clonal, but polymorphic genetic markers have not yet been identified. Here, we report on the selective amplification of restriction fragment (AFLP) analysis of 37 Sudanese clinical isolates of M. mycetomatis. Of 93 AFLP fragments generated, 25 were polymorphic, and 12 of these 25 polymorphic fragments were found in a large fraction of the strains. Comparative analysis resulted into a tree, composed of two main (clusters I and II) and one minor cluster (cluster III). Seventy-five percent of the strains found in cluster I originated from central Sudan, while the origin of the strains in cluster II was more heterogeneous. Furthermore, the strains found in cluster I were generally obtained from lesions larger than those from which the strains found in cluster II were obtained (chi-square test for trend, P = 0.03). Among the 12 more commonly found polymorphisms, 4 showed sequence homology with known genes. Marker A7 was homologous to an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase from Aspergillus oryzae, 97% identical markers A12 and B3 matched a hypothetical protein from Gibberella zeae, and marker B4 was homologous to casein kinase I from Danio rerio. The last marker seemed to be associated with strains originating from central Sudan (P = 0.001). This is the first report on a genotypic study where genetic markers which may be used to study pathogenicity in M. mycetomatis were obtained. PMID:16145076

  6. Induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic human keratinocytes by transfection with thymosin beta 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Ookuma, Yukiko F; Shiotsuka, Maho; Kihara, Makiko; Hasegawa, Kana; Someya, Hirotaka; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the recombination of cells liberated from developing tooth germs develop into teeth. However, it is difficult to use human developing tooth germ as a source of cells because of ethical issues. Previous studies have reported that thymosin beta 4 (Tmsb4x) is closely related to the initiation and development of the tooth germ. We herein attempted to establish odontogenic epithelial cells from non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by transfection with TMSB4X. TMSB4X-transfected cells formed nodules that were positive for Alizarin-red S (ALZ) and von Kossa staining (calcium phosphate deposits) when cultured in calcification-inducing medium. Three selected clones showing larger amounts of calcium deposits than the other clones, expressed PITX2, Cytokeratin 14, and Sonic Hedgehog. The upregulation of odontogenesis-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), Amelogenin (AMELX), Ameloblastin (AMBN) and Enamelin (ENAM) was also detected. These proteins were immunohistochemically observed in nodules positive for the ALZ and von Kossa staining. RUNX2-positive selected TMSB4X-transfected cells implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice formed matrix deposits. Immunohistochemically, AMELX, AMBN and ENAM were observed in the matrix deposits. This study demonstrated the possibility of induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by TMSB4X. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic human keratinocytes by transfection with thymosin beta 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamotsu Kiyoshima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the recombination of cells liberated from developing tooth germs develop into teeth. However, it is difficult to use human developing tooth germ as a source of cells because of ethical issues. Previous studies have reported that thymosin beta 4 (Tmsb4x is closely related to the initiation and development of the tooth germ. We herein attempted to establish odontogenic epithelial cells from non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by transfection with TMSB4X. TMSB4X-transfected cells formed nodules that were positive for Alizarin-red S (ALZ and von Kossa staining (calcium phosphate deposits when cultured in calcification-inducing medium. Three selected clones showing larger amounts of calcium deposits than the other clones, expressed PITX2, Cytokeratin 14, and Sonic Hedgehog. The upregulation of odontogenesis-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2, Amelogenin (AMELX, Ameloblastin (AMBN and Enamelin (ENAM was also detected. These proteins were immunohistochemically observed in nodules positive for the ALZ and von Kossa staining. RUNX2-positive selected TMSB4X-transfected cells implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice formed matrix deposits. Immunohistochemically, AMELX, AMBN and ENAM were observed in the matrix deposits. This study demonstrated the possibility of induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by TMSB4X.

  8. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  9. Changes in heparan sulfate are associated with delayed wound repair, altered cell migration, adhesion and contractility in the galactosyltransferase I (beta4GalT-7) deficient form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gotte, M; Spillmann, D; Yip, G.W; Versteeg, E.M.M; Echtermeyer, F.G; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Kiesel, L

    Reduced activity of beta4-galactosyltransferase 7 (beta4GalT-7), an enzyme involved in synthesizing the glycosaminoglycan linkage region of proteoglycans, is associated with the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS...

  10. [Interaction of the Siberian and Far Eastern subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus in mammals with mixed infection. Competition of the subtypes in acute and inapparent infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S G; Pogodina, V V; Koliasnikova, N M; Karan', L S; Malenko, G V; Levina, L S

    2011-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of natural tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) populations could reveal the change of TBEV subtypes, the displacement of the Far Eastern (FE) subtype, and its substitution for the Siberian (Sib) subtype. Acute and inapparent mixed infections were studied in Syrian hamsters to understand this phenomenon. The animals were inoculated with the Sib subtype and then with the FE one of TBEV (JQ845440-YaroslavI-Aver-08 and Fj214132-Kemerovo-Phateev-1954 strains). The inapparent form developed more frequently in mixed infection. Viral progeny was genotyped by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and hybridization fluorescence detection using genotype-specific probes. Independent reproduction of strains in the brain gave way to competition. The FE subtype dominated in hamster youngsters with acute infection. The Sib subtype had selective benefits in asymptomatic infection (adult hamsters infected intracerebrally and subcutaneously and youngsters infected subcutaneously). The competition of the subtypes was imperfect.

  11. Development of a radioiodinated ligand for characterising. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenoceptors. [Pentolamine and 2 BETA-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethylaminomethyl)-tetralone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, A.; Jarrott, B.

    1982-03-15

    Two ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor antagonists, phentolamine and 2-(..beta..-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethylaminomethyl)-tetralone (BE 2254) which are phenolic derivatives were radioiodinated after chloramine-T oxidation of Na/sup 125/I and the labelled material isolated by chromatography. /sup 125/I-Phentolamine does not bind selectively to ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in guinea pig brain whereas the /sup 125/I-BE 2254 derivative binds rapidly, reversibly and with high affinity to these receptors with a K/sub d/ of 230 pM. At low concentrations of /sup 125/I-BE 2254 (< 100 pM) approx. 90% of the bound radioligand is specifically bound and under these conditions drug displacement studies show that the ligand binds predominantly to the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ subclass of adrenoceptors. Binding measurements to kidney and smooth muscle membrane preparations indicate that /sup 125/I-BE 2254 may also be a useful tool in the study of ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in peripheral tissues. The high specific activity of /sup 125/I-BE 2254 permits the use of minimal quantities of membrane material for receptor assay and ligand displacement measurements, e.g. 250 ..mu..g per assay tube, and this provides a significant advantage over the use of existing radioligands such as /sup 3/H-prazosin which requires approx. 40 times as much tissue.

  12. Psychopathy subtypes and psychopathic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Koshkina Ekaterina Nikolaevna

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses two main subtypes of psychopathy and its characteristic traits that allow to differ them from each other. Following that, the existence of more specific subtypes of psychopathy and sociopathy is argued on the basis of the recent researches. Also, the inclination of psychopaths and sociopaths to various kinds of violence is examined.

  13. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina;

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40...... oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell......-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were...

  14. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shen, Tongye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynch, Rebecca M [NON LANL; Derdeyn, Cynthia A [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  15. Design and Synthesis of a Series of L-trans-4-Substituted Prolines as Selective Antagonists for the Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors Including Functional and X-ray Crystallographic Studies of New Subtype Selective Kainic Acid Receptor Subtype 1 (GluK1) Antagonist (2S,4R)-4-(2-Carboxyphenoxy)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels; Delgar, Claudia; Koch, Karina;

    2017-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists are valuable tool compounds for studies of neurological pathways in the central nervous system. On the basis of rational ligand design, a new class of selective antagonists, represented by (2S,4R)-4-(2-carboxy-phenoxy)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (1b), f...

  16. A thymosin beta-4 is involved in production of hemocytes and immune defense of Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Yu, Ziniu

    2016-04-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with multiple and diverse intracellular and extracellular functions in vertebrates. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Tβ4 was cloned and identified in Crassostrea hongkongensis, designated as ChTβ4. The full-length cDNA of ChTβ4 consists of 530 bp with an open reading frame of 126 bp encoding a 41 amino acid polypeptide. SMART analysis indicated that there is one thymosin domain and a highly conserved actin-binding motif (18LKKTET23) in ChTβ4. In vivo injection of recombinant ChTβ4 protein could significantly increase total hemocytes count in oysters, and knockdown of the expression of ChTβ4 resulted in a significant decrease in the circulating hemocytes. Tissue distribution analysis revealed a ubiquitous presence of ChTβ4, with the highest expression in hemocytes. The upregulated transcripts of ChTβ4 in response to bacterial challenge and tissue injury suggest that ChTβ4 is involved in both innate immunity against pathogen infection and wound healing. Moreover, bacteria-clearance experiment showed ChTβ4 could facilitate the clearance of injected bacteria in oysters. In vivo injection with ChTβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS in hemocytes, which was associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX) by pre-treatment with ChTβ4. These results suggest that ChTβ4 is a thymosin beta-4 homolog and plays a vital role in the immune defense of C. hongkongensis.

  17. Comparative functional expression of nAChR subtypes in rodent DRG neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Smith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the functional expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in heterogeneous populations of dissociated rat and mouse lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons by calcium imaging. By this experimental approach, it is possible to investigate the functional expression of multiple receptor and ion-channel subtypes across more than 100 neuronal and glial cells simultaneously. Based on nAChR expression, DRG neurons could be divided into four subclasses: 1 neurons that express predominantly alpha3beta4 and alpha6beta4 nAChRs; 2 neurons that express predominantly alpha7 nAChRs; 3 neurons that express a combination of alpha3beta4/alpha6beta4 and alpha7 nAChRs; and 4 neurons that do not express nAChRs. In this comparative study, the same four neuronal subclasses were observed in mouse and rat DRG. However, the expression frequency differed between species: substantially more rat DRG neurons were in the first three subclasses than mouse DRG neurons, at all developmental time points tested in our study. Approximately 70-80% of rat DRG neurons expressed functional nAChRs, in contrast to only ~15-30% of mouse DRG neurons. Our study also demonstrated functional coupling between nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels and mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in discrete subsets of DRG neurons. In contrast to the expression of nAChRs in DRG neurons, we demonstrated that a subset of non-neuronal DRG cells expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs and not nAChRs. The general approach to comparative cellular neurobiology outlined in this paper has the potential to better integrate molecular and systems neuroscience by uncovering the spectrum of neuronal subclasses present in a given cell population and the functionally integrated signaling components expressed in each subclass.

  18. Variation in Campylobacter MLST Subtypes Detected from Chickens on Three Different Plating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni and coli detected on three discreet selective Campylobacter plating media to determine if different media select for different subtypes. Fifty ceca and fifty carcasses (n=100, representing 50 flocks) were collected from the...

  19. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...... treated with IV-tPA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis of MRI-selected stroke patients treated with IV-tPA between 2004 and 2010. The Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria were used to establish the stroke subtype by 3 months. The outcomes...... of interest were a 3-month modified Rankin Scale score of 0-1 (favorable outcome), and early neurological improvement defined as complete remission of neurological deficit or improvement of ≥4 on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale at 24 h. The outcomes among stroke subtypes were compared...

  20. Comparing two basic subtypes in OCD across three large community samples: a pure compulsive versus a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephanie; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Kawohl, Wolfram; Müller, Mario; Rössler, Wulf; Hengartner, Michael P; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Angst, Jules; Preisig, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Due to its heterogeneous phenomenology, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been subtyped. However, these subtypes are not mutually exclusive. This study presents an alternative subtyping approach by deriving non-overlapping OCD subtypes. A pure compulsive and a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype (including subjects manifesting obsessions with/without compulsions) were analyzed with respect to a broad pattern of psychosocial risk factors and comorbid syndromes/diagnoses in three representative Swiss community samples: the Zurich Study (n = 591), the ZInEP sample (n = 1500), and the PsyCoLaus sample (n = 3720). A selection of comorbidities was examined in a pooled database. Odds ratios were derived from logistic regressions and, in the analysis of pooled data, multilevel models. The pure compulsive subtype showed a lower age of onset and was characterized by few associations with psychosocial risk factors. The higher social popularity of the pure compulsive subjects and their families was remarkable. Comorbidities within the pure compulsive subtype were mainly restricted to phobias. In contrast, the mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype had a higher prevalence and was associated with various childhood adversities, more familial burden, and numerous comorbid disorders, including disorders characterized by high impulsivity. The current comparison study across three representative community surveys presented two basic, distinct OCD subtypes associated with differing psychosocial impairment. Such highly specific subtypes offer the opportunity to learn about pathophysiological mechanisms specifically involved in OCD.

  1. Upregulating of Fas, integrin beta4 and P53 and depressing of PC-PLC activity and ROS level in VEC apoptosis by safrole oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Miao, Junying; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli

    2005-10-24

    Previously, we found that safrole oxide could trigger vascular endothelial cell (VEC) apoptosis. In this study, to investigate its mechanism to induce apoptosis in VECs, the activities of nitric oxide synthetase and phosphatidylcholine specific phospholipase C, the level of reactive oxygen species and the expressions of Fas, integrin beta4 and P53 were analyzed. The data showed that safrole oxide induced apoptosis by increasing the expressions of Fas, integrin beta4 and P53, and depressing the activity of Ca(2+)-independent phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in VECs.

  2. Immunoreactivity for thymosin beta 4 and thymosin beta 10 in the adult rat oro-gastro-intestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4 and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10 are two members of the β-thymosin family, involved in multiple cellular activities in different organs in multiple animal species. Here we report the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in rat tissues, in the gut and in annexed glands. The two peptide were differently expressed: Tβ4 was absent in salivary glands whereas Tβ10 was expressed in parotid and in submandibular glands. Tβ4 was mildly expressed in the tongue and in the oesophagus, where Tβ10 was absent. A similar expression was found in the stomach, ileum and colon mucosa. In pancreas Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the Langerhans islet cells; Tβ4 was also detected in the exocrine cells. Both peptide were not expressed in liver cells. When the rat expression pattern in rat organs was compared to reactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 in humans, marked differences were found. Our data clearly indicate a species-specific expression of Tβ4 and Tβ10, characterized by the actual unpredictability of the expression of these peptides in different cells and tissues. The common high expression of Tβ4 in mast cells, both in humans and in rats, represents one of the few similarities between these two species.

  3. Binding of PAI-1 to endothelial cells stimulated by thymosin beta4 and modulation of their fibrinolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2006-01-13

    Our previous studies showed that thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) induced the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via the AP-1 dependent mechanism and its enhanced secretion. In this work we provide evidence that the released PAI-1 is accumulated on the surface of HUVECs, exclusively in its active form, in a complex with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) that is also up-regulated and released from the cells. This mechanism is supported by several lines of experiments, in which expression of both proteins was analyzed by flow cytometry and their colocalization supported by confocal microscopy. PAI-1 did not bind to quiescent cells but only to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells. In contrast, significant amounts of AGP were found to be associated with the cells overexpressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) without Tbeta4 treatment. The AGP.PAI-1 complex was accumulated essentially at the basal surface of endothelial cells, and such cells showed (a) morphology characteristic for strongly adhered and spread cells and (b) significantly reduced plasmin formation. Taken together, these results provide the evidence supporting a novel mechanism by which active PAI-1 can be bound to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells, thus influencing their adhesive properties as well as their ability to generate plasmin.

  4. Immunoreactivity for Thymosin Beta 4 and Thymosin Beta 10 in the Adult Rat Oro-Gastro-Intestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S; Ekstrom, J.; Cabras, T.; Gerosa, C.; Fanni, D.; Di Felice, E.; Locci, A.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2013-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10) are two members of the β-thymosin family, involved in multiple cellular activities in different organs in multiple animal species. Here we report the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in rat tissues, in the gut and in annexed glands. The two peptide were differently expressed: Tβ4 was absent in salivary glands whereas Tβ10 was expressed in parotid and in submandibular glands. Tβ4 was mildly expressed in the tongue and in the esophagus, where Tβ10 was absent. A similar expression was found in the stomach, ileum and colon mucosa. In pancreas Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the Langerhans islet cells; Tβ4 was also detected in the exocrine cells. Both peptide were not expressed in liver cells. When the rat expression pattern in rat organs was compared to reactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 in humans, marked differences were found. Our data clearly indicate a species-specific expression of Tβ4 and Tβ10, characterized by the actual unpredictability of the expression of these peptides in different cells and tissues. The common high expression of Tβ4 in mast cells, both in humans and in rats, represents one of the few similarities between these two species. PMID:23807296

  5. Thymosin Beta-4 Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Enhances Human Nucleus Pulposus Cell Proliferation and Reduces Cell Apoptosis and Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yi Wang; Qing-San Zhu; Yi-Wei Wang; Ruo-Feng Yin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Thymosin beta-4 (TB-4) is considered key roles in tissue development,maintenance and pathological processes.The study aimed to prove TB-4 positive biological function on nucleus pulposus (NP) cell apoptosis and slowing the process of cell aging while increasing the cell proliferation.Methods:TB-4 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) was constructed and induced to human NP cells.Cell of same group were cultured without gene modification as controlled group.Proliferation capacity and cell apoptosis were observed during 6 passages of the cells.Morphology and expression of the TB-4 gene were documented as parameter of cell activity during cell passage.Results:NP cells with TB-4 transfection has normal TB-4 expression and exocytosis.NP cells with TB-4 transfection performed significantly higher cell activity than that at the control group in each generation.TB-4 recombinant AAV-transfected human NP cells also show slower cell aging,lower cell apoptosis and higher cell proliferation than control group.Conclusions:TB-4 can prevent NP cell apoptosis,slow NP cell aging and promote NP cell proliferation.AAV transfection technique was able to highly and stably express TB-4 in human NP cells,which may provide a new pathway for innovation in the treatment of intervertebral disc degenerative diseases.

  6. 40 CFR 180.450 - Beta-(4-Chlorophenoxy)-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol; tolerances for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beta-(4-Chlorophenoxy)-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol; tolerances for residues. 180.450 Section 180.450 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD...

  7. Differential modulation of alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by flufenamic acid and niflumic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, R; Oortgiesen, M; Vijverberg, H P

    1995-03-01

    Effects of flufenamic acid (FFA) and niflumic acid (NFA), which are often used to block Ca(2+)-activated Cl- current, have been investigated in voltage-clamped Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). NFA and FFA inhibit alpha 3 beta 2 nAChR-mediated inward currents and potentiate alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated inward currents in normal, Cl(-)-free and Ca(2+)-free solutions to a similar extent. The concentration-dependence of the inhibition of alpha 3 beta 2 nAChR-mediated ion current yields IC50 values of 90 microM for FFA and of 260 microM for NFA. The potentiation of alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion current by NFA yields an EC50 value of 30 microM, whereas the effect of FFA does not saturate for concentrations of up to 1 mM. At 100 microM, FFA reduces the maximum of the concentration-effect curve of ACh for alpha 3 beta 2 nAChRs, but leaves the EC50 of ACh unaffected. The same concentration of FFA potentiates alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion currents for all ACh concentrations and causes a small shift of the concentration-effect curve of ACh to lower agonist concentrations. The potentiation, like the inhibition, is most likely due to a noncompetitive effect of FFA. Increasing ACh-induced inward current either by raising the agonist concentration from 10 microM to 200 microM or by coapplication of 10 microM ACh and 200 microM FFA causes a similar enhancement of block of the alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion current by Mg2+. This suggests that the effects of FFA and of an increased agonist concentration result in a similar functional modification of the alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-operated ion channel. It is concluded that alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 3 beta 2 nAChRs are oppositely modulated by FFA and NFA through a direct beta-subunit-dependent effect.

  8. Functional characteristics of HIV-1 subtype C compatible with increased heterosexual transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Brandon L; Armitage, Andrew E; Graham, Stephen C;

    2009-01-01

    lines, sequencing and cloning. Structural modeling was performed using a crystal structure of gp120-CD4-X5. Phylogenetic analysis was done using subtype-A, subtype-B and subtype-C sequences from blood and cervix of 37 infected women and database sequences. RESULTS: We identified two envelope motifs...... mononuclear cell and cell lines with low CCR5 expression. Structural modeling suggested the formation of an additional hydrogen bond between V3 and CCR5. Moreover, we found preferential selection of HIV with 316T and/or extremely short V1-V2 loops in cervices of three women infected with subtypes A/C, B or C...

  9. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  10. Survival Analysis of Breast Cancer Subtypes in Spinal Metastases Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Morgen, Soeren Smith

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 151 patients with breast cancer spinal metastases. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of breast cancer subtypes on survival duration of patients with breast cancer spinal metastases, and to aid spine surgeons in selecting treatments ...

  11. Dyscalculia and Attention Deficit Subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The association of specific academic deficits with attention deficit disorder (ADD) subtypes was determined in 20 students (ages 8-12) with ADD with hyperactivity (ADD/H) compared to 20 with ADD without hyperactivity (ADD/noH), at the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, TX.

  12. Electrophysiological Correlates of Dyslexic Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jane M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The construct validity of Boder's typology of dyslexia was investigated using quantified electroencephalography with 39 children (ages 7-11) during a reading task and at rest. Results supported beta frequency differences in anticipated regions by dyslexia subtype during the reading task. However, the direction of difference hypothesis was not…

  13. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators...

  14. A study on the rating scale selection of ischemic stroke subtypes according to TOAST classification%缺血性脑卒中TOAST分型各亚型评定量表选择及分型相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩杰; 贾文辉

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical rating scale appropriate to evaluate neurological impairment of ischemic stroke subtypes classified by Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria. Methods 289 cases of hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke in neurological wards of the first affiliated hospital of Dalian medical university from December 1,2007 to December 31, 2009 were analyzed prospectively. Results The component ratio of ischemic stroke subtypes on the basis of TOAST etiological classification were as follows: UND (36.6%) was the largest, SAO (29.8%) followed,OC (1.7%) was the lowest. In three-month mortality, CE (15.5%) was the most, LAA (11.8%) followed, SAO (1.2%) was the lowest. In three-month relapse rate, LAA (17.6%) was the most, CE (8.6%) followed, SAO (2.4%) was the lowest. The best validity of scale assessment about LAA, CE,UND, SAO subtypes were MESSS (-0.812), ESS (0.816), NIHSS (-0.807), NIHSS (-0.795) respectively, both reliability and operability were set as medium. Conclusion In ischemic stroke subtypes classified by TOAST criteria, UND had the highest incidence (SAO has the highest incidence in the specific etiology), CE mortality was the highest, LAA had the highest rate of recurrence, SAO mortality and relapse rate were the lowest. In ischemic stroke subtypes classified by TOAST criteria, MESSS was the most suitable scale for LAA, the most appropriate scale for CE was ESS, the most appropriate scale for UND, and the SAO was NIHSS.%目的 探讨缺血性脑卒中TOAST分型各亚型神经功能缺损的合适临床评定量表.方法 选择289例缺血性脑卒中患者进行前瞻性分析.结果 (1)缺血性脑卒中TOAST病因分型各亚型构成比:UND(36.6%)最大,SAO(29.8%)次之,OC(1.7%)最小;三个月死亡率:CE(15.5%)最高,LAA(11.8%)次之,SAO(1.2%)最低;三个月的复发率:LAA(17.6%)最高,CE(8.6%)次之,SAO(2.4%)最低.(2)LAA、CE、UND、SAO亚型量表评定效度最好的分别为MESSS(-0.812)

  15. Diagnosis and subtypes of adolescent antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredith; Westen, Drew

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the application of the Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) diagnosis to adolescents and investigated the possibility of subtypes of APD adolescents. As part of a broader study of adolescent personality in clinically-referred patients, experienced clinicians provided personality data on a randomly selected patient in their care using the SWAP-II-A personality pathology instrument. Three hundred thirteen adolescents met adult DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for APD. To characterize adolescents with the disorder, we aggregated the data to identify the items most descriptive and distinctive of APD adolescents relative to other teenagers in the sample (N = 950). Q-factor analysis identified five personality subtypes: psychopathic-like, socially withdrawn, impulsive-histrionic, emotionally dysregulated, and attentionally dysregulated. The five subtypes differed in predictable ways on a set of external criteria related to global adaptive functioning, childhood family environment, and family history of psychiatric illness. Both the APD diagnosis and the empirically derived APD subtypes provided incremental validity over and above the DSM-IV disruptive behavior disorders in predicting global adaptive functioning, number of arrests, early-onset severe externalizing pathology, and quality of peer relationships. Although preliminary, these results provide support for the use of both APD and personality-based subtyping systems in adolescents.

  16. Changes in heparan sulfate are associated with delayed wound repair, altered cell migration, adhesion and contractility in the galactosyltransferase I (beta4GalT-7) deficient form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotte, M.; Spillmann, D.; Yip, G.W.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Echtermeyer, F.G.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Kiesel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced activity of beta4-galactosyltransferase 7 (beta4GalT-7), an enzyme involved in synthesizing the glycosaminoglycan linkage region of proteoglycans, is associated with the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). In the invertebrates Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, m

  17. Changes in heparan sulfate are associated with delayed wound repair, altered cell migration, adhesion and contractility in the galactosyltransferase I (beta4GalT-7) deficient form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotte, M.; Spillmann, D.; Yip, G.W.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Echtermeyer, F.G.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Kiesel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced activity of beta4-galactosyltransferase 7 (beta4GalT-7), an enzyme involved in synthesizing the glycosaminoglycan linkage region of proteoglycans, is associated with the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). In the invertebrates Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans,

  18. Halogenated cytisine derivatives as agonists at human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Y E; Houlihan, L M; Maskell, P D; Exley, R; Bermúdez, I; Lukas, R J; Valdivia, A C; Cassels, B K

    2003-03-01

    Cytisine (cy) is a potent and competitive partial agonist at alpha4 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors while at homomeric alpha7-nACh receptors it behaves as a full agonist with a relatively lower potency. In the present study, we assessed the effects of bromination or iodination of the pyridone ring of cy and N-methylcytisine (N-Me-cy) on the effects of these compounds on recombinant human (h) alpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh receptors expressed in clonal cell lines and Xenopus oocytes. Halogenation at C(3) of cy or N-Me-cy usually brings about a marked increase in both affinity and efficacy at halpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh, the extent of which depends on whether the halogen is bromine or iodine, and upon receptor subtype. The effects of halogenation at C(5) are strongly influenced by the specific halogen substituent so that bromination causes a decrease in both affinity and efficacy while iodination decreases affinity but its effects on efficacy range from a decrease (halpha7, halpha4beta4 nACh receptors) to a marked increase (halpha4beta2 nACh receptors). Based on these findings, which differ from those showing that neither the affinity nor efficacy of nicotine, 3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)-pyridine or epibatidine are greatly affected by halogenation, dehalogenation or halogen exchange at equivalent positions, we suggest that cy, N-Me-cy and their halo-isosteres bind to neuronal nACh receptors in a different orientation allowing the halogen atom to interact with a hydrophobic halogen-accepting region within the predominantly hydrophobic agonist-binding pocket of the receptors.

  19. Immunological responses to envelope glycoprotein 120 from subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilljam, G; Svensson, A; Ekström, A; Wahren, B

    1999-07-01

    The outer envelope glycoprotein (gp120) from subtypes A-E of HIV-1 was purified using a specific high mannose-binding lectin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. All isolates were grown in peripheral blood lymphocyte cells in order to avoid selection in cell lines. A comparison of the reactivities of the envelope proteins was made using sera from patients infected with the different subtypes. In this study, the B and C subtype envelope glycoproteins showed the strongest immunological reactivity, when reacted with sera from patients infected with the same subtype of virus. On the other hand, sera of patients infected with subtype A or C virus had the strongest and broadest reactivities, to envelope glycoproteins of many subtypes. The purified gp120 proteins from all five subtypes stimulated mononuclear cells from HIV-1 (subtype B)-infected patients, indicating conserved T cell-activating epitopes. The immunological reactivities indicate that strong antigenicity does not always predict the broadest immunogenicity of an envelope glycoprotein. Glycoprotein 120 from foreign subtypes may serve to induce strong cross-reactive immune responses.

  20. Safrole oxide induces neuronal apoptosis through inhibition of integrin beta4/SOD activity and elevation of ROS/NADPH oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Le; Zhao, BaoXiang; Lv, Xin; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing

    2007-02-20

    Neuronal apoptosis is a very important event in the development of the central nervous system (CNS), but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that safrole oxide, a small molecule, induces integrin beta4 expression and promotes apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of safrole oxide on cell growth and apoptosis have been examined in primary cultures of mouse neurons. Safrole oxide was found to significantly inhibit neuronal cell growth and to induce apoptosis. The inhibitory and apoptotic activities of safrole oxide followed a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, the expression of integrin beta4 was significantly inhibited with safrole oxide treatment. Furthermore, safrole oxide dramatically increases the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity was decreased significantly with safrole oxide treatment. Our study thus demonstrates that safrole oxide induces neuronal apoptosis through integrin beta4, ROS, NADPH, and MnSOD.

  1. Safrole oxide induces apoptosis by up-regulating Fas and FasL instead of integrin beta4 in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, AiYing; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing; Yin, DeLing; Zhang, ShangLi

    2006-04-01

    Previously, we found that 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-1-(2',3'-epoxypropyl)-benzene (safrole oxide) induced a typical apoptosis in A549 human lung cancer cells by activating caspase-3, -8, and -9. In this study, we further investigated which upstream pathways were activated by safrole oxide during the apoptosis. Immunofluorescence assay combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that both Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) were up-regulated by the small molecule. In addition, Fas protein distribution was altered, showing a clustering distribution instead of a homogeneous one. Subsequently, Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulations of Fas and its membrane-binding form of FasL (m-FasL), as well as P53 protein. Conversely, safrole oxide hardly affected integrin beta4 subunit expression or distribution, which was reflected from the data obtained by immunofluorescence assay combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results suggested that Fas/FasL pathway might be involved in safrole oxide-induced apoptosis of A549 cells, while integrin beta4 might be irrelevant to the apoptosis. Nevertheless, we first found the strong expression of integrin beta4 in A549 cells. The study first suggested that safrole oxide might be used as a small molecular promoter of Fas/FasL pathway to elicit apoptosis in A549 cells, which would lay the foundation for us to insight into the new strategies for lung cancer therapy.

  2. cDNA sequence and gene locus of the human retinal phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C{beta}4 (PLCB4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Ghalayini, A.J.; Anderson, R.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Defects in the Drosophila norpA (no receptor potential A) gene encoding a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) block invertebrate phototransduction and lead to retinal degeneration. The mammalian homolog, PLCB4, is expressed in rat brain, bovine cerebellum, and the bovine retina in several splice variants. To determine a possible role of PLCB4 gene defects in human disease, we isolated several overlapping cDNA clones from a human retina library. The composite cDNA sequence predicts a human PLC{beta}4 polypeptide of 1022 amino acid residues (MW 117,000). This PLC{beta}4 variant lacks a 165-amino-acid N-terminal domain characteristic for the rat brain isoforms, but has a distinct putative exon 1 unique for human and bovine retina isoforms. A PLC{beta}4 monospecific antibody detected a major (130 kDa) and a minor (160 kDa) isoform in retina homogenates. Somatic cell hybrids and deletion panels were used to localize the PCLB4 gene to the short arm of chromosome 20. The gene was further sublocalized to 20p12 by florescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Mixed-Lineage Kinase 1 and Mixed-Lineage Kinase 3 Subtype-Selective Dihydronaphthyl[3,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazole-5-ones: Optimization, Mixed-Lineage Kinase 1 Crystallography, and Oral in Vivo Activity in 1-Methyl-4phenyltetrahydropyridine Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudkins,R.; Diebold, J.; Tao, M.; Josef, K.; Park, C.; Angeles, T.; Aimone, L.; Husten, J.; Ator, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The optimization of the dihydronaphthyl[3,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazole-5-one R2 and R12 positions led to the identification of the first MLK1 and MLK3 subtype-selective inhibitors within the MLK family. Compounds 14 (CEP-5104) and 16 (CEP-6331) displayed good potency for MLK1 and MLK3 inhibition with a greater than 30- to 100-fold selectivity for related family members MLK2 and DLK. Compounds 14 and 16 were orally active in vivo in a mouse MPTP biochemical efficacy model that was comparable to the first-generation pan-MLK inhibitor 1 (CEP-1347). The MLK1 structure-activity relationships were supported by the first-reported X-ray crystal structure of MLK1 bound with 16.

  4. Mixed-lineage kinase 1 and mixed-lineage kinase 3 subtype-selective dihydronaphthyl[3,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazole-5-ones: optimization, mixed-lineage kinase 1 crystallography, and oral in vivo activity in 1-methyl-4-phenyltetrahydropyridine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudkins, Robert L; Diebold, James L; Tao, Ming; Josef, Kurt A; Park, Chung Ho; Angeles, Thelma S; Aimone, Lisa D; Husten, Jean; Ator, Mark A; Meyer, Sheryl L; Holskin, Beverly P; Durkin, John T; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Mathiasen, Joanne R; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna; Saporito, Michael S; Scott, Richard W; Mallamo, John P

    2008-09-25

    The optimization of the dihydronaphthyl[3,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazole-5-one R(2) and R(12) positions led to the identification of the first MLK1 and MLK3 subtype-selective inhibitors within the MLK family. Compounds 14 (CEP-5104) and 16 (CEP-6331) displayed good potency for MLK1 and MLK3 inhibition with a greater than 30- to 100-fold selectivity for related family members MLK2 and DLK. Compounds 14 and 16 were orally active in vivo in a mouse MPTP biochemical efficacy model that was comparable to the first-generation pan-MLK inhibitor 1 (CEP-1347). The MLK1 structure-activity relationships were supported by the first-reported X-ray crystal structure of MLK1 bound with 16.

  5. Induction of ErbB-3 expression by alpha6beta4 integrin contributes to tamoxifen resistance in ERbeta1-negative breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Folgiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen is still the most widely used drug in hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Its benefits in adjuvant treatment are well documented in controlled and randomized clinical studies, which have demonstrated an increase in disease-free intervals of patients with positive hormonal receptors. However, the mechanisms involved in endocrine resistance are not clear. Laboratory and clinical data now indicate that bi-directional molecular cross-talk between nuclear or membrane ER and growth factor receptor pathways may be involved in endocrine resistance. We recently found a functional interaction between alpha6beta4 integrin and ErbB-3 receptor to maintain the PI3K/Akt survival pathway of mammary tumour cells. We sought to improve understanding of this process in order to provide the involvement of both receptors insight into mechanism of Tamoxifen resistance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using human breast cancer cell lines displaying different levels of alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 receptors and a series of 232 breast cancer biopsies from patients submitted to adjuvant Tamoxifen monotherapy for five years, we evaluated the functional interaction between both receptors in relationship to Tamoxifen responsiveness. In mammary carcinoma cells, we evidenced that the alpha6beta4 integrin strongly influence Akt phosphorylation through ErbB-3 protein regulation. Moreover, the ErbB-3 inactivation inhibits Akt phosphorylation, induces apoptosis and inhibits in vitro invasion favouring Tamoxifen responsiveness. The analysis of human tumors revealed a significant relationship between alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 in P-Akt-positive and ERbeta1-negative breast cancers derived from patients with lower disease free survival. CONCLUSIONS: We provided evidence that a strong relationship occurs between alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 positivity in ERbeta1-negative breast cancers. We also found that the association between ErbB-3 and P-Akt positivity mainly occurs in

  6. Targeting the subtypes of breast cancer: rethinking investigational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curigliano, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Marzia; Fumagalli, Luca; Brollo, Janaina; Munzone, Elisabetta; Nolé, Franco; Criscitiello, Carmen; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2012-02-01

    The choice of adjuvant treatments for women with breast cancer is based on several features that take into account the heterogeneity of the disease. Questions raised during the decision process include the following: i) What leads to the use of endocrine therapy? ii) What leads to the use of anti-HER2 therapy? iii) What justifies the use of chemotherapy? Choices of adjuvant treatment are based on parameters defined by molecular characterization of breast cancer subtypes or by approximations to this classification using traditional clinical-pathological features. Clinicians should consider cases within the various distinct subpopulation in order to properly select the most 'personalized' adjuvant therapeutic approach. Sensitivity to chemotherapy and/or targeted agents in subtypes of breast cancers are predictable based on gene pathway alterations and associated gene products. This review covers several clinical data on several investigational agents for early-stage breast cancer molecular subtypes. We selected from literature data prospective Phase I, II and III clinical trials of chemotherapy (weekly or daily schedules), including indicators of activity and toxicity and data on survival/mortality. The future of many investigational therapeutics in breast cancer is linked to our ability to identify the most druggable target in each subtype.

  7. HIV subtype, epidemiological and mutational correlations in patients from Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Maria Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Analyze patients with HIV infection from Curitiba, Paraná, their epidemiological characteristics and HIV RAM. METHODS: Patients regularly followed in an ID Clinic had their medical data evaluated and cases of virological failure were analyzed with genotypic report. RESULTS: Patients with complete medical charts were selected (n = 191. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared. One hundred thirty two patients presented with subtype B infection (69.1%, 41 subtype C (21.5%, 10 subtype F (5.2%, 7 BF (3.7% and 1 CF (0.5%. Patients with subtype B infection had been diagnosed earlier than patients with subtype non-B. Also, subtype B infection was more frequent in men who have sex with men, while non-B subtypes occurred more frequently in heterosexuals and women. Patients with previous history of three classes of ARVs (n = 161 intake were selected to evaluate resistance. For RT inhibitors, 41L and 210W were more frequently observed in subtype B than in non-B strains. No differences between subtypes and mutations were observed to NNTRIs. Mutations at 10, 32 and 63 position of protease were more observed in subtype B viruses than non-B, while positions 20 and 36 of showed more amino acid substitutions in subtype non-B viruses. Patients with history of NFV intake were evaluated to resistance pathway. The 90M pathway was more frequent in subtypes B and non-B. Mutations previously reported as common in non-B viruses, such as 65R and 106M, were uncommon in our study. Mutations 63P and 36I, previously reported as common in HIV-1 subtypes B and C from Brazil, respectively, were common. CONCLUSION: There is a significant frequency of HIV-1 non-B infections in Paraná state, with isolates classified as subtypes C, F, BF and BC. Patients with subtype C infection were more frequently female, heterosexual and had a longer average time of HIV diagnosis

  8. Optical studies of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, A L; Nelson, M E; Lindstrom, J; Salzberg, B M

    2005-08-01

    Nicotinic transmission in the enteric nervous system (ENS) is extensive, but the role of individual nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes in the functional connectivity of its plexuses has been elusive. Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against neuronal alpha3-, alpha4-, alpha3/alpha5-, beta2-, beta4- and alpha7-subunits, combined with radioimmunoassays and immunocytochemistry, we demonstrate that guinea-pig enteric ganglia contain all of these nAChR-subunits with the exception of alpha4, and so, differ from mammalian brain. This information alone, however, is insufficient to establish the functional role of the identified nAChR-subtypes within the enteric networks and, ultimately, their specific contributions to gastrointestinal physiology. We have used voltage-sensitive dyes and a high-speed CCD camera, in conjunction with specific antagonists to various nAChRs, to elucidate some of the distinct contributions of the individual subtypes to the behaviour of enteric networks. In the guinea-pig, the submucous plexus has the extraordinary advantage that it is virtually two-dimensional, permitting optical recording, with single cell resolution, of the electrical activity of all of its neurones. In this plexus, the block of alpha3beta2-, alpha3beta4- and/or alpha7-nAChRs always results in a decrease in the magnitude of the synaptic response. However, the magnitude of the fast excitatory post-synaptic potentials (epsps) evoked by electrical stimulation of a neighbouring ganglion varies from cell to cell, reflecting the differential expression of subunits already observed using mAbs, as well as the strengths of the activated synaptic inputs. At the same time, we observe that submucous neurones have a substantial mecamylamine (Mec)-insensitive (non-nicotinic) component to their fast epsps, which may point to the presence of purinergic or serotonergic fast epsps in this system. In the myenteric plexus, on the other hand, the antagonist-induced changes in the

  9. The distribution of Blastocystis subtypes in isolates from Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Madi, Marawan; Aly, Mahmoud; Behnke, Jerzy M; Clark, C Graham; Balkhy, Hanan

    2015-09-17

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasite of humans and other animals comprising at least 17 genetically distinct small subunit ribosomal RNA lineages (subtypes (STs)), nine of which have been found in humans. The geographic distribution of Blastocystis subtypes is variable, but the subtypes present in Qatar are at present unknown. Stool samples were collected from randomly selected, apparently healthy subjects arriving in Qatar for the first time. Blastocystis subtypes were determined by sequencing of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) PCR products. Phylogenetic analyses were done using Maximum Composite Likelihood method. 71.1 % of samples were positive for Blastocystis infection based on PCR-detection methodology compared to only 6.9 % by microscopy. Prevalence of Blastocystis did not differ between the sexes nor between age classes. However, there was a regional difference in prevalence with subjects arriving from Africa showing the highest (87.6 %), those from Western Asia intermediate (68.6 %) and from Eastern Asia the lowest prevalence (67.6 %). Genetic analysis detected only three STs. ST3 was the most common (69.3 %) and ST2 was the rarest (3.5 %), while ST1 had a prevalence of 27.2 %. ST2 showed a regional variation, being absent from the 64 Western Asian Blastocystis-positive subjects. Both ST1 and ST3 showed significant differences in prevalence between the sexes. This is the first report exploring the distribution of Blastocystis subtypes in our region. We recommend that stool screening via microscopy for the presence of Blastocystis should be abandoned since it is extremely insensitive. In future, the prevalence of Blastocystis infections should be based on PCR methodology and we predict that in the years ahead diagnostic PCR will become the tool of choice. More work is needed to identify the full range of Blastocystis subtypes that circulate in our region.

  10. HIV-1 LTR subtype and perinatal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackard, J T; Renjifo, B; Fawzi, W; Hertzmark, E; Msamanga, G; Mwakagile, D; Hunter, D; Spiegelman, D; Sharghi, N; Kagoma, C; Essex, M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple subtypes of HIV-1 have been identified; however, there is little data on the relative transmissibility of viruses belonging to different subtypes. A matched case-control study addressed whether viruses with different long terminal repeat (LTR) subtypes were transmitted equally from mother to infant. The LTR subtype was determined for 45 matched cases and controls who participated in a clinical trial in Tanzania. HIV-1 subtypes A, C, and D and intersubtype recombinant sequences were identified. Exact matched logistic regression analysis showed that viruses containing subtype A or intersubtype recombinant LTRs were 3.2 and 4.8 times more likely to be transmitted from mother to infant than viruses with subtype D LTRs. Viruses containing subtype C LTRs were 6.1 times more likely to be transmitted than those with subtype D LTRs. These differences in transmission were independent of maternal CD4 at enrollment. Thus, it appears that HIV-1 subtype may be associated with differing rates of perinatal transmission in Tanzania. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  12. Frequent intra-subtype recombination among HIV-1 circulating in Tanzania.

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    Ireen E Kiwelu

    Full Text Available The study estimated the prevalence of HIV-1 intra-subtype recombinant variants among female bar and hotel workers in Tanzania. While intra-subtype recombination occurs in HIV-1, it is generally underestimated. HIV-1 env gp120 V1-C5 quasispecies from 45 subjects were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing (median (IQR of 38 (28-50 sequences per subject. Recombination analysis was performed using seven methods implemented within the recombination detection program version 3, RDP3. HIV-1 sequences were considered recombinant if recombination signals were detected by at least three methods with p-values of ≤0.05 after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. HIV-1 in 38 (84% subjects showed evidence for intra-subtype recombination including 22 with HIV-1 subtype A1, 13 with HIV-1 subtype C, and 3 with HIV-1 subtype D. The distribution of intra-patient recombination breakpoints suggested ongoing recombination and showed selective enrichment of recombinant variants in 23 (60% subjects. The number of subjects with evidence of intra-subtype recombination increased from 29 (69% to 36 (82% over one year of follow-up, although the increase did not reach statistical significance. Adjustment for intra-subtype recombination is important for the analysis of multiplicity of HIV infection. This is the first report of high prevalence of intra-subtype recombination in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Tanzania, a region where multiple HIV-1 subtypes co-circulate. HIV-1 intra-subtype recombination increases viral diversity and presents additional challenges for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  13. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

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    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  14. Tweaking subtype-selectivity and agonist efficacy at (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in a small series of BnTetAMPA analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina V.

    2016-01-01

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp...... electrophysiology at the four homomeric AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The analogues 6 and 7 exhibit very different pharmacological profiles with binding affinity preference for the subtypes GluA1 and GluA3, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of three ligands (6, 7, and 8) in complex...... with the agonist binding domain (ABD) of GluA2 show that they induce full domain closure despite their low agonist efficacies. Trp767 in GluA2 ABD could be an important determinant for partial agonism of this compound series at AMPA receptors, since agonist efficacy also correlated with the location of the Trp767...

  15. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

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    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  16. Heterogeneity and penetration of HIV-1 non-subtype B viruses in an Italian province: public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, C; Lapadula, G; Izzo, I; Brindicci, G; Labbate, G; Quiros-Roldan, E; Diallo, I; Gargiulo, F; Castelnuovo, F; Calabresi, A; Carosi, G; Manca, N; Monno, L

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed changes in prevalence and distribution of HIV-1 non-subtype B viruses in Italian and immigrant patients over two decades in a province in Italy. All HIV-positive patients who underwent genotypic resistance testing were selected. Prevalence of non-subtype B viruses in 3-year periods was calculated. All sequences of non-subtype B and those provided by REGA as unassigned were analysed for phylogenetic relationships. In total, 250/1563 (16%) individuals were infected with a non-subtype B virus. Prevalence increased over time, reaching a peak (31.5%) in 2004-2006. In Italian patients, the most frequent subtypes were B (92.5%) and F1 (4%). F1 subtype was also prevalent in patients from South America (13.6%); in patients of African origin, CRF02_AG (54.9%) and G (12.3%) were the most frequent. HIV-1 non-subtype B infections in Italians were mostly found in patients who acquired HIV sexually. A phylogenetic relationship between F subtypes in Italian and representative HIV-1 sequences from Brazil was found. C subtypes in Italians were phylogenetically related to subtypes circulating in Brazil. Inter-subtype recombinants were also found in the latest years. The HIV-1 epidemic in Brescia province evolved to the point where about 1/3 patients recently diagnosed harboured non-B HIV subtypes. The distribution of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Italian patients resembled that in South American patients and phylogenetic relatedness between some Italian and South American HIV-1 strains was found. The possible epidemiological link between these two populations would have been missed by looking only at risk factors for HIV acquisition declared by patients. The evidence of inter-subtype recombinants points to significant genetic assortment. Overall our results support phylogenetic analysis as a tool for epidemiological investigation in order to guide targeted prevention strategies.

  17. Analysis of dinucleotide signatures in HIV-1 subtype B genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aridaman Pandit; Jyothirmayi Vadlamudi; Somdatta Sinha

    2013-12-01

    Dinucleotide usage is known to vary in the genomes of organisms. The dinucleotide usage profiles or genome signatures are similar for sequence samples taken from the same genome, but are different for taxonomically distant species. This concept of genome signatures has been used to study several organisms including viruses, to elucidate the signatures of evolutionary processes at the genome level. Genome signatures assume greater importance in the case of host–pathogen interactions, where molecular interactions between the two species take place continuously, and can influence their genomic composition. In this study, analyses of whole genome sequences of the HIV-1 subtype B, a retrovirus that caused global pandemic of AIDS, have been carried out to analyse the variation in genome signatures of the virus from 1983 to 2007.We show statistically significant temporal variations in some dinucleotide patterns highlighting the selective evolution of the dinucleotide profiles of HIV-1 subtype B, possibly a consequence of host specific selection.

  18. Genetic contributions to subtypes of aggression

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Boys and girls may display different styles of aggression. The aim of this study was to identify subtypes of aggression within the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) aggression scale, and determine their characteristics for both sexes. Maternal CBCL ratings of 7449 7-year-old twin pairs were analyzed using principal components analyses to identify subtypes of aggression, and structural equation modeling to carry out genetic analyses. Two aggression subtypes were identified: relational and direct...

  19. Thymosin beta(4 and beta(10 levels in pre-term newborn oral cavity and foetal salivary glands evidence a switch of secretion during foetal development.

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    Sonia Nemolato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta(4, its sulfoxide, and thymosin beta(10 were detected in whole saliva of human pre-term newborns by reversed-phase high performance chromatography coupled to electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Despite high inter-individual variability, concentration of beta-thymosins increases with an inversely proportional trend to postmenstrual age (PMA: gestational age plus chronological age after birth reaching a value more than twenty times higher than in adult whole saliva at 190 days (27 weeks of PMA (thymosin beta(4 concentration: more than 2.0 micromol/L versus 0.1 micromol/L. On the other hand, the ratio between thymosin beta(4 and thymosin beta(10 exhibits a constant value of about 4 along all the range of PMA (190-550 days of PMA examined. In order to investigate thymosin beta(4 origin and to better establish the trend of its production as a function of gestational age (GA, immunohistochemical analysis of major and minor salivary glands of different pre-term fetuses were carried out, starting from 84 days (12 weeks of gestational age. Reactive granules were seen in all glands with a maximum of expression around 140-150 days of GA, even though with high inter- and intra-individual variability. In infants and adults reactive granules in acinar cells were not observed, but just a diffuse cytoplasmatic staining in ductal cells. SIGNIFICANCE: This study outlines for the first time that salivary glands during foetal life express and secrete peptides such as beta-thymosins probably involved in the development of the oral cavity and its annexes. The secretion increases from about 12 weeks till to about 21 weeks of GA, subsequently it decreases, almost disappearing in the period of expected date of delivery, when the gland switches towards the secretion of adult specific salivary peptides. The switch observed may be an example of further secretion switches involving other exocrine and endocrine

  20. Cognitive subtypes of mathematics learning difficulties in primary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelet, Dimona; Ansari, Daniel; Vaessen, Anniek; Blomert, Leo

    2014-03-01

    It has been asserted that children with mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) constitute a heterogeneous group. To date, most researchers have investigated differences between predefined MLD subtypes. Specifically MLD children are frequently categorized a priori into groups based on the presence or absence of an additional disorder, such as a reading disorder, to examine cognitive differences between MLD subtypes. In the current study 226 third to six grade children (M age=131 months) with MLD completed a selection of number specific and general cognitive measures. The data driven approach was used to identify the extent to which performance of the MLD children on these measures could be clustered into distinct groups. In particular, after conducting a factor analysis, a 200 times repeated K-means clustering approach was used to classify the children's performance. Results revealed six distinguishable clusters of MLD children, specifically (a) a weak mental number line group, (b) weak ANS group, (c) spatial difficulties group, (d) access deficit group, (e) no numerical cognitive deficit group and (f) a garden-variety group. These findings imply that different cognitive subtypes of MLD exist and that these can be derived from data-driven approaches to classification. These findings strengthen the notion that MLD is a heterogeneous disorder, which has implications for the way in which intervention may be tailored for individuals within the different subtypes.

  1. Discovery and validation of breast cancer subtypes

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    Bukholm Ida RK

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies demonstrated breast cancer tumor tissue samples could be classified into different subtypes based upon DNA microarray profiles. The most recent study presented evidence for the existence of five different subtypes: normal breast-like, basal, luminal A, luminal B, and ERBB2+. Results Based upon the analysis of 599 microarrays (five separate cDNA microarray datasets using a novel approach, we present evidence in support of the most consistently identifiable subtypes of breast cancer tumor tissue microarrays being: ESR1+/ERBB2-, ESR1-/ERBB2-, and ERBB2+ (collectively called the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes. We validate all three subtypes statistically and show the subtype to which a sample belongs is a significant predictor of overall survival and distant-metastasis free probability. Conclusion As a consequence of the statistical validation procedure we have a set of centroids which can be applied to any microarray (indexed by UniGene Cluster ID to classify it to one of the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes. Moreover, the method used to define the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes is not specific to the disease. The method can be used to identify subtypes in any disease for which there are at least two independent microarray datasets of disease samples.

  2. A DNA methylation-based definition of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Moran, Sebastian; Gomez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Arribas-Jorba, Carlos; Sandoval, Juan; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Olafsdottir, Elinborg; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Jonasson, Jon G; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Esteller, Manel

    2015-03-01

    In cancer, epigenetic states are deregulated and thought to be of significance in cancer development and progression. We explored DNA methylation-based signatures in association with breast cancer subtypes to assess their impact on clinical presentation and patient prognosis. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium 450K arrays in 40 tumors and 17 normal breast samples, together with DNA copy number changes and subtype-specific markers by tissue microarrays. The identified methylation signatures were validated against a cohort of 212 tumors annotated for breast cancer subtypes by the PAM50 method (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Selected markers were pyrosequenced in an independent validation cohort of 310 tumors and analyzed with respect to survival, clinical stage and grade. The results demonstrate that DNA methylation patterns linked to the luminal-B subtype are characterized by CpG island promoter methylation events. In contrast, a large fraction of basal-like tumors are characterized by hypomethylation events occurring within the gene body. Based on these hallmark signatures, we defined two DNA methylation-based subtypes, Epi-LumB and Epi-Basal, and show that they are associated with unfavorable clinical parameters and reduced survival. Our data show that distinct mechanisms leading to changes in CpG methylation states are operative in different breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we show that a few selected proxy markers can be used to detect the distinct DNA methylation-based subtypes thereby providing valuable information on disease prognosis.

  3. The calculated genetic barrier for antiretroviral drug resistance substitutions is largely similar for different HIV-1 subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, D.A. van de; Wensing, A.M.J.; Angarano, G.; Asjo, B.; Balotta, C.; Camacho, R.; Chaix, M.; Costagliola, D.; De Luca, A.; Derdelinckx, I.; Grossman, Z.; Hamouda, O.; Hatzakis, A.; Hemmer, R.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Horban, A.; Korn, K.; Kücherer, C.; Leitner, T.; Loveday, C.; MacRae, E.; Maljkovic, I.; Mendoza, C. de; Meyer, L.; Nielsen, C.; Op de Coul, E.L.M.; Omaasen, V.; Paraskevis, D.; Perrin, L.; Puchhammer-Stöckl, E.; Salminen, M.; Schmit, J.; Scheider, F.; Schuurman, R.; Soriano, V.; Stanczak, G.; Stanojevic, M.; Vandamme, A.; Laethem, K. van; Violin, M.; Wilde, K.; Yerly, S.; Zazzi, M.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic barrier, defined as the number of mutations required to overcome drug-selective pressure, is an important factor for the development of HIV drug resistance. Because of high variability between subtypes, particular HIV-1 subtypes could have different genetic barriers for drug resistance s

  4. A comprehensive study on the putative δ-opioid receptor (sub)types using the highly selective δ-antagonist, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkas, Erika; Bakota, Lidia; Gulya, Karoly; Wen, Ting; Pintar, John; Tóth, Geza; Szucs, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The goal of our work was a throughout characterization of the pharmacology of the TIPP-analog, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH and see if putative δ-opioid receptor subtypes can be distinguished. Analgesic latencies were assessed in mouse tail-flick assays after intrathecal administration. In vitro receptor autoradiography, binding and ligand-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays were performed in the presence of putative δ(1)-(DPDPE: agonist, BNTX: antagonist), δ(2)-(agonist: deltorphin II, Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II, antagonist: naltriben) and μ-(DAMGO: agonist) opioid ligands. The examined antagonist inhibited the effect of DPDPE by 60%, but did not antagonize δ(2)- and μ-agonist induced analgesia. The radiolabeled form identified binding sites with K(D)=0.18 nM and receptor densities of 102.7 fmol/mg protein in mouse brain membranes. The binding site distribution of the [(3)H]Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH agreed well with that of [(3)H]Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II as revealed by receptor autoradiography. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH displayed 2.49±0.06 and 0.30±0.01 nM potency against DPDPE and deltorphin II in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay, respectively. The rank order of potency of putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-antagonists against DPDPE and deltorphin was similar in brain and CHO cells expressing human δ-opioid receptors. Deletion of the DOR-1 gene resulted in no residual binding of the radioligand and no significant DPDPE effect on G-protein activation. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH is a highly potent and δ-opioid specific antagonist both in vivo and in vitro. However, the putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-opioid receptors could not be unequivocally distinguished in vitro.

  5. SUBTYPES OF JUVENILE SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Slarovoitova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to allot clinical forms of juvenile systemic scleroderma (JSSD. Material and methods: investigation and dynamic observation of 60 patients aged 14-54 (mean age 25.1 ±7.2 with onset of disease in child's and adolescent’s ages from 1 to 16 years old ( in average 11. 4±3.8 year old and disease duration from 1 to 39 years (in average 13.1 ±7.9. Results: 55% of patients demonstrated JSSD subtype with focal cutaneous lesion of different localization. The possibility of overlap-syndrome development in JSSD patients with onset in adolescent age typical for SSD-rheumatoid arthritis, SSD-polymvositis should be underlined. Conclusion: knowledge of different clinical forms and courses of the disease, modern diagnostics and early beginning of differential JSSD treatment will enable us to improve the prognosis and disease outcome.

  6. The replacement of the 2-methoxy substituent of N-((6,6-diphenyl-1,4-dioxan-2-yl)methyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)ethan-1-amine improves the selectivity for 5-HT1A receptor over α1-adrenoceptor and D2-like receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Fabio; Bonifazi, Alessandro; Giannella, Mario; Giorgioni, Gianfabio; Piergentili, Alessandro; Petrelli, Riccardo; Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Keck, Thomas M; Mazzolari, Angelica; Vistoli, Giulio; Cilia, Antonio; Poggesi, Elena; Matucci, Rosanna; Quaglia, Wilma

    2017-01-05

    N-((6,6-diphenyl-1,4-dioxan-2-yl)methyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)ethan-1-amine (3) is a potent 5-HT1A receptor and α1d-adrenoceptor (α1d-AR) ligand. Analogues 5-10 were rationally designed and prepared to evaluate whether electronic and/or lipophilic properties of substituents in the ortho position of its phenoxy moiety exert any favorable effects on the affinity/activity at 5-HT1A receptor and improve selectivity over α1-ARs. To rationalize the experimental observations and derive information about receptor-ligand interactions of the reported ligands, docking studies, using 5-HT1A and α1d-AR models generated by homology techniques, and a retrospective computational study were performed. The results highlighted that proper substituents in position 2 of the phenoxy moiety of 3 selectively address the ligands toward 5-HT1A receptor with respect to α1-ARs and D2-like receptor subtypes. Methoxymethylenoxy derivative 9 showed the best 5-HT1A selectivity profile and the highest potency at 5-HT1A receptor, behaving as a partial agonist. Finally, 9, tested in light/dark exploration test in mice, significantly reduced anxiety-linked behaviors. Therefore, it may be considered a lead for the design of partial agonists potentially useful in the treatment of disorders in which 5-HT1A receptor is involved.

  7. Transsexual subtypes : Clinical and theoretical significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, YLS; van Goozen, SHM; Kuiper, AJ; Cohen-Kettenis, PT

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether transsexuals can be validly subdivided into subtypes on the basis of sexual orientation, and whether differences between subtypes of transsexuals are similar for male-to-female (ME) and female-to-male transsexuals (FMs). Within a large transsexua

  8. Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) with high selectivity against all other known S1P receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-15

    A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as S1P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of S1P1 binding against S1P2-5. These highly selective S1P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that S1P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models.

  9. ADHD-hyperactive/impulsive subtype in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V. Faraone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study to evaluate ADHD-hyperactive/impulsive subtype in a large clinical sample of adults with ADHD. The Quality of Life, Effectiveness, Safety and Tolerability (QuEST study included 725 adults who received clinician diagnoses of any ADHD subtype. Cross-sectional baseline data from 691 patients diagnosed with the hyperactive/impulsive (HI, inattentive (IA and combined subtypes were used to compare the groups on the clinician administered ADHD-RS, clinical features and health-related quality of life. A consistent pattern of differences was found between the ADHD-I and combined subtypes, with the combined subtype being more likely to be diagnosed in childhood, more severe symptom severity and lower HRQL. Twenty-three patients out of the total sample of 691 patients (3% received a clinician diagnosis of ADHD - hyperactive/impulsive subtype. Review of the ratings on the ADHD-RS-IV demonstrated, however, that this group had ratings of inattention comparable to the inattentive group. There were no significant differences found between the ADHD-HI and the other subtypes in symptom severity, functioning or quality of life. The hyperactive/impulsive subtype group identified by clinicians in this study was not significantly different from the rest of the sample. By contrast, significant differences were found between the inattentive and combined types. This suggests that in adults, hyperactivity declines and inattention remains significant, making the hyperactive/impulsive subtype as defined by childhood criteria a very rare condition and raising questions as to the validity of the HI subtype in adults.

  10. Statistical support for subtypes in posttraumatic stress disorder: the how and why of subtype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Constance J; Glaser, Dale; Alhassoon, Omar M

    2012-08-01

    A number of researchers have argued for the existence of different subtypes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In the current paper we present criteria by which to assess these putative subtypes, clarify potential pitfalls of the statistical methods employed to determine them, and propose alternative methods for such determinations. Specifically, three PTSD subtypes are examined: (1) complex PTSD, (2) externalizing/internalizing PTSD, and (3) dissociative/nondissociative PTSD. In addition, three criteria are proposed for subtype evaluation, these are the need for (1) reliability and clarity of definition, (2) distinctions between subtypes either structurally or by mechanism, and (3) clinical meaningfulness. Common statistical evidence for subtyping, such as statistical mean difference and cluster analysis, are presented and evaluated. Finally, more robust statistical methods are suggested for future research on PTSD subtyping. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neuraminidase subtyping of avian influenza viruses with PrimerHunter-designed primers and quadruplicate primer pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyan; Khan, Mazhar I; Khan, Mazhar; Măndoiu, Ion; Măndoiu, Ion I

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a software package called PrimerHunter to design primers for PCR-based virus subtyping. In this study, 9 pairs of primers were designed with PrimerHunter and successfully used to differentiate the 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in multiple PCR-based assays. Furthermore, primer pools were designed and successfully used to decrease the number of reactions needed for NA subtyping from 9 to 4. The quadruplicate primer-pool method is cost-saving, and was shown to be suitable for the NA subtyping of both cultured AIVs and uncultured AIV swab samples. The primers selected for this study showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in NA subtyping by RT-PCR, SYBR green-based Real-time PCR and Real-time RT-PCR methods. AIV RNA of 2 to 200 copies (varied by NA subtypes) could be detected by these reactions. No unspecific amplification was displayed when detecting RNAs of other avian infectious viruses such as Infectious bronchitis virus, Infectious bursal disease virus and Newcastle disease virus. In summary, this study introduced several sensitive and specific PCR-based assays for NA subtyping of AIVs and also validated again the effectiveness of the PrimerHunter tool for the design of subtyping primers.

  12. Classifying anatomical subtypes of subjective memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Na-Yeon; Seo, Sang Won; Yoo, Heejin; Yang, Jin-Ju; Park, Seongbeom; Kim, Yeo Jin; Lee, Juyoun; Lee, Jin San; Jang, Young Kyoung; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Eun-Joo; Na, Duk L; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to categorize subjective memory impairment (SMI) individuals based on their patterns of cortical thickness and to propose simple models that can classify each subtype. We recruited 613 SMI individuals and 613 age- and gender-matched normal controls. Using hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis, SMI individuals were divided into 3 subtypes: temporal atrophy (12.9%), minimal atrophy (52.4%), and diffuse atrophy (34.6%). Individuals in the temporal atrophy (Alzheimer's disease-like atrophy) subtype were older, had more vascular risk factors, and scored the lowest on neuropsychological tests. Combination of these factors classified the temporal atrophy subtype with 73.2% accuracy. On the other hand, individuals with the minimal atrophy (non-neurodegenerative) subtype were younger, were more likely to be female, and had depression. Combination of these factors discriminated the minimal atrophy subtype with 76.0% accuracy. We suggest that SMI can be largely categorized into 3 anatomical subtypes that have distinct clinical features. Our models may help physicians decide next steps when encountering SMI patients and may also be used in clinical trials.

  13. Neural network subtyping of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, T M; Parker, G; Austin, M P; Hickie, I; Mitchell, P; Wilhelm, K

    1998-10-01

    To examine the applicability of a neural network classification strategy to examine the independent contribution of psychomotor disturbance (PMD) and endogeneity symptoms to the DSM-III-R definition of melancholia. We studied 407 depressed patients with the clinical dataset comprising 17 endogeneity symptoms and the 18-item CORE measure of behaviourally rated PMD. A multilayer perception neural network was used to fit non-linear models of varying complexity. A linear discriminant function analysis was also used to generate a model for comparison with the non-linear models. Models (linear and non-linear) using PMD items only and endogeneity symptoms only had similar rates of successful classification, while non-linear models combining both PMD and symptoms scores achieved the best classifications. Our current non-linear model was superior to a linear analysis, a finding which may have wider application to psychiatric classification. Our non-linear analysis of depressive subtypes supports the binary view that melancholic and non-melancholic depression are separate clinical disorders rather than different forms of the same entity. This study illustrates how non-linear modelling with neural networks is a potentially fruitful approach to the study of the diagnostic taxonomy of psychiatric disorders and to clinical decision-making.

  14. Differential in vitro kinetics of drug resistance mutation acquisition in HIV-1 RT of subtypes B and C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo D Cunha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 subtype B is the most prevalent in developed countries and, consequently, it has been extensively studied. On the other hand, subtype C is the most prevalent worldwide and therefore is a reasonable target for future studies. Here we evaluate the acquisition of resistance and the viability of HIV-1 subtype B and C RT clones from different isolates that were subjected to in vitro selection pressure with zidovudine (ZDV and lamivudine (3TC. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MT4 cells were infected with chimeric virus pseudotyped with RT from subtype B and C clones, which were previously subjected to serial passage with increasing concentrations of ZDV and 3TC. The samples collected after each passage were analyzed for the presence of resistance mutations and VL. No differences were found between subtypes B and C in viral load and resistance mutations when these viruses were selected with 3TC. However, the route of mutations and the time to rebound of subtype B and C virus were different when subjected to ZDV treatment. In order to confirm the role of the mutations detected, other clones were generated and subjected to in vitro selection. RT subtype B virus isolates tended to acquire different ZDV resistance mutations (Q151M and D67N or T215Y, D67D/N and F214L compared to subtype C (D67N, K70R, T215I or T215F. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that different subtypes have a tendency to react differently to antiretroviral drug selection in vitro. Consequently, the acquisition of resistance in patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy can be dependent on the subtypes composing the viral population.

  15. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  16. Diagnostic problems in the subtyping of renal tumors encountered by five pathologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümmerlin, Intan; ten Kate, Fiebo; Smedts, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The diagnostic problems in the subtyping of renal tumors were evaluated by a panel of five pathologists studying a set of selected tumors. Five pathologists independently assessed a single hematoxylin-and-eosin (HE)-stained slide from 28 selected renal tumors. After this independent assessment...

  17. [HIV genetic subtypes and HIV drug resistance in China: a Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, N N; Yin, Y Q; Yuan, R; Wang, B

    2016-11-10

    Objective: To assess the relationship between HIV genetic subtypes and HIV resistance in China. Methods: The literature retrieval was conducted by using Chinese Science-Technology Journal Database (VIP), Wanfang Data, Chinese Journal Full-text Database (CNKI), PubMed and Web of Science to select the papers on the relationship between HIV subtypes and HIV drug resistance in China during 2005-2015. Eligible papers were included according to the inclusion. Meta-analysis was performed by using software Stata 12.0. Results: A total of 43 papers were selected and the pooled rate of drug resistance was 15.1% and the rate of primary drug resistance was 9.5%, the subtypes associated drug resistance were CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_ BC, B/B'and C. The pooled rates of drug resistance of each subtype were 12.8%, 7.4%, 14.3%, 25.7% and 34.9% and the rates of primary drug resistance of each subtype were 7.3%, 5.7%, 11.5%,15.5% and 23.9%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that both treated and area subgroup showed a significant difference among groups (PChina and southwestern China were higher than that in southern China. Conclusion: The distribution of HIV genotypes in China was complex and the prevalence of primary drug resistance of each subtype was high, together with a significant difference among subtypes. It is necessary to strengthen the monitoring of different subtypes of drug resistant strains in China to prevent the recombination and spreading of resistant strains.

  18. [Differential personality features in adult ADHD subtypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Ortega, Yolanda; Bosch Munsó, Rosa; Gomà-i-Freixanet, Montserrat; Valero Ventura, Sergi; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Nogueira, Mariana; Casas Brugué, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and personality traits are relatively stable from childhood and across life span. The purpose of this study was to identify differential and discriminative personality traits between clinical subtypes of ADHD in adults. The Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ) and the Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory-II (MCMI-II) were administered to a sample of 146 adults with ADHD. Activity and Aggression-Hostility dimensions from the ZKPQ allowed us to properly classify 75.8% of the inattentive and combined subtypes. Data indicates that ADHD is not a homogeneous entity, but rather, there are significant differences in personality characteristics among clinical subtypes. The results have theoretical implications about the connection between ADHD and personality, and clinical implications regarding diagnosis and treatment designs better tailored to the characteristics of each subtype.

  19. Molecular Identification and Subtype Analysis of Blastocystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Clark, C Graham

    2016-11-18

    Several typing methods have been used in studies aiming to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis, which is one of the most common intestinal parasites in human and many non-human hosts. Such studies have the potential to add to knowledge on Blastocystis transmission, host specificity, phylogeography, and clinical and public health significance, but rely on robust, standardized methods by which data can be generated and compared directly between studies. One of the most used methods is "barcoding,", which involves single-round PCR amplification and sequencing of partial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of the parasites. Recently, a publicly available online facility was developed for quick and standardized identification of subtypes (ribosomal lineages) and subtype alleles (variation within subtypes) based on sequence data obtained by barcoding PCR. Moreover, a modified barcoding approach is now available using nested PCR, which enables detection of mixed subtype infections. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun M. Adeoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH, isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH, and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH. Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5% and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7% were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2% was higher among males (P=0.048. Female subjects were more obese (P<0.0001 and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.

  1. Refining developmental coordination disorder subtyping with multivariate statistical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalanne Christophe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a large number of potentially relevant clinical indicators penalization and ensemble learning methods are thought to provide better predictive performance than usual linear predictors. However, little is known about how they perform in clinical studies where few cases are available. We used Random Forests and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis to select the most salient impairments in Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD and assess patients similarity. Methods We considered a wide-range testing battery for various neuropsychological and visuo-motor impairments which aimed at characterizing subtypes of DCD in a sample of 63 children. Classifiers were optimized on a training sample, and they were used subsequently to rank the 49 items according to a permuted measure of variable importance. In addition, subtyping consistency was assessed with cluster analysis on the training sample. Clustering fitness and predictive accuracy were evaluated on the validation sample. Results Both classifiers yielded a relevant subset of items impairments that altogether accounted for a sharp discrimination between three DCD subtypes: ideomotor, visual-spatial and constructional, and mixt dyspraxia. The main impairments that were found to characterize the three subtypes were: digital perception, imitations of gestures, digital praxia, lego blocks, visual spatial structuration, visual motor integration, coordination between upper and lower limbs. Classification accuracy was above 90% for all classifiers, and clustering fitness was found to be satisfactory. Conclusions Random Forests and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis are useful tools to extract salient features from a large pool of correlated binary predictors, but also provide a way to assess individuals proximities in a reduced factor space. Less than 15 neuro-visual, neuro-psychomotor and neuro-psychological tests might be required to provide a sensitive and

  2. H9N2 subtypes of flu vaccine strains selection and immune effect assessment%H9N2亚型禽流感疫苗株的筛选及其免疫效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许传田; 鲁梅; 胡北侠; 杨少华; 颜世敢; 张琳; 张秀美

    2012-01-01

    H9N2 influenza vaccine viruses were selected from local epidemic strains, providing appropriate bird flu vaccine strain which were used to produce a vaccine. Through cross hemagglutination, and SPF chicken were im- muned by the vaccine spare strain,and then were tapped poison by homogenous and heterologous strain to evaluate protective effect of vaccine spare strain. SPF chicken immuned, viruses quantity let out is reduced greatly in throat and cloacae,after tapping poison with epidemic influenza virus. In this study, H9N2 vaccine spare strain has certain protection efficiency,and complies with the vaccine strains requirements completely.%通过交叉血凝试验,疫苗备用毒株免疫SPF鸡后再用同源和异源毒株攻毒,评价疫苗备用毒株对SPF鸡保护效果。结果显示,H9N2疫苗备用株免疫SPF鸡后,再用H9亚型流感病毒流行株攻毒,SPF鸡咽喉和泄殖腔排毒量大大降低。结果表明,本试验筛选的疫苗备用毒株对H9N2亚型流感病毒具有一定的保护率,完全符合疫苗株要求。

  3. Improved darunavir genotypic mutation score predicting treatment response for patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B and non-subtype B receiving a salvage regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Luca, Andrea; Flandre, Philippe; Dunn, David;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to improve the prediction of the impact of HIV-1 protease mutations in different viral subtypes on virological response to darunavir. METHODS: Darunavir-containing treatment change episodes (TCEs) in patients previously failing PIs were selected from la...

  4. Structure-activity relationship study of first selective inhibitor of excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1: 2-Amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Mette N; Huynh, Tri H V; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Bastlund, Jesper F; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Monrad, Olja; Bekker-Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Christina W; Frydenvang, Karla; Jensen, Anders A; Bunch, Lennart

    2010-10-14

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are expressed throughout the central nervous system, where they are responsible for the reuptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate (Glu). (1) Recently, we have reported the discovery of the first subtype selective EAAT1 inhibitor 2-amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101) (1b) and presented an introductory structure-activity relationship (SAR) study. (2) Here, we present a detailed SAR by the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of analogues 1g-1t. By comparison of potencies of 1b, 1h, and 1i versus 1j, it is evident that potency is largely influenced by the chemical nature of the R(1) substituent. The study also demonstrates that any chemical change of the functional groups or a change to the parental scaffold results in the complete loss of inhibitory activity of the compounds at EAAT1. Finally, a bioavailability study of UCPH-101 determined the half-life to be 30 min in serum (rats) but also that it was not able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to any significant degree.

  5. High-resolution subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Stephan, Roger; Althaus, Denise; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of serious illnesses in humans and animals. Subtyping of S. aureus isolates plays a crucial role in epidemiological investigations. Metabolic fingerprinting by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is commonly used to identify microbes at species as well as subspecies level. In this study, we aimed to assess the suitability of FTIR spectroscopy as a tool for S. aureus subtyping. To this end, we compared the subtyping performance of FTIR spectroscopy to other subtyping methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing in a blinded experimental setup and investigated the ability of FTIR spectroscopy for identifying S. aureus clonal complexes (CC). A total of 70 S. aureus strains from human, animal, and food sources were selected, for which clonal complexes and a unique virulence and resistance gene pattern had been determined by DNA microarray analysis. FTIR spectral analysis resulted in high discriminatory power similar as obtained by spa typing and PFGE. High directional concordance was found between FTIR spectroscopy based subtypes and capsular polysaccharide expression detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the cap specific locus, reflecting strain specific expression of capsular polysaccharides and/or other surface glycopolymers, such as wall teichoic acid, peptidoglycane, and lipoteichoic acid. Supervised chemometrics showed only limited possibilities for differentiation of S. aureus CC by FTIR spectroscopy with the exception of CC45 and CC705. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for S. aureus subtyping, which complements current molecular and proteomic strain typing.

  6. Heterosubtypic immunity to influenza A virus infections in mallards may explain existence of multiple virus subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Latorre-Margalef

    Full Text Available Wild birds, particularly duck species, are the main reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV in nature. However, knowledge of IAV infection dynamics in the wild bird reservoir, and the development of immune responses, are essentially absent. Importantly, a detailed understanding of how subtype diversity is generated and maintained is lacking. To address this, 18,679 samples from 7728 Mallard ducks captured between 2002 and 2009 at a single stopover site in Sweden were screened for IAV infections, and the resulting 1081 virus isolates were analyzed for patterns of immunity. We found support for development of homosubtypic hemagglutinin (HA immunity during the peak of IAV infections in the fall. Moreover, re-infections with the same HA subtype and related prevalent HA subtypes were uncommon, suggesting the development of natural homosubtypic and heterosubtypic immunity (p-value = 0.02. Heterosubtypic immunity followed phylogenetic relatedness of HA subtypes, both at the level of HA clades (p-value = 0.04 and the level of HA groups (p-value = 0.05. In contrast, infection patterns did not support specific immunity for neuraminidase (NA subtypes. For the H1 and H3 Clades, heterosubtypic immunity showed a clear temporal pattern and we estimated within-clade immunity to last at least 30 days. The strength and duration of heterosubtypic immunity has important implications for transmission dynamics of IAV in the natural reservoir, where immune escape and disruptive selection may increase HA antigenic variation and explain IAV subtype diversity.

  7. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates from synanthropic and zoo animals and identification of a new subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, C. R.; Alfellani, M. A.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Blastocystis isolates from 56 Danish synanthropic and zoo animals, 62 primates primarily from United Kingdom (UK) collections and 16 UK primate handlers were subtyped by PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A new subtype (ST) from primates and artiodactyls was identified and designated...

  8. Comparative pathogenesis of a subtype A with a subtype B avian pneumovirus in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Zande, S; Nauwynck, H; De Jonghe, S; Pensaert, M

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a study in which the pathogenesis of avian pneumovirus strains, isolated in Belgium, and belonging to the two subtypes A and B, were compared in 2-week-old turkeys. After oculonasal inoculation, animals were either observed for clinical signs or killed for pathological and virological examination. Virus titration and immunofluorescence were performed on the conjunctivae, turbinates, sinuses, upper and lower part of the trachea, lungs and air sacs. No differences were seen between the two subtypes concerning respiratory signs, or macroscopic and microscopic lesions in the respiratory tract. Slight variations were found in site and extent of virus replication. First, only subtype A was able to invade the lower parts of the respiratory tract (bronchi), whereas viral antigens were not detected in the lungs with subtype B. Secondly, the subtype A strain infected two times more epithelial cells at all levels of the upper respiratory tract compared to subtype B. Thirdly, the amount of virus produced at different sites along the respiratory tract was lower in subtype B-inoculated turkeys than in subtype A-inoculated ones.

  9. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  10. The alpha3 laminin subunit, alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 integrin coordinately regulate wound healing in cultured epithelial cells and in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldfinger, L E; Hopkinson, S B; deHart, G W

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that proteolytic processing within the globular domain of the alpha3 subunit of laminin-5 (LN5) converts LN5 from a cell motility-inducing factor to a protein complex that can trigger the formation of hemidesmosomes, certain cell-matrix attachment sites found in epithe......-inhibiting antibodies, we provide evidence that LN5 and its two integrin receptors (alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1) appear necessary for wound healing to occur in MCF-10A cell culture wounds. We propose a model for healing of wounded epithelial tissues based on these results....... in epithelial cells. We have prepared a monoclonal antibody (12C4) whose epitope is located toward the carboxy terminus of the globular domain of the alpha3 laminin subunit. This epitope is lost from the alpha3 subunit as a consequence of proteolytic processing. Antibody 12C4 stains throughout the matrix...... the wound site. A similar phenomenon is observed in human skin wounds, since we also detect expression of the unprocessed alpha3 laminin subunit at the leading tip of the sheet of epidermal cells that epithelializes skin wounds in vivo. In addition, using alpha3 laminin subunit and integrin function...

  11. Precise subtyping for synchronous multiparty sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The notion of subtyping has gained an important role both in theoretical and applicative domains: in lambda and concurrent calculi as well as in programming languages. The soundness and the completeness, together referred to as the preciseness of subtyping, can be considered from two different points of view: operational and denotational. The former preciseness has been recently developed with respect to type safety, i.e. the safe replacement of a term of a smaller type when a term of a bigger type is expected. The latter preciseness is based on the denotation of a type which is a mathematical object that describes the meaning of the type in accordance with the denotations of other expressions from the language. The result of this paper is the operational and denotational preciseness of the subtyping for a synchronous multiparty session calculus. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of characteristic global types to prove the operational completeness.

  12. GABAA receptor subtype involvement in addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D N; King, S L; Lambert, J J; Belelli, D; Duka, T

    2017-01-01

    GABAA receptors form the major class of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain. This review sets out to summarize the evidence that variations in genes encoding GABAA receptor isoforms are associated with aspects of addictive behaviour in humans, while animal models of addictive behaviour also implicate certain subtypes of GABAA receptor. In addition to outlining the evidence for the involvement of specific subtypes in addiction, we summarize the particular contributions of these isoforms in control over the functioning of brain circuits, especially the mesolimbic system, and make a first attempt to bring together evidence from several fields to understanding potential involvement of GABAA receptor subtypes in addictive behaviour. While the weight of the published literature is on alcohol dependency, the underlying principles outlined are relevant across a number of different aspects of addictive behaviour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. Salmonella source attribution based on microbial subtyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barco, Lisa; Barrucci, Federica; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2013-01-01

    Source attribution of cases of food-borne disease represents a valuable tool for identifying and prioritizing effective food-safety interventions. Microbial subtyping is one of the most common methods to infer potential sources of human food-borne infections. So far, Salmonella microbial subtyping...... source attribution models have been implemented by using serotyping and phage-typing data. Molecular-based methods may prove to be similarly valuable in the future, as already demonstrated for other food-borne pathogens like Campylobacter. This review assesses the state of the art concerning Salmonella...... in the context of their potential applicability for Salmonella source attribution studies....

  14. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2016-01-01

    oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell...

  15. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  16. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  17. Effect of Thymosin beta4 on the Differentiation and Mineralization of MC3T3-E1 Cell on a Titanium Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Osteoblasts are responsible for the synthesis of bone matrix through the secretion of collagenous and non-collagenous proteins with mineralization. Thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) is an actin-sequestering peptide that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. A recent study reported that the inhibition of Tbeta4 mRNA synthesis strongly decreases the level of gene expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), osteocalcin (OCN), osteonectin (ON) and collagen type I (Col I) with mineralization during differentiation in odontoblasts. Titanium (Ti) is used commonly as an implant material for dental implants, which have strong mechanical potential and good biocompatibility with bone. This study examined whether Tbeta4 can be a potential molecule for promoting the differentiation and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells on a Ti surface. Tbeta4 increased the viability of MC3T3-E1 cells during differentiation on Ti discs compared to that of the control. The expression of Tbeta4 mRNA and protein in the Tbeta4-treated MC3T3-E1 cells was higher than the control during differentiation on the Ti discs. In addition, Tbeta4 increased the formation of mineralization nodules and the mRNA expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), DSPP, dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), BSP and Col I compared to that of the control in MC3T3-E1 cells during differentiation on Ti discs. From the results, Tbeta4 increased the viability and promoted the differentiation and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells on Ti discs. This highlights the potential use of Tbeta4 for increasing osseointegration through osteoblast differentiation and mineralization on Ti discs.

  18. Thymosin beta 4 may translocate from the cytoplasm in to the nucleus in HepG2 cells following serum starvation. An ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piludu, Marco; Piras, Monica; Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pierpaolo; Orrù, Germano; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Due to its actin-sequestering properties, thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is considered to play a significant role in the cellular metabolism. Several physiological properties of Tβ4 have been reported;, however, many questions concerning its cellular function remain to be ascertained. To better understand the role of this small peptide we have analyzed by means of transmission immunoelectron microscopy techniques the ultrastructural localization of Tβ4 in HepG2 cells. Samples of HepG2 cells were fixed in a mixture of 3% formaldehyde and 0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer and processed for standard electron microscopic techniques. The samples were dehydrated in a cold graded methanol series and embedded in LR gold resin. Ultrathin sections were labeled with rabbit antibodies to Tβ4, followed by gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit, stained with uranyl acetate and bismuth subnitrate, observed and photographed in a JEOL 100S transmission electron microscope. High-resolution electron microscopy showed that Tβ4 was mainly restricted to the cytoplasm of HepG2 growing in complete medium. A strong Tβ4 reactivity was detected in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasmic compartment where gold particles appeared strictly associated to the nuclear membrane. In the nucleus specific Tβ4 labeling was observed in the nucleolus. The above electron microscopic results confirm and extend previous observations at light microscopic level, highlighting the subcellular distribution of Tβ4 in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of HepG2 cells. The meaning of Tβ4 presence in the nucleolus is not on the best of our knowledge clarified yet. It could account for the interaction of Tβ4 with nucleolar actin and according with this hypothesis, Tβ4 could contribute together with the other nucleolar acting binding proteins to modulate the transcription activity of the RNA polymerases.

  19. Expression of thymosin beta-4 in human periodontal ligament cells and mouse periodontal tissue and its role in osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Im; Lee, Deok-Won; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Cha, Hee-Jae; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    A recent report showed that thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is expressed during the development of tooth germ, but its effect on osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation is a controversial topic. Furthermore, the precise expression and function of Tβ4 in periodontal tissue remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the immunolocalization of Tβ4 in the developing periodontium of mouse, the function of Tβ4 in osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation, and the underlying mechanism regulating periodontal regeneration in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs), cementoblasts, and osteoblasts. Tβ4 expression was observed in differentiating hPDLCs, osteoblasts of the periodontium during development, as well as in mature tissue. Higher Tβ4 expression was observed in hPDLCs than in cementoblasts and osteoblasts in the developing periodontium. The expression of Tβ4 mRNA and protein gradually increased during PDL cell differentiation. The downregulation of Tβ4 expression by Tβ4 siRNA transfection inhibited osteoblastic differentiation by decreasing calcium nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression of differentiation markers in hPDLCs, cementoblasts, and osteoblasts. In contrast, Tβ4 activation using a Tβ4 peptide, promoted these processes by activation of Akt, p38, ERK MAPKs, and the NF-κB pathway. The expression of nuclear NFATc1 was upregulated by Tβ4 peptide in hPDLCs. Inhibition of the calcineurin/NFATc1 pathway by cyclosporin A and FK506, attenuated Tβ4-induced osteoblastic differentiation and activation of Wnt-related genes, as well as nuclear β-catenin in hPDLCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that Tβ4 is expressed in developing periodontal tissue and that its expression is associated with osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation. These results suggests that Tβ4 is a potential therapeutic target for periodontal regeneration or bone disease.

  20. Thymosin beta 4 is associated with RUNX2 expression through the Smad and Akt signaling pathways in mouse dental epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOMEYA, HIROTAKA; FUJIWARA, HIROAKI; NAGATA, KENGO; WADA, HIROKO; HASEGAWA, KANA; MIKAMI, YURIE; JINNO, AKIKO; SAKAI, HIDETAKA; KOYANO, KIYOSHI; KIYOSHIMA, TAMOTSU

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies by our group, we reported that thymosin beta 4 (Tb4) is closely associated with the initiation and development of the tooth germ, and can induce the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) during the development of the tooth germ. RUNX2 regulates the expression of odontogenesis-related genes, such as amelogenin, X-linked (Amelx), ameloblastin (Ambn) and enamelin (Enam), as well as the differentiation of osteoblasts during bone formation. However, the mechanisms through which Tb4 induces the expression of RUNX2 remain unknown. In the present study, we employed a mouse dental epithelial cell line, mDE6, with the aim to elucidate these mechanisms. The mDE6 cells expressed odontogenesis-related genes, such as Runx2, Amelx, Ambn and Enam, and formed calcified matrices upon the induction of calcification, thus showing characteristics of odontogenic epithelial cells. The expression of odontogenesis-related genes, and the calcification of the mDE6 cells were reduced by the inhibition of phosphorylated Smad1/5 (p-Smad1/5) and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) proteins. Furthermore, we used siRNA against Tb4 to determine whether RUNX2 expression and calcification are associated with Tb4 expression in the mDE6 cells. The protein expression of p-Smad1/5 and p-Akt in the mDE6 cells was reduced by treatment with Tb4-siRNA. These results suggest that Tb4 is associated with RUNX2 expression through the Smad and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways, and with calcification through RUNX2 expression in the mDE6 cells. This study provides putative information concerning the signaling pathway through which Tb4 induces RUNX2 expression, which may help to understand the regulation of tooth development and tooth regeneration. PMID:25739055

  1. Thymosin Beta 4 May Translocate from the Cytoplasm in to the Nucleus in HepG2 Cells following Serum Starvation. An Ultrastructural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piludu, Marco; Piras, Monica; Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pierpaolo; Orrù, Germano; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Due to its actin-sequestering properties, thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is considered to play a significant role in the cellular metabolism. Several physiological properties of Tβ4 have been reported;, however, many questions concerning its cellular function remain to be ascertained. To better understand the role of this small peptide we have analyzed by means of transmission immunoelectron microscopy techniques the ultrastructural localization of Tβ4 in HepG2 cells. Samples of HepG2 cells were fixed in a mixture of 3% formaldehyde and 0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer and processed for standard electron microscopic techniques. The samples were dehydrated in a cold graded methanol series and embedded in LR gold resin. Ultrathin sections were labeled with rabbit antibodies to Tβ4, followed by gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit, stained with uranyl acetate and bismuth subnitrate, observed and photographed in a JEOL 100S transmission electron microscope. High-resolution electron microscopy showed that Tβ4 was mainly restricted to the cytoplasm of HepG2 growing in complete medium. A strong Tβ4 reactivity was detected in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasmic compartment where gold particles appeared strictly associated to the nuclear membrane. In the nucleus specific Tβ4 labeling was observed in the nucleolus. The above electron microscopic results confirm and extend previous observations at light microscopic level, highlighting the subcellular distribution of Tβ4 in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of HepG2 cells. The meaning of Tβ4 presence in the nucleolus is not on the best of our knowledge clarified yet. It could account for the interaction of Tβ4 with nucleolar actin and according with this hypothesis, Tβ4 could contribute together with the other nucleolar acting binding proteins to modulate the transcription activity of the RNA polymerases. PMID:25835495

  2. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, London (England))

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  3. A three monoclonal antibody combination potently neutralizes multiple botulinum neurotoxin serotype F subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Zhai, Wenwu; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.

    2017-01-01

    Human botulism is primarily caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B and E, with around 1% caused by serotype F (BoNT/F). BoNT/F comprises at least seven different subtypes with the amino acid sequence difference between subtypes as high as 36%. The sequence differences present a significant challenge for generating monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can bind, detect and neutralize all BoNT/F subtypes. We used repertoire cloning of immune mouse antibody variable (V) regions and yeast display to generate a panel of 33 lead single chain Fv (scFv) mAbs that bound one or more BoNT/F subtypes with a median equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 4.06 × 10−9 M. By diversifying the V-regions of the lead mAbs and selecting for cross reactivity we generated five mAbs that bound each of the seven subtypes. Three scFv binding non-overlapping epitopes were converted to IgG that had KD for the different BoNT/F subtypes ranging from 2.2×10−8 M to 1.47×10−12 pM. An equimolar combination of the mAbs was able to potently neutralize BoNT/F1, F2, F4 and F7 in the mouse neutralization assay. The mAbs have potential utility as diagnostics capable of recognizing the known BoNT/F subtypes and could be developed as antitoxins to prevent and treat type F botulism. PMID:28323873

  4. Human breast cancer associated fibroblasts exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchou Julia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which prognosis and treatment strategies are largely governed by the receptor status (estrogen, progesterone and Her2 of the tumor cells. Gene expression profiling of whole breast tumors further stratifies breast cancer into several molecular subtypes which also co-segregate with the receptor status of the tumor cells. We postulated that cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs within the tumor stroma may exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles and thus contribute to the biology of the disease in a subtype specific manner. Several studies have reported gene expression profile differences between CAFs and normal breast fibroblasts but in none of these studies were the results stratified based on tumor subtypes. Methods To address whether gene expression in breast cancer associated fibroblasts varies between breast cancer subtypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of early passage primary CAFs isolated from twenty human breast cancer samples representing three main subtypes; seven ER+, seven triple negative (TNBC and six Her2+. Results We observed significant expression differences between CAFs derived from Her2+ breast cancer and CAFs from TNBC and ER + cancers, particularly in pathways associated with cytoskeleton and integrin signaling. In the case of Her2+ breast cancer, the signaling pathways found to be selectively up regulated in CAFs likely contribute to the enhanced migration of breast cancer cells in transwell assays and may contribute to the unfavorable prognosis of Her2+ breast cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in addition to the distinct molecular profiles that characterize the neoplastic cells, CAF gene expression is also differentially regulated in distinct subtypes of breast cancer.

  5. Emotion recognition deficits exist in mild cognitive impairment, but only in the amnestic subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCade, Donna; Savage, Greg; Guastella, Adam; Lewis, Simon J G; Naismith, Sharon L

    2013-09-01

    Emotion recognition is impaired in dementia and there is some initial evidence to suggest that milder deficits may be present in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients, an "at risk" population for transition to dementia. In this study, we investigated the emotion recognition profile of MCI subgroups. Results show emotion recognition deficits exist for the amnestic subtype with impairment in multiple domains, with an emotion-specific deficit for anger recognition. Impaired emotion recognition in aMCI was independent of patient mood and cognitive deficits. The study is the first to examine the nonamnestic subtype. No emotion recognition deficits were found. This finding is surprising given the association between the nonamnestic subtype and frontal systems dysfunction. Impaired emotion recognition could be related to the selective pathophysiology in neural pathways, particularly the temporal lobe and connected limbic and prefrontal regions, implicated in both aMCI and emotion processing. These findings may have implications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management.

  6. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-03-17

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity.

  7. Ku80 as a novel receptor for thymosin beta4 that mediates its intracellular activity different from G-actin sequestering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Radoslaw; Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Cierniewska-Cieslak, Aleksandra; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2008-01-18

    Our data demonstrate that increased intracellular expression of thymosin beta4(Tbeta4) is necessary and sufficient to induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) gene expression in endothelial cells. To describe the mechanism of this effect, we produced Tbeta4 mutants with impaired functional motifs and tested their intracellular location and activity. Cytoplasmic distributions of Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)), Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)), and Tbeta4((K16A)) mutants fused with green fluorescent protein did not differ significantly from those of wild-type Tbeta4. Overexpression of Tbeta4, Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)), and Tbeta4((K16A)) affected intracellular formation of actin filaments. As expected, Tbeta4((K16A)) uptake by nuclei was impaired. On the other hand, overexpression of Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)) resulted in developing the actin filament network typical of adhering cells, indicating that the mutant lacked the actin binding site. The mechanism by which intracellular Tbeta4 induced the PAI-1 gene did not depend upon the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP and depended only partially on its ability to bind G-actin or enter the nucleus. Both Tbeta4 and Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)) induced the PAI-1 gene to the same extent, whereas mutants Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)) and Tbeta4((K16A)) retained about 60% of the original activity. By proteomic analysis, the Ku80 subunit of ATP-dependent DNA helicase II was found to be associated with Tbeta4. Ku80 and Tbeta4 consistently co-immunoprecipitated in a complex from endothelial cells. Co-transfection of endothelial cells with the Ku80 deletion mutants and Tbeta4 showed that the C-terminal arm domain of Ku80 is directly involved in this interaction. Furthermore, down-regulation of Ku80 by specific short interference RNA resulted in dramatic reduction in PAI-1 expression at the level of both mRNA and protein synthesis. These data suggest that Ku80 functions as a novel receptor for Tbeta4 and mediates its intracellular activity.

  8. Identification of M(1) muscarinic receptor subtype in rat stomach using a tissue segment binding method, and the effects of immobilization stress on the muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Morishima, Shigeru; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2008-12-03

    Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes widely distribute in stomach tissues and are involved in many physiological functions. Although mRNA of M(1) subtype was found in gastric mucosa, the M(1) subtype has not been detected by conventional membrane binding assays. In the present study, muscarinic receptor subtypes in the rat stomach were reevaluated by using the tissue segment binding technique recently developed to recognize the inherent/native profiles of receptors without receptor environment perturbation. [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bound to muscarinic receptors in the intact segments of rat gastric mucosa and muscle layers. The muscarinic receptors in the mucosal segments were composed of M(1), M(2) and M(3) subtypes, among which the M(1) subtype selectively showed high affinity for pirenzepine. However, in the membrane preparations, binding sites with high affinity for pirenzepine could not be detected. In the muscle layer, M(2) and M(3) subtypes, but not M(1), were identified in tissue segment and conventional membrane binding assays. Western blotting analysis recognized the M(1) subtype in the membrane preparations of mucosal but not muscle layers. Chronic immobilization stress increased the M(3) subtype in mucosal and muscle layers and decreased the M(2) subtype in the muscle layer, whereas M(1) and M(2) subtypes in mucosal layer did not change after the stress. The current study shows that M(1) subtype occurs as a pirenzepine-high affinity entity in intact segments of rat gastric mucosa, but that it loses the affinity for pirenzepine upon homogenization. Careful identification of native in vivo muscarinic receptors may further elucidate their functions in stomach.

  9. Epidemiology of subtypes of hypothyroidism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Laurberg, Peter; Pedersen, Inge B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Studies of hypothyroidism are often based on referred patients. and limited information is available on the incidence rates of subtypes of hypothyroidism in the general population. We therefore studied incidences of subtypes of primary. overt hypothyroidism in a Danish population cohort...... and compared incidences in two subcohorts with different levels of iodine intake. Design: A prospective population-based study, monitoring a well-defined cohort representative of the Danish population. Methods: The Danish Investigation of Iodine Intake and Thyroid Diseases registry of hyper- and hypothyroidism...... was established as part of the monitoring of the iodine fortification of salt in Denmark. A computer-based system linked to laboratory databases identified all patients diagnosed with new. biochemically overt hypothyroidism in populations living in Aalborg (moderate iodine deficiency, n = 311 102) and Copenhagen...

  10. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Whiteman, David C

    2013-01-01

    Whilst previous studies have reported that higher BMI increases a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved......-grade serous invasive tumours (1.13, 1.03–1.25) and in pre-menopausal women (1.11; 1.04–1.18). Among post-menopausal women, the associations did not differ between hormone replacement therapy users and non-users. Whilst obesity appears to increase risk of the less common histological subtypes of ovarian cancer......, it does not increase risk of high-grade invasive serous cancers, and reducing BMI is therefore unlikely to prevent the majority of ovarian cancer deaths. Other modifiable factors must be identified to control this disease....

  11. THE SUBTYPES OF PANCREATIC DUCTAL ADENOCARCINOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apeksha Kakkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Being the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and with a global increase in incidence, above 80% of pancreatic cancers are locally advanced or metastatic at the time of diagnosis. As surgical resection is the only hope for a cure, the answer is probably in early screening, proper classification and right therapy. The advancing research will likely lead to a better understanding of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC as well as enhance the techniques for screening, diagnosis, accurate subtyping and enable the use of targeted therapy. Thus, instead of clubbing together various subtypes of PDAC for trials, improving the subcategorization will ensure statistical significance for the academicians, and the clinicians would avoid administration of placebo drug to a vast number of patients.

  12. Subtyping Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Neuropsychological Correlates

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    Catherine L. Harris

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We administered neuropsychological measures considered sensitive to prefrontal dysfunction (both orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal neocortex to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD patients and control subjects. OCD subjects exhibited performance deficits, in comparison to community controls, on three measures sensitive to orbitofrontal neocortex dysfunction. Contrary to expectation, OCD patients also exhibited performance deficits on measures sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal neocortex dysfunction. However, distinct neurocognitive profiles emerged when we examined the impact of comorbid schizotypal personality features on neuropsychological test performance. Primary OCD patients displayed impaired performance on measures sensitive to orbitofrontal dysfunction; however, they did not differ from control subjects on tests of dorsolateral function. OCD subjects presenting with schizotypal personality features performed poorly not only on tests sensitive to orbitofrontal dysfunction, but also on tests sensitive to dorsolateral dysfunction. Findings suggest that OCD can be subdivided into clinical subtypes, and distinct prefrontal subsystems may be differentially involved in these subtypes.

  13. Colon cancer molecular subtypes identified by expression profiling and associated to stroma, mucinous type and different clinical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Villamil Beatriz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer patients with the same stage show diverse clinical behavior due to tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to discover distinct classes of tumors based on microarray expression patterns, to analyze whether the molecular classification correlated with the histopathological stages or other clinical parameters and to study differences in the survival. Methods Hierarchical clustering was performed for class discovery in 88 colon tumors (stages I to IV. Pathways analysis and correlations between clinical parameters and our classification were analyzed. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the main subtype was generated using the 3-Nearest-Neighbor method. Coincidences with other prognostic predictors were assesed. Results Hierarchical clustering identified four robust tumor subtypes with biologically and clinically distinct behavior. Stromal components (p BRAF mutations. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the Low-stroma-subtype distinguished low risk patients from high risk patients in the external cohort (Dukes B and C:HR = 8.56(2.53-29.01; Dukes B,C and D:HR = 1.87(1.07-3.25. Eight different reported survival gene signatures segregated our tumors into two groups the Low-stroma-subtype and the other tumor subtypes. Conclusions We have identified novel molecular subtypes in colon cancer with distinct biological and clinical behavior that are established from the initiation of the tumor. Tumor microenvironment is important for the classification and for the malignant power of the tumor. Differential gene sets and biological pathways characterize each tumor subtype reflecting underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis that may be used for the selection of targeted therapeutic procedures. This classification may contribute to an improvement in the management of the patients with CRC and to a

  14. Structure–Activity Relationship Study of Selective Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Subtype 1 (EAAT1) Inhibitor 2-Amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101) and Absolute Configurational Assignment Using Infrared and Vibrational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huynh, Tri H.V.; Shim, Irene; Bohr, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play essential roles in regulating the synaptic concentration of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian central nervous system. To date, five subtypes have been identified, named EAAT1–5 in humans, and GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC1, EAAT4, and EAAT5 i...

  15. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  16. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  17. Untypeable hepatitis C virus subtypes in Pakistan: A neglected section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Waheed; Nasim, Zeeshan; Zahir, Fazli; Ali, Shahid; Ali, Abid; Iqbal, Aqib; Munir, Iqbal

    2016-12-01

    Diagnostically untypeable subtypes contribute a considerable percent of hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtypes in Pakistan. In the present study, chronically infected HCV patients with known viremia were subjected to HCV genotyping. Among the total retrieved samples, 92.7% (64/69) were found typeable while 7.24% (5/69) were diagnostically untypeable. In conclusion, the presence of large number of untypeable HCV subtypes emphasizes the need of an updated type-specific genotyping assay and consideration of primers for proportionally rare subtypes to minimize the number of untypeable HCV subtypes.

  18. Non motor subtypes and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Anna; Jenner, Peter; Todorova, Antoniya; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2016-01-01

    Non motor symptoms (NMS) represent a significant burden in Parkinson's disease (PD) with numerous studies highlighting the importance of NMS both in "pre-motor" phase of PD as well as throughout the course of disease. In part this has led the international Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS) task force to attempt a re-definition of PD incorporating NMS and not base the diagnosis solely on motor symptoms. While motor subtypes within PD have been recognized and researched, recent clinical and neurobiological research suggests the existence of discrete non motor subtypes in PD, particularly in untreated (drug naïve) and early PD patients. Several independent observers have reported specific "clusters of NMS dominant PD" using a data driven approach in early and untreated PD patients while others have reported on the burden of NMS in untreated PD and specific NMS dominant phenotypes in untreated or treated PD using observational case series based data. In this review we report on specific NMS dominant phenotypes of PD as described in the literature using clinical observational studies and address pathophysiological concepts. A proposal for several NMS subtypes are reported combining clinical reports with, where possible, evidence base supporting probable biomarkers.

  19. Transcriptome classification reveals molecular subtypes in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainali Chrysanthi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterised by chronically elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, leading to aberrant keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Although certain clinical phenotypes, such as plaque psoriasis, are well defined, it is currently unclear whether there are molecular subtypes that might impact on prognosis or treatment outcomes. Results We present a pipeline for patient stratification through a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in paired lesional and non-lesional psoriatic tissue samples, compared with controls, to establish differences in RNA expression patterns across all tissue types. Ensembles of decision tree predictors were employed to cluster psoriatic samples on the basis of gene expression patterns and reveal gene expression signatures that best discriminate molecular disease subtypes. This multi-stage procedure was applied to several published psoriasis studies and a comparison of gene expression patterns across datasets was performed. Conclusion Overall, classification of psoriasis gene expression patterns revealed distinct molecular sub-groups within the clinical phenotype of plaque psoriasis. Enrichment for TGFb and ErbB signaling pathways, noted in one of the two psoriasis subgroups, suggested that this group may be more amenable to therapies targeting these pathways. Our study highlights the potential biological relevance of using ensemble decision tree predictors to determine molecular disease subtypes, in what may initially appear to be a homogenous clinical group. The R code used in this paper is available upon request.

  20. Comparative biochemical analysis of recombinant reverse transcriptase enzymes of HIV-1 subtype B and subtype C

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    Moisi Daniella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 subtype C infections account for over half of global HIV infections, yet the vast focus of HIV-1 research has been on subtype B viruses which represent less than 12% of the global pandemic. Since HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT is a major target of antiviral therapy, and since differential drug resistance pathways have been observed among different HIV subtypes, it is important to study and compare the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 RT derived from each of subtypes B and C as well as to determine the susceptibilities of these enzymes to various RT inhibitors in biochemical assays. Methods Recombinant subtype B and C HIV-1 RTs in heterodimeric form were purified from Escherichia coli and enzyme activities were compared in cell-free assays. The efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Processivity was assayed under single-cycle conditions using both homopolymeric and heteropolymeric RNA templates. Intrinsic RNase H activity was compared using 5'-end labeled RNA template annealed to 3'-end recessed DNA primer in a time course study in the presence and absence of a heparin trap. A mis-incorporation assay was used to assess the fidelity of the two RT enzymes. Drug susceptibility assays were performed both in cell-free assays using recombinant enzymes and in cell culture phenotyping assays. Results The comparative biochemical analyses of recombinant subtype B and subtype C HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicate that the two enzymes are very similar biochemically in efficiency of tRNA-primed (- ssDNA synthesis, processivity, fidelity and RNase H activity, and that both enzymes show similar susceptibilities to commonly used NRTIs and NNRTIs. Cell culture phenotyping assays confirmed these results. Conclusions Overall enzyme activity and drug susceptibility of HIV-1 subtype C RT are comparable to those of subtype B RT. The use of RT inhibitors (RTIs

  1. Understanding the undelaying mechanism of HA-subtyping in the level of physic-chemical characteristics of protein.

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    Mansour Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The evolution of the influenza A virus to increase its host range is a major concern worldwide. Molecular mechanisms of increasing host range are largely unknown. Influenza surface proteins play determining roles in reorganization of host-sialic acid receptors and host range. In an attempt to uncover the physic-chemical attributes which govern HA subtyping, we performed a large scale functional analysis of over 7000 sequences of 16 different HA subtypes. Large number (896 of physic-chemical protein characteristics were calculated for each HA sequence. Then, 10 different attribute weighting algorithms were used to find the key characteristics distinguishing HA subtypes. Furthermore, to discover machine leaning models which can predict HA subtypes, various Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine, Naïve Bayes, and Neural Network models were trained on calculated protein characteristics dataset as well as 10 trimmed datasets generated by attribute weighting algorithms. The prediction accuracies of the machine learning methods were evaluated by 10-fold cross validation. The results highlighted the frequency of Gln (selected by 80% of attribute weighting algorithms, percentage/frequency of Tyr, percentage of Cys, and frequencies of Try and Glu (selected by 70% of attribute weighting algorithms as the key features that are associated with HA subtyping. Random Forest tree induction algorithm and RBF kernel function of SVM (scaled by grid search showed high accuracy of 98% in clustering and predicting HA subtypes based on protein attributes. Decision tree models were successful in monitoring the short mutation/reassortment paths by which influenza virus can gain the key protein structure of another HA subtype and increase its host range in a short period of time with less energy consumption. Extracting and mining a large number of amino acid attributes of HA subtypes of influenza A virus through supervised algorithms represent a new avenue for

  2. Understanding the Underlying Mechanism of HA-Subtyping in the Level of Physic-Chemical Characteristics of Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansour; Aghagolzadeh, Parisa; Shamabadi, Narges; Tahmasebi, Ahmad; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Adelson, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the influenza A virus to increase its host range is a major concern worldwide. Molecular mechanisms of increasing host range are largely unknown. Influenza surface proteins play determining roles in reorganization of host-sialic acid receptors and host range. In an attempt to uncover the physic-chemical attributes which govern HA subtyping, we performed a large scale functional analysis of over 7000 sequences of 16 different HA subtypes. Large number (896) of physic-chemical protein characteristics were calculated for each HA sequence. Then, 10 different attribute weighting algorithms were used to find the key characteristics distinguishing HA subtypes. Furthermore, to discover machine leaning models which can predict HA subtypes, various Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine, Naïve Bayes, and Neural Network models were trained on calculated protein characteristics dataset as well as 10 trimmed datasets generated by attribute weighting algorithms. The prediction accuracies of the machine learning methods were evaluated by 10-fold cross validation. The results highlighted the frequency of Gln (selected by 80% of attribute weighting algorithms), percentage/frequency of Tyr, percentage of Cys, and frequencies of Try and Glu (selected by 70% of attribute weighting algorithms) as the key features that are associated with HA subtyping. Random Forest tree induction algorithm and RBF kernel function of SVM (scaled by grid search) showed high accuracy of 98% in clustering and predicting HA subtypes based on protein attributes. Decision tree models were successful in monitoring the short mutation/reassortment paths by which influenza virus can gain the key protein structure of another HA subtype and increase its host range in a short period of time with less energy consumption. Extracting and mining a large number of amino acid attributes of HA subtypes of influenza A virus through supervised algorithms represent a new avenue for understanding and

  3. Understanding the undelaying mechanism of HA-subtyping in the level of physic-chemical characteristics of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansour; Aghagolzadeh, Parisa; Shamabadi, Narges; Tahmasebi, Ahmad; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Adelson, David L; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the influenza A virus to increase its host range is a major concern worldwide. Molecular mechanisms of increasing host range are largely unknown. Influenza surface proteins play determining roles in reorganization of host-sialic acid receptors and host range. In an attempt to uncover the physic-chemical attributes which govern HA subtyping, we performed a large scale functional analysis of over 7000 sequences of 16 different HA subtypes. Large number (896) of physic-chemical protein characteristics were calculated for each HA sequence. Then, 10 different attribute weighting algorithms were used to find the key characteristics distinguishing HA subtypes. Furthermore, to discover machine leaning models which can predict HA subtypes, various Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine, Naïve Bayes, and Neural Network models were trained on calculated protein characteristics dataset as well as 10 trimmed datasets generated by attribute weighting algorithms. The prediction accuracies of the machine learning methods were evaluated by 10-fold cross validation. The results highlighted the frequency of Gln (selected by 80% of attribute weighting algorithms), percentage/frequency of Tyr, percentage of Cys, and frequencies of Try and Glu (selected by 70% of attribute weighting algorithms) as the key features that are associated with HA subtyping. Random Forest tree induction algorithm and RBF kernel function of SVM (scaled by grid search) showed high accuracy of 98% in clustering and predicting HA subtypes based on protein attributes. Decision tree models were successful in monitoring the short mutation/reassortment paths by which influenza virus can gain the key protein structure of another HA subtype and increase its host range in a short period of time with less energy consumption. Extracting and mining a large number of amino acid attributes of HA subtypes of influenza A virus through supervised algorithms represent a new avenue for understanding and

  4. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  5. Localized bullous pemphigoid: report of a case with an immunofluorescence and electron microscopical studies on the lesional distribution of 180-KD bullous pemphigoid antigen, beta 4 integrin, and type VII collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Y; Suzuki, M; Johkura, Y; Yaoita, H

    1993-07-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a left-sided hemiplegia had localized bullous pemphigoid demonstrating typical clinical lesions on the left pretibial skin and the radial-side skin of the right forearm. The histology showed a subepidermal blister with extensive hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, and acanthosis. Direct immunofluorescence revealed distinct linear deposits of IgG and C3 at the dermo-epidermal junction in the perilesional skin and in the roof of the blisters, but few deposits in nonlesional skin. Electron microscopy revealed separation in the lamina lucida. Indirect immunofluorescence of type VII collagen showed its localization in the blister floor. The distribution of the 180-KD bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPA) and beta 4 integrin, hemidesmosomal transmembrane proteins, were studied in the lesional skin by indirect immunofluorescence. Both 180-KD BPA and beta 4 integrin were localized in the blister roof. By immunoelectron microscopy, beta 4 integrin was detected in small groups on the cell surface facing the blister cavity. Since the epitope of the monoclonal antibody to 180-KD BPA used here is known to be localized at a distance of 20 to 50 nm from the membrane surface and this epitope retained in the blister roof, it appears that the blister was produced in the deep lamina lucida. The lesions were cleared with topical 0.05% clobetasole propionate ointment.

  6. Metabolomic Identification of Subtypes of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Fernández-Ramos, David; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Arranz, Ibon; Navasa, Nicolás; Van Liempd, Sebastiaan M; Lavín Trueba, José L; Mayo, Rebeca; Ilisso, Concetta P; de Juan, Virginia G; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; delaCruz-Villar, Laura; Mincholé, Itziar; Robinson, Aaron; Crespo, Javier; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Sann, Holger; Platon, Julian; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Aspichueta, Patricia; Noureddin, Mazen; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Anguita, Juan; Aransay, Ana M; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M

    2017-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of defects in diverse metabolic pathways that involve hepatic accumulation of triglycerides. Features of these aberrations might determine whether NAFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated whether the diverse defects observed in patients with NAFLD are caused by different NAFLD subtypes with specific serum metabolomic profiles, and whether these can distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis. We collected liver and serum from methionine adenosyltransferase 1a knockout (MAT1A-KO) mice, which have chronically low levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and spontaneously develop steatohepatitis, as well as C57Bl/6 mice (controls); the metabolomes of all samples were determined. We also analyzed serum metabolomes of 535 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (353 with simple steatosis and 182 with NASH) and compared them with serum metabolomes of mice. MAT1A-KO mice were also given SAMe (30 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks); liver samples were collected and analyzed histologically for steatohepatitis. Livers of MAT1A-KO mice were characterized by high levels of triglycerides, diglycerides, fatty acids, ceramides, and oxidized fatty acids, as well as low levels of SAMe and downstream metabolites. There was a correlation between liver and serum metabolomes. We identified a serum metabolomic signature associated with MAT1A-KO mice that also was present in 49% of the patients; based on this signature, we identified 2 NAFLD subtypes. We identified specific panels of markers that could distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis for each subtype of NAFLD. Administration of SAMe reduced features of steatohepatitis in MAT1A-KO mice. In an analysis of serum metabolomes of patients with NAFLD and MAT1A-KO mice with steatohepatitis, we identified 2 major subtypes of NAFLD and markers that differentiate steatosis from NASH in each subtype. These might be

  7. Discovery of new molecular subtypes in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniela; Wolff, Claudia; Langer, Rupert; Schuster, Tibor; Feith, Marcus; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients suffering from oesophageal adenocarcinomas do not respond to conventional chemotherapy; therefore, it is necessary to identify new predictive biomarkers and patient signatures to improve patient outcomes and therapy selections. We analysed 87 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue samples with a reverse phase protein array (RPPA) to examine the expression of 17 cancer-related signalling molecules. Protein expression levels were analysed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall patient survival. Proteomic analyses revealed a new, very promising molecular subtype of oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients characterised by low levels of the HSP27 family proteins and high expression of those of the HER family with positive lymph nodes, distant metastases and short overall survival. After confirmation in other independent studies, our results could be the foundation for the development of a Her2-targeted treatment option for this new patient subgroup of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Discovery of new molecular subtypes in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Berg

    Full Text Available A large number of patients suffering from oesophageal adenocarcinomas do not respond to conventional chemotherapy; therefore, it is necessary to identify new predictive biomarkers and patient signatures to improve patient outcomes and therapy selections. We analysed 87 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue samples with a reverse phase protein array (RPPA to examine the expression of 17 cancer-related signalling molecules. Protein expression levels were analysed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall patient survival. Proteomic analyses revealed a new, very promising molecular subtype of oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients characterised by low levels of the HSP27 family proteins and high expression of those of the HER family with positive lymph nodes, distant metastases and short overall survival. After confirmation in other independent studies, our results could be the foundation for the development of a Her2-targeted treatment option for this new patient subgroup of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  9. Identification of Logic Relationships between Genes and Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yansen; Pan, Linqiang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has two major subtypes: adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC are hindered by the limited knowledge about the pathogenesis mechanisms of subtypes of NSCLC. It is necessary to research the molecular mechanisms related with AC and SCC. In this work, we improved the logic analysis algorithm to mine the sufficient and necessary conditions for the presence states (presence or absence) of phenotypes. We applied our method to AC and SCC specimens, and identified lower and higher logic relationships between genes and two subtypes of NSCLC. The discovered relationships were independent of specimens selected, and their significance was validated by statistic test. Compared with the two earlier methods (the non-negative matrix factorization method and the relevance analysis method), the current method outperformed these methods in the recall rate and classification accuracy on NSCLC and normal specimens. We obtained biomarkers. Among biomarkers, genes have been used to distinguish AC from SCC in practice, and other six genes were newly discovered biomarkers for distinguishing subtypes. Furthermore, NKX2-1 has been considered as a molecular target for the targeted therapy of AC, and other genes may be novel molecular targets. By gene ontology analysis, we found that two biological processes (‘epidermis development’ and ‘cell adhesion’) were closely related with the tumorigenesis of subtypes of NSCLC. More generally, the current method could be extended to other complex diseases for distinguishing subtypes and detecting the molecular targets for targeted therapy. PMID:24743794

  10. Identification of logic relationships between genes and subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansen Su

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has two major subtypes: adenocarcinoma (AC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC are hindered by the limited knowledge about the pathogenesis mechanisms of subtypes of NSCLC. It is necessary to research the molecular mechanisms related with AC and SCC. In this work, we improved the logic analysis algorithm to mine the sufficient and necessary conditions for the presence states (presence or absence of phenotypes. We applied our method to AC and SCC specimens, and identified [Formula: see text] lower and [Formula: see text] higher logic relationships between genes and two subtypes of NSCLC. The discovered relationships were independent of specimens selected, and their significance was validated by statistic test. Compared with the two earlier methods (the non-negative matrix factorization method and the relevance analysis method, the current method outperformed these methods in the recall rate and classification accuracy on NSCLC and normal specimens. We obtained [Formula: see text] biomarkers. Among [Formula: see text] biomarkers, [Formula: see text] genes have been used to distinguish AC from SCC in practice, and other six genes were newly discovered biomarkers for distinguishing subtypes. Furthermore, NKX2-1 has been considered as a molecular target for the targeted therapy of AC, and [Formula: see text] other genes may be novel molecular targets. By gene ontology analysis, we found that two biological processes ('epidermis development' and 'cell adhesion' were closely related with the tumorigenesis of subtypes of NSCLC. More generally, the current method could be extended to other complex diseases for distinguishing subtypes and detecting the molecular targets for targeted therapy.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome subtype screening characteristics: constipation subtype patient profiles explored

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    Joyce K. Anastasi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a chronic disorder, greatly impacts the lives of those affected. Approximately one quarter of the North American population suffers from this condition that includes abdominal pain, discomfort and alterations in normal bowel function. Constipation-subtype IBS (IBS-C is often found to be a prevalent subtype; however, a lack of knowledge and effective treatment options remains surrounding this disorder. In the course of an ongoing study conducted by our research team on the use of acupuncture and moxibustion in the management of IBS symptoms, a considerable number of screened patients have met the widely accepted Rome III criteria for IBS-C.

  12. Characterization of cAMP accumulation mediated by three α1—adrenoceptor subtypes in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGYao; HUANGYan; DongEr-Dan; HANQi-De; ZHANGYou-Yi

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the characterization of cAMP response mediated by α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) subtypes in HEK293 cells. METHODS:(1) Full-length cDNA encoding three α1-AR subtypes were transfected into HEK293 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method, respectively. (2) The densities of α1-AR subtypes expressed in HEK293 cells were measured by radioligand binding assay. (3)cAMP accumulation was measured by [3H] adenine prelabeling method. RESULTS: (1)Activation of each of three subtypes resulted in an increase of cAMP accumulation in HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by selective α1-AR antagonist prazosin. (2) Comparing the pharmacological property, the maximal responses of α1A-AR to agonists were the most potent, while the sensitivity of α1-AR subtypes to norepinephrine(NE) was the highest. CONCLUSION: Each of three α1-AR subtypes can mediate cAMP accumulation in HEK293 cell line, and there are differences in pharmacological property.

  13. HIV-1 Adaptation to Antigen Processing Results in Population-Level Immune Evasion and Affects Subtype Diversification

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    Stefan Tenzer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8+ T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these regions encode epitopes presented by ∼30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ∼60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions at subtype-specific motifs. Multiple HLA variants presenting epitopes situated next to a given subtype-specific motif drive selection at this subtype-specific position, and epitope abundances correlate inversely with the HLA frequency distribution in affected populations. This adaptation reflects the sum of intrapatient adaptations, is predictable, facilitates viral subtype diversification, and increases global HIV diversity. Because low epitope abundance is associated with infrequent and weak T cell responses, this most likely results in both population-level immune evasion and inadequate responses in most people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins.

  14. Subtypes of written expression in elementary school children: a linguistic-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakely, Melissa B; Hooper, Stephen R; de Kruif, Renee E L; Swartz, Carl

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a reliable and valid classification scheme for written expression that captured the linguistic variability present in a typical elementary school sample. This empirically derived classification model was based on the following linguistic-based writing skills: (a) understandability of discourse, (b) grammar, (c) semantics, (d) spelling, and (e) reading comprehension. The sample included 257 fourth-grade (n = 142) and fifth-grade (n = 115) students (46.3% boys, 79.4% White, age range = 8;3-11;7 years; M = 10.10). All of the students were receiving their writing instruction in the regular education setting, with approximately one third receiving some type of educational assistance. The sample fell in the middle socioeconomic stratum. Cluster analytic techniques derived different possible solutions. Results of a series of internal validity studies provided strong evidence that the six-cluster solution was both stable and interpretable, with subtypes reflecting normal as well as writing disability variants. Further, the writing disability subtypes ranged from global impairment to more specific linguistic impediments. Based on their characteristics, the clusters were named (a) Average Writers (n = 102), (b) Low Semantics (n = 31), (c) Low Grammar (n = 18), (d) Expert Writers (n = 33), (e) Low Spelling-Reading (n = 13), and (f) Poor Text Quality (n = 60). Subtypes differed on the percentages of children in selected subtypes manifesting specific writing deficits as well as on selected aspects of measures of metacognition, self-efficacy, and self-regulation of the writing process. Results provide researchers with a foundation to further investigate the underlying neurolinguistic and neurocognitive processes that may strengthen or undermine students' ability to produce a quality written product and to design and implement intervention techniques to address the various subtype patterns inherent in a regular elementary school classroom.

  15. Variability of Delirium Motor Subtype Scale-Defined Delirium Motor Subtypes in Elderly Adults with Hip Fracture: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Rikie M; van Munster, Barbara C; Adamis, Dimitrios; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Meagher, David J; de Rooij, Sophia E J A

    2017-02-01

    To examine changes in motor subtype profile in individuals with delirium. Observational, longitudinal study; substudy of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Departments of surgery and orthopedics, Academic Medical Center and Tergooi Hospital, the Netherlands. Elderly adults acutely admitted for hip fracture surgery who developed delirium according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, for 2 days or longer (n = 76, aged 86.4 ± 6.1, 68.4% female). Delirium Motor Subtype Scale (DMSS), Delirium Rating Scale R98 (DRS-R98), comorbidity, and function. Median delirium duration was 3 days (interquartile range 2.0 days). At first assessment, the hyperactive motor subtype was most common (44.7%), followed by hypoactive motor subtype (28.9%), mixed motor subtype (19.7%), and no motor subtype (6.6%). Participants with no motor subtype had lower DRS-R98 scores than those with the other subtypes (P delirium duration or severity were not associated with change in motor subtype. Motor subtype profile was variable in the majority of participants, although changes that occurred were often related to changes from or to no motor subtype, suggesting evolving or resolving delirium. Changes appeared not be associated with demographic or clinical characteristics, suggesting that evidence from cross-sectional studies of motor subtypes could be applied to many individuals with delirium. Further longitudinal studies should be performed to clarify the stability of motor subtypes in different clinical populations. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    Cancer Association Consortium genotyped in the iCOGS array (211,155 SNPs). We estimate the array heritability (attributable to variants tagged on arrays) of each subtype and their genetic correlations. We also look for genetic overlaps with factors such as obesity, smoking behaviors, diabetes, age...... studies show that certain genetic variants confer susceptibility to all subtypes while other variants are subtype-specific. Here, we perform an extensive analysis of the genetic architecture of EOC subtypes. To this end, we used data of 10,014 invasive EOC patients and 21,233 controls from the Ovarian...... approximately 40 % of the total array heritability for each subtype. The contribution of each chromosome to the total heritability was not proportional to chromosome size. Through bivariate and cross-trait LD score regression, we found evidence of shared genetic backgrounds between the three high-grade subtypes...

  17. Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    TITLE: Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Harikrishna Nakshatri, B.V.Sc., PhD. Kasi...Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer? 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1...positive breast cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diabetes , Intrinsic subtypes, Breast Cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN RAT PROSTATE

    OpenAIRE

    Pontari, M.A.; LUTHIN, G. R.; Braverman, A. S.; Ruggieri, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the individual lobes of the rat prostate. Immunoprecipitation was performed on homogenates of these 3 lobes using antibodies to the m1-m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays (RT-PCR) were also performed using primers specific for each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5). The susceptibility of the receptors to degradation by endogenous prostate proteas...

  19. Presence of avian pneumovirus subtypes A and B in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Masaji; Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Imada, Tadao; Imai, Kunitoshi; Nakamura, Kikuyasu

    2003-01-01

    Four avian pneumovirus (APV) isolates from chickens clinically diagnosed with swollen head syndrome were genetically characterized as to the subtypes of the virus in Japan. The results of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions based on subtype-specific primers and direct sequence analysis of G genes indicated subtypes A and B but not C or D of APV were present in Japan. Several routes or sources are conceivable for APV to invade into Japan.

  20. Telomerase-independent paths to immortality in predictable cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers commandeer the activity of telomerase - the remarkable enzyme responsible for prolonging cellular lifespan by maintaining the length of telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase is only normally active in embryonic and highly proliferative somatic cells. Thus, targeting telomerase is an attractive anti-cancer therapeutic rationale currently under investigation in various phases of clinical development. However, previous reports suggest that an average of 10-15% of all cancers lose the functional activity of telomerase and most of these turn to an Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway (ALT). ALT-positive tumours will therefore not respond to anti-telomerase therapies and there is a real possibility that such drugs would be toxic to normal telomerase-utilising cells and ultimately select for resistant cells that activate an ALT mechanism. ALT exploits certain DNA damage response (DDR) components to counteract telomere shortening and rapid trimming. ALT has been reported in many cancer subtypes including sarcoma, gastric carcinoma, central nervous system malignancies, subtypes of kidney (Wilm's Tumour) and bladder carcinoma, mesothelioma, malignant melanoma and germ cell testicular cancers to name but a few. A recent heroic study that analysed ALT in over six thousand tumour samples supports this historical spread, although only reporting an approximate 4% prevalence. This review highlights the various methods of ALT detection, unravels several molecular ALT models thought to promote telomere maintenance and elongation, spotlights the DDR components known to facilitate these and explores why certain tissues are more likely to subvert DDR away from its usually protective functions, resulting in a predictive pattern of prevalence in specific cancer subsets.

  1. Nuclear spatial and spectral features based evolutionary method for meningioma subtypes classification in histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Kiran; Majeed, Hammad; Irshad, Humayun

    2017-04-05

    Meningioma subtypes classification is a real-world multiclass problem from the realm of neuropathology. The major challenge in solving this problem is the inherent complexity due to high intra-class variability and low inter-class variation in tissue samples. The development of computational methods to assist pathologists in characterization of these tissue samples would have great diagnostic and prognostic value. In this article, we proposed an optimized evolutionary framework for the classification of benign meningioma into four subtypes. This framework investigates the imperative role of RGB color channels for discrimination of tumor subtypes and compute structural, statistical and spectral phenotypes. An evolutionary technique, Genetic Algorithm, in combination with Support Vector Machine is applied to tune classifier parameters and to select the best possible combination of extracted phenotypes that improved the classification accuracy (94.88%) on meningioma histology dataset, provided by the Institute of Neuropathology, Bielefeld. These statistics show that computational framework can robustly discriminate four subtypes of benign meningioma and may aid pathologists in the diagnosis and classification of these lesions.

  2. Novel 4-phenylpiperidine-2,6-dione derivatives. Ligands for α1-adrenoceptor subtypes

    KAUST Repository

    Romeo, Giuseppe F.

    2011-07-01

    A number of new 4-phenylpiperidine-2,6-diones bearing at the 1-position an ω-[4-(substituted phenyl)piperazin-1-yl]alkyl moiety were designed and synthesized as ligands for the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) subtypes. Some synthesized compounds, tested in binding assays for the human cloned α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR subtypes, displayed affinities in the nanomolar range. Highest affinity values were found in derivatives having a butyl connecting chain between the 4-phenylpiperidine-2,6-dione and the phenylpiperazinyl moieties. 1-[4-[4-(2-Methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]butyl]-4-phenylpiperidine-2,6- dione (34) showed the best affinity for the α1A-AR (pK i = 8.74) and 10-fold selectivity compared to the other two α1-AR subtypes. Some representative compounds were also tested in order to evaluate their effects on the signal transduction pathway coupled to α1-AR subtypes. They all blocked norepinephrine-induced stimulation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, thus behaving as antagonists. Binding data were used to refine a previously developed pharmacophoric model for α1D-ARs. The revised model shows a highly predictive power and could be useful for the future design of high affinity α1D-AR ligands. © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cigarette smoking and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma and its subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Rostgaard, K; Glaser, S L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remains incompletely characterized. Studies of the association between smoking and HL have yielded ambiguous results, possibly due to differences between HL subtypes....

  4. Molecular subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R; Prieto, E; Aguas, M J; Manata, M J; Botas, J; Pereira, F Martins

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken.

  5. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  6. Genetic analysis of HIV-1 subtypes in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Khoja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis of a viral infection helps in following its spread in a given population, in tracking the routes of infection and, where applicable, in vaccine design. Additionally, sequence analysis of the viral genome provides information about patterns of genetic divergence that may have occurred during viral evolution. OBJECTIVE: In this study we have analyzed the subtypes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus -1 (HIV-1 circulating in a diverse sample population of Nairobi, Kenya. METHODOLOGY: 69 blood samples were collected from a diverse subject population attending the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. Total DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and used in a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to amplify the HIV gag gene. The PCR amplimers were partially sequenced, and alignment and phylogenetic analysis of these sequences was performed using the Los Alamos HIV Database. RESULTS: Blood samples from 69 HIV-1 infected subjects from varying ethnic backgrounds were analyzed. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed 39 isolates to be subtype A, 13 subtype D, 7 subtype C, 3 subtype AD and CRF01_AE, 2 subtype G and 1 subtype AC and 1 AG. Deeper phylogenetic analysis revealed HIV subtype A sequences to be highly divergent as compared to subtypes D and C. CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that HIV-1 subtypes in the Nairobi province of Kenya are dominated by a genetically diverse clade A. Additionally, the prevalence of highly divergent, complex subtypes, intersubtypes, and the recombinant forms indicates viral mixing in Kenyan population, possibly as a result of dual infections.

  7. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  8. HLA-B27 subtypes in Turkish patients with ankylosing spondylitis and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Muradiye; Cora, Tulin; Tunc, Recep; Acar, Hasan

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes frequency in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and related spondyloartropathy (SpA) patients. Therefore, we investigated the differences in HLA-B27 subtypes between HLA-B27-positive patients and controls. Sixty six patients were included in this study (51 AS and 15 SpA). Thirty-five individuals were diagnosed with leukemia or chronic renal failure, and their donors without any rheumatological problem (no SpA history) were selected as the control group. HLA-B27 subtyping was performed by PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer) method in serologically HLA-B27-positive 46 AS patients, 9 SpA patients and control group. When the frequency of HLA-B27 was 4.5% in Turkish population, this frequency was 90.2% in AS patients. Four different HLA-B27 subtypes found in AS patients were B 2705 (65.2%), B 2702 (26.1%), B 2704 (6.5%) and B 2707 (2.2%). In SpA patients, B 2705 and B 2702 found in equal frequency. Five B27 alleles were identified in our control group: B 2705 (54.3%), B 2702 (31.4) %, B 2703 (2.9%), B 2704 (2.9%) and B 2702/B 2705 (8.5%). Both in the patient group and in the control group, we also observed B 2705 as most frequent allele, and B 2702 was second common allele. Our results show that the frequency of HLA-B27 subtypes is not significantly different between patients and controls (P > 0.10).

  9. The molecular subtype classification is a determinant of sentinel node positivity in early breast carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Reyal

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several authors have underscored a strong relation between the molecular subtypes and the axillary status of breast cancer patients. The aim of our work was to decipher the interaction between this classification and the probability of a positive sentinel node biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our dataset consisted of a total number of 2654 early-stage breast cancer patients. Patients treated at first by conservative breast surgery plus sentinel node biopsies were selected. A multivariate logistic regression model was trained and validated. Interaction covariate between ER and HER2 markers was a forced input of this model. The performance of the multivariate model in the training and the two validation sets was analyzed in terms of discrimination and calibration. Probability of axillary metastasis was detailed for each molecular subtype. RESULTS: The interaction covariate between ER and HER2 status was a stronger predictor (p = 0.0031 of positive sentinel node biopsy than the ER status by itself (p = 0.016. A multivariate model to determine the probability of sentinel node positivity was defined with the following variables; tumour size, lympho-vascular invasion, molecular subtypes and age at diagnosis. This model showed similar results in terms of discrimination (AUC = 0.72/0.73/0.72 and calibration (HL p = 0.28/0.05/0.11 in the training and validation sets. The interaction between molecular subtypes, tumour size and sentinel nodes status was approximated. DISCUSSION: We showed that biologically-driven analyses are able to build new models with higher performance in terms of breast cancer axillary status prediction. The molecular subtype classification strongly interacts with the axillary and distant metastasis process.

  10. Ovarian cancer cell line panel (OCCP: clinical importance of in vitro morphological subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine M Beaufort

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease and remains the most lethal gynaecological malignancy in the Western world. Therapeutic approaches need to account for inter-patient and intra-tumoural heterogeneity and detailed characterization of in vitro models representing the different histological and molecular ovarian cancer subtypes is critical to enable reliable preclinical testing. There are approximately 100 publicly available ovarian cancer cell lines but their cellular and molecular characteristics are largely undescribed. We have characterized 39 ovarian cancer cell lines under uniform conditions for growth characteristics, mRNA/microRNA expression, exon sequencing, drug response for clinically-relevant therapeutics and collated all available information on the original clinical features and site of origin. We tested for statistical associations between the cellular and molecular features of the lines and clinical features. Of the 39 ovarian cancer cell lines, 14 were assigned as high-grade serous, four serous-type, one low-grade serous and 20 non-serous type. Three morphological subtypes: Epithelial (n = 21, Round (n = 7 and Spindle (n = 12 were identified that showed distinct biological and molecular characteristics, including overexpression of cell movement and migration-associated genes in the Spindle subtype. Comparison with the original clinical data showed association of the spindle-like tumours with metastasis, advanced stage, suboptimal debulking and poor prognosis. In addition, the expression profiles of Spindle, Round and Epithelial morphologies clustered with the previously described C1-stromal, C5-mesenchymal and C4 ovarian subtype expression profiles respectively. Comprehensive profiling of 39 ovarian cancer cell lines under controlled, uniform conditions demonstrates clinically relevant cellular and genomic characteristics. This data provides a rational basis for selecting models to develop

  11. Molecular subtypes and clinicopathological features of breastcancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irianiwati Irianiwati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with regard to morphological spectrum, clinical presentation and response to therapy. Based on immunohistochemistry detection of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Her-2 status, proliferation rate and clusters of basal gene expression, breast cancers can be classified into luminal A, luminal B, basal-like/triple negative, and Her-2 positive. It was suggested that there was a close relationship between molecular subtypes and clinicopathological features of breast cancer, as they are very important to predict prognosis and therapeutic implications. Keywords: molecular subtypes - breast cancer- clinicopathological features -heterogeneity –theraputicimplications   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  12. Is Rett Syndrome a Subtype of Pervasive Developmental Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Luke Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews whether Rett syndrome is a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The paper analyzes internal and external diagnostic validity and discusses whether Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder or a mental disorder. The paper concludes that data support the idea of classifying Rett syndrome as a subtype of PDD.…

  13. ADHD subtype differences in reinforcement sensitivity and visuospatial working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovis, S.; van der Oord, S.; Wiers, R.W.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Both cognitive and motivational deficits are thought to give rise to the problems in the combined (ADHD-C) and inattentive subtype (ADHD-I) of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In both subtypes one of the most prominent cognitive weaknesses appears to be in visuospatial working memory

  14. Preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by perfusion MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Hao; Roediger, Lars A.; Shen, Tianzhen; Miao, Jingtao; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This paper aims to evaluate the value of perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by analyzing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) of three benign subtypes and anaplastic meningiomas separately. Materials and methods Thirty-seven menin

  15. Integrative Analysis of Prognosis Data on Multiple Cancer Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yawei; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cancer research, profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for genes/SNPs associated with prognosis. Cancer is diverse. Examining the similarity and difference in the genetic basis of multiple subtypes of the same cancer can lead to a better understanding of their connections and distinctions. Classic meta-analysis methods analyze each subtype separately and then compare analysis results across subtypes. Integrative analysis methods, in contrast, analyze the raw data on multiple subtypes simultaneously and can outperform meta-analysis methods. In this study, prognosis data on multiple subtypes of the same cancer are analyzed. An AFT (accelerated failure time) model is adopted to describe survival. The genetic basis of multiple subtypes is described using the heterogeneity model, which allows a gene/SNP to be associated with prognosis of some subtypes but not others. A compound penalization method is developed to identify genes that contain important SNPs associated with prognosis. The proposed method has an intuitive formulation and is realized using an iterative algorithm. Asymptotic properties are rigorously established. Simulation shows that the proposed method has satisfactory performance and outperforms a penalization-based meta-analysis method and a regularized thresholding method. An NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) prognosis study with SNP measurements is analyzed. Genes associated with the three major subtypes, namely DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL, are identified. The proposed method identifies genes that are different from alternatives and have important implications and satisfactory prediction performance. PMID:24766212

  16. Subtyping Stuttering II: Contributions from Language and Temperament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter,…

  17. Tubal ligation and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Salvador, Shannon; McGuire, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Tubal ligation is a protective factor for ovarian cancer, but it is unknown whether this protection extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumors. We undertook an international collaborative study to examine the association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer subtypes....

  18. Nominal and Structural Subtyping in Component-Based Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    type. We analyze structural and different flavors of nominal subtyping from the perspective of component-based programming, where issues such as blame assignment and modular extensibility are important. Our analysis puts various existing subtyping mechanisms into a common frame of reference...

  19. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. Method: A literature search of psy

  20. Confocal Endomicroscopy Characteristics of Different Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Dewitt, John M; Modi, Rohan M; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary, and oncocytic subtypes where morphology portends disease prognosis. The study aim was to demonstrate EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy imaging features of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes. Four subjects, each with a specific intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtype were enrolled. An EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy miniprobe was utilized for image acquisition. The mean cyst size from the 4 subjects (2 females; mean age = 65.3±12 years) was 36.8±12 mm. All lesions demonstrated mural nodules and focal dilation of the main pancreatic duct. EUS-nCLE demonstrated characteristic finger-like papillae with inner vascular core for all subtypes. The image patterns of the papillae for the gastric, intestinal, and pancreatobiliary subtypes were similar. However, the papillae in the oncocytic subtype were thick and demonstrated a fine scale-like or honeycomb pattern with intraepithelial lumina correlating with histopathology. There was significant overlap in the needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy findings for the different intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes; however, the oncocytic subtype demonstrated distinct patterns. These findings need to be replicated in larger multicenter studies.

  1. Simple Identification of Complex ADHD Subtypes Using Current Symptom Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Heather E.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hay, David A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the assessment of the accuracy of simple rules based on symptom count for assigning youths to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes show that having six or more total symptoms and fewer than three hyperactive-impulsive symptoms is an accurate predictor for the latent class sever inattentive subtype.

  2. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Waarsing (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective. OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. Methods. We used latent class

  3. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis : data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Weinans, Harrie

    OBJECTIVE: OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. METHODS: We used latent class cluster analysis

  4. Genetic overlap between diagnostic subtypes of ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); M. Traylor (Matthew); R. Malik (Rainer); S. Bevan (Steve); G.J. Falcone (Guido J.); J. Hopewell; Y.-C. Cheng (Yu-Ching); I. Cotlarciuc (Ioana); J.C. Bis (Joshua); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); G. Boncoraglio (Giorgio Battista); R. Clarke (Robert); J.W. Cole (John W.); M. Fornage (Myriam); K.L. Furie (Karen); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); J. Jannes (Jim); T. Kittner (Thomas); L.F. Lincz (Lisa); J.M. Maguire (Jane); J.F. Meschia (James F.); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); E.A. Parati (Eugenio A.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P.M. Rothwell (Peter); S. Seshadri (Sudha); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); P. Sharma (Pankaj); C. Sudlow (Cathie); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); B.B. Worrall (Bradford B.); J. Rosand (Jonathan); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); C. Kubisch (Christian); H.S. Markus (Hugh); C. Levi (Christopher); J. Attia (John); N.R. Wray (Naomi)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose: Despite moderate heritability, the phenotypic heterogeneity of ischemic stroke has hampered gene discovery, motivating analyses of diagnostic subtypes with reduced sample sizes. We assessed evidence for a shared genetic basis among the 3 major subtypes: large arte

  5. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis : data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. METHODS: We used latent class cluster analysis

  6. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. Method: A literature search of

  7. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic l...

  8. Pharmacology, Distribution and Development of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes in the Optic Tectum of Rana Pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, C. M.; Pauly, J. R.; Wilkins, L. H.; Dwoskin, L. P.; Debski, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    Visually evoked behaviors mediated by the frog optic tectum require cholinergic activity, but the receptor subtypes through which acetylcholine acts are not yet identified. Using quantitative autoradiography and scintillation spectrometry, we examined the binding of [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]AF-DX 384 in the laminated optic tectum of the frog. In mammalian systems, these substances bind excitatory (m1 and m3 subtypes) and inhibitory (m2 and m4 subtypes) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively. Pharmacological analyses, including the use of specific muscarinic toxins, confirmed the subtype selectivity of the radioligands in the frog brain. Binding sites for [3H]pirenzepine were distinct from those for [3H]AF-DX 384. In the adult tectum, [3H]pirenzepine demonstrated specific binding in tectal layers 5–9. [3H]Pirenzepine binding was also present in tadpoles as young as stage V, but all sampled stages of tadpole tectum had significantly less binding when compared to adults. Lesioning of the optic nerve had no effect on [3H]pirenzepine binding. Specific [3H]AF-DX 384 binding was found in all layers of the adult tectum. All sampled tadpole stages exhibited binding sites for [3H]AF-DX 384, but the densities of these sites were also significantly higher in adults than they were in developing stages. Short-term lesions of the optic nerve reduced [3H]AF-DX 384 binding in all tectal layers of the deafferented lobe when compared to the afferented one. Long-term lesions decreased [3H]AF-DX 384 sites in both lobes. These results indicate that multiple muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites reside in the frog optic tectum at all stages of development, and their pharmacology resembles that of mammalian m1/m3, m2 and m4 subtypes. Our data indicate that few, if any, of these receptors are likely to be located on retinal ganglion cell terminals. Furthermore, the expression of inhibitory muscarinic subtypes seems to be regulated by different mechanisms than that for

  9. Osteoclastic finger arthrosis - a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand; Osteoklastische Fingerarthrose - Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W. [Radiologische Praxis, Hamburg-Barmbek (Germany); Dihlmann, A. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Unfallkrankenhaus Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    Aim: Description of a subtype of arthrosis deformans of the hand which is characterised as osteoclastic arthrosis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of radiographs of the hands of 150 women and 100 men with radiological findings of arthrosis deformans. Results: 5% of women and 2% of men showed at least one digital joint with subchondral osteolysis of one or both articulating bones involving at least a third of the phalanx. This subchondral osteolysis far exceeds the cysts which are situated in the epiphyseal part of the articular region. It may develop within a year. Conclusion: Osteoclastic arthrosis of the finger is a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand. Serial observations suggest that an osteoclast stimulating substance is produced by the cysts or arises directly from the synovial fluid; this enters the subchondral part of the bone through clefts which may or may not be visible radiologically and that this produces osteoclastic activity. The most important differential diagnoses are chronic tophacious gout and a benign tumor. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Beschreibung eines Subtyps der Arthrosis deformans an der Hand, der als osteoklastische Arthrose bezeichnet wird. Patienten und Methode: Retrospektive Analyse der Handroentgenaufnahmen von 150 Frauen und 100 Maennern mit Roentgenbefunden der Arthrosis deformans. Ergebnisse: 5% der Frauen und 2% der maennlichen Patienten des durchgesehenen Krankenguts zeigten an mindestens einem Fingergelenk eine Arthrose mit subchondralen Osteolysen an einem oder beiden artikulierenden Knochen, die mindestens ein Drittel der Phalanxlaenge erfasst hatten. Diese subchondralen Osteolysen gehen ueber die Groesse und Form der arthrotischen Geroellzysten, die lediglich im knoechernen (epiphysaeren) Gelenksockel sitzen, weit hinaus. Sie koennen innerhalb eines Jahres entstehen. Schlussfolgerung: Die osteoklastische Arthrose der Finger ist ein Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose. Nach Verlaufsbeobachtungen wird vermutet, dass eine

  10. Master regulators, regulatory networks, and pathways of glioblastoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Serdar; Li, Aiguo; Baysan, Mehmet; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor. GBM samples are classified into subtypes based on their transcriptomic and epigenetic profiles. Despite numerous studies to better characterize GBM biology, a comprehensive study to identify GBM subtype- specific master regulators, gene regulatory networks, and pathways is missing. Here, we used FastMEDUSA to compute master regulators and gene regulatory networks for each GBM subtype. We also ran Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on GBM expression dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project to compute GBM- and GBM subtype-specific pathways. Our analysis was able to recover some of the known master regulators and pathways in GBM as well as some putative novel regulators and pathways, which will aide in our understanding of the unique biology of GBM subtypes.

  11. Coping subtypes for men with coronary heart disease: relationship to well-being, stress and Type-A behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denollet, J; De Potter, B

    1992-08-01

    We used cluster analysis to delineate coping subtypes in a sample of 166 men with coronary heart disease who completed the Antwerp out-patient rehabilitation programme. These subtypes were identified on the basis of three well-defined superordinate traits that were selected from a comprehensive taxonomy: negative affectivity, social inhibition, and self-deception. Using Ward's minimum variance method and the cubic clustering criterion, we identified four coping subtypes; low-negative affectivity (N = 48), high-negative affectivity (N = 30), inhibited (N = 62), and repressive (N = 26) individuals. The accuracy of the resulting classification was demonstrated across parallel data sets and was further validated against external, health-related correlates that were not included in the clustering. The identified coping subtypes were significantly related to self-reports of subjective distress/perceived stress, ratings of Type A behaviour and anger-in, return to work, prevalence of chest-pain complaints, and use of minor tranquillizers and sleeping pills. The major findings of this study suggest that (a) male coronary patients represent a heterogeneous population with distinctly different coping subtypes, and that (b) a relatively small number of homogeneous subtypes can account for a substantial amount of variance in subjective well-being, coronary-prone behaviour, and return to work. These findings indicate that psychosomatic research should focus on how superordinate traits interact within individuals and corroborate the appropriateness of a class model to describe coping styles of male coronary patients. It is argued that discrepant findings across studies of Type-A behaviour and hostility may be related to the coping subtypes of the subject sample. Further attempts to cross-validate this classification scheme and to examine its health-related correlates are needed.

  12. Short communication: Subtyping of Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolates from milk and corresponding teat apices to verify the potential teat-skin origin of intramammary infections in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Frédéric; Van Coillie, Els; Braem, Gorik; Piessens, Veerle; Verbist, Bert; De Vuyst, Luc; De Vliegher, Sarne

    2015-11-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a major cause of intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows and they colonize the teat skin. Staphylococcus haemolyticus, one of the more common CNS, has been identified as a highly versatile opportunistic species. The aim of the present study was to gain better insight into the adaptation of S. haemolyticus subtypes to the udder ecosystem with respect to IMI development. During a longitudinal observational study conducted over 13 mo on 6 Flemish dairy herds, S. haemolyticus isolates were recovered from milk and teat apices. A total of 44 S. haemolyticus isolates originating from milk (24 isolates) and teat apices (20 isolates) of 6 selected udder quarters were singled out and analyzed using a combined methodology of (GTG)5-PCR and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting to determine intraspecies differences. Combining both fingerprinting methods, 4 S. haemolyticus subtypes were obtained (I to IV). Subtypes I, II, and IV were recovered from both milk and teat apex samples and were found to be associated with persisting IMI. Subtype III, not apparently related to IMI, was isolated solely from teat apices and not from milk. In general, S. haemolyticus subtypes found in milk from infected quarters could be recovered from the corresponding teat apices, although the latter could be colonized with up to 3 different subtypes. Comparing subtypes from milk and teat apices indicates that the IMI-causing agent likely originates from the teat skin.

  13. Methyridine (2-[2-methoxyethyl]-pyridine]) and levamisole activate different ACh receptor subtypes in nematode parasites: a new lead for levamisole-resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J; Bai, Guangxing; Clark, Cheryl L; Robertson, Alan P

    2003-01-01

    The development of resistance to all chemotherapeutic agents increases and needs to be addressed. We are interested in resistance in parasitic nematodes to the anthelmintic levamisole. During studies on methyridine, we found that it gave us a new insight into pharmacological changes associated with levamisole resistance. Initially, electrophysiological investigation using a two-micropipette current-clamp recording technique revealed that methyridine acts as a cholinergic agonist on nematode muscle receptors (Ascaris suum). Methyridine (>30 μM) produced reversible concentration-dependent depolarizations and increases in input conductance. Mecamylamine (30 μM) and paraherquamide (0.3 μM) produced reversible antagonism of the depolarization and conductance responses to methyridine. These observations suggest that methyridine, like acetylcholine and levamisole, gates ion channels on the muscle of parasitic nematodes. The antagonistic effects of dihydro-β-erythroidine and paraherquamide on methyridine-induced contractions of A. suum muscle flaps were then examined to determine if methyridine showed subtype selectivity for N-subtype (nicotine-sensitive) or L-subtype (levamisole-sensitive) acetylcholine receptors. Dihydro-β-erythroidine weakly antagonized the effects of methyridine (but had no effect on levamisole responses). The antagonism of methyridine (pA2, 5.9) and nicotine (pA2, 6.1) by paraherquamide was similar, but was less than the antagonism of levamisole (pA2, 7.0). The antagonist profiles suggested that methyridine has a selective action on the N-subtype rather than on the L-subtype. A novel use for a larval inhibition migration assay was made using L3 larvae of Oesophagostomum dentatum. Inhibitory effects of nicotine, levamisole, pyrantel and methyridine on the migration of larvae of levamisole-sensitive (SENS) and levamisole-resistant (LEV-R) isolates were tested at different concentrations. Levamisole and pyrantel (putative L-subtype-selective

  14. Radiomic analysis reveals DCE-MRI features for prediction of molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Li, Hui; Wang, Shijian; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and to incorporated clinical information to predict the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. In particular, 60 breast cancers with the following four molecular subtypes were analyzed: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-over-expressing and basal-like. The breast region was segmented and the suspicious tumor was depicted on sequentially scanned MR images from each case. In total, 90 features were obtained, including 88 imaging features related to morphology and texture as well as dynamic features from tumor and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and 2 clinical information-based parameters, namely, age and menopausal status. An evolutionary algorithm was used to select an optimal subset of features for classification. Using these features, we trained a multi-class logistic regression classifier that calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The results of a prediction model using 24 selected features showed high overall classification performance, with an AUC value of 0.869. The predictive model discriminated among the luminal A, luminal B, HER2 and basal-like subtypes, with AUC values of 0.867, 0.786, 0.888 and 0.923, respectively. An additional independent dataset with 36 patients was utilized to validate the results. A similar classification analysis of the validation dataset showed an AUC of 0.872 using 15 image features, 10 of which were identical to those from the first cohort. We identified clinical information and 3D imaging features from DCE-MRI as candidate biomarkers for discriminating among four molecular subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:28166261

  15. Reproducibility of histological subtyping of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brčić, Luka; Jakopović, Marko; Brčić, Iva; Klarić, Vlasta; Milošević, Milan; Sepac, Ana; Samaržija, Miroslav; Seiwerth, Sven

    2014-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has a very poor prognosis. Although clinical stage is currently the only reliable prognostic factor, histologic subtyping reportedly also affects prognosis. Some studies propose reclassification of pleomorphic epithelioid as biphasic or sarcomatoid MPM. This study assessed prognostic significance and interobserver agreement in MPM subtyping of small biopsy specimens. We analyzed biopsy specimens, and clinical and survival data from records of 108 patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 at the Institute of Pathology University of Zagreb School of Medicine, of whom 98 had epithelioid MPM, six biphasic MPM, and four sarcomatoid MPM. Among epithelioid subtypes, 44 (44.9 %) were solid, 19 (19.4 %) tubulopapillary, 18 (18.4 %) acinar, six (6.1 %) adenomatoid, five (5.1 %) pleomorphic, four (4.1 %) trabecular, and two (2.0 %) micropapillary subtype. Interobserver reliability for histological diagnosis was found to be κ = 0.72 (P sarcomatoid mesothelioma (4.0 [IQR 1.3-6.8] months; P = 0.270). We found strong reproducibility of MPM subtyping with good interobserver agreement. Furthermore, our results indicate that pleomorphic subtype to be a predictor of poor prognosis and support classifying it with sarcomatoid or biphasic MPM, as patients with the pleomorphic, biphasic, or sarcomatoid subtype show similarly poor overall survival.

  16. Common Molecular Subtypes Among Asian Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaisaingmongkol, Jittiporn; Budhu, Anuradha; Dang, Hien

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are clinically disparate primary liver cancers with etiological and biological heterogeneity. We identified common molecular subtypes linked to similar prognosis among 199 Thai ICC and HCC patients through systems integration...... of genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics. While ICC and HCC share recurrently mutated genes, including TP53, ARID1A, and ARID2, mitotic checkpoint anomalies distinguish the C1 subtype with key drivers PLK1 and ECT2, whereas the C2 subtype is linked to obesity, T cell infiltration, and bile acid...

  17. Receptor subtype involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ sig-naling in cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-li LUO; Jian GAO; Lin-lin FAN; Yu TANG; You-yi ZHANG; Qi-de HAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The enhancement of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in response to α1-adrener-gic receptor (α1-AR) stimulation is an essential signal transduction event in the regulation of cardiac functions, such as cardiac growth, cardiac contraction, and cardiac adaptation to various situations. The present study was intended to determine the role(s) of the α1-AR subtype(s) in mediating this response. Methods: We evaluated the effects of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists of the α1- AR on the intracellular Ca2+ signaling of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes using a confocal microscope. Results: After being cultured for 48 h, the myocytes exhibited spontaneous local Ca2+ release, sparks, and global Ca2+ transients. The activation of the α1-AR with phenylephrine, a selective agonist of the α1-AR, dose-dependently increased the frequency of Ca2+ transients with an EC50 value of 2.3 μmol/L. Blocking the α1A-AR subtype with 5-methyhirapidil (5-Mu) inhi-bited the stimulatory effect of phenylephrine with an IC50 value of 6.7 nmol/L. In contrast, blockade of the α1B-AR and α1D-AR subtypes with chloroethylclonidine and BMY 7378, respectively, did not affect the phenylephrine effect. Similarly, the local Ca2+ spark numbers were also increased by the activation of theα1-AR, and this effect could be abolished selectively by 5-Mu. More importantly, A61603, a novel selective α1A-AR agonist, mimicked the effects of phenylephrine, but with more potency (EC50 value =6.9 nmol/L) in the potentiation of Ca2+ transients, and blockade of the α1A-AR by 5-Mu caused abolishment of its effects. Conclusion: These results indicate that α1-adrenergic stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ activity is mediated selectively by the α1A-AR.

  18. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karah, Nabil; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Sahl, Jason W; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  19. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Karah

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST. CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  20. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated cell proliferation through a prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2004-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) mitogenesis. PGE-specific receptors are divided into four subtypes that are coupled either to Ca2+ mobilization (EP1 and EP3) or to the stimulation of adenyl cyclase (EP2 and EP4). The aims of the current study were to identify PGE receptor subtypes in cultured rat HSC and to examine which PGE receptor subtype(s) mediates the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to detect PGE receptor subtype mRNA expression. Cell proliferation was determined by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation, and intracellular cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cultured rat HSC expressed mRNAs for all four subtypes of PGE receptor. PGE2- and EP2-selective agonist produced dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PDGF-stimulated proliferation. Neither EP1-, EP3-, nor EP4-selective agonists showed any inhibitory effect. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor strongly blunted the inhibition of DNA synthesis elicited by PGE2 and the EP2 agonist. The EP2 agonist generated higher and more prolonged increases in intracellular cyclic AMP than the EP4 agonist. Activation of the PGE EP2 receptor has an antiproliferative effect in HSC that may be mediated by cyclic AMP-related signal transduction pathways.

  1. A comparative study of marine salmonid alphavirus subtypes 1-6 using an experimental cohabitation challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D A; Frost, P; McLaughlin, K; Rowley, H M; Gabestad, I; Gordon, A; McLoughlin, M F

    2011-04-01

    A comparative challenge study of six marine isolates representing subtypes 1-6 of salmonid alphavirus (salmon pancreas disease virus, Genus Alphavirus, Family Togaviridae) was conducted in Atlantic salmon in a fresh water cohabitation trial. Histopathological lesions typical of pancreas disease were observed with all subtypes, and virus was re-isolated from serum of cohabitant fish in each case. Using a virus neutralization (VN) test neutralizing salmonid alphavirus (SAV) subtype 1 strain F93-125, VN antibodies were detected in all challenge groups, consistent with serological cross-reactivity between these subtypes. Using real-time RT-PCR, SAV RNA was detected in heart tissue from 2 to 3 weeks post-challenge (wpc) in all cohabitant groups excluding controls. The results obtained suggested differences in the dynamics of infection between strains of SAV and potentially between subtypes. Results for SAV subtypes 1 and 3 suggested essentially synchronous infection of cohabitant fish. These two study groups also had the highest virus load in heart tissue as measured by quantitative RT-PCR and also had the most extensive histopathological changes. In contrast, results for SAV subtypes 2 and 6 strains were consistent with asynchronous infection in the cohabitant fish and were characterized by slow spread, low virus loads and mild histopathological changes. The SAV subtype 4 and 5 strains occupied an intermediate position in this regard. Despite the use of concentration procedures, it was not possible to detect SAV RNA in water samples from selected study tanks. However, testing of faeces from the SAV subtypes 1, 3 and 6 challenge groups found positive signals in each beginning at 1-3 wpc and remaining detectable for a further 2-3 weeks. Parallel testing of mucus samples found these became positive at 2-3 wpc and remained positive for a further 1-3 weeks. These results demonstrate for the first time that shedding and transmission of virus may occur by both these routes

  2. Effect of cyproterone acetate on alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in rat vas deferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Campos

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal hormones regulate the expression of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in several tissues. The present study was carried out to determine whether or not cyproterone acetate, an anti-androgenic agent, regulates the alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes that mediate contractions of the rat vas deferens in response to noradrenaline. The actions of subtype selective alpha1-antagonists were investigated in vas deferens from control and cyproterone acetate-treated rats (10 mg/day, sc, for 7 days. Prazosin (pA2 ~9.5, phentolamine (pA2 ~8.3 and yohimbine (pA2 ~6.7 presented competitive antagonism consistent with activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors in vas deferens from both control and treated rats. The pA2 values estimated for WB 4101 (~9.5, benoxathian (~9.7, 5-methylurapidil (~8.5, indoramin (~8.7 and BMY 7378 (~6.8 indicate that alpha1A-adrenoceptors are involved in the contractions of the vas deferens from control and cyproterone acetate-treated rats. Treatment of the vas deferens from control rats with the alpha1B/alpha1D-adrenoceptor alkylating agent chloroethylclonidine had no effect on noradrenaline contractions, supporting the involvement of the alpha1A-subtype. However, this agent partially inhibited the contractions of vas deferens from cyproterone acetate-treated rats, suggesting involvement of multiple receptor subtypes. To further investigate this, the actions of WB 4101 and chloroethylclonidine were reevaluated in the vas deferens from rats treated with cyproterone acetate for 14 days. In these organs WB 4101 presented complex antagonism characterized by a Schild plot with a slope different from unity (0.65 ± 0.05. After treatment with chloroethylclonidine, the complex antagonism presented by WB 4101 was converted into classical competitive antagonism, consistent with participation of alpha1A-adrenoceptors as well as alpha1B-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that cyproterone acetate induces plasticity in the alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes

  3. Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] is a potent ligand for selectively labeling alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Arik J; Whiteaker, Paul; Mohn, Jesse L; Jacob, Michele H; McIntosh, J Michael

    2010-08-01

    The alpha7* (*denotes the possible presence of additional subunits) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype is widely expressed in the vertebrate nervous system and implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders that compromise thought and cognition. In this report, we demonstrate that the recently developed fluorescent ligand Cy3-ArIB[V11L;V16A] labels alpha7 nAChRs in cultured hippocampal neurons. However, photobleaching of this ligand during long image acquisition times prompted us to develop a new derivative. In photostability studies, this new ligand, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A], was significantly more resistant to bleaching than the Cy3 derivative. The classic alpha7 ligand alpha-bungarotoxin binds to alpha1* and alpha9* nAChRs. In contrast, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] potently (IC(50) 1.8 nM) and selectively blocked alpha7 nAChRs but not alpha1* or alpha9* nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Selectivity was further confirmed by competition binding studies of native nAChRs in rat brain membranes. The fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] were assessed using human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably transfected with nAChRs; labeling was observed on cells expressing alpha7 but not cells expressing alpha3beta2, alpha3beta4, or alpha4beta2 nAChRs. Further imaging studies demonstrate that Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] labels hippocampal neurons from wild-type mice but not from nAChR alpha7 subunit-null mice. Thus, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] represents a potent and selective ligand for imaging alpha7 nAChRs.

  4. Towards a brief definition of burnout syndrome by subtypes: Development of the "Burnout Clinical Subtypes Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gili Margarita

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout has traditionally been described by means of the dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism and lack of eficacy from the "Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey" (MBI-GS. The "Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12, comprising the dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, is proposed as a brief means of identifying the different ways this disorder is manifested. The aim of the study is to test the construct and criterial validity of the BCSQ-12. Method A cross-sectional design was used on a multi-occupational sample of randomly selected university employees (n = 826. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA was performed on half of the sample using the maximum likelihood (ML method with varimax orthogonal rotation, while confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was performed on the other half by means of the ML method. ROC curve analysis was preformed in order to assess the discriminatory capacity of BCSQ-12 when compared to MBI-GS. Cut-off points were proposed for the BCSQ-12 that optimized sensitivity and specificity. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were used to estimate effect size as an odds ratio (OR adjusted for sociodemographic and occupational variables. Contrasts for sex and occupation were made using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskall-Wallis tests on the dimensions of both models. Results EFA offered a solution containing 3 factors with eigenvalues > 1, explaining 73.22% of variance. CFA presented the following indices: χ2 = 112.04 (p 2/gl = 2.44, GFI = 0.958, AGFI = 0.929, RMSEA = 0.059, SRMR = 0.057, NFI = 0.958, NNFI = 0.963, IFI = 0.975, CFI = 0.974. The area under the ROC curve for 'overload' with respect to the 'exhaustion' was = 0.75 (95% CI = 0.71-0.79; it was = 0.80 (95% CI = 0.76-0.86 for 'lack of development' with respect to 'cynicism' and = 0.74 (95% CI = 0.70-0.78 for 'neglect' with respect to 'inefficacy'. The presence of 'overload' increased the likelihood of suffering from

  5. Llama antibody fragments recognizing various epitopes of the CD4bs neutralize a broad range of HIV-1 subtypes A, B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokappe, Nika; Szynol, Agnieszka; Aasa-Chapman, Marlèn; Gorlani, Andrea; Forsman Quigley, Anna; Hulsik, David Lutje; Chen, Lei; Weiss, Robin; de Haard, Hans; Verrips, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Many of the neutralising antibodies, isolated to date, display limited activities against the globally most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes A and C. Therefore, those subtypes are considered to be an important target for antibody-based therapy. Variable domains of llama heavy chain antibodies (VHH) have some superior properties compared with classical antibodies. Therefore we describe the application of trimeric forms of envelope proteins (Env), derived from HIV-1 of subtype A and B/C, for a prolonged immunization of two llamas. A panel of VHH, which interfere with CD4 binding to HIV-1 Env were selected with use of panning. The results of binding and competition assays to various Env, including a variant with a stabilized CD4-binding state (gp120(Ds2)), cross-competition experiments, maturation analysis and neutralisation assays, enabled us to classify the selected VHH into three groups. The VHH of group I were efficient mainly against viruses of subtype A, C and B'/C. The VHH of group II resemble the broadly neutralising antibody (bnmAb) b12, neutralizing mainly subtype B and C viruses, however some had a broader neutralisation profile. A representative of the third group, 2E7, had an even higher neutralization breadth, neutralizing 21 out of the 26 tested strains belonging to the A, A/G, B, B/C and C subtypes. To evaluate the contribution of certain amino acids to the potency of the VHH a small set of the mutants were constructed. Surprisingly this yielded one mutant with slightly improved neutralisation potency against 92UG37.A9 (subtype A) and 96ZM651.02 (subtype C). These findings and the well-known stability of VHH indicate the potential application of these VHH as anti-HIV-1 microbicides.

  6. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  7. A differentiation-based phylogeny of cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Riester

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological classification of human tumors relies in part on the degree of differentiation of the tumor sample. To date, there is no objective systematic method to categorize tumor subtypes by maturation. In this paper, we introduce a novel computational algorithm to rank tumor subtypes according to the dissimilarity of their gene expression from that of stem cells and fully differentiated tissue, and thereby construct a phylogenetic tree of cancer. We validate our methodology with expression data of leukemia, breast cancer and liposarcoma subtypes and then apply it to a broader group of sarcomas. This ranking of tumor subtypes resulting from the application of our methodology allows the identification of genes correlated with differentiation and may help to identify novel therapeutic targets. Our algorithm represents the first phylogeny-based tool to analyze the differentiation status of human tumors.

  8. A Bayesian semiparametric factor analysis model for subtype identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiehuan; Warren, Joshua L; Zhao, Hongyu

    2017-04-25

    Disease subtype identification (clustering) is an important problem in biomedical research. Gene expression profiles are commonly utilized to infer disease subtypes, which often lead to biologically meaningful insights into disease. Despite many successes, existing clustering methods may not perform well when genes are highly correlated and many uninformative genes are included for clustering due to the high dimensionality. In this article, we introduce a novel subtype identification method in the Bayesian setting based on gene expression profiles. This method, called BCSub, adopts an innovative semiparametric Bayesian factor analysis model to reduce the dimension of the data to a few factor scores for clustering. Specifically, the factor scores are assumed to follow the Dirichlet process mixture model in order to induce clustering. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that BCSub has improved performance over commonly used clustering methods. When applied to two gene expression datasets, our model is able to identify subtypes that are clinically more relevant than those identified from the existing methods.

  9. Effect of HIV-1 Subtype C integrase mutations implied using molecular modeling and docking data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachithanandham, Jaiprasath; Konda Reddy, Karnati; Solomon, King; David, Shoba; Kumar Singh, Sanjeev; Vadhini Ramalingam, Veena; Alexander Pulimood, Susanne; Cherian Abraham, Ooriyapadickal; Rupali, Pricilla; Sridharan, Gopalan; Kannangai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The degree of sequence variation in HIV-1 integrase genes among infected patients and their impact on clinical response to Anti retroviral therapy (ART) is of interest. Therefore, we collected plasma samples from 161 HIV-1 infected individuals for subsequent integrase gene amplification (1087 bp). Thus, 102 complete integrase gene sequences identified as HIV-1 subtype-C was assembled. This sequence data was further used for sequence analysis and multiple sequence alignment (MSA) to assess position specific frequency of mutations within pol gene among infected individuals. We also used biophysical geometric optimization technique based molecular modeling and docking (Schrodinger suite) methods to infer differential function caused by position specific sequence mutations towards improved inhibitor selection. We thus identified accessory mutations (usually reduce susceptibility) leading to the resistance of some known integrase inhibitors in 14% of sequences in this data set. The Stanford HIV-1 drug resistance database provided complementary information on integrase resistance mutations to deduce molecular basis for such observation. Modeling and docking analysis show reduced binding by mutants for known compounds. The predicted binding values further reduced for models with combination of mutations among subtype C clinical strains. Thus, the molecular basis implied for the consequence of mutations in different variants of integrase genes of HIV-1 subtype C clinical strains from South India is reported. This data finds utility in the design, modification and development of a representative yet an improved inhibitor for HIV-1 integrase.

  10. Correlation between the High Density Lipoprotein and its Subtypes in Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To detect the changes of high density lipoprotein (HDL and its subtypes in serum of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods: 337 hospitalized patients were selected from our hospital during August, 2014 - January, 2015, and divided into CHD group (n = 190 and control group (n = 127. Lipoprint lipoprotein analyzer was used to classify low density lipoprotein (LDL particle size and its sub-components, as well as HDL particle size and its sub-components. The changes of the subtypes in patients with CHD were statistically analyzed. The possible mechanism was explored. Results: (1 Compared with the control group, the concentration of HDL in CHD patients reduced, HDLL significantly decreased (P S increased (P L had the most significant decreased; (3 HDL and all HDL subtypes were positively correlated with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, of which, HDLL had the biggest correlation with apoA-I (P M had a maximum correlation with HDL (P Conclusion: HDL maturation disorders existed in the serum of CHD patients, HDLL may be protected factor for CHD, whose decrease was closely related wit the risk increase of CHD. The cardiovascular protection function of HDLL may be related with apoA-I content.

  11. Computational Classification Approach to Profile Neuron Subtypes from Brain Activity Mapping Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Zhao, Fang; Lee, Jason; Wang, Dong; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2015-07-27

    The analysis of cell type-specific activity patterns during behaviors is important for better understanding of how neural circuits generate cognition, but has not been well explored from in vivo neurophysiological datasets. Here, we describe a computational approach to uncover distinct cell subpopulations from in vivo neural spike datasets. This method, termed "inter-spike-interval classification-analysis" (ISICA), is comprised of four major steps: spike pattern feature-extraction, pre-clustering analysis, clustering classification, and unbiased classification-dimensionality selection. By using two key features of spike dynamic - namely, gamma distribution shape factors and a coefficient of variation of inter-spike interval - we show that this ISICA method provides invariant classification for dopaminergic neurons or CA1 pyramidal cell subtypes regardless of the brain states from which spike data were collected. Moreover, we show that these ISICA-classified neuron subtypes underlie distinct physiological functions. We demonstrate that the uncovered dopaminergic neuron subtypes encoded distinct aspects of fearful experiences such as valence or value, whereas distinct hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells responded differentially to ketamine-induced anesthesia. This ISICA method should be useful to better data mining of large-scale in vivo neural datasets, leading to novel insights into circuit dynamics associated with cognitions.

  12. Molecular Evolution of Antibody Cross-Reactivity for Two Subtypes of Type a Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Levy, R.; Arndt, J.W.; Forsyth, C.M.; Razai, A.; Lou, J.; Geren, I.; Stevens, R.C.; Marks, J.D.; /UC, San Francisco /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Broadening antibody specificity without compromising affinity should facilitate detection and neutralization of toxin and viral subtypes. We used yeast display and a co-selection strategy to increase cross-reactivity of a single chain (sc) Fv antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Starting with a scFv that binds the BoNT/A1 subtype with high affinity (136 pM) and the BoNT/A2 subtype with low affinity (109 nM), we increased its affinity for BoNT/A2 1,250-fold, to 87 pM, while maintaining high-affinity binding to BoNT/A1 (115 pM). To find the molecular basis for improved cross-reactivity, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of wild-type and cross-reactive antibodies complexed to BoNT/A1 at resolutions up to 2.6 A, and measured the thermodynamic contribution of BoNT/A1 and A2 amino acids to wild-type and cross-reactive antibody binding. The results show how an antibody can be engineered to bind two different antigens despite structural differences in the antigen-antibody interface and may provide a general strategy for tuning antibody specificity and cross-reactivity.

  13. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  14. Non-Structural Subtype Entailment in Automata Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Niehren, Joachim; Priesnitz, Tim

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Decidability of non-structural subtype entailment is a long standing open problem in programming language theory. In this paper, we apply automata theoretic methods to characterize the problem equivalently by using regular expressions and word equations. This characterization induces new results on non-structural subtype entailment, constitutes a promising starting point for further investigations on decidability, and explains for the first time why the problem is so d...

  15. Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0213 TITLE: Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0213 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...generally dominant. Based on the analysis of a limited number of TNBC cell lines we found that the epigenetic profiles of TNBCs are highly heterogeneous

  16. Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    TITLE: Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer ? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Harikrishna Nakshatri, B.V.Sc., PhD Kasi R... Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0651...as in type II diabetes , to disrupt GATA- 3:FOXA1:ERα network. Insulin induced the expression of T-bet in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF-7 cells

  17. Molecular subtypes of glioblastoma are relevant to lower grade glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Guan

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with great heterogeneity in histopathology and clinical course. The intent was to evaluate the relevance of known glioblastoma (GBM expression and methylation based subtypes to grade II and III gliomas (ie. lower grade gliomas.Gene expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array and clinical data were obtained for 228 GBMs and 176 grade II/II gliomas (GII/III from the publically available Rembrandt dataset. Two additional datasets with IDH1 mutation status were utilized as validation datasets (one publicly available dataset and one newly generated dataset from MD Anderson. Unsupervised clustering was performed and compared to gene expression subtypes assigned using the Verhaak et al 840-gene classifier. The glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (G-CIMP was assigned using prediction models by Fine et al.Unsupervised clustering by gene expression aligned with the Verhaak 840-gene subtype group assignments. GII/IIIs were preferentially assigned to the proneural subtype with IDH1 mutation and G-CIMP. GBMs were evenly distributed among the four subtypes. Proneural, IDH1 mutant, G-CIMP GII/III s had significantly better survival than other molecular subtypes. Only 6% of GBMs were proneural and had either IDH1 mutation or G-CIMP but these tumors had significantly better survival than other GBMs. Copy number changes in chromosomes 1p and 19q were associated with GII/IIIs, while these changes in CDKN2A, PTEN and EGFR were more commonly associated with GBMs.GBM gene-expression and methylation based subtypes are relevant for GII/III s and associate with overall survival differences. A better understanding of the association between these subtypes and GII/IIIs could further knowledge regarding prognosis and mechanisms of glioma progression.

  18. The biological effects of five feline IFN-alpha subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Powell, Tim D; Sellins, Karen S; Radecki, Steven V; Cohen, J John; Milhausen, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    IFN-alpha has been shown to induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in animals. This report describes the biological activity of five recently identified feline IFN-alpha subtypes expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line (rfeIFN-alpha1[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha2[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha5[CHO] and rfeIFN-alpha6[CHO]) and the feIFN-alpha6 subtype expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris (rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]). The rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes were tested for antiviral activity against either Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) infected feline embryonic fibroblast cell line (AH927) or Crandell feline kidney cell line (CRFK). Antiviral activity was induced against both VSV and FCV infected AH927 cells and VSV infected CRFK cells by all five of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]. In addition, the IFN-alpha inducible Mx gene (associated with antiviral activity) was upregulated in vivo 24 h following treatment with rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris], compared to baseline levels seen prior to treatment. All of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris] exhibited antiproliferative activity in the FeT-J cell line (an IL-2 independent feline T-cell line). Both necrosis and apoptosis were observed in rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]-treated FeT-J cells. The rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO] subtype consistently exhibited lower antiviral and antiproliferative activity compared to that observed with the other four rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes. In summary, this paper demonstrates that five previously described feIFN-alpha subtypes induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in vitro and are capable of upregulating the feMx gene in vivo.

  19. [Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 in Liaoning province of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X; Jiang, Y; Shang, H

    2001-12-01

    To study the prevalence of HIV-1 in Liaoning province of China. Nuclear acids were extracted from blood samples of 16 HIV-1 infected individuals collected locally in Liaoning province of China from Jun. 1997 to Dec. 2000. The 0.7 kb or 1.2 kb segments of HIV-1 env gene were amplified using nested-PCR and the HIV-1 genetic subtypes were then assayed by heteroduplex mobility assay. Fifteen of 16 samples were positive by PCR amplification of HIV-1 env region and samples were found to be genetic subtype A,B',C,E. The proportion due to sexual transmission in all HIV infection was 31.25% (5/15), among which subtype B' (3/5) was the majority. A man who returned from Africa together with his spouse both had type A (2/5) infection. Intravenous drug users (IDUs) took up 31.25% (5/15) of all the HIV infections. Subtype C (2/4) and E were predominant among intravenous drug users. However, there was one IDU with subtype B or E. Nearly all blood recipients and blood donors were B' (4/5) except one with C. There have been several subtypes of HIV-1 existed in Liaoning province, demonstrating the complexity of HIV epidemology in Liaoning province and the difficulty conducting prevention and treatment.

  20. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. (Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  1. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates in Sebha, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis is a genetically diverse and a common intestinal parasite of humans with a controversial pathogenic potential. This study was carried out to identify the Blastocystis subtypes and their association with demographic and socioeconomic factors among outpatients living in Sebha city, Libya. Blastocystis in stool samples were cultured followed by isolation, PCR amplification of a partial SSU rDNA gene, cloning, and sequencing. The DNA sequences of isolated clones showed 98.3% to 100% identity with the reference Blastocystis isolates from the Genbank. Multiple sequence alignment showed polymorphism from one to seven base substitution and/or insertion/deletion in several groups of non-identical nucleotides clones. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three assemblage subtypes (ST) with ST1 as the most prevalent (51.1%) followed by ST2 (24.4%), ST3 (17.8%) and mixed infections of two concurrent subtypes (6.7%). ST1 infection was significantly associated with female (P = 0.009) and low educational level (P = 0.034). ST2 was also significantly associated with low educational level (P= 0.008) and ST3 with diarrhoea (P = 0.008). Phylogenetic analysis of Libyan Blastocystis isolates identified three different subtypes; with ST1 being the predominant subtype and its infection was significantly associated with female gender and low educational level. More extensive studies are needed in order to relate each Blastocystis subtype with clinical symptoms and potential transmission sources in this community.

  2. Molecular evolution of the porcine type I interferon family: subtype-specific expression and antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs, key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼ 60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has

  3. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  4. Variability of Delirium Motor Subtype Scale-Defined Delirium Motor Subtypes in Elderly Adults with Hip Fracture : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Rikie M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Adamis, Dimitrios; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Meagher, David J.; de Rooij, Sophia E. J. A.

    OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in motor subtype profile in individuals with delirium. DESIGN: Observational, longitudinal study; substudy of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Departments of surgery and orthopedics, Academic Medical Center and Tergooi Hospital, the Netherlands.

  5. Distinguishing subtypes of extrinsic motivation among people with mild to borderline intellectual disability : Distinguishing subtypes of extrinsic motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frielink, N.; Schuengel, C.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    Background According to self-determination theory, motivation is ordered in types, including amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. Self-determination theory defines four subtypes of extrinsic motivation: external motivation, introjected motivation, identified motivation and

  6. Short-term stability of subtypes in the irritable bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsbro, A L; Simren, M; Bytzer, P

    2012-01-01

    In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtyping is used in research and clinical practice. Knowledge of subtype stability is needed for proper design of trials and treatment strategies.......In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtyping is used in research and clinical practice. Knowledge of subtype stability is needed for proper design of trials and treatment strategies....

  7. Structure-activity relationship study of selective excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 (EAAT1) inhibitor 2-amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101) and absolute configurational assignment using infrared and vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy in combination with ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tri H V; Shim, Irene; Bohr, Henrik; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Birgitte; Jensen, Anders A; Bunch, Lennart

    2012-06-14

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play essential roles in regulating the synaptic concentration of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian central nervous system. To date, five subtypes have been identified, named EAAT1-5 in humans, and GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC1, EAAT4, and EAAT5 in rodents, respectively. In this paper, we present the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of seven 7-N-substituted analogues of UCPH-101/102. Analogue 9 inhibited EAAT1 in the micromolar range (IC(50) value 20 μM), whereas analogues 8 and 10 were inactive (IC(50) values >100 μM). The diastereomeric pairs 11a/11b and 12a/12b were separated by HPLC and the absolute configuration assigned by VCD technique in combination with ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. Analogues 11a (RS-isomer) and 12b (RR-isomer) inhibited EAAT1 (IC(50) values 5.5 and 3.8 μM, respectively), whereas analogues 11b (SS-isomer) and 12a (SR-isomer) failed to inhibit EAAT1 uptake (IC(50) values >300 μM).

  8. ADHD Subtype Differences in Reinforcement Sensitivity and Visuospatial Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovis, Sebastiaan; Van der Oord, Saskia; Wiers, Reinout W; Prins, Pier J M

    2015-01-01

    Both cognitive and motivational deficits are thought to give rise to the problems in the combined (ADHD-C) and inattentive subtype (ADHD-I) of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In both subtypes one of the most prominent cognitive weaknesses appears to be in visuospatial working memory (WM), which is composed of short-term memory (STM) and a central executive (CE). In children with ADHD-C, both STM and the CE seem impaired, and together with motivational impairments, give rise to their deficits in visuospatial WM. In children with ADHD-I, no studies investigated these WM components and their interplay with motivational impairments. Effects of a standard (feedback only) and a high level of reinforcement (feedback + 10 euros) on visuospatial WM-, STM-, and CE performance were examined in 27 children with ADHD-I (restrictive-subtype), 70 children with ADHD-C, and 40 typically developing controls (aged 9-12). In both ADHD-subtypes CE and WM performance was worse than in controls. STM performance of children with ADHD-I was, in contrast to that of children with ADHD-C, not different from controls. STM and WM performance was worse in ADHD-C than in ADHD-I, whereas CE-related performance did not differ. High reinforcement improved STM and WM performance in both subtypes but not in controls. This improvement was equally pronounced in both subtypes. High reinforcement did not improve CE-related performance. Both subtypes have equally pronounced motivational deficits, which have detrimental effects on their visuospatial STM and WM performance. In contrast to children with ADHD-C, children with ADHD-I seem unimpaired on visuospatial STM; only an impaired CE and motivational impairments give rise to their deficits in visuospatial WM.

  9. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo de Anda-Jáuregui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes.In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples is also inferred and analyzed.Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e. CNR2 or to a particular subtype (such as LCK. Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance.With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer.

  10. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda-Jáuregui, Guillermo; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes. In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples) is also inferred and analyzed. Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e., CNR2) or to a particular subtype (such as LCK). Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance. With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer.

  11. Is PIGD a legitimate motor subtype in Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a chronic progressive syndrome with a broad array of clinical features. Different investigators have suggested the heterogeneous motor manifestations of early Parkinson disease can be conceptualized through a taxonomy of clinical subtypes including tremor-predominant and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtypes. Although it is theoretically valuable to distinguish subtypes of Parkinson disease, the reality is that few patients fit these discrete categories well and many transition from exhibiting elements of one subtype to elements of another. In the time since the initial description of the postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtype, Parkinson disease clinical research has blossomed in many ways - including an increased emphasis on the role of medical comorbidities and extranigral pathologies in Parkinson disease as markers of prognostic significance. By conceptualizing the pathogenesis of an expansive disease process in the limited terms of categorical motor subtypes, we run the risk of overlooking or misclassifying clinically significant pathogenic risk factors that lead to the development of motor milestones such as falls and related axial motor disability. Given its critical influence on quality of life and overall prognosis, we are in need of a model of postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features in Parkinson disease that emphasizes the overlooked pathological influence of aging and medical comorbidities on the development of axial motor burden and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features. This Point of View proposes thinking of postural instability and gait difficulties in Parkinson disease not as a discrete subtype, but rather as multidimensional continuum influenced by several overlapping age-related pathologies.

  12. Transcriptional Network Architecture of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda-Jáuregui, Guillermo; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity is evident at the clinical, histological and molecular level. High throughput technologies allowed the identification of intrinsic subtypes that capture transcriptional differences among tumors. A remaining question is whether said differences are associated to a particular transcriptional program which involves different connections between the same molecules. In other words, whether particular transcriptional network architectures can be linked to specific phenotypes. In this work we infer, construct and analyze transcriptional networks from whole-genome gene expression microarrays, by using an information theory approach. We use 493 samples of primary breast cancer tissue classified in four molecular subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, Basal and HER2-enriched. For comparison, a network for non-tumoral mammary tissue (61 samples) is also inferred and analyzed. Transcriptional networks present particular architectures in each breast cancer subtype as well as in the non-tumor breast tissue. We find substantial differences between the non-tumor network and those networks inferred from cancer samples, in both structure and gene composition. More importantly, we find specific network architectural features associated to each breast cancer subtype. Based on breast cancer networks' centrality, we identify genes previously associated to the disease, either, generally (i.e., CNR2) or to a particular subtype (such as LCK). Similarly, we identify LUZP4, a gene barely explored in breast cancer, playing a role in transcriptional networks with subtype-specific relevance. With this approach we observe architectural differences between cancer and non-cancer at network level, as well as differences between cancer subtype networks which might be associated with breast cancer heterogeneity. The centrality measures of these networks allow us to identify genes with potential biomedical implications to breast cancer. PMID:27920729

  13. Variation in Campylobacter Multilocus Sequence Typing Subtypes from Chickens as Detected on Three Plating Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Ladely, S R; Meinersmann, R J; Line, J E; Oakley, B B; Cox, N A

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli detected on three selective Campylobacter plating media to determine whether each medium selected for different subtypes. Fifty ceca and 50 carcasses (representing 50 flocks) were collected from the evisceration line in a commercial broiler processing plant. Campylobacter was cultured and isolated from cecal contents and carcass rinses on Campy-Cefex, Campy Line, and RF Campylobacter jejuni/coli agars. When a positive result was obtained with all three media, one colony of the most prevalent morphology on each medium was selected for further analysis by full genome sequencing and multilocus sequence typing. Sequence types were assigned according to PubMLST. A total of 49 samples were positive for Campylobacter on all three media. Forty samples contained only C. jejuni , three had only C. coli , and both species were detected in six samples. From 71% of samples, Campylobacter isolates of the same sequence type were recovered on all three media. From 81.6% of samples, isolates were all from the same clonal complex. From significantly fewer samples (26%, P Campylobacter jejuni/coli . From one sample, three sequence types were detected. In most cases, all three plating media allowed detection of the same type of Campylobacter from complex naturally contaminated chicken samples.

  14. [Identification of an ABx09 phenotype of ABO subtype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiao-zhen; Ying, Yan-ling; Xu, Xian-guo; Ma, Kai-rong; Lan, Xiao-fei; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Fa-ming; Lv, Hang-jun; Yan, Li-xing

    2011-10-01

    To analyze the molecular basis for an individual with ABx09 phenotype of ABO subtype. The ABO group antigens on red blood cells of the proband were identified by monoclonal antibodies, and the ABO antibody in serum was detected by standard A, B, O cells. The exons 1 to 7 of ABO gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) respectively and the PCR products were sequenced directly. The amplified products for exons 5 to 7 were also cloned by TOPO TA cloning sequencing kit to split the two alleles apart, selected colonies were sequenced bidirectionally for exons 5 to 7 of the ABO gene. The samples of the proband's parents were collected, then serological test of the blood group and sequence analysis for exons 6 and 7 of ABO gene were preformed. Both A and B antigens were detected on red blood cells of the proband and there was anti-B antibody in the serum. There was no G deletion at position 261, while 297AG in exon 6, 467CT, 526CG, 657CT, 703GA, 796CA, 803GC, 889GA and 930GA heterozygote in exon 7 were detected by direct DNA sequencing, which can be assigned for A102Bx09 genotype. After cloning and sequencing, two alleles A102 and Bx09 were obtained. The sequence of Bx09 had one nucleotide changes (G to A) at position 889 compared with that of B101, which resulted in an amino acid change of Glu to Lys at 297 position. The Bx09 in the proband was inherited from her mother by family investigation. G to A at nt889 of alpha-1,3 galactosyltransferasegene can result in Bx09 phenotype, with the presence of anti-B antibody in serum.

  15. Comparison of lung cancer cell lines representing four histopathological subtypes with gene expression profiling using quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancers are the most common type of human malignancy and are intractable. Lung cancers are generally classified into four histopathological subtypes: adenocarcinoma (AD, squamous cell carcinoma (SQ, large cell carcinoma (LC, and small cell carcinoma (SC. Molecular biological characterization of these subtypes has been performed mainly using DNA microarrays. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of these four subtypes using twelve human lung cancer cell lines and the more reliable quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Results We selected 100 genes from public DNA microarray data and examined them by DNA microarray analysis in eight test cell lines (A549, ABC-1, EBC-1, LK-2, LU65, LU99, STC 1, RERF-LC-MA and a normal control lung cell line (MRC-9. From this, we extracted 19 candidate genes. We quantified the expression of the 19 genes and a housekeeping gene, GAPDH, with qPCR, using the same eight cell lines plus four additional validation lung cancer cell lines (RERF-LC-MS, LC-1/sq, 86-2, and MS-1-L. Finally, we characterized the four subtypes of lung cancer cell lines using principal component analysis (PCA of gene expression profiling for 12 of the 19 genes (AMY2A, CDH1, FOXG1, IGSF3, ISL1, MALL, PLAU, RAB25, S100P, SLCO4A1, STMN1, and TGM2. The combined PCA and gene pathway analyses suggested that these genes were related to cell adhesion, growth, and invasion. S100P in AD cells and CDH1 in AD and SQ cells were identified as candidate markers of these lung cancer subtypes based on their upregulation and the results of PCA analysis. Immunohistochemistry for S100P and RAB25 was closely correlated to gene expression. Conclusions These results show that the four subtypes, represented by 12 lung cancer cell lines, were well characterized using qPCR and PCA for the 12 genes examined. Certain genes, in particular S100P and CDH1, may be especially important for distinguishing the different subtypes. Our results

  16. Immunogenicity of a recombinant measles HIV-1 subtype C vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, Richard; Li, Bo; Lorin, Clarisse; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Février, Michèle; Mee, Edward T; Page, Mark; Almond, Neil; Tangy, Frédéric; Voss, Gérald

    2013-12-09

    The HIV epidemic is greatest in Sub-Saharan Africa and India where HIV-1 subtype C is predominant. To control the spread of HIV in these parts of the world a preventive HIV-1 subtype C vaccine is urgently required. Here we report the immunogenicity of a candidate HIV-1 subtype C vaccine delivered by a recombinant measles vector carrying an insert encoding HIV-1 subtype C Gag, RT and Nef (MV1-F4), in MHC-typed non-human primates. HIV-1 specific cytokine secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were detected in 15 out of 16 vaccinees. These HIV-specific T cell responses persisted in lymphoid tissues. Anti-HIV-1 antibody responses were detected in 15 out of 16 vaccinees and titres were boosted by a second immunisation carried out 84 days later. These findings support further exploration of the MV1-F4 vector as a candidate HIV-1 subtype C vaccine or as part of a wider vaccine strategy.

  17. Long noncoding RNA profiles reveal three molecular subtypes in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Qian, Jin; Wang, Ying-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Xia; You, Yong-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Gliomas are the most lethal type of primary brain tumor in adult. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are involved in the progression of various cancers, may offer a potential gene therapy target in glioma. We first classified gliomas into three molecular subtypes (namely LncR1, LncR2 and LncR3) in Rembrandt dataset using consensus clustering. Survival analysis indicated that LncR3 had the best prognosis, while the LncR1 subtype showed the poorest overall survival rate. The results were further validated in an independent glioma dataset GSE16011. Additionally, we collected and merged data of the two databases (Rembrandt and GSE16011 dataset) and analyzed prognosis of each subtype in WHO II, III and IV gliomas. The similar results were obtained. Gene Set Variation Analysis (GSVA) demonstrated that LncR1 subtype enriched cultured astroglia's gene signature, while LncR2 subtype was characterized by neuronal gene signature. Oligodendrocytic was rich in LncR3. In addition, IDH1 mutation and 1p/19q LOH were found rich with LncR3, and EGFR amplification showed high percentage in LncR1 in GSE16011 dataset. We report a novel molecular classification of glioma based on lncRNA expression profiles and believe that it would provide a potential platform for future studies on gene treatment for glioma and lead to more individualized therapies to improve survival rates. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain as determined in binding studies with AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, E.; Hammer, R.; Ladinsky, H.

    1987-03-02

    In vitro competition binding experiments with the selective muscarinic antagonists AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine (PZ) vs /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine as radioligand revealed a characteristic distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in different regions of rat brain. Based on nonlinear least squares analysis, the binding data were compatible with the presence of three different subtypes: the M/sub 1/ receptor (high affinity for PZ), the cardiac M/sub 2/ receptor (high affinity for AF-DX 116) and the glandular M/sub 2/ receptor (low affinity for PZ and AF-DX 116). The highest proportion of M/sub 1/ receptors was found in the hippocampus, while the cerebellum and the hypothalamus were the regions with the largest fraction of the cardiac M/sub 2/ and glandular M/sub 2/ receptors, respectively. In certain brain areas, depending on the relative proportions of the subtypes, flat binding curves were seen for AF-DX 116 and PZ. Based on these data, an approximate distribution pattern of the subtypes in the various brain regions is presented. 19 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  19. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated With Learning Disability Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M; Holland, Sara C; Kubas, Hanna A; Fitzer, Kim R; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A; Fraccaro, Rebecca L; Smith, Amanda D; Macoun, Sarah J; Harrison, Gina L; Hale, James B

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent comprehensive evaluations for learning and/or behavior problems in two Pacific Northwest school districts. Using concordance-discordance model (C-DM) processing strengths and weaknesses SLD identification criteria, results revealed working memory SLD (n = 20), processing speed SLD (n = 30), executive SLD (n = 32), and no disability groups (n = 41). Of the SLD subtypes, repeated measures MANOVA results revealed the processing speed SLD subtype exhibited the greatest psychosocial and adaptive impairment according to teacher behavior ratings. Findings suggest processing speed deficits may be behind the cognitive and psychosocial disturbances found in what has been termed "nonverbal" SLD. Limitations, implications, and future research needs are addressed.

  20. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I. [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Revmatizma; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter`s syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Parkinson's disease severity and motor subtype influence physical capacity components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pinto Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The severity of Parkinson's disease (PD and PD's motor subtypes influence the components of physical capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of both PD severity and motor subtype in the performance of these components. Thirty-six PD patients were assigned into four groups: Tremor (TD initial and TD mild, akinetic-rigid (AR initial, and AR mild. Patients' strength, balance, coordination, mobility and aerobic capacity were evaluated and groups were compared using a two-way ANOVA (severity and subtype as factors. AR presents a poorer performance than TD in almost all tests. Also this performance was worsened with the advance of the disease in AR, contrary to TD. We conclude that AR and TD subgroups are different about their performance on physical capacity components, moreover, this performance worsens with the advance of the disease of the AR group, but not for TD.

  2. Regular Expression Subtyping for XML Query and Update Languages

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, James

    2008-01-01

    XML database query languages such as XQuery employ regular expression types with structural subtyping. Subtyping systems typically have two presentations, which should be equivalent: a declarative version in which the subsumption rule may be used anywhere, and an algorithmic version in which the use of subsumption is limited in order to make typechecking syntax-directed and decidable. However, the XQuery standard type system circumvents this issue by using imprecise typing rules for iteration constructs and defining only algorithmic typechecking, and another extant proposal provides more precise types for iteration constructs but ignores subtyping. In this paper, we consider a core XQuery-like language with a subsumption rule and prove the completeness of algorithmic typechecking; this is straightforward for XQuery proper but requires some care in the presence of more precise iteration typing disciplines. We extend this result to an XML update language we have introduced in earlier work.

  3. Groin hernia subtypes are associated in patients with bilateral hernias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian;

    2015-01-01

    for a DIH. Females and males operated for a unilaterally indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) had HRs of 6.93 (CI 95% 3.66-13.11) and 1.89 (CI95% 1.24-2.88) for being contralaterally operated for an IIH. The same tendency was seen for femoral hernias. CONCLUSIONS: All hernia subtypes were bilaterally associated......BACKGROUND: To investigate the relation between groin hernia subtypes in patients operated for bilateral hernias. METHODS: With data from the Danish Hernia Database, we identified all patients operated for primary groin hernias from 1998 to 2012. Within this cohort all patients that were...... bilaterally operated were analyzed. Risk factors for bilateral groin hernia operation as well as the relationship between groin hernia subtypes bilaterally, were analyzed using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and Kappa statistics. RESULTS: A total of 108, 775 persons with primary groin hernia...

  4. Fractionation of human H1 subtypes and characterization of a subtype-specific antibody exhibiting non-uniform nuclear staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parseghian, M H; Clark, R F; Hauser, L J; Dvorkin, N; Harris, D A; Hamkalo, B A

    1993-07-01

    Four histone H1 subtypes and H1(0) were fractionated from human placental nuclei and purified to homogeneity by a combination of Bio-Rex 70 chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits against one of these subtypes designated H1-3. Antibodies reacted only against this subtype in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and Western assays; subtype specificity was documented further by Western blotting of cell and nuclear extracts. They crossreacted with monkey H1, but not with H1 from other vertebrates tested. The epitope(s) recognized were mapped by immunoblotting against peptides prepared by cleavage with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and alpha-chymotrypsin; it includes the variant amino-terminal tail of the protein as well as a portion of the globular domain. The antibody stains mitotic chromosomes weakly but uniformly and, unlike antibodies that recognize total H1 which show uniform nuclear staining after indirect immunofluorescence localization, anti-H1-3 exhibits preferential labelling of the nuclear periphery. This non-uniform staining suggests compartmentalization of this subtype which may have functional significance with respect to differential chromatin condensation.

  5. Therapeutic response to benzodiazepine in panic disorder subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Valença

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: This study makes a comparison between two subtypes of panic disorder regarding the clinical efficacy of clonazepam, a benzodiazepine. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of clonazepam in a fixed dosage (2 mg/day, compared to placebo, in the treatment of panic disorder patients and to verify whether there are any differences in the responses to clonazepam between panic disorder patients with the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes. TYPE OF STUDY: Randomized study with clonazepam and placebo. SETTING: Outpatient Anxiety and Depression Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 34 patients with a diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia, between 18 and 55 years old. PROCEDURES: Administration of clonazepam or placebo for 6 weeks, in panic disorder patients, after they were classified within two subtypes of panic disorder: respiratory and non-respiratory. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Changes in the number of panic attacks in comparison with the period before the beginning of the study; Hamilton Anxiety Scale; Global Clinical Impression Scale; and Patient's Global Impression scale. RESULTS: In the group that received clonazepam, by the end of the 6th week there was a statistically significant clinical improvement, shown by the remission of panic attacks (p < 0.001 and decrease in anxiety (p = 0.024. In the group that received clonazepam there was no significant difference between the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, regarding the therapeutic response to clonazepam. CONCLUSION: Clonazepam was equally effective in the treatment of the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, suggesting there is no difference in the therapeutic response between the two subtypes.

  6. Pain Experience in Dementia Subtypes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnekade, Tarik T; Van Kooten, Janime; Lobbezoo, Frank; Rhebergen, Didi; Van der Wouden, J C; Smalbrugge, Martin; Scherder, Erik J A

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the number of studies focusing on pain in dementia has increased considerably. Still, little attention has been paid to the influence of the neuropathology of different dementia subtypes on pain experience. In 2003, a review identified several studies that indicated a relation between dementia subtype and pain experience. Now, ten years later, an update is warranted. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that assessed pain experience and dementia subtypes by searching PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: (1) major dementia subtype diagnosis i.e. Alzheimer's dementia (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB); (2) age ≥60 years; and (3) pain experience. We identified twelve studies that addressed AD, three studies VaD, one study FTD, and no studies DLB. In AD, studies on clinical pain indicate a reduced pain experience compared to controls, whereas experimental studies show inconsistent findings. In VaD, clinical studies found that primary caregivers rated pain equal to cognitively intact controls, although more painful locations were reported. During self-report, elderly with VaD reported higher pain levels than cognitively intact controls. In FTD, a significantly lower pain sensitivity to experimental pain was found. Considering the limited number of studies, these findings should be considered with caution. Existing literature provides some evidence that dementia subtype affects pain experience. Further research is needed to clarify the relation between dementia subtype and pain experience as it could serve as basis for improving the assessment and management of pain in people with dementia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Subtypes of Preterm Birth and the Risk of Postneonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D.; DeFranco, Emily A.; Chung, Ethan; Chen, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the differences in postneonatal death risk among 3 clinical subtypes of preterm birth: preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM), indicated preterm birth, and spontaneous preterm labor. Study design We analyzed the 2001–2005 US linked birth/infant death (birth cohort) datasets. The preterm birth subtypes were classified using information on the birth certificate: reported PROM, induction of labor, cesarean section, and complications of pregnancy and labor. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate covariate-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs for postneonatal death (from days 28 to 365). Estimation was given for preterm birth subtypes in a week-by-week analysis. Causes of death were analyzed by preterm birth subtype and then separately at 24–27, 28–31, and 32–36 weeks of gestation. Results For the total of 1 895 350 singleton preterm births who survived the neonatal period, the postneonatal mortality rate was 1.11% for preterm PROM, 0.78% for indicated preterm birth, and 0.53% for spontaneous preterm labor. Preterm PROM was associated with significantly higher risk of postneonatal death compared with spontaneous preterm labor in infants born at 27 weeks gestation or later. Similarly, indicated preterm birth was associated with a significantly higher risk of postneonatal death than spontaneous preterm labor in infants born at 25 weeks gestation or later. Preterm PROM and indicated preterm birth were associated with greater risk of death in the postneonatal period compared with spontaneous preterm labor, irrespective of the cause of death. Conclusion Subtypes of preterm birth carry different risks of postneonatal mortality. Prevention of preterm-related postneonatal death may require more research into the root causes of preterm birth subtypes. PMID:22878113

  8. Identification of Blastocystis Subtype 1 Variants in the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pipatsatitpong, Duangnate; Tan-ariya, Peerapan; Naaglor, Tawee; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of Blastocystis infection was conducted to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors, and subtypes of Blastocystis at the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand in November 2008. Of 370 stool samples, 118 (31.9%) were infected with Blastocystis. Genotypic characterization of Blastocystis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Subtype 1 was the most predominant (94.8%), followed by subtype 6 (3.5%) and subtype 2 (1.7%). Sequence analyses revealed nucleotide polymorphisms for Blastocystis subtype 1, which were described as subtype 1/variant 1, subtype 1/variant 2. Blastocystis subtype 1/variant 1 was the most predominant infection occurring in almost every house. The results showed that subtype analysis of Blastocystis was useful for molecular epidemiological study. PMID:23166199

  9. Identification of Blastocystis subtype 1 variants in the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pipatsatitpong, Duangnate; Tan-ariya, Peerapan; Naaglor, Tawee; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2013-02-01

    A cross-sectional study of Blastocystis infection was conducted to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors, and subtypes of Blastocystis at the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand in November 2008. Of 370 stool samples, 118 (31.9%) were infected with Blastocystis. Genotypic characterization of Blastocystis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Subtype 1 was the most predominant (94.8%), followed by subtype 6 (3.5%) and subtype 2 (1.7%). Sequence analyses revealed nucleotide polymorphisms for Blastocystis subtype 1, which were described as subtype 1/variant 1, subtype 1/variant 2. Blastocystis subtype 1/variant 1 was the most predominant infection occurring in almost every house. The results showed that subtype analysis of Blastocystis was useful for molecular epidemiological study.

  10. Identification of Multiple Subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni in Chicken Meat and the Impact on Source Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Hudson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Most source attribution studies for Campylobacter use subtyping data based on single isolates from foods and environmental sources in an attempt to draw epidemiological inferences. It has been suggested that subtyping only one Campylobacter isolate per chicken carcass incurs a risk of failing to recognise the presence of clinically relevant, but numerically infrequent, subtypes. To investigate this, between 21 and 25 Campylobacter jejuni isolates from each of ten retail chicken carcasses were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE using the two restriction enzymes SmaI and KpnI. Among the 227 isolates, thirteen subtypes were identified, the most frequently occurring subtype being isolated from three carcasses. Six carcasses carried a single subtype, three carcasses carried two subtypes each and one carcass carried three subtypes. Some subtypes carried by an individual carcass were shown to be potentially clonally related. Comparison of C. jejuni subtypes from chickens with isolate subtypes from human clinical cases (n = 1248 revealed seven of the thirteen chicken subtypes were indistinguishable from human cases. None of the numerically minor chicken subtypes were identified in the human data. Therefore, typing only one Campylobacter isolate from individual chicken carcasses may be adequate to inform Campylobacter source attribution.

  11. Differentiation of Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor on I-123 IPT(I-123-N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-cholorophenyl) tropane) Brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Moon Sun [Kwandong University College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Tae Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Min [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jai Yong; Ryu, Won Gee; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    The study was to assess I-123-N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2[beta]-carbomethoxy-3[beta]-(4-cholorophenyl) tropane (IPT) SPECT in differential diagnosis among early stage of Parkinson's disease(PD) and essential tremor(ET) and normal control(NL) groups quantitatively. I-123 IPT brain SPECT of 50 NL, 20 early PD, 30 advanced PD, and 20 ET were performed at 20 minutes and 2 hours. Specific/nonspecific binding of striatum was calculated by using right and left striatal specific to occipital non-specific uptake ratio (striatum-OCC/OCC). Mean value of specific/nonspecific binding ratio was significantly different between advanced PD group and NL group. However, significant overlap of striatal specific/nonspecific binding ratio was observed between PD group and ET group. Bilateral striatal specific/nonspecific binding ratios were decreased in advanced PD. Lateralized differences in the striatal uptake of I-123 IPT correlated with asymmetry in clinical findings in PD group. I-123 IPT SPECT may be a useful method for the diagnosis of PD and objective evaluation of progress of clinical stages. Care should be made in the differential diagnosis of early stage of PD and other motor disturbances mimicking PD such as ET in view of significant overlap in striatal I-123 specific/nonspecific binding ratio.

  12. Bulimia nervosa-nonpurging subtype: closer to the bulimia nervosa-purging subtype or to binge eating disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer; McIntosh, Virginia V W; Carter, Janet D; Rowe, Sarah; Taylor, Kathryn; Frampton, Christopher M A; McKenzie, Janice M; Latner, Janet; Joyce, Peter R

    2014-04-01

    DSM-5 has dropped subtyping of bulimia nervosa (BN), opting to continue inclusion of the somewhat contentious diagnosis of BN-nonpurging subtype (BN-NP) within a broad BN category. Some contend however that BN-NP is more like binge eating disorder (BED) than BN-P. This study examines clinical characteristics, eating disorder symptomatology, and Axis I comorbidity in BN-NP, BN-P, and BED groups to establish whether BN-NP more closely resembles BN-P or BED. Women with BN-P (n = 29), BN-NP (n = 29), and BED (n = 54) were assessed at baseline in an outpatient psychotherapy trial for those with binge eating. Measures included the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV, Eating Disorder Examination, and Eating Disorder Inventory-2. The BN-NP subtype had BMIs between those with BN-P and BED. Both BN subtypes had higher Restraint and Drive for Thinness scores than BED. Body Dissatisfaction was highest in BN-NP and predicted BN-NP compared to BN-P. Higher Restraint and lower BMI predicted BN-NP relative to BED. BN-NP resembled BED with higher lifetime BMIs; and weight-loss clinic than eating disorder clinic attendances relative to the BN-P subtype. Psychiatric comorbidity was comparable except for higher lifetime cannabis use disorder in the BN-NP than BN-P subtype These results suggest that BN-NP sits between BN-P and BED however the high distress driving inappropriate compensatory behaviors in BN-P requires specialist eating disorder treatment. These results support retaining the BN-NP group within the BN category. Further research is needed to determine whether there are meaningful differences in outcome over follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HIV-1 subtype C envelope characteristics associated with divergent rates of chronic disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulder Philip JR

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 envelope diversity remains a significant challenge for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The evolutionary forces that shape the diversity of envelope are incompletely understood. HIV-1 subtype C envelope in particular shows significant differences and unique characteristics compared to its subtype B counterpart. Here we applied the single genome sequencing strategy of plasma derived virus from a cohort of therapy naïve chronically infected individuals in order to study diversity, divergence patterns and envelope characteristics across the entire HIV-1 subtype C gp160 in 4 slow progressors and 4 progressors over an average of 19.5 months. Results Sequence analysis indicated that intra-patient nucleotide diversity within the entire envelope was higher in slow progressors, but did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.07. However, intra-patient nucleotide diversity was significantly higher in slow progressors compared to progressors in the C2 (p = 0.0006, V3 (p = 0.01 and C3 (p = 0.005 regions. Increased amino acid length and fewer potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGs were observed in the V1-V4 in slow progressors compared to progressors (p = 0.009 and p = 0.02 respectively. Similarly, gp41 in the progressors was significantly longer and had fewer PNGs compared to slow progressors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.02 respectively. Positive selection hotspots mapped mainly to V1, C3, V4, C4 and gp41 in slow progressors, whereas hotspots mapped mainly to gp41 in progressors. Signature consensus sequence differences between the groups occurred mainly in gp41. Conclusions These data suggest that separate regions of envelope are under differential selective forces, and that envelope evolution differs based on disease course. Differences between slow progressors and progressors may reflect differences in immunological pressure and immune evasion mechanisms. These data also indicate that the pattern of envelope evolution

  14. Subtype- and antigenic site-specific differences in biophysical influences on evolution of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stray Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus undergoes rapid evolution by both antigenic shift and antigenic drift. Antibodies, particularly those binding near the receptor-binding site of hemagglutinin (HA or the neuraminidase (NA active site, are thought to be the primary defense against influenza infection, and mutations in antibody binding sites can reduce or eliminate antibody binding. The binding of antibodies to their cognate antigens is governed by such biophysical properties of the interacting surfaces as shape, non-polar and polar surface area, and charge. Methods To understand forces shaping evolution of influenza virus, we have examined HA sequences of human influenza A and B viruses, assigning each amino acid values reflecting total accessible surface area, non-polar and polar surface area, and net charge due to the side chain. Changes in each of these values between neighboring sequences were calculated for each residue and mapped onto the crystal structures. Results Areas of HA showing the highest frequency of pairwise changes agreed well with previously identified antigenic sites in H3 and H1 HAs, and allowed us to propose more detailed antigenic maps and novel antigenic sites for H1 and influenza B HA. Changes in biophysical properties differed between HAs of different subtypes, and between different antigenic sites of the same HA. For H1, statistically significant differences in several biophysical quantities compared to residues lying outside antigenic sites were seen for some antigenic sites but not others. Influenza B antigenic sites all show statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities for all antigenic sites, whereas no statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities were seen for any antigenic site is seen for H3. In many cases, residues previously shown to be under positive selection at the genetic level also undergo rapid change in biophysical properties. Conclusions The biophysical

  15. Regulation of nicotinic receptor subtypes following chronic nicotinic agonist exposure in M10 and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warpman, U; Friberg, L; Gillespie, A

    1998-01-01

    The present study further investigated whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes differ in their ability to up-regulate following chronic exposure to nicotinic agonists. Seven nicotinic agonists were studied for their ability to influence the number of chick alpha4beta2 n......AChR binding sites stably transfected in fibroblasts (M10 cells) following 3 days of exposure. The result showed a positive correlation between the Ki values for binding inhibition and EC50 values for agonist-induced alpha4beta2 nAChR up-regulation. The effects of epibatidine and nicotine were further...... investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (expressing alpha3, alpha5, beta2, and beta4 nAChR subunits). Nicotine exhibited a 14 times lower affinity for the nAChRs in SH-SY5Y cells as compared with M10 cells, whereas epibatidine showed similar affinities for the nAChRs expressed in the two cell lines...

  16. ΔFosB induction in striatal medium spiny neuron subtypes in response to chronic pharmacological, emotional, and optogenetic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Mary Kay; Zaman, Samir; Damez-Werno, Diane M; Koo, Ja Wook; Bagot, Rosemary C; DiNieri, Jennifer A; Nugent, Alexandria; Finkel, Eric; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Chandra, Ramesh; Riberio, Efrain; Rabkin, Jacqui; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Cachope, Roger; Cheer, Joseph F; Han, Ming-Hu; Dietz, David M; Self, David W; Hurd, Yasmin L; Vialou, Vincent; Nestler, Eric J

    2013-11-20

    The transcription factor, ΔFosB, is robustly and persistently induced in striatum by several chronic stimuli, such as drugs of abuse, antipsychotic drugs, natural rewards, and stress. However, very few studies have examined the degree of ΔFosB induction in the two striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) subtypes. We make use of fluorescent reporter BAC transgenic mice to evaluate induction of ΔFosB in dopamine receptor 1 (D1) enriched and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) enriched MSNs in ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, and in dorsal striatum (dStr) after chronic exposure to several drugs of abuse including cocaine, ethanol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and opiates; the antipsychotic drug, haloperidol; juvenile enrichment; sucrose drinking; calorie restriction; the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, fluoxetine; and social defeat stress. Our findings demonstrate that chronic exposure to many stimuli induces ΔFosB in an MSN-subtype selective pattern across all three striatal regions. To explore the circuit-mediated induction of ΔFosB in striatum, we use optogenetics to enhance activity in limbic brain regions that send synaptic inputs to NAc; these regions include the ventral tegmental area and several glutamatergic afferent regions: medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and ventral hippocampus. These optogenetic conditions lead to highly distinct patterns of ΔFosB induction in MSN subtypes in NAc core and shell. Together, these findings establish selective patterns of ΔFosB induction in striatal MSN subtypes in response to chronic stimuli and provide novel insight into the circuit-level mechanisms of ΔFosB induction in striatum.

  17. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); K. Angelis (Konstantinos); I. Mamais (Ioannis); Katzourakis, A. (Aris); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); J. Albert (Jan); Lawyer, G. (Glenn); O. Hamouda (Osamah); D. Struck (Daniel); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); A. Wensing (Amj); I. Alexiev (Ivailo); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); C. Balotta (Claudia); Gomes, P. (Perpétua); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); S. Coughlan (Suzie); A. Griskevicius (Algirdas); Z. Grossman (Zehava); Horban, A. (Anders); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); Lepej, S.J. (Snjezana J.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Linka (Marek); C. Nielsen; D. Otelea (Dan); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); J.C. Schmit; A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); Stylianou, D.C. (Dora C.); C.A. Boucher (Charles); Nikolopoulos, G. (Georgios); Vasylyeva, T. (Tetyana); Friedman, S.R. (Samuel R.); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); G. Angarano (Guiseppe); M.L. Chaix (Marie Laure); A. de Luca (Andrea); K. Korn (Klaus); Loveday, C. (Clive); V. Soriano (Virtudes); S. Yerly (Sabine); M. Zazzi; A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa

  18. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Angelis, Konstantinos; Mamais, Ioannis; Katzourakis, Aris; Hatzakis, Angelos; Albert, Jan; Lawyer, Glenn; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Anders; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Lepej, Snjezana J.; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elizabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Stylianou, Dora C.; Boucher, Charles A B; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Friedman, Samuel R.; van de Vijver, David; Angarano, Gioacchino; Chaix, Marie Laure; de Luca, Andrea; Korn, Klaus; Loveday, Clive; Soriano, Vincent; Yerly, Sabine; Zazzi, Mauricio; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa through Haiti

  19. Sensory Processing Subtypes in Autism: Association with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Young, Robyn L.; Baker, Amy E. Z.; Angley, Manya T.

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes…

  20. Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Dennis, Simon J.; Geraghty, Maureen E.

    2011-01-01

    Distinct sensory processing (SP) subtypes in autism have been reported previously. This study sought to replicate the previous findings in an independent sample of thirty children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Model-based cluster analysis of parent-reported sensory functioning (measured using the Short Sensory Profile) confirmed the…

  1. Defining breast cancer intrinsic subtypes by quantitative receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, Maggie C U; Martin, Miguel; Nielsen, Torsten O; Prat, Aleix; Voduc, David; Rodriguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Ruiz, Amparo; Chia, Stephen; Shepherd, Lois; Ruiz-Borrego, Manuel; Calvo, Lourdes; Alba, Emilio; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalia; Tu, Dongsheng; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Levine, Mark N; Bramwell, Vivien H; Parker, Joel; Bernard, Philip S; Ellis, Matthew J; Perou, Charles M; Di Leo, Angelo; Carey, Lisa A

    2015-05-01

    To determine intrinsic breast cancer subtypes represented within categories defined by quantitative hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 expression. We merged 1,557 cases from three randomized phase III trials into a single data set. These breast tumors were centrally reviewed in each trial for quantitative ER, PR, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) stain and by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), with intrinsic subtyping by research-based PAM50 RT-qPCR assay. Among 283 HER2-negative tumors with definition of triple-negative breast cancer significantly diminished enrichment for basal-like cancer (p 10%) expression, only 69 (54%) were HER2-enriched and 55 (43%) were luminal (39 luminal B, 16 luminal A). Quantitative HR expression by RT-qPCR gave similar results. Regardless of methodology, basal-like cases seldom expressed ER/ESR1 or PR/PGR and were associated with the lowest expression level of HER2/ERBB2 relative to other subtypes. Significant discordance remains between clinical assay-defined subsets and intrinsic subtype. For identifying basal-like breast cancer, the optimal HR IHC cut point was <1%, matching the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists guidelines. Tumors with borderline HR staining are molecularly diverse and may require additional assays to clarify underlying biology. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Identifying Psychopathy Subtypes on the Basis of Personality Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian M.; Markon, Kristian E.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Krueger, Robert F.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    The authors used model-based cluster analysis to identify subtypes of criminal psychopaths on the basis of differences in personality structure. Participants included 96 male prisoners diagnosed as psychopathic, using the Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991). Personality was assessed using the brief form of the Multidimensional…

  3. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for detecting type B Clostridium botulinum toxin produced in pure culture and an inoculated model cured meat system...Characterization of botulinum neurotoxin A subtypes 1 through 5 by investigation of activities in mice, in neuronal cell cultures , and in vitro, Infect

  4. Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal…

  5. Phonological and Surface Subtypes among University Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of phonological and surface dyslexia subtypes among Swedish university students with dyslexia (n = 40) was examined using both the regression method, developed by Castles and Coltheart, and latent profile analysis. When an academic-level control group was used as a reference group in a regression, eight students with phonological…

  6. Preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by perfusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shen, Tianzhen [Fudan University Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Miao, Jingtao [Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2008-10-15

    This paper aims to evaluate the value of perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by analyzing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) of three benign subtypes and anaplastic meningiomas separately. Thirty-seven meningiomas with peritumoral edema (15 meningothelial, ten fibrous, four angiomatous, and eight anaplastic) underwent perfusion MR imaging by using a gradient echo echo-planar sequence. The maximal rCBV (compared with contralateral normal white matter) in both tumoral parenchyma and peritumoral edema of each tumor was measured. The mean rCBVs of each two histological subtypes were compared using one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference tests. A p value less than 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The mean rCBV of meningothelial, fibrous, angiomatous, and anaplastic meningiomas in tumoral parenchyma were 6.93{+-}3.75, 5.61{+-}4.03, 11.86{+-}1.93, and 5.89{+-}3.85, respectively, and in the peritumoral edema 0.87{+-}0.62, 1.38{+-}1.44, 0.87{+-}0.30, and 3.28{+-}1.39, respectively. The mean rCBV in tumoral parenchyma of angiomatous meningiomas and in the peritumoral edema of anaplastic meningiomas were statistically different (p<0.05) from the other types of meningiomas. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful functional information on meningiomas and help in the preoperative diagnosis of some subtypes of meningiomas. (orig.)

  7. Central Timing Deficits in Subtypes of Primary Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a proposed speech disorder subtype that interferes with motor planning and/or programming, affecting prosody in many cases. Pilot data (Peter & Stoel-Gammon, 2005) were consistent with the notion that deficits in timing accuracy in speech and music-related tasks may be associated with CAS. This study…

  8. Depression and anxiety related subtypes in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard G; Landau, Sabine; Hindle, John V; Playfer, Jeremy; Samuel, Michael; Wilson, Kenneth C; Hurt, Catherine S; Anderson, Rachel J; Carnell, Joanna; Dickinson, Lucy; Gibson, Grant; van Schaick, Rachel; Sellwood, Katie; Thomas, Bonnita A; Burn, David J

    2011-07-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and although clinically important remain poorly understood and managed. To date, research has tended to treat depression and anxiety as distinct phenomena. There is growing evidence for heterogeneity in PD in the motor and cognitive domains, with implications for pathophysiology and outcome. Similar heterogeneity may exist in the domain of depression and anxiety. To identify the main anxiety and depression related subtype(s) in PD and their associated demographic and clinical features. A sample of 513 patients with PD received a detailed assessment of depression and anxiety related symptomatology. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to identify putative depression and anxiety related subtypes. Results LCA identified four classes, two interpretable as 'anxiety related': one anxiety alone (22.0%) and the other anxiety coexisting with prominent depressive symptoms (8.6%). A third subtype (9%) showed a prominent depressive profile only without significant anxiety. The final class (60.4%) showed a low probability of prominent affective symptoms. The validity of the four classes was supported by distinct patterns of association with important demographic and clinical variables. Depression in PD may manifest in two clinical phenotypes, one 'anxious-depressed' and the other 'depressed'. However, a further large proportion of patients can have relatively isolated anxiety. Further study of these putative phenotypes may identify important differences in pathophysiology and other aetiologically important factors and focus research on developing more targeted and effective treatment.

  9. Associations among Empathy, Social Competence, & Reactive/Proactive Aggression Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Megan L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2007-01-01

    Differences between proactive and reactive aggression subtypes on self-reported measures of empathy, social competence, and expectation for reward were examined among 433 middle school students (65.4% White, 33.9% Black). As hypothesized, males scored higher on proactive and reactive aggression scales and lower on empathy measures than females.…

  10. Salmonella Source Attribution in Japan by a Microbiological Subtyping Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyofuku, Hajime; Pires, Sara Monteiro; Hald, Tine

    2011-01-01

    In order to estimate the number of human Salmonella infections attributable to each of major animal-food source, and help identifying the best Salmonella intervention strategies, a microbial subtyping approach for source attribution was applied. We adapted a Bayesian model that attributes illnesses...

  11. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated with Learning Disability Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M.; Holland, Sara C.; Kubas, Hanna A.; Fitzer, Kim R.; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A.; Fraccaro, Rebecca L.; Smith, Amanda D.; Macoun, Sarah J.; Harrison, Gina L.; Hale, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent…

  12. Phonological and Surface Subtypes among University Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of phonological and surface dyslexia subtypes among Swedish university students with dyslexia (n = 40) was examined using both the regression method, developed by Castles and Coltheart, and latent profile analysis. When an academic-level control group was used as a reference group in a regression, eight students with phonological…

  13. Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal…

  14. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); K. Angelis (Konstantinos); I. Mamais (Ioannis); Katzourakis, A. (Aris); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); J. Albert (Jan); Lawyer, G. (Glenn); O. Hamouda (Osamah); D. Struck (Daniel); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); A. Wensing (Amj); I. Alexiev (Ivailo); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); C. Balotta (Claudia); Gomes, P. (Perpétua); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); S. Coughlan (Suzie); A. Griskevicius (Algis); Z. Grossman (Zehava); Horban, A. (Anders); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); Lepej, S.J. (Snjezana J.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Linka (Marek); C. Nielsen; D. Otelea (Dan); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); J.C. Schmit; A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); Stylianou, D.C. (Dora C.); C.A. Boucher (Charles); Nikolopoulos, G. (Georgios); Vasylyeva, T. (Tetyana); Friedman, S.R. (Samuel R.); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); G. Angarano (Guiseppe); M.L. Chaix (Marie Laure); A. de Luca (Andrea); K. Korn (Klaus); Loveday, C. (Clive); V. Soriano (Virtudes); S. Yerly (Sabine); M. Zazzi; A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa th

  15. The Boder Test: Neuropsychological and Demographic Features of Dyslexic Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzrow, Cathy F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the demographic and neuropsychological characteristics of 30 children in reading categories defined by performance on the Boder Test. Provided evidence that the Boder Test may be a nonbiased valid screening test for the identification of dyslexia and dyslexic subtypes. (JAC)

  16. Close phylogenetic relationship between Angolan and Romanian HIV-1 subtype F1 isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Monick L; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Otsuki, Koko; da Silva, Rosa Ferreira FC; Francisco, Moises; da Silva, Filomena Gomes; Serrano, Ducelina; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Here, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the HIV-1 subtype F1 circulating in Angola with subtype F1 strains sampled worldwide and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this subtype in Central Africa. Methods Forty-six HIV-1-positive samples were collected in Angola in 2006 and subtyped at the env-gp41 region. Partial env-gp120 and pol-RT sequences and near full-length genomes from those env-gp41 subtype F1 samples were further generated. Phylogenetic analyses of partial and full-length subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide were carried out. The onset date of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central Africa was estimated using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Results Nine Angolan samples were classified as subtype F1 based on the analysis of the env-gp41 region. All nine Angolan sequences were also classified as subtype F1 in both env-gp120 and pol-RT genomic regions, and near full-length genome analysis of four of these samples confirmed their classification as "pure" subtype F1. Phylogenetic analyses of subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide revealed that isolates from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were the earliest branching lineages within the subtype F1 phylogeny. Most strains from Angola segregated in a monophyletic group together with Romanian sequences; whereas South American F1 sequences emerged as an independent cluster. The origin of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central African was estimated at 1958 (1934–1971). Conclusion "Pure" subtype F1 strains are common in Angola and seem to be the result of a single founder event. Subtype F1 sequences from Angola are closely related to those described in Romania, and only distantly related to the subtype F1 lineage circulating in South America. Original diversification of subtype F1 probably occurred within the DRC around the late 1950s. PMID:19386115

  17. Close phylogenetic relationship between Angolan and Romanian HIV-1 subtype F1 isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Ducelina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the HIV-1 subtype F1 circulating in Angola with subtype F1 strains sampled worldwide and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this subtype in Central Africa. Methods Forty-six HIV-1-positive samples were collected in Angola in 2006 and subtyped at the env-gp41 region. Partial env-gp120 and pol-RT sequences and near full-length genomes from those env-gp41 subtype F1 samples were further generated. Phylogenetic analyses of partial and full-length subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide were carried out. The onset date of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central Africa was estimated using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Results Nine Angolan samples were classified as subtype F1 based on the analysis of the env-gp41 region. All nine Angolan sequences were also classified as subtype F1 in both env-gp120 and pol-RT genomic regions, and near full-length genome analysis of four of these samples confirmed their classification as "pure" subtype F1. Phylogenetic analyses of subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide revealed that isolates from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC were the earliest branching lineages within the subtype F1 phylogeny. Most strains from Angola segregated in a monophyletic group together with Romanian sequences; whereas South American F1 sequences emerged as an independent cluster. The origin of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central African was estimated at 1958 (1934–1971. Conclusion "Pure" subtype F1 strains are common in Angola and seem to be the result of a single founder event. Subtype F1 sequences from Angola are closely related to those described in Romania, and only distantly related to the subtype F1 lineage circulating in South America. Original diversification of subtype F1 probably occurred within the DRC around the late 1950s.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of salmonid alphavirus (SAV subtype 3 in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Mona D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreas disease (PD is a viral fish disease which in recent years has significantly affected Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. In Norway, the aetiological agent salmonid alphavirus (SAV has been found to be represented by the subtype 3 only. SAV subtype 3 has in previous analyses been found to show a lower genetic divergence than the subtypes found to cause PD in Ireland and Scotland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nucleotide (nt and amino acid divergence and the phylogenetic relationship of 33 recent SAV subtype 3 sequences. The samples from which the sequences were obtained originated from both PD endemic and non-endemic regions in an attempt to investigate agent origin/spread. Multiple samples throughout the seawater production phase from several salmonid populations were included to investigate genetic variation during an outbreak. The analyses were mainly based on partial sequences from the E2 gene. For some samples, additional partial 6 K and nsP3 gene sequences were available. Results The nucleotide divergence for all gene fragments ranged from total identity (0.0% divergence to 0.45% (1103 nt fragment of E2, 1.11% (451 nt fragment of E2, 0.94% (6 K and 0.28% (nsP3. This low nucleotide divergence corresponded well to previous reports on SAV 3 sequences; however the observed divergence for the short E2 fragment was higher than that previously reported. When compared to SAVH20/03 (AY604235, amino acid substitutions were detected in all assessed gene fragments however the in vivo significance of these on for example disease outbreak mortality could not be concluded on. The phylogenetic tree based on the 451 nt E2 fragment showed that the sequences divided into two clusters with low genetic divergence, representing only a single SAV subtype. Conclusions The analysed sequences represented two clusters of a single SAV subtype; however some of the observed sequence divergence was higher than that previously reported

  19. Deficits in long-term recognition memory reveal dissociated subtypes in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollhoff, Rainer; Jost, Jürgen; Elze, Tobias; Kennerknecht, Ingo

    2011-01-25

    The study investigates long-term recognition memory in congenital prosopagnosia (CP), a lifelong impairment in face identification that is present from birth. Previous investigations of processing deficits in CP have mostly relied on short-term recognition tests to estimate the scope and severity of individual deficits. We firstly report on a controlled test of long-term (one year) recognition memory for faces and objects conducted with a large group of participants with CP. Long-term recognition memory is significantly impaired in eight CP participants (CPs). In all but one case, this deficit was selective to faces and didn't extend to intra-class recognition of object stimuli. In a test of famous face recognition, long-term recognition deficits were less pronounced, even after accounting for differences in media consumption between controls and CPs. Secondly, we combined test results on long-term and short-term recognition of faces and objects, and found a large heterogeneity in severity and scope of individual deficits. Analysis of the observed heterogeneity revealed a dissociation of CP into subtypes with a homogeneous phenotypical profile. Thirdly, we found that among CPs self-assessment of real-life difficulties, based on a standardized questionnaire, and experimentally assessed face recognition deficits are strongly correlated. Our results demonstrate that controlled tests of long-term recognition memory are needed to fully assess face recognition deficits in CP. Based on controlled and comprehensive experimental testing, CP can be dissociated into subtypes with a homogeneous phenotypical profile. The CP subtypes identified align with those found in prosopagnosia caused by cortical lesions; they can be interpreted with respect to a hierarchical neural system for face perception.

  20. Deficits in long-term recognition memory reveal dissociated subtypes in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Stollhoff

    Full Text Available The study investigates long-term recognition memory in congenital prosopagnosia (CP, a lifelong impairment in face identification that is present from birth. Previous investigations of processing deficits in CP have mostly relied on short-term recognition tests to estimate the scope and severity of individual deficits. We firstly report on a controlled test of long-term (one year recognition memory for faces and objects conducted with a large group of participants with CP. Long-term recognition memory is significantly impaired in eight CP participants (CPs. In all but one case, this deficit was selective to faces and didn't extend to intra-class recognition of object stimuli. In a test of famous face recognition, long-term recognition deficits were less pronounced, even after accounting for differences in media consumption between controls and CPs. Secondly, we combined test results on long-term and short-term recognition of faces and objects, and found a large heterogeneity in severity and scope of individual deficits. Analysis of the observed heterogeneity revealed a dissociation of CP into subtypes with a homogeneous phenotypical profile. Thirdly, we found that among CPs self-assessment of real-life difficulties, based on a standardized questionnaire, and experimentally assessed face recognition deficits are strongly correlated. Our results demonstrate that controlled tests of long-term recognition memory are needed to fully assess face recognition deficits in CP. Based on controlled and comprehensive experimental testing, CP can be dissociated into subtypes with a homogeneous phenotypical profile. The CP subtypes identified align with those found in prosopagnosia caused by cortical lesions; they can be interpreted with respect to a hierarchical neural system for face perception.

  1. Breast cancer molecular subtypes: from TNBC to QNBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Jane Date C; Singh, Baljit; Sahin, Aysegul; Du, Gang; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Vincent Y; Deng, Fang-Ming; Zhang, David Y; Monaco, Marie E; Lee, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Treatment protocols for breast cancer depend predominantly on receptor status with respect to estrogen (estrogen receptor alpha), progesterone (progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)]. The presence of one or more of these receptors suggests that a treatment targeting these pathways might be effective, while the absence of, or in the case of HER2, lack of overexpression of, all of these receptors, termed triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), indicates a need for the more toxic chemotherapy. In an effort to develop targeted therapies for TNBC, it will be necessary to differentiate among specific TNBC subtypes. The subset of TNBC that expresses androgen receptor (AR) has been determined to express genes consistent with a luminal subtype and therefore may be amenable to therapies targeting either AR, itself, or other pathways typical of a luminal subtype. Recent investigations of the AR signal pathway within breast cancer lead to AR as a significant target for breast cancer therapy with several clinical trials currently in progress. The subclass of TNBC that lacks AR, which we have termed quadruple negative breast cancer (QNBC) currently lacks a defined targetable pathway. Unlike AR-positive TNBC, QNBC predominantly exhibits a basal-like molecular subtype. Several subtypes and related pathway proteins are preferentially expressed in QNBC that may serve as effective targets for treatment, such as ACSL4, SKP2 and EGFR. ACSL4 expression has been demonstrated to be inversely correlated with expression of hormone/growth factor receptors and may thus serve as a biomarker for QNBC as well as a target for therapy. In the following review we summarize some of the current efforts to develop alternatives to chemotherapy for TNBC and QNBC.

  2. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Qiang Jin; Jin-Chao Wang; Yong-An Sun; Pu Lyu; Wei Cui; Yuan-Yuan Liu; Zhi-Gang Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments.This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes.Methods:From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years,this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit,conscious or not,and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province.All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria.Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes' discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes.Results:Among the 1989 patients,797,689,109,and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction,ICH,subarachnoid hemorrhage,and other forms of nonstroke,respectively.A history of atrial fibrillation,vomiting,and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction,while vomiting,systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg,and age <65 years were more typical of ICH.For noncomatose stroke patients,Bayes' discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients,corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%.Conclusions:The model herein presented,with multiple parameters,can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning,either in alert or comatose patients.This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke.

  3. Distinct DNA methylation profiles in subtypes of orofacial cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Gemma C; Ho, Karen; Davies, Amy; Stergiakouli, Evie; Humphries, Kerry; McArdle, Wendy; Sandy, Jonathan; Davey Smith, George; Lewis, Sarah J; Relton, Caroline L

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic data could help identify risk factors for orofacial clefts, either by revealing a causal role for epigenetic mechanisms in causing clefts or by capturing information about causal genetic or environmental factors. Given the evidence that different subtypes of orofacial cleft have distinct aetiologies, we explored whether children with different cleft subtypes showed distinct epigenetic profiles. In whole-blood samples from 150 children from the Cleft Collective cohort study, we measured DNA methylation at over 450,000 sites on the genome. We then carried out epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to test the association between methylation at each site and cleft subtype (cleft lip only (CLO) n = 50; cleft palate only (CPO) n = 50; cleft lip and palate (CLP) n = 50). We also compared methylation in the blood to methylation in the lip or palate tissue using genome-wide data from the same 150 children and conducted an EWAS of CLO compared to CLP in lip tissue. We found four genomic regions in blood differentially methylated in CLO compared to CLP, 17 in CPO compared to CLP and 294 in CPO compared to CLO. Several regions mapped to genes that have previously been implicated in the development of orofacial clefts (for example, TBX1, COL11A2, HOXA2, PDGFRA), and over 250 associations were novel. Methylation in blood correlated with that in lip/palate at some regions. There were 14 regions differentially methylated in the lip tissue from children with CLO and CLP, with one region (near KIAA0415) showing up in both the blood and lip EWAS. Our finding of distinct methylation profiles in different orofacial cleft (OFC) subtypes represents a promising first step in exploring the potential role of epigenetic modifications in the aetiology of OFCs and/or as clinically useful biomarkers of OFC subtypes.

  4. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  5. Automatic Classification on Multi-Modal MRI Data for Diagnosis of the Postural Instability and Gait Difficulty Subtype of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quanquan; Zhang, Huan; Xuan, Min; Luo, Wei; Huang, Peiyu; Xia, Shunren; Zhang, Minming

    2016-05-11

    Patients with the postural instability and gait difficulty subtype (PIGD) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are a refractory challenge in clinical practice. Despite previous attempts that have been made at studying subtype-specific brain alterations across PD population, conclusive neuroimaging biomarkers on patients with the PIGD subtype are still lacking. Machine learning-based classifications are a promising tool for differential diagnosis that effectively integrate complex and multivariate data. Our present study aimed to introduce the machine learning-based automatic classification for the first time to distinguish patients with the PIGD subtype from those with the non-PIGD subtype of PD at the individual level. Fifty-two PD patients and forty-five normal controls (NCs) were recruited and underwent multi-modal MRI scans including a set of resting-state functional, 3D T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging sequences. By comparing the PD patients with the NCs, features that were not conducive to the subtype-specific classification were ruled out from massive brain features. We applied a support vector machine classifier with the recursive feature elimination method to multi-modal MRI data for selecting features with the best discriminating power, and evaluated the proposed classifier with the leave-one-out cross-validation. Using this classifier, we obtained satisfactory diagnostic rates (accuracy = 92.31%, specificity = 96.97%, sensitivity = 84.21% and AUCmax  = 0.9585). The diagnostic agreement evaluated by the Kappa test showed an almost perfect agreement with the existing clinical categorization (Kappa value = 0.83). With these favorable results, our findings suggested the machine learning-based classification as an alternative technique to classifying clinical subtypes in PD.

  6. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  7. Genome-wide analysis for identification of adaptive diversification between hepatitis C virus subtypes 1a and 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ruirui; Du, Xiaogang; Zhang, Mingwang; Xie, Meng

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and has been estimated to infect approximately 2%-3% of the world's population. HCV genotype 1 is the subject of intense research and clinical investigations because of its worldwide prevalence and poor access to treatment for patients in developing countries and marginalized populations. The predominant subtypes 1a and 1b of HCV genotype 1 present considerable differences in epidemiological features. However, the genetic signature underlying such phenotypic functional divergence is still an open question. Here, we performed a genome-wide evolutionary study on HCV subtypes 1a and 1b. The results show that adaptive selection has driven the diversification between these subtypes. Furthermore, the major adaptive divergence-related changes have occurred on proteins E1, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B. Structurally, a number of adaptively selected sites cluster in functional regions potentially relevant to (i) membrane attachment and (ii) the interactions with viral and host cell factors and the genome template. These results might provide helpful hints about the molecular determinants of epidemiological divergence between HCV 1a and 1b.

  8. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer subtypes: the hormone receptor/HER2-positive subtype is associated with the most favorable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; van Kampen, Roel J W; Voogd, Adri C; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Smilde, Tineke J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Peters, Frank P J; van Riel, Johanna M G H; Peters, Natascha A J B; de Boer, Maaike; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to the situation in early breast cancer, little is known about the prognostic relevance of the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to present survival estimates and to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes based on HR and HER2 status in a recent cohort of metastatic breast cancer patients, which is representative of current clinical practice. Patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2009 were included. Information regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment was collected. Patients were categorized in four subtypes based on the HR and HER2 status of the primary tumor: HR positive (+)/HER2 negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtype, adjusted for possible confounders. Median follow-up was 21.8 months for the 815 metastatic breast cancer patients included; 66 % of patients had the HR+/HER2- subtype, 8 % the HR-/HER2+ subtype, 15 % the TN subtype and 11 % the HR+/HER2+ subtype. The longest survival was observed for the HR+/HER2+ subtype (median 34.4 months), compared to 24.8 months for the HR+/HER2- subtype, 19.8 months for the HR-/HER2+ subtype and 8.8 months for the TN subtype (P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, subtype was an independent prognostic factor, as were initial site of metastases and metastatic-free interval. The HR+/HER2+ subtype was associated with the longest survival after diagnosis of distant metastases.

  9. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC mediates antipsychotic-like effects via the M4 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Marla L; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Shaw, David B; Knitowski, Karen M; Quets, Anne T; Chesterfield, Amy K; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2013-12-01

    The generation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtype-selective compounds has been challenging, requiring use of nonpharmacological approaches, such as genetically engineered animals, to deepen our understanding of the potential that members of the muscarinic receptor subtype family hold as therapeutic drug targets. The muscarinic receptor agonist 'BuTAC' was previously shown to exhibit efficacy in animal models of psychosis, although the particular receptor subtype(s) responsible for such activity was unclear. Here, we evaluate the in vitro functional agonist and antagonist activity of BuTAC using an assay that provides a direct measure of G protein activation. In addition, we employ the conditioned avoidance response paradigm, an in vivo model predictive of antipsychotic activity, and mouse genetic deletion models to investigate which presynaptic mAChR subtype mediates the antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC. Our results show that, in vitro, BuTAC acts as a full agonist at the M2AChR and a partial agonist at the M1 and M4 receptors, with full antagonist activity at M3- and M5AChRs. In the mouse conditioned avoidance response (CAR) assay, BuTAC exhibits an atypical antipsychotic-like profile by selectively decreasing avoidance responses at doses that do not induce escape failures. CAR results using M2(-/-), M4(-/-), and M2/M4 (M2/M4(-/-)) mice found that the effects of BuTAC were near completely lost in M2/M4(-/-) double-knockout mice and potency of BuTAC was right-shifted in M4(-/-) as compared with wild-type and M2(-/-) mice. The M2/M4(-/-) mice showed no altered sensitivity to the antipsychotic effects of either haloperidol or clozapine, suggesting that these compounds mediate their actions in CAR via a non-mAChR-mediated mechanism. These data support a role for the M4AChR subtype in mediating the antipsychotic-like activity of BuTAC and implicate M4AChR agonism as a potential novel therapeutic mechanism for ameliorating symptoms associated with

  10. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; DeCarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino II, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%); the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype. PMID:28276464

  11. Robust Identification of Alzheimer's Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Han, Cheol E; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2017-03-09

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%); the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  12. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Decarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel, II; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; de Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, Maryann; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; Devous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; Macavoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%) the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  13. Construction of a High Titer Infectious HIV-1 Subtype C Proviral Clone from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Bodem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtype C is currently the predominant subtype worldwide. Cell culture studies of Sub-Saharan African subtype C proviral plasmids are hampered by the low replication capacity of the resulting viruses, although viral loads in subtype C infected patients are as high as those from patients with subtype B. Here, we describe the sequencing and construction of a new HIV-1 subtype C proviral clone (pZAC, replicating more than one order of magnitude better than the previous subtype C plasmids. We identify the env-region for being the determinant for the higher viral titers and the pZAC Env to be M-tropic. This higher replication capacity does not lead to a higher cytotoxicity compared to previously described subtype C viruses. In addition, the pZAC Vpu is also shown to be able to down-regulate CD4, but fails to fully counteract CD317.

  14. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  15. Assessing the Differences in Public Health Impact of Salmonella Subtypes Using a Bayesian Microbial Subtyping Approach for Source Attribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Sara Monteiro; Hald, Tine

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. To prioritize interventions and assess the effectiveness of efforts to reduce illness, it is important to attribute salmonellosis to the responsible sources. Studies have suggested that some Salmonella subtypes have a higher health...

  16. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients : characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P. J.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.

    Background Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive subtypes

  17. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients : characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P. J.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive subtypes

  18. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients : characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P J; Alizadeh, B Z; Aleman, A; van den Heuvel, E R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive subtype

  19. Concurrent and prognostic utility of subtyping anorexia nervosa along dietary and negative affect dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbush, Kelsie T; Hagan, Kelsey E; Salk, Rachel H; Wildes, Jennifer E

    2017-03-01

    Bulimia nervosa can be reliably classified into subtypes based on dimensions of dietary restraint and negative affect. Community and clinical studies have shown that dietary-negative affect subtypes have greater test-retest reliability and concurrent and predictive validity compared to subtypes based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Although dietary-negative affect subtypes have shown utility for characterizing eating disorders that involve binge eating, this framework may have broader implications for understanding restrictive eating disorders.

  20. Review to better understand the macroscopic subtypes and histogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuichi; Sanada; Yujo; Kawashita; Satomi; Okada; Takashi; Azuma; Shigetoshi; Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is macroscopically classified into three subtypes, mass-forming-type, periductal infiltrating-type, and intraductal growth-type. Each subtype should be preoperatively differentiated to perform the valid surgical resection. Recent researches have revealed the clinical, radiologic, pathobiological characteristics of each subtype. We reviewed recently published studies covering various aspects of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma(ICC), focusing especially on the macroscopic subtypes and stem cell features to better understand the pathophysiology of ICC and to establish the valid therapeutic strategy.

  1. Extended Genetic Diversity of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Frequency of Genotypes and Subtypes in Cattle in Italy between 1995 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Luzzago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic typing of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV has distinguished BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 species and an emerging putative third species (HoBi-like virus, recently detected in southern Italy, signaling the occurrence of natural infection in Europe. Recognizing the need to update the data on BVDV genetic variability in Italy for mounting local and European alerts, a wide collection of 5′ UTR sequences (n = 371 was selected to identify the frequency of genotypes and subtypes at the herd level. BVDV-1 had the highest frequency, followed by sporadic BVDV-2. No novel HoBi-like viruses were identified. Four distribution patterns of BVDV-1 subtypes were observed: highly prevalent subtypes with a wide temporal-spatial distribution (1b and 1e, low prevalent subtypes with a widespread geographic distribution (1a, 1d, 1g, 1h, and 1k or a restricted geographic distribution (1f, and sporadic subtypes detected only in single herds (1c, 1j, and 1l. BVDV-1c, k, and l are reported for the first time in Italy. A unique genetic variant was detected in the majority of herds, but cocirculation of genetic variants was also observed. Northern Italy ranked first for BVDV introduction, prevalence, and dispersion. Nevertheless, the presence of sporadic variants in other restricted areas suggests the risk of different routes of BVDV introduction.

  2. Extended genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus and frequency of genotypes and subtypes in cattle in Italy between 1995 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzago, Camilla; Lauzi, Stefania; Ebranati, Erika; Giammarioli, Monica; Moreno, Ana; Cannella, Vincenza; Masoero, Loretta; Canelli, Elena; Guercio, Annalisa; Caruso, Claudio; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Mia, Gian Mario; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Peletto, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Genetic typing of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has distinguished BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 species and an emerging putative third species (HoBi-like virus), recently detected in southern Italy, signaling the occurrence of natural infection in Europe. Recognizing the need to update the data on BVDV genetic variability in Italy for mounting local and European alerts, a wide collection of 5' UTR sequences (n = 371) was selected to identify the frequency of genotypes and subtypes at the herd level. BVDV-1 had the highest frequency, followed by sporadic BVDV-2. No novel HoBi-like viruses were identified. Four distribution patterns of BVDV-1 subtypes were observed: highly prevalent subtypes with a wide temporal-spatial distribution (1b and 1e), low prevalent subtypes with a widespread geographic distribution (1a, 1d, 1g, 1h, and 1k) or a restricted geographic distribution (1f), and sporadic subtypes detected only in single herds (1c, 1j, and 1l). BVDV-1c, k, and l are reported for the first time in Italy. A unique genetic variant was detected in the majority of herds, but cocirculation of genetic variants was also observed. Northern Italy ranked first for BVDV introduction, prevalence, and dispersion. Nevertheless, the presence of sporadic variants in other restricted areas suggests the risk of different routes of BVDV introduction.

  3. An evaluation protocol for subtype-specific breast cancer event prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman M J Sontrop

    Full Text Available In recent years increasing evidence appeared that breast cancer may not constitute a single disease at the molecular level, but comprises a heterogeneous set of subtypes. This suggests that instead of building a single monolithic predictor, better predictors might be constructed that solely target samples of a designated subtype, which are believed to represent more homogeneous sets of samples. An unavoidable drawback of developing subtype-specific predictors, however, is that a stratification by subtype drastically reduces the number of samples available for their construction. As numerous studies have indicated sample size to be an important factor in predictor construction, it is therefore questionable whether the potential benefit of subtyping can outweigh the drawback of a severe loss in sample size. Factors like unequal class distributions and differences in the number of samples per subtype, further complicate comparisons. We present a novel experimental protocol that facilitates a comprehensive comparison between subtype-specific predictors and predictors that do not take subtype information into account. Emphasis lies on careful control of sample size as well as class and subtype distributions. The methodology is applied to a large breast cancer compendium involving over 1500 arrays, using a state-of-the-art subtyping scheme. We show that the resulting subtype-specific predictors outperform those that do not take subtype information into account, especially when taking sample size considerations into account.

  4. Empirically Derived Learning Disability Subtypes: A Replication Attempt and Longitudinal Patterns over 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreen, Otfried; Haaf, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Test scores of two groups of learning disabled children (N=63 and N=96) were submitted to cluster analysis in an attempt to replicate previously described subtypes. All three subtypes (visuo-perceptual, linguistic, and articulo-graphomotor types) were identified along with minimally and severely impaired subtypes. Similar clusters in the same…

  5. Empirically Derived Learning Disability Subtypes: A Replication Attempt and Longitudinal Patterns over 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreen, Otfried; Haaf, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Test scores of two groups of learning disabled children (N=63 and N=96) were submitted to cluster analysis in an attempt to replicate previously described subtypes. All three subtypes (visuo-perceptual, linguistic, and articulo-graphomotor types) were identified along with minimally and severely impaired subtypes. Similar clusters in the same…

  6. [Home literacy experiences and socio-cultural characteristics associated with the subtypes of reading disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan E; Rodríguez, Cristina

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to analyse the home literacy experiences and socio-cultural characteristics associated with the subtypes of reading disability. For this purpose, we used a reading level match design and we selected four samples of families as a function of their children's reading profile: a group of parents (15 fathers and 16 mothers) whose children had a profile of surface dyslexia (DSP); a second group of parents (6 fathers and 6 mothers) whose children had a profile of phonological dyslexia (DFP); a third group of parents (38 fathers and 41 mothers) whose children were matched in age with the children who had learning disabilities (ECP); and a fourth group of parents (33 fathers and 35 mothers) whose children were matched in reading age with children who had learning disabilities (NLP). Both dyslexic subtypes showed a deficit in phonological awareness, but children with surface dyslexia also showed a deficit in orthographical processing assessed by homophone comprehension task. This deficit was related to home literacy experiences because the group of parents whose children had surface dyslexia, in comparison to parents of children matched in reading age, promoted fewer home literacy experiences.

  7. Use of functioning-disability and dependency for case-mix and subtyping of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Ochoa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: To evaluate the utility of the constructs functioning and disability (F & D and dependency for case-mix and subtyping of patients with schizophrenia by psychosocial, clinical, use of services and attention received from informal carers. Methods: A randomly selected total of 205 people with schizophrenia, and their careers were evaluated through PANSS, DAS-sv, Objective and Subjective Burden Scale (ECFOS-II and use of services. Results: Two groups and Four profiles were identified according to levels of Dependency: The non-dependent group was made of two profiles: independent (I, and persons with disability in the community (DiC. The dependent group included persons with dependency in the community (DeC and persons with dependency in hospital care (DeH. There are clinical and psychosocial differences between these profiles being the dependent the most severe. Regarding use of services, DeC use the most resources, with the exception DeH (more hospitalization resources. The DeC profile generate greater family burden in the following areas; taking medication, being accompanied to appointments, and management than the DiC, despite both groups showing a high need for support. Conclusions: Dependency is a relevant construct for case-mix and subtyping in schizophrenia, and it is related to severity both at the social and clinical level. DeC generate more family burden than the other profiles, followed by DiC (patients with schizophrenia with disability but non-dependent.

  8. Targeting to 5-HT1F Receptor Subtype for Migraine Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    The effective anti-migraine drugs triptans, all bind with high affinity to three serotonin (5-HT) subtypes, the 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D and 5-HT1F. 5- HT1B mRNA is densely localized within smooth muscle, and less in the endothelium of cerebral blood vessels. This vascular distribution of 5-HT1B receptor has...... been shown to mediate the vasoconstrictive properties of the triptans, responsible for potential cardiac adverse events. Activation of 5-HT1D subtype, although effective in animal models of migraine, was not enough efficient to attenuate migraine attacks in clinical trials. Τhe 5- HT1F receptor...... is located both in vessels and within the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C), but with the difference that the 5-HT1F receptor lack vasoconstrictive properties, making it an attractive target for new anti-migraine drugs. Selective activation of 5-HT1F receptor potently...

  9. Developing a radiomics framework for classifying non-small cell lung carcinoma subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongdong; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhou, Mu; Gevaert, Olivier; Fang, Mengjie; Shi, Jingyun; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Patient-targeted treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has been well documented according to the histologic subtypes over the past decade. In parallel, recent development of quantitative image biomarkers has recently been highlighted as important diagnostic tools to facilitate histological subtype classification. In this study, we present a radiomics analysis that classifies the adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). We extract 52-dimensional, CT-based features (7 statistical features and 45 image texture features) to represent each nodule. We evaluate our approach on a clinical dataset including 324 ADCs and 110 SqCCs patients with CT image scans. Classification of these features is performed with four different machine-learning classifiers including Support Vector Machines with Radial Basis Function kernel (RBF-SVM), Random forest (RF), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), and RUSBoost algorithms. To improve the classifiers' performance, optimal feature subset is selected from the original feature set by using an iterative forward inclusion and backward eliminating algorithm. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that radiomics features achieve encouraging classification results on both complete feature set (AUC=0.89) and optimal feature subset (AUC=0.91).

  10. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinyiko G. Makhubele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14, beta-2 microglobulin (β2M, CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P<0.01–P<0.0001. The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group.

  11. Distribution and epidemiologic trends of HBV genotypes and subtypes in 14 countries neighboring china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhao; Jianqiong, Wang; Hongmei, Li; Rong, Zeng; Li, Li; Jinping, Zhang; Tao, Shen

    2015-05-01

    The number of cases of HBV infection reported by the WHO for each district and country is positively correlated with the number of HBV sequences in the database isolated from the corresponding district and country. This study determined distribution characteristics of HBV genotypes and subtypes in 14 countries neighboring China. The progress made in genomic research involving HBV was also reviewed. Nine hundred fifty-one complete genome sequences of HBV from 14 countries neighboring China were selected from NCBI. The sequence-related information was analyzed and recorded. One hundred seventy-two sequences of HBV genotype B were screened for alignment using DNA star and MEGA 5.1. Dominant HBV genotypes in the countries neighboring China were genotypes B, C and D and dominant subtypes were adw2 and adrq+. The association between genotype and serotype of HBV in these countries was shown to differ from previous research results. As shown by sequence alignment, the sequence divergence between five subgenotypes (B3, B5, B7, B8 and B9) was below 4%. The B subgenotypes shared six common specific amino acid sites in the S region. The B3, B5, B7, B8 and B9 subgenotypes can be clustered into quasi-sub-genotype B3 and the open reading frame of HBV has a start codon preference; however, whether a mutation in the start codon in the pre-S2 region has an impact on survival and replication of HBV remains to be determined.

  12. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; López-González, Irene; Thüne, Katrin; Carmona, Margarita; Zafar, Saima; Andréoletti, Olivier; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidre

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons, in astrocytes, and/or in microglia, thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet, inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signaling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit) specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  13. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc eLlorens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sCJD MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons and/or in astrocytes and/or in microglia thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signalling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  14. Reappraisal of TDP-43 pathology in FTLD-U subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Ian R; Neumann, Manuela

    2017-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau-negative, ubiquitin-immunoreactive (-ir) pathology (FTLD-U) is subclassified based on the type and cortical laminar distribution of neuronal inclusions. Following the discovery of the transactive response DNA-binding protein Mr 43 kD (TDP-43) as the ubiquitinated protein in most FTLD-U, the same pathological criteria have been used to classify FTLD cases based on TDP-43-ir changes. However, the fact that immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ubiquitin and TDP-43 each recognizes slightly different pathological changes in these cases means that the original FTLD-U subtype criteria may not be directly applicable for use with TDP-43 IHC. We formally re-evaluated the TDP-43-ir pathological features that characterize the different FTLD-U subtypes to see if the current classification could be refined. In our series of 78 cases, 81% were classified as one of the common FTLD-U subtypes (29% A, 35% B, 17% C). With TDP-43 IHC, each subtype demonstrated consistent intra-group pathological features and clear inter-group differences. The TDP-43-ir changes that characterized type A and C cases were similar to those seen with ubiquitin IHC; specifically, compact neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI), short thick dystrophic neurites (DN), and lentiform neuronal intranuclear inclusions concentrated in cortical layer II in type A cases, and a predominance of long thick DN in type C. However, type B cases showed significant differences with TDP-43 compared with ubiquitin IHC; with many diffuse granular NCI and wispy thread and dots-like profiles in all cortical layers. The remaining 15 cases (12 with C9orf72 mutations) showed changes that were consistent with combined type A and type B pathology. These findings suggest that the pathological criteria for subtyping FTLD cases based on TDP-43 IHC might benefit from some refinement that recognizes differences in the morphologies of NCI and neurites. Furthermore, there is a significant subset of cases

  15. Differential drug resistance acquisition in HIV-1 of subtypes B and C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda A J M Soares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subtype C is the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype in the world, mainly in countries with the highest HIV prevalence. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of antiretroviral therapy on this subtype. In southern Brazil, the first developing country to offer free and universal treatment, subtypes B and C co-circulate with equal prevalence, allowing for an extensive evaluation of this issue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Viral RNA of 160 HIV-1+ patients was extracted, and the protease and reverse transcriptase genes were sequenced, subtyped and analyzed for ARV mutations. Sequences were grouped by subtype, and matched to type (PI, NRTI and NNRTI and time of ARV exposure. Statistical analyses were performed to compare differences in the frequency of ARV-associated mutations. There were no significant differences in time of treatment between subtypes B and C groups, although they showed distinct proportions of resistant strains at different intervals for two of three ARV classes. For PI, 26% of subtype B strains were resistant, compared to only 8% in subtype C (p = 0.0288, Fisher's exact test. For NRTI, 54% of subtype B strains were resistant versus 23% of subtype C (p = 0.0012. Differences were significant from 4 years of exposure, and remained so until the last time point analyzed. The differences observed between both subtypes were independent of time under rebound viremia in cases of virologic failure and of the number of HAART regimens used by treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results pointed out to a lower rate of accumulation of mutations conferring resistance to ARV in subtype C than in subtype B. These findings are of crucial importance for current initiatives of ARV therapy roll-out in developing countries, where subtype is C prevalent.

  16. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Peck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future.

  17. Unique Migraine Subtypes, Rare Headache Disorders, and Other Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The medical aphorism that common things happen commonly makes unique (and less common) migraine subtypes especially appropriate to review for the general neurologist. This article also identifies some rare headache disorders and other disturbances, and offers strategies to manage them. This article discusses migraine with brainstem aura, which is troublesome clinically and has had a change in terminology in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition, beta version (ICHD-3 beta), and hemiplegic migraine, which is also troublesome in practice. The rare headache disorder hypnic headache and the exploding head syndrome are also discussed. When hypnic headache is recognized, it is eminently treatable, while exploding head syndrome is a benign condition with no reported consequences. Unique migraine subtypes, rare headache disorders, and other disturbances present to neurologists. When recognized, they can often be managed very well, which offers significant benefits to patients and practice satisfaction to neurologists.

  18. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Austin, John W.; Bano, Luca; Bradshaw, Marite; Cuervo, Paula; Cheng, Luisa W.; Derman, Yagmur; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Fisher, Audrey; Hill, Karen K.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia; Lista, Florigio; Lúquez, Carolina; Mazuet, Christelle; Pirazzini, Marco; Popoff, Michel R.; Rossetto, Ornella; Rummel, Andreas; Sesardic, Dorothea; Singh, Bal Ram; Stringer, Sandra C.

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future. PMID:28106761

  19. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  20. Genetic overlap between diagnostic subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Elizabeth G; Traylor, Matthew; Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Falcone, Guido; Hopewell, Jemma C; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Bis, Joshua C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Clarke, Robert; Cole, John W; Fornage, Myriam; Furie, Karen L; Ikram, M Arfan; Jannes, Jim; Kittner, Steven J; Lincz, Lisa F; Maguire, Jane M; Meschia, James F; Mosley, Thomas H; Nalls, Mike A; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Parati, Eugenio A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rothwell, Peter M; Seshadri, Sudha; Scott, Rodney J; Sharma, Pankaj; Sudlow, Cathie; Wiggins, Kerri L; Worrall, Bradford B; Rosand, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S; Levi, Christopher; Attia, John; Wray, Naomi R

    2015-03-01

    Despite moderate heritability, the phenotypic heterogeneity of ischemic stroke has hampered gene discovery, motivating analyses of diagnostic subtypes with reduced sample sizes. We assessed evidence for a shared genetic basis among the 3 major subtypes: large artery atherosclerosis (LAA), cardioembolism, and small vessel disease (SVD), to inform potential cross-subtype analyses. Analyses used genome-wide summary data for 12 389 ischemic stroke cases (including 2167 LAA, 2405 cardioembolism, and 1854 SVD) and 62 004 controls from the Metastroke consortium. For 4561 cases and 7094 controls, individual-level genotype data were also available. Genetic correlations between subtypes were estimated using linear mixed models and polygenic profile scores. Meta-analysis of a combined LAA-SVD phenotype (4021 cases and 51 976 controls) was performed to identify shared risk alleles. High genetic correlation was identified between LAA and SVD using linear mixed models (rg=0.96, SE=0.47, P=9×10(-4)) and profile scores (rg=0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.93). Between LAA and cardioembolism and SVD and cardioembolism, correlation was moderate using linear mixed models but not significantly different from zero for profile scoring. Joint meta-analysis of LAA and SVD identified strong association (P=1×10(-7)) for single nucleotide polymorphisms near the opioid receptor μ1 (OPRM1) gene. Our results suggest that LAA and SVD, which have been hitherto treated as genetically distinct, may share a substantial genetic component. Combined analyses of LAA and SVD may increase power to identify small-effect alleles influencing shared pathophysiological processes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Complete genome amplification of Equine influenza virus subtype 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sguazza, G. H.; Fuentealba, N. A.; Tizzano, Marco Antonio; Galosi, Cecilia Mónica; Pecoraro, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a method for rapid amplification of the complete genome of equine influenza virus subtype 2 (H3N8). A ThermoScriptTM reverse transcriptase instead of the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase or Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase was used. This enzyme has demonstrated higher thermal stability and is described as suitable to make long cDNA with a complex secondary structure. The product obtained by this method can be cloned, used in later...

  2. Complete genome amplification of Equine influenza virus subtype 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sguazza, G.H.; Fuentealba, N. A.; Tizzano, Marco Antonio; Galosi, Cecilia Mónica; M. R. Pecoraro

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a method for rapid amplification of the complete genome of equine influenza virus subtype 2 (H3N8). A ThermoScriptTM reverse transcriptase instead of the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase or Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase was used. This enzyme has demonstrated higher thermal stability and is described as suitable to make long cDNA with a complex secondary structure. The product obtained by this method can be cloned, used in later...

  3. Maltreatment and psychopathy subtypes in high-risk adolescent females

    OpenAIRE

    Coupland, Ruth Louise

    2011-01-01

    Psychopathy is often viewed as a unitary construct, however, research with adults and adolescent males has revealed two heterogeneous subtypes. Primary psychopathy is presumed to have biological underpinnings and is associated with low levels of anxiety and psychological distress. In contrast, secondary psychopathy is believed to result from exposure to adversity, including childhood maltreatment, and is associated with emotional reactivity, impulsivity, and comorbid psychological problems. T...

  4. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Angelis, Konstantinos; Mamais, Ioannis; Katzourakis, Aris; Hatzakis, Angelos; Albert, Jan; Lawyer, Glenn; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Anders; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana J; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elizabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Stylianou, Dora C; Boucher, Charles A B; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Friedman, Samuel R; van de Vijver, David; Angarano, Gioacchino; Chaix, Marie-Laure; de Luca, Andrea; Korn, Klaus; Loveday, Clive; Soriano, Vincent; Yerly, Sabine; Zazzi, Mauricio; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa through Haiti to United States. However, the pattern of the subsequent spread still remains poorly understood. Here we analyze a large dataset of globally representative HIV-1 subtype B strains to map their spread around the world over the last 50years and describe significant spread patterns. We show that subtype B travelled from North America to Western Europe in different occasions, while Central/Eastern Europe remained isolated for the most part of the early epidemic. Looking with more detail in European countries we see that the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland exchanged viral isolates with non-European countries than with European ones. The observed pattern is likely to mirror geopolitical landmarks in the post-World War II era, namely the rise and the fall of the Iron Curtain and the European colonialism. In conclusion, HIV-1 spread through specific migration routes which are consistent with geopolitical factors that affected human activities during the last 50years, such as migration, tourism and trade. Our findings support the argument that epidemic control policies should be global and incorporate political and socioeconomic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. HIV-1 subtype B: Traces of a pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-08-01

    Human migration is a major process that shaped the origin and dissemination of HIV. Within HIV-1, subtype B (HIV-1B) is the most disseminated variant and it is assumed to be the causative agent in approximately 11% of all cases of HIV worldwide. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that HIV-1B emerged in Kinshasa (Africa) and was introduced into the Caribbean region via Haiti in or around 1966 by human migration. After localized dispersion, the virus was brought to the United States of America via homosexual/bisexual contact around 1969. Inside USA, the incidence of HIV-1B infection increased exponentially and it became established in the population, affecting not only homosexual individuals but also heterosexual individuals and injecting drug users. Soon after, the virus was disseminated and became established in other regions, including Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to this pandemic clade, several lineages have emerged from Haiti and reached other Caribbean and Latin American countries via short-distance dissemination. Different subtype B genetic variants have also been detected in these epidemics. Four genetic variants have been described to date: subtype B', which mainly circulates in Thailand and other Asian countries; a specific variant mainly found in Trinidad and Tobago; the GPGS variant, which is primarily detected in Korea; and the GWGR variant, which is mainly detected in Brazil. This paper reviews the evolution of HIV-1B and its impact on the human population.

  6. Clinical investigation of set-shifting subtypes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Buzzichelli, Sara; Marzola, Enrica; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo

    2014-11-30

    While evidence continues to accumulate on the relevance of cognitive inflexibility in anorexia nervosa (AN), its clinical correlates remain unclear. We aimed at examining the relationship between set-shifting and clinical variables (i.e., eating psychopathology, depression, and personality) in AN. Ninety-four individuals affected by AN and 59 healthy controls (HC) were recruited. All participants were assessed using: Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The AN group scored worse than HCs on set-shifting. According to their neuropsychological performances, AN patients were split into two groups corresponding to poor (N=30) and intact (N=64) set-shifting subtypes. Interoceptive awareness, impulse regulation, and maturity fears on the EDI-2 and depression on the BDI differed across all groups (HC, intact, and poor set-shifting subtype). Self-directedness on the TCI differed significantly among all groups. Cooperativeness and reward dependence differed instead only between HC and AN poor set-shifting subtype. After controlling for depression, only interoceptive awareness remained significant with reward dependence showing a trend towards statistical significance. These findings suggest that multiple clinical variables may be correlated with set-shifting performances in AN. The factors contributing to impaired cognitive inflexibility could be more complex than heretofore generally considered.

  7. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis in Thai-Myanmar border, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popruk, Supaluk; Udonsom, Ruenruetai; Koompapong, Khuanchai; Mahittikorn, Aongart; Kusolsuk, Teera; Ruangsittichai, Jiraporn; Palasuwan, Attakorn

    2015-02-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a common zoonotic intestinal protozoa which has been classified into 17 subtypes (STs). A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and subtype distribution of Blastocystis in villagers living on the Thai-Myanmar border, where the risk of parasitic infection is high. A total of 207 stool samples were collected and DNA was extracted. PCR and sequencing using primers targeting small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene were performed. The prevalence of Blastocystis infection was 37.2% (77/207). ST3 (19.8%; 41/207) was the predominant subtype, followed by ST1 (11.6%; 24/207), ST2 (5.3%; 11/207), and ST4 (0.5%; 1/207). A phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using the maximum likelihood (ML) method based on the Hasegawa-Kishino-Yano + G + I model. The percentage of bootstrapped trees in which the associated taxa clustered together was relatively high. Some sequences of Blastocystis positive samples (TK18, 39, 46, 71, and 90) were closely related to animals (pig and cattle) indicating zoonotic risks. Therefore, proper health education in parasitic prevention for the villagers should be promoted to improve their personal hygiene. Further longitudinal studies are required to monitor the prevalence of parasitic infections after providing health education and to investigate Blastocystis ST in animals living in these villages.

  8. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E; Hoek, Hans W

    2009-11-01

    To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. A literature search of psychiatry databases for studies published in peer-reviewed journals that used the DSM-definitions of BN and BED, and included both individuals with BN-NP and individuals with BN-P and/or BED. Twenty-three studies compared individuals with BN-NP (N = 671) to individuals with BN-P (N = 1795) and/or individuals with BED (N = 1921), two of which reported on course, 12 on comorbidity and none on treatment response-the indicators for validity and clinical utility. The differences found were mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, suggesting a gradual difference in severity from BN-P (most severe) through BN-NP to BED (least severe). None of the comparisons provided convincing evidence for the validity or utility of the BN-NP diagnosis. Three options for the position of BN-NP in DSM-V were suggested: (1) maintaining the BN-NP subtype, (2) dropping nonpurging compensatory behavior as a criterion for BN, so that individuals currently designated as having BN-NP would be designated as having BED, and (3) including BN-NP in a broad BN category.

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome subtypes defined by Rome II and Rome III criteria are similar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Spencer D; Morris, Carolyn B; Hu, Yuming; Toner, Brenda B; Diamant, Nicholas; Whitehead, William E; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Drossman, Douglas A

    2009-03-01

    The implications of the Rome III recommendations to change the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtype criteria for stool pattern are unknown. (1) Determine the level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes and (2) compare the behaviors of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time. Female patients (n=148) with Rome II defined IBS were prospectively tracked over 5 consecutive 3-month periods. At baseline, bowel habit reports on questionnaires were used to subclassify patients into Rome II and Rome III subtypes. Over the subsequent 15 months, bowel habit reports on diary cards were used to subclassify patients based on previously derived surrogate criteria into Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes. The level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtype assignments was quite high (86.5%; kappa 0.79). The behavior of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time was also similar in terms of subtype prevalence, subtype stability, and the proportion of subjects who met criteria for alternating irritable bowel syndrome. Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes are in high agreement and behave similarly over time. Therefore, studies that used Rome II subtype criteria and studies that will use Rome III criteria will define comparable populations.

  10. Strategies for subtyping influenza viruses circulating in the Danish pig population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    in the Danish pig population functional and rapid subtyping assays are required. The conventional RT-PCR influenza subtyping assays developed by Chiapponi et al. (2003) have been implemented and used for typing of influenza viruses found positive in a pan influenza A real time RT-PCR assay. The H1 and N1 assays...... assays based on RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing were implemented for the four subtypes H1, H3, N1, and N2. The assays were based on primer sets published by the WHO, but slightly modified for improved detection of Danish subtype variants. Sequencing of circulating influenza viruses is beneficial since......Influenza viruses are endemic in the Danish pig population and the dominant circulating subtypes are H1N1, a Danish H1N2 reassortant, and H3N2. Here we present our current and future strategies for influenza virus subtyping. For diagnostic and surveillance of influenza subtypes circulating...

  11. GABAA receptor subtypes in the mouse brain: Regional mapping and diazepam receptor occupancy by in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Herde, Adrienne; Benke, Dietmar; Ralvenius, William T; Mu, Linjing; Schibli, Roger; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2017-02-10

    Classical benzodiazepines, which are widely used as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsants, exert their therapeutic effects through interactions with heteropentameric GABAA receptors composed of two α, two β and one γ2 subunit. Their high affinity binding site is located at the interface between the γ2 and the adjacent α subunit. The α-subunit gene family consists of six members and receptors can be homomeric or mixed with respect to the α-subunits. Previous work has suggested that benzodiazepine binding site ligands with selectivity for individual GABAA receptor subtypes, as defined by the benzodiazepine-binding α subunit, may have fewer side effects and may even be effective in diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or chronic pain, that do not respond well to classical benzodiazepines. The distributions of the individual α subunits across the CNS have been extensively characterized. However, as GABAA receptors may contain two different α subunits, the distribution of the subunits does not necessarily reflect the distribution of receptor subtypes with respect to benzodiazepine pharmacology. In the present study, we have used in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET and in vitro [(3)H]flumazenil autoradiography in combination with GABAA receptor point-mutated mice to characterize the distribution of the two most prevalent GABAA receptor subtypes (α1 and α2) throughout the mouse brain. The results were in agreement with published in vitro data. High levels of α2-containing receptors were found in brain regions of the neuronal network of anxiety. The α1/α2 subunit combinations were predictable from the individual subunit levels. In additional experiments, we explored in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET to determine the degree of receptor occupancy at GABAA receptor subtypes following oral administration of diazepam. The dose to occupy 50% of sensitive receptors, independent of the receptor subtype(s), was 1-2mg/kg, in agreement with published data from ex vivo

  12. Accounting for tissue heterogeneity in infrared spectroscopic imaging for accurate diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marin, David; Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Walsh, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy was used to image tissue samples from twenty patients diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma. The spectral data were then used to differentiate between follicular thyroid carcinoma and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma using principle component analysis coupled with linear discriminant analysis and a Naïve Bayesian classifier operating on a set of computed spectral metrics. Classification of patients' disease type was accomplished by using average spectra from a wide region containing follicular cells, colloid, and fibrosis; however, classification of disease state at the pixel level was only possible when the extracted spectra were limited to follicular epithelial cells in the samples, excluding the relatively uninformative areas of fibrosis. The results demonstrate the potential of FT-IR microscopy as a tool to assist in the difficult diagnosis of these subtypes of thyroid cancer, and also highlights the importance of selectively and separately analyzing spectral information from different features of a tissue of interest.

  13. Functional and Developmental Identification of a Molecular Subtype of Brain Serotonergic Neuron Specialized to Regulate Breathing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael D. Brust

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. By manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one by one chemogenetically, we find that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Furthermore, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections—increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth.

  14. Synthesis, binding, and modeling studies of new cytisine derivatives, as ligands for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasso, Bruno; Canu Boido, Caterina; Terranova, Emanuela; Gotti, Cecilia; Riganti, Loredana; Clementi, Francesco; Artali, Roberto; Bombieri, Gabriella; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Sparatore, Fabio

    2009-07-23

    The availability of drug affecting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may have important therapeutic potential for the treatment of several CNS pathologies. Pursuing our efforts on the systematic structural modification of cytisine and N-arylalkyl and N-aroylalkyl cytisines were synthesized and tested for the displacement of [(3)H]-epibatidine and [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin from the most widespread brain nAChRs subtypes alpha(4)beta(2) and alpha(7), respectively. While the affinity for alpha(7) subtype was rather poor (K(i) from 0.4 to >50 microM), the affinity for alpha(4)beta(2) subtype was very interesting, with nanomolar K(i) values for the best compounds. The N-substituted cytisines were docked into the rat and human alpha(4)beta(2) nAChR models based on the extracellular domain of a molluscan acetylcholine binding protein. The docking results agreed with the binding data, allowing the detection of discrete amino acid residues of the alpha and beta subunits essential for the ligand binding on rat and human nAChRs, providing a novel structural framework for the development of new alpha(4)beta(2) selective ligands.

  15. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, L.K.H. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Kashima, S.; Amarante, M.F.C.; Haddad, R.; Rodrigues, E.S. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, K.L.T.; Lima, T.A.; Castro, D.B.; Brito, F.C.; Almeida, E.G. [Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Covas, D.T. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Malheiro, A. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF-BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible “homogenous” subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country. Key words: HIV-1; Subtypes; Phylogenetic analysis; Blood donors; Molecular and epidemiological characterization.

  16. Subtypes of reading disability in a shallow orthography: a double dissociation between accuracy-disabled and rate-disabled readers of Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shany, Michal; Share, David L

    2011-06-01

    Whereas most English language sub-typing schemes for dyslexia (e.g., Castles & Coltheart, 1993) have focused on reading accuracy for words varying in regularity, such an approach may have limited utility for reading disability sub-typing beyond English in which fluency rather than accuracy is the key discriminator of developmental and individual differences in reading ability. The present study investigated the viability of an accuracy/fluency-based typology in a regular orthography, pointed Hebrew. We sought evidence of true or "hard" accuracy/rate subtypes in the strict (double dissociation) sense of selective impairment on only one dimension in the presence of normal levels of performance on the other dimension. In a nationally representative sample of fourth graders, we were able to identify a specific accuracy-disabled sub-group as well as an equally specific rate-disabled subgroup. Validating this subdivision, we show that the nature of reading performance in these subgroups and their converging cognitive/linguistic profiles are unique and distinctive on variables other than the measures used to define them. While the rate-specific disability appeared to reflect a general deficit in speed of processing affecting reading rate, and rapid automatized naming of print-related material, the accuracy-only disability subgroup displayed selective deficits in phonological awareness and morphological knowledge. Biosocial, demographic, and instructional factors, furthermore, did not explain the sub-group differences. It appears that both these subtypes are equally prevalent each counting close to 10% of the population.

  17. Chromatography studies on bio-affinity of nine ligands of α1-adrenoceptor to α1D subtypes overexpressed in cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Dian; YUAN; Bingxiang; DENG; Xiuling; YANG; Guangd

    2004-01-01

    To improve selectivity and specificity of cell membrane chromatography(CMC),the chromatography affinities of nine ligands of α1-adrenergic receptor(AR)to α1D-AR subtype were investigated.The human embryonic kidney(HEK)293 cells expressed by cDNA of α1D-AR subtypes were cultured and cell membrane stationary phase(CMSP)was prepared.Then the interactions between ligands and α1D-AR in CMSP were investigated using CMC.The affinity rank order to α1D-AR subtype obtained from CMC for the nine α1-adrenoceceptor ligands is:prazosin,BMY7378,phentolamine,oxymetazoline,5-methylurapidil,norepinephrine,phenylephrine,methoxamine,RS-17053.The affinity rank order is similar and correlates well with that obtained from others' radioligand binding assays(RBA).CMSP prepared by transfected HEK293 cells with α1D-adrenoceptor cDNA and CMC method could be used to evaluate affinities of drug-receptor and drug-receptor subtypes and to screen drugs selective to α1D-AR.

  18. Phylogeography, phylodynamics and transmission chains of bovine viral diarrhea virus subtype 1f in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Francesco; Luzzago, Camilla; Lauzi, Stefania; Ebranati, Erika; Caruso, Claudio; Masoero, Loretta; Moreno, Ana; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Peletto, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1 in Italy is characterized by high genetic diversity, with at least 20 subtypes. Subtype 1f is endemic in a restricted geographic area, meaning that it has local distribution. We investigated the population dynamics of BVDV-1f in Northern Italy and characterized the transmission chains of a subset of samples from Piedmont and Aosta Valley regions. A total of 51 samples from 1966 to 2013 were considered and 5' UTR sequences were used for phylogeography. A subset of 12 samples was selected for Npro gene sequencing and further characterization of the transmission chains using both molecular and epidemiological data. Phylogeography estimated the root of BVDV-1f tree in Veneto in 1965. Four significant subclades included sequences clustering by region: Lombardy (n=3), Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna (n=7), Piedmont (n=17), Piedmont and Aosta Valley (n=21). The Piedmont-only subclade has a ladder-like branching structure, while the Piedmont and Aosta Valley subclade has a nearly complete binary structure. In the subset, the outbreak reconstruction identified one sample from Piedmont as the most probable source of infection for the Aosta Valley cases. An ad hoc questionnaire submitted to public veterinarians revealed connections between sampled and non-sampled farms by means of trades, exhibitions and markets. According to the phylogeography, BVDV-1f moved westward, entering from Veneto, and spreading to Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna in the early 1990s, and finally to Piedmont and Aosta Valley in the first decade of 2000s. Both phylogeographic analyses on the whole dataset and on the selection of Npro dataset pointed out that subtype 1f entered Aosta Valley from Piedmont. The integration of molecular and epidemiological data revealed connections between farms, and such approach should be considered in any control plan. In Aosta Valley, the study showed that BVDV1f can be controlled only monitoring the introduction of cattle from Piedmont

  19. HLA-associated immune escape pathways in HIV-1 subtype B Gag, Pol and Nef proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrina L Brumme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive genetic diversity of HIV-1, viral evolution in response to immune selective pressures follows broadly predictable mutational patterns. Sites and pathways of Human Leukocyte-Antigen (HLA-associated polymorphisms in HIV-1 have been identified through the analysis of population-level data, but the full extent of immune escape pathways remains incompletely characterized. Here, in the largest analysis of HIV-1 subtype B sequences undertaken to date, we identify HLA-associated polymorphisms in the three HIV-1 proteins most commonly considered in cellular-based vaccine strategies. Results are organized into protein-wide escape maps illustrating the sites and pathways of HLA-driven viral evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HLA-associated polymorphisms were identified in HIV-1 Gag, Pol and Nef in a multicenter cohort of >1500 chronically subtype-B infected, treatment-naïve individuals from established cohorts in Canada, the USA and Western Australia. At q< or =0.05, 282 codons commonly mutating under HLA-associated immune pressures were identified in these three proteins. The greatest density of associations was observed in Nef (where close to 40% of codons exhibited a significant HLA association, followed by Gag then Pol (where approximately 15-20% of codons exhibited HLA associations, confirming the extensive impact of immune selection on HIV evolution and diversity. Analysis of HIV codon covariation patterns identified over 2000 codon-codon interactions at q< or =0.05, illustrating the dense and complex networks of linked escape and secondary/compensatory mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The immune escape maps and associated data are intended to serve as a user-friendly guide to the locations of common escape mutations and covarying codons in HIV-1 subtype B, and as a resource facilitating the systematic identification and classification of immune escape mutations. These resources should facilitate

  20. [22q11.2DS Syndrome as a Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Rodríguez, Cindy Katherin; Payán-Gómez, César; Forero-Castro, Ruth Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with the microdeletion of this chromosomal region, and represents the second most common genetic syndrome after Down's syndrome. In patients with schizophrenia, 22q11.2DS has a prevalence of 2%, and in selected groups can be increased to between 32-53%. To describe the generalities of 22q11.2DS syndrome as a genetic subtype of schizophrenia, its clinical characteristics, molecular genetic aspects, and frequency in different populations. A review was performed from 1967 to 2013 in scientific databases, compiling articles about 22q11.2DS syndrome and its association with schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 DS syndrome has a variable phenotype associated with other genetic syndromes, birth defects in many tissues and organs, and a high rate of psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Likewise, it has been identified in clinical populations with schizophrenia selected by the presence of common syndromic characteristics. FISH, qPCR and MLPA techniques, and recently, aCGH and NGS technologies, are being used to diagnose this microdeletion. It is important in clinical practice to remember that people suffering the 22q11.2DS have a high genetic risk for developing schizophrenia, and it is considered that the simultaneous presence of this disease and 22q11.2DS represents a genetic subtype of schizophrenia. There are clear phenotypic criteria, molecular and cytogenetic methods to diagnose this group of patients, and to optimize a multidisciplinary approach in their monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

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    Suresh K Mendu

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

  2. Quantitative MRI radiomics in the prediction of molecular classifications of breast cancer subtypes in the TCGA/TCIA data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Yitan; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Huang, Erich; Drukker, Karen; Hoadley, Katherine A; Fan, Cheng; Conzen, Suzanne D; Zuley, Margarita; Net, Jose M; Sutton, Elizabeth; Whitman, Gary J; Morris, Elizabeth; Perou, Charles M; Ji, Yuan; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-01-01

    Using quantitative radiomics, we demonstrate that computer-extracted magnetic resonance (MR) image-based tumor phenotypes can be predictive of the molecular classification of invasive breast cancers. Radiomics analysis was performed on 91 MRIs of biopsy-proven invasive breast cancers from National Cancer Institute's multi-institutional TCGA/TCIA. Immunohistochemistry molecular classification was performed including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and for 84 cases, the molecular subtype (normal-like, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like). Computerized quantitative image analysis included: three-dimensional lesion segmentation, phenotype extraction, and leave-one-case-out cross validation involving stepwise feature selection and linear discriminant analysis. The performance of the classifier model for molecular subtyping was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The computer-extracted tumor phenotypes were able to distinguish between molecular prognostic indicators; area under the ROC curve values of 0.89, 0.69, 0.65, and 0.67 in the tasks of distinguishing between ER+ versus ER-, PR+ versus PR-, HER2+ versus HER2-, and triple-negative versus others, respectively. Statistically significant associations between tumor phenotypes and receptor status were observed. More aggressive cancers are likely to be larger in size with more heterogeneity in their contrast enhancement. Even after controlling for tumor size, a statistically significant trend was observed within each size group (P = 0.04 for lesions ≤ 2 cm; P = 0.02 for lesions >2 to ≤5 cm) as with the entire data set (P-value = 0.006) for the relationship between enhancement texture (entropy) and molecular subtypes (normal-like, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like). In conclusion, computer-extracted image phenotypes show promise for high-throughput discrimination of breast cancer subtypes and may yield a

  3. MLST subtypes and population genetic structure of Cryptosporidium andersoni from dairy cattle and beef cattle in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Cattle are the main reservoir host of C. andersoni, which shows a predominance in yearlings and adults of cattle. To understand the subtypes of C. andersoni and the population genetic structure in Heilongjiang Province, fecal specimens were collected from 420 dairy cattle and 405 beef cattle at the age of 12-14 months in eight cattle farms in five areas within this province and were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 19.15% (158/825 and all the Cryptosporidium isolates were identified as C. andersoni by the SSU rRNA gene nested PCR-RFLP using SspI, VspI and MboII restriction enzymes. A total of 50 C. andersoni isolates were randomly selected and sequenced to confirm the RFLP results before they were subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16. Four, one, two and one haplotypes were obtained at the four loci, respectively. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed an absolute predominance and a wide distribution among the six MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of a clonal population genetic structure of C. andersoni in cattle, suggesting the absence of recombination among lineages. The finding of a clonal population genetic structure indicated that the prevalence of C. andersoni in cattle in Heilongjiang Province is not attributed to the introduction of cattle. Thus, prevention and control strategies should be focused on making stricter measures to avoid the occurrence of cross-transmission and re-infection between cattle individuals. These molecular data will also be helpful to explore the source attribution of infection/contamination of C. andersoni and to elucidate its transmission dynamics in Heilongjiang Province, even in China.

  4. Meta-analysis of the relationship between cytotoxin-associated gene-A and ischemic stroke subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yang; Xiaoli Zhao; Yongjun Gao; Zhidong Zheng; Jilai Li; Xinyi Li; Xiaoyuan Niu; Yingying Su

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To assess the role of cytotoxin-associated gene-A (CagA) positive strains of Helicobacterpylori (Hp)in ischemic stroke (IS)subtypes.DATA SOURCES:A computer-based online search of PubMed,EMBASE,the Cochrane Collaboration database,the CNKI database and the VIP database,from January 1997 to July 2010,was performed to find relevant studies.DATA SELECTION:Case-control studies relevant to CagA with IS and IS subtypes were selected.Data regarding related factors in the case group and control group were acquired using the same approach.All patients had been diagnosed as exhibiting IS using skull CT or MRI,and were etiologically typed according to the 1993 TOAST diagnosis criteria.Two investigators independently performed the same search and study selection.Meta-analyses were then performed for the selected studies using RevMan 5.0 software (Cochrane Collaboration) after strict screening.Heterogeneity tests,sensitivity analyses and publication bias assessments were then conducted.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Relationship of CagA with IS and IS subtypes.RESULTS:Eight studies were selected,involving data from 879 patients with IS,and 849 healthy controls.Five out of eight of the selected studies were related to large artery atherosclerosis (461patients with IS and 497 health controls).The results of our meta-analysis revealed a significant association between prior infection with CagA-positive strains and increased risk of IS (odds ratio (OR) = 2.31,95% confidence interval (CI):1.89 2.82,P<0.01).In addition,we found an association between infection with CagA-negative strains and IS (OR = 0.57,95%C/:0.47 0.70,P<0.01).CagA positive and negative strains were found to correlate with large artery atherosclerosis (CagA-positive strains:OR = 2.87,95%CI:2.19-3.77,P < 0.01;CagA-negative strains:OR = 0.51,95%CI:0.39-0.67,P< 0.01).Because of the diversity of etiological factors in the case-control study,we conducted further analyses after correcting for confounding factors

  5. HIV-1 subtype C primary isolates exhibit high sensitivity to an anti-gp120 RNA aptamer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent subtype, yet most antiretroviral drugs are developed against subtype B. UCLA1 RNA aptamer, which we previously showed neutralizes HIV-1 subtype C Env-pseudotyped viruses was examined for neutralization...

  6. Isolation of Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers That Distinguish Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtype H1 from H5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Sanggyu; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) mediates the binding of influenza virus to host cell receptors containing sialic acid, facilitating the entry of the virus into host cells. Therefore, the HA protein is regarded as a suitable target for the development of influenza virus detection devices. In this study, we isolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers binding to the HA1 subunit of subtype H1 (H1-HA1), but not to the HA1 subunit of subtype H5 (H5-HA1), using a counter-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (counter-SELEX) procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance studies showed that the selected aptamers bind tightly to H1-HA1 with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were binding to H1-HA1 in a concentration-dependent manner, yet were not binding to H5-HA1. Interestingly, the selected aptamers contained G-rich sequences in the central random nucleotides region. Further biophysical analysis showed that the G-rich sequences formed a G-quadruplex structure, which is a distinctive structure compared to the starting ssDNA library. Using flow cytometry analysis, we found that the aptamers did not bind to the receptor-binding site of H1-HA1. These results indicate that the selected aptamers that distinguish H1-HA1 from H5-HA1 can be developed as unique probes for the detection of the H1 subtype of influenza virus. PMID:25901739

  7. Development of an abbreviated version of the delirium motor subtyping scale (DMSS-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, D; Adamis, D; Leonard, M; Trzepacz, P; Grover, S; Jabbar, F; Meehan, K; O'Connor, M; Cronin, C; Reynolds, P; Fitzgerald, J; O'Regan, N; Timmons, S; Slor, C; de Jonghe, J; de Jonghe, A; van Munster, B C; de Rooij, S E; Maclullich, A

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome with considerable heterogeneity in clinical profile. Identification of clinical subtypes can allow for more targeted clinical and research efforts. We sought to develop a brief method for clinical subtyping in clinical and research settings. A multi-site database, including motor symptom assessments conducted in 487 patients from palliative care, adult and old age consultation-liaison psychiatry services was used to document motor activity disturbances as per the Delirium Motor Checklist (DMC). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify the class structure underpinning DMC data and also items for a brief subtyping scale. The concordance of the abbreviated scale was then compared with the original Delirium Motor Subtype Scale (DMSS) in 375 patients having delirium as per the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (4th edition) criteria. Latent class analysis identified four classes that corresponded closely with the four recognized motor subtypes of delirium. Further, LCA of items (n = 15) that loaded >60% to the model identified four features that reliably identified the classes/subtypes, and these were combined as a brief motor subtyping scale (DMSS-4). There was good concordance for subtype attribution between the original DMSS and the DMSS-4 (κ = 0.63). The DMSS-4 allows for rapid assessment of clinical subtypes in delirium and has high concordance with the longer and well-validated DMSS. More consistent clinical subtyping in delirium can facilitate better delirium management and more focused research effort.

  8. Duration of cross-protection between subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Zande, S; Nauwynck, H; Naylor, C; Pensaert, M

    2000-07-29

    The degree and duration of clinical and virological cross-protection between avian pneumovirus subtypes A and B were examined in two-week-old pneumovirus antibody-free turkeys. The turkeys were inoculated with either a virulent subtype A (Belgian isolate A/T6/96), a virulent subtype B (Belgian isolate B/T9/96), an attenuated subtype A or an attenuated subtype B, and challenged homologously and heterologously with virulent avian pneumovirus two, five and 11 weeks after inoculation. Birds inoculated with virulent A or B virus showed typical respiratory signs from three to seven days after inoculation. After challenge, no clinical signs were observed in any of the groups, and no virus was isolated from the turkeys that had been initially inoculated with a virulent strain. Virulent virus was recovered from the birds that had been initially inoculated with attenuated subtypes and challenged five and/or 11 weeks later with a heterologous virulent strain. Birds challenged after five weeks showed a serological booster reaction only when they had been inoculated initially with a virulent or attenuated subtype B and challenged with subtype A. Seroconversion was observed in all the groups challenged after 11 weeks except when they had been inoculated initially with attenuated subtype B and challenged with subtype B.

  9. Robust stratification of breast cancer subtypes using differential patterns of transcript isoform expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Stricker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death of women worldwide, is a heterogenous disease with multiple different subtypes. These subtypes carry important implications for prognosis and therapy. Interestingly, it is known that these different subtypes not only have different biological behaviors, but also have distinct gene expression profiles. However, it has not been rigorously explored whether particular transcriptional isoforms are also differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes, or whether transcript isoforms from the same sets of genes can be used to differentiate subtypes. To address these questions, we analyzed the patterns of transcript isoform expression using a small set of RNA-sequencing data for eleven Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ subtype and fourteen triple negative (TN subtype tumors. We identified specific sets of isoforms that distinguish these tumor subtypes with higher fidelity than standard mRNA expression profiles. We found that alternate promoter usage, alternative splicing, and alternate 3'UTR usage are differentially regulated in breast cancer subtypes. Profiling of isoform expression in a second, independent cohort of 68 tumors confirmed that expression of splice isoforms differentiates breast cancer subtypes. Furthermore, analysis of RNAseq data from 594 cases from the TCGA cohort confirmed the ability of isoform usage to distinguish breast cancer subtypes. Also using our expression data, we identified several RNA processing factors that were differentially expressed between tumor subtypes and/or regulated by estrogen receptor, including YBX1, YBX2, MAGOH, MAGOHB, and PCBP2. RNAi knock-down of these RNA processing factors in MCF7 cells altered isoform expression. These results indicate that global dysregulation of splicing in breast cancer occurs in a subtype-specific and reproducible manner and is driven by specific differentially expressed RNA processing factors.

  10. The dendritic cell subtype-restricted C-type lectin Clec9A is a target for vaccine enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Caminschi, Irina; Proietto, Anna I.; Ahmet, Fatma; Kitsoulis, Susie; Shin Teh, Joo; Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Wu, Li; Vremec, David; van Dommelen, Serani L.H.; Campbell, Ian K.; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Braley, Hal; Davey, Gayle M.; Mottram, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A novel dendritic cell (DC)–restricted molecule, Clec9A, was identified by gene expression profiling of mouse DC subtypes. Based on sequence similarity, a human ortholog was identified. Clec9A encodes a type II membrane protein with a single extracellular C-type lectin domain. Both the mouse Clec9A and human CLEC9A were cloned and expressed, and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each were generated. Surface staining revealed that Clec9A was selective for mouse DCs and was restricted to the...

  11. Leptomeningeal disease and breast cancer: the importance of tumor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouharb, Sausan; Ensor, Joe; Loghin, Monica Elena; Katz, Ruth; Moulder, Stacy L; Esteva, Francisco J; Smith, Benjamin; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Melhem-Bertrandt, Amal

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common tumors to involve the leptomeninges. We aimed to characterize clinical features and outcomes of patients with LMD based on BC subtypes. We retrospectively reviewed records of 233 patients diagnosed with LMD from BC between 1997 and 2012. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and significant differences in survival were determined by Cox proportional hazards or log-rank tests. Of 190 patients with BC subtype available, 67 (35 %) had hormone receptor positive (HR+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative BC, 56 (29 %) had HER2+BC, and 67 (35 %) had triple-negative BC (TNBC). Median age at LMD diagnosis was 50 years. Median overall survival (OS) from LMD diagnosis was 4.4 months for HER2+BC (95 % CI 2.8, 6.9), 3.7 months (95 % CI 2.4, 6.0) for HR+/HER2-BC, and 2.2 months (95 % CI 1.5, 3.0) for TNBC (p = 0.0002). Older age was associated with worse outcome (p LMD were more likely to receive systemic therapy (ST) (p = 0.001). Use of intrathecal therapy (IT) (52 %) was similar (p = 0.35). Both IT (p LMD carries a dismal prognosis. Modest survival differences by tumor subtype were seen. Patients with HER2+BC had the best outcome. There is an urgent need to develop effective treatment strategies.

  12. On the bases of two subtypes of developmental [corrected] dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manis, F R; Seidenberg, M S; Doi, L M; McBride-Chang, C; Petersen, A

    1996-02-01

    This study examined whether there are different subtypes of developmental dyslexia. The subjects were 51 dyslexic children (reading below the 30th percentile in isolated word recognition), 51 age-matched normal readers, and 27 younger normal readers who scored in the same range as the dyslexics on word recognition. Using methods developed by Castles and Coltheart (1993), we identified two subgroups who fit the profiles commonly termed "surface" and "phonological" dyslexia. Surface subjects were relatively poorer in reading exception words compared to nonwords; phonological dyslexics showed the opposite pattern. However, most dyslexics were impaired on reading both exception words and nonwords compared to same-aged normal readers. Whereas the surface dyslexics' performance was very similar to that of younger normal readers, the phonological dyslexics' was not. The two dyslexic groups also exhibited a double dissociation on two validation tasks: surface subjects were impaired on a task involving orthographic knowledge but not one involving phonology; phonological dyslexics showed the opposite pattern. The data support the conclusion that there are at least two subtypes of developmental dyslexia. Although these patterns have been taken as evidence for the dual-route model, we provide an alternative account of them within the Seidenberg and McClelland (1989) connectionist model. The connectionist model accounts for why dyslexics tend to be impaired on both exception words and nonwords; it also suggests that the subtypes may arise from multiple underlying deficits. We conclude that performance on exception words and nonwords is not sufficient to identify the basis of dyslexic behavior; rather, information about children's performance on other tasks, their remediation experiences, and the computational mechanisms that give rise to impairments must be taken into account as well.

  13. Differences in oxidative stress dependence between gastric adenocarcinoma subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brigitte Bancel; Jacques Estève; Jean-Christophe Souquet; Shinya Toyokuni; Hiroshi Ohshima; Brigitte Pignatelli

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the extent of oxidative stress in preneoplastic and neoplastic gastric mucosa in relation to their pathological criteria and histological subtypes.METHODS: A total of 104 gastric adenocarcinomas from 98 patients (88 infiltrative and 16 intraepithelial tumors)were assessed immunohistochemically for expression of iNOS and occurrence of nitrotyrosine (NTYR)-containing proteins and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-containing DNA, as markers of NO production and damages to protein and DNA.RESULTS: Tumor cells staining for iNOS, NTYR and 8-OH-dG were detected in 41%, 62% and 50% of infiltrative carcinoma, respectively. The three markers were shown for the first time in intraepithelial carcinoma.The expression of iNOS was significantly more frequent in tubular carcinoma (TC) compared to diffuse carcinoma (DC) (54% vs 18%; P=0.008) or in polymorphous carcinoma (PolyC) (54% vs 21%; P=0.04). NTYR staining was obviously more often found in TC than that in PolyC (72% vs 30%; P=0.03). There was a tendency towards a higher rate of iNOS staining when distant metastasis (pM) was present. In infiltrative TC, the presence of oxidative stress markers was not significantly correlated with histological grade, density of inflammation, the depth of infiltration (pT), lymph nodes dissemination (pN) and pathological stages (pTNM).CONCLUSION: The iNOS-oxidative pathway may play an important role in TC, but moderately in PolyC and DC.DNA oxidation and protein nitration occur in the three subtypes. Based on the significant differences of NTYR levels, TC and PolyC appear as two distinct subtypes.

  14. Rate of renal cell carcinoma subtypes in different races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sankin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We sought to identify racial differences among histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC between black and non-black patients in an equal-access health care system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a multi-institutional, prospective database of patients undergoing partial or radical nephrectomy between January 1, 2000 and Sept 31, 2009. For the purposes of this study, data captured included age at diagnosis, race, tumor size, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of capsular invasion, margin status, and tumor histology. RESULTS: 204 kidney tumors were identified (Table-1. Of these, 117 (57.4% were in black patients and 87 (42.6% were in non-black patients. Age at surgery ranged from 37 to 87 with a median of 62. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 22.0 cm with a median of 5.0 cm. Overall, tumors were composed of clear cell RCC in 97 cases (47.5%, papillary RCC in 65 cases (31.9%, chromophobe RCC in 13 cases (6.4%, collecting duct/medullary RCC in 2 cases (1.0%, RCC with multiple histological subtypes in 8 cases (3.9%, malignant tumors of other origin in 6 cases (2.9%, and benign histology in 13 cases (6.4%. Among black patients, papillary RCC was seen in 56 cases (47.9%, compared to 9 cases (10.3% among non-black patients (p < 0.001 (Table-2. Clear cell RCC was present in 38 (32.5% of black patients and in 59 (67.8% of non-blacks (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, papillary RCC had a much higher occurrence among black patients compared to non-black patients. This is the first study to document such a great racial disparity among RCC subtypes.

  15. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  16. Alterations of muscarinic receptor subtypes in pathways relating to memory: Effects of lesions and transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified pharmacologically into two distinct populations designated muscarinic type-one (M-1) and mscarinic type-two (M-2). The semiquantitative technique of receptor autoradiography was used to examine the anatomical and cellular distribution, and densities of M-1 and M-2 receptors in the rate brain. Muscarinic receptors were labeled with the classical antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Differentiation of the muscarinic subtypes was accomplished by competition studies of ({sup 3}H)QNB against the relatively selective M-1 antagonist pirenzepine (PZ), and the relatively selective M-2 antagonist, AFDX-116. In addition, M-1 and M-2 receptors were directly labeled with ({sup 3}H)PZ and ({sup 3}H)AFDX-116, respectively. Cholinergic pathways from the large cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) to the cortex and from the medial septum (MS) to the hippocampus were examined by lesioning with the selective cholinergic neurotoxin, AF64A. Bilateral cerebral cortical infarction was performed in order to analyze potential changes in muscarinic receptor populations in subcortical structures that are sensitive to cortical infarction. Finally, the response of muscarinic receptors to fetal septodiagonal band transplants in the deafferentated hippocampus was examined.

  17. Pay attention to impulsivity: modelling low attentive and high impulsive subtypes of adult ADHD in the 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Anneka; Grayson, Ben; Marsh, Samuel; Harte, Michael K; Barnes, Samuel A; Marshall, Kay M; Neill, Joanna C

    2014-08-01

    Varying levels of attention and impulsivity deficits are core features of the three subtypes of adult attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To date, little is known about the neurobiological correlates of these subtypes. Development of a translational animal model is essential to improve our understanding and improve therapeutic strategies. The 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in rats can be used to examine different forms of attention and impulsivity. Adult rats were trained to pre-set 5C-CPT criterion and subsequently separated into subgroups according to baseline levels of sustained attention, vigilance, premature responding and response disinhibition in the 5C-CPT. The behavioural subgroups were selected to represent the different subtypes of adult ADHD. Consequently, effects of the clinically used pharmacotherapies (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) were assessed in the different subgroups. Four subgroups were identified: low-attentive (LA), high-attentive (HA), high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI). Methylphenidate and atomoxetine produced differential effects in the subgroups. Methylphenidate increased sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced premature responding in HI animals. Atomoxetine also improved sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced response disinhibition and premature responding in HI animals. This is the first study using adult rats to demonstrate the translational value of the 5C-CPT to select subgroups of rats, which may be used to model the subtypes observed in adult ADHD. Our findings suggest that this as an important paradigm to increase our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of adult ADHD-subtypes and their response to pharmacotherapy.

  18. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating vasoconstriction of human umbilical vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Lereis, Virginia Andrea; Hita, Francisco Javier; Gobbi, Mauro Darío; Verdi, Marcela Gomez; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempted to pharmacologically characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of human umbilical vein (HUV). HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves were constructed for acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50: 6.16±0.04; maximum response 80.00±1.98% of the responses induced by serotonin 10 μM). The absence of endothelium did not modify the contractile responses of ACh in this tissue. The role of cholinesterases was evaluated: neither neostigmine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) nor iso-OMPA (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) modified ACh responses. When both enzymes were simultaneously inhibited, a significantly but little potentiation was observed (control: pEC50 6.33±0.03; double inhibition: pEC50 6.57±0.05). Atropine, nonselective muscarinic receptors antagonist, inhibited ACh-induced contraction (pKB 9.67). The muscarinic receptors antagonists pirenzepine (M1), methoctramine (M2) and pFHHSiD (M3) also antagonized responses to ACh. The affinity values estimated for these antagonists against responses evoked by ACh were 7.58, 6.78 and 7.94, respectively. On the other hand, PD 102807 (M4 selective muscarinic receptors antagonist) was ineffective against ACh-induced contraction. In presence of a blocking concentration of pirenzepine, pFHHSiFD produced an additional antagonism activity on ACh-induced responses. The M1 muscarinic receptors agonist McN-A-343 produced similar maximum but less potent responses than ACh in HUV. The calculated pA2 for pirenzepine against McN-A-343 induced responses was 8.54. In conclusion, the data obtained in this study demonstrate the role of M1 muscarinic receptor subtypes and suggest the involvement of M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in ACh-induced vasoconstriction in HUV rings. In addition, the vasomotor activity evoked by ACh does not seem to be modulated by endothelial factors, and their enzymatic degradation appears to have little functional relevance in this

  19. HIV-1 Subtype distribution in morocco based on national sentinel surveillance data 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrim Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about HIV-1 subtype distribution in Morocco. Some data suggest an emergence of new HIV subtypes. We conducted phylogenetic analysis on a nationally representative sample of 60 HIV-1 viral specimens collected during 2004-2005 through the Morocco national HIV sentinel surveillance survey. Results While subtype B is still the most prevalent, 23.3% of samples represented non-B subtypes, the majority of which were classified as CRF02_AG (15%. Molecular clock analysis confirmed that the initial introduction of HIV-1B in Morocco probably came from Europe in the early 1980s. In contrast, the CRF02_AG strain appeared to be introduced from sub-Saharan Africa in two separate events in the 1990s. Conclusions Subtype CRF02_AG has been emerging in Morocco since the 1990s. More information about the factors introducing HIV subtype-specific transmission will inform the prevention strategy in the region.

  20. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, L K H; Kashima, S; Amarante, M F C; Haddad, R; Rodrigues, E S; Silva, K L T; Lima, T A; Castro, D B; Brito, F C; Almeida, E G; Covas, D T; Malheiro, A

    2012-02-01

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF_BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible "homogenous" subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country.

  1. [Visual detection of H1 subtype and identification of N1, N2 subtype of avian influenza virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Xie, Zhi-Xun; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Chen-Yu; Liu, Jia-Bo; Pang, Yao-Shan; Deng, Xian-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Qin; Xie, Li-Ji; Fan, Qing; Luo, Si-Si

    2013-03-01

    In order to visually detect H1, N1 and N2 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV), three reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays were developed. According to the sequences of AIV gene available in GenBank, three degenerate primer sets specific to HA gene of H1 subtype AIV, NA gene of N1 and N2 subtype AIV were designed, and the reaction conditions were optimized. The results showed that all the assays had no cross-reaction with other subtype AIV and other avian respiratory pathogens, and the detection limit was higher than that of conventional RT-PCR. These assays were performed in water bath within 50 minutes. Without opening tube, the amplification result could be directly determined by inspecting the color change of reaction system as long as these assays were fin-ished. Fourteen specimens of H1N1 subtype and eight specimens of H1N2 subtype of AIV were identified from the 120 clinical samples by RT-LAMP assays developed, which was consistent with that of virus isolation. These results suggested that the three newly developed RT-LAMEP assays were simple, specific and sensitive and had potential for visual detection of H1, N1 and N2 subtype of AIV in field.

  2. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears

    OpenAIRE

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Laine, M.L.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ligthart, L.; van Wijk, A J; De Jongh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis included five twin studies on fears and ten twin studies on specific phobias. Heritability estimates of fear subtypes and specific phobia subtypes both varied widely, even within the subtypes. A meta-a...

  3. Mortality of treated HIV-1 positive individuals according to viral subtype in Europe and Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate prognosis by viral subtype in HIV-1-infected individuals from start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and after viral failure. DESIGN: Collaborative analysis of data from eight European and three Canadian cohorts. METHODS: Adults (N>20 000) who started triple ART between 199....... There was no difference in mortality between subtypes A, B and C after viral failure. CONCLUSION: Patients with subtype A had worse prognosis, an observation which may be confounded by socio-demographic factors....

  4. Molecular Mechanisms and Genome-Wide Aspects of PPAR Subtype Specific Transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anne Skovsø; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are central regulators of fat metabolism, energy homeostasis, proliferation, and inflammation. The three PPAR subtypes, PPARα, β/δ, and γ activate overlapping but also very different target gene programs. This review summarizes the insights...... into PPAR subtype-specific transactivation provided by genome-wide studies and discusses the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying PPAR subtype specificity with special focus on the regulatory role of AF-1....

  5. Rapid Subtyping of Dengue Virus Serotypes 1 and 4 by Restriction Site-Specific PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Marize P Miagostovich; dos Santos, Flavia B.; Gutiérrez, C. Milena; Riley, Lee W.; Harris, Eva

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported a simple subtyping method, restriction site-specific PCR (RSS-PCR), for dengue virus serotypes 2 and 3; here we describe its application for subtyping dengue virus serotypes 1 and 4. Three major RSS-PCR types were observed for dengue virus serotype 1 and two types were observed for dengue virus serotype 4, in agreement with previous strain classifications based on sequence analysis. Because of its simplicity, this method is amenable to rapid subtyping and application to...

  6. Evidence of multiple introductions of HIV-1 subtype C in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Joana Morais; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent group M clade in southern Africa and some eastern African countries. Subtype C is also the most frequent subtype in Angola (southwestern Africa), with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. In order to better understand the origin of the HIV-1 subtype C strains circulating in Angola, 31 subtype C pol sequences of Angolan origin were compared with 1950 subtype C pol sequences sampled in other African countries. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the Angolan subtype C sequences were distributed in 16 different lineages that were widely dispersed among other African strains. Ten subtype C Angolan lineages were composed by only one sequence, while the remaining six clades contain between two and seven sequences. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis indicates that most Angolan clades probably originated in different southern African countries with the exception of one lineage that most likely originated in Burundi. Evolutionary analysis suggests that those Angolan subtype C clades composed by ≥ 2 sequences were introduced into the country between the late 1970s and the mid 2000s. The median estimated time frame for the origin of those Angolan lineages coincides with periods of positive migration influx in Angola that were preceded by phases of negative migratory outflow. These results demonstrate that the Angolan subtype C epidemic resulted from multiple introductions of subtype C viruses mainly imported from southern African countries over the last 30years, some of which have been locally disseminated establishing several autochthonous transmission networks. This study also suggests that population mobility between Angola and southern African countries during civil war (1974-2002) may have played a key role in the emergence of the Angolan subtype C epidemic.

  7. Molecular subtypes of PMI/RaRa in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to describe the frequency of molecular subtypes of PML/RARα in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and their distribution according to risk of recurrence and cytomorphology. A case series was carried out, including fifty patients registered at the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) during 2010-2012, with molecular diagnosis of APL PML/RARα and bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 subtypes by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bcr1 subtype...

  8. Subtype Identification of Avian Influenza Virus on DNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-rong; YU Kang-zhen; DENG Guo-hua; SHI Rui; LIU Li-ling; QIAO Chuan-ling; BAO Hong-mei; KONG Xian-gang; CHEN Hua-lan

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection of H5, H7 and H9 subtypes of avian influenza virus (AIV). The strains used in the experiment were A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 (H5N1), A/African starling/983/79 (H7N1) and A/Turkey/Wiscosin/1/66 (H9N2). The capture DNAs clones which encoding approximate 500-bp avian influenza virus gene fragments obtained by RT-PCR, were spotted on a slide-bound microarray. Cy5-1abeled fluorescent cDNAs,which generated from virus RNA during reverse transcription were hybridized to these capture DNAs. These capture DNAs contained multiple fragments of the hemagglutinin and matrix protein genes of AIV respectively, for subtyping and typing AIV. The arrays were scanned to determine the probe binding sites. The hybridization pattern agreed approximately with the known grid location of each target. The results show that DNA microarray technology provides a useful diagnostic method for AIV.

  9. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating.

  10. Neglect subtypes, race, and poverty: individual, family, and service characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett; Zhou, Pan

    2013-02-01

    Recent child maltreatment research has highlighted the very different context of poverty for Black and White children. Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment and strongly associated with poverty. Neglect is, however, not a unitary construct. We lack an understanding of whether reporting of and responding to different types of neglect may vary by poverty, race, or the intersection of the two. Administrative census, child welfare, welfare, health, and education data were used to examine how family and community poverty factors associate with various subtypes of neglect and subsequent case dispositions for Black and White children. Black children reported to child welfare reside in far poorer communities than Whites, even after taking into account family income (Aid to Families with Dependent Children [AFDC]/Temporary Aid to Needy Families [TANF]). Black children were more commonly reported and substantiated for severe and basic needs neglect. Community poverty indicators had a different relationship to report disposition for Black as compared to White children after controlling for neglect subtypes, child and family characteristics. Implications for practice and policy are discussed.

  11. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  12. Molecular Subtypes of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma and Correlation with Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce N. Barlin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular etiology of uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS is poorly understood, which accounts for the wide disparity in outcomes among women with this disease. We examined and compared the molecular profiles of ULMS and normal myometrium (NL to identify clinically relevant molecular subtypes. Discovery cases included 29 NL and 23 ULMS specimens. RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix U133A 2.0 transcription microarrays. Differentially expressed genes and pathways were identified using standard methods. Fourteen NL and 44 ULMS independent archival samples were used for external validation. Molecular subgroups were correlated with clinical outcome. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes between ULMS and NL samples identified overrepresentation of cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, and genomic integrity. External validation confirmed differential expression in 31 genes (P < 4.4 × 10−4, Bonferroni corrected, with 84% of the overexpressed genes, including CDC7, CDC20, GTSE1, CCNA2, CCNB1, and CCNB2, participating in cell cycle regulation. Unsupervised clustering of ULMS identified two clades that were reproducibly associated with progression-free (median, 4.0 vs 26.0 months; P = .02; HR, 0.33 and overall (median, 18.2 vs 77.2 months; P = .04; HR, 0.33 survival. Cell cycle genes play a key role in ULMS sarcomagenesis, providing opportunities for therapeutic targeting. Reproducible molecular subtypes associated with clinical outcome may permit individualized adjuvant treatment after clinical trial validation.

  13. Molecular dating of HIV-1 subtype C from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontell, Irene; Sarker, Md Safiullah; Rahman, Mustafizur; Afrad, Mokibul Hassan; Sönnerborg, Anders; Azim, Tasnim

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has an overall low HIV prevalence of Bangladesh and related strains from other countries, and thereby clarify when and from where subtype C was introduced in the country and how it subsequently spread within Bangladesh. The phylogenetic analysis included 118 Bangladeshi gag sequences and 128 sequences from other countries and was performed using the BEAST package. Our analysis revealed that the vast majority of Bangladeshi sequences (97/118, 82%) fall into a large regional cluster of samples from Bangladesh, India, China and Myanmar, which dates back to the early 1960's. Following its establishment in the region, this strain has entered Bangladesh multiple times from around 1975 and onwards, but extensive in-country transmission could only be detected among drug users and not through sexual transmission. In addition, there have been multiple (at least ten) introductions of subtype C to Bangladesh from outside this region, but no extensive spread could be detected for any of these. Since many HIV-infections remain undetected while asymptomatic, the true extent of the transmission of each strain remains unknown, especially among hard to reach groups such as clients of sex workers and returning migrants with families.

  14. ONE-CLASS DETECTION OF CELL STATES IN TUMOR SUBTYPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOKOLOV, ARTEM; PAULL, EVAN O.; STUART, JOSHUA M.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular composition of a tumor greatly influences the growth, spread, immune activity, drug response, and other aspects of the disease. Tumor cells are usually comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of subclones, each of which could contain their own distinct character. The presence of minor subclones poses a serious health risk for patients as any one of them could harbor a fitness advantage with respect to the current treatment regimen, fueling resistance. It is therefore vital to accurately assess the make-up of cell states within a tumor biopsy. Transcriptome-wide assays from RNA sequencing provide key data from which cell state signatures can be detected. However, the challenge is to find them within samples containing mixtures of cell types of unknown proportions. We propose a novel one-class method based on logistic regression and show that its performance is competitive to two established SVM-based methods for this detection task. We demonstrate that one-class models are able to identify specific cell types in heterogeneous cell populations better than their binary predictor counterparts. We derive one-class predictors for the major breast and bladder subtypes and reaffirm the connection between these two tissues. In addition, we use a one-class predictor to quantitatively associate an embryonic stem cell signature with an aggressive breast cancer subtype that reveals shared stemness pathways potentially important for treatment. PMID:26776204

  15. Whole-genome landscapes of major melanoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Nicholas K; Wilmott, James S; Waddell, Nicola; Johansson, Peter A; Field, Matthew A; Nones, Katia; Patch, Ann-Marie; Kakavand, Hojabr; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Burke, Hazel; Jakrot, Valerie; Kazakoff, Stephen; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Mularoni, Loris; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Waddell, Nick; Tembe, Varsha; Pupo, Gulietta M; De Paoli-Iseppi, Ricardo; Vilain, Ricardo E; Shang, Ping; Lau, Loretta M S; Dagg, Rebecca A; Schramm, Sarah-Jane; Pritchard, Antonia; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Newell, Felicity; Fitzgerald, Anna; Shang, Catherine A; Grimmond, Sean M; Pickett, Hilda A; Yang, Jean Y; Stretch, Jonathan R; Behren, Andreas; Kefford, Richard F; Hersey, Peter; Long, Georgina V; Cebon, Jonathan; Shackleton, Mark; Spillane, Andrew J; Saw, Robyn P M; López-Bigas, Núria; Pearson, John V; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Mann, Graham J

    2017-05-11

    Melanoma of the skin is a common cancer only in Europeans, whereas it arises in internal body surfaces (mucosal sites) and on the hands and feet (acral sites) in people throughout the world. Here we report analysis of whole-genome sequences from cutaneous, acral and mucosal subtypes of melanoma. The heavily mutated landscape of coding and non-coding mutations in cutaneous melanoma resolved novel signatures of mutagenesis attributable to ultraviolet radiation. However, acral and mucosal melanomas were dominated by structural changes and mutation signatures of unknown aetiology, not previously identified in melanoma. The number of genes affected by recurrent mutations disrupting non-coding sequences was similar to that affected by recurrent mutations to coding sequences. Significantly mutated genes included BRAF, CDKN2A, NRAS and TP53 in cutaneous melanoma, BRAF, NRAS and NF1 in acral melanoma and SF3B1 in mucosal melanoma. Mutations affecting the TERT promoter were the most frequent of all; however, neither they nor ATRX mutations, which correlate with alternative telomere lengthening, were associated with greater telomere length. Most melanomas had potentially actionable mutations, most in components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol kinase pathways. The whole-genome mutation landscape of melanoma reveals diverse carcinogenic processes across its subtypes, some unrelated to sun exposure, and extends potential involvement of the non-coding genome in its pathogenesis.

  16. CT Assessment of Subtypes of Pulmonary Emphysema in Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togami,Taro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective study examining the prevalence and subtypes of pulmonary emphysema (PE identified by computed tomography (CT in females. We reviewed the records of 1,687 female subjects who had undergone CT. They were divided into the following 2 age groups:group A (<50 years and group B (>_50 years. PE was diagnosed by the presence of low-attenuation areas using visual assessment (grades 0-3 on CT images. Two subtypes of PE were observed:centrilobular emphysema (CLE and paraseptal emphysema (PSE. PE was divided into the following 3 categories:I (CLE or CLE-predominant;II (CLE and PSE of equal extent;and III (PSE or PSE-predominant. PE was found in 64 of 274 smokers (23.3% and 54 of 1,413 non-smokers (3.8%. In smoking subjects, when grades 1 and 2 were grouped together as mild PE, the mean age for CT grade 3 (severe PE was significantly higher than that for mild PE. In group A, category III predominated, whereas category I was more prevalent in group B, in both smoking and non-smoking subjects. A high incidence of PE was found in smoking subjects as compared with non-smoking subjects. PSE predominated in younger subjects, whereas CLE predominated in older subjects.

  17. Cognitive process-based subtypes of developmental coordination disorder (DCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asonitou, Katerina; Koutsouki, Dimitra

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the cognitive subtypes demonstrated by children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) using the Planning-Attention-Simultaneous-Successive Processing (PASS) theory and the Cognitive Assessment System (D-N CAS). Participants were 108 children aged 5- and 6-years old, 54 with DCD and 54 without DCD, all attending typical kindergartens. They were examined on 31 cognitive-motor variables. Hierarchical-agglomerative and iterative partitioning cluster analyses including 9 motor and 7 cognitive variables revealed the following six subtypes: o C1 = children at risk (having considerable difficulty with jumping and minor difficulty with manual dexterity and simultaneous coding); o C2 = children on the mean (all cognitive-motor scores close to the mean); o C3 = free from cognitive-motor problems (all scores above average); o C4 = manual dexterity, planning and simultaneous coding difficulties; o C5 = manual dexterity, dynamic balance, and planning difficulties; o C6 = generalized cognitive-motor dysfunction (all scores considerably below average). It is well known that DCD is a heterogeneous condition. However, whenever cognitive processes were lower than average, cognitive-motor relationship was evident in subgroups C1, C4, C5 and C6. Early identification of task-specific cognitive-motor difficulties may be essential for early educational intervention practices in order to anticipate and improve learning, academic and performing difficulties.

  18. Advances in Molecular Serotyping and Subtyping of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina M. Fratamico

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available E. coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtyping and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. A variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.

  19. Cloning, functional expression, and characterization of the human prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, L; Sawyer, N; Grygorczyk, R; Metters, K M; Adam, M

    1994-04-22

    A cDNA clone encoding the human prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor EP2 subtype has been isolated from a human lung cDNA library. The 1.9-kilobase pair cDNA, hEP2, encodes for a 488-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 53,115 and has the seven putative transmembrane domains characteristic of G protein-coupled receptors. The specific binding of [3H]PGE2 to COS cell membranes transfected with the hEP2 cDNA was of high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 1 nM and the rank order of potency for prostaglandins in competition for [3H]PGE2 specific binding was PGE1 = PGE2 > iloprost > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. In competition studies using more selective prostanoid-receptor agonist and antagonists, the [3H]PGE2 specific binding was competed by MB28767, an EP3 agonist, but not by the EP1-preferring antagonists AH6809 and SC19220, or by the EP2 agonist butaprost. Electrophysiological studies of Xenopus oocytes co-injected with hEP2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (cAMP-activated Cl- channel) cDNAs detected PGE2-specific inward Cl- currents, demonstrating that the hEP2 cDNA encoded a functional receptor which produced an increase in cAMP levels. Thus, we have cloned the human EP2 receptor subtype which is functionally coupled to increase in cAMP. Northern blot analysis showed that hEP2 is expressed as a 3.8-kilobase mRNA in a number of human tissues with the highest expression levels present in the small intestine.

  20. A new subtype of high-grade mandibular osteosarcoma with RASAL1/MDM2 amplification.

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