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Sample records for beta-alumina type ceramics

  1. The thermal stability of sodium beta'-Alumina solid electrolyte ceramic in AMTEC cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Homer, Margie L.; Lara, Liana; Manatt, Ken; Shields, Virgil; Cortez, Roger H.; Kulleck, James

    1999-01-01

    A critical component of alkali metal thermal-to electric converter (AMTEC) devices for long duration space missions is the beta'-alumina solid electrolyte ceramic (BASE), for which there exists no substitute. The temperature and environmental conditions under which BASE remains stable control operational parameters of AMTEC devices. We have used mass loss experiments in vacuum to 1573K to characterize the kinetics of BASE decomposition, and conductivity and exchange current measurements in sodium vapor filled exposure cells to 1223K to investigate changes in the BASE which affect its ionic conductivity. There is no clear evidence of direct thermal decomposition of BASE below 1273K, although limited soda loss may occur. Reactive metals such as Mn or Cr can react with BASE at temperatures at least as low as 1223K

  2. On the existence of europium aluminum oxynitrides with a magnetoplumbite or beta-alumina type structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Hanssen, R.; Jansen, S.R.; Metselaar, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the literature confusion exists concerning the structure type, the valence of europium, and the amount of nitrogen incorporation of the compound europium aluminum oxynitride. By using X-ray diffraction and luminescence measurements, we show that europium aluminum oxynitride has the

  3. Combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of LaPO4 monazite and beta-alumina on alumina fibers for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, T.J.; Hendrick, M.R.; Shao, H.; Hornis, H.G.; Hunt, A.T.

    1998-01-01

    This research used the low cost, open atmosphere combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD SM ) method to efficiently deposit protective coatings onto alumina fibers (3M Nextel TM 610) for use in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). La-monazite (LaPO 4 ) and beta-alumina were the primary candidate debonding coating materials investigated. The coated fibers provide thermochemical stability, as well as desired debonding/sliding interface characteristics to the CMC. Dense and uniform La-phosphate coatings were obtained at deposition temperatures as low as 900-1000 C with minimal degradation of fibers. However, all of the β-alumina phases required high deposition temperatures and, thus, could not be applied onto the Nextel TM 610 alumina fibers. The fibers appeared to have complete and relatively uniform coatings around individual filaments when 420 and 1260 filament tows were coated via the CCVD process. Fibers up to 3 feet long were fed through the deposition flame in the laboratory of MicroCoating Technologies (MCT). TEM analyses performed at Wright-Patterson AFB on the CCVD coated fibers showed a 10-30 nm thick La-rich layer at the fiber/coating interface, and a layer of columnar monazite 0.1-1 μm thick covered with sooty carbon of <50 nm thick on the outside. A single strength test on CCVD coated fibers performed by 3M showed that the strength value fell in the higher end of data from other CVD coated samples. (orig.)

  4. Synthesis of beta alumina from aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide precursors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, A

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Two aluminium oxyhydroxides, boehmite and pseudoboehmite, and two aluminium hydroxides, bayerite and gibbsite, have been investigated as precursors for the synthesis of the solid electrolyte, beta alumina. Reaction pathways and products have been...

  5. Properties of single crystal beta''-aluminas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.B.; Brown, G.M.; Kaneda, T.; Brundage, W.E.; Wang, J.C.; Engstrom, H.

    1979-01-01

    Large single crystals of sodium beta''-alumina were grown by slow evaporation of Na 2 O at 1690 0 C from a mixture of Na 2 CO 3 , MgO, and Al 2 O 3 . Polarized Raman measurements were made on the Na β'' single crystals and on single crystals of Li, K, Rb, and Ag β'' prepared by ion exchange of Na β''. The low frequency Raman spectra of Na, K, Rb, and Ag β'' contained four or more bands due to vibrations of the mobile cations. These results were analyzed by assuming the spectra to be due to the normal modes of a defect cluster consisting of a cation vacancy surrounded by three cations. From model calculations, the Raman band of Na β'' at 33 cm -1 is assigned to the attempt mode for diffusion of Na + ions. The structure of a Ag β'' single crystal was investigated by neutron diffraction, and 20% of the Ag + ion sites were found to be vacant

  6. Characteristics of the Na/beta-alumina/Na cell as a sodium vapor pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takikawa, O.; Imai, A.; Harata, M.

    1982-01-01

    The EMF and voltage-current characteristics for a galvanic cell with the configuration Na vapor (P 1 )/sodium beta-alumina/Na vapor (P 2 ) were studied. It was verified that the EMF followed the Nernst relation over a wide pressure range. For example, when P 1 = 2 x 10 -2 mm Hg and beta-alumina temperature = 340 0 C, the measured EMF agreed with the calculated value in P 2 range from 10 -5 to 10 -2 mm Hg. At lower pressure range, the measured EMF showed a negative deviation. Coexisting argon gas did not influence the cell EMF characteristic. In an atmosphere containing oxygen, the measured EMF was very high at first. Then it decreased and finally approached a value which agreed with the Nernst equation after several hours. At low beta-alumina temperatures, current saturation was observed in the voltage versus current relation with the anode on the P 2 side. Although the sodium pressure could be determined from saturating current measurement, the measurable pressure range was narrower than that for EMF measurement. At high beta-alumina temperature, current saturation was not clear. Values of 6 x 10 -6 (Ω cm) -1 for the electron conductivity and 6 x 10 -10 (Ω cm) -1 for the hole conductivity at 340 0 C were obtained for beta-alumina from the voltage-current characteristics at low sodium pressure. (Auth.)

  7. Advanced materials for sodium-beta alumina batteries: Status, challenges and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

    The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a β″-Al 2O 3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300-350 °C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However, there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

  8. Advanced materials for sodium-beta alumina batteries: Status, challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-01-01

    The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a β''-Al 2 O 3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300-350 C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However, there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement. (author)

  9. Proton-conducting beta"-alumina via microwave-assisted synthesis and mechanism of enhanced corrosion prevention of a zinc rich coating with electronic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brent William

    Proton Conducting beta-alumina via Microwave Assisted Synthesis. The microwave assisted synthesis of proton conducting Mg- and Li-stabilized NH4+/H3O+ beta-alumina from a solution based gel precursor is reported. beta-alumina is a ceramic fast ion conductor containing two-dimensional sheets of mobile cations. Na +-beta-alumina is the most stable at the sintering temperatures (1740°C) reached in a modified microwave oven, and can be ion exchanged to the K+ form and then to the NH4+/H 3O+ form. beta-phase impurity is found to be 20% for Mg-stabilized material and 30-40% for Li-stabilized material. The composition of the proton conducting form produced here is deficient in NH4 + as compared to the target composition (NH4)1.00 (H3O)0.67Mg0.67Al10.33O 17. Average grain conductivity for Li-stabilized material at 150°C is 6.6x10-3 +/- 1.6x10-3 S/cm with 0.29 +/- 0.05 eV activation energy, in agreement with single crystal studies in the literature. Grain boundary conductivity is found to be higher in the Li-stabilized material. A hydrogen bond energy hypothesis is presented to explain these differences. Li-stabilized NH4+/H3O + beta-alumina is demonstrated as a fuel cell electrolyte, producing 28 muA/cm2 of electrical current at 0.5 V. Mechanism of Enhanced Corrosion Prevention of a Zinc Rich Coating with Electronic Control. A corrosion inhibition system consisting of high weight-loading zinc rich coating applied to steel panels is examined. An electronic control unit (ECU) consisting of a battery and a large capacitor in series with the panel is shown to improve corrosion protection upon immersion in 3% NaCl solution. Weekly solution changes to avoid zinc saturation in solution system were necessary to see well differentiated results. The corrosion product, hydrozincite [Zn5(CO3) 2(OH)6] is observed to deposit within the pores of the coating and on the surface as a barrier layer. Simonkolleite [Zn5(OH) 8Cl2·H2O] is found to form in place of the original zinc particles

  10. A powder neutron diffraction study of stoichiometric silver beta alumina at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsam, J.M.; Tofield, B.C.

    1980-10-01

    The low-temperature structure of stoichiometric silver beta alumina, AgAl 11 O 17 , is described for the first time. A powder neutron diffraction study at 4.2 K reveals that there is a single three-fold silver location of unit occupancy in each mirror plane. The silver site lies between the mid-oxygen and Beevers-Ross positions where the Ag-O contact distances can be minimised. The Ag-O interactions, in particular the cooperative movement of the spacer oxygens, are responsible for the superlattice which has been described previously. The Beevers-Ross, anti-Beevers-Ross and interstitial aluminium sites are vacant and the c-axis constant is expanded relative to the non-stoichiometric parent. (author)

  11. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  12. Ceramic materials on perovskite-type structure for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiak, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic materials exhibiting the perovskite-type structure constitute among others, resource base for many fields of widely understood electronics (i.e., piezoelectronics, accustoelectronics, optoelectronics, computer science, tele- and radioelectronics etc.). Most often they are used for fabrication of different type sensors (detectors), transducers, ferroelectric memories, limiters of the electronic current intensity, etc., and hence they are numbered among so-called intelligent materials. Prototype structure of this group of materials is the structure of the mineral called perovskite (CaTiO 3 ). By means of right choice of the chemical composition of ABO 3 and deforming the regular perovskite structure (m3m) more than 5000 different chemical compounds and solid solutions exhibiting the perovskite-type structure have been fabricated. The concept of perovskite functional ceramics among often things ferroelectric ceramics, pyroelectric ceramics, piezoelectric ceramics, electrostrictive ceramics, posistor ceramics, superconductive ceramics and ferromagnetic ceramics. New possibilities of application of the perovskite-type ceramics are opened by nanotechnology. (author)

  13. [Comparison of machinability of two types of dental machinable ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Li, Yong; Fan, Xinping; Li, Yan; Lin, Xuefeng

    2002-11-01

    In terms of the problems of now available dental machinable ceramics, a new type of calcium-mica glass-ceramic, PMC-I ceramic, was developed, and its machinability was compared with that of Vita MKII quantitatively. Moreover, the relationship between the strength and the machinability of PMC-I ceramic was studied. Samples of PMC-I ceramic were divided into four groups according to their nucleation procedures. 600-seconds drilling tests were conducted with high-speed steel tools (Phi = 2.3 mm) to measure the drilling depths of Vita MKII ceramic and PMC-I ceramic, while constant drilling speed of 600 rpm and constant axial load of 39.2 N were used. And the 3-point bending strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were recorded. Drilling depth of Vita MKII was 0.71 mm, while the depths of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 0.88 mm, 1.40 mm, 0.40 mm and 0.90 mm, respectively. Group B of PMC-I ceramic showed the largest depth of 1.40 mm and was statistically different from other groups and Vita MKII. And the strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 137.7, 210.2, 118.0 and 106.0 MPa, respectively. The machinability of the new developed dental machinable ceramic of PMC-I could meet the need of the clinic.

  14. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods: Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons. Results: Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05. Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01. Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets.

  15. A Quantitative Tunneling/Desorption Model for the Exchange Current at the Porous Electrode/Beta - Alumina/Alkali Metal Gas Three Phase Zone at 700-1300K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; Saipetch, C.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange current observed at porous metal electrodes on sodium or potassium beta -alumina solid electrolytes in alkali metal vapor is quantitatively modeled with a multi-step process with good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzberger, Christian; Apel, Elke; Höland, Wolfram; Peschke, Arnd; Rheinberger, Volker M.

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  17. Effect of furnace type and ceramming heat treatment conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of a canasite glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; van Noort, R; Walsh, J M

    2000-07-01

    To assess the effect of different heat treatment conditions when using two different furnace types on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of a fluorcanasite castable glass-ceramic. Two furnace types, one a programmable furnace (PF), the other a dental laboratory burnout furnace (DLF), were used with various ceramming times to determine their effect on the BFS of a fluorcanasite castable glass-ceramic. The glass-ceramic material was cast to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the lost wax casting process (n = 80). After casting, both furnace types were used to ceram the discs. Half the discs were not de-vested from the casting ring before ceramming but cerammed in situ (DLF) and half were de-vested before ceramming (PF). All the discs were given a nucleation heat treatment at 520 degrees C for 1 h and then cerammed at 860 degrees C using four heat soak times (0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h). The DLF furnace had a rate of climb of 13 degrees C/min and the PF furnace had a rate of climb of 5 degrees C/min to 520 degrees C and 3 degrees C/min to 860 degrees C. After ceramming the discs were de-vested and the BFS determined using a Lloyd 2000R tester. The maximum BFS values seen for both furnace types were almost identical (280 MPa), but were achieved at different heat soak times (1 h DLF, and 2 h PF). The only significant differences in BFS values for the two furnaces were between the 0.5 and 2 h heat soak times (p < or = 0.05). Individual differences were seen between results obtained from each furnace type/heat soak times evaluated (p < or = 0.05). Already available dental laboratory burnout furnaces can be used to ceram fluorcanasite glass-ceramic castings to the same BFS values as more expensive and slower specialist programmable furnaces.

  18. Ceramic BOT type blanket with poloidal helium cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, A.; Daenenr, W.; Iseli, M.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the work done and results achieved over the past two years on the ceramic breeder BOT blanket with poloidal helium cooling. A conclusive remark on the brick/plate option described previously is followed by short descriptions of the low and high performance pebble bed options elaborated as alternatives for both NET and DEMO. The results show, togethre with those about the poloidal cooling of the First Wall, good prospects for this blanket type provided that the questions connected wiht an extensive use of beryllium find a satisfactor answer. (author). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Heavy ion irradiation effects of brannerite-type ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Wang, L.M.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Ewing, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Brannerite, UTi 2 O 6 , occurs in polyphase Ti-based, crystalline ceramics that are under development for plutonium immobilization. In order to investigate radiation effects caused by α-decay events of Pu, a 1 MeV Kr + irradiation on UTi 2 O 6 , ThTi 2 O 6 , CeTi 2 O 6 and a more complex material, composed of Ca-containing brannerite and pyrochlore, was performed over a temperature range of 25-1020 K. The ion irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transformation was observed in all brannerite samples. The critical amorphization temperatures of the different brannerite compositions are: 970 K, UTi 2 O 6 ; 990 K, ThTi 2 O 6 ; 1020 K, CeTi 2 O 6 . The systematic increase in radiation resistance from Ce-, Th- to U-brannerite is related to the difference of mean atomic mass of A-site cation in the structure. As compared with the pyrochlore structure-type, brannerite phases are more susceptible to ion irradiation-induced amorphization. The effects of structure and chemical compositions on radiation resistance of brannerite-type and pyrochlore-type ceramics are discussed

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Some Types of Ferrimagnetic Glass Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. M. Abdel-Hameed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at studying the acceleration of the bioactive layer on the surface of ferrimagnetic glass ceramic with a basic composition 40Fe2O3–15P2O5–20SiO2–5TiO2 through the addition of 20% of different types of metal oxides like MgO or CaO or MnO or CuO or ZnO or CeO2. SEM, EDAX, and ICP were applied to present the results of the study. SEM and EDAX measurements indicated the presence of apatite layer formed on the surface of the prepared glass ceramics after immersion in SBF within 7 to 30 days. The investigation of the results clarified that the addition of CaO or ZnO accelerated the formation of apatite on the surfaces of the samples in the simulated body fluid faster than other metal oxides. Inductive coupled plasma (ICP analysis shows the evolution of ion extraction by the simulated body fluid solution (SBF with time in relation to the elemental composition.

  1. Ceramic inlays : effect of mechanical cycling and ceramic type on restoration-dentin bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trindade, F.Z.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; da Silva, L.H.; Feilzer, A.J.; Cesar, P.F.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max

  2. Utilisation of different types of coal fly ash in the production of ceramic tiles

    OpenAIRE

    KocKal, N. U.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of varying proportions of different types of fly ash (used in place of feldspar) and different sintering temperatures on the sintered properties of ceramic tile bodies was evaluated. The results indicated that sintering ceramic tiles with a high fly ash content at a high temperature caused a decrease in the properties because of bloating. The ceramic samples containing a higher amount of fly ash that were sintered at low temperature exhibited lower water absorption, larger shrin...

  3. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  4. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used.

  5. Electronic, electrical and magnetic ceramics synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calix, V.S.; Saligan, P.P.; Naval, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the research and development activities of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) on the synthesis and characterization of soft and hard ferrites and some beta alumina type superionic conductor materials. XRD, XRF and Moessbauer effect spectrometry are used to determine the structure phases, compositions and some magnetic properties of the materials. Effects of composition and preparation methods on the bulk electronic and magnetic properties are also discussed. (Auth.). 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Bioactive type glass-ceramics within incorporated aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volzone, C.; Stabile, F.M.; Ortiga, J.

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramics are used as biomaterials for the reparation of bone tissue. They are prepared, generally, by bioglass of specific composition for each particular use. The aluminium addition in the formulation at very small quantities influences on the structural properties. Two glass-ceramics obtained by P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 formulation within aluminium (0.5 % in Al 2 O 3 base) added through a reactive alumina and purified feldspar were analyzed. The results showed structural differences between both glass-ceramics. (author)

  7. Sodium beta-alumina thin films as gate dielectrics for AlGaN/GaN metal—insulator—semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Ben-Lang; Chen Chao; Li Yan-Rong; Zhang Wan-Li; Liu Xing-Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Sodium beta-alumina (SBA) is deposited on AlGaN/GaN by using a co-deposition process with sodium and Al 2 O 3 as the precursors. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum reveals that the deposited thin film is amorphous. The binding energy and composition of the deposited thin film, obtained from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, are consistent with those of SBA. The dielectric constant of the SBA thin film is about 50. Each of the capacitance—voltage characteristics obtained at five different frequencies shows a high-quality interface between SBA and AlGaN. The interface trap density of metal—insulator—semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MISHEMT) is measured to be (3.5∼9.5)×10 10 cm −2 ·eV −1 by the conductance method. The fixed charge density of SBA dielectric is on the order of 2.7×10 12 cm −2 . Compared with the AlGaN/GaN metal—semiconductor heterostructure high-electron-mobility transistor (MESHEMT), the AlGaN/GaN MISHEMT usually has a threshold voltage that shifts negatively. However, the threshold voltage of the AlGaN/GaN MISHEMT using SBA as the gate dielectric shifts positively from −5.5 V to −3.5 V. From XPS results, the surface valence-band maximum (VBM-EF) of AlGaN is found to decrease from 2.56 eV to 2.25 eV after the SBA thin film deposition. The possible reasons why the threshold voltage of AlGaN/GaN MISHEMT with the SBA gate dielectric shifts positively are the influence of SBA on surface valence-band maximum (VBM-EF), the reduction of interface traps and the effects of sodium ions, and/or the fixed charges in SBA on the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  8. Influence of ceramic thickness and type on micromechanical properties of light-cured adhesive bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Bolay, Sükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical properties of different adhesive bonding agents when polymerized through ceramics. Sixty sound extracted human third molars were selected and the crowns were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis in order to obtain dentin slices to be bonded with one of the following adhesives: Syntac/Heliobond (Ivoclar-Vivadent) or Adper-Scotchbond-1XT (3M-ESPE). The adhesives were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS-e.max-Press, Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS-Empress®CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0 mm, 0.75 mm, 2 mm). Thirty groups were included, each containing 60 measurements. Micromechanical properties (Hardness, HV; indentation modulus, E; and creep, Cr) of the adhesives were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, as well as a multivariate analysis to test the influence of the study parameters (SPSS 18.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the adhesives (p ceramic type showed the highest effect on HV (Partial-eta squared (η(2)) = 0.109) of the tested adhesives, while E (η(2) = 0.275) and Cr (η(2) = 0.194) were stronger influenced by the adhesive type. Ceramic thickness showed no effect on the E and Cr of the adhesives. The adhesive bonding agents used in this study performed well by curing through different thicknesses of ceramics. The micromechanical properties of the adhesives were determined by the adhesive type and were less influenced by ceramic type and curing time.

  9. Internal Friction in L.A.S. Type Glass and Glass-Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Arnault , L.; RiviÈre , A.

    1996-01-01

    Internal friction measurements have been performed on glass and glass-ceramics of the Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 type by isothermal mechanical spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out over a large frequency range (10-4Hz - 31.6 Hz) for various temperatures between 260K and 850K. For the glass, a relaxation peak is observed at low temperature (276K for 1Hz). This peak does not appear in the glass-ceramics ; however, for each of them, two other peaks were observed : the first one at about 343K (1Hz) and...

  10. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  12. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Kim, Seok-Gyu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (Pabutment shade (Pabutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations.

  13. Development of the Electromagnetic Induction Type Micro Air Turbine Generator Using MEMS and Multilayer Ceramic Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiduka, A; Ishigaki, K; Takikawa, Y; Ohse, T; Saito, K; Uchikoba, F

    2011-01-01

    The miniaturized electromagnetic induction type air turbine generator is described. The micro air turbine generator rotated by the compressed air and generating electricity was fabricated by the combination of MEMS and multilayer ceramic technology. The micro generator consisted of an air turbine and a magnetic circuit. The turbine part consisted of 7 silicon layers fabricated by the MEMS technology. The magnetic circuit was fabricated by the multilayer ceramic technology based on the green sheet process. The magnetic material used in the circuit was ferrite, and the internal conductor was silver. The dimensions of the obtained generator were 3.5x4x3.5 mm. The output power was 1.92 μW. From FEM analysis of the magnetic flux, it was found that leakage of the flux affected the output power.

  14. Origin and type of flaws in heat engine ceramic materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govila, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    A number of ceramic materials such as Silicon Nitrides and Carbides, Sialons, Whisker-Reinforced Ceramic Composites and Partially-Stabilized Zirconias (PSZs) have been developed for use as structural components in heat engine applications. The reliability and durability of a structural engine component is critically dependent on the size, density of distribution and location of flaws. This information is critical for the processing and design engineers in order to design structural components using suitable materials and thus minimize stress intensity. In general, the failure initiating flaws are associated or produced due to material impurity, processing methods and parameters, and fabrication techniques (machining and grinding). Examples of each type of flaws associated with material impurity, processing methods and fabrication techniques are illustrated

  15. Utilisation of different types of coal fly ash in the production of ceramic tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kockal, N. U.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of varying proportions of different types of fly ash (used in place of feldspar and different sintering temperatures on the sintered properties of ceramic tile bodies was evaluated. The results indicated that sintering ceramic tiles with a high fly ash content at a high temperature caused a decrease in the properties because of bloating. The ceramic samples containing a higher amount of fly ash that were sintered at low temperature exhibited lower water absorption, larger shrinkage and strength because of the densification observed also in microstructural investigation.

    Se ha evaluado la influencia de la proporción de diferentes tipos de cenizas volantes (en lugar de feldespato y diferentes temperaturas de sinterización en las propiedades de soportes cerámicos. Los resultados indicaron que las composiciones con un alto contenido de cenizas volantes provocaron una disminución en las propiedades de las piczas cocidas a alta temperatura como consecuencia del hinchamiento. Las composiciones con una mayor cantidad de cenizas sinterizadas a baja temperatura mostraron una menor absorción de agua, mayor contracción y resistencia mecánica debido a la densificación como también se observó en la investigación microestructural.

  16. Effect of investment type and mold temperature on casting accuracy and titanium-ceramic bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the casting accuracy of crown margins and metal-ceramic shear bond strength (SBS) of pure titanium injected into casting molds made using 2 investment types at 3 mold temperatures. Sixty crown (30-degree beveled finish line) and 60 cylinder (5mm diameter × 8mm high) patterns were divided into 6 groups (n=10), and cast using a phosphate-bonded investment (P) and a magnesium oxide-bonded investment (U), at 400°C (groups P400 and U400), 550°C (groups P550 and U550) and 700°C (groups P700 and U700) mold temperatures. Crown margins were recorded in impression material, the degree of marginal rounding was measured and margin length deficiencies (µm) were calculated. Titanium-ceramic specimens were prepared using Triceram ceramic (2mm high) and SBS was tested. Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). For casting accuracy, expressed by marginal deficiency (µm), investment U provided more accurate results (64 ± 11) than P (81 ± 23) (pcasting accuracy for U700 (55 ± 7) and worse for P700 (109 ± 18). Casting accuracy at 700°C (82 ± 31) was significantly different from 400°C (69 ± 9) and 550°C (68 ± 9) (pcasting accuracy than investment P. The SBS was similar for all combinations of investments and temperatures.

  17. Monazite-type ceramics for conditioning of minor actinides. Structural characterization and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babelot, Carole

    2013-01-01

    The minor actinides (MA) neptunium, americium, and curium are mainly responsible for the long-term radiotoxicity of the High Active Waste (HAW) generated during the nuclear power operation. If these long-lived radionuclides are removed from the HAW by partitioning and converted by neutron fission (transmutation) into shorter-lived or stable elements, the remaining waste loses most of its long-term radiotoxicity. Thus, partitioning and transmutation (P and T) are considered as attractive options for reducing the burden on geological disposals. As an alternative, these separated MA can also be conditioned (P and C strategy) in specifically adapted ceramics to ensure their safe final disposal over long periods. At the moment, spent fuel elements are foreseen either for direct disposal in deep geological repositories or for reprocessing. The highly active liquid waste that is produced during reprocessing is conditioned industrially using a vitrification process before final disposal. Although the widely used borosilicate glasses meet most of the specifications needed, ceramic host matrices appear to be even more suitable in terms of resistance to corrosion. The development of new materials based on tailor-made highly specific ceramics with extremely stable behavior would make it possible to improve the final storage of long-lived high-level radiotoxic waste. In the framework of this PhD research project, monazite-type ceramics were chosen as promising host matrices for the conditioning of trivalent actinides. The focus on the monazite-type ceramics is justified by their properties such as high chemical durability. REPO 4 ceramics are named monazite for RE = La - Gd (monoclinic symmetry) and xenotime for RE = Tb - Lu and Y (tetragonal symmetry). The objective of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the alteration behavior of such ceramics under the repository conditions. REPO 4 (with RE = La, Eu) is prepared by hydrothermal synthesis at 200 C. Structural

  18. Monazite-type ceramics for conditioning of minor actinides. Structural characterization and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelot, Carole

    2013-07-01

    The minor actinides (MA) neptunium, americium, and curium are mainly responsible for the long-term radiotoxicity of the High Active Waste (HAW) generated during the nuclear power operation. If these long-lived radionuclides are removed from the HAW by partitioning and converted by neutron fission (transmutation) into shorter-lived or stable elements, the remaining waste loses most of its long-term radiotoxicity. Thus, partitioning and transmutation (P and T) are considered as attractive options for reducing the burden on geological disposals. As an alternative, these separated MA can also be conditioned (P and C strategy) in specifically adapted ceramics to ensure their safe final disposal over long periods. At the moment, spent fuel elements are foreseen either for direct disposal in deep geological repositories or for reprocessing. The highly active liquid waste that is produced during reprocessing is conditioned industrially using a vitrification process before final disposal. Although the widely used borosilicate glasses meet most of the specifications needed, ceramic host matrices appear to be even more suitable in terms of resistance to corrosion. The development of new materials based on tailor-made highly specific ceramics with extremely stable behavior would make it possible to improve the final storage of long-lived high-level radiotoxic waste. In the framework of this PhD research project, monazite-type ceramics were chosen as promising host matrices for the conditioning of trivalent actinides. The focus on the monazite-type ceramics is justified by their properties such as high chemical durability. REPO{sub 4} ceramics are named monazite for RE = La - Gd (monoclinic symmetry) and xenotime for RE = Tb - Lu and Y (tetragonal symmetry). The objective of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the alteration behavior of such ceramics under the repository conditions. REPO{sub 4} (with RE = La, Eu) is prepared by hydrothermal synthesis at 200 C

  19. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  20. Does the CO2 laser reduce bond strength in different types of ceramic brackets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lourenço Romano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the influence of the CO2 laser and of the type of ceramic bracket on the shear bond strength (SBS to enamel. METHODS: A total of 60 enamel test surfaces were obtained from bovine incisors and randomly assigned to two groups, according to the ceramic bracket used: Allure (A; Transcend (T. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (n = 15: L, laser (10W, 3s; C, no laser, or control. Twenty-four hours after the bonding protocol using Transbond XT, SBS was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. After debonding, the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was evaluated at 10 x magnification and compared among the groups. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s, Mann-Whitney’s and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Mean SBS in MPa were: AL = 0.88 ± 0.84; AC = 12.22 ± 3.45; TL = 12.10 ± 5.11; TC = 17.71 ± 6.16. ARI analysis showed that 73% of the specimens presented the entire adhesive remaining on the tooth surfaces (score 3. TC group presented significantly higher SBS than the other groups. The lased specimens showed significantly lower bond strength than the non-lased groups for both tested brackets. CONCLUSION: CO2 laser irradiation decreased SBS values of the polycrystalline ceramic brackets, mainly Allure.

  1. Experimental study on TiN coated racetrack-type ceramic pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiang-Tao; Hong, Yuan-Zhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    TiN film was coated on the internal surface of a racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. The highest deposition rate was 156 nm/h, which was obtained by magnetron sputtering coating. Based on AFM, SEM and XPS test results, the properties of TiN film, such as film roughness and surface morphology, were analyzed. Furthermore, the deposition rates were studied with two different cathode types, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, the deposition rate of TiN/Ti film was about 800 nm/h with Ti plate cathode by DC magnetron sputtering. Using Ti plate cathode rather than Ti wire cathode can greatly improve the film deposition rate. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11075157)

  2. Flexible Mixed-Potential-Type (MPT) NO₂ Sensor Based on An Ultra-Thin Ceramic Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Rui; Jing, Gaoshan; Yu, Hongyan; Cui, Tianhong

    2017-07-29

    A novel flexible mixed-potential-type (MPT) sensor was designed and fabricated for NO₂ detection from 0 to 500 ppm at 200 °C. An ultra-thin Y₂O₃-doped ZrO₂ (YSZ) ceramic film 20 µm thick was sandwiched between a heating electrode and reference/sensing electrodes. The heating electrode was fabricated by a conventional lift-off process, while the porous reference and the sensing electrodes were fabricated by a two-step patterning method using shadow masks. The sensor's sensitivity is achieved as 58.4 mV/decade at the working temperature of 200 °C, as well as a detection limit of 26.7 ppm and small response time of less than 10 s at 200 ppm. Additionally, the flexible MPT sensor demonstrates superior mechanical stability after bending over 50 times due to the mechanical stability of the YSZ ceramic film. This simply structured, but highly reliable flexible MPT NO₂ sensor may lead to wide application in the automobile industry for vehicle emission systems to reduce NO₂ emissions and improve fuel efficiency.

  3. Archaeometric study of the ceramics Tigrillo type from San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara M, M.E.; Cruz O, J.C.; Cipres, A.

    2004-01-01

    The archaeological locality of San Lorenzo is situated in Veracruz, Mexico and is considered one of the most important olmec culture settlements. On of the most typical ceramic materials founded in this site is Tigrillo type. The typological classification of olmec pottery from San Lorenzo was determinate trough physic characteristics, however, this study suggest the existence of variability inside this typology. Seven Tigrillo samples were analysed by qualitative petrography, mineragraphy and X-ray Powder Diffraction. The relation between the clay and the fillers was determined. The data shows that the most important components of the pottery are montmorillonite, and the added materials are mica, feldspars, hematite, goethite-limonite and quartz; also, glass splinter and ceramic fragments were identified, these two components are not present in all samples. On the other hand, a correlation with a previous study about the regional soil was carried out, to understand the supply sources for the original clay. The preliminary results suggest that the clay was obtained from soils of the locality and the fillers were imported from near areas and then processed and used. (Author) 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  4. Segregation of chlorine in n-type tin monosulfide ceramics: Actual chlorine concentration for carrier-type conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yuki; Sugiyama, Taiki; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Yanagi, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Tin monosulfide (SnS) is an attractive material for photovoltaic cells because of its suitable band-gap energy, high absorption coefficient, and non-toxic and abundant constituent elements. The primary drawback of this material is the lack of n-type SnS. We recently demonstrated n-type SnS by doping with Cl. However, the Cl-doped n-type SnS bulk ceramics exhibited an odd behavior in which carrier-type conversion but not electron carrier concentration depended on the Cl concentration. In this study, the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) elemental mapping of Cl-doped SnS revealed continuous homogeneous regions with a relatively low Cl concentration along with the islands of high Cl concentration in which Sn/S is far from unity. The difference between the Cl concentration in the homogeneous region (determined by EPMA) and the bulk Cl concentration (determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) increased with the increasing Cl doping amount. The carrier concentration and the Hall coefficient clearly depended on the Cl concentration in the homogeneous region. Carrier-type conversion was observed at the Cl concentration of 0.26 at. % (in the homogeneous region).

  5. Uniformly Porous Nanocrystalline CaMgFe1.33Ti3O12 Ceramic Derived Electro-Ceramic Nanocomposite for Impedance Type Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Ashis; Pramanik, Sumit; Manna, Ayan; Shasmin, Hanie Nadia; Radzi, Zamri; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    Since humidity sensors have been widely used in many sectors, a suitable humidity sensing material with improved sensitivity, faster response and recovery times, better stability and low hysteresis is necessary to be developed. Here, we fabricate a uniformly porous humidity sensor using Ca, Ti substituted Mg ferrites with chemical formula of CaMgFe1.33Ti3O12 as humidity sensing materials by solid-sate step-sintering technique. This synthesis technique is useful to control the grain size with increased porosity to enhance the hydrophilic characteristics of the CaMgFe1.33Ti3O12 nanoceramic based sintered electro-ceramic nanocomposites. The highest porosity, lowest density and excellent surface-hydrophilicity properties were obtained at 1050 °C sintered ceramic. The performance of this impedance type humidity sensor was evaluated by electrical characterizations using alternating current (AC) in the 33%–95% relative humidity (RH) range at 25 °C. Compared with existing conventional resistive humidity sensors, the present sintered electro-ceramic nanocomposite based humidity sensor showed faster response time (20 s) and recovery time (40 s). This newly developed sensor showed extremely high sensitivity (%S) and small hysteresis of humidity sensors. PMID:27916913

  6. Advanced ceramics for nuclear heat utilization and energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Deep; Purohit, R.D.; Sinha, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years concerns related to global warming and green house gas emissions have focused the attention towards lowering the carbon foot print of energy generation. In this scenario, nuclear energy is considered as one of the strongest options to take on the challenges. Further, the nuclear heat, originated from the fission of nuclear fuels may be utilized not only by conversion to electricity using conventional techniques, but also may be used for production of hydrogen by splitting water. In the endeavor of realizing sustainable energy generation technologies, ceramic materials find key role as critical components. This paper covers an overview of various ceramic materials which are potential candidates for energy and hydrogen generation devices. These include solid oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric oxides and sodium conducting beta-alumina for alkali metal thermoelectric converters (AMTEC). The materials, which are generally complex oxides often need to be synthesized using chemical methods for purity and compositional control. Further, ceramic materials offer advantages in terms of doping different cations to engineer defects and maneuver properties. Nonetheless, shaping of ceramics to complex components is a challenging task, due to which various techniques such as isopressing, tape-casting, extrusion, slurry coating, spray deposition etc. are employed. The paper also provides a highlight of fabrication techniques and demonstration of miniature devices which are at various stages of development. (author)

  7. Effect of coping thickness and background type on the masking ability of a zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaian, Farhad; Taghizade, Fateme; Namdari, Mahshid

    2018-01-01

    The masking ability of zirconia ceramics as copings is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of coping thickness and background type on the masking ability of a zirconia ceramic and to determine zirconia coping thickness cut offs for masking the backgrounds investigated. Thirty zirconia disks in 3 thickness groups of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mm were placed on 9 backgrounds to measure CIELab color attributes using a spectrophotometer. The backgrounds included A1, A2, and A3.5 shade composite resin, A3 shade zirconia, nickel-chromium alloy, nonprecious gold-colored alloy, amalgam, black, and white. ΔE values were measured to determine color differences between the specimens on the A2 shade composite resin background and the same specimens on the other backgrounds. The color change (ΔE) values were compared with threshold values for acceptability (ΔE=5.5) and perceptibility (ΔE=2.6). Repeated measures ANOVA, the Bonferroni test, and 1-sample t tests were used to analyze data (α=.05). Mean ΔE values ranged between 1.44 and 7.88. The zirconia coping thickness, the background type, and their interaction affected the CIELab and ΔE values (Pmasking, the minimum thickness of a zirconia coping should be 0.4 mm for A1 and A3.5 shade composite resin, A3 shade zirconia, and nonprecious gold-colored alloy, 0.6 mm for amalgam, and 0.8 mm for nickel-chromium alloy. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impedance matching of pillbox-type RF windows and direct measurement of the ceramic relative dielectric constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki.ao@j-parc.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asano, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Naito, Fujio [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ouchi, Nobuo; Tamura, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takata, Koji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-02-11

    Impedance matching of RF windows that minimizes the RF reflection is necessary to prevent localized standing waves between an RF window and a cavity, which may cause thermal and/or multipactoring issues. It has been observed that the impedance matching condition of the pillbox-type RF window, checked by voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) measurement, depends on the manufacturing lot of the window ceramic disk made of 95% purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The present report proposes new procedures for impedance matching as follows: (i) The relative dielectric constant of the ceramic window is directly measured using the resonant frequency of a cavity made by temporarily combining the pillbox part of the RF window and two short-circuiting plates. (ii) The dimensions of the pillbox section including the ceramic disk are fixed on the basis of the measured relative dielectric constant. To confirm this procedure, three RF windows were fabricated using the same type of ceramic material, and successful impedance matching of these windows was performed (VSWR<1.05). The measured results also suggest that the relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing density and that the impedance matching condition is mainly affected by variations of the relative dielectric constant due to shrinkage of the alumina during sintering. -- Highlights: • We measured the relative dielectric constant of an RF window ceramic directly. • We used the circular TE011-mode frequency of the pillbox part of an RF window itself. • The dimensions of the pillbox part were fixed on the basis of the measurement result. • Three RF windows were fabricated, and VSWR <1.05 for these windows was performed. • The relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing ceramic density.

  9. Impedance matching of pillbox-type RF windows and direct measurement of the ceramic relative dielectric constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao, Hiroyuki; Asano, Hiroyuki; Naito, Fujio; Ouchi, Nobuo; Tamura, Jun; Takata, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Impedance matching of RF windows that minimizes the RF reflection is necessary to prevent localized standing waves between an RF window and a cavity, which may cause thermal and/or multipactoring issues. It has been observed that the impedance matching condition of the pillbox-type RF window, checked by voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) measurement, depends on the manufacturing lot of the window ceramic disk made of 95% purity Al 2 O 3 . The present report proposes new procedures for impedance matching as follows: (i) The relative dielectric constant of the ceramic window is directly measured using the resonant frequency of a cavity made by temporarily combining the pillbox part of the RF window and two short-circuiting plates. (ii) The dimensions of the pillbox section including the ceramic disk are fixed on the basis of the measured relative dielectric constant. To confirm this procedure, three RF windows were fabricated using the same type of ceramic material, and successful impedance matching of these windows was performed (VSWR<1.05). The measured results also suggest that the relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing density and that the impedance matching condition is mainly affected by variations of the relative dielectric constant due to shrinkage of the alumina during sintering. -- Highlights: • We measured the relative dielectric constant of an RF window ceramic directly. • We used the circular TE011-mode frequency of the pillbox part of an RF window itself. • The dimensions of the pillbox part were fixed on the basis of the measurement result. • Three RF windows were fabricated, and VSWR <1.05 for these windows was performed. • The relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing ceramic density

  10. Monazite-type ceramics for the immobilization of minor actinides plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Julia Maria

    2015-01-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological formations is a challenging task of present and future generations. Innovative strategies as the conditioning of radionuclides in ceramic matrices can make a contribution here. This work points out monazite-type ceramics as potential waste forms for minor actinides and Pu. Several aspects concerning nuclear disposal as well as fundamental structural information were investigated. Lanthanide phosphate endmembers (LnPO 4 ) within the stability field of monazite (Ln = La-Gd) were synthesised within the scope of this work. To extend the knowledge of monazite phases, monoclinic TbPO 4 - and DyPO 4 -phases were prepared and characterised. Tb- and Dy-phosphates are situated in the xenotime stability field close to that of monazite. They can exist as metastable monazite phases. Structural characterisations of long- and short-range order were performed by X-ray diffraction, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. Structural data could be complemented, enhanced and gaps of knowledge could be filled by the first systematic consideration of the complete Ln-monazite-series (Ln = La-Dy). Furthermore, this work focuses on Sm-monazite phases. Samarium with an atomic number of 62 is located in the middle part of the lanthanides showing the monazite structure. Accordingly, it has a mean cationic radius within the Ln-monazite-series and hence shows a relative high flexibility regarding the incorporation of radionuclides with different radii. Sintering densities of SmPO 4 ceramics were optimised by varying process parameters like pressure and number of pressing steps. An irregular texture as well as densities of 94% of the theoretical value could be achieved. The resistance of Sm-monazite against ionising radiation were examined. Radiation damages caused by the α-decay of radionuclides incorporated in a ceramic matrix were simulated by computer calculations and experimentally by heavy ion bombardment of SmPO 4 . Thin layers of

  11. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  12. Characteristics of 1–3-type ferroelectric ceramic/auxetic polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolov, V Yu; Bowen, C R

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents modelling and simulation results on 1–3 piezoactive composites comprising a range of ferroelectric ceramics, which are assumed to have variable properties and an auxetic polymer (i.e. a material with a negative Poisson ratio) that improves the hydrostatic piezoelectric response of the composite. Dependences of the effective piezoelectric coefficients and related parameters of the 1–3 composites on the degree of poling, mobility of the 90° domain walls within ceramic grains, on the volume fraction of the ceramic component and on the Poisson ratio of the polymer component have been calculated and analysed. The role of the piezoelectric anisotropy and domain-orientation processes in improving and optimising the effective parameters, piezoelectric activity and sensitivity of 1–3 ferroelectric ceramic/auxetic composites is discussed

  13. Construction and evaluation of a hollow cone type nozzle with ceramic nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Amirshaghaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to improve the use of pesticides and pesticide consumption and prevent environmental pollution, manufactures and scientists have considered two major trends. The first major trend is improving techniques that are practical and effective use of small quantities of chemicals to reduce the negative effect of residues of pesticides. The use of new methods usually requires investment and cost. The second major trend is changing the parts that are more important to reform the sprayer components in order to reduce pollution, mainly by including engineering controls, and design and construction of appropriate nozzles. The optimization can be done with the least expensive pesticide. Nozzle is a device for spraying the solution in the form of particles with a certain pattern. Tip of a nozzle is placed in the nozzle’s body and has many different types. The main factors in choosing tips include: material, pattern of distribution, spray angle and the amount of the solution. The spray tip may be made of aluminum, brass, nylon, stainless steel, ceramic or other materials. Nanocomposites are composites that contain at least one component with dimensions in the nanometer range between 1 to 100 nm. This material is suitable as an alternative to overcome the limitations that exist with integrated microcomposites. The aim of this study was the construction and evaluation of a sprayer nozzle with ceramic nanocomposites with good shelf life and optimum performance. Materials and methods: This research was supported by the Agricultural Engineering Research Institute and Nanotechnology Committee of the Ministry of Agriculture. The operations of this study were as follows: 1- Preparing of materials, including alumina powder and stabilized zirconia powder with yttrium. 2- Design and manufacture of molds. 3- Preparation of the samples pressing operations. 4- Zintering of samples to achieve high density. 5- Tests to determine the quality of the

  14. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  15. INFLUENCE OF THE CEMENT TYPE ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MINERAL FOAM APPLICABLE IN FOAMED CERAMIC TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolev Evgeniy Valer'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is the influence of the type of Portland cement, as well as the nature and concentration of additives that represent electrolytes and polymers, onto the foam stability. The project is implemented within the framework of the research of foamed ceramic. Detailed explanation of the influence pattern is provided. The research performed by the authors has generated the following findings. Besides the rheological properties of the solution, chemical interaction between the mix components must be taken into account in the course of development of the best foamed ceramic mix composition, as chemical processes produce a substantial influence onto the foam stability. Polymer additives based on liquid carbamyde-formaldehyde and polyacrylamide substantially improve the quality of the foam mineralized by the particles of the cement binder. They also assure the foam stability rate sufficient for the formation of a high-quality foamed material.

  16. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (p<0.05) occurred when 0.5 mm veneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (p<0.05) in comparison with both substrates and restored teeth. Therefore, it was concluded that the thickness of the restoration influences color and luminosity changes for conventional dual and light-cured cements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness.

  17. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p enamel showed the highest mean fracture load (MFL; 1591 ± 172.59 N). The RelyX Ultimate groups MFLs were significantly higher than the corresponding RelyX U200 groups (p enamel (p enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Development of composite ceramic materials with improved thermal conductivity and plasticity based on garnet-type oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovkina, L. S.; Orlova, A. I.; Boldin, M. S.; Sakharov, N. V.; Chuvil'deev, V. N.; Nokhrin, A. V.; Konings, R.; Staicu, D.

    2017-06-01

    Powders based on the complex garnet-type oxide Y2.5Nd0.5Al5O12 - x wt. % Ni (x = 0, 10, 20) were prepared using wet chemistry methods. Ceramics based on these compounds were obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a relative densities: 99%. 4% (TD = 4.77 g/cm3 (0%)), 97.6% (TD = 4.88 g/cm3 (10%)), 94.4% (TD = 5.06 g/cm3 (20%)). The influence of nickel concentration on the mechanical (fracture toughness, microhardness) and thermophysical (thermal conductivity) properties of the composites was studied.

  19. Characterization of different types of ceramic waste and its incorporation to the cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, G.A.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C. de

    2009-01-01

    The porcelain tike is a product resulting from the technological development of ceramic plating industry. Its large acceptation by the consumer market is probably linked with certain properties, such as low porosity, high mechanical resistance, facility in maintenance, besides being a material of modern and versatile characteristics. The aim of this work was characterizing the different ceramic wastes (enameled and porcelain tike) and evaluating its influence on the mechanical behavior in cement pastes. The wastes were characterized through the determination of its chemical composition, size particle distribution and X-ray diffraction. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions and glue time determination, water absorption and resistance to compression assays were taken. The results indicate that although the wastes don't show any variation in the elementary chemical composition, changes in the cement paste behavior related to the values of resistance to compression were observed. (author)

  20. Structural and dielectric properties of four - layer Aurivillius - type Ba0.25Sr0.75Bi4Ti4O15 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Parveen K.; Khokhar, Anita; Sreenivas, K.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a barium strontium bismuth titanate (Ba 0.25 Sr 0.75 Bi 4 Ti 4 O 15 , BSBT) ceramic composition has been prepared by conventional solid-state reaction. In order to study the structure of as synthesized BSBT ceramics, the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman and FTIR studies have been carried out on the powdered sample. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the formation of a single phase four-layer Aurivillius-type ceramics that crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure with A2 1 am space group. The dielectric properties of the ceramics have been studied in the temperature range 30 - 600℃ temperature range at various frequencies (100 Hz to 1 MHz). A sharp dielectric anomaly was observed at ∼ 485℃ at all the frequencies corresponding to the ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition. The ferroelectric behavior is confirmed from the Curie-Weiss law fitting of the dielectric data. (author)

  1. Effects of electron irradiation on the resistive behaviour of YBCO-type ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatanu, A.; Novac, A.; Mosteanu, T.; Magureanu, M.

    1998-01-01

    YBCO-123 ceramic samples were irradiated with electron beams (E=0.5 MeV), the particle fluxes ranging between 10 15 and 10 19 e - /cm 2 . The induced structure modifications are analyzed through X-ray diffraction and their effects on the resistive behaviour are estimated. It is shown that a direct correlation can be established between the irradiation effects, oxygen disorder and hence the modification of the sample resistivity. A particular attention is given to the effects on the fluctuation mechanism arising near the transition temperature. (authors)

  2. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  3. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  4. A novel zincum-doped perovskite-type ceramic membrane for oxygen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xinzhi; Liu Hongfei; Wei Yanying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 381 Wushan Road, 510640 Guangzhou (China); Caro Juergen [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstr. 3-3A D-30179 Hannover (Germany); Wang Haihui, E-mail: hhwang@scut.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 381 Wushan Road, 510640 Guangzhou (China)

    2009-09-18

    Zincum-doped ceramic membrane materials based on BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub x}Zr{sub (0.2-x)}O{sub 3-delta} with 0 <= x <= 0.2 were synthesized by combining citric acid and ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complexing method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that the BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-delta} ceramic oxide exhibits a pure cubic perovskite structure. Oxygen temperature-programmed desorption (O{sub 2}-TPD) profile indicates that BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-delta} possesses a good phase reversibility. An oxygen permeation flux of 0.65 ml/min cm{sup 2} was obtained at 950 deg. C and a single activation energy of 67 kJ/mol was observed for the oxygen permeation in the temperature range of 600-950 deg. C. No decline was found during more than 100 h oxygen permeation.

  5. Flexible Mixed-Potential-Type (MPT NO2 Sensor Based on An Ultra-Thin Ceramic Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui You

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel flexible mixed-potential-type (MPT sensor was designed and fabricated for NO2 detection from 0 to 500 ppm at 200 °C. An ultra-thin Y2O3-doped ZrO2 (YSZ ceramic film 20 µm thick was sandwiched between a heating electrode and reference/sensing electrodes. The heating electrode was fabricated by a conventional lift-off process, while the porous reference and the sensing electrodes were fabricated by a two-step patterning method using shadow masks. The sensor’s sensitivity is achieved as 58.4 mV/decade at the working temperature of 200 °C, as well as a detection limit of 26.7 ppm and small response time of less than 10 s at 200 ppm. Additionally, the flexible MPT sensor demonstrates superior mechanical stability after bending over 50 times due to the mechanical stability of the YSZ ceramic film. This simply structured, but highly reliable flexible MPT NO2 sensor may lead to wide application in the automobile industry for vehicle emission systems to reduce NO2 emissions and improve fuel efficiency.

  6. Development of composite ceramic materials with improved thermal conductivity and plasticity based on garnet-type oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovkina, L.S., E-mail: golovkina_lyudmila@mail.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Orlova, A.I.; Boldin, M.S.; Sakharov, N.V.; Chuvil' deev, V.N.; Nokhrin, A.V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Konings, R.; Staicu, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Powders based on the complex garnet-type oxide Y{sub 2.5}Nd{sub 0.5}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} - x wt. % Ni (x = 0, 10, 20) were prepared using wet chemistry methods. Ceramics based on these compounds were obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a relative densities: 99%. 4% (TD = 4.77 g/cm{sup 3} (0%)), 97.6% (TD = 4.88 g/cm{sup 3} (10%)), 94.4% (TD = 5.06 g/cm{sup 3} (20%)). The influence of nickel concentration on the mechanical (fracture toughness, microhardness) and thermophysical (thermal conductivity) properties of the composites was studied. - Highlights: •Powders were prepared using wet chemistry methods. •Ceramics were sintering by SPS method (ρ{sub rel} ∼ 99%); t{sub shrinkage} < 10 min. •By increasing Ni concentration in composites, their fracture toughness was enhanced. •Thermal conductivity increases with elevated concentration of Ni.

  7. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  8. Effect of metal opaquer on the final color of 3 ceramic crown types on 3 abutment configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rabia; Yilmaz, Burak; Mortazavi, Aras; Ozcelik, Tuncer B; Johnston, William M

    2018-04-30

    The effect of a recently introduced metal opaquer when used to mask the color of a titanium abutment under ceramic crown systems is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the color coordinates of 3 ceramic crown types-characterized monolithic lithium disilicate (LDC) (IPS e.max; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), layered lithium disilicate (LDL) (IPS e.max; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), and layered zirconia (ZL) (H.C. Starck)-on 3 abutment configurations, nonopaqued titanium (Ti), resin opaqued titanium (Op), and zirconia (Zir). In addition, the color differences (CIEDE2000) were evaluated among the 3 crown types on 3 different abutment substrates. Ten Ti disks (10×1 mm) were fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) to represent the Ti abutments. Five Ti specimens were opaqued (Op) (whiteMetal Opaquer wMO; Blue Sky Bio), and 5 were not opaqued (Ti). Ten zirconia disks were fabricated with CAD-CAM and sintered (10×1.2 mm). Five disks were used as backings to represent Zir abutments, and 5 disks were layered with 1 mm of porcelain (B1, IPS e.Max Ceram; Ivoclar Vivadent AG) to represent layered zirconia crowns (ZL). Ten lithium disilicate plates (14×14×1.2 mm) were sectioned from CAD blocks (B1 IPS e.Max CAD; Ivoclar Vivadent AG). Five plates were layered with the same porcelain (B1, 1 mm), and 5 plates were surface characterized and glazed. An LDL crown on a Zir abutment configuration was used as the control. The 3 simulated crown types (n=5) were optically connected to each of the 3 abutment types, and the color of the 9 groups was measured using a spectroradiometer. Measured data were reported in CIELab coordinates. CIELab data were used to calculate color differences between the control and the 8 experimental groups. Color data were summarized for each group, and analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA. For pairwise comparisons, a Bonferroni correction of t tests was used, and for interpretive analysis of resulting color difference

  9. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  10. Characterizing the Soldering Alloy Type In–Ag–Ti and the Study of Direct Soldering of SiC Ceramics and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koleňák

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to characterize the soldering alloy In–Ag–Ti type, and to study the direct soldering of SiC ceramics and copper. The In10Ag4Ti solder has a broad melting interval, which mainly depends on its silver content. The liquid point of the solder is 256.5 °C. The solder microstructure is composed of a matrix with solid solution (In, in which the phases of titanium (Ti3In4 and silver (AgIn2 are mainly segregated. The tensile strength of the solder is approximately 13 MPa. The strength of the solder increased with the addition of Ag and Ti. The solder bonds with SiC ceramics, owing to the interaction between active In metal and silicon infiltrated in the ceramics. XRD analysis has proven the interaction of titanium with ceramic material during the formation of the new minority phases of titanium silicide—SiTi and titanium carbide—C5Ti8. In and Ag also affect bond formation with the copper substrate. Two new phases were also observed in the bond interphase—(CuAg6In5 and (AgCuIn2. The average shear strength of a combined joint of SiC–Cu, fabricated with In10Ag4Ti solder, was 14.5 MPa. The In–Ag–Ti solder type studied possesses excellent solderability with several metallic and ceramic materials.

  11. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  12. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  13. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  14. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang; Zhu, Xinhua; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2014-01-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric constants of

  15. Fiscal 2000 achievement report. Venture business assisting type regional consortium - Minor business creation base type (Development of aluminum alloy casting system using aluminum titanate ceramic member); 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Chitansan aluminium ceramics buzai wo shiyoshita aluminium gokin chuzo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An automatic liquid metal charging system driven by a linear induction type electromagnetic pump is developed, with its members to be in contact with liquid aluminum alloy being constituted of aluminum titanate ceramics not to be wetted by liquid aluminum alloy and highly resistant to thermal impact. Technologies for casting aluminum titanate ceramic members in plaster molds, CIP (cold isostatic pressing) molding, and burning were established. The mechanism of wettability of liquid aluminum alloy on aluminum titanate ceramic members was elucidated, and an aluminum titanate ceramic member with a dense spinel layer formed thereon in situ was developed for improvement on non-wettability. The developed member remained non-wettable more than six times longer than conventional members. A special electronic counter mechanism was developed by installing in a conduit an aluminum titanate ceramic made impeller whose revolution was converted into electric signals for the measurement of the amount of charged liquid. A non-asbestos polycrystalline alumina-silica fiber was selected as the insulator for the melting/holding furnace, which enabled 30% energy conservation as compared with the conventional type. (NEDO)

  16. Of the crystal chemistry of Ruddlesden-Porter type structures in high Tc ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, A.; Cormack, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on atomistic computer simulation employed to examine the energetics and crystal chemistry of some Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide superconductors. Similar structural patterns have been noticed in the superconducting oxides. The formation of Ruddlesden-Popper type layers (alternating slabs of rocksalt and perovskite structures) is similar in many respects to that seen in the system Sr-Ti-O. However, there are some significant differences, for example, the rocksalt and perovskite blocks in the new superconducting compounds are not necessarily electrically neutral unlike in the Sr-Ti-O system and this may well lead to significant differences in their structural chemistry

  17. Pyrochlore type semiconducting ceramic oxides in Ca-Ce-Ti-M-O system (M = Nb or Ta)-Structure, microstructure and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, M.; Prabhakar Rao, P.; Radhakrishnan, A.N.; Sibi, K.S.; Koshy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A new series of pyrochlore type ceramic semiconducting oxides in Ca-Ce-Ti-M-O (M = Nb or Ta) system has been synthesized by the conventional ceramic route. The electrical conductivity measurements show that these oxides exhibit semiconducting behavior and the conductivity increases with the Ce content in the compound. Activation energy of the current carriers is in the range of 0.5-1.6 eV. The electrical conductivity in these oxides is due to the presence of Ce 3+ , which remains in the reduced state without being oxidized to Ce 4+ by structural stabilization. The photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis corroborate the presence of Ce in the 3+ state. Impedance spectral analysis is carried out to evaluate the transport properties and indicates that the conduction in these compounds is mainly due to electronic contribution. The X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analysis establishes that these oxides belong to a cubic pyrochlore type structure.

  18. Flash X-ray cinematography analysis of dwell and penetration of small caliber projectiles with three types of SiC ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Strassburger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of ceramic composite armor it is essential to know the mechanisms during each phase of the projectile–target interaction and their influence on the penetration resistance. Since the view on the crater zone and the tip of a projectile penetrating a ceramic is rapidly getting obscured by damaged material, a flash X-ray technique has to be applied in order to visualize projectile penetration. For this purpose, usually several flash X-ray tubes are arranged around the target and the radiographs are recorded on film. At EMI a flash X-ray imaging method has been developed, which provides up to eight flash radiographs in one experiment. A multi-anode 450 kV flash X-ray tube is utilized with this method. The radiation transmitted through the target is then detected on a fluorescent screen. The fluorescent screen converts the radiograph into an image in the visible wavelength range, which is photographed by means of a high-speed camera. This technique has been applied to visualize and analyze the penetration of 7.62 mm AP projectiles into three different types of SiC ceramics. Two commercial SiC grades and MICASIC (Metal Infiltrated Carbon derived SiC, a C-SiSiC ceramic developed by DLR, have been studied. The influences, not only of the ceramic but also the backing material, on dwell time and projectile erosion have been studied. Penetration curves have been determined and their relevance to the ballistic resistance is discussed.

  19. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  20. Phase evolution and microwave dielectric properties of A5M5O17-type ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Murad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of A5M5O17 (A = Na, Ca, Sr, La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Yb; B = Ti, Nb, Ta type compounds were prepared by a solid-state sintering route and characterized in terms of structure, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties. The compatibility of rare earths with mixed niobate/tantalate and titanate phases was investigated. The larger ionic radii mismatch resulted in the formation of pyrochlore and/or mixed phases while in other cases, pure A5M5O17 phase was formed. The samples exhibited relative permittivity in the range of 35 to 82, quality factor (Q × fo = 897 GHz to 11946 GHz and temperature coefficient of resonance frequency (τf = -120 ppm/°C to 318 ppm/°C.

  1. Crystal chemistry of Ruddlesden-Popper type structures in high Tc ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Anurag; Cormack, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    Similar structural patterns have been noticed in the systems La-Cu-O, La-Ni-O and Bi and Tl-containing superconducting oxides. The formation of Ruddlesden-Popper type layers (alternating slabs of rocksalt and perovskite strucutres) is seen in these oxides which is similar in many respects to what is seen in the system Sr-Ti-O. However, there are some significant differences, for example the rocksalt and perovskite blocks in new superconducting compounds are not necessarily electrically neutral, unlike in the Sr-Ti-O system. It, thus, becomes necessary to create oxygen vacancies in the basic perovskite structure of Bi-containing compounds, when the width of the perovskite slab changes on addition of extra Cu-O planes. Results of atomistic simulations suggest that these missing oxygen ions allows the Cu-O planes to buckle in Bi-series of compounds. This is also supported by the absence of buckling in the Sr-Ti-O series of compounds and the first member of Bi-containing compounds in which there are no missing oxygen ions. Additional results on the phase stability of polytypoid structure in la-Cu-O system and defect chemistry of compounds of La N i-O system are presented. (author). 14 re fs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Significantly enhanced piezoelectricity in low-temperature sintered Aurivillius-type ceramics with ultrahigh Curie temperature of 800 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kai; Huang, Chengcheng; Guo, Dong

    2017-01-01

    We report an Aurivillius-type piezoelectric ceramic (Ca 1−2x (LiCe) x Bi 4 Ti 3.99 Zn 0.01 O 15 ) that has an ultrahigh Curie temperature (T c ) around 800 °C and a significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ), comparable to that of textured ceramics fabricated using the complicated templating method. Surprisingly, the highest d 33 of 26 pC/N was achieved at an unexpectedly low sintering temperature (T s ) of only 920 °C (∼200 °C lower than usual) despite the non-ideal density. Study of different synthesized samples indicates that a relatively low T s is crucial for suppressing Bi evaporation and abnormal grain growth, which are indispensable for high resistivity and effective poling due to decreased carrier density and restricted anisotropic conduction. Because the layered structure is sensitive to lattice defects, controlled Bi loss is considered to be crucial for maintaining structural order and spontaneous polarization. This low-T s system is very promising for practical applications due to its high piezoelectricity, low cost and high reproducibility. Contrary to our usual understanding, the results reveal that a delicate balance of density, Bi loss and grain morphology achieved by adjusting the sintering temperature is crucial for the enhancing performance in Aurivillius-type high- T c ceramics. (paper)

  3. Evolution of loss tangent with structural ordering of the perovskite-type Ba_3CaNb_2O_9 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, J.E.F.S.; Correr, W.R.; Hernandes, A.C.; Castro, P.J.; Pizani, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the microwave dielectric properties considering the de-gree of disorder, which plays a fundamental role in the values of dielectric loss, for the perovskite-type Ba_3CaNb_2O_9 ceramics. Dense ceramics were prepared by con-ventional method in solid state reactions and their dielectric properties were then ob-tained as a function of sintering time. The coexistence of domains in the 1:1 (cubic) and the 1:2 (trigonal) ordering types in all samples was realized. Specifically, the in-crease of sintering time tends to reduce the domains 1:1, raising the unloaded quality factor (Q_u). The domain (1:1) acts as a lattice vibration damping, thus increasing the dielectric loss at resonance. The best performance was recorded in sintered ceramic at 1500° C for 32 h: ε_r = 43 (relative permittivity), Q_u × f_R = 15,752 GHz (resonant frequency f_R = 7.76 GHz) and τ_f = 278 ppm/deg C (coefficient of resonant frequency variation with temperature). (author)

  4. Thermal Response of Whipox-Type All-Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites during Reentry Simulation in the Dlr-Lbk Arc-Heated Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechnich, P.; Braue, W.; Schneider, H.; Koch, U.; Esser, B.; Gülhan, A.

    2005-02-01

    All-oxide ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) such as WHIPOXTM (wound highly porous oxide) exhibit excellent damage tolerance and thermal stability up to 1400°C. Due to their low density and thermal conductivity these new ceramic materials are considered promising candidates for thermal protection systems (TPS) of spacecrafts. The performance of WHIPOX-type CMCs was evaluated during reentry simulations in the L2K leg of the arc-heated LBK facility of DLR, Cologne. The application of reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) coatings provides significant CMC surface protection and decreased gas permeability, which are key issues for reentry applications. Since emittance and catalycity of the RBAO-coatings limit the performance of CMCs in a reentry environment, binary SiC/RBAO coatings providing higher emittance and/or lower catalycity proved to be a promising approach.

  5. Repair of rabbit radial bone defects using true bone ceramics combined with BMP-2-related peptide and type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingfeng; Lin Zhenyu; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Lan Shenghui; Liu Sunan; Yang Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    An ideal bone graft material is the one characterized with good biocompatibility, biodegradation, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. In this study, a novel synthetic BMP-2-related peptide (designated P24) corresponding to residues of the knuckle epitope of BMP-2 was introduced into a biomimetic scaffold based on sintered bovine bone or true bone ceramics (TBC) and type I collagen (TBC/collagen I) using a simulated body fluid (SBF). Hydroxylapatite crystal mineralization with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.63 was observed on the surface of P24/TBC/collagen I composite by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Cell adhesion rate evaluation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded on materials in vitro showed that the percentage of cells attached to P24/TBC/collagen I composite was significantly higher than that of the TBC/collagen I composite. A 10 mm unilateral segmental bone defect was created in the radius of New Zealand white rabbits and randomly implanted with three groups of biomaterials (Group A: P24/TBC/collagen I composite; Group B: TBC/collagen I composite and Group C: TBC alone). Based on radiographic evaluation and histological examination, the implants of P24/TBC/collagen I composite significantly stimulated bone growth, thereby confirming the enhanced rate of bone healing compared with that of TBC/collagen I composite and TBC alone. It was concluded that BMP-2-related peptide P24 could induce nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the surface of TBC/collagen I composite. The TBC/collagen I composite loaded with the synthetic BMP-2-related peptide is a promising scaffold biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  7. Frequency domain kinetic of positron-electron annihilation in the MgO-Al2O3 spinel-type ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fl'unt, Orest; Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the kinetic of positron-electron annihilation in the MgO-Al2O3 spinel-type ceramics sintered at different temperatures (1100, 1200 and 1400 °C) has been calculated and analyzed in a frequency domain. The spectra of real (in-phase) and imaginary (quadrature) components of positron-electron annihilation kinetic have been obtained numerically from usual temporal characteristics using integral Fourier transform. The numerical calculations were carried out using cubic spline interpolation of the pulse characteristics of MgO-Al2O3 ceramics in time domain with following analytical calculations of integrals. The obtained spectra as real so imaginary part of MgO-Al2O3 ceramics in frequency domain almost good obey a Debye law denying correlation between elementary positron annihilation processes. Complex diagrams of frequency domain responses of as-prepared samples have a shape of semicircles with close characteristic frequencies. Some deviation on low-frequency side of the semicircles is observed confirming an availability of longer time kinetic processes. Sintering temperature dependencies of the relaxation times and characteristic frequencies of positron-electron annihilation processes have been obtained. It is shown that position of large maxima on the frequency dependencies of imaginary part corresponds to fast average relaxation lifetime representing the most intensive interaction process of positrons with small cavity traps in solids.

  8. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  10. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  11. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  12. Studies and mechanical properties of a new type of 'hybrid' ceramic block for buildings in structural masonry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camara, Cassio Freire; Gomes, Uilame Umbelino

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a hybrid ceramic block to the use of resides in the buildings executed with structural masonry. This work seeking new materials and / or products with the purpose of increasing the compressive strength of the ceramic blocks, without neglecting other properties (water absorption and linear shrinkage). After the obtained material (clay powder and crushed), the packaging (in percentages ranging from 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% substitution of crushed clay powder), the identification and measuring (weights and lengths) of the bodies of the test piece, was performed on the approach characterized by fluorescence, mineralogy and SEM of these materials as well as the characterization (SEM) of ceramic blocks after the sintering (temperature of the 900 deg C, 1000 deg C, and 1100 deg C rate with heating tax of 5 o C/minute and soak for 1 hour). Then the samples were subjected to the tests (compressive strength and water absorption) and the respective calculated linear shrinkage. After conducting the analysis of the results of these tests (according to the criteria and parameters required by the ABNT NBR 15270) was found that the 'hybrid' block with the addition of 10% crushed powder obtained the best results, increasing the compressive strength at 16 % without compromising the other parameters required by the Standard. (author)

  13. Radiation silver paramagnetic centers in a beta-alumina crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, A.G.; Zhitnikov, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Silver paramagnetic centers in a β-alumina crystal, formed after X-ray radiation at 77 K, are investigated by the EPR method. Silver enters the β-alumina crystal, substituting sodium and potassium ions in a mirror plane. Crystals with substitution from 0.1 to 100% of alkali metal ions by Ag + ions are investigated. Silver atomic centers (Ag 0 -centers), formed by electron capture with the Ag + ion, are firstly detected and investigated in the β-alumina. Hole Ag 2+ -centers are investigated and detected in crystals with high concentration of Ag + . By studying the orientation dependence of a g-factor it is established that hole capture by the Ag + ion is accompanied by Ag 2+ ion displacement from the position, Ag + being primarity taken up (Beavers-Roth or anti- Beavers-Roth) to the position between two oxygen ions in the mirror plane

  14. Ionic and molecular transport in beta- and beta''-alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.B.

    1984-03-01

    Investigations of rapid transport of cations and water molecules in the β- and β''-alumina family of superionic conductors are reviewed. Particular topics that are discussed include the Haven ratio and mixed-ion effects in β-alumina, and the influence of superlattice ordering on ionic transport in β''-alumina

  15. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  16. Pyrochlore type semiconducting ceramic oxides in Ca-Ce-Ti-M-O system (M = Nb or Ta)-Structure, microstructure and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepa, M. [Materials and Minerals Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Trivandrum 695019 (India); Prabhakar Rao, P., E-mail: padala_rao@yahoo.com [Materials and Minerals Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Trivandrum 695019 (India); Radhakrishnan, A.N.; Sibi, K.S.; Koshy, Peter [Materials and Minerals Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Trivandrum 695019 (India)

    2009-07-01

    A new series of pyrochlore type ceramic semiconducting oxides in Ca-Ce-Ti-M-O (M = Nb or Ta) system has been synthesized by the conventional ceramic route. The electrical conductivity measurements show that these oxides exhibit semiconducting behavior and the conductivity increases with the Ce content in the compound. Activation energy of the current carriers is in the range of 0.5-1.6 eV. The electrical conductivity in these oxides is due to the presence of Ce{sup 3+}, which remains in the reduced state without being oxidized to Ce{sup 4+} by structural stabilization. The photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis corroborate the presence of Ce in the 3+ state. Impedance spectral analysis is carried out to evaluate the transport properties and indicates that the conduction in these compounds is mainly due to electronic contribution. The X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analysis establishes that these oxides belong to a cubic pyrochlore type structure.

  17. Study of the microstructure and the hardness of PZT piezoelectric ceramics types I and III used in electro acoustic transducers; Estudo da microestrutura e da microdureza das ceramicas piezoeletricas tipos PZT I e III utilizadas em transdutores eletroacusticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Ricardo de Freitas; Itaboray, Lucas Mendes; Santos, Anna Paula de Oliveira [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UNIFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    The field of electronic processing of the ceramic piezoelectric type imported powdered led to the production of ceramics with 97% of theoretical density, homogeneous microstructure with great potential for applications in piezoelectric devices such as electro acoustic transducers. However, the production of electronic ceramics National piezoelectric type is not yet able to have as raw material zirconate titanate Lead (PZT) 100% made in Brazil. Thus, this is used for supply of domestic production, the zirconium oxide. In this work, both post PZT types I and III, imported, were uniaxially pressed at 70 MPa and sintered at 1200 and 1250 deg C for 3 hours. Hardness measurements were performed by micro indentation, X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The hardness of PZT I was 393 HV. (author)

  18. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  19. In situ formation of low friction ceramic coatings on carbon steel by plasma electrolytic oxidation in two types of electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunlong; Jiang Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on Q235 carbon steel was achieved by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in carbonate electrolyte and silicate electrolyte, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphology, phase and elemental composition of PEO coatings were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The bond strength of the coating was determined using a direct pull-off test. The hardness as well as tribological properties of the ceramic coating was primarily studied. The results indicated that the coating obtained in carbonate electrolyte was Fe 3 O 4 , while the coating achieved from silicate electrolyte was proved to be amorphous. Both kinds of coatings showed coarse and porous surface. The Fe 3 O 4 coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte showed a high bonding strength to the substrate up to 20 ± 2 MPa and the value was 15 ± 2 MPa for the amorphous coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte. The micro hardness of the amorphous coating and the Fe 3 O 4 coating was 1001 Hv and 1413 Hv, respectively, which was more than two and three times as that of the Q235 alloy substrate (415 Hv). The friction coefficient exhibited by amorphous coating and Fe 3 O 4 coating was 0.13 and 0.11, respectively, both lower than the uncoated Q235 substrate which ranged from 0.17 to 0.35.

  20. Study on lithium/air secondary batteries - Stability of NASICON-type lithium ion conducting glass-ceramics with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Jian; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurimamachiya-cho, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The water stability of the fast lithium ion conducting glass-ceramic electrolyte, Li{sub 1+x+y}Al{sub x}Ti{sub 2-x}Si{sub y}P{sub 3-y}O{sub 12} (LATP), has been examined in distilled water, and aqueous solutions of LiNO{sub 3}, LiCl, LiOH, and HCl. This glass-ceramics are stable in aqueous LiNO{sub 3} and aqueous LiCl, and unstable in aqueous 0.1 M HCl and 1 M LiOH. In distilled water, the electrical conductivity slightly increases as a function of immersion time in water. The Li-Al/Li{sub 3-x}PO{sub 4-y}N{sub y}/LATP/aqueous 1 M LiCl/Pt cell, where lithium phosphors oxynitrides Li{sub 3-x}PO{sub 4-y}N{sub y} (LiPON) are used to protect the direct reaction of Li and LATP, shows a stable open circuit voltage (OCV) of 3.64 V at 25 C, and no cell resistance change for 1 week. Lithium phosphors oxynitride is effectively used as a protective layer to suppress the reaction between the LATP and Li metal. The water-stable Li/LiPON/LATP system can be used in Li/air secondary batteries with the air electrode containing water. (author)

  1. Battery voltage-balancing applications of disk-type radial mode Pb(Zr • Ti)O3 ceramic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenathayalan, Daniel; Lee, Chun-gu; Park, Joung-hu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel technique to build a charge-balancing circuit for series-connected battery strings using various kinds of disk-type ceramic Pb(Zr • Ti)O3 piezoelectric resonators (PRs). The use of PRs replaces the whole external battery voltage-balancer circuit, which consists mainly of a bulky magnetic element. The proposed technique is validated using different ceramic PRs and the results are analyzed in terms of their physical properties. A series-connected battery string with a voltage rating of 61.5 V is set as a hardware prototype under test, then the power transfer efficiency of the system is measured at different imbalance voltages. The performance of the proposed battery voltage-balancer circuit employed with a PR is also validated through hardware implementation. Furthermore, the temperature distribution image of the PR is obtained to compare power transfer efficiency and thermal stress under different operating conditions. The test results show that the battery voltage-balancer circuit can be successfully implemented using PRs with the maximum power conversion efficiency of over 96% for energy storage systems.

  2. Structural and electrical properties of NASICON type solid electrolyte nanoscaled glass-ceramic powder by mechanical milling for thin film batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vaishali; Patil, Arun; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Choi, Ji-Won

    2013-05-01

    During last two decades, lithium-based glasses have been studied extensively as electrolytes for solid-state secondary batteries. For practical use, solid electrolyte must have high ionic conductivity as well as chemical, thermal and electrochemical stability. Recent progresses have focused on glass electrolytes due to advantages over crystalline solid. Glass electrolytes are generally classified into two types oxide glass and sulfide glass. Oxide glasses do not react with electrode materials and this chemical inertness is advantageous for cycle performances of battery. In this study, major effort has been focused on the improvement of the ion conductivity of nanosized LiAlTi(PO4)3 oxide electrolyte prepared by mechanical milling (MM) method. After heating at 1000 degrees C the material shows good crystallinity and ionic conductivity with low electronic conductivity. In LiTi2(PO4)3, Ti4+ ions are partially substituted by Al3+ ions by heat-treatment of Li20-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 glasses at 1000 degrees C for 10 h. The conductivity of this material is 1.09 x 10(-3) S/cm at room temp. The glass-ceramics show fast ion conduction and low E(a) value. It is suggested that high conductivity, easy fabrication and low cost make this glass-ceramics promising to be used as inorganic solid electrolyte for all-solid-state Li rechargeable batteries.

  3. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  4. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  5. Application of the FITSC method for characterization of PZT-type ceramics with the diffuse phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, M.; Kozielski, L.; Lisinska-Czekaj, A.; Czekaj, D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Profound electrical properties examination of interesting PBZT composition, with the superposition of piezoelectric and relaxor properties. → Explanation of unusual behavior of dielectric characteristics, especially of a low frequency dispersion that appears in paraelectric phase → We can assume that the response will be a combination of three key factors: relaxor (changing polar regions), piezoelectric (reducing the remanent polarization) and technology (processing). → Findings presented on the paper give a starting point for developing material to prevent or slow the progression of relaxor properties, what could be implementing in actuator and MEMS applications. - Abstract: In the present work the (Pb 0.84 Ba 0.16 )(Zr 0.54 Ti 0.46 )O 3 (PBZT 16/54/46) ceramics has been studied from the point of view of its electrical properties. Dielectric properties of PBZT were measured within the temperature range of the ferroelectric-paraelectric (FE-PE) phase transition region. The method of field-induced thermally stimulated currents (FITSC) was applied and thus the thermal relaxation effects were studied. The observed field dependence of thermally stimulated depolarization currents has revealed the existence of different frequency-dependent relaxation processes in the temperature range between 200 and 400 deg. C. Our experiment demonstrates that modification of ferroelectric materials with isovalent ions, but bigger radii than the origin atom, significantly affect its properties, particularly the PBZT real part of electrical permittivity shows the phase transition character change from ferroelectric to relaxor and finally, that electrical examination can be effectively used for drawing decisive applications conclusions considering polarization parameters distribution.

  6. Monazite-type ceramics for the immobilization of minor actinides plutonium; Keramiken des Monazit-Typs zur Immobilisierung von minoren Actinoiden und Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Julia Maria

    2015-07-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological formations is a challenging task of present and future generations. Innovative strategies as the conditioning of radionuclides in ceramic matrices can make a contribution here. This work points out monazite-type ceramics as potential waste forms for minor actinides and Pu. Several aspects concerning nuclear disposal as well as fundamental structural information were investigated. Lanthanide phosphate endmembers (LnPO{sub 4}) within the stability field of monazite (Ln = La-Gd) were synthesised within the scope of this work. To extend the knowledge of monazite phases, monoclinic TbPO{sub 4}- and DyPO{sub 4}-phases were prepared and characterised. Tb- and Dy-phosphates are situated in the xenotime stability field close to that of monazite. They can exist as metastable monazite phases. Structural characterisations of long- and short-range order were performed by X-ray diffraction, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. Structural data could be complemented, enhanced and gaps of knowledge could be filled by the first systematic consideration of the complete Ln-monazite-series (Ln = La-Dy). Furthermore, this work focuses on Sm-monazite phases. Samarium with an atomic number of 62 is located in the middle part of the lanthanides showing the monazite structure. Accordingly, it has a mean cationic radius within the Ln-monazite-series and hence shows a relative high flexibility regarding the incorporation of radionuclides with different radii. Sintering densities of SmPO{sub 4} ceramics were optimised by varying process parameters like pressure and number of pressing steps. An irregular texture as well as densities of 94% of the theoretical value could be achieved. The resistance of Sm-monazite against ionising radiation were examined. Radiation damages caused by the α-decay of radionuclides incorporated in a ceramic matrix were simulated by computer calculations and experimentally by heavy ion bombardment of Sm

  7. Performance characteristics of porous alumina ceramic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latella, B.A.; Liu, T.

    2000-01-01

    Porous ceramics have found a wide range of applications as filters for liquids and gases. The suitability of materials for use in these types of applications depends on the microstructure (grain size, pore size and pore volume fraction) and hence the mechanical and thermal properties. In this study alumina ceramics with different levels of porosity and controlled pore sizes were fabricated and the surface damage and fracture properties were examined. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  8. [Experimental study of the effect of new bone formation on new type artificial bone composed of bioactive ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minghua; Zeng, Yi; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang

    2005-03-15

    To investigate the osteogenic potential of four kinds of new bioactive ceramics combined with bovine bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and to explore the feasibility of using compounds as bone substitute material. Ninety-six rats were divided into 4 groups (24 in each group). BMP was combined with hydroxyapatite (HA), tricalcium phosphate (TCP), fluoridated-HA (FHA), and collagen-HA(CHA) respectively. The left thighs of the rats implanted with HA/BMP, TCP/BMP, FHA/BMP, and CHA/BMP were used as experimental groups. The right thighs of the rats implanted with HA, TCP, CHA, and decalcified dentin matrix (DDM) were used as control groups. The rats were sacrificed 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks after implantation and bone induction was estimated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), phosphorus (P), and total protein (TP) measurement. The histological observation and electronic microscope scanning of the implants were also made. The cartilage growth in the 4 experimental groups and the control group implanted with DDM was observed 1 week after operation and fibrous connective tissues were observed in the other 3 control groups. 3 weeks after implantation, lamellar bone with bone marrow and positive reaction in ALP stain were observed in the 4 experimental groups. No bone formation or positive reaction in ALP stain were observed in the control groups. The amount of ALP activity, P value, and new bone formation in the experimental groups were higher than those in the control group(P < 0.05). The amount of ALP activity, P value, and new bone formation in TCP/BMP group were higher than those in HA/BMP, CHA/BMP and FHA/BMP groups (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in TP between the BMP treatment group and the control groups. From 5th to 7th week, new bone formation, histochemistry evaluation, and the level of ALP, P, TP value were as high as those in the 3rd week. New composite artificial bone of TCP/BMP, HA/BMP, CHA/BMP, and FHA/BMP all prove to be effective, but TCP/BMP is the

  9. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  10. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  11. Repair bond strength of resin composite to bilayer dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments (ST) on the shear bond strength of resin composite to three bilayer dental ceramics made by CAD/CAM and two veneering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different bilayer dental ceramics and two different veneering ceramics were used (Group A: IPS e.max CAD+IPS e.max Ceram; Group B: IPS e.max ZirCAD+IPS e.max Ceram, Group C: Vita Suprinity+Vita VM11; Group D: IPS e.max Ceram; Group E: Vita VM11). All groups were divided into eight subgroups according to the ST. Then, all test specimens were repaired with a nano hybrid resin composite. Half of the test specimens were subjected to thermocycling procedure and the other half was stored in distilled water at 37℃. Shear bond strength tests for all test specimens were carried out with a universal testing machine. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences among the tested surface treatments within the all tested fracture types (P.00125). CONCLUSION This study revealed that HF etching for glass ceramics and sandblasting for zirconia ceramics were adequate for repair of all ceramic restorations. The effect of ceramic type exposed on the fracture area was not significant on the repair bond strength of resin composites to different ceramic types. PMID:29713430

  12. Energetics and crystal chemistry of Ruddlesden-Popper type structures in high T(sub c) ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Anurag; Cormack, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of Ruddlesden-Popper type layers (alternating slabs of rocksalt and perovskite structures) is seen in these oxides which is similar in many respects to what is seen in the system Sr-Ti-O. However, it was observed that there are some significant differences, for example the rocksalt and perovskite blocks in new superconducting compounds are not necessarily electrically, unlike in Sr-Ti-O systems. This will certainly render an additional coulombic bonding energy between two different types of blocks and may well lead to significant differences in their structural chemistry. In the higher order members of the various homologous series, additional Cu-O planes are inserted in the perovskite blocks. In order for the unit cell to electrically neutral the net positive charge on rocksalt block (which remains constant throughout the homologous series) should be balanced by an equal negative charge on perovskite block. It, thus becomes necessary to create oxygen vacancies in the basic perovskite structure, when width of the perovskite slab changes on addition of extra Cu-O planes. Results of atomistic simulations suggest that these missing oxygen ions allow the Cu-O planes to buckle in these compounds. This is also supported by the absence of buckling in the first member of Bi-containing compounds in which there are no missing oxygen ions and the Sr-Ti-O series of compounds. Additional results are presented on the phase stability of polytypoid structures in these crystal chemically complex systems. The studies will focus on the determination of the location of Cu(3+) in the structures of higher order members of the La-Cu-O system and whether Cu(3+) ions or oxygen vacancies are energetically more favorable charge compensating mechanism.

  13. Type-I pseudo-first-order phase transition induced electrocaloric effect in lead-free Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.06BaTiO3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Chen, Guorui; Liu, Xing; Zhai, Jiwei; Shen, Bo; Li, Shandong; Li, Peng; Yang, Ke; Zeng, Huarong; Yan, Haixue

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the electrocaloric effect (ECE) of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.06BaTiO3 (BNT-0.06BT) ceramic has been directly measured using a home-made adiabatic calorimeter. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) approaches 0.86 K under an electric field of 5 kV/mm at 110 °C, which provides experimental evidence for optimizing the ECE near the type-I pseudo-first-order phase transition (PFOPT). Most importantly, a considerable ΔT value can be maintained over a wide temperature range well above the temperature of the PFOPT under a high electric field. In addition, ΔT is closely related to the structural transition and electric field strength. This work provides a guideline to investigate the high ECE in BNT-based ferroelectric ceramics for applications in cooling technologies.

  14. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (Pceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (Pceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transmission of Er:YAG laser through different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Tugrul; Tuncel, Ilkin; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser transmission ratio through different dental ceramics with different thicknesses. Laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the transmission of laser energy through the ceramic and the ablation of resin cement, because of the transmitted laser energy. Five different dental ceramics were evaluated in this study: sintered zirconium-oxide core ceramic, monolithic zirconium-oxide ceramic, feldspathic ceramic, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, and lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic. Two ceramic discs with different thicknesses (0.5 and 1 mm) were fabricated for each group. Ceramic discs were placed between the sensor membrane of the laser power meter and the tip of the contact handpiece of an Er:YAG laser device with the aid of a custom- made acrylic holder. The transmission ratio of Er:YAG laser energy (500 mJ, 2 Hz, 1 W, 1000 μs) through different ceramic discs was measured with the power meter. Ten measurements were made for each group and the results were analyzed with two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. The highest transmission ratio was determined for lithium disilicate-reinforced ceramic with 0.5 mm thickness (88%) and the lowest was determined for feldspathic ceramic with 1 mm thickness (44%). The differences among the different ceramics and between the different thicknesses were significant (pCeramic type and thickness should be taken into consideration to adjust the laser irradiation parameters during laser debonding of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations.

  16. Separation of BSA through FAU-type zeolite ceramic composite membrane formed on tubular ceramic support: Optimization of process parameters by hybrid response surface methodology and biobjective genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth Kumar, R; Ganesh Moorthy, I; Pugazhenthi, G

    2017-08-09

    In this study, Faujasite (FAU) zeolite was coated on low-cost tubular ceramic support as a separating layer through hydrothermal route. The mixture of silicate and aluminate solutions was used to create a zeolitic separation layer on the support. The prepared zeolite ceramic composite membrane was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), particle size distribution (PSD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and zeta potential measurements. The porosity of ceramic support (53%) was reduced by the deposition of FAU (43%) zeolite layer. The pore size and water permeability of the membrane were evaluated as 0.179 µm and 1.62 × 10 -7  m 3 /m 2  s kPa, respectively, which are lower than that of the support (pore size of 0.309 µm and water permeability of 5.93 × 10 -7  m 3 /m 2  s kPa). The permeate flux and rejection potential of the prepared membrane were evaluated by microfiltration of bovine serum albumin (BSA). To study the influences of three independent variables such as operating pressure (68.94-275.79 kPa), concentration of BSA (100-500 ppm), and solution pH (2-4) on permeate flux and percentage of rejection, the response surface methodology (RSM) was used. The predicted models for permeate flux and rejection were further subjected to biobjective genetic algorithm (GA). The hybrid RSM-GA approach resulted in a maximum permeate flux of 2.66 × 10 -5  m 3 /m 2  s and BSA rejection of 88.02%, at which the optimum conditions were attained as 100 ppm BSA concentration, 2 pH solution, and 275.79 kPa applied pressure. In addition, the separation efficiency was compared with other membranes applied for BSA separation to know the potential of the fabricated FAU zeolite ceramic composite membrane.

  17. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia–ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal–ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Methods Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia–ceramic and 6 metal–ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3 ± 2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Results Among the 12 zirconia–ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal–ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Significance Zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia–ceramic FDPs relative to their metal–ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia–ceramic FDPs. PMID:26233469

  18. [Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations.

  19. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  20. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  1. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the venture business assisting type regional consortium - Core industry creation type. Development of technology for manufacturing large-size, optionally shapable, totally oxide type continuous fiber ceramic composite; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. All oxide ogata nin'i keijo renzoku sen'i kyoka ceramics no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This research and development endeavor is based on Tokyo University's technical seeds and aims to put on the market Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} based CFCC (continuous fiber ceramic composite) materials. They do not break down and are shapable into large or complicate forms as required, which features are not to be expected from a single ceramic material, and are usable in a high temperature oxidizing atmosphere. High purity alumina fiber and alumina-silica fiber containing 70% of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were selected, and woven. The resultant cloth was baked at a low temperature for burning away organic impurities. The cloth was then immersed in a zirconia sol containing 30wt% of the stock solution, and was allowed to dry at 105 degrees C. An alumina slurry was prepared containing a dispersant and a binder, and was applied to the zirconia-soaked cloth until it was as thick as desired. The cloth was kept at 800 degrees C for 1 hour for degreasing, and was baked at a low temperature where no heat caused degradation of the ceramic fiber would occur. Specimens stand long use when the temperature is 1,300 degrees or lower for high purity fiber and approximately 1,150 degrees or lower for alumina-silica fiber. They withstand 30-100MPa, dependent on the manufacturing conditions and the kind of fiber used. (NEDO)

  2. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  4. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  5. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  6. Preparation, structural characterization, and enhanced electrical conductivity of pyrochlore-type (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, X.L. [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Institute of Oceanography Instruments, Shandong Academy of Science, Chinese National Engineering Research Center for Marine Monitoring Equipment, Qingdao (China); Liu, Z.G.; Ouyang, J.H. [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zheng, Y. [Institute of Oceanography Instruments, Shandong Academy of Science, Chinese National Engineering Research Center for Marine Monitoring Equipment, Qingdao (China)

    2012-08-15

    (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (0 {<=} x {<=} 1.0) samples are prepared by solid state reaction method using Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZrO{sub 2} as starting materials. The phase composition and microstructure of (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with selected area electron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and TEM show that all the samples exhibit a single pyrochlore-type structure. HRTEM observation indicates that the whole grain interior of Sm{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramic is a perfect crystal free of any dislocation. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the degree of structural disorder of (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics increases gradually with increasing Eu content. The electrical conductivity of (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics is investigated by impedance spectroscopy in the air and hydrogen atmospheres, respectively. The electrical conductivity of (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics increases with increasing Eu content at identical temperature levels. Both the activation energy E{sub g} and the pre-exponential factor {sigma}{sub 0g} for the grain conductivity gradually increase with increasing Eu content. As the ionic conductivity shows no obvious change in both air and hydrogen atmospheres, the conduction of (Sm{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} is purely ionic with negligible electronic conduction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Characterization of different types of ceramic waste and its incorporation to the cement paste; Caracterizaco de diferentes tipos de residuos ceramicos e sua incorporacao a pasta de cimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, G.A.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C. de, E-mail: valeria@eq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    The porcelain tike is a product resulting from the technological development of ceramic plating industry. Its large acceptation by the consumer market is probably linked with certain properties, such as low porosity, high mechanical resistance, facility in maintenance, besides being a material of modern and versatile characteristics. The aim of this work was characterizing the different ceramic wastes (enameled and porcelain tike) and evaluating its influence on the mechanical behavior in cement pastes. The wastes were characterized through the determination of its chemical composition, size particle distribution and X-ray diffraction. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions and glue time determination, water absorption and resistance to compression assays were taken. The results indicate that although the wastes don't show any variation in the elementary chemical composition, changes in the cement paste behavior related to the values of resistance to compression were observed. (author)

  8. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials.

  9. Solidification of HLLW into sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O-Oka, K.; Ohta, T.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated HLLW from the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai was solidified into sintered ceramics by normal sintering or hot-pressing with addition of some oxides. Among various ceramic products obtained so far, the most preferable was nepheline-type sintered solids formed with addition of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 to the simulated waste calcine. The solid shows advantageous properties in leach rate and mechanical strength, which suggest that the ceramic solids were prepared with additions of ZrO 2 or MnO 2 , and some of them showed good characteristics

  10. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudnos, E.

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C

  11. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  12. Assessment of stability of ceramics type perovskite, Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, submerged in crude oil taken from oil wells of Sergipe - Brazil; Avaliacao da estabilidade de ceramicas tipo perovskita, Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, submersas em petroleo cru retirado de pocos do estado de Sergipe - Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Y.P.; Sales, D.G.; Lima, M.M.; Ferreira, R.A.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: daniella_guedes@yahoo.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Oil wells are harsh environments, thus, it is necessary to find materials that are able to resist the weather imposed by these sites. Many of the new technology incorporating ceramic components because their chemical properties, electrical, mechanical, thermal and structural. The ceramics exhibit high hardness and therefore resistant to high pressure, have high melting point, resisting the high temperatures, and make inert nature in hostile environments. The ceramics, type Perovskite Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, were submerged in crude oil for thirty days and then examined by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness to see if there were changes in structural characteristics, microstructural and mechanical properties. This work was evaluated and discussed by these results, the stability of these ceramics when subject to attack by crude oil taken from oil wells of land and sea state of Sergipe, Brazil. (author)

  13. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  14. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  15. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  16. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  17. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  18. Advanced ceramic materials and their potential impact on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laren, M.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the types of advanced ceramic materials that are being used today and their potential for even greater utilization in the future. Market analysis and projections have been developed from a number of sources both foreign and domestic are referenced and given in the text. Projection on the future use of advanced ceramics to the year 2000 indicate a potential growth of the total world market approaching 187 billion dollars. This paper describes advanced ceramic materials by their functionality, i.e. structural, electronic, chemical, thermal, biological, nuclear, etc. It also refers to specific engineering uses of advanced ceramics and include automotive ceramic materials with physical data for the most likely ceramic materials to be used for engine parts. This family of materials includes silicon carbides, silicon nitride, partially stabilized zirconia and alumina. Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are discussed with recognition of the research on fiber coating chemistry and the compatibility of the coating with the fiber and the matrix. Another class of advanced ceramics is toughened ceramics. The transformation toughened alumina is recognized as an example of this technology. The data indicate that electronic ceramic materials will always have the largest portion of the advanced ceramic market and the critical concepts of a wide range of uses is reviewed. (Auth.)

  19. Corrosion of technical ceramics by molten aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, U.; Wolff, L.R.; Loo, van F.J.J.; Ziegler, G.; With, de G.; Terpstra, R.A.; Metselaar, R.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion investigations on various types of nonoxide technical ceramic materials, two types of silicon nitride (HIPRBSN and RBSN) and two types of silicon carbide (HIPSIC and SiSiC), were carried out in aluminum (Al99.99) melts. HIPRBSN showed nearly no corrosion attack under the most severe

  20. Aerospace Ceramic Materials: Thermal, Environmental Barrier Coatings and SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2018-01-01

    Ceramic materials play increasingly important roles in aerospace applications because ceramics have unique properties, including high temperature capability, high stiffness and strengths, excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance. Ceramic materials also generally have lower densities as compared to metallic materials, making them excellent candidates for light-weight hot-section components of aircraft turbine engines, rocket exhaust nozzles, and thermal protection systems for space vehicles when they are being used for high-temperature and ultra-high temperature ceramics applications. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), including non-oxide and oxide CMCs, are also recently being incorporated in gas turbine engines for high pressure and high temperature section components and exhaust nozzles. However, the complexity and variability of aerospace ceramic processing methods, compositions and microstructures, the relatively low fracture toughness of the ceramic materials, still remain the challenging factors for ceramic component design, validation, life prediction, and thus broader applications. This ceramic material section paper presents an overview of aerospace ceramic materials and their characteristics. A particular emphasis has been placed on high technology level (TRL) enabling ceramic systems, that is, turbine engine thermal and environmental barrier coating systems and non-oxide type SiC/SiC CMCs. The current status and future trend of thermal and environmental barrier coatings and SiC/SiC CMC development and applications are described.

  1. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  2. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Venture business fostering regional consortium in its 2nd year--Creation of key industries (Development of novel manufacturing technology capable of dealing with multiple types of environmental preservation oriented fine ceramic porous structures); 1998 nendo kankyoyo fine ceramics takotai no tahinshu taiogata shinseizo gijutsu no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This effort aims to develop a technology to manufacture various types of high-temperature dust collecting porous ceramic bodies. In the development of a molding technology, guidelines regarding foam containing slurry adjustment by use of surfactant are established and, under the guidelines, an alumina body with its average porosity exceeding 80% is fabricated, with the pores structured homogenous, gradient on the surface, formed in multiple layers, and composite. As for coating, a surface reforming method is developed by which a coating that is a few tens of nanometers thick is uniformly formed on an alumina panel surface, on the exterior of a porous body, and inside a model alumina porous body. It is found that the coating enhances the anti-corrosion capability of alumina. When a titanium oxide coating with 2% silica added thereto is formed on a porous body surface by the said surface reforming method, it is found that there is a catalytic activity achieving an 80% denitrating rate at 700 degrees C. Thanks to a newly developed dust collecting performance evaluating unit, it is proved that the ceramic filter meet the purpose of a dust collector sufficiently. (NEDO)

  3. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  4. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  5. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  6. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  7. In vivo biofilm formation on different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Felicia; Grade, Sebastian; Kohorst, Philipp; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the formation of oral biofilm on various dental ceramics in vivo. Five different ceramic materials were included: a veneering glass- ceramic, a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP), a hot isostatically pressed (HIP) Y-TZP ceramic, and an HIP Y-TZP ceramic with 25% alumina. Test specimens were attached to individually designed acrylic appliances; five volunteers wore these appliances for 24 hours in the maxillary arch. After intraoral exposure, the samples were removed from the appliances and the adhering biofilms vitally stained. Then, the two-dimensional surface coating and thickness of the adhering biofilm were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA with the level of significance set at .05. Significant differences (P ceramic materials. The lowest surface coating (19.0%) and biofilm thickness (1.9 Μm) were determined on the HIP Y-TZP ceramic; the highest mean values were identified with the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (46.8%, 12.6 Μm). Biofilm formation on various types of dental ceramics differed significantly; in particular, zirconia exhibited low plaque accumulation. In addition to its high strength, low plaque accumulation makes zirconia a promising material for various indications (including implant abutments and telescopic crowns) that previously were met only with metal-based materials.

  8. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  9. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  10. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  11. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  12. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  13. Study of the effect of nano surface morphology on the stain-resistant property of ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, S P; Hung, J K; Liu, Y T

    2014-01-01

    In this study, six types of commercially available ceramic tiles, including nano-structured ceramic tiles and regular ceramic tiles, were selected to investigate the effect of surface morphology on their stain-resistant property. The stain-resistant efficiencies of various ceramic tiles with nano-size surface were measured in order to determine the appropriate method for testing ceramic tiles with nano-structure surface

  14. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  15. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  16. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  17. Ceramic applications in the advanced Stirling automotive engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazic, W. A.; Cairelli, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements of the ideal Stirling cycle, as well as basic types of practical engines are described. Advantages, disadvantages, and problem areas of these Stirling engines are discussed. The potential for ceramic components is also considered. Currently ceramics are used in only two areas, the air preheater and insulating tiles between the burner and the heater head. For the advanced Stirling engine to achieve high efficiency and low cost, the principal components are expected to be made from ceramic materials, including the heater head, air preheater, regenerator, the burner and the power piston. Supporting research and technology programs for ceramic component development are briefly described.

  18. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  19. Developing 300°C Ceramic Circuit Boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A

    2015-02-15

    This paper covers the development of a geothermal ceramic circuit board technology using 3D traces in a machinable ceramic. Test results showing the circuit board to be operational to at least 550°C. Discussion on producing this type of board is outlined along with areas needing improvement.

  20. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gokce, Bulent; Comlekoglu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    Objectives. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Methods. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to

  1. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  2. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hossein; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as follows: 1) machined finish as control, 2) machined finish and sandblasting with alumina, and 3) machined finish and hydrofluoric acid etching for the leucite and lithium disilicate-based ceramics, and for the zirconia; 1) machined finish and post-sintered as control, 2) machined finish, post-sintered, and sandblasting, and 3) machined finish, post-sintered, and Nd;YAG laser irradiation. The BFS were measured in a universal testing machine. Data based were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons post-hoc test (α=0.05). The mean BFS of machined finish only surfaces for leucite ceramic was significantly higher than that of sandblasted (P=0.001) and acid etched surfaces (P=0.005). A significantly lower BFS was found after sandblasting for lithium disilicate compared with that of other groups (Pceramics was affected by the type of ceramic material and surface treatment method. Sandblasting with alumina was detrimental to the strength of only silica-based ceramics. Nd:YAG laser irradiation may lead to substantial strength degradation of zirconia.

  3. Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S R; Passi, D; Singh, P; Bhuibhar, A

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic defects with bone graft substitutes has shown promising result achieving almost complete bone regeneration depending on product resorption similar to human bone's physicochemical and crystallographic characteristics. Among these, non-ceramic and ceramic hydroxyapatite being the main inorganic salt of bone is the most studied calcium phosphate material in clinical practices ever since 1970s and non-ceramic since 1985. Its "chemical similarity" with the mineralized phase of biologic bone makes it unique. Hydroxyapatite as an excellent carrier of osteoinductive growth factors and osteogenic cell populations is also useful as drug delivery vehicle regardless of its density. Porous ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite is osteoconductive, biocompatible and very inert. The need for bone graft material keeps on increasing with increased age of the population and the increased conditions of trauma. Recent advances in genetic engineering and doping techniques have made it possible to use non-ceramic hydroxyapatite in larger non-ceramic crystals and cluster forms as a successful bone graft substitute to treat various types of bone defects. In this paper we have mentioned some recently studied properties of hydroxyapatite and its various uses through a brief review of the literatures available to date.

  4. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  5. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  6. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  7. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  8. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  9. Energy storage in ceramic dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLC's) have not been considered for energy storage applications for two primary reasons. First, physically large ceramic capacitors were very expensive and, second, total energy density obtainable was not nearly so high as in electrolytic capacitor types. More recently, the fabrication technology for MLC's has improved significantly, permitting both significantly higher energy density and significantly lower costs. Simultaneously, in many applications, total energy storage has become smaller, and the secondary requirements of very low effective series resistance and effective series inductance (which, together, determine how efficiently the energy may be stored and recovered) have become more important. It is therefore desirable to reexamine energy storage in ceramics for contemporary commercial and near-commercial dielectrics. Stored energy is proportional to voltage squared only in the case of paraelectric insulators, because only they have capacitance that is independent of bias voltage. High dielectric constant materials, however, are ferroics (that is ferroelectric and/or antiferroelectric) and display significant variation of effective dielectric constant with bias voltage

  10. Residual stress measurement in veneering ceramic by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-05-01

    Mismatch in thermal expansion properties between veneering ceramic and metallic or high-strength ceramic cores can induce residual stresses and initiate cracks when combined with functional stresses. Knowledge of the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic is a key factor for understanding and predicting chipping failures, which are well-known problems with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for measuring the stress profile in veneering ceramics and to compare ceramic-fused-to-metal compounds to veneered Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal ceramic. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. Because of the high sensitivity needed in comparison with industrial applications, a high sensitivity electrical measurement chain was developed. All samples exhibited the same type of stress vs. depth profile, starting with compressive at the ceramic surface, decreasing with depth and becoming tensile at 0.5-1.0mm from the surface, and then becoming slightly compressive again. The zirconia samples exhibited a stress depth profile of larger magnitude. The hole drilling method was shown be a practical tool for measuring residual stresses in veneering ceramics. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Processing and characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kander, R.G.; Namboodri, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    One way to more easily process a brittle high-temperature ceramic superconductor into a useful structure is to combine it with a polymer to form a composite material. Processing of polymer-based composites into complex shapes is well established and relatively easy when compared with traditional ceramic processing unit operations. In addition, incorporating a ceramic superconductor into a polymer matrix can improve mechanical performance as compared with a monolithic ceramic. Finally, because ceramic superconductors are susceptible to attack by moisture, a polymer-based composite structure can also provide protection from deleterious environmental effects. This paper focuses on the processing and subsequent characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites designed primarily for electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic applications. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x [YBCO] ceramic superconductor is combined with poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] to form novel composite structures. Composite structures have been molded with both a discontinuous superconducting phase (i.e., ceramic particulate reinforced polymers) and with a continuous superconducting phase (i.e., polymer infiltrated porous ceramics). Characterization of these composite structures includes the determination of diamagnetic strength, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, mechanical performance, and environmental resistance. The goal of this program is to produce a composite structure with increased mechanical integrity and environmental resistance at liquid nitrogen temperatures without compromising the electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic properties of the superconducting phase. Composites structures of this type are potentially useful in numerous magnetic applications including electromagnetic shielding, magnetic sensors, energy storage, magnetic levitation, and motor windings

  12. Interaction at interface between superconducting yttrium ceramics and copper or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Medved', N.V.; Myshlyaeva, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Light metallography, scanning electron microscopy and local energy dispersion analysis have been used to study the interaction of Y-ceramics with copper and niobium. Samples in the form of wire of two types were employed, that is, consisting of ceramic core YBaCuO and Cu shell or a ceramic core YBaCuO and bimetallic Cu/Nb shell. The interaction of the ceramics with the shell metal began already at 500 deg with the formation at the interafaces Cu-YBaCuO of oxide layers containing ceramic elements, and in the ceramic core - nonsuperconducting phases. A thin Al-layer placed between the ceramics and the shell appreciably decreased the reactability of the ceramics with respect to copper and niobium

  13. Sol-gel applications for ceramic membrane preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, I.

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic membranes possessing superior properties compared to polymeric membranes are more durable under severe working conditions and therefore their service life is longer. The ceramic membranes are composed of some layers. The support is the layer composed of coarser ceramic structure and responsible for mechanical durability under filtration pressure and it is prepared by consolidation of ceramic powders. The top layer is composed of a finer ceramic micro-structure mainly responsible for the separation of components present in the fluid to be filtered and sol-gel method is a versatile tool to prepare such a tailor-made ceramic filtration structure with finer pores. Depending on the type of filtration (e.g. micro-filtration, ultra-filtration, nano-filtration) aiming separation of components with different sizes, sols with different particulate sizes should be prepared and consolidated with varying precursors and preparation conditions. The coating of sol on the support layer and heat treatment application to have a stable ceramic micro-structure are also important steps determining the final properties of the top layer. Sol-gel method with various controllable parameters (e.g. precursor type, sol formation kinetics, heat treatment conditions) is a practical tool for the preparation of top layers of ceramic composite membranes with desired physicochemical properties.

  14. Building ceramic based on sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szöke, A-M; Muntean, M; Dumitrescu, O; Bartalis, I

    2013-01-01

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century

  15. Science and Technology of Ceramics -4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of these ceramics other materials are ... temperature range of 800 to 1650 °C. SiC fiber reinforced SiC composite is .... (X= S, Se, Te) system where it is possible to get an n-type semi- conductor by ...

  16. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  17. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  19. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  20. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  1. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  2. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  3. Non-conventional synthesis of ceramic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziubak, C.; Rutkowski, R.; Gebel, R.

    2003-01-01

    A short characterization of traditional methods of homogenization of components, used to produce ceramic pigments, was presented. Efficient and economic methods are searched to prepare raw material sets for ceramic pigments as alternative methods for the traditional way of wet mixing in ball mill or of dry mixing in the mixer of 'Z' type. The results of research of the use of sol-gel method to achieve these aims are presented. At the present stage of research, carried out on the yellow praseodymium and coral-pink iron-zirconium pigments show that traditional methods are better. (author)

  4. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  5. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  6. Electrical and electrochemical properties of architectured electrodes based on perovskite and A2MO4-type oxides for Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batocchi, P.; Mauvy, F.; Fourcade, S.; Parco, M.

    2014-01-01

    Two mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxides (MIEC) have been investigated as potential cathode materials for protonic ceramic fuel cell (PCFC): the perovskite Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 Co 0.8 Fe 0.2 O 3-δ (BSCF) and the Ruddlesden Popper Pr 2 NiO 4+δ (PrN). Their electrical properties have been studied over a large range of water vapour partial pressure. All compounds exhibit high electronic conductivities (σ ≥ 40 S.cm −1 at 600 °C) whatever the pH 2 O of the surrounding atmosphere. Electrochemical characterizations have been performed as a function of pH 2 O, under zero dc conditions and under dc polarization using symmetrical cells based on BaCe 0.9 Y 0.1 O 3-δ (BCY10) as electrolyte. For this purpose, two electrode architectures have been elaborated: a single phase electrode and a composite cathode/BCY10 architectured electrode. All electrodes showed pH 2 O-dependence with promising polarization resistance values lower than 0.8 Ω cm 2 at 600 °C under air whatever the gas humidification rate. The use of architectured electrodes led to a significant decrease of the polarization resistance with values as low as 0.23 and 0.19 Ω cm 2 for PrN and BSCF respectively, at 600 °C and pH 2 O = 0.20 bar. Concerning the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanisms, rate determining steps involving protons have been identified. They have been respectively assigned to the proton interface transfer and to the water formation and/or desorption for single phase and architectured electrodes. This change has been attributed to an extent of the electrochemically active area and to an enhancement of the protonic transport properties in the architectured electrodes. However electrodes performances seem to be governed by the dissociative adsorption of oxygen species and/or the charge transfer. Concerning performances under dc current, cathodic polarization is reduced when architectured electrodes are used. An enhancement of the electrodes performances has been also evidenced with water

  7. Structural behaviour of nitrogen in oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghauri, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in molten oxides has significant consideration for two quite different types of engineering materials. The implication of a knowledge of the role of nitrogen in these oxides for refining high nitrogen steels in obvious but similar nitrogen-bearing oxide melts are of critical importance in the densification of silicon nitride ceramics. Present paper discusses structural behaviour and phase equilibria qualitatively in the light of knowledge available on slag structure through infrared and x-ray diffraction. Nitrogen solubility in glasses and related sialon based ceramics may be of paramount importance to understand the role of nitrogen in these materials as these oxides are similar in composition, structure and characteristics to sintering glasses in nitrogen ceramics. It is quite logical to infer that the same oxide model can be applied in order to massively produce nitrogen alloyed steels which are actively competing to be the materials of the next century. (author)

  8. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  9. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  10. Stress relief of ceramic components in high voltage assemblies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, R.J.

    1979-02-01

    Two types of ceramic packages were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of encapsulating the ceramic components in beta eucryptite filled epoxy. The requirements (no high voltage breakdown, no ceramic cracking, and no encapsulant cracking) were met by the spark gap assembly, but the sprytron assembly had cracking in the encapsulant after thermal cycling. The encapsulation of the ceramic component in beta eucryptite filled epoxy with a stress decoupling material selectively applied in the stress concentrated areas were used to prevent cracking in the sprytron encapsulant. This method is proposed as the standard encapsulation process for high voltage ceramic components

  11. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  12. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  13. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  14. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  15. Fatigue failure load of two resin-bonded zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramics: Effect of ceramic thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Jaiane Bandoli; Riquieri, Hilton; Prochnow, Catina; Guilardi, Luís Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; de Melo, Renata Marques; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of ceramic thickness on the fatigue failure load of two zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) glass-ceramics, adhesively cemented to a dentin analogue material. Disc-shaped specimens were allocated into 8 groups (n=25) considering two study factors: ZLS ceramic type (Vita Suprinity - VS; and Celtra Duo - CD), and ceramic thickness (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5mm). A trilayer assembly (ϕ=10mm; thickness=3.5mm) was designed to mimic a bonded monolithic restoration. The ceramic discs were etched, silanized and luted (Variolink N) into a dentin analogue material. Fatigue failure load was determined using the Staircase method (100,000 cycles at 20Hz; initial fatigue load ∼60% of the mean monotonic load-to-failure; step size ∼5% of the initial fatigue load). A stainless-steel piston (ϕ=40mm) applied the load into the center of the specimens submerged in water. Fractographic analysis and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were also performed. The ceramic thickness influenced the fatigue failure load for both ZLS materials: Suprinity (716N up to 1119N); Celtra (404N up to 1126N). FEA showed that decreasing ceramic thickness led to higher stress concentration on the cementing interface. Different ZLS glass-ceramic thicknesses influenced the fatigue failure load of the bonded system (i.e. the thicker the glass ceramic is, the higher the fatigue failure load will be). Different microstructures of the ZLS glass-ceramics might affect the fatigue behavior. FEA showed that the thicker the glass ceramic is, the lower the stress concentration at the tensile surface will be. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical properties of zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E; Elnaghy, Amr M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical properties of recently introduced zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic. Two types of CAD/CAM glass-ceramics (Vita Suprinity (VS); zirconia reinforced lithium silicate and IPS e.max CAD (IC); lithium disilicate) were used. Fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, brittleness index, and microstructures were evaluated. Data were analyzed using independent t tests. Weibull analysis of flexural strength data was also performed. VS had significantly higher fracture toughness (2.31±0.17MPam(0.5)), flexural strength (443.63±38.90MPa), elastic modulus (70.44±1.97GPa), and hardness (6.53±0.49GPa) than IC (Pglass-ceramic revealed significantly a higher brittleness index (2.84±0.26μm(-1/2)) (lower machinability) than IC glass-ceramic (Pglass-ceramic revealed a lower probability of failure and a higher strength than IC glass-ceramic according to Weibull analysis. The VS zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic revealed higher mechanical properties compared with IC lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  18. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  19. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  1. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  2. Corrosion of technical ceramics by molten aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, U.; Wolff, L.R.; Loo, van F.J.J.; Ziegler, G.

    1992-01-01

    The corrosion of 8 types of ceramics, i.e., 1 grade of hot isostatically pressed reaction-bonded Si3N4 (HIPRBSN), 3 grades of hot pressed Si3N4 (HPSN), and 4 grades of RBSN, and 2 types of SiC (HIPSiC and Si-impregnated SiC (SiSiC)) in molten Al (pure Al and AlZnMgCu1.5) was studied. The HIPRBSN and

  3. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  4. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  7. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  8. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  9. Microporous calcium phosphate ceramics driving osteogenesis through surface architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Barbieri, Davide; ten Hoopen, Hetty; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Yuan, Huipin

    2015-03-01

    The presence of micropores in calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics has shown its important role in initiating inductive bone formation in ectopic sites. To investigate how microporous CaP ceramics trigger osteoinduction, we optimized two biphasic CaP ceramics (i.e., BCP-R and BCP-S) to have the same chemical composition, equivalent surface area per volume, comparable protein adsorption, similar ion (i.e., calcium and phosphate) exchange and the same surface mineralization potential, but different surface architecture. In particular, BCP-R had a surface roughness (Ra) of 325.4 ± 58.9 nm while for BCP-S it was 231.6 ± 35.7 nm. Ceramic blocks with crossing or noncrossing channels of 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 µm were implanted in paraspinal muscle of dogs for 12 weeks. The percentage of bone volume in the channels was not affected by the type of pores (i.e., crossing vs. closed) or their size, but it was greatly influenced by the ceramic type (i.e., BCP-R vs. BCP-S). Significantly, more bone was formed in the channels of BCP-R than in those of BCP-S. Since the two CaP ceramics differed only in their surface architecture, the results hereby demonstrate that microporous CaP ceramics may induce ectopic osteogenesis through surface architecture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  12. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  13. Current Progress in Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengde; Deng, Youwen; Feng, Pei; Mao, Zhongzheng; Li, Pengjian; Yang, Bo; Deng, Junjie; Cao, Yiyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have received great attention in the past decades owing to their success in stimulating cell proliferation, differentiation and bone tissue regeneration. They can react and form chemical bonds with cells and tissues in human body. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the application of bioactive ceramics for bone repair and regeneration. The review systematically summarizes the types and characters of bioactive ceramics, the fabrication methods for nanostructure and hierarchically porous structure, typical toughness methods for ceramic scaffold and corresponding mechanisms such as fiber toughness, whisker toughness and particle toughness. Moreover, greater insights into the mechanisms of interaction between ceramics and cells are provided, as well as the development of ceramic-based composite materials. The development and challenges of bioactive ceramics are also discussed from the perspective of bone repair and regeneration. PMID:24646912

  14. Randomized clinical trial of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F; Clark, Arthur E; Shuster, Jonathan J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52-75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD, and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher's exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure (p = 0.68), and connector height (p = 0

  15. About kinetics of paramagnetic radiation malformations in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabinkin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper [1] specifies that γ-radiation of the beryllium-oxide-based ceramics results in development of paramagnetic radiation malformations emerging the ESR spectrum in form of doublet with the splitting rate of oestrasid Δ∼1.6 and g-factor of 2.008. This report presents evaluation outcomes of dependence of paramagnetic radiation malformations concentration in beryllium ceramics on gamma-radiation dose ( 60 Co) within the range of 0-100 Mrad. Total paramagnetic parameters of beryllium ceramics in the range 0-100 Mrad of gamma-radiation dose varied slightly, and were specified by the first type of paramagnetic radiation malformations

  16. Ceramic Surface Treatment with a Single-component Primer: Resin Adhesion to Glass Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Mayara; Prochnow, Catina; Marchionatti, Ana Maria Estivalete; Baldissara, Paolo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Wandscher, Vinicius Felipe

    2018-04-19

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of composite cement bonded to two machined glass ceramics and its durability, comparing conventional surface conditioning (hydrofluoric acid + silane) to a one-step primer (Monobond Etch & Prime). Machined slices of lithium disilicate ceramic (LDC) (IPS e.max CAD) and feldspathic ceramic (FC) (VITA Mark II) glass ceramics were divided into two groups (n = 10) according to two factors: 1. surface treatment: HF+S (ca 5% hydrofluoric acid [IPS Ceramic Etching GEL] + silane coupling agent [SIL; Monobond Plus]) or MEP (single-component ceramic conditioner; Monobond Etch & Prime); 2. storage condition: baseline (without aging; tested 24 h after cementing) or aged (70 days of water storage + 12,000 thermal cycles). Composite cement (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to starch matrices on the treated ceramic surfaces and photoactivated. A μSBS test was performed (0.5 mm/min) and the failure pattern was determined. Contact angle and micromorphological analyses were also performed. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test (α = 5%). For both ceramic materials, HF+S resulted in higher mean μSBS (MPa) at baseline (LDC: HF+S 21.2 ± 2.2 > MEP 10.4 ± 2.4; FC: HF+S 19.6 ± 4.3 > MEP 13.5 ± 5.4) and after aging (LDC: HF+S 14.64 ± 2.31 > MEP 9 ± 3.4; FC HF+S: 14.73 ± 3.33 > MEP 11.1 ± 3.3). HF+S resulted in a statistically significant decrease in mean μSBS after aging (p = 0.0001), while MEP yielded no significant reduction. The main failure type was adhesive between composite cement and ceramic. HF+S resuted in the lowest contact angle. Hydrofluoric acid + silane resulted in higher mean μSBS than Monobond Etch & Prime for both ceramics; however, Monobond Etch & Prime had stable bonding after aging.

  17. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  18. FY 1999 project on the development of new industry support type international standards. Standardization of a testing/evaluation method of biological use fine ceramics; 1999 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Seitaiyo fine ceramics no shiken hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of standardizing/international standardizing an evaluation method of the characteristics required for biological use fine ceramics, and the FY 1999 results were summed up. In the study of characteristics of biological use fine ceramic materials, it was confirmed that zirconia ceramics are more excellent than alumina ceramics in static strength, repeated loads and fatigue properties in the atmospheric air at room temperature. In the study of the evaluation method of biological affinity, the standardization of the simulated body liquid preparation process was studied, and the simulated body liquid was prepared. To evaluate the bioactivity of biological use fine ceramics without making animal experiments, the simulated body liquid in which the ion concentration was made exactly equal to that of human being was prepared using 2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazinyl ethane sulfonic acid as buffer. There were seen no changes in ion concentration for four weeks at longest as long as this liquid is kept in airtight container at temperature of 36.5 degrees C or below. The present situation of the standardization of bioceramics was surveyed. (NEDO)

  19. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  20. Tradition and changes in the Lima ceramics of Huaca Pucllana

    OpenAIRE

    Ccencho Huamaní, José

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of ceramics from the site of Huaca Pucllana carried out by Isabel Flores, director of the Huaca Pucllana Archaeological Project. This research is approached from the perspective of chronologicaldiferentiation, arriving at the continuities and changes that occurred in ceramics at the site during its construction and occupation by the Lima society from 530-650 AD. Five pottery types were identified that relate to three constructive phases and a f...

  1. Immobilization of INEL low-level radioactive wastes in ceramic containment materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, W.C.; Kelsey, P.V.

    1978-11-01

    INEL low-level radioactive wastes have an overall chemical composition that lends itself to self-containment in a ceramic-based material. Fewer chemical additives would be needed to process the wastes than to process high-level wastes or use a mixture containment method. The resulting forms of waste material could include a basalt-type glass or glass ceramic and a ceramic-type brick. Expected leach resistance is discussed in relationshp to data found in the literature for these materials and appears encouraging. An overview of possible processing steps for the ceramic materials is presented

  2. In vitro evaluation of frictional forces of two ceramic orthodontic brackets versus a stainless steel bracket in combination with two types of archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Mahmoud; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khorasani, Sara; Sobouti, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare frictional forces between monocrystalline alumina (MA), polycrystalline alumina (PA), and stainless steel (SS) brackets with two SS wires: Rectangular and round. In this in vitro study, 60 0.022 brackets [20 PA (0° torque, Forestadent, Germany) and 20 MA (0° torque, Ormco, California, USA)] brackets plus 20 SS brackets (0° torque, Foretadent, Germany) and 60 SS archwires (30 rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwires and 30 round 0.018 archwires, Ortho Technology, USA) were used in subgroups of 10 from the combination of all brackets and all archwires. A universal testing machine (Instron, Model STM 250, Germany) was used to investigate the static frictional resistance. The angulation between the bracket and wire was 0°, and the wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Two-way and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to analyze the data. Mean (SD) static frictional force for each group was as follows: MA + round: 3.47 (0.38); MA + rectangular: 4.05 (0.47); PA + round: 4.14 (0.37); PA + rectangular: 4.45 (0.65); SS + round: 3.28 (0.22); and SS + rectangular: 4.22 (0.61). Significant effects of bracket types (P = 0.001) and archwire types (P = 0.000) on the friction force were detected using ANOVA. Tukey test indicated significant differences between PA brackets with both SS and MA brackets (P brackets. The two archwires as well had significantly different effects (Tukey P = 0.000). Based on the present in-vitro study, the PA brackets might create higher frictional forces compared to both SS and MA brackets. The rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwire might create greater forces than round 0.018 archwire.

  3. In vitro evaluation of frictional forces of two ceramic orthodontic brackets versus a stainless steel bracket in combination with two types of archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Mahmoud; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khorasani, Sara; Sobouti, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare frictional forces between monocrystalline alumina (MA), polycrystalline alumina (PA), and stainless steel (SS) brackets with two SS wires: Rectangular and round. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 60 0.022 brackets [20 PA (0° torque, Forestadent, Germany) and 20 MA (0° torque, Ormco, California, USA)] brackets plus 20 SS brackets (0° torque, Foretadent, Germany) and 60 SS archwires (30 rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwires and 30 round 0.018 archwires, Ortho Technology, USA) were used in subgroups of 10 from the combination of all brackets and all archwires. A universal testing machine (Instron, Model STM 250, Germany) was used to investigate the static frictional resistance. The angulation between the bracket and wire was 0°, and the wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Two-way and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Mean (SD) static frictional force for each group was as follows: MA + round: 3.47 (0.38); MA + rectangular: 4.05 (0.47); PA + round: 4.14 (0.37); PA + rectangular: 4.45 (0.65); SS + round: 3.28 (0.22); and SS + rectangular: 4.22 (0.61). Significant effects of bracket types (P = 0.001) and archwire types (P = 0.000) on the friction force were detected using ANOVA. Tukey test indicated significant differences between PA brackets with both SS and MA brackets (P brackets. The two archwires as well had significantly different effects (Tukey P = 0.000). Conclusions: Based on the present in-vitro study, the PA brackets might create higher frictional forces compared to both SS and MA brackets. The rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwire might create greater forces than round 0.018 archwire. PMID:26020037

  4. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  5. Glass-ceramics: Their production from wastes - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlings, R.D.; Wu, J.P.; Boccaccini, A.R. [University of London, London (United Kingdom). Imperial College of Science & Technology, Dept. of Medicine

    2006-02-15

    Glass-ceramics are polycrystalline materials of fine microstructure that are produced by the controlled crystallisation (devitrification) of a glass. Numerous silicate based wastes, such as coal combustion ash, slag from steel production, fly ash and filter dusts from waste incinerators, mud from metal hydrometallurgy, different types of sludge as well as glass cullet or mixtures of them have been considered for the production of glass-ceramics. Developments of glass-ceramics from waste using different processing methods are described comprehensively in this review, covering R&D work carried out worldwide in the last 40 years. Properties and applications of the different glass-ceramics produced are discussed. The review reveals that considerable knowledge and expertise has been accumulated on the process of transformation of silicate waste into useful glass-ceramic products. These glass-ceramics are attractive as building materials for usage as construction and architectural components or for other specialised technical applications requiring a combination of suitable thermo-mechanical properties. Previous attempts to commercialise glass-ceramics from waste and to scale-up production for industrial exploitation are also discussed.

  6. Development of small ceramic gas turbines for cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Details of the project at NEDO to develop 300 kW ceramic gas turbines with a thermal efficiency of ≥42% at a turbine inlet temperature (TIT) of 1,350 o C. The project is part of the 'New Sunshine Projects' promoted by Japan's Agency of Industrial Science and Technology and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. So far, a thermal efficiency of 37% at a TIT of 1,280 o C has been achieved by a basic ceramic gas turbine (CGT). Work to develop pilot CGTs to achieve the final target is being carried out alongside research and development of ceramic parts and improved performance of ceramic components for CGTs. One group of engine and ceramic manufacturers is developing a single shaft regenerative cycle CGT (CGT 301) and a second group a double shaft type (CGT 302). The heat-resistant ceramic parts, nitrogen oxide emissions and performance of these two prototypes are outlined and the properties of the ceramic materials used are indicated. Market estimates and economics are noted

  7. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  8. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  10. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  11. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  12. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  13. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  14. Structural and Magnetic Properties Evolution of Co-Nd Substituted M-type Hexagonal Strontium Ferrites Synthesized by Ball-Milling-Assisted Ceramic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Wu, Wenwei; Zhou, Chong; Zhou, Shifang; Li, Miaoyu; Ning, Yu

    2018-03-01

    M-type hexagonal Sr1- x Co x Nd x Fe12- x O19 ( x = 0, 0.08, 0.16, and 0.24) has been synthesized by ball milling, followed by calcination in air. The calcined products have been characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra, and vibrating sample magnetometry. XRD and SEM analyses confirm the formation of M-type Sr hexaferrite with platelet-like morphology when Sr1- x Co x Nd x Fe12- x O19 ( x = 0, 0.08, 0.16, and 0.24) precursors are calcined at 950°C in air for 2.5 h. Lattice parameters " a" and " c" values of Sr1- x Co x Nd x Fe12- x O19 reflect a very small variation after doping of Nd3+ and Co2+ ions. Average crystallite size of Sr1- x Co x Nd x Fe12- x O19 sample, calcined at 1150°C, decreased obviously after doping of Co2+ and Nd3+ ions. This is because the bond energy of Nd3+-O2- is much larger than that of Sr2+-O2-. Magnetic characterization indicates that all the samples exhibit good magnetic properties. Substitution of Sr2+ and Fe3+ ions by Nd3+ and Co2+ ions can improve the specific saturation magnetizations and remanence of Sr1- x Co x Nd x Fe12- x O19. Sr0.84Co0.16Nd0.16Fe11.84O19, calcined at 1050°C, has the highest specific saturation magnetization value (74.75 ± 0.60 emu/g), remanence (45.15 ± 0.32 emu/g), and magnetic moment (14.34 ± 0.11 μ B); SrFe12O19, calcined at 1150°C, has the highest coercivity value (4037.01 ± 42.39 Oe). These magnetic parameters make this material a promising candidate for applications such as high-density magnetic recording and microwave absorbing materials.

  15. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  17. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  18. Ceramic membrane microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T J; Gainer, J L; Kirwan, D J

    1992-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor. In this type of reactor, the substrate solution permeates the ceramic membrane and reacts with an enzyme that has been immobilized within its porous interior. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of permeation rate on the observed kinetic parameters for the immobilized enzyme in order to assess possible mass transfer influences or shear effects. Kinetic parameters were found to be independent of flow rate for immobilized penicillinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, neither mass transfer nor shear effects were observed for enzymes immobilized within the ceramic membrane. Both the residence time and the conversion in the microfilter reactor could be controlled simply by regulating the transmembrane pressure drop. This study suggests that a ceramic microfilter reactor can be a desirable alternative to a packed bed of porous particles, especially when an immobilized enzyme has high activity and a low Michaelis constant.

  19. Structural response testing of thermal barrier load bearing ceramic pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, J.L.; Black, W.E.; Luci, R.K.; Oland, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    A load-bearing insulating structure for use in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) was investigated. The structure was composed of dense ceramic materials in the form of circular pads arranged in a stack. Specifically, the test program was structured to investigate the isolation effectiveness of interface materials placed between the ceramic pads to reduce the effectiveness of mechanically induced loads. The tests were conducted at room temperature using tapered loading platens on single ceramic pads. Seventeen alumina specimens, representing two types of material and two thicknesses, were tested. Three interface material thicknesses were introduced using silica cloth and graphite foil. Pre- and post-test nondestructive examinations were conducted in an effort to identify potential damage-inducing anomalies in the ceramic pads. A total of 62 tests was conducted with all specimens eventually loaded to failure

  20. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  1. Metal-ceramic alloys in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Howard W; Berzins, David W; Moore, B Keith; Charlton, David G

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review basic information about the alloys used for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations in dentistry. Their compositions, properties, advantages, and disadvantages are presented and compared. In addition to reviewing traditional noble-metal and base-metal metal-ceramic alloys, titanium and gold composite alloys are also discussed. A broad search of the published literature was performed using Medline to identify pertinent current articles on metal-ceramic alloys as well as articles providing a historical background about the development of these alloys. Textbooks, the internet, and manufacturers' literature were also used to supplement this information. The review discusses traditional as well as more recently-developed alloys and technologies used in dentistry for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations. Clear advantages and disadvantages for these alloy types are provided and discussed as well as the role that compositional variations have on the alloys' performance. This information should enable clinicians and technicians to easily identify the important physical properties of each type and their primary clinical indications. A number of alloys and metals are available for metal-ceramic use in dentistry. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, primarily based on its specific composition. Continuing research and development are resulting in the production of new technologies and products, giving clinicians even more choices in designing and fabricating metal-ceramic restorations.

  2. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  3. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  4. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  5. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  6. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  7. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  8. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  9. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  10. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  11. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  13. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  14. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  15. Experimentqal and analytical study on thermocracking of alumina ceramic ring in a mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, M.; Matsuda, K.; Kaneta, M.

    1994-04-01

    A mechanism of thermocracking, which occurs in an alumina ceramic ring of a mechanical face seal, is proposed based on experimental and analytical results. Methods for its prevention are also discussed. The experiments were conducted using an external type mechanical face seal composed of a carbon ring and three kinds of alumina ceramic rings, with distilled water as the liquid to be sealed. By using a layer of gold vacuum deposited onto the surface of the ceramic ring as a part of a DC circuit, the moment of crack initiation was identified. The thermal stresses produced in the ceramic ring by frictional heating were calculated using finite element analysis.

  16. Quantum efficiencies of near-infrared emission from Ni2+-doped glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takenobu; Arai, Yusuke; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2008-01-01

    A systematic method to evaluate potentials of Ni 2+ -doped transparent glass-ceramics as a new broadband optical gain media is presented. At first, near-infrared emission of various ceramics were investigated to explore the suitable crystalline phase to be grown in the glass-ceramics. The quantum efficiency of Ni 2+ near-infrared emission estimated by the Struck-Fonger analysis was higher than 95% for spinel-type structure gallate crystals MgGa 2 O 4 and LiGa 5 O 8 at room temperature. Transparent glass-ceramics containing Ni 2+ :LiGa 5 O 8 could be prepared and the quantum efficiency for the glass-ceramics was measured to be about 10%. This value shows a potential of Ni-doped transparent glass-ceramics as a broadband gain media

  17. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  18. Disk-type piezoelectric transformer of a Na0.5K0.5NbO3–CuNb2O6 lead-free ceramic for driving T5 fluorescent lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ming-Ru; Chu, Sheng-Yuan; Chan, I.-Hao; Yang, Song-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CuNb 2 O 6 dopants were doped into NKN ceramics not only improved the density but also exhibited superior piezoelectric characteristic, temperature stability of resonance frequency. ► Lead-free NKN-01CN piezoelectric transformer was simplified as an equivalent circuit and analyzed using MATLAB. ► An 8W T5 fluorescent lamp was successfully driven by the NKN-01CN piezoelectric transformer. - Abstract: Lead-free (Na 0.5 K 0.5 )NbO 3 (NKN) ceramics doped with 1 mol% CuNb 2 O 6 (CN) ceramics were prepared using the conventional mixed oxide method, with a sintering temperature of 1075 °C. Microstructural analyses of the NKN–01CN ceramics were carried out and compared, using X-ray diffraction (XRD). NKN–01CN ceramics sintered at 1075 °C not only exhibited excellent ‘hard’ piezoelectric properties of k p = 40%, k t = 45%, k 33 = 57%, a ferroelectric property of E c = 23 kV/cm, and an extraordinarily high mechanical quality factor (Q m ) of 1933 but also showed excellent stability with temperature (TCF = −154 ppm/°C). The piezoelectric transformer was simplified, using an equivalent circuit, and analyzed, using MATLAB; the simulation data agreed well with the experimental results. An efficiency of 95.7% was achieved for the NKN–01CN piezoelectric transformer with load resistance of 20 kΩ. An 8 W T5 fluorescent lamp was successfully driven by the NKN–01CN piezoelectric transformer.

  19. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoğlu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to their respectively corresponding cores, namely leucite-reinforced ceramic ((IPS)Empress, Ivoclar), low leucite-reinforced ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco), glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina, Vita) and lithium disilicate ((IPS)Empress 2, Ivoclar) were used for SBS and MTBS tests. Ceramic cores (N=40, n=10/group for SBS test method, N=5 blocks/group for MTBS test method) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (for SBS: thickness, 3mm; diameter, 5mm and for MTBS: 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) and ultrasonically cleaned. The veneering ceramics (thickness: 2mm) were vibrated and condensed in stainless steel moulds and fired onto the core ceramic materials. After trying the specimens in the mould for minor adjustments, they were again ultrasonically cleaned and embedded in PMMA. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week and bond strength tests were performed in universal testing machines (cross-head speed: 1mm/min). The bond strengths (MPa+/-S.D.) and modes of failures were recorded. Significant difference between the two test methods and all-ceramic types were observed (P<0.05) (2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni). The mean SBS values for veneering ceramic to lithium disilicate was significantly higher (41+/-8 MPa) than those to low leucite (28+/-4 MPa), glass-infiltrated (26+/-4 MPa) and leucite-reinforced (23+/-3 MPa) ceramics, while the mean MTBS for low leucite ceramic was significantly higher (15+/-2 MPa) than those of leucite (12+/-2 MPa), glass-infiltrated (9+/-1 MPa) and lithium disilicate ceramic (9+/-1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.05). Both the testing methodology and the differences in chemical compositions of the core and veneering ceramics

  20. Development of ceramic glaze with photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezza, V.B.; Uggioni, E.; Carrera, A.A. Duran; Bernardin, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glazes were developed by adding anatase in commercial ceramic plates as an agent of photocatalysis. The glazes were coated on ceramic tiles, which were fired between 800 and 1000°C. The formulations were characterized (SEM, XRD), and the wettability was determined by measuring the water contact angle. The microstructural analysis (SEM) showed that the anatase particles can disperse properly in the glaze matrix. The X-ray diffraction shows that from 1000°C, the glaze becomes very reactive, and particles of anatase are transformed into titanite or rutile, depending on the glaze used. The determination of the contact angle shows the clear influence of the glaze type and sintering temperature on the wettability characteristics of the obtained layer. (author)

  1. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscolo, I.; Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.; Giannessi, L.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are present. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm 2. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm 2, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10 - 4 mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way

  2. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  3. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  4. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic from Teotenango, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez R, R.; Mondragon, M.; Villa S, G.; Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D.

    2006-01-01

    Of all the kind of artifacts which may be found at archaeological sites, ceramics are surely among the most important. A ceramic material is highly durable, and virtually unchanged after hundred of years from its date of manufacture. Because of this, a ceramic will always be an important object for serious studies to determine which culture produced it, to date cultures, reconstruct economic patterns and social organization, and establish routes of trade or simply to classify the different types of ceramics. The aim of this paper was to perform a thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic samples belonging to Teotenango, Mexico. The analysis is complemented with a physicochemical characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). TL analysis shows some differences when the samples are exposed to ionizing radiation field, while SEM analysis shows a porous and granular structure in all samples, EDS analysis shows oxygen (O), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), iron (Fe), sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) in significant amounts. These results allow establishing differences among ceramic samples belonging to the same place. (Author)

  6. Thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic from Teotenango, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez R, R. [Centro INAH Estado de Mexico, Morelos Ote. 502, Col. San Sebastian, 50090 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mondragon, M. [Museo Roman Pina Chan, Teotenango 1024 (Mexico); Villa S, G.; Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Of all the kind of artifacts which may be found at archaeological sites, ceramics are surely among the most important. A ceramic material is highly durable, and virtually unchanged after hundred of years from its date of manufacture. Because of this, a ceramic will always be an important object for serious studies to determine which culture produced it, to date cultures, reconstruct economic patterns and social organization, and establish routes of trade or simply to classify the different types of ceramics. The aim of this paper was to perform a thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic samples belonging to Teotenango, Mexico. The analysis is complemented with a physicochemical characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). TL analysis shows some differences when the samples are exposed to ionizing radiation field, while SEM analysis shows a porous and granular structure in all samples, EDS analysis shows oxygen (O), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), iron (Fe), sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) in significant amounts. These results allow establishing differences among ceramic samples belonging to the same place. (Author)

  7. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  8. Decontamination factors of ceramic filter in radioactive waste incineration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Hiromi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Ono, Tetsuo; Yoshiki, Shinya; Kouyama, Hiroaki; Nagae, Madoka; Sekiguchi, Ryosaku; Takaoku, Yoshinobu; Hozumi, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    A suspension-firing type radioactive waste incineration system is developed and cold demonstration testing of ceramic filters for the system are carried out. The incineration system, which is useful for a wide variety of waste materials, can serve to simplify the facilities and to reduce the costs for waste disposal. The incineration system can be used for drying-processing of concentrated waste liquids and disposal of flame resistant materials including ion exchange resins and rubber, as well as for ordinary combustible solid materials. An on-line backwash system is adopted to allow the ceramic filters to operate stably for a long period of time. For one-step filtering using the ceramic filter, the decontamination factor is greater than 10 5 for the processing of various wastes. In a practical situation, there exist vapor produced by the spray drier and the cladding in used ion exchange resin, which act to increase the decontamination performance of the ceramic filters to ensure safe operation. For the waste incineration system equipped with a waste gas processing apparatus consisting of a ceramic filter and HEPA filter, the overall decontamination factor is expected to be greater than 10 6 at portions down to the outlet of the ceramic filter and greater than 10 8 at portions down to the outlet of the HEPA filter. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Confocal examination of subsurface cracking in ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, Maged K

    2009-10-01

    The original ceramic surface finish and its microstructure may have an effect on crack propagation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between crack propagation and ceramic microstructure following cyclic fatigue loading, and to qualitatively evaluate and quantitatively measure the surface and subsurface crack depths of three types of ceramic restorations with different microstructures using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Twenty (8 x 4 x 2 mm(3)) blocks of AllCeram (AC), experimental ceramic (EC, IPS e.max Press), and Sensation SL (SSL) were prepared, ten glazed and ten polished of each material. Sixty antagonist enamel specimens were made from the labial surfaces of permanent incisors. The ceramic abraders were attached to a wear machine, so that each enamel specimen presented at 45 degrees to the vertical movement of the abraders, and immersed in artificial saliva. Wear was induced for 80K cycles at 60 cycles/min with a load of 40 N and 2-mm horizontal deflection. The specimens were examined for cracks at baseline, 5K, 10K, 20K, 40K, and 80K cycles. Twenty- to 30-microm deep subsurface cracking appeared in SSL, with 8 to 10 microm in AC, and 7 microm close to the margin of the wear facets in glazed EC after 5K cycles. The EC showed no cracks with increasing wear cycles. Seventy-microm deep subsurface cracks were detected in SSL and 45 microm in AC after 80K cycles. Statistically, there was significant difference among the three materials (p 0.05) in crack depth within the same ceramic material with different surface finishes. The ceramic materials with different microstructures showed different patterns of subsurface cracking.

  10. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  11. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  12. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  15. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  16. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  17. Development of crystalline ceramic for immobilization of TRU wastes in V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.E.; Anderson, E.B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the Radium Institute's experience in the synthesis of crystalline ceramics based on two groups of actinide host-phases: 1) Zircon/zirconia-(Zn, Ac)SiO 4 /(Zr, Ac)O 2 , where Ac=Pu, Np, Am, Cm; 2) Garnet/perovskite-(Y, Gd, Ac) 3 (Al, Ga, Ac,..) 5 O 12 /(Y, Gd, Ac)(Al, Ga)O 3 . The zircon/zirconia ceramic was suggested as an universal waste form for the immobilization of TRU as well as weapon-grade Pu. Because the position of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) does not consider weapons Pu as a waste', the Radium Institute proposed the use of the same ceramic (mainly monophase zirconia ) as a Pu-fuel. The garnet/perovskite ceramic was suggested for the immobilization of military TRU wastes of complex chemical composition. The advantage of this ceramic is that Garnet and Perovskite host-phases can incorporate in their lattices not only actinides, but also other elements including neutron absorbers in a broad range of concentration and in different valence state. Sample of zircon/zirconia ceramic were prepared by hot uniaxial pressing (at temperature T=1300, 1400, 1500degC and pressure P=25 MPa) and sintering (at T=1450, 1490, 1500, 1600degC) methods using different types of initial precursor. Samples of garnet/perovskite ceramic were synthesized by melting method at T=2000degC. Ce, U, Gd were used as TRU stimulants for both types of ceramic. One sample of zircon/zirconia ceramic was doped with 10 wt.% of Pu 239 . Physico-chemical features of these ceramics are described. In conclusion we propose that the pressureless technology based on sintering or melting methods be used for the synthesis of ceramics for the immobilization of all types of TRU wastes. (author)

  18. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  19. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  20. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  1. Ceramic Defects in Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses Made from Co-Cr and Au-Pt Alloys: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeli, Aikaterini; Boening, Klaus W; Lißke, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic defects in porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations may depend on framework alloy type. This study assessed ceramic defects on cobalt-chromium- (Co-Cr-) and gold-platinum- (Au-Pt-) based PFM restorations. In this study, 147 Co-Cr-based and 168 Au-Pt-based PFM restorations inserted between 1998 and 2010 (139 patients) were examined for ceramic defects. Detected defects were assigned to three groups according to clinical defect relevance. Ceramic defect rates (Co-Cr-based: 12.9%; Au-Pt-based: 7.2%) revealed no significant difference but a strong statistical trend (U test, P = .082). Most defects were of little clinical relevance. Co-Cr PFM restorations may be at higher risk for ceramic defects compared to Au-Pt-based restorations.

  2. Computer vision techniques applied to the quality control of ceramic plates

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Joaquim; Ferreira, Manuel João Oliveira; Santos, Cristina; Martins, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a system, based on computer vision techniques, that detects and quantifies different types of defects in ceramic plates. It was developed in collaboration with the industrial ceramic sector and consequently it was focused on the defects that are considered more quality depreciating by the Portuguese industry. They are of three main types: cracks; granules and relief surface. For each type the development was specific as far as image processing techn...

  3. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  4. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  5. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petykhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ( 60 Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects

  6. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermoluminescence study of materials (natural minerals) used in ceramic tiles industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, K V R, E-mail: drmurthykvr@yahoo.com [Display Materials Laboratory Applied Physics Department Faculty of Technology and Engineering M.S. University of Baroda, Baroda-390 001 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Mother earth is giving many materials in the natural form as well as in mineral form. Among them the marbles, granites and other variety of slabs for house hold flooring purposes. The people demand for variety of flooring materials leads to develop various types of ceramic tile. In India ceramic tiles industry is one of the fast growing one. More than two hundred units are manufacturing the ceramic tiles situated around Morbi, Rajkot, Gujarat, India. The basic raw materials required for manufacturing the various types of ceramic tiles are natural minerals. The following are the minerals used to manufacture the ceramic tiles i.e. quartz, feldspar, zircon, china clay, talc, grok, Aluminum oxide etc.,

  8. Thermoluminescence study of materials (natural minerals) used in ceramic tiles industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, K V R

    2009-01-01

    Mother earth is giving many materials in the natural form as well as in mineral form. Among them the marbles, granites and other variety of slabs for house hold flooring purposes. The people demand for variety of flooring materials leads to develop various types of ceramic tile. In India ceramic tiles industry is one of the fast growing one. More than two hundred units are manufacturing the ceramic tiles situated around Morbi, Rajkot, Gujarat, India. The basic raw materials required for manufacturing the various types of ceramic tiles are natural minerals. The following are the minerals used to manufacture the ceramic tiles i.e. quartz, feldspar, zircon, china clay, talc, grok, Aluminum oxide etc.,

  9. Investigations on the performance of ultrasonic drilling process with special reference to precision machining of advanced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adithan, M.; Laroiya, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced ceramics are assuming an important role in modern industrial technology. The applications and advantages of using advanced ceramics are many. There are several reasons why we should go in for machining of advanced ceramics after their compacting and sintering. These are discussed in this paper. However, precision machining of advanced ceramics must be economical. Critical technological issues to be addressed in cost effective machining of ceramics include design of machine tools, tooling arrangements, improved yield and precision, relationship of part dimensions and finish specifications to functional performance, and on-line inspection. Considering the above ultrasonic drilling is an important process used for the precision machining of advanced ceramics. Extensive studies on tool wear occurring in the ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics have been carried out. In addition, production accuracy of holes drilled, surface finish obtained and surface integrity aspects in the machining of advanced ceramics have also been investigated. Some specific findings with reference to surface integrity are: a) there were no cracks or micro-cracks developed during or after ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics, b) while machining Hexoloy alpha silicon carbide a recast layer is formed as a result of ultrasonic machining. This is attributed to the viscous heating resulting from high energy impacts during ultrasonic machining. While machining all other types of ceramics no such formation of recast layer was observed, and , c) there is no change in the microstructure of the advanced ceramics as a result of ultrasonic machining

  10. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  11. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  12. Ceramic drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Bajpai, P K

    1998-01-01

    A variety of ceramics and delivery systems have been used to deliver chemicals, biologicals, and drugs at various rates for desired periods of time from different sites of implantation. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that ceramics can successfully be used as drug-delivery devices. Matrices, inserts, reservoirs, cements, and particles have been used to deliver a large variety of therapeutic agents such as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, anticoagulants, analgesics, growth factors, hormones, steroids, and vaccines. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of conventional drug-delivery systems and the different approaches used to deliver chemical and biological agents by means of ceramic systems will be reviewed.

  13. High flow ceramic pot filters

    OpenAIRE

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6–19 L h−1), but initial LRVs for E. coli o...

  14. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  15. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  16. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  17. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  18. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  19. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  20. Development of optical phase shifter based on piezoelectric ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fusheng; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yao, Chunjuan; Leng, Changlin

    2005-02-01

    The phase shifter is necessary in the optical phase-shifting measurement. At present the phase shifter commonly used is approximately divided into the penetrance-type and the reflection-type. In this paper, a reflection-type phase shifter made of piezoelectric ceramic stackup assemble is developed. The assemble are constituted of the flat piezoelectric ceramic with parallel connection circuit and inline structure. The communication between the computer and MCU is by RS232. The D/A converter controlled by the MCU outputs 0~10V voltage. Then the voltage is amplified to 0~400V DC voltage by the designed linear DC amplifier. When this voltage loads on the piezoelectric ceramic stackup assemble, the assemble will axially extend 0~5mm. In this paper, the connecting types for the mechanical construction and circuit of the piezoelectric ceramic stackup assemble, the driving power and the DC amplifier with high linearity are all introduced. The whole system developed is standardized by using phase-interfering Michelson. The standardization and the practical application indicates that this system has excellent linearity and precision repeatability.

  1. Observation of domain patterns on a ferroelectric ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, R.C.; Zavaglia, C.A.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this work ferroelectric domain patterns are observed on a PZT-like ceramic material produced in Brazil. This material has tetragonal unit cell composing a perovskite type structure. The samples, after grinding and polishing, were chemically etched and observed on optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. (author)

  2. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part II: Multiple-unit FDPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar; Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Zwahlen, Marcel; Thoma, Daniel Stefan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported FDPs with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complemented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 10 studies from a previous systematic review [1]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Forty studies reporting on 1796 metal-ceramic and 1110 all-ceramic FDPs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated 5-year survival rate of metal-ceramic FDPs of 94.4% (95% CI: 91.2-96.5%). The estimated survival rate of reinforced glass ceramic FDPs was 89.1% (95% CI: 80.4-94.0%), the survival rate of glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs was 86.2% (95% CI: 69.3-94.2%) and the survival rate of densely sintered zirconia FDPs was 90.4% (95% CI: 84.8-94.0%) in 5 years of function. Even though the survival rate of all-ceramic FDPs was lower than for metal-ceramic FDPs, the differences did not reach statistical significance except for the glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (p=0.05). A significantly higher incidence of caries in abutment teeth was observed for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to metal-ceramic FDPs. Significantly more framework fractures were reported for reinforced glass ceramic FDPs (8.0%) and glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (12.9%) compared to metal-ceramic FDPs (0.6%) and densely sintered zirconia FDPs (1.9%) in 5 years in function. However, the incidence of ceramic fractures and loss of retention was significantly (p=0.018 and 0.028 respectively) higher for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to all other types of FDPs. Survival rates of all

  3. Solid ceramic based on mixed-frame titanium phosphate and calcium synthesized in solar furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salikhov, T. P.; Kan, V. V.; Urazaeva, Eh. M.; Savatyugina, T. V.; Arushanov, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors synthesized of mixed orthophosphates Ca 0 . 5 Ti 2 (PO 4 ) 3 using concentrated solar radiation. We obtained a porous ceramic filter with the given type of NZP structure and high thermal and hydrolytic stability. (authors)

  4. Moessbauer studies of Inca ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.; Marticorena, B.; Salazar, R.; Schwabe, R.; Riederer, J.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information on the firing of Inca ceramics, 7 samples from different locations were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy including a detailed laboratory refiring procedure. The glaze typical for the surface of this ware was studied by Moessbauer scattering. (Auth.)

  5. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  6. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  7. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part I: Single crowns (SCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported single crowns (SCs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complimented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 34 studies from a previous systematic review [1,2]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Sixty-seven studies reporting on 4663 metal-ceramic and 9434 all-ceramic SCs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies reported on metal-ceramic crowns, and 54 studies reported on all-ceramic crowns. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated survival rate of metal-ceramic SCs of 94.7% (95% CI: 94.1-96.9%) after 5 years. This was similar to the estimated 5-year survival rate of leucit or lithium-disilicate reinforced glass ceramic SCs (96.6%; 95% CI: 94.9-96.7%), of glass infiltrated alumina SCs (94.6%; 95% CI: 92.7-96%) and densely sintered alumina and zirconia SCs (96%; 95% CI: 93.8-97.5%; 92.1%; 95% CI: 82.8-95.6%). In contrast, the 5-year survival rates of feldspathic/silica-based ceramic crowns were lower (pceramic and zirconia crowns exhibited significantly lower survival rates in the posterior region (pceramic fractures than metal-ceramic SCs (pceramic SCs than for metal-ceramic SCs. Survival rates of most types of all-ceramic SCs were similar to those reported for metal-ceramic SCs, both in anterior and posterior regions. Weaker feldspathic/silica-based ceramics should be limited to applications in the anterior region. Zirconia-based SCs should not be considered as primary option due to their high incidence of technical problems. Copyright © 2015 Academy

  8. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  9. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  10. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  11. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  12. Tribological properties of ceramics evaluated at low sliding speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Kano, Shigeki

    1998-03-01

    Low speed tribological properties of stainless steel, ceramics and hard metals were investigated in air at room temperature and in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature for the consideration of sliding type support structure in intermediate heat exchanger of fast reactor. The following results are obtained. (1) In low speed friction measurements in air at room temperature, friction coefficients of ceramics and hard metals were smaller than that of stainless steel. Surface roughness of the specimens increased the friction force and silicon carbide showed the smallest friction coefficient among the specimens with mirror polished surface. (2) From the results of friction measurements at various sliding speeds in air at room temperature, friction coefficients of ceramics and hard metals were always stable and lower than that of stainless steel. Among ceramics, PSZ showed the smallest friction and silicon carbide showed the most stable friction at any sliding speeds. (3) Friction coefficients of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature showed low values as measured at room temperature. On the contrary, friction coefficient of stainless steel measured in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature were higher than that measured at room temperature, over 1. (4) In the reciprocal sliding tests in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature, friction coefficient of stainless steel were over 1. On the contrary, the friction coefficients of ceramics were less than 1 instead of chipping during the slidings. (author)

  13. Cathodic electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials. Fundamental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, I

    2002-03-29

    Electrodeposition of ceramic materials can be performed by electrophoretic (EPD) or electrolytic (ELD) deposition. Electrophoretic deposition is achieved via motion of charged particles towards an electrode under an applied electric field. Electrolytic deposition produces colloidal particles in cathodic reactions for subsequent deposition. Various electrochemical strategies and deposition mechanisms have been developed for electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic films, and are discussed in the present article. Electrode-position of ceramic and organoceramic materials includes mass transport, accumulation of particles near the electrode and their coagulation to form a cathodic deposit. Various types of interparticle forces that govern colloidal stability in the absence and presence of processing additives are discussed. Novel theoretical contributions towards an interpretation of particle coagulation near the electrode surface are reviewed. Background information is given on the methods of particle charging, stabilization of colloids in aqueous and non-aqueous media, electrophoretic mobility of ceramic particles and polyelectrolytes, and electrode reactions. This review also covers recent developments in the electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials.

  14. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  15. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  16. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  17. Preparation and properties of highly porous, biomorphic YSZ ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, C.R.; Cao, J.; Sieber, H.

    2004-01-01

    Highly porous, biomorphic YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) ceramics were manufactured by infiltration of zirconium-oxychloride (ZrOCl 2 ·8H 2 O) sol into biological template structures derived from rattan and pine wood. 3-5 mol% yttrium nitrate (Y(NO 3 ) 3 ·5H 2 O) was added to the sol to stabilize the tetragonal ZrO 2 phase. After vacuum-assisted infiltration, the specimens were pyrolysed at 800 deg. C in N 2 atmosphere. Repeated infiltrations and subsequent annealing in air at temperatures up to 1550 deg. C yields the burn out of the biocarbon template and resulted in the formation of biomorphous YSZ ceramics, which maintained the microstructural features of the biological preform. Depending on the type of the biological template as well as the processing parameters, biomorphic ZrO 2 ceramics with an unidirected pore morphology and a large variety of microstructures can be obtained

  18. Gamma radiation in ceramic capacitors: a study for space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Ferreira, Eduardo; Sarango Souza, Juliana

    2017-10-01

    We studied the real time effects of the gamma radiation in ceramic capacitors, in order to evaluate the effects of cosmic radiation on these devices. Space missions have electronic circuits with various types of devices, many studies have been done on semiconductor devices exposed to gamma radiation, but almost no studies for passive components, in particular ceramic capacitors. Commercially sold ceramic capacitors were exposed to gamma radiation, and the capacitance was measured before and after exposure. The results clearly show that the capacitance decreases with exposure to gamma radiation. We confirmed this observation in a real time capacitance measurement, obtained using a data logging system developed by us using the open source Arduino platform.

  19. Characterization of clays used in the red ceramics industry at Itabaianinha-SE (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, T.F.; Andrade, C.E.C. de; Santos, C.R. dos; Barreto, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    The Local Cluster of red ceramic industry in the state of Sergipe comprises Itabaianinha-SE, Itabaiana and Baixo Sao Francisco municipalities (Propria and Santana do Sao Francisco). The city of Itabaianinha concentrates a large number of ceramics and potteries producing ceramic bricks and tiles. The study was conducted in a red ceramic industry of the region. The focus of this work was an incremental innovation in the process and product. It was analyzed three types of clays used for manufacturing of ceramic bricks (barro preto, diamante and jardim). The samples were prepared by pressing and heat treated between 600 ° C - 1100 C °. The samples characterization was by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and physical tests (water absorption, linear retraction and three points flection). The clays are composed mainly of kaolinite, illite-muscovite and quartz. The results showed that the Barro Preto clay showed better results in retraction, absorption and mechanical strain. (author)

  20. Quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials utilizing the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Lima, J.C. de; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Maliska, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic materials have properties defined by their chemical and micro-structural composition. The quantification of the crystalline phases is a fundamental stage in the determination of the structure, properties and applications of a ceramic material. Within this context, this study aims is the quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials developed with addition of mineral coal bottom ash, utilizing the X ray diffraction technique, through the method proposed by Rietveld. For the formulation of the ceramic mixtures a {3,3} simplex-lattice design was used, giving ten formulations of three components (two different types of clays and coal bottom ash). The crystalline phases identified in the ceramic materials after sintering at 1150 deg C during two hours are: quartz, tridimite, mullite and hematite. The proposed methodology utilizing the Rietveld method for the quantification relating to crystalline phases of the materials was shown to be adequate and efficient. (author)

  1. Alumina-zirconium ceramics synthesis by selective laser sintering/melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkovsky, I.; Yadroitsev, I.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, porous refractory ceramics synthesized by selective laser sintering/melting from a mixture of zirconium dioxide, aluminum and/or alumina powders are subjected to optical metallography and X-ray analysis to study their microstructure and phase composition depending on the laser processing parameters. It is shown that high-speed laser sintering in air yields ceramics with dense structure and a uniform distribution of the stabilizing phases. The obtained ceramic-matrix composites may be used as thermal and electrical insulators and wear resistant coating in solid oxide fuel cells, crucibles, heating elements, medical tools. The possibility to reinforce refractory ceramics by laser synthesis is shown on the example of tetragonal dioxide of zirconium with hardened micro-inclusion of Al 2 O 3 . By applying finely dispersed Y 2 O 3 powder inclusions, the type of the ceramic structure is significantly changed

  2. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  3. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  4. Fabrication, characterization and radiation damage stability of hollandite based ceramics devoted to radioactive immobilisation; Synthese, caracterisation et etude du comportement sous irradiation electronique de matrices de type hollandite destinees au confinement du cesium radioactif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin-Chevaldonnet, V. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DETCD/SCDV), Dept. d' Etudes du Traitement et du Conditionnement des Dechets, Service de Conditionnement des Dechets et Vitrification, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2004-11-01

    Research on treating specifically the long-lived and high level nuclear wastes, notably cesium, is currently carried out in France. Cesium immobilization in host matrices of high chemical durability constitutes the favoured option. Hollandite matrix is a good candidate because of its high cesium incorporation ability and its excellent chemical stability. During this study, different compositions of hollandite ceramics Ba{sub x}Cs{sub y}C{sub z}Ti{sub 8-z}O{sub 16} (C = Al{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Sc{sup 3+}), synthesized by oxide route, were characterized in terms of structure, microstructure and physical and chemical properties. Iron ions seems to be the most suitable of the studied C cations to get high-performance hollandites. The stability of these ceramics under external electron irradiation, simulating the {beta} particles emitted by radioactive cesium, were also estimated, at the macroscopic and atomic scale. The point defects creation and their thermal stability were followed by electron paramagnetic resonance. (author)

  5. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  6. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  7. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1992. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Portable regenerative double-shaft ceramic gas turbine for portable power generation); 1992 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kahanshiki hatsuden'yo saiseishiki ceramic gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-05-01

    Research and development has been advanced on a ceramic gas turbine (CGT) with an output of 300-kW class and thermal efficiency of 42% or higher. Activities were performed in the following three fields: 1) research of heat resistant ceramic members, 2) research of elementary technologies, and 3) studies on design, prototype fabrication, and operation. In Item 1, research was performed on forming the heat resistant ceramic members, and all-ceramic members constituting the basic type gas turbine were fabricated. Improvements were given on the problems discovered in the heat shock test, and the hot spin test. In Item 2, elementary researches were made on the basic technologies for the ceramic gas turbine, such as on the heat exchanger, combustor, and ceramic turbine, wherein discussions were given on improvement of mechanical strength and performance. In Item 3, design and prototype fabrication were performed on the basic type ceramic gas turbine, based on the results of research operations on the basic type (metallic gas turbine). Adjustment operations were launched on some of the components. (NEDO)

  9. Electromechanical characteristics of piezoelectric ceramic transformers in radial vibration composed of concentric piezoelectric ceramic disk and ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Hu, Jing; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    A new type of piezoelectric ceramic transformer in radial vibration is presented. The piezoelectric transformer consists of a pairing of a concentric piezoelectric ceramic circular disk and ring. The inner piezoelectric ceramic disk is axially polarized and the outer piezoelectric ring is radially polarized. Based on the plane stress theory, the exact analytical theory for the piezoelectric transformer is developed and its electromechanical equivalent circuit is introduced. The resonance/anti-resonance frequency equations of the transformer are obtained and the relationship between the resonance/anti-resonance frequency, the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient and the geometrical dimensions of the piezoelectric transformer is analyzed. The dependency of the voltage transformation ratio on the frequency is obtained. To verify the analytical theory, a numerical method is used to simulate the electromechanical characteristics of the piezoelectric transformer. It is shown that the analytical resonance/anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerical results. (paper)

  10. Development and characterization of basalt-glass ceramics for the immobilization of transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.; Chick, L.A.; Thomas, L.E.

    1982-09-01

    Basalt-based waste forms were developed for the immobilization of transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes. The specific waste studied is a 3:1 blend of process sludge and incinerator ash. Various amounts of TRU blended waste were melted with Pomona basalt powder. The vitreous products were subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to form glass ceramics. The total crystallinity of the glass ceramic, ranging from 20 to 45 wt %, was moderately dependent on composition and heat treatment conditions. Three parent glasses and four glass ceramics with varied composition and heat treatment were produced for detailed phase characterization and leaching. Both parent glasses and glass ceramics were mainly composed of a continuous, glassy matrix phase. This glass matrix entered into solution during leaching in both types of materials. The Fe-Ti rich dispersed glass phase was not significantly degraded by leaching. The glass ceramics, however, exhibited four to ten times less elemental releases during leaching than the parent glasses. The glass ceramic matrix probably contains higher Fe and Na and lower Ca and Mg relative to the parent glass matrix. The crystallization of augite in the glass ceramics is believed to contribute to the improved leach rates. Leach rates of the basalt glass ceramic are compared to those of other TRU nuclear waste forms containing 239 Pu

  11. Ceramics for Molten Materials Containment, Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a project on Molten Materials Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface, molten materials containment samples of various ceramics were tested to determine their performance in contact with a melt of lunar regolith simulant. The test temperature was 1600 C with contact times ranging from 0 to 12 hours. Regolith simulant was pressed into cylinders with the approximate dimensions of 1.25 dia x 1.25cm height and then melted on ceramic substrates. The regolith-ceramic interface was examined after processing to determine the melt/ceramic interaction. It was found that the molten regolith wetted all oxide ceramics tested extremely well which resulted in chemical reaction between the materials in each case. Alumina substrates were identified which withstood contact at the operating temperature of a molten regolith electrolysis cell (1600 C) for eight hours with little interaction or deformation. This represents an improvement over alumina grades currently in use and will provide a lifetime adequate for electrolysis experiments lasting 24 hours or more. Two types of non-oxide ceramics were also tested. It was found that they interacted to a limited degree with the melt resulting in little corrosion. These ceramics, Sic and BN, were not wetted as well as the oxides by the melt, and so remain possible materials for molten regolith handling. Tests wing longer holding periods and larger volumes of regolith are necessary to determine the ultimate performance of the tested ceramics.

  12. Effect of CASP glass doping on sintering and dielectric properties of SBN ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guohua; Qi Bing

    2009-01-01

    16CaO-29Al 2 O 3 -34SiO 2 -13PbO-4B 2 O 3 -2ZnO-2P 2 O 5 (CASP) glass doped-Sr 0.5 Ba 0.5 Nb 2 O 6 (SBN50) ceramics have been synthesized by solid-state ceramic route. The effects of CASP glass on the firing, microstructure and dielectric characterization of SBN50 ceramics are investigated. The densities of the ceramic samples firstly increase and then slightly decrease with increasing CASP glass content. The appropriate amount of doping glass is 2%. The SBN50 ceramics doped with CASP glass can be sintered at a relatively low temperature, 1200 deg. C. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the single phase (tetragonal tungsten bronze type structure) is preserved for all the samples. The diffuse character of the ceramic system increases and the dielectric constant at phase transition temperature (T c ) markedly decreases as CASP glass content increases. Interestingly, the CASP glass addition drastically alters the microstructure of the sintered ceramics. The isotropic grains in the pure SBN50 ceramics transform to rod like grains after the addition of CASP glass. The grain size of SBN phase is found to obviously increase with increase in CASP glass doping level

  13. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  14. Addition of an expansive clay facies of Corumbatai formation from Porto Ferreira city to ceramic mass used in ceramic pole Santa Gertrudes for dry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Paulo Eduardo de Campos e; Christofoletti, Sergio Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the search for diversification of ceramic products by the dry-process, in this work was added in the composition of a ceramic mass of Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Pole-PCSG, an expansive clay of Corumbatai Formation found in Porto Ferreira city. The ceramics characterization was carried out in Porto Ferreira Ceramic Industry following the standards (ABNT, 1997). The samples were first pressed resulting in specimens of dimension 10x3 cm which were burned in a laboratory furnace at a temperature of 1160 ° C. The tests were conducted of the flexion strength (raw, dry and burning), water absorption, bulk density, firing shrinkage in individual samples and the composition of 30% of sample Porto Ferreira (APF) plus 70% sample of Santa Gertrudes (ASG). The results showed that the ceramic samples showed good results from individual MRF and AA: 633.76 Kgf/cm 2 and 0.37% for a sample of Santa Gertrudes (ASG) and 437.32 and 3.06% for the sample of Porto Ferreira (APF). The result of the composition showed an increase in values or MRF= 722.20 Kgf/cm 2 and increased values of AA to 0.75%. The expansive clay type 'montmorillonite' clays found in the sample Porto Ferreira (APF) have contributed in improving the packaging and therefore the improvement of the ceramic properties. (author)

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of MAX Ceramics (MAXCERs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Johnny Carl

    This research has focused on the design and development of novel multifunctional MAX reinforced ceramics (MAXCERs). These MAXCERs were manufactured with 1-50 vol% ratios of ceramics to MAX phases. Chapter II reports on the synthesis and tribological behavior of Ti3SiC2 matrix composites by incorporating (1 and 6 vol%) Al2O3, (1 and 5 vol%) BN, and (1 and 5 vol%) B4C ceramic particulate additives in the matrix. All the composites were fabricated by pressureless sintering by using 1 wt% Ni as a sintering agent at 1550 °C for 2 hours. SEM and XRD studies showed that Al2O3 is relatively inert in the Ti3SiC 2 matrix whereas BN and B4C reacted significantly with the Ti3 SiC2 matrix to form TiB2. Detailed tribological studies showed that Ti3SiC2-1wt%Ni (baseline) samples showed dual type tribological behavior where the friction coefficient (micro) was low ( 0.2) during stage 1, thereafter micro increased sharply and transitioned into stage 2 ( 0.8). The addition of Al2O3 as an additive had little effect on the tribological behavior, but the addition of B4C and BN was able to enhance the tribological behavior by increasing the transition distance (TD). Chapter III reports on the synthesis and tribological behavior of TiB2 matrix composites by incorporating (10, 30, and 50 vol%) Ti3SiC2 ceramic particulate additives in the matrix. The fabrication parameters were similar to the Ti3SiC2 samples from Chapter II. There was minimal reaction between the TiB2 and the Ti3SiC2. Detailed tribological studies showed that TiB2 (baseline) and TiB2-10%Ti 3SiC2 samples showed an average micro of 0.29 and 0.28, respectively. TiB2-30%Ti3SiC2 and TiB 2-50%Ti3SiC2 showed dual-type tribological behavior where micro was low ( 0.25) during stage 1, thereafter micro increased gradually and transitioned into stage 2 ( 0.6). Low wear rates were seen for all samples.

  16. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  17. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  18. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  19. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  20. Product design management and organizational learning capability in several company types of the ceramic sector; Gestion del diseno de producto y capacidad de aprendizaje organizativo en varios tipos de empresas del sector ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiva, R.; Lapiedra, R.; Devece, C.; Gil, I.

    2012-11-01

    This study analyses the product design management in several companies of the Spanish ceramic sector and its relationship with organizational learning. We carried out a case study of four companies in order to assess the organizational learning factors involved in the two phases of the product design process: the analytical-conceptual and the technical-creative phases. The case study shows a positive relationship between the organizational learning factors analysed and the product design process. Specifically, the factors related to market, technology and organization knowledge acquisition are linked to the analytical-conceptual phase. The organizational learning factors related to knowledge dissemination and use are linked to the technical-creative phase or the global management of the design process. (Author) 42 refs.

  1. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  2. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  3. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h -1 ), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Concentration of Immunoglobulins in Microfiltration Permeates of Skim Milk: Impact of Transmembrane Pressure and Temperature on the IgG Transmission Using Different Ceramic Membrane Types and Pore Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Heidebrecht

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of bioactive bovine milk immunoglobulins (Ig has been found to be an alternative treatment for certain human gastrointestinal diseases. Some methodologies have been developed with bovine colostrum. These are considered in laboratory scale and are bound to high cost and limited availability of the raw material. The main challenge remains in obtaining high amounts of active IgG from an available source as mature cow milk by the means of industrial processes. Microfiltration (MF was chosen as a process variant, which enables a gentle and effective concentration of the Ig fractions (ca. 0.06% in raw milk while reducing casein and lactose at the same time. Different microfiltration membranes (ceramic standard and gradient, pore sizes (0.14–0.8 µm, transmembrane pressures (0.5–2.5 bar, and temperatures (10, 50 °C were investigated. The transmission of immunoglobulin G (IgG and casein during the filtration of raw skim milk (<0.1% fat was evaluated during batch filtration using a single channel pilot plant. The transmission levels of IgG (~160 kDa were measured to be at the same level as the reference major whey protein β-Lg (~18 kDa at all evaluated pore sizes and process parameters despite the large difference in molecular mass of both fractions. Ceramic gradient membranes with a pore sizes of 0.14 µm showed IgG-transmission rates between 45% to 65% while reducing the casein fraction below 1% in the permeates. Contrary to the expectations, a lower pore size of 0.14 µm yielded fluxes up to 35% higher than 0.2 µm MF membranes. It was found that low transmembrane pressures benefit the Ig transmission. Upscaling the presented results to a continuous MF membrane process offers new possibilities for the production of immunoglobulin enriched supplements with well-known processing equipment for large scale milk protein fractionation.

  5. Concentration of Immunoglobulins in Microfiltration Permeates of Skim Milk: Impact of Transmembrane Pressure and Temperature on the IgG Transmission Using Different Ceramic Membrane Types and Pore Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidebrecht, Hans-Jürgen; Toro-Sierra, José; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2018-06-28

    The use of bioactive bovine milk immunoglobulins (Ig) has been found to be an alternative treatment for certain human gastrointestinal diseases. Some methodologies have been developed with bovine colostrum. These are considered in laboratory scale and are bound to high cost and limited availability of the raw material. The main challenge remains in obtaining high amounts of active IgG from an available source as mature cow milk by the means of industrial processes. Microfiltration (MF) was chosen as a process variant, which enables a gentle and effective concentration of the Ig fractions (ca. 0.06% in raw milk) while reducing casein and lactose at the same time. Different microfiltration membranes (ceramic standard and gradient), pore sizes (0.14⁻0.8 µm), transmembrane pressures (0.5⁻2.5 bar), and temperatures (10, 50 °C) were investigated. The transmission of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and casein during the filtration of raw skim milk (fat) was evaluated during batch filtration using a single channel pilot plant. The transmission levels of IgG (~160 kDa) were measured to be at the same level as the reference major whey protein β-Lg (~18 kDa) at all evaluated pore sizes and process parameters despite the large difference in molecular mass of both fractions. Ceramic gradient membranes with a pore sizes of 0.14 µm showed IgG-transmission rates between 45% to 65% while reducing the casein fraction below 1% in the permeates. Contrary to the expectations, a lower pore size of 0.14 µm yielded fluxes up to 35% higher than 0.2 µm MF membranes. It was found that low transmembrane pressures benefit the Ig transmission. Upscaling the presented results to a continuous MF membrane process offers new possibilities for the production of immunoglobulin enriched supplements with well-known processing equipment for large scale milk protein fractionation.

  6. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  7. Ion implantation and fracture toughness of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics generally lack toughness which is largely determined by the ceramic surface where stresses likely to cause failure are usually highest. Ion implantation has the capacity to improve the surface fracture toughness of ceramics. Significantly reduced ion size and reactivity restrictions exist compared with traditional methods of surface toughening. We are studying the effect of ion implantation on ceramic fracture toughness using indentation testing as the principal tool of analysis

  8. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  9. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  10. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.F.; MacEwen, S.R.; Sawicka, B.D.; Hayward, P.J.; Sridhar, S.

    1986-12-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  11. Modified PZT ceramics as a material that can be used in micromechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasz, Radosław; Bochenek, Dariusz

    2015-11-01

    Results on investigations of the PZT type ceramics with the following chemical composition: Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.50 Ti0.50)0.99 Cr0.01O3 (PSZTC) which belongs to a group of multicomponent ceramic materials obtained on basis of the PZT type solid solution, are presented in this work. Ceramics PSZTC was obtained by a free sintering method under the following conditions: Tsint = 1250 °C and tsint = 2 h. Ceramic compacts of specimens for the sintering process were made from the ceramic mass consisting of a mixture of the synthesized PSZTC powder and 3% polyvinyl alcohol while wet. The PSZTC ceramic specimens were subjected to poling by two methods: low temperature and high temperature. On the basis of the examinations made it has been found that the ceramics obtained belongs to ferroelectric-hard materials and that is why it may be used to build resonators, filters and ultrasonic transducers. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Materials for Dielectric Applications" edited by Maciej Jaroszewski and Sabu Thomas.

  12. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  13. Present status and future trends for ceramic parts and engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.

    1987-01-01

    The author feels that there have been subtle changes in the direction of ceramic engine research in years. Before then, the emphasis was to develop countermeasures to overcome the disappointing performance of adiabatic engines which were made using partially stabilized zirconia. Current interest focuses on finding appropriate applications, namely those which make effective use of ceramic properties, and developing new materials suitable for adiabatic engines. Partially stabilized zirconia in the adiabatic diesel loses its strength around 800 degrees C. On the other hand, silicon nitride has demonstrated the ability to withstand thermal shock because of its high rupture strength. Other new materials are alumina zirconia and alumina titanium (Al 2 TiO 3 ). The latter has both good thermal and rupture strength properties, making it suitable for adiabatic engines. Also important are new or improved metal-ceramic joining technologies needed for camshafts, pistons, rocker arms and supercharger rotor blades. Another reason for the failure of the previous ceramic adiabatic engine was the inherent inability of the engine design to make use of the excess heat generated in the combustion chamber. In order to overcome this difficulty, a new type of adiabatic turbo-compound engine has been considered. A turbocharger-type energy recovery system is installed at the engine exhaust, and its power output is fed back to the crankshaft through an elaborate generator/motor system in lieu of the traditional gear train system. The generator speed is regulated to achieve the maximum exhaust gas turbine efficiency

  14. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, Fran?ois; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantages CoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion. However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with...

  15. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  16. Ceramic component with reinforced protection against radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, J.; Laville, H.; Le Gal, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic components hardened against radiations are claimed (for example capacitors or ceramic substrates for semiconductors). They are prepared with a sintered ceramic containing a high proportion of heavy atoms (for instance barium titanate and a bismuth salt) provided with a glass layer containing a high proportion of light atoms. The two materials are joined by vitrification producing a diffusion zone at the interface [fr

  17. Study of brazilian market of advanvced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, M.M.; Soares, P.S.M.; SIlva, A.P. da; Alvarinho, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    The brazilian actual market survey of advanced ceramics, divided in sectors according to their function is described. The electroelectronics, magnetics, optics, mechanics and nuclears ceramics are presented. A forecasting of the brazilian market in advanced ceramics are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric composites (PZT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassora, L.A.; Eiras, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric transducers, with 1-3 of connectivity were prepared with different concentration of ceramic material. Piezoelectric composites, with equal electromechanical coupling factor and acoustic impedance of one third from that ceramic transducer, were obtained when the fractionary volume of PZT reach 30%. (C.G.C.)

  19. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  20. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 2: Outsourcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Maurizio; Vichi, Alessandro; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To test different Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks, comparing mean flexural strength (sigma), Weibull modulus (m), and Weibull characteristic strength (sigma0) in an ISO standardized set-up. Following the recent ISO Standard (ISO 6872:2008), 11 types of ceramic blocks were tested: IPS e.max CAD MO, IPS e.max CAD LT and IPS e.max CAD HT (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic); In-Ceram SPINELL, In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Zirconia (glass-infiltrated materials); inCoris AL and In-Ceram AL (densely sintered alumina); In-Ceram YZ, IPS e.max Zir-CAD and inCoris ZI (densely sintered zirconia). Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, crystallized/infiltrated/sintered, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus were obtained. A statistically significant difference was found (P ceramic (sigma = 272.6 +/- 376.8 MPa, m = 6.2 +/- 11.3, sigma0 = 294.0 +/- 394.1 MPa) and densely sintered alumina (sigma = 441.8 +/- 541.6 MPa, m = 11.9 +/- 19.0, sigma0 = 454.2 +/- 565.2 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.254) in glass infiltrated materials (sigma = 376.9 +/- 405.5 MPa, m = 7.5 +/- 11.5, sigma0 = 393.7 +/- 427.0 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.160) in densely sintered zirconia (sigma = 1,060.8 +/- 1,227.8 MPa, m = 5.8 +/- 7.4, sigma0 = 1,002.4 +/- 1,171.0 MPa). Not all the materials tested fulfilled the requirements for the clinical indications recommended by the manufacturer.

  1. Effect of different surface treatments on bond strength, surface and microscopic structure of zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab R. El-Shrkawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: (1 Surface treatments of Y-TZP ceramic together with MDP primer and silane-coupling agent application improve the bond strength to resin cement. (2 Plasma-Silica coating and plasma-oxygen treatment, both are valuable methods that improve the bond strength of resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic. (3 Silica coating by plasma technology provides durable bond strength and can be a promising alternative pretreatment before silane application to enhance bonding with zirconia ceramic. (4 Tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation had occurred in Y-TZP samples received both types of plasma treatment.

  2. Extended defects in insulating MgAl2O4 ceramic materials studied by PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klym, H; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, O; Filipecki, J; Hadzaman, I

    2010-01-01

    Extended positron-trapping defects in technological modified insulating nanoporous MgAl 2 O 4 ceramics are characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results are achieved using three-component fitting procedure with arbitrary lifetimes applied to treatment of measured spectra. Within this approach, the first component in the lifetime spectra reflects microstructure specificity of the spinel structure, the second component responsible to extended defects near intergranual boundaries and the third component correspond to ortho-positronium 'pick-off' decaying in nanopores of ceramics. It is shown that in ceramics of different technological modifications the same type of positron traps prevails.

  3. High temperature ceramic-tubed reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph J.; Rosenberg, Robert A.; McDonough, Lane J.

    1990-03-01

    The overall objective of the HiPHES project is to develop an advanced high-pressure heat exchanger for a convective steam/methane reformer. The HiPHES steam/methane reformer is a convective, shell and tube type, catalytic reactor. The use of ceramic tubes will allow reaction temperature higher than the current state-of-the-art outlet temperatures of about 1600 F using metal tubes. Higher reaction temperatures increase feedstock conversion to synthesis gas and reduce energy requirements compared to currently available radiant-box type reformers using metal tubes. Reforming of natural gas is the principal method used to produce synthesis gas (primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, H2 and CO) which is used to produce hydrogen (for refinery upgrading), methanol, as well as several other important materials. The HiPHES reformer development is an extension of Stone and Webster's efforts to develop a metal-tubed convective reformer integrated with a gas turbine cycle.

  4. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs

  5. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  6. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  7. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  8. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri Galbiati

    2009-01-01

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  9. Uranium determination in dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, I.; Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Moreno, A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many reports of high uranium concentration in dental ceramics, so they require to be controlled. The SSNTD is an optional method to determine the uranium concentration. In this work the analysis of several commercial dental ceramics used regularly in Mexico by dentists is presented. The chemical and electrochemical processes are used and the optimal conditions for high sensitivity are determined. CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) was used as detector. The preliminary results show some materials with high uranium concentrations. Next step will be the analysis of equivalent dose and the effects in the public health. (author)

  10. FY 1999 project on the development of new industry support type international standards. Standardization of test/evaluation methods of telecommunication use fine ceramics; 1999 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Tsushin kikiyo fine ceramics no shiken hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    As to high frequency/ultra-high frequency band use fine ceramics, the R and D were conducted with the aim of establishing the evaluation method of electric characteristics such as dielectric constants and dielectric losses, and at standardizing and internationally standardizing the principle of the measuring method, preparation method of equipment and test pieces, measuring procedures, etc. The FY 1999 results were summed up. As to the measuring method of electric characteristics, enhancement of measuring accuracy was made for the millimeter wave coaxial exciting cavity resonator method and the Fabry Perot method. Further, field survey was made of the developmental trend of the measuring method in Europe and the U.S. Concerning measuring use standard test pieces, candidate materials were trially manufactured, and the shape/dimension of a part of the candidate materials were determined. As to surface basic properties, effects of surface shape and convex/concave faces of test pieces on characteristic evaluation were studied, and it was made clear that convex/concave faces were greatly influential. In the technical committee, how to proceed with the development was discussed in the first meeting, and evaluation methods and candidate standard substances were selected in the second meeting. (NEDO)

  11. The effect of abrading and cutting instruments on machinability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Satoshi; Nakao, Noriko; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2018-03-16

    The aim was to investigate the effect of machining instruments on machinability of dental ceramics. Four dental ceramics, including two zirconia ceramics were machined by three types (SiC, diamond vitrified, and diamond sintered) of wheels with a hand-piece engine and two types (diamond and carbide) of burs with a high-speed air turbine. The machining conditions used were abrading speeds of 10,000 and 15,000 r.p.m. with abrading force of 100 gf for the hand-piece engine, and a pressure of 200 kPa and a cutting force of 80 gf for the air-turbine hand-piece. The machinability efficiency was evaluated by volume losses after machining the ceramics. A high-abrading speed had high-abrading efficiency (high-volume loss) compared to low-abrading speed in all abrading instruments used. The diamond vitrified wheels demonstrated higher volume loss for two zirconia ceramics than those of SiC and diamond sintered wheels. When the high-speed air-turbine instruments were used, the diamond points showed higher volume losses compared to the carbide burs for one ceramic and two zirconia ceramics with high-mechanical properties. The results of this study indicated that the machinability of dental ceramics depends on the mechanical and physical properties of dental ceramics and machining instruments. The abrading wheels show autogenous action of abrasive grains, in which ground abrasive grains drop out from the binder during abrasion, then the binder follow to wear out, subsequently new abrasive grains come out onto the instrument surface (autogenous action) and increase the grinding amount (volume loss) of grinding materials.

  12. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  13. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  14. Enhancing mechanical properties of ceramic papers loaded with zeolites using borate compounds as binders

    OpenAIRE

    Juan P. Cecchini; Ramiro M. Serra; María A. Ulla; Miguel A. Zanuttini; Viviana G. Milt

    2013-01-01

    NaY zeolite-containing ceramic papers were prepared by a papermaking technique with a dual polyelectrolyte retention system that implied the use of cationic and anionic polymers. To improve their mechanical properties, we found that some borate compounds could be successfully used as ceramic binders. Three types of sodium and/or calcium borates were tested as binders: colemanite, nobleite, and anhydrous ulexite. The improvement in the mechanical properties depends both on the borate used and ...

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS OF IOT AND BIG DATA ANALYTICS TO EXTEND CERAMIC MANUFACTURING

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Faisal*, Dr. Vinodini Katiyar

    2016-01-01

    In this article transformation of ceramic manufacturing factory into a smart ceramic manufacturing has been discussed. Based the unknown industrial visit and observation finding has been mapped with the proven generic smart manufacturing framework where the focus is to identify the types of sensors which need to be connected with the components of the machine real time monitoring and get the insights by utilizing these data through the big data analytics. To transform a old heavy industry In ...

  16. Comparison of mechanical properties of three machinable ceramics with an experimental fluorophlogopite glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brian T W; Tsoi, James K H; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Pow, Edmond H N

    2015-09-01

    Fluorophlogopite glass ceramic (FGC) is a biocompatible, etchable, and millable ceramic with fluoride releasing property. However, its mechanical properties and reliability compared with other machinable ceramics remain undetermined. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the mechanical properties of 3 commercially available millable ceramic materials, IPS e.max CAD, Vitablocs Mark II, and Vita Enamic, with an experimental FGC. Each type of ceramic block was sectioned into beams (n=15) of standard dimensions of 2×2×15 mm. Before mechanical testing, specimens of the IPS e.max CAD group were further fired for final crystallization. Flexural strength was determined by the 3-point bend test with a universal loading machine at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Hardness was determined with a hardness tester with 5 Vickers hardness indentations (n=5) using a 1.96 N load and a dwell time of 15 seconds. Selected surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Data were analyzed by the 1-way ANOVA test and Weibull analysis (α=.05). Weibull parameters, including the Weibull modulus (m) as well as the characteristic strength at 63.2% (η) and 10.0% (B10), were obtained. A significant difference in flexural strength (PVita Enamic (145.95 ±12.65 MPa)>Vitablocs Mark II (106.67 ±18.50 MPa), and FGC (117.61 ±7.62 MPa). The Weibull modulus ranged from 6.93 to 18.34, with FGC showing the highest Weibull modulus among the 4 materials. The Weibull plot revealed that IPS e.max CAD>Vita Enamic>FGC>Vitablocs Mark II for the characteristic strength at both 63.2% (η) and 10.0% (B10). Significant difference in Vickers hardness among groups (PVitablocs Mark II (594.74 ±25.22 H(V))>Vita Enamic (372.29 ±51.23 H(V))>FGC (153.74 ±23.62 H(V)). The flexural strength and Vickers hardness of IPS e.max CAD were significantly higher than those of the 3 materials tested. The FGC's flexural strength was comparable with Vitablocs Mark II

  17. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  18. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing fractures in total hip arthroplasty: an analysis of data from the National Joint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, D P; Wall, P D H; Fernandez, M A; Parsons, H; Howard, P W

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA) are commonly used, but concerns exist regarding ceramic fracture. This study aims to report the risk of revision for fracture of modern CoC bearings and identify factors that might influence this risk, using data from the National Joint Registry (NJR) for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man. We analysed data on 223 362 bearings from 111 681 primary CoC THAs and 182 linked revisions for bearing fracture recorded in the NJR. We used implant codes to identify ceramic bearing composition and generated Kaplan-Meier estimates for implant survivorship. Logistic regression analyses were performed for implant size and patient specific variables to determine any associated risks for revision. A total of 222 852 bearings (99.8%) were CeramTec Biolox products. Revisions for fracture were linked to seven of 79 442 (0.009%) Biolox Delta heads, 38 of 31 982 (0.119%) Biolox Forte heads, 101 of 80 170 (0.126%) Biolox Delta liners and 35 of 31 258 (0.112%) Biolox Forte liners. Regression analysis of implant size revealed smaller heads had significantly higher odds of fracture (chi-squared 68.0, p ceramic type. Liner thickness was not predictive of fracture (p = 0.67). Body mass index (BMI) was independently associated with revision for both head fractures (odds ratio (OR) 1.09 per unit increase, p = 0.031) and liner fractures (OR 1.06 per unit increase, p = 0.006). We report the largest independent study of CoC bearing fractures to date. The risk of revision for CoC bearing fracture is very low but previous studies have underestimated this risk. There is good evidence that the latest generation of ceramic has greatly reduced the odds of head fracture but not of liner fracture. Small head size and high patient BMI are associated with an increased risk of ceramic bearing fracture. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1012-19. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Ceramic industries of Poompuhar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.

    stream_size 5 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name 4_Indian_Conf_Mar_Archaeol_Proc_1997_127.pdf.txt stream_source_info 4_Indian_Conf_Mar_Archaeol_Proc_1997_127.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  20. Ceramic industries of Dwarka

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.

    stream_size 4 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Mar_Archaeol_1_110.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Mar_Archaeol_1_110.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  2. Ceramic process and plant design for high-level nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; De Wames, R.E.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the last 3 years, significant advances in ceramic technology for high-level nuclear waste solidification have been made. Product quality in terms of leach-resistance, compositional uniformity, structural integrity, and thermal stability promises to be superior to borosilicate glass. This paper addresses the process effectiveness and preliminary designs for glass and ceramic immobilization plants. The reference two-step ceramic process utilizes fluid-bed calcination (FBC) and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidation. Full-scale demonstration of these well-developed processing steps has been established at DOE and/or commercial facilities for processing radioactive materials. Based on Savannah River-type waste, our model predicts that the capital and operating cost for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste is about the same for the ceramic and glass options. However, when repository costs are included, the ceramic option potentially offers significantly better economics due to its high waste loading and volume reduction. Volume reduction impacts several figures of merit in addition to cost such as system logistics, storage, transportation, and risk. The study concludes that the ceramic product/process has many potential advantages, and rapid deployment of the technology could be realized due to full-scale demonstrations of FBC and HIP technology in radioactive environments. Based on our finding and those of others, the ceramic innovation not only offers a viable backup to the glass reference process but promises to be a viable future option for new high-level nuclear waste management opportunities

  3. Remakes of Colorlogic and IPS Empress ceramic restorations in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekland, Helge; Riise, Trond; Berg, Einar

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article was to study frequencies and distribution of remakes of all-ceramic inlays/onlays, veneers, and crowns occurring before and after cementation. A total of 2,069 sintered feldspathic ceramic restorations (Colorlogic) and 1,136 pressure-molded ceramic restorations (IPS Empress 1 and 2) were produced during the study period by one dental laboratory. The laboratory gave an unqualified and unlimited guarantee for their ceramic restorations. The outcome variable was reports from the clinicians to the dental laboratory about any problems related to the restoration, necessitating remake. Problems occurring before cementation occurred in 4.4% of the restorations. Veneers were remade more frequently than the other types of restorations (6.6%). After cementation, the overall 2-year rate of remakes was 1%, indicating a survival rate of the ceramic restorations of 99%, with inlays/onlays exhibiting the highest (99.8%) and crowns the lowest (98.4%) rates. This difference in rates was significant. No significant differences in remakes between ceramics or tooth categories were found. There were few problems in a short- to medium-term perspective that, in the opinion of general practitioners, necessitated remakes of all-ceramic restorations.

  4. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  5. Microstructural Design for Tough Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    or Rockwell cones) where the contact pressure (i.e. the ’hardness’) is effectively independent of load (Sperisen, Carry and Mocellin 1986, Makino...148. RrrcHM, R. 0., 1988, Mater. Sci. Engng, A, 103, 15. SPERmEN, T., CARRY, C., and MOCELLIN , A, 1986, Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics, Vol. 8, edited

  6. Electrical Degradation in Ceramic Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-09

    and D. M. Smyth, " Positron Annihilation in Calcium-Doped Barium Titanate", in Electro- Ceramics and Solid State Ionsi, H. L. Tuller and D. M. Smyth...2 with the formation of ompensating oxygen vacancies, and this causes an increase in the ioni conductivity: 2CaO CaC + Call + 20 + (5) TiO2 --- V

  7. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  8. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  9. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  10. GEORGIAN PRODUCTION PREFABRICATED CERAMIC FIREPLACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaprindashvili, G.; Chemia, M.; Kartozia, L.

    2006-01-01

    General description and basic working principles of new construction prefabricated ceramic fireplace are given. The presented fireplace represents a unique synthesis of various fireplaces distributed in Georgian and some European countries; however, it is distinguished for its higher efficiency and other advantages. (author)

  11. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  12. Compositionally Graded Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Cheol; Zhou, Jie E; Maurya, Deepam; Yan, Yongke; Wang, Yu U; Priya, Shashank

    2017-09-27

    Multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC) are widely used in consumer electronics. Here, we provide a transformative method for achieving high dielectric response and tunability over a wide temperature range through design of compositionally graded multilayer (CGML) architecture. Compositionally graded MLCCs were found to exhibit enhanced dielectric tunability (70%) along with small dielectric losses (filters and power converters.

  13. Soft lithography of ceramic patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göbel, Ole; Nedelcu, M.; Steiner, U.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-based precursor solutions are patterned using a soft-lithographic patterning technique to yield sub-micrometer-sized ceramic patterns. By using a polymer-metal-nitrate solution as a lithographic resist, we demonstrate a micromolding procedure using a simple rubber stamp that yields a

  14. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These ceramics are developed by chemical synthesis, in other words, they ... Science in 1980 and was a post doctoral ... complex crystal structures that have anisotropic characteristics. (Box 1) .... is a rare-earth or transition metal ion) and hexagonal ferrites. .... dielectric loss factor and dielectric strength normally determine.

  15. Photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, D. J.; Linz, A.; Jenssen, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The ceramic structure was simulated in a form that is more tractable to correlation between experiment and theory. Single crystals (of barium titanate) were fabricated in a simple corrugated structure in which the pedestals of the corrugation simulated the grain while the intervening cuts could be filled with materials simulating the grain boundaries. The observed photovoltages were extremely small (100 mv).

  16. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  17. TECHNOLOGY OF PRODUCTION OF CERAMIC TILES BASED ON DOLERITE AND FUSIBLE CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleshko Marianna Viktorovna

    2018-02-01

    . Results: a composition of a moderately red-hot mass was developed for the production of ceramic tiles for the internal lining of walls using the technology of rapid single firing; compositions of engobe and glaze coatings were developed with improved physical, mechanical and aesthetic properties due to the use of new, non-traditional types of raw materials; an energy-efficient technological scheme for the production of ceramic facing tiles of the developed compositions was proposed, which makes it possible to increase the competitiveness of the finished product. Conclusions: the developed compositions of charge materials and their preparation can be used in the production of ceramic tiles for internal wall lining using the technology of rapid single firing at already existing plants and newly constructed ones.

  18. Compatibility of stainless steels and lithiated ceramics with beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    The introduction of beryllium as a neutron multiplier in ceramic blankets of thermonuclear fusion reactors may give rise to the following compatibility problems: (i) oxidation of Be by ceramics (lithium aluminate and silicates) or by water vapour; (ii) interaction between beryllium and austenitic and martensitic steels. The studies were done in contact tests under vacuum and in tests under wet sweeping helium. The contact tests under vacuum have revealed that the interaction of beryllium with ceramics seems to be low up to 700°C, the interaction of beryllium with steels is significant and is characterized by the formation of a diffusion layer and of a brittle Be-Fe-Ni compound. With type 316 L austenitic steel, this interaction appears quite large at 600°C whereas it is noticeable only at 700°C with martensitic steels. The experiments carried out with sweeping wet helium at 600°C have evidenced a slight oxidation of beryllium due to water vapour which can be enhanced in the front of uncompletely dehydrated ceramics.

  19. Ceramic tools insert assesment based on vickers indentation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husni; Rizal, Muhammad; Aziz M, M.; Wahyu, M.

    2018-05-01

    In the interrupted cutting process, the risk of tool chipping or fracture is higher than continues cutting. Therefore, the selection of suitable ceramic tools for interrupted cutting application become an important issue to assure that the cutting process is running effectively. At present, the performance of ceramics tools is assessed by conducting some cutting tests, which is required time and cost consuming. In this study, the performance of ceramic tools evaluated using hardness tester machine. The technique, in general, has a certain advantage compare with the more conventional methods; the experimental is straightforward involving minimal specimen preparation and the amount of material needed is small. Three types of ceramic tools AS10, CC650 and K090 have been used, each tool was polished then Vickers indentation test were performed with the load were 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kgf. The results revealed that among the load used in the tests, the indentation loads of 5 kgf always produce well cracks as compared with others. Among the cutting tool used in the tests, AS10 has produced the shortest crack length and follow by CC 670, and K090. It is indicated that the shortest crack length of AS10 reflected that the tool has a highest dynamic load resistance among others insert.

  20. Corrosion penetration monitoring of advanced ceramics in hot aqueous fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Nickel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramics are considered as components in energy related systems, because they are known to be strong, wear and corrosion resistant in many environments, even at temperatures well exceeding 1000 °C. However, the presence of additives or impurities in important ceramics, for example those based on Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 or Al2O3 makes them vulnerable to the corrosion by hot aqueous fluids. The temperatures in this type of corrosion range from several tens of centigrade to hydrothermal conditions above 100 °C. The corrosion processes in such media depend on both pH and temperature and include often partial leaching of the ceramics, which cannot be monitored easily by classical gravimetric or electrochemical methods. Successful corrosion penetration depth monitoring by polarized reflected light optical microscopy (color changes, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (luminescence changes and SEM (porosity changes will be outlined. The corrosion process and its kinetics are monitored best by microanalysis of cross sections, Raman spectroscopy and eluate chemistry changes in addition to mass changes. Direct cross-calibrations between corrosion penetration and mechanical strength is only possible for severe corrosion. The methods outlined should be applicable to any ceramics corrosion process with partial leaching by fluids, melts or slags.

  1. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  2. Surface degradation of glass ceramics after exposure to acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCAHUANA, Vanessa Zulema S.; ÖZCAN, Mutlu; MESQUITA, Alfredo Mikail Melo; NISHIOKA, Renato Sussumo; KIMPARA, Estevão Tomomitsu; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the surface degradation effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel exposure on the glassy matrix ceramics as a function of time. Material and methods Disc-shaped ceramic specimens (N = 120, 10/per ceramic material) were prepared in stainless steel molds (inner diameter: 5 mm, height: 2 mm) using 6 dental ceramics: 3 indicated for ceramic-fused-to-metal (Vita Omega 900, Carmen and Vita Titankeramik), 2 for all-ceramic (Vitadur Alpha and Finesse® Low Fusing) and 1 for both types of restorations (IPS d.SIGN). The specimens were wet ground finished, ultrasonically cleaned and auto-glazed. All specimens were subjected to calculation of percentage of mass loss, surface roughness analysis and topographical description by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before (0 min) and after exposure to 1.23 % APF gel for 4 min and 60 min representing short- and long-term etching effect, respectively. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey`s test (α=0.05). Results Significant effect of the type of the ceramics (p=0.0000, p=0.0031) and exposure time (p=0.0000) was observed in both surface roughness and percentage of mass loss values, respectively. The interaction factor between both parameters was also significant for both parameters (p=0.0904, p=0.0258). Both 4 min (0.44±0.1 - 0.81±0.2 µm) and 60 min (0.66±0.1 - 1.04±0.3 µm) APF gel exposure created significantly more surface roughness for all groups when compared to the control groups (0.33±0.2 - 0.68±0.2 µm) (p0.05) but at 60 min exposure, IPS d.SIGN showed the highest percentage of mass loss (0.1151±0.11). The mean surface roughness for Vita Titankeramik (0.84±0.2 µm) and Finesse® Low Fusing (0.74.±0.2 µm) was significantly higher than those of the other ceramics (0.59±0.1 µm - 0.49±0.1 µm) and Vita Titankeramik (pcorrosive attack on all of ceramics at varying degrees. Conclusions The ceramics indicated for either metal-ceramic or all-ceramic

  3. Structure and properties of hot-pressed boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval' chenko, M S; Tkachenko, IU G; Koval' chuk, V V; Iurchenko, D Z; Satanin, S V [Institut Problem Materialovedeniia, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1990-07-01

    The microstructure and strength of B4C-TiB2-TiO{sub 2} ceramics samples, hot-compacted from a mixture of two types of B4C-TiO2-C powder, are examined. The two types are obtained by combining boric acid with either sucrose or carbon black. The grain-sizes of the two powders are found to be distinctly different from one another both before and after the grinding procedure and the degree of dispersion is not high. The strength tests show 600 MPa, the Vicker's hardness is 34.5 GPa, and the crack resistance coefficient of ceramics containing 15 percent TiB2 by mass is 5 MPa m exp 1/2. The use of soluble boron carbide powder helps achieve higher levels of strength and crack resistance. 5 refs.

  4. Application of neutron activation analysis in study of ancient ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoxia; Zhao Weijuan; Gao Zhengyao; Xie Jianzhong; Huang Zhongxiang; Jia Xiuqin; Han Song

    2000-01-01

    Trace-elements in ancient ceramics and imitative ancient ceramics were determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The NAA data are then analyzed by fuzzy cluster method and the trend cluster diagram is obtained. The raw material sources of ancient ceramics and imitative ancient ceramics are determined. The path for improving quality of imitative ancient ceramics is found

  5. Evaluation of machinability and flexural strength of a novel dental machinable glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feng; Zheng, Shucan; Luo, Zufeng; Li, Yong; Guo, Ling; Zhao, Yunfeng; Fu, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the machinability and flexural strength of a novel dental machinable glass-ceramic (named PMC), and to compare the machinability property with that of Vita Mark II and human enamel. The raw batch materials were selected and mixed. Four groups of novel glass-ceramics were formed at different nucleation temperatures, and were assigned to Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4. The machinability of the four groups of novel glass-ceramics, Vita Mark II ceramic and freshly extracted human premolars were compared by means of drilling depth measurement. A three-point bending test was used to measure the flexural strength of the novel glass-ceramics. The crystalline phases of the group with the best machinability were identified by X-ray diffraction. In terms of the drilling depth, Group 2 of the novel glass-ceramics proves to have the largest drilling depth. There was no statistical difference among Group 1, Group 4 and the natural teeth. The drilling depth of Vita MK II was statistically less than that of Group 1, Group 4 and the natural teeth. Group 3 had the least drilling depth. In respect of the flexural strength, Group 2 exhibited the maximum flexural strength; Group 1 was statistically weaker than Group 2; there was no statistical difference between Group 3 and Group 4, and they were the weakest materials. XRD of Group 2 ceramic showed that a new type of dental machinable glass-ceramic containing calcium-mica had been developed by the present study and was named PMC. PMC is promising for application as a dental machinable ceramic due to its good machinability and relatively high strength.

  6. Porous hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics promote ectopic osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lingli; Fan Hongsong; Zhang Xingdong [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Maeda, Megumi; Minowa, Takashi, E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.j [Nanotechnology Innovation Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Because calcium phosphate (Ca-P) ceramics have been used as bone substitutes, it is necessary to investigate what effects the ceramics have on osteoblast maturation. We prepared three types of Ca-P ceramics with different Ca-P ratios, i.e. hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics with dense-smooth and porous structures. Comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of mouse osteoblast-like cells cultured on these ceramics revealed that porous Ca-P ceramics considerably affected the gene expression profiles, having a higher potential for osteoblast maturation. In the in vivo study that followed, porous Ca-P ceramics were implanted into rat skeletal muscle. Sixteen weeks after the implantation, more alkaline-phosphatase-positive cells were observed in the pores of hydroxyapatite and BCP, and the expression of the osteocalcin gene (an osteoblast-specific marker) in tissue grown in pores was also higher in hydroxyapatite and BCP than in {beta}-TCP. In the pores of any Ca-P ceramics, 16 weeks after the implantation, we detected the expressions of marker genes of the early differentiation stage of chondrocytes and the complete differentiation stage of adipocytes, which originate from mesenchymal stem cells, as well as osteoblasts. These marker gene expressions were not observed in the muscle tissue surrounding the implanted Ca-P ceramics. These observations indicate that porous hydroxyapatite and BCP had a greater potential for promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts than {beta}-TCP.

  7. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (Pceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  9. [Recostruction of Extensive Acetabular Defects by Bioactive Glass Ceramics in Re-operations of Total Endoprostheses.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K; Sponer, P

    1998-01-01

    The authors made 37 revisions on account of aseptic loosening of total endoprostheses of the hip joint using bioactive glass ceramics BAS-0 of Lasak Co. Prague. For reconstruction of large defects of the acetabulum they used a combination of different types of anti-protrusion metal baskets and granules from this material. In some instances the glass ceramic material was combined with autologous spongiosa. The longest follow-up period is over 4 years. In no instance loosening of the glass ceramic material occurred or its expulsion. All reconstructed sockets of hip joints were burdened by the patients from the third month after surgery. Harris Hip Score before operation was on average 52. During the last checkups of the patients it reached the level of 86. The authors mention complications associated with the procedure. The advantages and disadvantages of the procedure are discussed. Key words: bioactive glass ceramics, reconstruction of acetabular defect, aseptic loosening of endoprosthesis.

  10. Structural response testing of thermal barrier load-bearing ceramic pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Luci, R.K.; Pickering, J.L.; Oland, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    A load bearing insulating structure for use in a HTGR was investigated. The structure was composed of dense ceramic materials in the form of circular pads arranged in a stack. Specifically, the test program was structured to investigate the isolation effectiveness of interface materials placed between the ceramic pads to reduce the effectiveness of mechanically induced loads. The tests were conducted at room temperature using tapered loading platens on single ceramic pads. Seventeen alumina specimens, representing two types of material and two thicknesses, were tested. Three interface material thicknesses were introduced using silica cloth and graphite foil. Pre and post test nondestructive examinations were conducted in an effort to identify potential damage-inducing anomalies in the ceramic pads. A total of 62 tests was conducted with all specimens eventually loaded to failure. (orig./HP)

  11. Application of porous ceramic as soil moisture sensor in controlled environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.M.; Nono, M.C.A.; Mineiro, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the behavior of ZrO 2 -TiO 2 porous ceramic as soil water content sensor element at different climatic conditions is presented. The analysis of the sensor element was carried out correlating the results of electrical properties, through the measurement of capacitance and impedance variation in function of the soil water content, with the microstructure of the ZrO 2 -TiO 2 ceramic. The ceramic sensor was studied in a sandy clay soil type at different climatic conditions characterized by temperature and relative humidity. The microstructural characterization of the ceramic sensor included scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction patterns and pore size distribution using mercury porosimetry. (author)

  12. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  13. Light energy attenuation through orthodontic ceramic brackets at different irradiation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Tiu, Szu Hui; McGuinness, Niall J P; Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the total light energy (TLE) transmission through three types of ceramic brackets with, bracket alone and with the addition of orthodontic adhesive, at different exposure durations, and to compare the microhardness of the cured adhesive. Three different makes of ceramic brackets, Pure Sapphire(M), Clarity™ ADVANCED(P) and Dual Ceramic(P) were used. Eighteen specimens of each make were prepared and allocated to three groups (n = 6). MARC(®)-resin calibrator was used to determine the light curing unit (LCU) tip irradiance (mW/cm(2)) and TLE (J/cm(2)) transmitted through the ceramic brackets, and through ceramic bracket plus Transbond™ XT Light Cure Adhesive, for 5, 10 and 20 s. Vickers-hardness values at the bottom of the cured adhesive were determined. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); P = 0.05. TLE transmission rose significantly among all samples with increasing exposure durations. TLE reaching the adhesive- enamel interface was less than 10 J/cm(2), and through monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets was significantly different (P brackets. Clinicians are advised to measure the tip irradiance of their LCUs and increase curing time beyond 5 s. Orthodontic clinicians should understand the type of light curing device and the orthodontic adhesive used in their practice.

  14. Evaluation of Monolithic Ceramics and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesel Engine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swab, Jeffrey J

    2001-01-01

    The Metals and Ceramics Research Branch (MCRB) of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate is providing ceramic material characterization and evaluation to the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC...

  15. Glass ceramic fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschek, O.; Paulitsch, P.

    1983-01-01

    As the correlation between mineralogical phase and chemical composition influences the type of application at different high temperatures, we studied the mineralogical phases of nine crystal glass fibres of the temperature ranges 1 150 degrees Celsius (Type 1), 1 400 degrees Celsius (Type 2) and 1 500 degrees Celsius (Type 3) at various high temperatures. The methods used in the study were microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential thermal analysis. The investigations showed that mullite forms in glassy fibres of the system Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 from 850 degrees Celsius to 990 degrees Celsius as 2/1 mullite; 3/2 mullite appeared above 990 degrees Celsius besides the crystallization of cristobalite. Fibres with 95 per cent Al 2 O 3 include the phases delta-Al 2 O 3 and alpha- Al 2 O 3 and mullite. Delta- Al 2 O 3 is stable up to 1 100 degrees Celsius. Alpha-Al 2 O 3 and mullite are only stable phases at 1 400 degrees Celsius. These different crystal phases influence the quality of the technical fibre according to the stability field of glass and crystals. This study has determined that it is possible to identify different fibres from different productions by their mineralogical compositions and to relate them to the high temperature application

  16. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  17. Werkstoffwoche 98. Vol. 7. Symposium 9: Ceramics. Symposium 14: Simulation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.; Ziegler, G.; Hermel, W.; Riedel, H.

    1999-01-01

    The leading subject of this proceedings volume is ceramic materials, with papers on the following subject clusters: Processing (infiltration, sintering, forming) - Physics and chemistry of ceramics (functional ceramics, SiC, ceramic precursors, microstructural properties) - Novel concepts (composites, damage induced by oxidation and mechanical stress, performance until damage under mechanical and thermal stress, layers, nanocomposites). 28 of the conference papers have been prepared for individual retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  19. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures

  20. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  1. Interfaces in ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    Internal interfaces in all-ceramic dispersion fuels (such as these for HTGRs) are discussed for two classes: BeO-based dispersions, and coated particles for graphite-based fuels. The following points are made: (1) The strength of a two-phase dispersion is controlled by the weaker dispersed phase bonded to the matrix. (2) Differential expansion between two phases can be controlled by an intermediate buffer zone of low density. (3) A thin ceramic coating should be in compression. (4) Chemical reaction between coating and substrate and mass transfer in service should be minimized. The problems of the nuclear fuel designer are to develop coatings for fission product retention, and to produce radiation-resistant interfaces. 44 references, 18 figures

  2. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  3. Microimpurity composition of superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiglov, Yu.S.; Poltoratskij, Yu.B.; Protsenko, A.N.; Tuchin, O.V.

    1989-01-01

    Using laser mass spectrometry, the microimpurity composition of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y superconducting ceramics, prepared by routine solid-phase synthesis from extremely pure yttrium and copper oxides and BaCO 3 , is determined. The presence of F, Na, Al, P, Cl, S, K, Ca impurities, which concentration in specimens varies within 10 -3 +5x10 -3 at.% and also Si, Sr, Fe of about 1x10 -1 at.% is established. It is difficult to determine concentrations of C, N, H 2 O impurities because of the presence of background signals of residual gases in the chamber. Using the method of Auger electron spectroscopy, a surface layer of HTSC ceramics grain is studied. The availability of chlorine impurity, which amount considerably exceeds its volume concentration, is determined in near the surface layer. 2 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Surface treatment of zirconia ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of chemically micropitting and/or microcratering at least a portion of a smooth surface of an impervious zirconia-base ceramic is described, comprising (a) contacting the smooth surface with a liquid leachant selected from concentrated sulphuric acid, ammonium bisulphate, alkali metal bisulphates and mixtures thereof at a temperature of at least 250 0 C for a period of time sufficient to effect micropitting and/or microcratering generally uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure of the resultant leached surface; (b) removing the leached surface from contact with the leachant; (c) contacting the leached surface with hydrochloric acid to effect removal from the leached surface of a residue thereon comprising sulphate of metal elements including zirconium in the ceramic; (d) removing the leached surface from contact with the hydrochloric acid; and (e) rinsing the leached surface with water to effect removal of acid residue from that surface. (author)

  5. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  6. Acid-base properties of ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter addresses the fundamental aspects of potentiometric titration, electrokinetics, and conductometric titration in evaluating surface and interfacial thermodynamic behavior. Emphasizes the characterization of aqueous systems which are pertinent to the processing of ceramic powders. Attempts to clarify the role of novel analytical techniques that will increasingly contribute to the advanced characterization of ceramic powders. Evaluates recently developed acid-base and complexation concepts and their applications to the processing of oxide ceramics

  7. Structure and conductivity of nanostructured YBCO ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchayev, D. K.; Gadzhimagomedov, S. Kh; Murlieva, Zh Kh; Rabadanov, M. Kh; Emirov, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Superconducting nanostructured ceramics based on YBa2Cu3O7-δ were made of nanopowder obtained by burning nitrate-organic precursors. The structure, morphology, electrical resistivity, and density of ceramics were studied. Various porosity values of the ceramics were achieved by preliminary heat treatment of the nanopowder. The features of conductivity and the reason for increase of the of the superconducting transition temperature in these materials are discussed.

  8. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1990-04-01

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author) [pt

  9. Piezoelectric ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials comprising piezoelectric ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the piezoelectric ceramic particulates are subjected to strain, such as the strain experienced during vibration of the material, they generate an electrical voltage that is converted into Joule heat in the surrounding metal matrix, thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The piezoelectric ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to improve the mec...

  10. High temperature fracture of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiederhorn, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of fracture mechanisms and methods of lifetime prediction in ceramic materials. Techniques of lifetime prediction are based on the science of fracture mechanics. Application of these techniques to structural ceramics is limited by our incomplete understanding of fracture mechanisms in these materials, and by the occurrence of flaw generation in these materials at elevated temperatures. Research on flaw generation and fracture mechanisms is recommended as a way of improving the reliability of structural ceramics

  11. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Forex - one particular alumina ceramic, I our own detailed crack ample, the relatively large values of r, and c* for the VI observations, and those of...particularly toughness indices, 1i71", indicating that there is sonic the c° , T parameters. However, the indentation mcth- kind of trade -o1Tbetwecn...macroscopic and microsnpic odology takes us closer to the strengths of specimens toughness levels, and that this trade -off is cont’olled by with natural

  12. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  13. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  14. Influence of Surface Conditioning Protocols on Reparability of CAD/CAM Zirconia-reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thagafi, Rana; Al-Zordk, Walid; Saker, Samah

    2016-01-01

    To test the effect of surface conditioning protocols on the reparability of CAD/CAM zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic compared to lithium-disilicate glass ceramic. Zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Vita Suprinity) and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic blocks (IPS e.max CAD) were categorized into four groups based on the surface conditioning protocol used. Group C: no treatment (control); group HF: 5% hydrofluoric acid etching for 60 s, silane (Monobond-S) application for 60 s, air drying; group HF-H: 5% HF acid etching for 60 s, application of silane for 60 s, air drying, application of Heliobond, light curing for 20 s; group CO: sandblasting with CoJet sand followed by silanization. Composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) was built up into 4 x 6 x 3 mm blocks using teflon molds. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The microtensile bond strength test was employed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. SEM was employed for evaluation of all the debonded microbars, the failure type was categorized as either adhesive (failure at adhesive layer), cohesive (failure at ceramic or composite resin), or mixed (failure between adhesive layer and substrate). Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD post-hoc test were applied to test for significant differences in bond strength values in relation to different materials and surface pretreatment (p ceramic types used (p ceramics and lithium-disilicate glass ceramic could be improved when ceramic surfaces are sandblasted with CoJet sand followed by silanization.

  15. The Electrospun Ceramic Hollow Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Homaeigohar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hollow nanofibers are largely gaining interest from the scientific community for diverse applications in the fields of sensing, energy, health, and environment. The main reasons are: their extensive surface area that increases the possibilities of engineering, their larger accessible active area, their porosity, and their sensitivity. In particular, semiconductor ceramic hollow nanofibers show greater space charge modulation depth, higher electronic transport properties, and shorter ion or electron diffusion length (e.g., for an enhanced charging–discharging rate. In this review, we discuss and introduce the latest developments of ceramic hollow nanofiber materials in terms of synthesis approaches. Particularly, electrospinning derivatives will be highlighted. The electrospun ceramic hollow nanofibers will be reviewed with respect to their most widely studied components, i.e., metal oxides. These nanostructures have been mainly suggested for energy and environmental remediation. Despite the various advantages of such one dimensional (1D nanostructures, their fabrication strategies need to be improved to increase their practical use. The domain of nanofabrication is still advancing, and its predictable shortcomings and bottlenecks must be identified and addressed. Inconsistency of the hollow nanostructure with regard to their composition and dimensions could be one of such challenges. Moreover, their poor scalability hinders their wide applicability for commercialization and industrial use.

  16. Silicate bonded ceramics of laterites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Douse, V.

    1989-05-01

    Sodium silicate is vacuum impregnated in bauxite waste (red mud) at room temperature to develop ceramics of mechanical properties comparable to the sintered ceramics. For a concentration up to 10% the fracture toughness increases from 0.12 MNm -3/2 to 0.9 MNm -3/2 , and the compressive strength from 7 MNm -2 to 30 MNm -2 . The mechanical properties do not deteriorate, when soaked in water for an entire week. The viscosity and the concentration of the silicate solution are crucial, both for the success of the fabrication and the economics of the process. Similar successful results have been obtained for bauxite and lime stone, even though the latter has poor weathering properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis, an attempt is made to identify the crystals formed in the composite, which are responsible for the strength. The process is an economic alternative to the sintered ceramics in the construction industry in the tropical countries, rich in lateritic soils and poor in energy. Also the process has all the potential for further development in arid regions abundant in limestone. (author). 6 refs, 20 figs, 3 tabs

  17. All-ceramic restorations: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, F; Carossa, S; Pera, P; Preti, G

    1998-09-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations are reviewed particularly from the aesthetic point of view. All-ceramic restorations offer the best results because they let the light through optimally. In constructing all-ceramic crowns on teeth which have been endodontically treated, the material used to rebuild the pin-abutments must be taken into consideration if the best aesthetic results are to be achieved. Materials which, because of their translucent characteristics, are the most aesthetic alternatives to metal alloy pin-abutments in rebuilding teeth which have been endodontically treated, are then described.

  18. Performances of multi-channel ceramic photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.; Karolak, M.; Piret, Y.; Mouly, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Ceramic electron multipliers with real metal dynodes and independent channels ware constructed using multilayer ceramic technology. Tests of these prototypes show their capability to form sensitive detectors such as photomultipliers or light intensifiers. Here, we present results for the photocathode sensitivity, dynode activation, gain, linearity range and dynamic characteristics as well as the effect of 3-year aging of the main operational functions. The advantages provided by the ceramic components are discussed. These results motivate the development of a compact 256 pixel ceramic photomultiplier. (author)

  19. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  20. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Zito, S.; Tironi, A.; Irassar, E.F.; Rahhal, V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs) were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs). For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass) was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement. [es

  1. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium, and cop......Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium...

  2. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  3. Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

  4. Tritium behaviour in ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Tritium release from the candidate ceramic materials, Li 2 O, LiA10 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 ZrO 3 , is being investigated in many blanket programs. Factors that affect tritium release from the ceramic into the helium sweep gas stream include operating temperature, ceramic microstructure, tritium transport and solubility in the solid. A review is presented of the material properties studied and of the irradiation programs and the results are summarized. The ceramic breeder blanket concept is briefly reviewed

  5. Emerging ceramic-based materials for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I; Kelly, J R

    2014-12-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  6. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  7. Pressure Induced Phase Transformations in Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimanis, Ivar [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cioabanu, Cristian [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The study of materials with unusual properties offers new insight into structure-property relations as well as promise for the design of novel composites. In this spirit, the PIs seek to (1) understand fundamental mechanical phenomena in ceramics that exhibit pressure-induced phase transitions, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and negative compressibility, and (2) explore the effect of these phenomena on the mechanical behavior of composites designed with such ceramics. The broad and long-term goal is to learn how to utilize these unusual behaviors to obtain desired mechanical responses. While the results are expected to be widely applicable to many ceramics, most of the present focus is on silicates, as they exhibit remarkable diversity in structure and properties. Eucryptite, a lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSiO4), is specifically targeted because it exhibits a pressure-induced phase transition at a sufficiently low pressure to be accessible during conventional materials processing. Thus, composites with eucryptite may be designed to exhibit a novel type of transformation toughening. The PIs have performed a combination of activities that encompass synthesis and processing to control structures, atomistic modeling to predict and understand structures, and characterization to study mechanical behavior. Several materials behavior discoveries were made. It was discovered that small amounts of Zn (as small as 0.1 percent by mol) reverse the sign of the coefficient of thermal expansion of beta-eucryptite from negative to slightly positive. The presence of Zn also significantly mitigates microcracking that occurs during thermal cycling of eucryptite. It is hypothesized that Zn disrupts the Li ordering in beta-eucryptite, thereby altering the thermal expansion behavior. A nanoindentation technique developed to characterize incipient plasticity was applied to examine the initial stages of the pressure induced phase transformation from beta to

  8. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathopoulos, V.N., E-mail: vasta@teihal.gr [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece); General Department of Applied Sciences, School of Technological Applications, Technological Educational Institute of Sterea Ellada, GR 34400 Psahna (Greece); Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J. [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in

  9. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stathopoulos, V.N.; Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an

  10. A review of the strength properties of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondrum, S O

    1992-06-01

    New ceramic materials for restorative dentistry have been developed and introduced in recent years. This article reviews advantages and disadvantages of dental ceramics, concentrating on strength properties. Included are factors affecting the strength of dental ceramic materials and the most common mechanisms for increasing the strength of dental ceramics. The properties of presently available materials such as dispersion-strengthened ceramics, cast ceramics, and foil-reinforced materials are discussed. Current research efforts to improve the fracture resistance of ceramic restorative materials are reviewed. A description of methods to evaluate the strength of ceramics is included, as a caution concerning the interpretation of strength data reported in the literature.

  11. Production and study of the behavior of ceramic sintering SR2ALWO5,5 to application on the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.M.; Ferreira, R.A. Sanguinetti; Yadava, Y.P.

    2011-01-01

    The complex perovskita ceramics based on tungsten are highly inert corrosive environments. For this reason, this type of ceramic is used in the manufacture of parts and components for the oil industry where the hostile environment is constant problem. We are working in manufacturing temperature sensors encased in ceramic to petroleum industry. Produce ceramic Sr 2 AlWO 5,5 thermo-mechanical process using a ball mill and subsequently heat treatment temperature of 1200°C for 24 hours. Studied the sintering behavior in the temperature range from 1200 to 1350 °C. In this process, the ceramic powder had a high homogeneity in terms of size and distribution of particles, which facilitates sintering at low temperature and shorter time. Structure and microstructure of calcined ceramic was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and presented at the congress. (author)

  12. Electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla-Campos, Luis; Buljan, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Research on tritium breeder material is fundamental to the development of deuterium-tritium type fusion reactors for producing clean, non contaminating, electrical energy, since only energy and helium, a harmless gas, are produced from the fusion reaction. Lithium titanate ceramic is one of the possible candidates for the tritium breeder material. This last material is thought to form part of the first wall of the nucleus of the reactor which will provide the necessary tritium for the fusion and will also serve as a shield. Lithium titanate has advantageous characteristics compared to other materials. Some of these are low activation under the irradiation of neutrons, good thermal stability, high density of lithium atoms and relatively fast tritium release at low temperatures. However, there are still several physical and chemical properties with respect to the tritium release mechanism and mechanical properties that have not been studied at all. This work presents a theoretical study of the electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic and the corresponding tritiated material. Band calculations using the Extended H kel Tight-Binding approach were carried out. Results show that after substituting lithium for tritium atoms, the electronic states for the latter appear in the middle of prohibited band gap which it is an indication that the tritiated material should behave as a semiconductor, contrary to Li 2 TiO 3 which is a dielectric isolator. A study was also carried out to determine the energetically most favorable sites for the substitution of lithium for tritium atoms. Additionally, we analyzed possible pathways for the diffusion of a tritium atom within the crystalline structure of the Li 2 TiO 3

  13. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. Index Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric absorption, cracking.

  14. Chemical characterisation of zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazulla Barreda, M. F.; Rodrigo Edo, M.; Blasco Roca, E.; Orduna Cordero, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper addresses the development of a methodology that allows the complete chemical characterisation of zircon cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments including minor and major elements. To develop the methodology, five zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide pigments with different hues were selected, studying the different measurement process steps, from sample preparation to the optimisation of the measurement of the different components of the pigments by spectroscopic techniques (WD-XRF and elemental analysis by combustion and IR detection). The chemical characterisation method developed was validated with synthetic standards prepared from the mixture of certified reference materials and pure oxides because no certified referenced materials of this type of pigments were commercially available. The developed method can be used for a complete chemical characterization of zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments with a very low uncertainty for all the elements analysed. (Author)

  15. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotovs, A; Rogulis, U; Sarakovskis, A; Dimitrocenko, L, E-mail: andris-f@navigator.l [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga st. 8, LV-1063, Riga (Latvia)

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF{sub 3} crystalline phase.

  16. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotovs, A.; Rogulis, U.; Sarakovskis, A.; Dimitrocenko, L.

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF3 crystalline phase.

  17. Structural characterization of clays commercially used in red ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, E.M.; Moura, J.K.L.; Souza, R.B.; Brandim, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of clays hills being an alternative to clay floodplain, due to environmental protection laws. The research project aims at the morphological and chemical characterization of hills clays used industrially for the production of ceramic tiles and blocks. Therefore, two types of methods were known commercially in the region of Teresina-PI through diffraction of X-rays (X-DR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry X-ray (EDS). It can be observed that the samples have a high percentage of quartz, hematite still having in its constitution aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide and titanium oxide. The results show that the clays are clays and montmorillonites may be used for the production of ceramic tiles and blocks, but as the proportion of using the same will be focusing the next job. (author)

  18. Development of nano-structured silicon carbide ceramics: from synthesis of the powder to sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-12-01

    The materials used inside future nuclear reactors will be subjected to very high temperature and neutrons flux. Silicon carbide, in the form of SiC f /SiC nano-structured composite is potentially interesting for this type of application. It is again necessary to verify the contribution of nano-structure on the behaviour of this material under irradiation. To verify the feasibility and determine the properties of the matrix, it was envisaged to produce it by powder metallurgy from SiC nanoparticles. The objective is to obtain a fully dense nano-structured SiC ceramic without additives. For that, a parametric study of the phases of synthesis and agglomeration was carried out, the objective of which is to determine the active mechanisms and the influence of the key parameters. Thus, studying the nano-powder synthesis by laser pyrolysis allowed to produce, with high production rates, homogeneous batches of SiC nanoparticles whose size can be adjusted between 15 and 90 nm. These powders have been densified by an innovating method: Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The study and the optimization of the key parameters allowed the densification of silicon carbide ceramic without sintering aids while preserving the nano-structure of material. The thermal and mechanical properties of final materials were studied in order to determine the influence of the microstructure on their properties. (author)

  19. FIVE YEAR OUTCOMES OF CERAMIC-ОN-CERAMIC AND CERAMIC-ОN-POLYETHYLENE BEARINGS IN HIP JOINT REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Murylev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing number of hip joint replacement volume there remains the key issue of improving prosthesis survivorship which directly depends on the friction couple. Material and methods. The authors have analyzed five year outcomes of two bearing types (head and insert used in hip replacement: ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC in 324 patients and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP in 300 patients. Totally 550 patients were operated in the period starting 2010 till 2014, including 74 patients underwent bilateral hip replacement. The authors divided patients based on gender and also into three age groups: 20-40, 41-60 and 61-80 years old. The largest group comprised 156 women aged 41-60 years (28.4%. Additional grouping of patients was made based on gender, age and bearing diameter.36 mm diameter bearing was characterized of the most frequent use. Functional outcomes were assessed by Harris Hip Score. Statistical analysis was made with Statistica 10 software. Statistical significant was observed at p<0.05.Results.28 mm diameter bearing were rarely (19.5% applied and mainly in women which is related to need for use of smaller acetabulum components and inability to implant a larger insert.36 mm diameter bearing were used most frequently, CoC articulation of36 mm was used in men in 34% of cases and in women – in 18.12% of cases.40 mm articulations were implanted in women two times less than in men which is related to a smaller diameter of acetabulum in women. Generally, CoC bearings were implanted more often in men which can be explained by a bigger social demand as well as a higher anti-luxation stability of large diameter bearings. Dislocations of implants occurred in 5 (0.91% patients: in 4 patients with CoP bearingand in one patient with CoC articulation. Four revision procedures (0.64% were made due to deep periprosthetic infection: two surgeries in each group. Harris Hip Score evaluation in CoC group demonstrated excellent and good outcomes in

  20. Fiscal 1998 intellectual infrastructure project utilizing civil sector functions. Research and development project on prompt-effect type intellectual infrastructure creation (Research and development concerning relations between sintered body textural structure and material characteristics in fine ceramics); 1998 nendo minkan no kino wo katsuyoshita chiteki kiban jigyo seika hokokusho. Sokkogata chiteki kiban sosei kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo (fine ceramics no shoketsutai soshiki kozo to zairyo tokusei tono kankei ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Research and development was carried out involving fine ceramic sintered body textural structure evaluation methods for the development of process technologies for achieving higher quality and lower cost. Studies centered about a method for evaluating coarse pores and coarse grains in sintered bodies, relations between sintered body fracture strength and textural structure, and the standardization of evaluation methods. As the result, an evaluation method for observing pore structures in a sintered body flake specimen under an optical microscope and another for observing coarse grains under a polarization microscope were proposed. As for the effect of coarse defects on the fracture strength of ceramics, it was demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that coarse defects several tens of micrometers in size greatly affected the fracture strength. In the study of methods for sintered body grain size evaluation, findings were obtained about the processing of the specimen surface. (NEDO)

  1. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. I n order to achieve these objectives, NAC, a leading U.S. advanced ceramics component manufacturer, assembled a multidisciplinary, vertically integrated team. This team included: a major diesel engine builder, Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC); a corporate ceramics research division, SGIC's Northboro R and D Center; intelligent processing system developers, BDM Federal/MATSYS; a furnace equipment company, Centorr/Vacuum Industries; a sintering expert, Wittmer Consultants; a production OEM, Deco-Grand; a wheel manufacturer and grinding operation developer, Norton Company's Higgins Grinding Technology Center (HGTC); a ceramic machine shop, Chand Kare Technical Ceramics; and a manufacturing cost consultant, IBIS Associates. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration

  2. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Feilzer, Albert J; de Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-10-01

    A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+DeltaTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compressive stresses in the weaker veneering ceramic and thus enhance the overall strength of the restoration. This technique had excellent results with porcelain fused to metal restorations (PFM). However, there are concerns to apply this concept to all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this research was to determine the stresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations due to the mismatch in TEC. Two commercial veneering ceramics with a TEC lower than that of zirconia (+DeltaTEC); NobelRondo zirconiatrade mark and Lava Ceramtrade mark, plus one experimental veneering ceramic with an identical TEC that matches that of zirconia (DeltaTEC = 0) were used to veneer zirconia discs. The specimens were loaded in biaxial flexure test setup with the veneer ceramic in tension. The stresses due to load application and TEC mismatch were calculated using fractography, engineering mathematics, and finite element analysis (FEA). In this study, the highest load at failure (64 N) was obtained with the experimental veneer where the thermal mismatch between zirconia and veneering ceramic was minimal. For the two commercial veneer ceramics the magnitude of the thermal mismatch localized at the zirconia veneer interface (42 MPa) exceeded the bond strength between the two materials and resulted in delamination failure during testing (ca. 50 MPa). For all-ceramic zirconia veneered restorations it is recommended to minimize the thermal mismatch as much as possible. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Glass-ceramics with multibarrier structure obtained from industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzina, L.; Cimdins, R.; Rozenstrauha, I. [Riga Tech. Univ. (Latvia). Fac. of Chem. Technol.; Bossert, J. [Technisches Inst.: Materialwissenschaft, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany); Kravtchenko, I. [Inst. for Problems of Material Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Recycling problem for various kind of waste is solved by processing the waste to ecological depositable products with multibarrier structure. In order to form a multibarrier structure the ecologically incompatible substances may be diluted and chemically bound until their recycling products gain a structure like natural mineral or glass (I. barrier). After that, remineralized materials are converted into a new product by melting or powder technology using an ecological compatible type of waste as a matrix phase (II. barrier). Waste which are treated this way could be applied to produce ceramic building materials and goods such as floor tiles, stone pavement and casting products. Industrial waste from the metallurgical factory in Latvia ``Liepajas metalurgs`` are metallurgical slag, filter dust, etching waste and sewage used in technologies. The main constituents of chemical compositions of these waste are: Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, Al, Mn etc. In some types of waste a small amount of ecologically risky elements such as Cr, Ni, Zr, Sn and Pb can occur. The combination of metallurgical waste with peat ashes from Riga thermal power station, oil shale ashes or glass waste under controlled sintering procedure gives bulk materials with surface or/and bulkcrystallization. The structure of glass-ceramics built this way may prevent the migration of ecologically risky elements into environment due to corrosion or friction. Physical-chemical properties and thermal behaviour (DTA, dilatometry, melting) of waste define the range of sintering for production of glass-ceramics (powder technology) and decorative glass-ceramic materials (melting and powder technology). (orig.) 5 refs.

  4. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by α-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  5. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-Wzirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  6. Microstructure of SiC ceramics fabricated by pyrolysis of electron beam irradiated polycarbomethylsilane containing precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yunshu; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    A modified gel-casting method was developed to form the ceramics precursor matrix by using polycarbomehylsilane (PCMS) and SiC powder. The polymer precursor was mixed with SiC powder in toluene, and then the slurry samples were cast into designed shapes. The pre-ceramic samples were then irradiated by 2.0 MeV electron beam generated by a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator in He gas flow to about 15 MGy. The cured samples were pyrolyzed and sintered into SiC ceramics at 1300degC in Ar gas. The modified gel-casting method leaves almost no internal stress in the pre-ceramic samples, and the electron beam curing not only diminished the amount of pyrolysis gaseous products but also enhanced the interface binding of the polymer converted SiC and the grains of SiC powder. Optical microscope, AFM and SEM detected no visible internal or surface cracks in the final SiC ceramics matrix. A maximum value of 122 MPa of flexural strength of the final SiC ceramics was achieved. (author)

  7. Temperature dependent dielectric relaxation and ac-conductivity of alkali niobate ceramics studied by impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhinav; Mantry, Snigdha Paramita; Fahad, Mohd.; Sarun, P. M.

    2018-05-01

    Sodium niobate (NaNbO3) ceramics is prepared by conventional solid state reaction method at sintering temperature 1150 °C for 4 h. The structural information of the material has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The XRD analysis of NaNbO3 ceramics shows an orthorhombic structure. The FE-SEM micrograph of NaNbO3 ceramics exhibit grains with grain sizes ranging between 1 μm to 5 μm. The surface coverage and average grain size of NaNbO3 ceramics are found to be 97.6 % and 2.5 μm, respectively. Frequency dependent electrical properties of NaNbO3 is investigated from room temperature to 500 °C in wide frequency range (100 Hz-5 MHz). Dielectric constant, ac-conductivity, impedance, modulus and Nyquist analysis are performed. The observed dielectric constant (1 kHz) at transition temperature (400 °C) are 975. From conductivity analysis, the estimated activation energy of NaNbO3 ceramics is 0.58 eV at 10 kHz. The result of Nyquist plot shows that the electrical behavior of NaNbO3 ceramics is contributed by grain and grain boundary responses. The impedance and modulus spectrum asserts that the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior and non-Debye type relaxation in NaNbO3.

  8. An Overview on the Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Ceramics Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, J.; Brito, J. D.; Silvestre, N.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their prominent properties (mechanical, stiffness, strength, thermal stability), ceramic composite materials (CMC) have been widely applied in automotive, industrial and aerospace engineering, as well as in biomedical and electronic devices. Because monolithic ceramics exhibit brittle behaviour and low electrical conductivity, CMC_s have been greatly improved in the last decade. CMC_s are produced from ceramic fibres embedded in a ceramic matrix, for which several ceramic materials (oxide or non-oxide) are used for the fibres and the matrix. Due to the large diversity of available fibres, the properties of CMC_s can be adapted to achieve structural targets. They are especially valuable for structural components with demanding mechanical and thermal requirements. However, with the advent of nanoparticles in this century, the research interests in CMC_s are now changing from classical reinforcement (e.g., microscale fibres) to new types of reinforcement at nano scale. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge on processing and mechanical properties of a new generation of CMC_s: Ceramics Nano composites (CNC_s)

  9. An Overview on the Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Ceramics Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Silvestre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their prominent properties (mechanical, stiffness, strength, thermal stability, ceramic composite materials (CMC have been widely applied in automotive, industrial and aerospace engineering, as well as in biomedical and electronic devices. Because monolithic ceramics exhibit brittle behaviour and low electrical conductivity, CMCs have been greatly improved in the last decade. CMCs are produced from ceramic fibres embedded in a ceramic matrix, for which several ceramic materials (oxide or non-oxide are used for the fibres and the matrix. Due to the large diversity of available fibres, the properties of CMCs can be adapted to achieve structural targets. They are especially valuable for structural components with demanding mechanical and thermal requirements. However, with the advent of nanoparticles in this century, the research interests in CMCs are now changing from classical reinforcement (e.g., microscale fibres to new types of reinforcement at nanoscale. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge on processing and mechanical properties of a new generation of CMCs: Ceramics Nanocomposites (CNCs.

  10. Characterization techniques to predict mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated by ceramic microstereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adake, Chandrashekhar V.; Bhargava, Parag; Gandhi, Prasanna

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic microstereolithography (CMSL) has emerged as solid free form (SFF) fabrication technology in which complex ceramic parts are fabricated from ceramic suspensions which are formulated by dispersing ceramic particles in UV curable resins. Ceramic parts are fabricated by exposing ceramic suspension to computer controlled UV light which polymerizes resin to polymer and this polymer forms rigid network around ceramic particles. A 3-dimensional part is created by piling cured layers one over the other. These ceramic parts are used to build microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices after thermal treatment. In many cases green ceramic parts can be directly utilized to build MEMS devices. Hence characterization of these parts is essential in terms of their mechanical behaviour prior to their use in MEMS devices. Mechanical behaviour of these green ceramic parts depends on cross link density which in turn depends on chemical structure of monomer, concentrations of photoinitiator and UV energy dose. Mechanical behaviour can be determined with the aid of nanoindentation. And extent of crosslinking can be verified with the aid of DSC. FTIR characterization is used to analyse (-C=C-) double bond conversion. This paper explains characterization tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated in CMSL

  11. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, François; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantagesCoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion.However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with fracture of a component.We recommend that surgeons weigh the potential advantages and disadvantages of current CoC THA in comparison with other bearing surfaces when considering young very active patients who are candidates for THA. Cite this article: Hernigou P, Roubineau F, Bouthors C, Flouzat-Lachaniette C-H. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:107-111. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000027.

  12. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  13. Characterization of Conventional and High-Translucency Y-TZP Dental Ceramics Submitted to Air Abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Guimarães, Renato Bastos; Noronha-Filho, Jaime Dutra; Botelho, Glauco Dos Santos; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion on t®m phase transformation, roughness, topography and the elemental composition of three Y-TZP (Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal) dental ceramics: two conventional (Lava Frame and IPS ZirCad) and one with high-translucency (Lava Plus). Plates obtained from sintered blocks of each ceramic were divided into four groups: AS (as-sintered); 30 (air-abrasion with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles); 50 (air-abrasion with 50 mm Al2O3 particles) and 150 (air-abrasion with 150 mm Al2O3 particles). After the treatments, the plates were submitted to X-ray diffractometry; 3-D profilometry and SEM/EDS. The AS surfaces were composed of Zr and t phases. All treatments produced t®m phase transformation in the ceramics. The diameter of air-abrasion particles influenced the roughness (150>50>30>AS) and the topography. SEM analysis showed that the three treatments produced groove-shaped microretentions on the ceramic surfaces, which increased with the diameter of air-abrasion particles. EDS showed a decrease in Zr content along with the emergence of O and Al elements after air-abrasion. Presence of Si was also detected on the plates air-abraded with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles. It was concluded that irrespective of the type and diameter of the particles, air-abrasion produced t®m phase transformation, increased the roughness and changed the elemental composition of the three Y-TZP dental ceramics. Lava Plus also behaved similarly to the conventional Y-TZP ceramics, indicating that this high translucency ceramic could be more suitable to build monolithic ceramic restorations in the aesthetic restorative dentistry field.

  14. Fracture toughness of zirconia ceramic crowns made by feather-edge tooth preparation design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fracture toughness determines functional crown strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. There is a lack of relevant literature data about fracture toughness of crowns made by feather-edge preparation. Mechanical testing of ceramic samples is supposed to show if feather-edge tooth preparation is a successful method for making ceramic crowns without any risk of reduction of their mechanical properties. This research was done to establish effects of feather-edge tooth preparation on fracture toughness of single zirconia ceramic crowns. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Sixty (60 ceramic crowns were made on non-carious extracted human premolars. Thirty (30 crowns were made on the basis of feather-edge preparation (experimental group I. The group II included 30 crowns made on 1 mm rounded shoulder. Crowns fabrication was executed on a copy mill production system “Zirkonzahn” (Zirkonzahn GMBH, Gais, Germany. The spherical compression test was used to determine fracture toughness, using 6 mm diameter ceramic ball. Fracture load for damaging ceramic crown was recorded on a universal testing machine - Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research introduced significant differences between fracture toughness of ceramic samples in every examined group. However, fracture toughness of crowns from both group was above 2 000 N, what was double beyond a recommended value. The mean value of fracture toughness in the feather-edge group was 2 090 N, and in shoulder group it was 2 214 N. Conclusion. This research showed a high fracture toughness of zirconia crowns made on feather-edge preparation. The examined crowns showed a fracture resistance at a sufficient distance in relation to the minimum values of functional loads. Further research of functional loads of these crown is necessary, as well as research of marginal adaptation of cemented crowns and

  15. Microstructure and spectroscopic investigations of calcium zinc bismuth phosphate glass ceramics doped with manganese ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneel Kumar, A.; Sambasiva Rao, M. V.; Chinna Ram, G.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2018-01-01

    Multi-component 10CaF2-20ZnO-(15 - x)Bi2O3-55P2O5:xMnO (0 ≤ x ≤ 2.5) glass ceramics were synthesised by melt quenching technique and heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramics were characterised by XRD, DTA, EDS and SEM. Spectroscopic studies such as optical absorption, EPR, FTIR and Raman were also carried out on these glass ceramics. The XRD and SEM studies have indicated that ceramic samples contain well defined and randomly distributed grains of different crystalline phases. The observed increase of enthalpy from DTA patterns up to 1 mol% of MnO indicates that the crystallisation starts initially from the surface of the material then gradually it is extended to the volume of the material and this influence is meagre at higher concentrations of MnO. The absorption spectra of manganese doped glass ceramics have exhibited two types of conventional bands; one due to Mn2+ ions and other due to Mn3+ ions. The EPR spectra of MnO doped glass ceramics showed a resonance signal around g2 = 2.023 with a six line hyperfine structure and another signal at about g1 = 4.314. The relative intensity and half-width of these two signals are observed to increase with the increase in the concentration of manganese ions up to 1 mol% beyond this concentration it is found to decrease. Such observation indicates the conversion of part of Mn2+ ions into Mn3+ ions in the glass ceramic matrix. The observed increase in the intensity of symmetrical structural units at the expense of asymmetrical structural units from the FTIR and Raman spectra at higher concentration of MnO indicating that Mn2+ ions occupy the network forming positions in the glass ceramic structure.

  16. Evaluation of marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with two finish lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Gulce; Ozturk, Nilgun; Inan, Ozgur; Bozogullari, Nalan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study investigated the marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with 2 finish line designs. Methods: Forty machined stainless steel molar die models with two different margin designs (chamfer and rounded shoulder) were prepared. A total of 40 standardized copings were fabricated and divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each finish line-coping material). Coping materials tested were IPS e.max Press and Zirkonzahn; luting agent was Variolink II. Marginal fit was evaluated after cementation with a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ16). Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD test were performed to assess the influence of each finish line design and ceramic type on the marginal fit of 2 all-ceramic copings (α =.05). Results: Two-way analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant differences for marginal fit relative to finish lines (P=.362) and ceramic types (P=.065). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, both types of all-ceramic copings demonstrated that the mean marginal fit was considered acceptable for clinical application (⩽120 μm). PMID:22509119

  17. Distribution Species Composition And Size Of Flying Fish Exocoetidae In The Ceram Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friesland Tuapetel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ceram Sea is new resources area of catching flying fish. The purpose of study is to determine the species composition size and distribution of flying fish caught by drifting baits. Flying fish data collection was conducted in June until October 2013 in three locations i.e Kaimana East Ceram and Fak-Fak. There are three flying fish species collected namely Hirundichthys oxycephalus Torani Cypselurus poecilopterus Banggulung and Chellopogon abeia yellow wing. The results was showed that in Fak-Fak and Kaimana there are two types of fly fishing that H. oxycephalus andC. poecilopterus whereas in East Ceram found three types including H. oxycephalus C. poecilopterus and C. abeia. The dominant type of flying fish in three locations is H. oxycephalus. Flying fish has a variety size range of body size from 195.6 to 243.6 mm in Kaimana East Ceram range from 206.3 to 284.3 mm while Fak-Fak range from 187.1 to 243.1 mm. The result is expected to be a reference literature as basic data for the management and sustainable utilization of flyling fish in Ceram sea.

  18. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  19. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  20. Superplasticity in Fine-Grained Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-31

    Stabilized, Tetragonal Zirconia," Acta Metall. Mater., 39(12), (1991), pp. 3227-3236. 10. B. Kellett, P. Carry, and A. Mocellin , "Extrusion of Tet-ZrO2...F. Wakai, S. Sakaguchi, and H. Kato, J. Ceram. Soc. Jap., 94, 72 (1986). 8. B. Kellett, P. Carry, and A. Mocellin , J. Amer. Ceram. Soc., 74, 1922

  1. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  2. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  3. Crack growth in thermally sprayed ceramic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, František; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2004), s. 149-168 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP106/04/P084; GA ČR GA101/03/0331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : ceramic coatings, fracture mechanics, crack extension Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  4. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate

  5. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1983-01-01

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO 2 are described

  6. Ceramics for applications in fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Six critical applications for ceramics in fusion systems are reviewed, and structural and electrical problem areas discussed. Fusion neutron radiation effects in ceramics are considered in relation to fission neutron studies. A number of candidate materials are proposed for further evaluation

  7. Atomic imaging and microanalysis of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.; Ramesh, R.

    1988-10-01

    This paper is a short review of electron microscopy techniques, as applied to modern ceramics. Examples: representative of the significance of modern electron microscopy, methods of atomic resolution imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy in the task of characterising, and understanding typical ceramic materials are given. (JL)

  8. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolitsch, A.; Richter, E.; Wolf, M.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  9. Nature of radiation damage in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to determine the equivalence between different sources of radiation damage in ceramics are reviewed. The ways in which ceramics differ from metals are examined and proposed mechanisms for creation and stabilization of defects in insulators are outlined. Work on radiation damage in crystalline oxides is summarized and suggestions for further research are offered

  10. High performance structural ceramics for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Faker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A family of Saint-Gobain structural ceramic materials and products produced by its High performance Refractory Division is described. Over the last fifty years or so, Saint-Gobain has been a leader in developing non oxide ceramic based novel materials, processes and products for application in Nuclear, Chemical, Automotive, Defense and Mining industries

  11. Synthesis and characterization of biomorphic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, Carlos Renato

    2001-01-01

    Biotemplating represents a recently developed technology for manufacturing of biomorphous ceramics from naturally grown plant structures. This approach allows the production of ceramic materials with cellular structure, where the microstructural features of the ceramic product are similar to the native plant. After processing, the biomorphic ceramic exhibits directed pore morphology in the micrometer range. Biomorphic SiC fibers were produced from bamboo by carbothermal reduction of SiO 2 originally present in the bamboo structure. Bamboo pieces were heated up to 1500 deg C in argon to promote the reaction between carbon and silica. Biomorphic alumina, mullite and zirconia ceramics were manufactured via the sol-gel route by repeated infiltration of low viscous oxide precursors (sols) into rattan, pine and bamboo structures. The raw samples were pyrolyzed at 800 deg C in nitrogen for 1h and subsequently annealed at 1550 deg C in air. The microstructure and physical properties of the biomorphic ceramics were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high temperature-XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosimetry and picnometry. Thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) was performed on the infiltrated samples in order to evaluate the reactions and the total weight loss during the thermal process. The mechanical properties were evaluated by compressive strength tests. In contrast to conventional processed ceramic foam of similar porosity, the microstructure highly porous biomorphic ceramics shows uniaxial pore morphology with anisotropic properties. These properties are favorable for applications in catalyst support, filters or low-density heat insulation structures, or as biomaterials. (author)

  12. Extended defects in insulating MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramic materials studied by PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klym, H; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, O; Filipecki, J; Hadzaman, I, E-mail: klymha@yahoo.com, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Extended positron-trapping defects in technological modified insulating nanoporous MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics are characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results are achieved using three-component fitting procedure with arbitrary lifetimes applied to treatment of measured spectra. Within this approach, the first component in the lifetime spectra reflects microstructure specificity of the spinel structure, the second component responsible to extended defects near intergranual boundaries and the third component correspond to ortho-positronium 'pick-off' decaying in nanopores of ceramics. It is shown that in ceramics of different technological modifications the same type of positron traps prevails.

  13. About kinetics of paramagnetic radiation malformations in beryllium ceramics; O kinetike nakopleniya paramagnitnykh radiatsionnykh defectov v berillievykh keramikakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabinkin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I [Fiziko-tekhniucheskij Inst. Ministerstva Nauki i Vysshego Obrazovaniya Respubliki Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Petukhov, Yu V [Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii Natsional' nogo Yadernogo Tsentra Respubliki Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    1999-07-01

    This paper [1] specifies that {gamma}-radiation of the beryllium-oxide-based ceramics results in development of paramagnetic radiation malformations emerging the ESR spectrum in form of doublet with the splitting rate of oestrasid {delta}{approx}1.6 and g-factor of 2.008. This report presents evaluation outcomes of dependence of paramagnetic radiation malformations concentration in beryllium ceramics on gamma-radiation dose ({sup 60}Co) within the range of 0-100 Mrad. Total paramagnetic parameters of beryllium ceramics in the range 0-100 Mrad of gamma-radiation dose varied slightly, and were specified by the first type of paramagnetic radiation malformations.

  14. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  15. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  16. Polymer and ceramic nanocomposites for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Vivek T.; Kumar, Jayanth S.; Jain, Anjana

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews the potential of polymer and ceramic matrix composites for aerospace/space vehicle applications. Special, unique and multifunctional properties arising due to the dispersion of nanoparticles in ceramic and metal matrix are briefly discussed followed by a classification of resulting aerospace applications. The paper presents polymer matrix composites comprising majority of aerospace applications in structures, coating, tribology, structural health monitoring, electromagnetic shielding and shape memory applications. The capabilities of the ceramic matrix nanocomposites to providing the electromagnetic shielding for aircrafts and better tribological properties to suit space environments are discussed. Structural health monitoring capability of ceramic matrix nanocomposite is also discussed. The properties of resulting nanocomposite material with its disadvantages like cost and processing difficulties are discussed. The paper concludes after the discussion of the possible future perspectives and challenges in implementation and further development of polymer and ceramic nanocomposite materials.

  17. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially.

  18. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  19. Clinical evaluation of two types of ceramic inlays and onlays after 6 months Avaliação clínica de inlays e onlays confeccionadas com dois tipos de cerâmica, após 06 meses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jacinta M. Coelho Santos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performance of two types of ceramics: a slurry-powder ceramic (Duceram Plus, Degussa - D and a hot-pressed leucite-based glass-ceramic (IPS Empress, Ivoclar Vivadent - IPS. Eighty-six restorations, 44 IPS and 42 D, were made by one operator. A total of 33 onlays and 53 inlays on twenty-seven premolars and 59 molars were cemented in 35 patients of both sexes, mean age 35 years. All restorations were cemented with the dual-resin cement (Variolink, Ivoclar-Vivadent under rubber dam and were evaluated at the baseline and after six months, using the modified U.S.P.H.S. criteria for postoperative sensitivity, secondary caries, fracture, color match, marginal discoloration, marginal integrity and surface texture. Additionally radiographs and intraoral photographs were carried out. At baseline 86 restorations were analyzed and all of them received Alfa rating, except for the following that received Bravo rating for postoperative sensitivity - IPS (2.27%; D (7.14%; for color match - IPS (2.27%; D (2.38% and for surface texture - IPS (2.27%; D (11.90%. After 6 months 100% of the restorations were analyzed and the following received Bravo rating: color match - IPS (4.55% and D (9.52%; surface texture - IPS (2.27% and D (11.9%; marginal discoloration - IPS (6.82% and D (4.76% and marginal integrity - IPS (4.55% and D (7.14%. The results were submitted to the Fisher and McNemar Statistical Tests. No significant differences were noticed between the two ceramics. Both ceramics demonstrated satisfactory clinical performance after six months.Este trabalho se propôs a avaliar a performance clínica de dois tipos de cerâmica: IPS Empress, Ivoclar-Vivadent - IPS e Duceram Plus, Degussa - D. Foram realizadas 86 restaurações por apenas um operador, sendo 44 IPS e 42 D. Vinte e sete pré-molares e 59 molares, num total de 33 onlays e 53 inlays, foram cimentadas em 35 pacientes de ambos os sexos, com idade m

  20. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.