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Sample records for beta-adrenergic receptor response

  1. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

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    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  2. cAMP-mediated beta-adrenergic signaling negatively regulates Gq-coupled receptor-mediated fetal gene response in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizio, Mario; Vago, Valerio; Musumeci, Marco; Fecchi, Katia; Sposi, Nadia Maria; Mattei, Elisabetta; Catalano, Liviana; Stati, Tonino; Marano, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The treatment with beta-blockers causes an enhancement of the norepinephrine-induced fetal gene response in cultured cardiomyocytes. Here, we tested whether the activation of cAMP-mediated beta-adrenergic signaling antagonizes alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR)-mediated fetal gene response. To address this question, the fetal gene program, of which atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the beta-isoform of myosin heavy chain are classical members, was induced by phenylephrine (PE), an alpha(1)-AR agonist. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, we found that stimulation of beta-ARs with isoproterenol, a beta-AR agonist, inhibited the fetal gene expression induced by PE. Similar results were also observed when cardiomyocytes were treated with forskolin (FSK), a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, or 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP, a selective activator of protein kinase A (PKA). Conversely, the PE-induced fetal gene expression was further upregulated by H89, a selective PKA inhibitor. To evaluate whether these results could be generalized to Gq-mediated signaling and not specifically to alpha(1)-ARs, cardiomyocytes were treated with prostaglandin F(2)alpha, another Gq-coupled receptor agonist, which is able to promote fetal gene expression. This treatment caused an increase of both ANP mRNA and protein levels, which was almost completely abolished by FSK treatment. The capability of beta-adrenergic signaling to regulate the fetal gene expression was also evaluated in vivo conditions by using beta1- and beta2-AR double knockout mice, in which the predominant cardiac beta-AR subtypes are lacking, or by administering isoproterenol (ISO), a beta-AR agonist, at a subpressor dose. A significant increase of the fetal gene expression was found in beta(1)- and beta(2)-AR gene deficient mice. Conversely, we found that ANP, beta-MHC and skACT mRNA levels were significantly decreased in ISO-treated hearts. Collectively, these data indicate that cAMP-mediated beta-adrenergic signaling

  3. Effects of thyroid hormone on. beta. -adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

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    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have compared the effects of ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/)-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T/sub 3/ treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T/sub 3/ treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites measured by (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, ..beta..-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T/sub 3/-treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T/sub 3/ treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T/sub 3/ treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals.

  4. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  5. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  6. Amiloride interacts with renal. cap alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors

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    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors), (/sup 3/H)prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors), and (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (..beta..-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 ..mu..M, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for (/sup 3/H)prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of ..cap alpha../sub 2/ > ..cap alpha../sub 1/ > ..beta... Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent.

  7. Altered beta-adrenergic receptor-stimulated cAMP formation in cultured skin fibroblasts from Alzheimer donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H M; Gibson, G E

    1993-07-15

    An alteration in signal transduction systems in Alzheimer's disease would likely be of pathophysiological significance, because these steps are critical to normal brain function. Since dynamic processes are difficult to study in autopsied brain, the current studies utilized cultured skin fibroblasts. The beta-adrenergic-stimulated increase in cAMP was reduced approximately 80% in fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease compared with age-matched controls. The deficit in Alzheimer fibroblasts in response to various adrenergic agonists paralleled their beta-adrenergic potency, and enhancement of cAMP accumulation by a non-adrenergic agonist, such as prostaglandin E1, was similar in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Diminished adenylate cyclase activity did not underlie these abnormalities, since direct stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin elevated cAMP production equally in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Cholera toxin equally stimulated cAMP formation in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Moreover, cholera toxin partially reduced isoproterenol-induced cAMP deficit in Alzheimer fibroblasts. Pertussis toxin, on the other hand, did not alter the Alzheimer deficits. The results suggest either that the coupling of the GTP-binding protein(s) to the beta-adrenergic receptor is abnormal or that the sensitivity of receptor is altered with Alzheimer's disease. Further, any hypothesis about Alzheimer's disease must explain why a reduced beta-adrenergic-stimulated cAMP formation persists in tissue culture.

  8. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  9. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

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    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  10. Immunoanalogue of vertebrate beta-adrenergic receptor in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2002-01-01

    Cell fractionation, SDS-PAGE, quantitative Western blot, confocal immunolocalization and immunogold labelling were performed to find an interpretation of the physiological response of the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium to beta-adrenergic ligands. The 69 kDa polypeptide separated by SDS-PAGE in S2 and P2 Paramecium subcellular fractions cross-reacted with antibody directed against human beta2-adrenergic receptor. This was detected by Western blotting followed by chemiluminescent detection. Quantitative image analysis showed that beta-selective adrenergic agonist (-)-isoproterenol--previously shown to enhance phagocytic activity--evoked redistribution of the adrenergic receptor analogue from membraneous (P2) to cytosolic (S2) fraction. The relative increase in immunoreactive band intensity in S2 reached 80% and was paralleled by a 59% decrease in P2 fraction. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed beta2-adrenergic receptor sites on the cell surface and at the ridge of the cytopharynx--where nascent phagosomes are formed. This localization was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. These results indicate that the 69 kDa Paramecium polypeptide immunorelated to vertebrate beta2-adrenergic receptor appeared in this evolutionary ancient cell as a nutrient receptor.

  11. Brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding in rats with obesity induced by a beef tallow diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that compared with safflower oil diet, feeding a beef tallow diet leads to a greater accumulation of body fat by reducing sympathetic activities. The present study examined the effects of dietary fats consisting of different fatty acids on alpha1- and beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were meal-fed isoenergetic diets based on safflower oil (rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) or beef tallow (rich in saturated fatty acids) for 8 weeks. Binding affinities of the beta-adrenergic receptor in the hypothalamus and cortex were significantly lower in the beef tallow diet group, but those of the alpha1-receptor did not differ between the two groups. The polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratio and fluidities of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cortex were lower in the beef tallow diet group than in the safflower oil diet group. These results suggest that the beef tallow diet decreases membrane fluidity by altering the fatty acid composition of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of rat. Consequently, beta-adrenergic receptor binding affinities in the brain were lower in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet. We recognized that there is possible link between the membrane fluidity and the changes in affinity of beta-adrenoceptors in rat brain.

  12. Pregnancy modifies the alpha2-beta-adrenergic receptor functional balance in rabbit fat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet-Mélou, A; Muñoz, C; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Lafontan, M

    1999-02-01

    The sympathetic nervous system controls lipolysis in fat by activation of four adrenergic receptors: beta1, beta2, beta3, and alpha2. During pregnancy, maternal metabolism presents anabolic and catabolic phases, characterized by modifications of fat responsiveness to catecholamines. The contributions of the four adrenergic receptors to adipocyte responsiveness during pregnancy have never been studied. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of pregnancy on adrenergic receptor-mediated lipolysis in rabbit white adipocytes. Functional studies were performed using subtype-selective and non-selective adrenergic receptor agonists. Overall adrenergic responsiveness was measured with the physiological agonist epinephrine. Non-adrenergic agents were used to evaluate different steps of the lipolytic cascade. The alpha2- and beta1/beta2-adrenergic receptor numbers were determined with selective radioligands. Non-adrenergic agents revealed that pregnancy induced an intracytoplasmic modification of the lipolytic cascade in inguinal but not in retroperitoneal adipocytes. Pregnancy induced an increase in beta1- and specially beta3-mediated lipolysis. The amounts of adipocyte beta1/beta2- and alpha2-adrenergic receptors were increased in pregnant rabbits. Epinephrine effects revealed an increased contribution of alpha2-adrenergic receptor-mediated antilipolysis in adipocytes from pregnant rabbits. These results indicate that pregnancy regulates adipocyte responsiveness to catecholamines mainly via the alpha2- and beta3-adrenergic pathways. Pregnancy induces an intracytoplasmic modification of the lipolytic cascade, probably via hormone-sensitive lipase, with differences according to fat location.-Bousquet-Mélou, A., C. Muñoz, J. Galitzky, M. Berlan, and M. Lafontan. Pregnancy modifies the alpha2-beta-adrenergic receptor functional balance in rabbit fat cells.

  13. Early developmental 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure decreases chick embryo heart chronotropic response to isoproterenol but not to agents affecting signals downstream of the beta-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Rebecca J; Hume, Adam J; Ciak, Jessica M; Vannostrand, John J; Friggens, Megan; Walker, Mary K

    2005-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes cardiovascular toxicity in laboratory animals, including alteration in several processes in which beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) signaling plays important roles. Thus, our laboratory investigated the effects of TCDD on beta-AR expression and signal transduction. Fertile chicken eggs were injected with vehicle (corn oil), 0.24 or 0.3 pmol TCDD/g egg on incubation day 0 (D0) or D5. On D10, heart function was assessed by ECG in ovo. Exposure to TCDD increased the incidence of arrhythmias and decreased the positive chronotropic responsiveness of the heart to isoproterenol. The reduced beta-AR responsiveness was, in part, independent of any overt morphological changes in the heart as chick embryos exposed to TCDD on D5 displayed an intermediate responsiveness to beta-AR agonist in the absence of the dilated cardiomyopathy observed in chick embryos exposed to TCDD on D0. TCDD did not decrease the chronotropic response of the heart to agents that stimulate signals downstream of the beta-AR. In fact, TCDD-exposed embryos were more sensitive than controls to forskolin, increasing heart rates (HR) 21.8 +/- 3.5 beats per min (bpm) above baseline versus control values at 6.3 +/- 2.7 bpm above baseline. TCDD exposure also augmented the negative chronotropic response of the heart to verapamil, decreasing HR -23.2 +/- 7.4 bpm relative to baseline versus control embryos at -12.7 +/- 5.9 bpm below baseline. Finally, the mean cardiac beta1-AR mRNA expression in D10 embryos was not significantly altered by exposure to TCDD on D0. These findings establish that a functional end point of the developing chick heart is sensitive to TCDD exposure and that the TCDD-induced reduction in beta-AR responsiveness may result from alterations in signal transduction upstream of adenylyl cyclase.

  14. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in dispersed rat testicular interstitial cells

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    Poyet, P.; Labrie, F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate steroidogenesis and cyclic AMP formation in mouse Leydig cells in culture. To obtain information about the possible presence and the characteristics of a beta-adrenergic receptor in rat testicular interstitial cells, the potent beta-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol (CYP) was used as ligand. Interstitial cells prepared by collagenase dispersion from rat testis were incubated with the ligand for 2 h at room temperature. (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binds to a single class of high affinity sites at an apparent KD value of 15 pM. A number of sites of 6,600 sites/cell is measured when 0.1 microM (-) propranolol is used to determine non-specific binding. The order of potency of a series of agonists competing for (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binding is consistent with the interaction of a beta 2-subtype receptor: zinterol greater than (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine = salbutamol much greater than (-) norepinephrine. In addition, it was observed that the potency of a large series of specific beta 1 and beta 2 synthetic compounds for displacing (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol in rat interstitial cells is similar to the potency observed for these compounds in a typical beta 2-adrenergic tissue, the rat lung. For example, the potency of zinterol, a specific beta 2-adrenergic agonist, is 10 times higher in interstitial cells and lung than in rat heart, a typical beta 1-adrenergic tissue. Inversely, practolol, a typical beta 1-antagonist, is about 50 times more potent in rat heart than in interstitial cells and lung.

  15. Determination of beta-adrenergic receptor blocking pharmaceuticals in united states wastewater effluent

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    Huggett, D.B.; Khan, I.A.; Foran, C.M.; Schlenk, D

    2003-02-01

    This is the first report of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist pharmaceuticals in United States wastewater effluent. - Beta adrenergic receptor antagonists ({beta}-Blockers) are frequently prescribed medications in the United States and have been identified in European municipal wastewater effluent, however no studies to date have investigated these compounds in United States wastewater effluent. Municipal wastewater effluent was collected from treatment facilities in Mississippi, Texas, and New York to investigate the occurrence of metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol. Propranolol was identified in all wastewater samples analyzed (n=34) at concentrations {<=}1.9 {mu}g/l. Metoprolol and nadolol were identified in {>=}71% of the samples with concentrations of metoprolol {<=}1.2 {mu}g/l and nadolol {<=}0.36 {mu}g/l. Time course studies at both Mississippi plants and the Texas plant indicate that concentrations of propranolol, metoprolol, and nadolol remain relatively constant at each sampling period. This study indicates that {beta}-Blockers are present in United States wastewater effluent in the ng/l to {mu}g/l range.

  16. Metabolic response to various beta-adrenoceptor agonists in beta3-adrenoceptor knockout mice: evidence for a new beta-adrenergic receptor in brown adipose tissue.

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    Preitner, F; Muzzin, P; Revelli, J P; Seydoux, J; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Lafontan, M; Giacobino, J P

    1998-08-01

    The beta3-adrenoceptor plays an important role in the adrenergic response of brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT). In this study, in vitro metabolic responses to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation were compared in adipose tissues of beta3-adrenoceptor knockout and wild type mice. The measured parameters were BAT fragment oxygen uptake (MO2) and isolated white adipocyte lipolysis. In BAT of wild type mice (-)-norepinephrine maximally stimulated MO2 4.1+/-0.8 fold. Similar maximal stimulations were obtained with beta1-, beta2- or beta3-adrenoceptor selective agonists (dobutamine 5.1+/-0.3, terbutaline 5.3+/-0.3 and CL 316,243 4.8+/-0.9 fold, respectively); in BAT of beta3-adrenoceptor knockout mice, the beta1- and beta2-responses were fully conserved. In BAT of wild type mice, the beta1/beta2-antagonist and beta3-partial agonist CGP 12177 elicited a maximal MO2 response (4.7+/-0.4 fold). In beta3-adrenoceptor knockout BAT, this response was fully conserved despite an absence of response to CL 316,243. This unexpected result suggests that an atypical beta-adrenoceptor, distinct from the beta1-, beta2- and beta3-subtypes and referred to as a putative beta4-adrenoceptor is present in BAT and that it can mediate in vitro a maximal MO2 stimulation. In isolated white adipocytes of wild type mice, (-)-epinephrine maximally stimulated lipolysis 12.1+/-2.6 fold. Similar maximal stimulations were obtained with beta1-, beta2- or beta3-adrenoceptor selective agonists (TO509 12+/-2, procaterol 11+/-3, CL 316,243 11+/-3 fold, respectively) or with CGP 12177 (7.1+/-1.5 fold). In isolated white adipocytes of beta3-adrenoceptor knockout mice, the lipolytic responses to (-)epinephrine, to the beta1-, beta2-, beta3-adrenoceptor selective agonists and to CGP 12177 were almost or totally depressed, whereas those to ACTH, forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP were conserved.

  17. Synthesis of the sup 11 C-labelled. beta. -adrenergic receptor ligands atenolol, metoprolol and propanolol

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    Antoni, G.; Ulin, J.; Laangstroem, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    The {sup 11}C-labelled {beta}-adrenergic receptor ligands atenolol 1, metoprolol 2 and propranolol 3 have been synthesized by an N-alkylation reaction using (2-{sup 11}C)isopropyl iodide. The labelled isopropyl iodide was prepared in a one-pot reactor system from ({sup 11}C)carbon dioxide and obtained in 40% radiochemical yield within 14 min reaction time. The total reaction times for compounds 1-3, counted from the start of the isopropyl iodide synthesis and including purification were 45-55 min. The products were obtained in 5-15% radiochemical yields and with radiochemical purities higher than 98%. The specific activity ranged from 0.4 to 4 GBq/{mu}mol. In a typical experiment starting with 4 GBq around 75 MBq of product was obtained. (author).

  18. Ischemia- and agonist-induced changes in. alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptor traffic in guinea pig hearts

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    Maisel, A.S.; Motulsky, H.J.; Ziegler, M.G.; Insel, P.A. (Univ. of California, La Jolla (USA))

    1987-11-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques and subcellular fraction to assess whether changes in expression of myocardial {alpha}{sub 1}- and {beta}-adrenergic receptors are mediated by a redistribution of receptors between various membrane fractions. Three fractions were prepared from the left ventricles of guinea pigs that underwent either 1 h of ischemia or injection of epinephrine a crude membrane, a purified sarcolemma, and a light vesicle fraction. In control animals {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors (({sup 3}H)prazosin binding) in light vesicles was only 25% of the total {alpha}{sub 1}-receptor density found in sarcolemmal and light vesicle fractions as compared with 50% for {beta}-adrenergic receptors (({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol binding sites). Although ischemia was associated with a 53% decrease in the number of light vesicle {beta}-adrenergic receptors and a 42% increase in the number of sarcolemma {beta}-receptors there was no change in the number of light vesicle {alpha}{sub 1}-receptors, even though the number of sarcolemmal {alpha}{sub 1}-receptors increased 34%. Epinephrine treatment promoted internalization of {beta}-adrenergic receptors. These results indicate that {alpha}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors may undergo a different cellular itinerary in guinea pig myocardium. Agonist and ischemia-induced changes in surface {beta}-receptors, but not {alpha}{sub 1}-receptors, appear to result from entry and exit of receptors from an intracellular pool that can be isolated in a light vesicle fraction. Changes in expression of {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors may represent changes in the properties of receptors found in the sarcolemma or in a membrane fraction other than the light vesicle fraction that they have isolated.

  19. Beta-adrenergic receptors are critical for weight loss but not for other metabolic adaptations to the consumption of a ketogenic diet in male mice

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    Nicholas Douris

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: The response of β-less mice distinguishes at least two distinct categories of physiologic effects in mice consuming KD. In the liver, KD regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα-dependent pathways through an action of FGF21 independent of the SNS and beta-adrenergic receptors. In sharp contrast, induction of interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT and increased energy expenditure absolutely require SNS signals involving action on one or more β-adrenergic receptors. In this way, the key metabolic actions of FGF21 in response to KD have diverse effector mechanisms.

  20. Age-associated alterations in hepatic. beta. -adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

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    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and approx. 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that ..beta..-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of ..beta..-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  1. Beta-adrenergic receptors are differentially expressed in distinct interneuron subtypes in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David J; Racca, Claudia; LeBeau, Fiona E N

    2008-08-20

    Noradrenaline (NA) acting via beta-adrenergic receptors (betaARs) plays an important role in the modulation of memory in the hippocampus. betaARs have been shown to be expressed in principal cells, but their distribution across different interneuron classes is unknown. We have used specific interneuron markers including calcium binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin) and neuropeptides (somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, and cholecystokinin) together with either beta1AR or beta2AR to determine the distribution of these receptors in all major subfields of the hippocampus. We found that beta1AR-expressing interneurons were more prevalent in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus than in the dentate gyrus, where they were relatively sparse. beta2AR-expressing interneurons were more uniformly distributed between all three regions of the hippocampus. A high proportion of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the dentate gyrus co-expressed beta2AR. beta1AR labeling was common in interneurons expressing somatostatin and parvalbumin in the CA3 and CA1 regions, particularly in the stratum oriens of these regions. beta2AR labeling was more likely to be found than beta1AR labeling in cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. In contrast, calretinin-containing interneurons were virtually devoid of beta1AR or beta2AR labeling. These regional and interneuron type-specific differences suggest functionally distinct roles for NA in modulating hippocampal activity via activation of betaARs.

  2. [Anti-arrhythmic effect of acupuncture pretreatment in the rat of myocardial ischemia the post-receptor signaling pathway of beta-adrenergic receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun-hong; Fu, Wei-xing; Jin, Zhi-gao; Yu, Xiao-chun

    2006-06-01

    To observe anti-arrhythmic effect of acupuncture pretreatment in the rat of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (MIR) and to explore the role of cAMP and Gsa protein in beta-adrenergic receptor signaling. MIR was produced by ligation and reperfusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery in the rat. Arrhythmic score, content of cAMP and Gsalpha protein in ischemic myocardium were compared among the normal control (NC), ischemia and reperfusion (IR), electroacupuncture (EA) and EA plus propranolol (EAP) groups. The arrhythmic score in the IR group at 10 min after reperfusion was higher than the NC group (P signaling pathway of beta-adrenergic receptor.

  3. Indices of brain beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the learned helplessness animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurguis, G N; Kramer, G; Petty, F

    1996-01-01

    Both stress response and antidepressant drug action may be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta AR). Since learned helplessness is a stress-induced animal model of depression, beta AR are relevant to investigate in this model. To date, studies have measured changes in total receptor density (RT), but have not examined more detailed aspects of signal transduction mechanisms such as coupling of the receptor to GS protein. We have investigated brain beta AR coupling in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats exposed to inescapable shock and then tested for learned helplessness, and in both tested and naive controls using [125I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as the ligand. Both antagonist-saturation and agonist-displacement experiments were conducted, and the specificity for the beta AR was optimized by excluding ICYP binding to 5HT1B receptors. The percentage receptor density in the high-conformational state (%RH) and the ratio of agonist (isoproterenol) dissociation constant from the receptor in the low-/high-conformational states (KL/KH) were used as indices of coupling to GS protein. No significant differences were found between rats developing learned helplessness and non-helpless rats after inescapable stress in any parameter measured in any brain region. In the frontal cortex, exposure to inescapable shock induced beta AR uncoupling from GS protein as suggested by a low KL/KH ratio both in helpless and non-helpless rats but not in either control group. In the hypothalamus, there were trends for higher RL, RT and KL/KH ratio in helpless rats and stressed controls compared to naive controls. These findings suggest that beta AR binding parameters in frontal cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus did not differentiate between helpless and non-helpless rats. Changes in beta AR coupling observed in these brain regions may reflect effects of stress, which appeared to be region-specific, rather than stress-induced behavioral depression.

  4. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  5. Reduced number of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in the myocardium of rats exposed to tobacco smoke

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    Larue, D.; Kato, G.

    1981-04-09

    The concentration of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors--as measured by specific (/sup 3/H)WB-4101 and (-)-(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol binding--was diminished by 60% below control values in the hearts of rats exposed to tobacco smoke. These changes in receptor numbers took place almost immediately after tobacco smoke exposure and were rapidly reversible after termination of the exposure. The dissociation constant, KD, for (/sup 3/H)WB-4101 was identical in exposed (KD . 0.34 +/- 0.09 nM) and control (KD . 0.35 +/- 0.07 nM) hearts but was significantly different in the case of (-)-(3H)dihydroalprenolol binding (exposed, KD . 2.83 +/- 0.30 mM vs. control KD . 5.22 +/- 0.61 nM). For beta-receptor binding there was no significant difference between exposed and control animals in the Ki values for (-)-epinephrine, (-)-norepinephrine, (-)-alprenolol, (+/-)-propranolol or timolol. (-)-Isoproterenol, however, was found to bind with lower affinity in exposed compared with control hearts. For alpha-receptor binding there was no significant difference between control and 'smoked' animals in the Ki values for (-)-epinephrine, (-0)-norepinephrine or phentolamine. The decrease in alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor concentration may be related to the phenomenon of receptor desensitization resulting from a release of catecholamines in rats exposed to tobacco smoke.

  6. The roles of beta-adrenergic receptors in tumorigenesis and the possible use of beta-adrenergic blockers for cancer treatment: possible genetic and cell-signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luong KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Khanh vinh quốc Lương, Lan Thi Hoàng NguyễnVietnamese American Medical Research Foundation, Westminster, California, USAAbstract: Cancer is the leading cause of death in the USA, and the incidence of cancer increases dramatically with age. Beta-adrenergic blockers appear to have a beneficial clinical effect in cancer patients. In this paper, we review the evidence of an association between β-adrenergic blockade and cancer. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine which proteins link β-adrenergic blockade to cancer pathology. In particular, this link involves the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the renin–angiotensin system, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Beta-adrenergic blockers also exert anticancer effects through non-genomic factors, including matrix metalloproteinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide synthase. In conclusion, β-adrenergic blockade may play a beneficial role in cancer treatment. Additional investigations that examine β-adrenergic blockers as cancer therapeutics are required to further elucidate this role.Keywords: β-adrenergic blocker, neoplasm, β-adrenergic antagonism, non-genomic factor

  7. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  8. Mechanism for desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptor-stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes from rats harboring pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokocimer, P G; Maze, M; Vickery, R G; Hoffman, B B

    1988-07-01

    Prolonged stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors with catecholamines leads to desensitization of their ability to activate cAMP accumulation. However, little is known about the relationship between these changes and possible alterations in physiological responses. We have used isolated adipocytes prepared from NEDH rats harboring pheochromocytomas, a norepinephrine-secreting tumor, to address this question. As expected, there was a decrease in the ability of isoproterenol to maximally activate cAMP accumulation in adipocytes from rat harboring pheochromocytoma [323 +/- 107 vs. 707 +/- 145 pmol/10(5) cells.min (mean +/- SD) in controls]. This change was associated with an increase in the EC50 of isoproterenol for activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (5.8 X 10(-8) vs. 2.4 X 10(-8) M in controls) and a decrease in maximal activation of the kinase (38 +/- 16% vs. 77 +/- 14% in controls). For lipolysis there was a loss in sensitivity to isoproterenol but no change in maximal lipolytic rate in the adipocytes from rats harboring pheochromocytoma. For both groups there was a similar relationship between kinase activation and lipolysis; maximal lipolysis had already occurred for protein kinase-A activity ratios less than 30%. Therefore, the blunted cAMP response in adipocytes from rats harboring pheochromocytoma did not impair the maximal lipolytic rate. These results demonstrate that adipocytes can efficiently maintain maximal lipolysis in a desensitized state because of considerable reserve in the biochemical cascade leading to the lipolytic response. In addition, our findings demonstrate that there are no regulatory changes induced by prolonged exposure to catecholamines that are distal to cAMP accumulation.

  9. Pavlovian conditioning of morphine-induced alterations of immune status: evidence for peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussons-Read, M E; Dykstra, L A; Lysle, D T

    1994-09-01

    The present studies examined the involvement of peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor activity in the establishment and expression of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that morphine's immunomodulatory effects can become conditioned to environmental stimuli which predict drug administration. These immune alterations include conditioned changes in natural killer cell activity, interleukin-2 production, and mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation. During the training phase of these experiments, Lewis rats received two conditioning sessions during which a subcutaneous injection of 15 mg/kg morphine sulfate was paired with exposure to a distinctive environment. On the test day, rats were reexposed to the conditioned stimulus prior to sacrifice. Saline or nadolol (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, or 2.0 mg/kg) was administered either prior to the training sessions or prior to the test session. Administration of nadolol prior to training did not affect the development of conditioned alterations of immune status. Conversely, nadolol administration prior to testing completely attenuated the expression of a subset of the conditioned morphine-induced changes in immune status. Taken together, these studies suggest that whereas peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor activity is not required for the establishment of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status, it is involved in the expression of a subset of these conditioned immunomodulatory effects.

  10. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists induce the release of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2, oncostatin M, and vascular endothelial growth factor from macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Doornbos, R.P.; Witkamp, R.F.; Greef, de J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oncostatin M (OSM), and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) are up-regulated in U937 macrophages and peripheral blood macrophages exposed to LPS, beta-adrenergic receptor (ß2-AR) agonists (e.g. zilpaterol, and clenbuterol) and some other agents

  11. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists induce the release of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2, oncostatin M, and vascular endothelial growth factor from macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.C.; Doornbos, R.P.; Witkamp, R.F.; Greef, J. van der; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oncostatin M (OSM), and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) are up-regulated in U937 macrophages and peripheral blood macrophages exposed to LPS, beta-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) agonists (e.g. zilpaterol, and clenbuterol) and some other agen

  12. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists induce the release of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2, oncostatin M, and vascular endothelial growth factor from macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Doornbos, R.P.; Witkamp, R.F.; Greef, J. van der; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oncostatin M (OSM), and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) are up-regulated in U937 macrophages and peripheral blood macrophages exposed to LPS, beta-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonists (e.g. zilpaterol, and clenbuterol) and some other agents

  13. Dynamin-association with agonist-mediated sequestration of beta-adrenergic receptor in single-cell eukaryote Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2004-04-01

    Evidence that dynamin is associated with the sequestration of the Paramecium beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) immunoanalogue is presented. We previously reported a dramatic change in the distribution of betaAR analogue in the subcellular fractions upon isoproterenol treatment: it is redistributed from the membraneous to the cytosolic fraction, as revealed by quantitative image analysis of western blots. Here we confirm and extend this observation by laser scanning confocal and immunogold electron microscopy. In the presence of isoproterenol (10 micro mol l(-1)) betaAR translocated from the cell surface into dynamin-positive vesicles in the cytoplasmic compartment, as observed by dual fluorochrome immunolabeling in a series of the confocal optical sections. Colocalization of betaAR and dynamin in the tiny endocytic vesicles was detected by further electron microscopic studies. Generally receptor sequestration follows its desensitization, which is initiated by receptor phosphorylation by G-protein-coupled receptor kinase. We cloned and sequenced the gene fragment of 407 nucleotides homologous to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARK): its deduced amino acid sequence shows 51.6% homology in 126 amino acids that overlap with the human betaARK2 (GRK3), and may participate in Paramecium betaAR desensitization. These results suggest that the molecular machinery for the desensitization/sequestration of the receptor immunorelated to vertebrate betaAR exists in unicellular PARAMECIUM:

  14. Differential modulation of Beta-adrenergic receptor signaling by trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists.

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    Gunnar Kleinau

    Full Text Available Trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR are rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. TAAR are involved in modulation of neuronal, cardiac and vascular functions and they are potentially linked with neurological disorders like schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Subtype TAAR1, the best characterized TAAR so far, is promiscuous for a wide set of ligands and is activated by trace amines tyramine (TYR, phenylethylamine (PEA, octopamine (OA, but also by thyronamines, dopamine, and psycho-active drugs. Unfortunately, effects of trace amines on signaling of the two homologous β-adrenergic receptors 1 (ADRB1 and 2 (ADRB2 have not been clarified yet in detail. We, therefore, tested TAAR1 agonists TYR, PEA and OA regarding their effects on ADRB1/2 signaling by co-stimulation studies. Surprisingly, trace amines TYR and PEA are partial allosteric antagonists at ADRB1/2, whereas OA is a partial orthosteric ADRB2-antagonist and ADRB1-agonist. To specify molecular reasons for TAAR1 ligand promiscuity and for observed differences in signaling effects on particular aminergic receptors we compared TAAR, tyramine (TAR octopamine (OAR, ADRB1/2 and dopamine receptors at the structural level. We found especially for TAAR1 that the remarkable ligand promiscuity is likely based on high amino acid similarity in the ligand-binding region compared with further aminergic receptors. On the other hand few TAAR specific properties in the ligand-binding site might determine differences in ligand-induced effects compared to ADRB1/2. Taken together, this study points to molecular details of TAAR1-ligand promiscuity and identified specific trace amines as allosteric or orthosteric ligands of particular β-adrenergic receptor subtypes.

  15. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis in search for a putative Paramecium beta-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płatek, A; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis were performed in order to search for a putative beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) in Paramecium using several beta2-adrenergic-specific molecular probes. Under strictly defined RT-PCR conditions DNA species of expected molecular size about 360 bp were generated with the primers corresponding to the universal mammalian beta2-AR sequence tagged sites (located within the 4th and the 6th transmembrane regions of the receptor). This RT-PCR product hybridized in Southern blot analysis with the oligonucleotide probe designed to the highly conservative beta2-AR region involved in G-proteins interaction and located within the amplified region. Northern hybridization was performed on Paramecium total RNA and mRNA with human beta2-AR cDNA and two oligonucleotide probes: the first included Phe 290 involved in agonist binding (Strader et al., 1995) and the second was the backward RT-PCR primer. All these probes revealed the presence of about 2 kb mRNA which is consistent with the size of beta2-AR transcripts found in higher eukaryotes.

  16. Vitamins C and E attenuate apoptosis, beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ ATPase downregulation after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fuzhong; Yan, Chen; Patel, Ravish; Liu, Weimin; Dong, Erdan

    2006-05-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in mediating ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in heart failure (HF), but its mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. In this study we determined whether a combination of antioxidant vitamins reduced myocyte apoptosis, beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) Ca2+ ATPase downregulation in HF after myocardial infarction (MI) and whether these effects were associated with amelioration of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction. Vitamins (vitamin C 300 mg and vitamin E 300 mg) were administered to rabbits 1 week after MI or sham operation for 11 weeks. The results showed that MI rabbits exhibited cardiac dilation and LV dysfunction measured by fractional shortening and the maximal rate of pressure rise (dP/dt), an index of contractility. These changes were associated with elevation of oxidative stress, decreases of mitochondrial Bcl-2 and cytochrome c proteins, increases of cytosolic Bax and cytochrome c proteins, caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and myocyte apoptosis, and downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity and SR Ca2+ ATPase. Combined treatment with vitamins C and E diminished oxidative stress, increased mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein, decreased cytosolic Bax, prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, reduced caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and myocyte apoptosis, blocked beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization and SR Ca2+ ATPase downregulation, and attenuated LV dilation and dysfunction in HF after MI. The results suggest that antioxidant therapy may be beneficial in HF.

  17. Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Mechanisms in Asthma: The New Long-Acting Beta-Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Townley

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to review β-adrenergic receptors and mechanisms in the immediate and late bronchial reaction in asthma and the new long-acting β-agonist. This will be discussed in light of the controversy of the potential adverse effect of regular use of long-acting β-agonists. We studied the effect of formoterol on the late asthmatic response (LAR and airway inflammation in guinea-pigs. Formoterol suppressed the LAR, antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, although isoproterenol failed to inhibit these parameters. β-Adrenergic hyporesponsiveness, and cholinergic and a- adrenergic hyperresponsiveness have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. A decrease in β-adrenoreceptor function can result either from exogenously administered β-agonist or from exposure to allergens resulting in a late bronchial reaction. There is increasing evidence that eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes which are of primary importance in the late bronchial reaction are also modulated by β2- adrenoreceptors. In functional studies of guinea-pig or human isolated trachea and lung parenchyma, PAF and certain cytokines significantly reduced the potency of isoproterenol to reverse methacholine- or histamine-induced contraction. The effect of glucocorticoids on pulmonary β-adrenergic receptors and responses suggests an important role for glucocorticoids to increase β-adrenergic receptors and responsiveness.

  18. Central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the enhancing effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shima; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Akhavan, Maziar M

    2010-03-17

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the beta-adrenergic system in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the beta-adrenergic receptors, the animals were received propranolol (a beta-blocker), or nadolol (a peripherally acting beta-blocker) before each night of five consecutive nights of exercise. Then their learning and memory were tested on the water maze task using a two-trials-per-day for 5 consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that propranolol, but not nadolol reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat. Our findings indicate that central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mediating the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on learning and memory.

  19. Simultaneous stimulation of GABA and beta adrenergic receptors stabilizes isotypes of activated adenylyl cyclase heterocomplex

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    Robichon Alain

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated how the synthesis of cAMP, stimulated by isoproterenol acting through β-adrenoreceptors and Gs, is strongly amplified by simultaneous incubation with baclofen. Baclofen is an agonist of δ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors [GABAB], known to inhibit adenylyl cyclase via Gi. Because these agents have opposite effects on cAMP levels, the unexpected increase in cAMP synthesis when they are applied simultaneously has been intensively investigated. From previous reports, it appears that cyclase type II contributes most significantly to this phenomenon. Results We found that simultaneous application of isoproterenol and baclofen specifically influences the association/dissociation of molecules involved in the induction and termination of cyclase activity. Beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi has a higher affinity for adenylyl cyclase isoform(s when these isoforms are co-associated with Gs. Our data also suggest that, when beta/gamma and Gαs are associated with adenylyl cyclase isoform(s, beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi retards the GTPase activity of Gαs from adrenergic receptor. These reciprocal regulations of subunits of the adenylyl cyclase complex might be responsible for the drastic increase of cAMP synthesis in response to the simultaneous signals. Conclusions Simultaneous signals arriving at a particular synapse converge on molecular detectors of coincidence and trigger specific biochemical events. We hypothesize that this phenomenon comes from the complex molecular architectures involved, including scaffolding proteins that make reciprocal interactions between associated molecules possible. The biochemistry of simultaneous signaling is addressed as a key to synaptic function.

  20. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  1. Ultrastructural characterization of noradrenergic- and beta-adrenergic receptor-containing profiles in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala

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    Claudia Farb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine (NE is thought to play a key role in fear and anxiety, but its role in amygdala-dependent Pavlovian fear conditioning, a major model for understanding the neural basis of fear, is poorly understood. The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA is a critical brain region for fear learning and regulating the effects of stress on memory. To understand better the cellular mechanisms of NE and its adrenergic receptors in the LA, we used antibodies directed against dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH, the synthetic enzyme for NE, or against two different isoforms of the beta-adrenergic receptors (βARs, one that predominately recognizes neurons (βAR 248 and the other astrocytes (βAR 404, to characterize the microenvironments of DβH and βAR. By electron microscopy, most DβH terminals did not make synapses, but when they did, they formed both asymmetric and symmetric synapses. By light microscopy, βARs were present in both neurons and astrocytes. Confocal microscopy revealed that both excitatory and inhibitory neurons express βAR248. By electron microscopy, βAR 248 was present in neuronal cell bodies, dendritic shafts and spines, and some axon terminals and astrocytes. When in dendrites and spines, βAR 248 was frequently concentrated along plasma membranes and at post-synaptic densities of asymmetric (excitatory synapses. βAR 404 was expressed predominately in astrocytic cell bodies and processes. These astrocytic processes were frequently interposed between unlabeled terminals or ensheathed asymmetric synapses. Our findings provide a morphological basis for understanding ways in which NE may modulate transmission by acting via synaptic or non-synaptic mechanisms in the LA.

  2. Alterations in the oxygen deficit-oxygen debt relationships with beta-adrenergic receptor blockade in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R L

    1984-04-01

    The effects of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade (100 mg oral metoprolol) or matched placebo on gas exchange kinetics were studied in six males. Ventilation and gas exchange were monitored in four transitions for each treatment from loadless pedalling (0 W) to a selected work rate (100 W) and back to 0 W. Breath-by-breath data were averaged for analysis. Oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics were significantly slowed at the onset of exercise and recovery by beta-blockade. This resulted in larger oxygen deficit and oxygen debt (671 +/- 115, 586 +/- 87 ml O2, respectively) for beta-blockade than for placebo (497 +/- 87, 474 +/- 104 ml O2). In addition, oxygen deficit was significantly larger than oxygen debt during beta-blockade tests. These results can be explained by greater utilization of oxygen and creatine phosphate stores as well as anaerobic glycolysis at the onset of 100 W exercise with beta-blockade. Carbon dioxide output (VCO2) kinetics were significantly slowed by beta-blockade only at the onset of exercise. Expired ventilation (VE) kinetics were not affected by beta-blockade. At 0 W, VE was significantly reduced by beta-blockade. Heart rate was lower at all times with beta-blockade. Kinetics of heart rate were not affected. These data for VO2 kinetics at the start and end of exercise indicate that even in moderate-intensity exercise, lactic acid production can contribute significantly to energy supply. The use of the term ' alactic ' to describe the deficit and debt associated with this exercise is not appropriate.

  3. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  4. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  5. beta. -adrenergic receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis is increased in aged male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, P.A.; Graham, S.M.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of age on catecholamine-stimulated glycogenolysis was studied in isolated hepatocytes prepared from 3, 12, and 24 month-old rats. Glucose release was stimulated by epinephrine and norepinephrine, this was inhibited by phentolamine and prazosin. Isoproterenol (ISO) stimulated glycogenolysis only in cells from 24 month-old rats, this was blocked by propranolol. In liver plasma membranes, binding of (/sup 3/H)yohimbine (100-130 fmol/mg protein) did not change with age, whereas (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding decreased from 870 fmol/mg at 3 months to 435 fmol/mg at 12 months, but subsequently rose to 656 fmol/mg at 24 months. (/sup 125/I)Cyanopindolol binding increased from 8 fmol/mg at 3 months to 19 fmol/mg at 24 months. The proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high affinity state increased from 28% at 3 months to 42% at 24 months. ISO stimulated adenylate cyclase at 24 months but not at 3 months. Basal, fluoride-, GTP-, and Gpp(NH)p-stimulated activities were 1.4- to 2.4-fold greater at 24 months than at 3 months. These results suggest an age-related increase in the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to ..beta..-receptor stimulation.

  6. Fluorescence histochemical study of the localisation and distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondok, A A; Botros, K G; el-Mohandes, E A

    1988-10-01

    The distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites has been studied in chicken spinal cord and cerebellum using a fluorescent analogue of propranolol, 9-amino-acridin-propranolol (9-AAP). In the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord, beta-adrenoceptor sites were concentrated on cell bodies of alpha-motor neurons of the dorsolateral and ventrolateral nuclear groups of the ventral horn. In the thoracic region, they were present on cell bodies of the preganglionic sympathetic nucleus (dorsal commissural nucleus). In the dorsal horn, the receptor sites were present mainly on cell bodies of columna dorsalis magnocellularis. Sparse distribution of fluorescence was present in other regions of the gray matter. In the cerebellum, a dense distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites was observed on Purkinje cell bodies and their apical dendrites. Sparse distribution of receptor sites was present on fine ramifications of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. Receptor sites were absent in the granule cell layer and the white matter. These observations indicate that alpha-motor neurons, preganglionic sympathetic neurons, neurons of columna dorsalis magnocellularis, and Purkinje cells are adrenoceptive, while granule cells are non-adrenoceptive.

  7. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells Treated with Forskolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, K. Y.; Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted by in vivo administration of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonists. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through the betaAR, and alterations in the population of betaAR could potentially change the ability of the cell to respond to the betaAR agonists. Since the intracellular chemical signal generated by the betaAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of functional betaAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 microM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the betaAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 microM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in betaAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 microM. This increase in PAR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of betaAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc

  8. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of [Beta]-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C Siebenmann; P Rasmussen; H Sørensen; T C Bonne; M Zaar; N J Aachmann-Andersen; N B Nordsborg; N H Secher; C Lundby

    2015-01-01

      Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition...

  9. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via (I{sup 125})iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay.

  10. Effect of. cap alpha. -,. beta. -adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists of the efflux of /sup 22/Na and uptake of /sup 42/K by rat brain cortical slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillis, J.W.; Wu, P.H.; Thierry, D.L.

    1982-03-18

    The effects of norepinephrine on ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices have now been ascertained. /sup 22/Na efflux and /sup 42/K influx are enhanced by norepinephrine. The increase in ion fluxes can be blocked by ouabain, phentolamine and propranolol, suggesting that the catecholamine activates a membrane sodium pump by a receptor-mediated step. The facilitation of /sup 22/Na efflux is stereospecific as demonstrated by the very weak action of D-norepinephrine at 10/sup -5/ M concentration. Various ..cap alpha..-adrenergic and ..beta..-adrenergic receptor agonists, including oxymetazoline, naphazoline, clonidine, tramazoline, methoxamine, phenylephrine, L-isoproterenol and methoxyphenamine are potent stimulants of the sodium pump as demonstrated by their enhancement of ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that norepinephrine hyperpolarizes central neurons by activating an ouabain-sensitive, receptor-mediated sodium pump.

  11. Mapping genetic variants associated with beta-adrenergic responses in inbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Hersch

    Full Text Available β-blockers and β-agonists are primarily used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Inter-individual variability in response to both drug classes is well recognized, yet the identity and relative contribution of the genetic players involved are poorly understood. This work is the first genome-wide association study (GWAS addressing the values and susceptibility of cardiovascular-related traits to a selective β(1-blocker, Atenolol (ate, and a β-agonist, Isoproterenol (iso. The phenotypic dataset consisted of 27 highly heritable traits, each measured across 22 inbred mouse strains and four pharmacological conditions. The genotypic panel comprised 79922 informative SNPs of the mouse HapMap resource. Associations were mapped by Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA, a method that corrects for the population structure and genetic relatedness of the various strains. A total of 205 separate genome-wide scans were analyzed. The most significant hits include three candidate loci related to cardiac and body weight, three loci for electrocardiographic (ECG values, two loci for the susceptibility of atrial weight index to iso, four loci for the susceptibility of systolic blood pressure (SBP to perturbations of the β-adrenergic system, and one locus for the responsiveness of QTc (p<10(-8. An additional 60 loci were suggestive for one or the other of the 27 traits, while 46 others were suggestive for one or the other drug effects (p<10(-6. Most hits tagged unexpected regions, yet at least two loci for the susceptibility of SBP to β-adrenergic drugs pointed at members of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Loci for cardiac-related traits were preferentially enriched in genes expressed in the heart, while 23% of the testable loci were replicated with datasets of the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Altogether these data and validation tests indicate that the mapped loci are relevant to the traits and responses studied.

  12. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Emma André

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The noradrenergic (NA-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning(EL, and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR, regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behaviour in an ‘AAA’ or ‘ABA’ paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze(context-A to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL(unrewarded, whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B, and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded occurred. Typically, in control ‘AAA’ animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control ‘ABA’ animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A behavior on day 5, that was followed (in day 5 by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given.Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the ‘ABA’ paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B. Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5 in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the ‘A’ context.β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  13. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marion Agnès Emma; Wolf, Oliver T.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic (NA)-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning (EL), and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR), regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behavior in an “AAA” or “ABA” paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze (context-A) to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL (unrewarded), whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B), and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded) occurred. Typically, in control “AAA” animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control “ABA” animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A) behavior on day 5, that was succeeded (on day 5) by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given. Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the “ABA” paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B). Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5) in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the “A” context. β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  14. Beta-adrenergic receptors couple to CFTR chloride channels of intercalated mitochondria-rich cells in the heterocellular toad skin epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Amstrup, Jan; Willumsen, Niels J

    2003-12-30

    In the heterocellular toad skin epithelium the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol activates cyclic AMP-dependent Cl(-) channels that are not located in the principal cells. With four experimental approaches, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the signalling pathway targets cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-chloride channels of mitochondria-rich cells. (i) Serosal application of isoproterenol (log(10)EC(50)=-7.1+/-0.2; Hill coefficient=1.1+/-0.2), as well as noradrenaline, activated an anion pathway with an apical selectivity sequence, G(Cl)>G(Br)> or =G(NO(3))>G(I), comparable to the published selectivity sequence of cloned human CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. (ii) Known modulators of human CFTR, glibenclamide (200 micromol/l) and genistein (50 micromol/l), depressed and activated, respectively, the receptor-stimulated G(Cl). Genistein did not modify the anion selectivity. (iii) Transcellular voltage clamp studies of single isolated mitochondria-rich cells revealed functional beta-adrenergic receptors on the basolateral membrane. With approximately 60,000 mitochondria-rich cells per cm(2), the saturating activation of 11.9+/-1.6 nS/cell accounted for the measured isoproterenol-activated transepithelial conductance of 600-900 microS/cm(2). In forskolin-stimulated cells, glibenclamide (200 micromol/l) reversibly inhibited the transcellular conductance by 9.6+/-1.6 nS/cell. (iv) With primers constructed from cloned Xenopus CFTR and PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed mRNA from toad skin, full-length Bufo CFTR cDNA was generated. The derived protein of 1466 residues shows 86% homology with xCFTR and 89% homology with hCFTR. All major functional sequences, that is, the R- and the NBF1- and NBF2-domains are well-conserved as are the predicted transmembrane segments proposed to form the pore of the channel protein. These new results taken together with our previously identified small-conductance CFTR-like Cl

  15. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  16. Dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic effects on gastric antral motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P; Gottrup, F

    1984-01-01

    of bethanechol or pentagastrin inducing motor activity patterns as in the phase III of the MMC and the digestive state respectively. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by dopamine. The effect was significantly blocked by specifically acting dopaminergic blockers, while alpha- and beta......-adrenergic blockers were without any significant effects. Dose-response experiments with bethanechol and dopamine showed inhibition of a non-competitive type. Isoprenaline was used alone and in conjunction with selective blockade of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors during infusion of bethanechol which induces a pattern...... similar to phase III in the migrating myoelectric complex. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by isoprenaline. The effect could be significantly blocked by propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blocker) and by using in conjunction the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker practolol...

  17. Effect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Beta Adrenergic ReceptorAdenylate Cyclase System on Surfaces of Peripheral Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ailin; TIAN Yuke; JIN Shiao

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the level of CAMP, the ratio of cAPM to cGMP,IL-2R expression and IL-2 production in vitro in lymphocytes immediate and 2 weeks after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were significantly lower than those before anesthetics in the patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. These findings suggested that CPB could cause serious damage to adrenergic beta receptor-adenylate cyclase system on circulating lymphocytes surfaces,which might be one of the mechanisms resulting in immunosuppression after open heart surgery with CPB.

  18. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of [beta]-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors.(Report)(Author abstract)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aachmann-Andersen, N.J; Rasmussen, P; Secher, N.H; Zaar, M; Lundby, C; Sorensen, H; Nordsborg, N.B; Bonne, T.C; Siebenmann, C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition...

  19. CRM 1-mediated degradation and agonist-induced down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A

    2006-10-01

    The beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324], we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat beta1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing beta1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in beta1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in beta1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the beta1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of beta1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the beta1-AR mRNAs.

  20. Acupuncture Attenuates Renal Sympathetic Activity and Blood Pressure via Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yang; Wang, Xue-Rui; Li, Fang; Xiao, Ling-Yong; Shi, Guang-Xia

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system, via epinephrine and norepinephrine, regulates β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) expression, and renal sympathetic activation causes sustained increases in blood pressure by enhanced renin release. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) on renal sympathetic activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Unanesthetized rats were subject to daily acupuncture for 2 weeks. Mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored at days 0, 7, and 14 by radiotelemetry. After euthanasia on the 14th day, blood and the kidneys were collected and subject to the following analyses. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were detected by ELISA. The expression of β-ARs was studied by western blotting and PCR. The renin content was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. 14-day acupuncture significantly attenuates the increase of MBP. The HRV indices, the standard deviation of all normal NN intervals (SDNN), and the ratio of the low-frequency component to the high-frequency component (LF/HF) were improved following acupuncture. Renal sympathetic activation induced upregulation of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and renin content were attenuated by acupuncture. In addition, acupuncture decreased β1-AR expression and improved β2-AR expression. These results indicated that acupuncture relieves the increased MBP via the regulation of renal sympathetic activity and β-ARs. PMID:28270938

  1. Post-Retrieval [beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Blockade: Effects on Extinction and Reconsolidation of Cocaine-Cue Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N.; Marshall, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Contexts and discrete cues associated with drug-taking are often responsible for relapse among addicts. Animal models have shown that interference with the reconsolidation of drug-cue memories can reduce seeking of drugs or drug-paired stimuli. One such model is conditioned place preference (CPP) in which an animal is trained to associate a…

  2. Association of beta-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and mortality in carvedilol-treated chronic heart-failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Hjelvang, Brian R

    2011-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT • Chronic heart failure (HF) is a syndrome with increasing prevalence. Though mortality is still high, the introduction of ß-adrenoceptor blockers for its treatment has improved survival considerably. • As is the case for all medical treatment, not all...... patients benefit from ß-adrenoceptor blocker treatment, and stratifying patients to different ß-adrenoceptor blockers by the use of pharmacogenomics might be of great value in improving HF therapy. • Previous studies have shown that the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ADRB1 Arg389Gly and ADRB2...... Gln27Glu interact with the ß-adrenoceptor blockers metoprolol and carvedilol, respectively. These interactions have led to stratified responses with regard to surrogate parameters, e.g. left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pulse and blood pressure. • Several studies have failed to show...

  3. beta-Adrenergic agonist activity of a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, J G; Kaveri, S V; Durieu, O; Delavier, C; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1985-03-01

    Hybridoma cells bearing monoclonal antibody against the beta-adrenergic ligand alprenolol were used as an immunogen to raise monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies. Of six anti-idiotypic antibodies, which inhibit ligand binding, three were able to recognize beta-adrenergic receptors. One of them, mAb2B4, an IgM that could be amplified into ascites, binds to the beta-adrenergic catecholamine receptors of intact epidermoid A431 cells and precipitates receptors solubilized from plasma membranes by digitonin. This antibody identifies the beta 2-adrenergic receptor of A431 cells as a single 55-kDa protein and stimulates adenylate cyclase activity. This stimulation is inhibited by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol.

  4. Ser-2030, but not Ser-2808, is the major phosphorylation site in cardiac ryanodine receptors responding to protein kinase A activation upon beta-adrenergic stimulation in normal and failing hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bailong; Zhong, Guofeng; Obayashi, Masakazu; Yang, Dongmei; Chen, Keyun; Walsh, Michael P; Shimoni, Yakhin; Cheng, Heping; Ter Keurs, Henk; Chen, S R Wayne

    2006-05-15

    We have recently shown that RyR2 (cardiac ryanodine receptor) is phosphorylated by PKA (protein kinase A/cAMP-dependent protein kinase) at two major sites, Ser-2030 and Ser-2808. In the present study, we examined the properties and physiological relevance of phosphorylation of these two sites. Using site- and phospho-specific antibodies, we demonstrated that Ser-2030 of both recombinant and native RyR2 from a number of species was phosphorylated by PKA, indicating that Ser-2030 is a highly conserved PKA site. Furthermore, we found that the phosphorylation of Ser-2030 responded to isoproterenol (isoprenaline) stimulation in rat cardiac myocytes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas Ser-2808 was already substantially phosphorylated before beta-adrenergic stimulation, and the extent of the increase in Ser-2808 phosphorylation after beta-adrenergic stimulation was much less than that for Ser-2030. Interestingly, the isoproterenol-induced phosphorylation of Ser-2030, but not of Ser-2808, was markedly inhibited by PKI, a specific inhibitor of PKA. The basal phosphorylation of Ser-2808 was also insensitive to PKA inhibition. Moreover, Ser-2808, but not Ser-2030, was stoichiometrically phosphorylated by PKG (protein kinase G). In addition, we found no significant phosphorylation of RyR2 at the Ser-2030 PKA site in failing rat hearts. Importantly, isoproterenol stimulation markedly increased the phosphorylation of Ser-2030, but not of Ser-2808, in failing rat hearts. Taken together, these observations indicate that Ser-2030, but not Ser-2808, is the major PKA phosphorylation site in RyR2 responding to PKA activation upon beta-adrenergic stimulation in both normal and failing hearts, and that RyR2 is not hyperphosphorylated by PKA in heart failure. Our results also suggest that phosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2030 may be an important event associated with altered Ca2+ handling and cardiac arrhythmia that is commonly observed in heart failure upon beta-adrenergic

  5. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  6. Development of a multiplex non-radioactive receptor assay : the benzodiazepine receptor, the serotonin transporter and the beta-adrenergic receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Lutea A. A.; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C. Margot; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2007-01-01

    Binding assays still form a fundamental part of modem drug development. Receptor binding assays are mostly based on radioactivity because of their speed, ease of use and reproducibility. Disadvantages, such as health hazards and production of radioactive waste, have prompted the development of non-r

  7. Alpha and beta adrenergic effects on metabolism in contracting, perfused muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Galbo, H

    1982-01-01

    The role of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation for the effect of epinephrine on muscle glycogenolysis, glucose- and oxygen uptake and muscle performance was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter at rest and during electrical stimulation (60 contractions/min). Adrenergic stimulation...... was obtained by epinephrine in a physiological concentration (2.4 X 10(-8) M) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade by 10(-5) M phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Epinephrine enhanced net glycogenolysis during contractions most markedly in slow-twitch red fibers. In these fibers the effect...... of alpha-adrenergic receptors and had a positive inotropic effect during contractions which was abolished by alpha- as well as by beta-adrenergic blockade. The results indicate that epinephrine has profound effects on contracting muscle, and that these effects are elicited through different combinations...

  8. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  9. Intracoronary genistein acutely increases coronary blood flow in anesthetized pigs through beta-adrenergic mediated nitric oxide release and estrogenic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David A S G; Uberti, Francesca; Caimmi, Philippe Primo; Surico, Nicola; Vacca, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    Various studies have suggested that the phytoestrogen genistein has beneficial cardioprotective and vascular effects. However, there has been scarce information regarding the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and its mechanisms including estrogen receptors, autonomic nervous system, and nitric oxide (NO). The present study was planned to determine the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and the mechanisms involved. In anesthetized pigs, changes in left anterior descending coronary artery caused by intracoronary infusion of genistein at constant heart rate and arterial pressure were assessed using ultrasound flowmeters. In 25 pigs, genistein infused at 0.075 mg/min increased coronary blood flow by about 16.3%. This response was graded in a further five pigs by increasing the infused dose of the genistein between 0.007 and 0.147 mg/min. In the 25 pigs, blockade of cholinergic receptors (iv atropine; five pigs) and alpha-adrenergic receptors (iv phentolamine; five pigs) did not abolish the coronary response to genistein, whose effects were prevented by blockade of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (iv butoxamine; five pigs), nitric oxide synthase (intracoronary N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; five pigs) and estrogenic receptors (ERs; ERalpha/ERbeta; intracoronary fulvestrant; five pigs). In porcine aortic endothelial cells, genistein induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO production through ERK 1/2, Akt, and p38 MAPK pathways, which was prevented by the concomitant treatment by butoxamine and fulvestrant. In conclusion, genistein primarily caused coronary vasodilation the mechanism of which involved ERalpha/ERbeta and the release of NO through vasodilatory beta(2)-adrenoreceptor effects.

  10. Phospholemman and beta-adrenergic stimulation in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JuFang; Gao, Erhe; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Li, Jifen; Koch, Walter J; Tucker, Amy L; Philipson, Kenneth D; Chan, Tung O; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorylation at serine 68 of phospholemman (PLM) in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation results in simultaneous inhibition of cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger NCX1 and relief of inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The role of PLM in mediating beta-adrenergic effects on in vivo cardiac function was investigated with congenic PLM-knockout (KO) mice. Echocardiography showed similar ejection fraction between wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated higher baseline contractility (+dP/dt) but similar relaxation (-dP/dt) in PLM-KO mice. In response to isoproterenol (Iso), maximal +dP/dt was similar but maximal -dP/dt was reduced in PLM-KO mice. Dose-response curves to Iso (0.5-25 ng) for WT and PLM-KO hearts were superimposable. Maximal +dP/dt was reached 1-2 min after Iso addition and declined with time in WT but not PLM-KO hearts. In isolated myocytes paced at 2 Hz. contraction and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) transient amplitudes and [Na(+)](i) reached maximum 2-4 min after Iso addition, followed by decline in WT but not PLM-KO myocytes. Reducing pacing frequency to 0.5 Hz resulted in much smaller increases in [Na(+)](i) and no decline in contraction and [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitudes with time in Iso-stimulated WT and PLM-KO myocytes. Although baseline Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase current was 41% higher in PLM-KO myocytes because of increased alpha(1)- but not alpha(2)-subunit activity, resting [Na(+)](i) was similar between quiescent WT and PLM-KO myocytes. Iso increased alpha(1)-subunit current (I(alpha1)) by 73% in WT but had no effect in PLM-KO myocytes. Iso did not affect alpha(2)-subunit current (I(alpha2)) in WT and PLM-KO myocytes. In both WT and NCX1-KO hearts, PLM coimmunoprecipitated with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-subunits, indicating that association of PLM with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase did not require NCX1. We conclude that under stressful conditions in which [Na(+)](i) was high, beta-adrenergic agonist

  11. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of aminoalkanol derivatives of selected azatricycloundecane system for binding with beta-adrenergic and 5HT1A and 5HT2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, Jerzy; Kuran, Bozena

    2007-01-01

    A series of aminoalkanol derivatives of 8,11-dimethyl-3,5-dioxo-4-azatricyclo[5.2.2.0(2,6)] undec-8-en-1-yl acetate and 1,11-dimethyl-4-azatricyclo[5.2.2.0(2,6)]undecane-3,5,8-trione was prepared. The pharmacological profile of selected compounds was evaluated for affinity to beta-adrenoreceptors and serotoninergic receptors (5HT1A and 5HT2A).

  12. Impaired beta-adrenergic response and decreased L-type calcium current of hypertrophied left ventricular myocytes in postinfarction heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Saraiva

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Infarct-induced heart failure is usually associated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ß-adrenergic responsiveness. However, conflicting results have been reported concerning the density of L-type calcium current (I Ca(L, and the mechanisms underlying the decreased ß-adrenergic inotropic response. We determined I Ca(L density, cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]i transients, and the effects of ß-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol in a model of postinfarction heart failure in rats. Left ventricular myocytes were obtained by enzymatic digestion 8-10 weeks after infarction. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained using the patch-clamp technique. [Ca2+]i transients were investigated via fura-2 fluorescence. ß-Adrenergic receptor density was determined by [³H]-dihydroalprenolol binding to left ventricle homogenates. Postinfarction myocytes showed a significant 25% reduction in mean I Ca(L density (5.7 ± 0.28 vs 7.6 ± 0.32 pA/pF and a 19% reduction in mean peak [Ca2+]i transients (0.13 ± 0.007 vs 0.16 ± 0.009 compared to sham myocytes. The isoproterenol-stimulated increase in I Ca(L was significantly smaller in postinfarction myocytes (Emax: 63.6 ± 4.3 vs 123.3 ± 0.9% in sham myocytes, but EC50 was not altered. The isoproterenol-stimulated peak amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients was also blunted in postinfarction myocytes. Adenylate cyclase activation through forskolin produced similar I Ca(L increases in both groups. ß-Adrenergic receptor density was significantly reduced in homogenates from infarcted hearts (Bmax: 93.89 ± 20.22 vs 271.5 ± 31.43 fmol/mg protein in sham myocytes, while Kd values were similar. We conclude that postinfarction myocytes from large infarcts display reduced I Ca(L density and peak [Ca2+]i transients. The response to ß-adrenergic stimulation was also reduced and was probably related to ß-adrenergic receptor down-regulation and not to changes in adenylate cyclase activity.

  13. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. II. Comparison of beta-adrenergic responsiveness of rat ascites hepatoma cells with cultured normal rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Takemoto, N; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1985-05-01

    The pharmacological properties of beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells were compared with those in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. Adenylate cyclases in the homogenates of cultured normal rat liver cells and rat ascites hepatoma cells, AH44, AH66, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974, were all activated by isoproterenol or NaF to different degrees. The enzyme in rat liver cells was activated by several beta 2-agonists but those in all hepatoma cells hardly responded. Furthermore, salbutamol, a beta 2-partial agonist, antagonized the cyclase activation by isoproterenol in AH130 cells. The Kact value of isoproterenol for the activation of adenylate cyclase in AH130 cells was smaller than that in rat liver cells. A comparison of the Ki values of beta-antagonists for the inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cyclase activity shows that while the Ki values of propranolol and butoxamine in AH130 cells were similar to those in rat liver cells, a significant difference was observed in the values for beta 1-selective antagonists between AH130 cells and rat liver cells. The Ki values of metoprolol and atenolol for AH130 cells were 137- and 90-fold lower, respectively, than for normal rat liver cells. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells including AH130 cells have similar properties to the mammalian beta 1-receptor.

  14. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AM Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Wuethrich, A. J.; Hancock, D. L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 days of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 days. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-day period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and breast muscle groups of twelve-day chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 micron clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 days beginning on the seventh day in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes were significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of MHC was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast and leg muscle cultures; however, MHC quantity was 50- 100% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 nM and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The Beta-AR population was 4,000-7,000 Beta-AR per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum, with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle cultures. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the Beta-AR population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 18,000-20,000 Beta-AR per cell. Basal concentration of cAMP was not significantly affected by any of the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 micron isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP concentration above basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were stimulated with 1 micron isoproterenol, increases of 600

  15. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were

  16. Cooperative regulation of non-small cell lung carcinoma by nicotinic and beta-adrenergic receptors: a novel target for intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein A N Al-Wadei

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death; 80-85% of lung cancer cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Smoking is a documented risk factor for the development of this cancer. Although nicotine does not have the ability to initiate carcinogenic events, recent studies have implicated nicotine in growth stimulation of NSCLC. Using three NSCLC cell lines (NCI-H322, NCI-H441 and NCI-H1299, we identified the cooperation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs as principal regulators of these effects. Proliferation was measured by thymidine incorporation and MTT assays, and Western blots were used to monitor the upregulation of the nAChRs and activation of signaling molecules. Noradrenaline and GABA were measured by immunoassays. Nicotine-treated NSCLC cells showed significant induction of the α7nAChR and α4nAChR, along with significant inductions of p-CREB and p-ERK1/2 accompanied by increases in the stress neurotransmitter noradrenaline, which in turn led to the observed increase in DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Effects on cell proliferation and signaling proteins were reversed by the α7nAChR antagonist α-BTX or the β-blocker propranolol. Nicotine treatment also down-regulated expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD 65 and the level of endogenous GABA, while treatment of NSCLC cells with GABA inhibited cell proliferation. Interestingly, GABA acts by reducing β-adrenergic activated cAMP signaling. Our findings suggest that nicotine-induced activation of this autocrine noradrenaline-initiated signaling cascade and concomitant deficiency in inhibitory GABA, similar to modulation of these neurotransmitters in the nicotine-addicted brain, may contribute to the development of NSCLC in smokers. Our data suggest that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements facilitates growth and progression of NSCLC and that pharmacological intervention by β blocker may

  17. The Relationship between Birthweight and Longitudinal Changes of Blood Pressure Is Modulated by Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Genes: The Bogalusa Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the genetic influence of β-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms (β2-AR Arg16Gly and β3-AR Trp64Arg on the relationship of birthweight to longitudinal changes of blood pressure (BP from childhood to adulthood in 224 black and 515 white adults, aged 21–47 years, enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study. Blacks showed significantly lower birthweight and frequencies of β2-AR Gly16 and β3-AR Trp64 alleles and higher BP levels and age-related trends than whites. In multivariable regression analyses using race-adjusted BP and birthweight, low birthweight was associated with greater increase in age-related trend of systolic BP (standardized regression coefficient β=−0.09, P=.002 and diastolic BP (β=−0.07, P=.037 in the combined sample of blacks and whites, adjusting for the first BP measurement in childhood, sex, age, and gestational age. Adjustment for the current body mass index strengthened the birthweight-BP association. Importantly, the strength of the association, measured as regression coefficients, was modulated by the combination of β2-AR and β3-AR genotypes for systolic (P=.042 for interaction and diastolic BP age-related trend (P=.039 for interaction, with blacks and whites showing a similar trend in the interaction. These findings indicate that the intrauterine programming of BP regulation later in life depends on β-AR genotypes.

  18. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  19. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of phagocytosis in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium aurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E

    1989-08-01

    Bete-adrenergic agonists isoproterenol and norepinephrine enhanced phagocytosis in Paramecium. Stimulation was stereospecific, dose-dependent and inhibited by the beta-agonists propranolol and alprenolol. Phorbol ester and forskolin potentiated the stimulatory effect of catecholamines on Paramecium phagocytosis. The dansyl analogue of propranolol (DAPN) was used for fluorescent visualization of the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in Paramecium which have been found to be localized at the cell membrane and within the membrane of the nascent digestive vacuoles. The appearance of the characteristic fluorescent pattern has been blocked by 1-propranolol.

  20. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  1. Ontogenic loss of brown adipose tissue sensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation in the ovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Michael A; Sadiq, Fouzia; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Karamitri, Angeliki; Trayhurn, Paul; Hazlerigg, David G

    2007-01-01

    In ruminants and other large animals, expression of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is confined to the perinatal period when it plays a key role in nonshivering thermogenesis. This study determined whether loss of expression of the BAT phenotype was due to reduced response to a beta-agonist, isoprenaline, and expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family [PPARalpha, PPARgamma, PPAR coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha)], which regulates UCP1 gene expression. Perirenal adipose tissue (PAT) was sampled from ovine fetuses, newborn lambs, and lambs on d 1, 5, 7, and 21 of life. UCP1 mRNA and protein in PAT increased from d 123 of fetal life to reach a maximum at birth followed by a rapid decrease over the first 5 d of life. Expression of the coactivator, PGC-1alpha and PPAR alpha, peaked between fetal day 123 and birth, and then declined to undetectable levels in the first days of life. In vivo administration of isoprenaline was able to induce expression of UCP1, PGC-1alpha, and PPARalpha in BAT up to 5 d of age but thereafter was ineffective. In vitro addition of beta-receptor, PPARalpha, and PPARgamma agonists were unable to overcome the suppression of UCP1, PPARalpha, and PPARgamma expression observed in differentiated adipocytes prepared from 30-d-old compared with 1-d-old lambs. These data are consistent with a model in which postnatal loss of UCP1 expression and beta-adrenergic induction of the brown adipocyte phenotype is due to loss of expression of PGC-1alpha and PPARalpha.

  2. beta-Adrenergic activation reveals impaired cardiac calcium handling at early stage of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    op den Buijs, Jorn; Miklós, Zsuzsanna; van Riel, Natal A W; Prestia, Christina M; Szenczi, Orsolya; Tóth, András; Van der Vusse, Ger J; Szabó, Csaba; Ligeti, László; Ivanics, Tamás

    2005-01-21

    Cardiac function is known to be impaired in diabetes. Alterations in intracellular calcium handling have been suggested to play a pivotal role. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic activation can reveal the functional derangements of intracellular calcium handling of the 4-week diabetic heart. Langendorff perfused hearts of 4-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were subjected to the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol. Cyclic changes in [Ca(2+)](i) levels were measured throughout the cardiac cycle using Indo-1 fluorescent dye. Based on the computational analysis of the [Ca(2+)](i) transient the kinetic parameters of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and the ryanodine receptor were determined by minimizing the squared error between the simulated and the experimentally obtained [Ca(2+)](i) transient. Under unchallenged conditions, hemodynamic parameters were comparable between control and diabetic hearts. Isoproterenol administration stimulated hemodynamic function to a greater extent in control than in diabetic hearts, which was exemplified by more pronounced increases in rate of pressure development and decline. Under unchallenged conditions, [Ca(2+)](i) amplitude and rate of rise and decline of [Ca(2+)](i) as measured throughout the cardiac cycle were comparable between diabetic and control hearts. Differences became apparent under beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. Upon beta-activation the rate-pressure product showed a blunted response, which was accompanied by a diminished rise in [Ca(2+)](i) amplitude in diabetic hearts. Computational analysis revealed a reduced function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-release channel in response to beta-adrenoceptor challenge. Alterations in Ca(2+)(i) handling may play a causative role in depressed hemodynamic performance of the challenged heart at an early stage of diabetes.

  3. Beta-adrenergic Blockade at Memory Encoding, but Not Retrieval, Decreases the Subjective Sense of Recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Lackovic, Sandra F; Tobe, Russell H; Leventhal, Bennett L; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Humans remember emotional events not only better but also exhibit a qualitatively distinct recollective experience-that is, emotion intensifies the subjective vividness of the memory, the sense of reliving the event, and confidence in the accuracy of the memory [Phelps, E. A., & Sharot, T. How (and why) emotion enhances the subjective sense of recollection. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17, 147-152, 2008]. Although it has been demonstrated that activation of the beta-adrenergic system, linked to increases in stress hormone levels and physiological arousal, mediates enhanced emotional memory accuracy, the mechanism underlying the increased subjective sense of recollection is unknown. Behavioral evidence suggests that increased arousal associated with emotional events, either at encoding or retrieval, underlies their increased subjective sense of recollection. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject design, we showed that reducing arousal at encoding through oral intake of 80-mg of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol decreases the subjective sense of recollection for both negative and neutral stimuli 24 hr later. In contrast, administration of propranolol before memory retrieval did not alter the subjective sense of recollection. These results suggest that the neurohormonal changes underlying increased arousal at the time of memory formation, rather than the time of memory retrieval, modulate the subjective sense of recollection.

  4. Beta adrenergic blockade reduces utilitarian judgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Sylvia, Terbeck; Kahane, Guy; Guy, Kahane; McTavish, Sarah; Sarah, McTavish; Savulescu, Julian; Julian, Savulescu; Levy, Neil; Neil, Levy; Hewstone, Miles; Miles, Hewstone; Cowen, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) significantly reduced heart rate, but had no effect on self-reported mood. Importantly, propranolol made participants more likely to judge harmful actions as morally unacceptable, but only in dilemmas where harms were 'up close and personal'. In addition, longer response times for such personal dilemmas were only found for the placebo group. Finally, judgments in personal dilemmas by the propranolol group were more decisive. These findings indicate that noradrenergic pathways play a role in responses to moral dilemmas, in line with recent work implicating emotion in moral decision-making. However, contrary to current theorising, these findings also suggest that aversion to harming is not driven by emotional arousal. Our findings are also of significant practical interest given that propranolol is a widely used drug in different settings, and is currently being considered as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder in military and rescue service personnel.

  5. Association between Selective Beta-adrenergic Drugs and Blood Pressure Elevation: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Selective beta-adrenergic drugs are used clinically to treat various diseases. Because of imperfect receptor selectivity, beta-adrenergic drugs cause some adverse drug events by stimulating other adrenergic receptors. To examine the association between selective beta-adrenergic drugs and blood pressure elevation, we reviewed the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Reports (JADERs) submitted to the Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. We used the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Preferred Terms extracted from Standardized MedDRA queries for hypertension to identify events related to blood pressure elevation. Spontaneous adverse event reports from April 2004 through May 2015 in JADERs, a data mining algorithm, and the reporting odds ratio (ROR) were used for quantitative signal detection, and assessed by the case/non-case method. Safety signals are considered significant if the ROR estimates and lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) exceed 1. A total of 2021 reports were included in this study. Among the nine drugs examined, significant signals were found, based on the 95%CI for salbutamol (ROR: 9.94, 95%CI: 3.09-31.93) and mirabegron (ROR: 7.52, 95%CI: 4.89-11.55). The results of this study indicate that some selective beta-adrenergic drugs are associated with blood pressure elevation. Considering the frequency of their indications, attention should be paid to their use in elderly patients to avoid adverse events.

  6. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  7. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Hugo H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cystic ovarian disease (COD is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5mm, preovulatory (10mm and cystic follicles (25mm. Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development.

  8. PET measures of pre- and post-synaptic cardiac beta adrenergic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Jeanne M.; Stratton, John R.; Levy, Wayne; Poole, Jeanne E.; Shoner, Steven C.; Stuetzle, Werner; Caldwell, James H. E-mail: jcald@u.washington.edu

    2003-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography was used to measure global and regional cardiac {beta}-adrenergic function in 19 normal subjects and 9 congestive heart failure patients. [{sup 11}C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine was used to image norepinephrine transporter function as an indicator of pre-synaptic function and [{sup 11}C]-CGP12177 was used to measure cell surface {beta}-receptor density as an indicator of post-synaptic function. Pre-synaptic, but not post-synaptic, function was significantly different between normals and CHF patients. Pre-synaptic function was well matched to post-synaptic function in the normal hearts but significantly different and poorly matched in the CHF patients studied. This imaging technique can help us understand regional sympathetic function in cardiac disease.

  9. Beta adrenergic overstimulation impaired vascular contractility via actin-cytoskeleton disorganization in rabbit cerebral artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Kyu Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Beta adrenergic overstimulation may increase the vascular damage and stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms of beta adrenergic overstimulation in cerebrovascular dysfunctions are not well known. We investigated the possible cerebrovascular dysfunction response to isoproterenol induced beta-adrenergic overstimulation (ISO in rabbit cerebral arteries (CAs. METHODS: ISO was induced in six weeks aged male New Zealand white rabbit (0.8-1.0 kg by 7-days isoproterenol injection (300 μg/kg/day. We investigated the alteration of protein expression in ISO treated CAs using 2DE proteomics and western blot analysis. Systemic properties of 2DE proteomics result were analyzed using bioinformatics software. ROS generation and following DNA damage were assessed to evaluate deteriorative effect of ISO on CAs. Intracellular Ca(2+ level change and vascular contractile response to vasoactive drug, angiotensin II (Ang II, were assessed to evaluate functional alteration of ISO treated CAs. Ang II-induced ROS generation was assessed to evaluated involvement of ROS generation in CA contractility. RESULTS: Proteomic analysis revealed remarkably decreased expression of cytoskeleton organizing proteins (e.g. actin related protein 1A and 2, α-actin, capping protein Z beta, and vimentin and anti-oxidative stress proteins (e.g. heat shock protein 9A and stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 in ISO-CAs. As a cause of dysregulation of actin-cytoskeleton organization, we found decreased level of RhoA and ROCK1, which are major regulators of actin-cytoskeleton organization. As functional consequences of proteomic alteration, we found the decreased transient Ca(2+ efflux and constriction response to angiotensin II and high K(+ in ISO-CAs. ISO also increased basal ROS generation and induced oxidative damage in CA; however, it decreased the Ang II-induced ROS generation rate. These results indicate that ISO disrupted actin cytoskeleton proteome network

  10. Role of prostaglandin E2 in alterations of the beta-adrenergic system from rat eclamptic uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, M E; Borda, E S; Sterin-Borda, L; Arregger, A; Andrada, E C

    1995-09-28

    The inotropic effect of isoproterenol, as well as the beta-adrenoceptor population, was measured in pregnant uterine tissue from female spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) (control group: C) and female SHR that were grafted with skin from Holtzman male rats (eclamptic group: E). The Kd value of the concentration-response curve of isoproterenol was higher for uteri from E rats than C rats. This phenomenon was not accompanied by a modification in the expression of beta-adrenoceptors. Inhibition of the synthesis of prostaglandins prevented the hyporeactivity to isoproterenol during eclampsia. Moreover, uteri from E rats generated and released greater amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than uteri from C rats, even in the presence or absence of isoproterenol. In addition, whereas isoproterenol administered alone increased basal cyclic AMP (cAMP) production from C uteri, PGE2 administered alone enhanced cAMP production in E uterine tissue. These results suggest that the decrease in beta-adrenergic response to the agonist in E rats is ascribed to PGE2 production. The abnormal reactivity to the beta-agonist could be associated with a heterologous desensitization of uterine beta-adrenoceptors exerted by PGE2 overload in uteri from E rats. These results bear directly on the regulation of uterine motility during pregnancy, since an impaired response to beta-adrenergic innervation could lead to increased uterine motility, impairing the maintenance of pregnancy.

  11. A single bout of exercise induces beta-adrenergic desensitization in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion-Latard, F; De Glisezinski, I; Crampes, F; Berlan, M; Galitzky, J; Suljkovicova, H; Riviere, D; Stich, V

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether physiological activation of the sympathetic nervous system induced by exercise changes adipose tissue responsiveness to catecholamines in humans. Lipid mobilization in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was studied with the use of a microdialysis method in 11 nontrained men (age: 22. 3 +/- 1.5 yr; body mass index: 23.0 +/- 1.6). Adipose tissue adrenergic sensitivity was explored with norepinephrine, dobutamine (beta(1)-agonist), or terbutaline (beta(2)-agonist) perfused during 30 min through probes before and after 60-min exercise (50% of the maximal aerobic power). The increase in extracellular glycerol concentration during infusion was significantly lower after the exercise when compared with the increase observed before the exercise (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.01, respectively, for norepinephrine, dobutamine, and terbutaline). In a control experiment realized without exercise, no difference in norepinephrine-induced glycerol increase between the two infusions was observed. To assess the involvement of catecholamines in the blunted beta-adrenergic-induced lipolytic response after exercise, adipose tissue adrenergic sensitivity was explored with two 60-min infusions of norepinephrine or epinephrine separated by a 60-min interval. With both catecholamines, the increase in glycerol was significantly lower during the second infusion (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that aerobic exercise, which increased adrenergic activity, induces a desensitization in beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic lipolytic pathways in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  12. The rush to adrenaline: drugs in sport acting on the beta-adrenergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E; Loiacono, R; Summers, R J

    2008-06-01

    Athletes attempt to improve performance with drugs that act on the beta-adrenergic system directly or indirectly. Of three beta-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes, the beta(2)-AR is the main target in sport; they have bronchodilator and anabolic actions and enhance anti-inflammatory actions of corticosteroids. Although demonstrable in animal experiments and humans, there is little evidence that these properties can significantly improve performance in trained athletes. Their actions may also be compromised by receptor desensitization and by common, naturally occurring receptor mutations (polymorphisms) that can influence receptor signalling and desensitization properties in individuals. Indirectly acting agents affect release and reuptake of noradrenaline and adrenaline, thereby influencing all AR subtypes including the three beta-ARs. These agents can have potent psychostimulant effects that provide an illusion of better performance that does not usually translate into improvement in practice. Amphetamines and cocaine also have considerable potential for cardiac damage. beta-AR antagonists (beta-blockers) are used in sports that require steadiness and accuracy, such as archery and shooting, where their ability to reduce heart rate and muscle tremor may improve performance. They have a deleterious effect in endurance sports because they reduce physical performance and maximum exercise load. Recent studies have identified that many beta-AR antagonists not only block the actions of agonists but also activate other (mitogen-activated PK) signalling pathways influencing cell growth and fate. The concept that many compounds previously regarded as 'blockers' may express their own spectrum of pharmacological properties has potentially far-reaching consequences for the use of drugs both therapeutically and illicitly.

  13. A comparison of locomotor responses to some psychotropic drugs and cerebral receptors in the Acomys cahirinus and the laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marona-Lewicka, D; Michaluk, J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L; Vetulani, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative studies of the laboratory mouse and Acomys cahirinus have shown differences in their motor activity patterns and motor responses to morphine, apomorphine and clonidine. The two species also differed in respect of the density of cerebral alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but no significant differences between other types of receptors (alpha 1-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, opiate mu and delta, and spiroperidol binding sites) were found. It is suggested that the high excitability of the Acomys may be related to a deficit in the inhibitory noradrenergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  14. Non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade prevents reduction of the cerebral metabolic ratio during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Rasmussen, P.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    of a non-selective beta-adrenergic (beta(1) + beta(2)) receptor antagonist (propranolol) reduced heart rate (69 +/- 8 to 58 +/- 6 beats min(-1)) and exercise capacity (239 +/- 42 to 209 +/- 31 W; P exercise with propranolol, the increase in a......Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of oxygen to carbohydrates [O(2)/(glucose + (1/2)lactate)], but whether this ratio is influenced by adrenergic stimulation is not known. In eight males, incremental cycle ergometry increased arterial lactate to 15.3 +/- 4.2 mm (mean +/- s.......d.) and the arterial-jugular venous (a-v) difference from -0.02 +/- 0.03 mm at rest to 1.0 +/- 0.5 mm (P increased from 0.7 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mm (P

  15. Beta-adrenergically stimulated fat oxidation is diminished in middle-aged compared to young subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, E.E.; van Baak, M.A.; Saris, W.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of aging on beta-adrenergically mediated substrate utilization was investigated in nine young (25.2 +/- 1.7 yr old) and eight older males (52.9 +/- 2.1 yr old), matched for body weight and body composition. In a first experiment, the nonselective beta-agonist isoprenaline (ISO) was

  16. Beta-adrenergic modulation of tremor and corticomuscular coherence in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Baker

    Full Text Available Coherence between the bioelectric activity of sensorimotor cortex and contralateral muscles can be observed around 20 Hz. By contrast, physiological tremor has a dominant frequency around 10 Hz. Although tremor has multiple sources, it is partly central in origin, reflecting a component of motoneuron discharge at this frequency. The motoneuron response to ~20 Hz descending input could be altered by non-linear interactions with ~10 Hz motoneuron firing. We investigated this further in eight healthy human subjects by testing the effects of the beta-adrenergic agents propranolol (non-selective β-antagonist and salbutamol (β(2-agonist, which are known to alter the size of physiological tremor. Corticomuscular coherence was assessed during an auxotonic precision grip task; tremor was quantified using accelerometry during index finger extension. Experiments with propranolol used a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. A single oral dose of propranolol (40 mg significantly increased beta band (15.3-32.2 Hz corticomuscular coherence compared with placebo, but reduced tremor in the 6.2-11.9 Hz range. Salbutamol (2.5 mg was administered by inhalation. Whilst salbutamol significantly increased tremor amplitude as expected, it did not change corticomuscular coherence. The opposite direction of the effects of propranolol on corticomuscular coherence and tremor, and the fact that salbutamol enhances tremor but does not affect coherence, implies that the magnitude of corticomuscular coherence is little influenced by non-linear interactions with 10 Hz oscillations in motoneurons or the periphery. Instead, we suggest that propranolol and salbutamol may affect both tremor and corticomuscular coherence partly via a central site of action.

  17. DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue is under. beta. -adrenergic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehnmark, S.; Nedergaard, J. (Univ. of Stockholm (Sweden))

    1989-02-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue was followed with injections of ({sup 3}H)thymidine. Cold exposure led to a large increase in the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum after 8 days, after which the activity abruptly ceased. A series of norepinephrine injections was in itself able to increase ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation. When norepinephrine was injected in combination with the {alpha}-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or with the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, the stimulation was fully blocked by propranolol. It is suggested that stimulation of DNA synthesis in brown adipose tissue is a {beta}-adrenergically mediated process and that the tissue is an interesting model for studies of physiological control of DNA synthesis.

  18. [Sleep disturbances in Smith-Magenis syndrome: treatment with melatonin and beta-adrenergic antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Thillo, A; Devriendt, K; Willekens, D

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome is a generic disorder, characterised by physical, neurological and behavioural features and caused by a 17p11.2 deletion. Patients with this syndrome typically display an inversion of the sleep-wake cycle. In this article we describe clinical developments in a two-year-old girl with Smith-Magenis syndrome whose sleep problems were successfully treated with melatonin and beta-adrenergic blockers. We also mention relevant data obtained in our literature search.

  19. Contractile properties of early human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: beta-adrenergic stimulation induces positive chronotropy and lusitropy but not inotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillekamp, Frank; Haustein, Moritz; Khalil, Markus; Emmelheinz, Markus; Nazzal, Rewa; Adelmann, Roland; Nguemo, Filomain; Rubenchyk, Olga; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brockmeier, Konrad; Hescheler, Juergen

    2012-08-10

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) provide the unique opportunity to study the very early development of the human heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium and beta-adrenergic stimulation on the contractile properties of early hESC-CMs. Beating clusters containing hESC-CMs were co-cultured in vitro with noncontractile slices of neonatal murine ventricles. After 5-7 days, when beating clusters had integrated morphologically into the damaged tissue, isometric force measurements were performed during spontaneous beating as well as during electrical field stimulation. Spontaneous beating stopped when extracellular calcium ([Ca²⁺](ec)) was removed or after administration of the Ca²⁺ channel blocker nifedipine. During field stimulation at a constant rate, the developed force increased with incremental concentrations of [Ca²⁺](ec). During spontaneous beating, rising [Ca²⁺](ec) increased beating rate and developed force up to a [Ca²⁺](ec) of 2.5 mM. When [Ca²⁺](ec) was increased further, spontaneous beating rate decreased, whereas the developed force continued to increase. The beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol induced a dose-dependent increase of the frequency of spontaneous beating; however, it did not significantly change the developed force during spontaneous contractions or during electrical stimulation at a constant rate. Force developed by early hESC-CMs depends on [Ca²⁺](ec) and on the L-type Ca²⁺ channel. The lack of an inotropic reaction despite a pronounced chronotropic response after beta-adrenergic stimulation most likely indicates immaturity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. For cell-replacement strategies, further maturation of cardiac cells has to be achieved either in vitro before or in vivo after transplantation.

  20. Autonomic modulation during acute myocardial ischemia by low-dose pirenzepine in conscious dogs with a healed myocardial infarction: a comparison with beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Roberto F E; Prete, Giovanna; Foreman, Robert D; Adamson, Philip B; Vanoli, Emilio

    2003-05-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence documents the beneficial effects of blocking sympathetic activity and modulating heart rate to reduce risk for lethal events in ischemic heart disease. Beside beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, vagal activation is a meaningful approach but not yet easily attainable. Promising results were shown with low-dose atropine and scopolamine, but no follow-up was done because of significant adverse side effects. Pirenzepine is an atropine analogue approved to treat peptic ulcer disease in Europe that is devoid of central actions, which are mostly responsible for anti-muscarinic agents side effects. The vagomimetic action of IV low-dose pirenzepine was studied at rest under control conditions, at rest during acute coronary artery occlusion, and during exercise in conscious dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction (MI). The effects of pirenzepine were then compared, by internal control analysis, with those of atenolol (1 mg/kg). Increasing doses of pirenzepine (from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg) were tested in 11 dogs at rest by measuring time and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV). The most effective dose (0.1 mg/kg) was used in the study. At the most effective dose, pirenzepine increased all measures of time domain HRV by 40-50%. However, the vagomimetic action of pirenzepine was lost during exercise and brief ischemia and no anti-arrhythmic action was observed. Conversely, pirenzepine effectively modulated the heart rate increase during acute ischemia at rest with an effect comparable to that of atenolol. The vagomimetic action of pirenzepine in the acutely ischemic heart supports the possibility that this intervention may be helpful for chronic autonomic modulation in post-MI patients.

  1. Beta-Adrenergic gene therapy for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Walter J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy using in vivo recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is an effective technique that offers great potential to improve existing drug treatments for the complex cardiovascular diseases of heart failure and vascular smooth muscle intimal hyperplasia. Cardiac-specific adenovirus-mediated transfer of the carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct, acting as a Gβγ-β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK1 inhibitor, improves basal and agonist-induced cardiac performance in both normal and failing rabbit hearts. In addition, βARKct adenovirus infection of vascular smooth muscle is capable of significantly diminishing neointimal proliferation after angioplasty. Therefore, further investigation is warranted to determine whether inhibition of βARK1 activity and sequestration of Gβγ via an adenovirus that encodes the βARKct transgene might be a useful clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies.

  2. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of skeletal muscle HSL can be overridden by AMPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Matthew J; Steinberg, Gregory R; Chan, Stanley; Garnham, Andrew; Kemp, Bruce E; Febbraio, Mark A

    2004-09-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), an important regulatory enzyme for triacylglycerol hydrolysis within skeletal muscle, is controlled by beta-adrenergic signaling as well as intrinsic factors related to contraction and energy turnover. In the current study, we tested the capacity of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to suppress beta-adrenergic stimulation of HSL activity. Eight male subjects completed 60 min of cycle exercise at 70% VO2 peak on two occasions: either with normal (CON) or low (LG) pre-exercise muscle glycogen content, which is known to enhance exercise-induced AMPK activity. Muscle samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise. Pre-exercise glycogen averaged 375 +/- 35 and 163 +/- 27 mmol x kg(-1) dm for CON and LG, respectively. AMPK alpha-2 was not different between trials at rest and was increased (3.7-fold, PHSL activity did not differ between trials at rest and increased (0 min: 1.67 +/- 0.13; 60 min: 2.60 +/- 0.26 mmol x min(-1) x kg(-1) dm) in CON. The exercise-induced increase in HSL activity was attenuated by AMPK alpha-2 activation in LG. The attenuated HSL activity during LG occurred despite higher plasma epinephrine levels (60 min: CON, 1.96 +/- 0.29 vs LG, 4.25 +/- 0.60 nM, PHSL activity in LG, IMTG was decreased by exercise (0 min: 27.1 +/- 2.0; 60 min: 22.5 +/- 2.0 mmol x kg(-1) dm, PHSL activity, we performed experiments in muscle cell culture. The epineprine-induced increase in HSL activity was totally attenuated (PHSL activity that can override beta-adrenergic stimulation. However, the increased IMTG degradation in LG suggests factors other than HSL activity are important for IMTG degradation.

  3. Antidiuretic effect of ritodrine with and without beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritse, R; Pinas, I M; Reuwer, P J; Haspels, A A; Charbon, G A; Beijer, H J

    1985-11-01

    Dose-related effects of ritodrine and ritodrine combined with metoprolol on urinary excretion rate were studied in anesthetized dogs. Urine production was abruptly reduced after a total dose of 4 micrograms.kg-1 of ritodrine. This effect could not be antagonized by metoprolol, although the ritodrine-induced decrease of mean arterial pressure and renal arterial blood flow was significantly inhibited. The possible role of fluid retention during tocolytic treatment, even with beta-adrenergic blockade, in the etiology of pulmonary edema is discussed with a review on recent literature.

  4. Beta-adrenergic agonist therapy accelerates the resolution of hydrostatic pulmonary edema in sheep and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, J A; Wang, Y; Osorio, O; Matthay, M A

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether beta-adrenergic agonist therapy increases alveolar liquid clearance during the resolution phase of hydrostatic pulmonary edema, we studied alveolar and lung liquid clearance in two animal models of hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Hydrostatic pulmonary edema was induced in sheep by acutely elevating left atrial pressure to 25 cmH(2)O and instilling 6 ml/kg body wt isotonic 5% albumin (prepared from bovine albumin) in normal saline into the distal air spaces of each lung. After 1 h, sheep were treated with a nebulized beta-agonist (salmeterol) or nebulized saline (controls), and left atrial pressure was then returned to normal. beta-Agonist therapy resulted in a 60% increase in alveolar liquid clearance over 3 h (P Ringer lactate). beta-Agonist therapy resulted in a significant decrease in excess lung water (P < 0.01) and significant improvement in arterial blood gases by 2 h (P < 0.03). These preclinical experimental studies support the need for controlled clinical trials to determine whether beta-adrenergic agonist therapy would be of value in accelerating the resolution of hydrostatic pulmonary edema in patients.

  5. Effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Iwasaki, M; Koshiura, R

    1982-12-01

    Effects of several autonomic agents on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells were studied. When beta-adrenergic stimulants such as isoproterenol, epinephrine, terbutaline and turobuterol were added at concentrations over 10(-14) M 15 to 60 min before mitomycin C, the colony-forming ability of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited more than by mitomycin C alone. The action of isoproterenol and epinephrine on the colony-forming ability of the cells was abolished by propranolol. The intracellular cyclic AMP level of HeLa cells reached the peak of about two-fold the basal level at 30 min after the addition of 10(-8) M isoproterenol. In combination with mitomycin C, the high level of intracellular cyclic AMP induced by isoproterenol was maintained for a significantly longer period in comparison with that by isoproterenol alone, while mitomycin C alone caused essentially no change in the cyclic AMP level. The pretreatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP also enhanced the effect of mitomycin C. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that the synergistic effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is mediated via stimulation of the beta-adrenoceptors of HeLa cells which elevates the intracellular cyclic AMP for a long time in combination with mitomycin C.

  6. Glucagon and plasma catecholamines during beta-receptor blockade in exercising man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Holst, Janett; Christensen, N J

    1976-01-01

    Seven men ran at 60% of individual maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion during beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol (P), during lipolytic blockade with nicotinic acid (N), or without drugs (C). The total work times (83 +/- 9 (P), 122 +/- 8 (N), 166 +/- 10 (C) min, mean and SE) differed...... decrease glucagon concentrations increased progressively in parallel with declining plasma glucose and were at exhaustion always three times preexercise values. Thus beta-adrenergic blockade did not diminish the glucagon response. Nor was this response increased when alpha-receptor stimulation in P...... experiments was intensified. Carbohydrate combustion was smaller and NEFA and glycerol concentrations in serum larger during C experiments. Alanine concentrations were never raised at exhaustion. Accordingly, neither stimulation of adrenergic receptors nor NEFA and alanine concentrations are major...

  7. Participation of beta-adrenergic activity in modulation of GLUT4 expression during fasting and refeeding in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through in vitro studies, several factors have been reported as modulators of GLUT4 gene expression. However, the role(s) of each potential GLUT4 modulator is not completely understood in the in vivo setting. The present study has investigated the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic stimulation particip...

  8. Phospholemman-mediated activation of Na/K-ATPase limits [Na]i and inotropic state during beta-adrenergic stimulation in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despa, Sanda; Tucker, Amy L; Bers, Donald M

    2008-04-08

    Cardiac Na/K-ATPase (NKA) regulates intracellular Na ([Na](i)), which in turn affects intracellular Ca and thus contractility via Na/Ca exchange. Recent evidence shows that phosphorylation of the NKA-associated small transmembrane protein phospholemman (PLM) mediates beta-adrenergic-induced NKA stimulation. Here, we tested whether PLM phosphorylation during beta-adrenergic activation limits the rise in [Na](i), Ca transient amplitude, and triggered arrhythmias in mouse ventricular myocytes. In myocytes from wild-type (WT) mice, [Na](i) increased on field stimulation at 2 Hz from 11.1+/-1.8 mmol/L to a plateau of 15.2+/-1.5 mmol/L. Isoproterenol induced a decrease in [Na](i) to 12.0+/-1.2 mmol/L. In PLM knockout (PLM-KO) mice in which beta-adrenergic stimulation does not activate NKA, [Na](i) also increased at 2 Hz (from 10.4+/-1.2 to 17.0+/-1.5 mmol/L) but was unaltered by isoproterenol. The PLM-mediated decrease in [Na](i) in WT mice could limit the isoproterenol-induced inotropic state. Indeed, the isoproterenol-induced increase in the amplitude of Ca transients was significantly smaller in the WT mice (5.2+/-0.4- versus 7.1+/-0.5-fold in PLM-KO mice). This also was the case for the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca content, which increased by 1.27+/-0.09-fold in WT mice versus 1.53+/-0.09-fold in PLM-KO mice. The higher sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca content in PLM-KO versus WT mice was associated with an increased propensity for spontaneous Ca transients and contractions in PLM-KO mice. These data suggest that PLM phosphorylation and NKA stimulation are an integral part of the sympathetic fight-or-flight response, tempering the rise in [Na](i) and cellular Ca loading and perhaps limiting Ca overload-induced arrhythmias.

  9. Personality effects on cardiovascular reactivity: need for closure moderates the impact of task difficulty on engagement-related myocardial beta-adrenergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Michael; Baeriswyl, Eric; Roets, Arne

    2012-05-01

    An experiment assessed the joint effect of dispositional need for closure (NFC) and task difficulty on engagement-related myocardial beta-adrenergic activity. Participants who scored either low or high on the NFC scale performed an ambiguous categorization task with either low or high difficulty. Confirming the theory-derived predictions, task difficulty effects on pre-ejection period (PEP) reactivity were moderated by NFC. If difficulty was low, PEP reactivity was low and independent of the participants' NFC level. If difficulty was high, participants with high NFC showed increased PEP reactivity compared to participants with low NFC. These results extend previous research on Wright's model of engagement-related cardiovascular reactivity and suggest that the model may provide a useful framework for assessing the impact of personality on cardiovascular response.

  10. Role of beta2 agonists in respiratory medicine with particular attention to novel patents and effects on endocrine system and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Nancy E; Moreno, Dolores; Garmendia, Jenny V; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2011-09-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors are very important in respiratory medicine. Traditionally, the stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors by beta2-agonists is commonly used for giving bronchodilation in chronic airflow obstruction However; the wide distribution of these receptors in cells and tissues other than airway smooth muscle suggests that beta agonists should offer other beneficial effects in respiratory disease. Recent studies have shown the importance of these receptors in the modulation of endocrine and immune system that affect respiratory function and may decrease therapy effectiveness in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New patented compound and uses have provided new insights in future therapeutics of respiratory diseases in which genetic, endocrine and immune response should be considered.

  11. A case of life-threatening lactic acidosis after smoke inhalation - interference between beta-adrenergic agents and ethanol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboulet, P; Clemessy, J L; Freminet, A; Baud, F J

    1995-12-01

    A 49-year-old male developed bronchospasm and severe lactic acidosis after exposition to fire smoke. The correction of lactic acidosis following beta-adrenergic agents withdrawal, and the transitory increase in lactate after salbutamol reintroduction are consistent with hypersensitivity to salbutamol. However, the plasma lactate concentration (32.6 mmol/l) that we observed 9.5 h after admission is far above those currently seen after administration of beta-adrenergic agents. We searched for causes able to potentiate the adverse effects of these drugs and we noticed that our patient had a high plasma ethanol level (2.4 g/l). Alcohol metabolism in the liver results in generation of high NADH/NAD+ ratios, thus reducing lactate liver clearance. This observation suggests that plasma lactate levels should be monitored closely in alcoholic patients treated with beta-mimetic agents.

  12. Glucose-induced thermogenesis in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. The effect of acute beta-adrenergic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Tuxen, C

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with histologically verified small cell lung carcinoma were given an oral glucose load of 75 g on two occasions to examine the effect of glucose on whole body and forearm thermogenesis with and without acute beta-adrenergic inhibition with propranolol. Whole body energy expenditure...... was measured by the open circuit ventilated hood system. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography. The uptake of oxygen in the forearm was calculated as the product of the forearm blood flow and the difference in arteriovenous oxygen concentration. The glucose......-induced forearm oxygen uptake in the period 60-120 min following the glucose load was significantly reduced after beta-adrenergic inhibition from 103 +/- 28 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 to 29 +/- 29 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 (P blood was not increased...

  13. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greeley, G.H. Jr.; Lluis, F.; Gomex, G.; Ishizuka, J.; Holland, B.; Thompson, J.C. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1} {center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the {beta}-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of {beta}-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release.

  14. G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel 1 (GIRK1 Knockdown Decreases Beta-Adrenergic, MAP Kinase and Akt Signaling in the MDA-MB-453 Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Hance

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous data from our laboratory have indicated that there is a functional link between the beta-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway and the G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1 in breast cancer cell lines and that these pathways are involved in growth regulation of these cells. To determine functionality, MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells were stimulated with ethanol, known to open GIRK channels. Decreased GIRK1 protein levels were seen after treatment with 0.12% ethanol. In addition, serum-free media completely inhibited GIRK1 protein expression. This data indicates that there are functional GIRK channels in breast cancer cells and that these channels are involved in cellular signaling. In the present research, to further define the signaling pathways involved, we performed RNA interference (siRNA studies. Three stealth siRNA constructs were made starting at bases 1104, 1315, and 1490 of the GIRK1 sequence. These constructs were transfected into MDA-MB-453 cells, and both RNA and protein were isolated. GIRK1, β2-adrenergic and 18S control levels were determined using real-time PCR 24 hours after transfection. All three constructs decreased GIRK1 mRNA levels. However, β2 mRNA levels were unchanged by the GIRK1 knockdown. GIRK1 protein levels were also reduced by the knockdown, and this knockdown led to decreases in beta-adrenergic, MAP kinase and Akt signaling.

  15. Characterization and regulation of. beta. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    ..beta../sub 2/-Adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens were examined by measuring the binding of /sup 125/I-pindolol (/sup 125/IPIN) to membrane preparations and the inhibition of evoked contractions in intact tissues. /sup 125/IPIN labeled a single class of binding sites with mass action kinetics. Affinity constants for ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonists calculated from both binding and functional experiments agreed well, suggesting that /sup 125/IPIN labels the functional ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor. n-Bromoacetylalprenololmenthane (BAAM) was used to decrease receptor density so that agonist affinity constants could be determined functionally. Treatment of tissues with BAAM decreased the functional potencies of agonists. Higher concentrations of BAAM decreased the maximum tissue response. Affinity constants for agonists calculated after BAAM treatment were compared to affinity constants determined from binding studies done under conditions designed to promote high or low affinity agonist binding. Functional affinity constants for isoproterenol and salbutamol agreed with the low affinity binding constants, suggesting that the low affinity form of the receptor initiates the functional response. Because acute denervation of vasa deferentia did not alter the density of /sup 125/IPIN binding sites, the sites are probably post-junctional. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol reduced the potency of isoproterenol, the maximum tissue response, and the receptor density. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptor density and responsiveness in rat vas deferens are not affected by removing catecholamine sources, but receptor density and responsiveness can be decreased by increasing agonist concentration at the receptor.

  16. Metabolic consequences of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade for the acutely ischemic dog myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westera, G.; Hollander, W. den; Wall, E.E. van der; Eenige, M.J. van; Scholtalbers, S.; Visser, F.C.; Roos, J.P.

    1984-02-01

    In an experimental study in 50 dogs the myocardial uptake of free fatty acids (FFAs) after beta-blockade was determined using radioiodinated heptadecanoic acid as a metabolic tracer. All 4 beta-blockers used (metoprolol, timolol, propranolol and pindolol) lowered the uptake of FFAs in the normal canine heart. Uptake of FFAs was also diminished after coronary artery occlusion per se, but administration of beta-blockers exerted little additional influence on the uptake of FFAs. This observation was qualitatively parallelled by the uptake of /sup 201/Tl in concomitant experiments. Plasma FFA levels were increased by pindolol (non-selective with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity), not changed by metoprolol (a cardioselective betablocking agent) and lowered by timolol and propranolol (both non-selective compounds). The extent of ischemic tissue, as reflected by uptake of iodoheptadecanoic acid and /sup 201/Tl, was diminished by metoprolol but not by other beta-blockers. Regional distribution of both tracers, as shown in the endo-epicardial uptake ratios, was hardly influenced by beta-blockade, except for a small increase of /sup 201/Tl uptake in non-occluded endocardium. Uptake of /sup 201/Tl as well as of iodoheptadecanoic acid in the ischemic area was increased by metoprolol, timolol and propranolol and decreased by pindolol. We conclude that beta-blocking agents confer different effects on myocardial uptake and metabolism of FFAs which might possibly be related to their different inherent properties.

  17. [Central effects of five beta-adrenergic receptor blockers in healthy volunteers: a quantitative EEG study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabot, C; Pechadre, J C; Beudin, P; Lauxerois, M; Trolese, J F; Kantelip, J P; Ducher, J L; Gibert, J

    1989-03-01

    The effects of five beta blockers on the central nervous system of healthy subjects was studied by computerized EEG analysis. All subjects underwent continuous recording with a Holter magnetic type recorder during the experimental period. For 10 consecutive days, five groups of subjects received alternately placebo and the beta blockers acebutolol 600 mg, carteolol 20 mg, metoprolol 200 mg, pindolol 30 mg and sotalol 320 mg. EEG recordings (C4/P4, P4/02 and C3/P3, P3/01) lasting 5 min were made between 8.30 and 9.30 a.m. Subjects were at rest with eyes closed and there was no vigilance control. The signal was recorded on a magnetic tape recorder and then processed by Nicolet MED 80 system. Comparisons of absolute and relative powers and of average frequencies were then made between the different sequences and groups. The possible correlations between the changes observed in the power spectrum and the clinical, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic specific properties of each beta blocker are discussed.

  18. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes counteracting effects on hindlimb vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Joseph M; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2005-12-01

    Our previous studies concluded that stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A2a receptors evokes preferential hindlimb vasodilation mainly via inducing increases in preganglionic sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) directed to the adrenal medulla. This increase in pre-ASNA causes the release of epinephrine and subsequent activation of beta-adrenergic receptors that are preferentially located in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Selective activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes variable, mostly pressor effects and increases pre-ASNA, as well as lumbar sympathetic activity, which is directed to the hindlimb. These counteracting factors may have opposite effects on the hindlimb vasculature resulting in mixed vascular responses. Therefore, in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, we evaluated the contribution of vasodilator versus vasoconstrictor effects of stimulation of NTS A1 receptors on the hindlimb vasculature. We compared the changes in iliac vascular conductance evoked by microinejctions into the NTS of the selective A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (330 pmol in 50 nl volume) in intact animals with the responses evoked after beta-adrenergic blockade, bilateral adrenalectomy, bilateral lumbar sympathectomy, and combined adrenalectomy + lumbar sympathectomy. In intact animals, stimulation of NTS A1 receptors evoked variable effects: increases and decreases in mean arterial pressure and iliac conductance with prevailing pressor and vasoconstrictor effects. Peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and bilateral adrenalectomy eliminated the depressor component of the responses, markedly potentiated iliac vasoconstriction, and tended to increase the pressor responses. Lumbar sympathectomy tended to decrease the pressor and vasoconstrictor responses. After bilateral adrenalectomy plus lumbar sympathectomy, a marked vasoconstriction in iliac vascular bed still persisted, suggesting that the vasoconstrictor component of the

  19. Lack of beta-adrenergic role for catecholamines in the development of hyperglycemia and ketonaemia following acute insulin withdrawal in type I diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylot, M; Sautot, G; Dechaud, H; Cohen, R; Riou, J P; Serusclat, P; Mornex, R

    1985-04-01

    In order to evaluate the role of beta-receptor mediated effects of catecholamines in the metabolic deterioration following insulin withdrawal in insulin-dependent diabetic patients we have measured in 5 patients metabolic substrate and hormone concentrations during a 6 hours arrest of insulin infusion, without or with a simultaneous infusion of propranolol. During insulin deprivation plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine increased slightly (from 107 +/- 10 ng/L to 173 +/- 6 ng/L and from 307 +/- 37 ng/L to 518 +/- 77/ng/L respectively (p less than 0.05), cortisol decreased physiologically, but growth hormone and glucagon were not significantly modified. Free insulin decreased progressively from 12.2 +/- 2.5 mU/L to 5.4 +/- 1.1 mU/L (p less than 0.01). Blood glucose and ketone bodies rose sharply before any significant change in catecholamine levels. Plasma free fatty acids and blood glycerol increased progressively and their rise appeared somewhat temporally related to the variations of catecholamine levels. The addition of propranolol to insulin deprivation did not modify the changes in hormone concentrations in spite of a slightly greater rise of epinephrine (from 78 +/- 4 ng/L to 179 +/- 7 ng/L, p less than 0.05) and norepinephrine (from 395 +/- 80 ng/L to 679 +/- 153 ng/L, p less than 0.05). The rises of glucose and ketone bodies were unaffected whereas the increases of free fatty acids and glycerol were slightly blunted. In conclusion, we have no evidence for a beta-adrenergic mediated role for catecholamines in the development of hyperglycaemia and ketonaemia in non-stressed insulin deprived diabetic patients, and only small evidence for a permissive effect on lipolysis.

  20. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2001-01-01

    with beta-blockers, but the effect of this treatment on arterial compliance has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the effects of propranolol on the arterial compliance of patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty patients with cirrhosis underwent a haemodynamic......) of 17.8 mmHg, and responded to beta-blocker treatment with a significant reduction in the HVPG (-16%; P beta-adrenergic blockade (1.27 versus 1.29 ml/mmHg, +2%, ns), whereas...... with beta-blockers increases small vessel (arteriolar) vascular tone towards the normal level, but does not affect the elevated compliance of the larger arteries in patients with cirrhosis....

  1. Altered adrenergic response and specificity of the receptors in rat ascites hepatoma AH130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1989-11-15

    Adenylate cyclase activation through adrenergic receptors in rat ascites hepatoma (AH) 130 cells in response to adrenergic drugs was studied, and receptor binding and displacement were compared with those of normal rat hepatocytes. Epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) activated AH130 adenylate cyclase about half as much as isoproterenol (IPN) but equaled IPN after treatment with the alpha-antagonist phentolamine or islet-activating protein (IAP). The three catecholamines in hepatocytes were similar regardless of phentolamine or IAP. These catecholamines activated adenylate cyclase in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells but IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in hepatocytes. We then used the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin, the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine, and the beta-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol [( 125I]ICYP), and found that AH130 cells had few prazosin-binding sites, about eight times as many clonidine-binding sites with high affinity, and many more ICYP-binding sites than in hepatocytes. The dissociation constant (Ki) of the beta 1-selective drug metoprolol by Hofstee plots for AH130 cells was lower than that for hepatocytes. The inhibition of specific ICYP binding by the beta 2-selective agonist salbutamol for AH130 cells gave only one Ki value which was much higher than both high and low Ki values of the drug for hepatocytes. These findings indicate that the alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes are predominantly alpha 1-type and beta 2-type, but that those in AH130 cells are predominantly alpha 2-type and beta 1-type, and the low adrenergic response of AH130 cells is due to the dominant appearance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, linked with the inhibitory guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory protein, instead of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, and beta 1-adrenergic receptors with low affinity for the hormone.

  2. Spinal GABA-B receptor modulates neutrophil recruitment to the knee joint in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Gabriel S; do C Malvar, David; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the central nervous system controls inflammatory responses by activating complex efferent neuroimmune pathways. The present study was designed to evaluate the role that central gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor plays in neutrophil migration in a murine model of zymosan-induced arthritis by using different pharmacological tools. We observed that intrathecal administration of baclofen, a selective GABA-B agonist, exacerbated the inflammatory response in the knee after zymosan administration characterized by an increase in the neutrophil recruitment and knee joint edema, whereas saclofen, a GABA-B antagonist, exerted the opposite effect. Intrathecal pretreatment of the animals with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) blocked the pro-inflammatory effect of baclofen. On the other hand, systemic administration of guanethidine, a sympatholytic drug that inhibits catecholamine release, and nadolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of saclofen. Moreover, saclofen suppressed the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines into the knee joint (ELISA) and pain-related behaviors (open field test). Since the anti-inflammatory effect of saclofen depends on the sympathetic nervous system integrity, we observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, mimics the central GABA-B blockade decreasing knee joint neutrophil recruitment. Together, these results demonstrate that the pharmacological manipulation of spinal GABAergic transmission aids control of neutrophil migration to the inflamed joint by modulating the activation of the knee joint-innervating sympathetic terminal fibers through a mechanism dependent on peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors and central components, such as p38 MAPK.

  3. N-terminal {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms do not correlate with bronchodilator response in asthma families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holyroyd, K.J.; Dragwa, C.; Xu, J. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Family and twin studies have suggested that susceptibility to asthma is inherited. One clinically relevant phenotype in asthma is the bronchodilator response to beta adrenergic therapy (reversibility) which may also be inherited and vary among asthmatics. Two polymorphisms of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor common to both asthmatic and normal individuals have been reported. One polymorphism, an amino acid polymorphism at position 16, correlated in one study with the need for long-term corticosteriod use in a population of asthmatics. It is conceivable that the increased use of corticosteroids needed to control symptoms in these patients may be explained by a decreased responsiveness to brochodilators mediated through this amino acid polymorphism in the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor. However, the response to {beta}{sub 2} bronchodilators was not tested in these patients. In our Dutch asthma families, DNA sequencing of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor has been performed for N-terminal polymorphisms at amino acid positions 16 and 27 in over 100 individuals, and no correlation was found with the increase of FEV{sub 1} in response to bronchodilator. Linkage analysis between bronchodilator response and marker D5S412 near the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor gene was performed in 286 sibpairs from these families. Using a bronchodilator response of >10% in FEV{sub 1} as a qualitative definition of affected individuals, there were 145 unaffected sibpairs, 121 sibpairs where one was affected, and 20 in which both were affected. Linear regression analysis of these sibpair data suggested possible linkage (p=0.007). This supports further examination of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor and its regulatory regions for polymorphisms that correlate with the bronchodilator response in asthma families.

  4. Exercise performance and beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with complete heart block treated with ventricular inhibited pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, J; Larsen, F F; Nordlander, R; Pehrsson, K; Aström, H

    1991-09-01

    The effect of beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol) on exercise performance was studied in 15 patients (12 men and 3 women, mean age 70 years) with complete heart block treated with a ventricular-inhibited pacemaker (VVI). In a double-blind procedure, the patients were randomly given either 0.1 mg/kg of propranolol or saline solution i.v. before a first exercise test and vice versa before a second test. The interval between the tests was 24 hours. Nine patients were in sinus rhythm, 4 patients had atrial flutter, and 2 others had atrial fibrillation. The exercise capacity was on an average 11% lower with propranolol than with placebo (p less than 0.001). The most marked reductions (20 and 33%) were found in the two patients with atrial fibrillation. The atrial rate in patients with sinus rhythm was significantly lower with propranolol than placebo both at rest (68 vs. 83 beats/min, p less than 0.001) and at maximal work load (91 vs. 141 beats/min, p less than 0.001). The present findings show that beta blockade has negative effects on exercise capacity in patients with complete heart block treated with VVI pacemakers. This finding should be considered in the selection of drug treatment in patients with fixed rate pacing and concomitant hypertension and/or ischemic heart disease.

  5. Enhanced negative chronotropy by inhibitory receptors in transgenic heart overexpressing beta(2)-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X J; Vincan, E; Percy, E; Woodcock, E A

    2000-03-15

    Transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing beta(2)-adrenoceptors (AR) in the heart have enhanced beta-adrenergic activity. Since the degree of beta-adrenergic activation influences the negative chronotropic control of heart rate (HR), we studied the inhibitory effect of cholinergic and purinergic stimulation on HR in TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. Bradycardia in response to vagal nerve stimulation and administration of acetylcholine or adenosine was studied in anesthetised animals and perfused hearts. Basal HR was significantly higher in TG than WT mice (P<0.01). Electrical stimulation of vagal nerves (1-32 Hz) induced a Hz-dependent reduction in HR and the response was more pronounced in TG than WT groups (P<0.01). In perfused hearts, HR reduction by acetylcholine (ACh) was more pronounced with EC(50) 110-fold lower in TG than WT hearts. Adenosine-induced bradycardia, which was abolished by a P(1) antagonist, was more pronounced in TG hearts. After pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PT, 100 microg/kg), bradycardia by vagal nerve stimulation or ACh remained unchanged in WT, but markedly inhibited in TG hearts (both P<0.01). Conversely, inhibiting guanylyl cyclase with LY83583 (30 microM) or nitric oxide synthase with L-NMMA (100 microM) attenuated HR reduction by vagal nerve stimulation in WT but not in TG hearts. Immunobloting assay showed similar G(ialpha2) abundance in TG and WT hearts. Thus, cardiac overexpression of beta(2)AR with high beta-adrenergic activity leads to hypersensitivity of inhibitory receptors controlling HR due to increase in activity of PT-sensitive G-proteins.

  6. Betaxolol. A new beta-adrenergic blocking agent for treatment of glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrospi, A R; Leibowitz, H M

    1982-06-01

    The intraocular pressure response to topically instilled 0.25% betaxolol hydrochloride was evaluated in 12 patients with chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The drug produced a significant lowering of IOP in all 12 of the patients under study. A 30% to 35% decrease below baseline IOP was observed and was maintained during the one-year observation period. Visual acuity was stable in all subjects throughout the study and corneal anesthesia was not encountered. Tear secretion was not adversely effected by betaxolol, nor did topical administration of the drug produce any systemic cardiovascular response of consequence. Blood pressure and pulse rate remained stable throughout the year. These data suggest that an ophthalmic formulation of betaxolol may have substantial clinical potential for the treatment of glaucoma.

  7. Cardiac Function in Patients with Early Cirrhosis during Maximal Beta-Adrenergic Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming; Dahl, Emilie Kristine

    2014-01-01

    with cirrhosis and controls had an equal stress response, the heart rate and ejection fraction increased similarly and maximal heart rate was reached in all. At rest CO was higher in Child B patients than controls. During maximal stress, Child B patients had higher CO (10.6±2.7 vs. 8.0±1.8 L/min), left ventricle...... A and B cirrhosis (9 with non-alcoholic cirrhosis) and 7 matched controls were included. We used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess left ventricular volumes and cardiac output (CO) at rest and during maximal heart rate induced by increasing dosages of dobutamine and atropine. RESULTS: Patients...... stress induced by dobutamine is normal. With progression of the disease, the mass of the heart increases along with increase in cardiac volumes....

  8. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 function regulates cardiac hypertrophy via stretch-induced activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sheryl E; Mann, Adrien; Jones, Shannon; Robbins, Nathan; Alkhattabi, Abdullah; Worley, Mariah C; Gao, Xu; Lasko-Roiniotis, Valerie M; Karani, Rajiv; Fulford, Logan; Jiang, Min; Nieman, Michelle; Lorenz, John N; Rubinstein, Jack

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension (increased afterload) results in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy leading to left ventricular hypertrophy and subsequently, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 subtype (TRPV2) function regulates hypertrophy under increased afterload conditions. We used functional (pore specific) TRPV2 knockout mice to evaluate the effects of increased afterload-induced stretch on cardiac size and function via transverse aortic constriction (TAC) as well as hypertrophic stimuli including adrenergic and angiotensin stimulation via subcutaneous pumps. Wild-type animals served as control for all experiments. Expression and localization of TRPV2 was investigated in wild-type cardiac samples. Changes in cardiac function were measured in vivo via echocardiography and invasive catheterization. Molecular changes, including protein and real-time PCR markers of hypertrophy, were measured in addition to myocyte size. TRPV2 is significantly upregulated in wild-type mice after TAC, though not in response to beta-adrenergic or angiotensin stimulation. TAC-induced stretch stimulus caused an upregulation of TRPV2 in the sarcolemmal membrane. The absence of functional TRPV2 resulted in significantly reduced left ventricular hypertrophy after TAC, though not in response to beta-adrenergic or angiotensin stimulation. The decreased development of hypertrophy was not associated with significant deterioration of cardiac function. We conclude that TRPV2 function, as a stretch-activated channel, regulates the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to increased afterload.

  9. Enhanced Noradrenergic Activity Potentiates Fear Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation by Differentially Recruiting alpha1- and beta-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarini, Lucas; Stern, Cristina A. Jark; Carobrez, Antonio P.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2013-01-01

    Consolidation and reconsolidation are phases of memory stabilization that diverge slightly. Noradrenaline is known to influence both processes, but the relative contribution of alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptors is unclear. The present study sought to investigate this matter by comparing their recruitment to consolidate and/or reconsolidate a…

  10. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S

    1987-01-01

    . To study these responses, we administered epinephrine in a graded intravenous infusion (0.5 to 5 micrograms per minute) to seven diabetic patients without neuropathy, seven diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, and seven normal subjects. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in the patients...... with autonomic neuropathy than in the other groups (P less than 0.05). These findings indicate that several beta-receptor-mediated responses to epinephrine are enhanced in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.......Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients...

  11. The impact of beta-adrenergic blockade on daily rhythms of melatonin and body temperature of golden spiny mice Acomys russatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, A; Zisapel, N

    1997-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic stimulation induces melatonin synthesis and non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in rodents. The golden spiny mouse, Acomys russatus is a nocturnal species capable of diurnal activity when coexisting with its congenitor the common spiny mouse A. cahirinus. We have investigated the impact of beta-adrenergic blockade on 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SMT--a metabolite and index of melatonin production) and body temperature (Tb) daily rhythms in male A. russatus. Mice were acclimated to an ambient temperature (Ta) of 28 degrees C, under two photoperiod regimes (16L:8D; 8L:16D). The daily rhythms of Tb and urinary 6-SMT were measured for a period of 30 h at intervals of 4 h. Propranolol (4.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered one hour before lights went off (i.e. when beta blockade does not affect NST in this species) and both variables were measured for another 30 h. The beta blocker markedly augmented melatonin output of A. russatus under both photoperiod regimes. The elevation in melatonin secretion was accompanied with an increase in Tb of only 16L:8D-acclimated mice (i.e. shorten duration of melatonin peak). However, in 8L:16D-acclimated mice, a phase advance of about 4 h was noted in 6-SMT daily rhythm. These results indicate that the role of sympathetic innervation in regulation of melatonin synthesis in A. russatus differs from that in the rat. In addition, these data are compatible with the hyperthermic action of melatonin in this species. Therefore, it is suggested that in A. russatus, other neural pathways are involved in its pineal regulation.

  12. Human adipose tissue blood flow during prolonged exercise, III. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade, nicotinic acid and glucose infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J

    1981-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured in six male subjects by the 133Xe-washout technique during 3-4 h of exercise at a work load corresponding to an oxygen uptake of about 1.71/min. The measurements were done during control conditions, during blockade of lipolysis by nicotinic...... of work. No increase in lipolysis and no increase in ATBF were found when lipolysis was blocked by nicotinic acid (0.3 g/h). Propranolol treatment (0.15 mg/kg) reduced lipolysis and nearly abolished the increase in ATBF during exercise. Intravenous administration of glucose (about 0.25 g/min) did...... not influence lipid metabolism (evaluated by the respiratory quotient) nor did it reduce the ATBF response to exercise. These results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that increase in ATBF during exercise is elicited via direct stimulation of vascular beta1-receptors, while they are not in disagreement...

  13. Beta-adrenergic signals regulate cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells via mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lihui; Jia, Zhuqing; Cui, Jingjing; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Huangtian; Zhang, Yongzhen; Zhou, Chunyan

    2011-08-01

    As embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) have the potential to be used in cell replacement therapy, an understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate their terminal differentiation is imperative. In previous studies, we discovered the presence of adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, little is known about the role of these receptors in cardiac differentiation and development, which is critically important in cardiac physiology and pharmacology. Here, we demonstrated that a β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) agonist significantly enhanced cardiac differentiation as indicated by a higher percentage of beating embryoid bodies and a higher expression level of cardiac markers. Application of β1-AR and β2-AR antagonists partly abolished the effect of the β-AR agonist. In addition, by administering selective inhibitors we found that the effect of β-AR was driven via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular-signal regulated kinase pathway. These findings suggest that ESCs are also a target for β-adrenergic regulation and β-adrenergic signaling plays a role in ESC cardiac differentiation.

  14. Sympathetic nervous system influence on the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestroni, Georges J M

    2006-06-01

    Our studies focused on the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) influence on dendritic cells (DCs), which play a crucial role in the innate immune response. We found that DCs express a variety of adrenergic receptors (ARs) with alpha1-ARs playing a stimulatory and beta2-ARs an inhibitory effect on DCs migration. beta2-ARs in skin and bone marrow-derived DCs when stimulated by bacterial toll-like receptors (TLRs) agonists respond to norepinephrine (NE) by decreased interleukin-12 (IL-12) and increased IL-10 production which in turn downregulates inflammatory cytokine production and CCR7 expression and thus their migration ability leading to reduced T helper-1 (Th1) priming. We also found that contact sensitizers that may induce a predominant Th1 response, do so by inhibiting the local NE turnover in the skin. The SNS seems therefore to contribute in shaping the information conveyed by DCs to T cells and thus in inducing the appropriate adaptive immune response. In this sense, the SNS physiological influence may allow Th2 priming to fight infections sustained by extracellular pathogens and limit the risk for organ-specific autoimmune reactions associated with excessive Th1 priming and inhibition of T regulatory cell functions. More recently, we found that preconditioning of the skin by beta-adrenergic antagonist and the TLR2 agonist S. Aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) may instruct a Th1 adaptive response to a soluble protein antigen. On the contrary, when the TLR4 agonist E. Coli lipopolysaccharide was used, the presence of the beta-adrenergic antagonist was not effective. These effects were consonant with the pattern of TLRs expression shown by epidermal keratinocytes (EKs) but not by skin DCs. As beta-ARs signaling defects together with S. Aureus infections are thought to serve as initiation and/or persistence factors for numerous Th1-sustained autoimmune inflammatory skin diseases, we might have disclosed at least part of the relevant pathogenetic mechanism.

  15. Ontogeny of catecholamine and adenosine receptor-mediated cAMP signaling of embryonic red blood cells: role of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R; Blass, C; Götz, R; Dragon, S

    1999-12-15

    We have previously shown that the cAMP signaling pathway controls major aspects of embryonic red blood cell (RBC) function in avian embryos (Glombitza et al, Am J Physiol 271:R973, 1996; and Dragon et al, Am J Physiol 271:R982, 1996) that are important for adaptation of the RBC gas transport properties to the progressive hypercapnia and hypoxia of later stages of avian embryonic development. Data about the ontogeny of receptor-mediated cAMP signaling are lacking. We have analyzed the response of primitive and definitive chick embryo RBC harvested from day 3 to 18 of development towards forskolin, beta-adrenergic, and A2 receptor agonists. The results show a strong response of immature definitive and primitive RBC to adenosine A2 and beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, which is drastically reduced in the last stage of development, coincident with the appearance of mature, transcriptionally inactive RBC. Modulation of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) has a controlling influence on cAMP accumulation in definitive RBC. Under physiological conditions, PDE3 is inhibited due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Inhibition of sGC with the specific inhibitor ODQ decreases receptor-mediated stimulation of cAMP production; this effect is reversed by the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. sGC is acitivated by nitric oxide (NO), but we found no evidence for production of NO by erythrocyte NO-synthase. However, embryonic hemoglobin releases NO in an oxygen-linked manner that may activate guanylyl cyclase.

  16. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  17. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  18. The beta-adrenergic blocker carvedilol restores L-type calcium current in a myocardial infarction model of rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; HUANG Cong-xin; JIANG Hong; CAO Feng; WANG Teng

    2005-01-01

    Background Carvedilol, an antagonist of α1- and β-adrenergic receptors, has shown efficacy in reducing all-cause death and arrhythmia death for ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure in several large-scale trials. It has been found to prevent ventricular remodeling, and recently was reported to reverse down-regulation of Na+ channel in a chronic heart failure model. This study was conducted to investigate whether carvedilol could reverse the ion remodeling in a myocardial infarction model of rabbit.Methods After the procedure of coronary ligation, animals were randomized to placebo or carvedilol treatment (5 mg/kg). Action potentials, L-type calcium current (Ica L) and the effect of isoproterenol stimulation on Ica L were measured using whole-cell patch method. Evaluation of the expression of calcium channel subunits was carried out by RT-PCR and Western blot. Results The results indicate that mean peak Ica L densities (pA/pF) at +10 mV was reduced in postinfarction myocytes (5.33±0.45, n=25) compared to sham myocytes (6.52±0.21, n=20). Treatment of myocardial infarction rabbits with carvedilol could restore it partially (5.91±0.39, n=20, P<0.05). However, steady-state activation parameters were similar in three groups. With stimulation by isoproterenol (1 μmol/L) Ica L increased in all three groups, but the increase was smaller in postinfarction myocytes. mRNA levels of calcium channel subunit CaA1 gene was decreased but CaB2a, CaB2b and CaB3 mRNA levels did not change after MI. Corresponding change in CaA1 protein was also observed. Conclusions The results demonstrate that carvedilol restores Ica L density and reverse the downregulation of CaA1 postinfarction.

  19. An unusual protein kinase phosphorylates the chemotactic receptor of Dictystelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, K.; Klein, C. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (USA))

    1988-04-01

    The authors report the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor of Dictyostelium discoideum in partially purified plasma membranes. The protein kinase responsible for receptor phosphorylation is associated with this fraction and preferentially phosphorylates the ligand-occupied form of the receptor. 8-Azido({sup 32}P)cAMP labeling of the cell surface has shown that the cAMP receptor exists in two forms. A 45-kDa protein is predominant on unstimulated cells. cAMP stimulation results in an increased receptor phosphorylation such that the receptor migrates on NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE as a 47-kDa protein. Phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor is not detected in membrane preparations unless cAMP is added to the incubation mixture. Only under those conditions is the phosphorylated 47-kDa form observed. The requirement for cAMP reflects the fact that the kinase involved preferentially uses the ligand-occupied receptor as a substrate. In vitro phosphorylation of the receptor does not involve tyrosine residues. The enzyme does not appear to be a cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinase nor is it sensitive to guanine nucleotides, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/phospholipid, or EGTA. Similarities with the {beta}-adrenergic receptor protein kinase are discussed.

  20. Melatonin responses to clonidine and yohimbine challenges.

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, S.H.; Gnam, W; Ralevski, E; Brown, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Melatonin (MT) release from the pineal gland has been used as a marker for central noradrenergic function in major depression. Norepinephrine acts at both alpha and beta adrenergic receptors on the pinealocyte membrane to mediate nocturnal MT release, but in humans the contribution of each receptor class is unclear. In order to explore the effect of alpha 2 receptors on MT release, 10 female subjects were given oral challenges, in separate placebo-controlled trials, of either 10.8 mg of yohim...

  1. Beyond extinction: erasing human fear responses and preventing the return of fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Soeter, M.; Vervliet, B.

    2009-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that fear memories can change when recalled, a process referred to as reconsolidation. We found that oral administration of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol before memory reactivation in humans erased the behavioral expression of the fear memory 24 h

  2. Noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu eNomura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cerebral cortex, whereas the cortical distribution ofdopaminergic fibers is more restricted. However, the relative functional impact ofnoradrenalin and dopamine receptors in various cortical regions is largely unknown. Using aspecific genetic label, we first confirmed that noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cortexwhereas dopaminergic fibers were present in all layers of restricted medial and lateral areasbut only in deep layers of other areas. Imaging of a genetically-encoded sensor revealed thatnoradrenalin and dopamine widely activate PKA in cortical pyramidal neurons of frontal,parietal and occipital regions with scarce dopaminergic fibers. Responses to noradrenalin hadhigher amplitude, velocity and occurred at more than 10 fold lower dose than those elicited bydopamine, whose amplitude and velocity increased along the antero-posterior axis. Thepharmacology of these responses was consistent with the involvement of Gs-coupled beta1adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors, but the inhibition of both noradrenalin anddopamine responses by beta adrenergic antagonists was suggestive of the existence of beta1-D1/D5 heteromeric receptors. Responses also involved Gi-coupled alpha2 adrenergic and D2-like dopaminergic receptors that markedly reduced their amplitude and velocity andcontributed to their cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Our results reveal that noradrenalin anddopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex withmoderate regional and laminar differences. These receptors can thus mediate widespreadeffects of both catecholamines, which are reportedly co-released by cortical noradrenergicfibers beyond the territory of dopaminergic fibers.

  3. Neurohumoral activation in heart failure: the role of adrenergic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia C. Brum; Rolim, Natale P. L.; BACURAU, Aline V. N.; Alessandra Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common endpoint for many forms of cardiovascular disease and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The development of end-stage HF often involves an initial insult to the myocardium that reduces cardiac output and leads to a compensatory increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. Acutely, the sympathetic hyperactivity through the activation of beta-adrenergic receptors increases heart rate and cardiac contractility, which compensate for decreased cardia...

  4. Sugars, Sweet Taste Receptors, and Brain Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allen A; Owyang, Chung

    2017-06-24

    Sweet taste receptors are composed of a heterodimer of taste 1 receptor member 2 (T1R2) and taste 1 receptor member 3 (T1R3). Accumulating evidence shows that sweet taste receptors are ubiquitous throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract as well as the hypothalamus. These sweet taste receptors are heavily involved in nutrient sensing, monitoring changes in energy stores, and triggering metabolic and behavioral responses to maintain energy balance. Not surprisingly, these pathways are heavily regulated by external and internal factors. Dysfunction in one or more of these pathways may be important in the pathogenesis of common diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. (S,S)- and (S,R)-1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol, ligands for the visualization of pulmonary {beta}-adrenergic receptors with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Vos, Marten G.; Waarde, Aren van; Braker, Anton H.; Groot, Tjibbe J. de; Anthonio, Rutger L.; Weemaes, Anne-Miek A.; Brodde, Otto-Erich; Visser, Gerben M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    1996-02-01

    The {beta}-adrenoceptor antagonist carazolol has been labelled with fluorine-18 in the isopropyl group via a reductive alkylation by [{sup 18}F]-fluoroacetone of the corresponding (S)-desisopropyl compound according to a known procedure. The introduction of fluorine in the isopropyl group creates a new stereogenic centre resulting in the formation of (S,S)- and (S,R)-1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol, which were separated by HPLC. Tissue distribution studies were performed in male Wistar rats. Both the (S,S)- and (S,R)-diastereomers (S.A. 500-2000 Ci/mmol; 18.5-74 TBq/mmol) showed high uptake in lung and heart, which could be blocked by pretreatment of the animals with ({+-})-propranolol. No significant differences were observed between the biodistribution of the two diastereomers. Metabolite analysis showed a rapid appearance of polar metabolites in plasma, while at 60 min postinjection 92% and 82% of the total radioactivity in lung and heart was unmetabolized 1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol. In a PET-study with male Wistar rats, the lungs were clearly visualized and the pulmonary uptake was decreased after pretreatment of the animals with ({+-})-propranolol. The heart could not be visualized. Similar results were obtained in PET-studies with lambs.

  6. Downregulation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human lung fibroblasts is specifically mediated by the prostaglandin E receptor EP2 through cAMP elevation and protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Elena; Hartig, Roland; Reiser, Georg

    2008-07-01

    Many cellular functions of lung fibroblasts are controlled by protease-activated receptors (PARs). In fibrotic diseases, PAR-1 plays a major role in controlling fibroproliferative and inflammatory responses. Therefore, in these diseases, regulation of PAR-1 expression plays an important role. Using the selective prostaglandin EP2 receptor agonist butaprost and cAMP-elevating agents, we show here that prostaglandin (PG)E(2), via the prostanoid receptor EP2 and subsequent cAMP elevation, downregulates mRNA and protein levels of PAR-1 in human lung fibroblasts. Under these conditions, the functional response of PAR-1 in fibroblasts is reduced. These effects are specific for PGE(2). Activation of other receptors coupled to cAMP elevation, such as beta-adrenergic and adenosine receptors, does not reproduce the effects of PGE(2). PGE(2)-mediated downregulation of PAR-1 depends mainly on protein kinase A activity, but does not depend on another cAMP effector, the exchange protein activated by cAMP. PGE(2)-induced reduction of PAR-1 level is not due to a decrease of PAR-1 mRNA stability, but rather to transcriptional regulation. The present results provide further insights into the therapeutic potential of PGE(2) to specifically control fibroblast function in fibrotic diseases.

  7. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH is a rare cause of Cushing´s syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein- coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing´s syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient´s adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing´s syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.

  8. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention.

  9. Responses to microbial challenges by SLAMF receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Job Van Driel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SLAMF Family (SLAMF of cell surface glycoproteins is comprised of nine glycoproteins and whilst SLAMF1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 are self-ligand receptors, SLAMF2 and SLAMF4 interact with each other. Their interactions induce signal transduction networks in trans, thereby shaping immune cell-cell communications. Collectively, these receptors modulate a wide range of functions, such as myeloid cell and lymphocyte development and, T and B cell responses to microbes and parasites. In addition, several SLAMF receptors serve as microbial sensors, which either positively or negatively modulate the function of macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils and NK cells in response to microbial challenges. The SLAMF receptor-microbe interactions contribute both to intracellular microbicidal activity as well as to migration of phagocytes to the site of inflammation. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on how the SLAMF receptors and their specific adapters SAP and EAT-2 regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to microbes.

  10. Control of yeast mating signal transduction by a mammalian. beta. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor and G sub s. alpha. subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, K.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA)); Dohlman, H.G.; Thorner, J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1990-10-05

    To facilitate functional and mechanistic studies of receptor-G protein interactions by expression of the human {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (h{beta}-AR) has been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This was achieved by placing a modified h{beta}-AR gene under control of the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. After induction by galactose, functional h{beta}-AR was expressed at a concentration several hundred times as great as that found in any human tissue. As determined from competitive ligand binding experiments, h{beta}-AR expressed in yeast displayed characteristic affinities, specificity, and stereoselectivity. Partial activation of the yeast pheromone response pathway by {beta}-adrenergic receptor agonists was achieved in cells coexpressing h{beta}-AR and a mammalian G protein (G{sub s}) {alpha} subunit - demonstrating that these components can couple to each other and to downstream effectors when expressed in yeast. This in vivo reconstitution system provides a new approach for examining ligand binding and G protein coupling to cell surface receptors.

  11. Pharmacogenomics: the inherited basis for interindividual differences in drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W E; Johnson, J A

    2001-01-01

    It is well recognized that most medications exhibit wide interpatient variability in their efficacy and toxicity. For many medications, these interindividual differences are due in part to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and/or drug targets (e.g., receptors, enzymes). Pharmacogenomics is a burgeoning field aimed at elucidating the genetic basis for differences in drug efficacy and toxicity, and it uses genome-wide approaches to identify the network of genes that govern an individual's response to drug therapy. For some genetic polymorphisms (e.g., thiopurine S-methyltransferase), monogenic traits have a marked effect on pharmacokinetics (e.g., drug metabolism), such that individuals who inherit an enzyme deficiency must be treated with markedly different doses of the affected medications (e.g., 5%-10% of the standard thiopurine dose). Likewise, polymorphisms in drug targets (e.g., beta adrenergic receptor) can alter the sensitivity of patients to treatment (e.g., beta-agonists), changing the pharmacodynamics of drug response. Recognizing that most drug effects are determined by the interplay of several gene products that govern the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications, pharmacogenomics research aims to elucidate these polygenic determinants of drug effects. The ultimate goal is to provide new strategies for optimizing drug therapy based on each patient's genetic determinants of drug efficacy and toxicity. This chapter provides an overview of the current pharmacogenomics literature and offers insights for the potential impact of this field on the safe and effective use of medications.

  12. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  13. Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity enhances beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate: Whole-heart study in a homozygous sodium/calcium exchanger overexpressor mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaese, Sven; Bögeholz, Nils; Pauls, Paul; Dechering, Dirk; Olligs, Jan; Kölker, Katharina; Badawi, Sascha; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Pott, Christian; Eckardt, Lars

    2017-08-01

    The cardiac sodium/calcium (Na(+)/Ca(2+)) exchanger (NCX) contributes to diastolic depolarization in cardiac pacemaker cells. Increased NCX activity has been found in heart failure and atrial fibrillation. The influence of increased NCX activity on resting heart rate, beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate, and cardiac conduction properties is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of NCX overexpression in a homozygous transgenic whole-heart mouse model (NCX-OE) on sinus and AV nodal function. Langendorff-perfused, beating whole hearts of NCX-OE and the corresponding wild-type (WT) were studied ± isoproterenol (ISO; 0.2 μM). Epicardial ECG, AV nodal Wenckebach cycle length (AVN-WCL), and retrograde AVN-WCL were obtained. At baseline, basal heart rate was unaltered between NCX-OE and WT (WT: cycle length [CL] 177.6 ± 40.0 ms, no. of hearts [n] = 20; NCX-OE: CL 185.9 ± 30.5 ms, n = 18; P = .21). In the presence of ISO, NCX-OE exhibited a significantly higher heart rate compared to WT (WT: CL 133.4 ± 13.4 ms, n = 20; NCX-OE: CL 117.7 ± 14.2 ms, n = 18; P heart rate. Mechanistically, increased NCX inward mode activity may promote acceleration of diastolic depolarization in sinus nodal pacemaker cells, thus enhancing chronotropy in NCX-OE. These findings suggest a novel potential therapeutic target for heart rate control in the presence of increased NCX activity, such as heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sympathetic reflex control of skeletal muscle blood flow in patients with congestive heart failure: evidence for beta-adrenergic circulatory control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassis, E.; Jacobsen, T.N.; Mogensen, F.; Amtorp, O.

    1986-11-01

    Mechanisms controlling forearm muscle vascular resistance (FMVR) during postural changes were investigated in seven patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and in seven control subjects with unimpaired left ventricular function. Relative brachioradial muscle blood flow was determined by the local /sup 133/Xe-washout technique. Unloading of baroreceptors with use of 45 degree upright tilt was comparably obtained in the patients with CHF and control subjects. Control subjects had substantially increased FMVR and heart rate to maintain arterial pressure whereas patients with CHF had decreased FMVR by 51 +/- 11% and had no increase in heart rate despite a fall in arterial pressure during upright tilt. The autoregulatory and local vasoconstrictor reflex responsiveness during postural changes in forearm vascular pressures were intact in both groups. In the patients with CHF, the left axillary nerve plexus was blocked by local anesthesia. No alterations in forearm vascular pressures were observed. This blockade preserved the local regulation of FMVR but reversed the vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 30 +/- 7% (p less than .02). Blockade of central neural impulses to this limb combined with brachial arterial infusions of phentolamine completely abolished the humoral vasoconstriction in the tilted position. Infusions of propranolol to the contralateral brachial artery that did not affect baseline values of heart rate, arterial pressure, or the local reflex regulation of FMVR reversed the abnormal vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 42 +/- 12% (p less than .02). Despite augmented baseline values, forearm venous but not arterial plasma levels of epinephrine increased in the tilted position, as did arteri rather than venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine in these patients.

  15. Adrenergic receptor control mechanism for growth hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackard, W G; Heidingsfelder, S A

    1968-06-01

    The influence of catecholamines on growth hormone secretion has been difficult to establish previously, possibly because of the suppressive effect of the induced hyperglycemia on growth hormone concentrations. In this study, an adrenergic receptor control mechanism for human growth hormone (HGH) secretion was uncovered by studying the effects of alpha and beta receptor blockade on insulin-induced growth hormone elevations in volunteer subjects. Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine during insulin hypoglycemia, 0.1 U/kg, inhibited growth hormon elevations to 30-50% of values in the same subjects during insulin hypoglycemia without adrenergic blockade. More complete inhibition by phentolamine could not be demonstrated at a lower dose of insulin (0.05 U/kg). Beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol during insulin hypoglycemia significantly enhanced HGH concentrations in paired experiments. The inhibiting effect of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade on HGH concentrations could not be attributed to differences in blood glucose or free fatty acid values; however, more prolonged hypoglycemia and lower plasma free fatty acid values may have been a factor in the greater HGH concentrations observed during beta blockade. In the absence of insulin induced hypoglycemia, neither alpha nor beta adrenergic receptor blockade had a detectable effect on HGH concentrations. Theophylline, an inhibitor of cyclic 3'5'-AMP phosphodiesterase activity, also failed to alter plasma HGH concentrations. These studies demonstrate a stimulatory effect of alpha receptors and a possible inhibitory effect of beta receptors on growth hormone secretion.

  16. [Effects of tilt test and beta-adrenergic stimulation on the QT interval in normal children and pediatric patients with unexplained syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Pilar; Dumas, Eduardo; Heusser, Felipe; González, Rolando; Jalil, Jorge

    2004-02-01

    In normal children, any procedure that increases heart rate, such as the tilt test, may shorten the QT interval. The effect of the tilt test on QT interval in children with syncope remains unknown. We analyzed the response of RR and QT intervals during a tilt test in 3 groups of children: 28 healthy children (group 1), 26 with syncope of unknown etiology and negative tilt test results (group 2), and 17 with vasovagal syncope (group 3). During the tilt test, RR and QT intervals were significantly shortened in groups 1 and 2. In group 3, RR interval was lengthened during syncope whereas the QT interval remained constant. QT interval lengthening during the tilt test is not a characteristic finding in normal children or in children with vasovagal syncope.

  17. Fibroblast-specific expression of AC6 enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin signaling and blunts bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Li, Fengying; Sun, Shu Qiang; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Kaminsky, Joseph; Balazs, Louisa; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary fibroblasts regulate extracellular matrix production and degradation and are critical in maintenance of lung structure, function, and repair, but they also play a central role in lung fibrosis. cAMP-elevating agents inhibit cytokine- and growth factor-stimulated myofibroblast differentiation and collagen synthesis in pulmonary fibroblasts. In the present study, we overexpressed adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6) in pulmonary fibroblasts and measured cAMP production and collagen synthesis. AC6 overexpression enhanced cAMP production and the inhibition of collagen synthesis mediated by isoproterenol and beraprost, but not the responses to butaprost or PGE(2). To examine if increased AC6 expression would impact the development of fibrosis in an animal model, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress AC6 under a fibroblast-specific promoter, FTS1. Lung fibrosis was induced in FTS1-AC6(+/-) mice and littermate controls by intratracheal instillation of saline or bleomycin. Wild-type mice treated with bleomycin showed extensive peribronchial and interstitial fibrosis and collagen deposition. By contrast, FTS1-AC6(+/-) mice displayed decreased fibrotic development, lymphocyte infiltration (as determined by pathological scoring), and lung collagen content. Thus, AC6 overexpression inhibits fibrogenesis in the lung by reducing pulmonary fibroblast-mediated collagen synthesis and myofibroblast differentiation. Because AC6 overexpression does not lead to enhanced basal or PGE(2)-stimulated levels of cAMP, we conclude that endogenous catecholamines or prostacyclin is produced during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and that these signals have antifibrotic potential.

  18. Social crowding stress diminishes the pituitary-adrenocortical and hypothalamic histamine response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugajski, J; Gadek-Michalska, A; Borycz, J

    1993-12-01

    Social stress of crowding almost totally reduced the rise in serum corticosterone elicited by intracerebroventricular administration of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, after 3 and 7 day of crowding and substantially diminished that response after 14 and 21 days. Crowding stress totally abolished the increase in hypothalamic histamine induced by isoprenaline in control rats. Crowding also significantly diminished the increase in serum corticosterone evoked by clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and abolished the clonidine-induced elevation in hypothalamic histamine levels. The stimulatory effect of phenylephrine, an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, on corticosterone secretion was only moderately diminished in crowded rats. Neither phenylephrine nor crowding stress changed significantly the hypothalamic histamine levels. These results indicate that social stress of crowding considerably impairs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responsiveness to central beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Crowding also abolishes the rise in hypothalamic histamine induced by beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, suggesting a role of hypothalamic histamine in the HPA adaptation to the social stress of crowding.

  19. Heart rate response to post-learning stress predicts memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larra, Mauro F; Schulz, André; Schilling, Thomas M; Ferreira de Sá, Diana S; Best, Daniel; Kozik, Bartlomiej; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Stressful experiences are often well remembered, an effect that has been explained by beta-adrenergic influences on memory consolidation. Here, we studied the impact of stress induced heart rate (HR) responses on memory consolidation in a post-learning stress paradigm. 206 male and female participants saw 52 happy and angry faces immediately before being exposed to the Cold Pressor Test or a non-stressful control procedure. Memory for the faces and their respective expression was tested twice, after 30 min and on the next day. High HR responders (in comparison to low HR responders as well as to the non-stressful control group) showed enhanced recognition memory one day after learning. Our results show that beta-adrenergic activation elicited shortly after learning enhances memory consolidation and that the stress induced HR response is a predictor for this effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting olfactory receptor neuron responses from odorant structure

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    Hähnel Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory receptors work at the interface between the chemical world of volatile molecules and the perception of scent in the brain. Their main purpose is to translate chemical space into information that can be processed by neural circuits. Assuming that these receptors have evolved to cope with this task, the analysis of their coding strategy promises to yield valuable insight in how to encode chemical information in an efficient way. Results We mimicked olfactory coding by modeling responses of primary olfactory neurons to small molecules using a large set of physicochemical molecular descriptors and artificial neural networks. We then tested these models by recording in vivo receptor neuron responses to a new set of odorants and successfully predicted the responses of five out of seven receptor neurons. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.66 to 0.85, demonstrating the applicability of our approach for the analysis of olfactory receptor activation data. The molecular descriptors that are best-suited for response prediction vary for different receptor neurons, implying that each receptor neuron detects a different aspect of chemical space. Finally, we demonstrate that receptor responses themselves can be used as descriptors in a predictive model of neuron activation. Conclusion The chemical meaning of molecular descriptors helps understand structure-response relationships for olfactory receptors and their "receptive fields". Moreover, it is possible to predict receptor neuron activation from chemical structure using machine-learning techniques, although this is still complicated by a lack of training data.

  1. Receptor response in Venus's fly-trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S L

    1965-09-01

    The insect-trapping movement of the plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus's fly-trap) is mediated by the stimulation of mechanosensory hairs located on the surface of the trap. It is known that stimulation of the hairs is followed by action potentials which are propagated over the surface of the trap. It has been reported that action potentials always precede trap closure. The occurrence of non-propagated receptor potentials is reported here. Receptor potentials always precede the action potentials. The receptor potential appears to couple the mechanical stimulation step to the action potential step of the preying sequence. Receptor potentials elicited by mechanical stimulation of a sensory hair were measured by using the hair as an integral part of the current-measuring path. The tip of the hair was cut off exposing the medullary tissue; this provided a natural extension of the measuring electrode into the receptor region at the base of the hair. A measuring pipette electrode was slipped over the cut tip of the hair. Positive and negative receptor potentials were measured. Evidence is presented which supports the hypothesis that the positive and negative receptor potentials originate from independent sources. An analysis is made of (a) the relation of the parameters of mechanical stimuli to the magnitude of the receptor potential, and (b) the relation of the receptor potentials to the action potential. The hypothesis that the positive receptor potential is the generator of the action potential is consistent with these data.

  2. Neurohumoral activation in heart failure: the role of adrenergic receptors

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    Patricia C. Brum

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a common endpoint for many forms of cardiovascular disease and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The development of end-stage HF often involves an initial insult to the myocardium that reduces cardiac output and leads to a compensatory increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. Acutely, the sympathetic hyperactivity through the activation of beta-adrenergic receptors increases heart rate and cardiac contractility, which compensate for decreased cardiac output. However, chronic exposure of the heart to elevated levels of catecholamines released from sympathetic nerve terminals and the adrenal gland may lead to further pathologic changes in the heart, resulting in continued elevation of sympathetic tone and a progressive deterioration in cardiac function. On a molecular level, altered beta-adrenergic receptor signaling plays a pivotal role in the genesis and progression of HF. beta-adrenergic receptor number and function are decreased, and downstream mechanisms are altered. In this review we will present an overview of the normal beta-adrenergic receptor pathway in the heart and the consequences of sustained adrenergic activation in HF. The myopathic potential of individual components of the adrenergic signaling will be discussed through the results of research performed in genetic modified animals. Finally, we will discuss the potential clinical impact of beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms for better understanding the progression of HF.A insuficiência cardíaca (IC é a via final comum da maioria das doenças cardiovasculares e uma das maiores causas de morbi-mortalidade. O desenvolvimento do estágio final da IC freqüentemente envolve um insulto inicial do miocárdio, reduzindo o débito cardíaco e levando ao aumento compensatório da atividade do sistema nervoso simpático (SNS. Existem evidências de que apesar da exposição aguda ser benéfica, exposições crônicas a elevadas concentra

  3. Neurotransmitter receptor-mediated signaling pathways as modulators of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system with its two antagonistic branches, the sympathicus and the parasympathicus, regulates the activities of all body functions that are not under voluntary control. While the autonomic regulation of organ functions has been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the potential role of neurohumoral transmission at the cellular level in the development of cancer. Studies conducted by our laboratory first showed that binding of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, as well as nicotine or its nitrosated cancer-causing derivative, NNK, to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors comprised of alpha7 subunits activated a mitogenic signal transduction pathway in normal and neoplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. On the other hand, beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs), which transmit signals initiated by binding of the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathicus, were identified by our laboratory as important regulators of cell proliferation in cell lines derived from human adenocarcinomas of the lungs, pancreas, and breast. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK bound with high affinity to Beta1- and Beta2-ARs, thus activating cAMP, protein kinase A, and the transcription factor CREB. Collectively, neurotransmitter receptors of the nicotinic and Beta-adrenergic families appear to regulate cellular functions essential for the development and survival of the most common human cancers.

  4. Neuroactive Steroids: Receptor Interactions and Responses

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    Kald Beshir Tuem

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroactive steroids (NASs are naturally occurring steroids, which are synthesized centrally as de novo from cholesterol and are classified as pregnane, androstane, and sulfated neurosteroids (NSs. NASs modulate many processes via interacting with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, N-methyl-d-aspartate, serotonin, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-dependent anion channels, α-adrenoreceptors, X-receptors of the liver, transient receptor potential channels, microtubule-associated protein 2, neurotrophin nerve growth factor, and σ1 receptors. Among these, NSs (especially allopregnanolone have high potency and extensive GABA-A receptors and hence demonstrate anticonvulsant, anesthetic, central cytoprotectant, and baroreflex inhibitory effects. NSs are also involved in mood and learning via serotonin and anti-nociceptive activity via T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Moreover, they are modulators of mitochondrial function, synaptic plasticity, or regulators of apoptosis, which have a role in neuroprotective via voltage-dependent anion channels receptors. For proper functioning, NASs need to be in their normal level, whereas excess and deficiency may lead to abnormalities. When they are below the normal, NSs could have a part in development of depression, neuro-inflammation, multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. On the other hand, stress and attention deficit disorder could occur during excessive level. Overall, NASs are very important molecules with major neuropsychiatric activity.

  5. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  6. Pleiotropic regulations of neutrophil receptors response to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical condition that causes a high mortality rate worldwide. Numerous studies on the pathophysiology of sepsis have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network, thus leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately death. The impairment of neu-trophil migration is associated with the outcome of sepsis. Literature review was performed on the roles of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil receptors as pleiotropic regulators during sepsis. Additionally, we systematically classify neutrophil receptors with regard to the neutrophil response during sepsis and discuss the clinical implications of these receptors for the treatment of sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant dysfunction in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis, characterized by the failure to migrate to the site of infection. Neutrophil receptors, as pleiotropic regulators, play important roles in the neutrophil response during sepsis. Neutrophil receptors play key roles in chemotactic neutrophil migration and may prove to be suitable targets in future pharmacological therapies for sepsis.

  7. Response of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors during lung inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, A I; DeLaney, R G

    1983-09-01

    Studies were conducted to establish the factors that determine the response of canine pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RAR) during lung inflation. Inflations of the lung were performed at several constant rates during which the activity of individual RAR was counted. At each rate of inflation tested multiple identical tests were performed. The volume of each test inflation was controlled. Data obtained in all tests at each flow rate were averaged to give the mean response of the receptor at that rate of inflation. These studies indicate the major response characteristics of RAR during lung inflation in conditions of relatively constant lung mechanics. First, at a constant rate of inflation, the activity of RAR augments increasingly as the lung is expanded. Second, their activity is influenced markedly by the rate of inflation. However, this sensitivity is nonlinear. Specifically, at low rates of inflation increases in flow rate produce more marked augmentation of RAR firing than do identical increases in flow at higher rates of inflation. The major difference between receptors is in their threshold; however, this too is a function of flow rate. With increasing flow rate the threshold, whether measured as the inflation volume or transpulmonary pressure at which receptors begin to fire, declines. The response of receptors, however, with thresholds over the entire range show the major features discussed above. The present results provide quantitative information which are necessary to begin to eludicate the transduction properties of this receptor type.

  8. Foetal vascular responses to thromboxane receptor blockade

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    B. A. Meyer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that foetal administration of SQ-29,548, a putative thromboxane receptor blocker, would prevent foeto–placental vasoconstriction produced by the thromboxane mimic U46619. Arterial blood gases, continuous monitoring of maternal and foetal heart rates and blood pressures were performed in chronically catheterized pregnant ewes. Foetal blood flows and vascular resistance were determined with radioactive microspheres. SQ-29,548 effectively blocked the expected vasoconstrictive effects of thromboxane. However, prolonged infusion of SQ-29,548 resulted in significant decreases in umbilical–placental blood flow and foetal mean arterial pressure. This was accompanied by a respiratory acidemia. Potential therapy for the vasoconstrictive disorders of pregnancy with SQ-29,548 awaits further investigation of its intrinsic vasoactive properties in the umbilical–placental vasculature.

  9. Of pheromones and kairomones: what receptors mediate innate emotional responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes-Marco, Lluis; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Some chemicals elicit innate emotionally laden behavioral responses. Pheromones mediate sexual attraction, parental care or agonistic confrontation, whereas predators' kairomones elicit defensive behaviors in their preys. This essay explores the hypothesis that the detection of these semiochemicals relies on highly specific olfactory and/or vomeronasal receptors. The V1R, V2R, and formyl-peptide vomeronasal receptors bind their ligands in highly specific and sensitive way, thus being good candidates for pheromone- or kairomone-detectors (e.g., secreted and excreted proteins, peptides and lipophilic volatiles). The olfactory epithelium also expresses specific receptors, for example trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) and guanylyl cyclase receptors (GC-D and other types), some of which bind kairomones and putative pheromones. However, most of the olfactory neurons express canonical olfactory receptors (ORs) that bind many ligands with different affinity, being not suitable for mediating responses to pheromones and kairomones. In this respect, trimethylthiazoline (TMT) is considered a fox-derived kairomone for mice and rats, but it seems to be detected by canonical ORs. Therefore, we have reassessed the kairomonal nature of TMT by analyzing the behavioral responses of outbred (CD1) and inbred mice (C57BL/J6) to TMT. Our results confirm that both mouse strains avoid TMT, which increases immobility in C57BL/J6, but not CD1 mice. However, mice of both strains sniff at TMT throughout the test and show no trace of TMT-induced contextual conditioning (immobility or avoidance). This suggests that TMT is not a kairomone but, similar to a loud noise, in high concentrations it induces aversion and stress as unspecific responses to a strong olfactory stimulation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Studies of membrane fluidity and heart contractile force in Trypanosoma cruzi infected mice

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    Julio E Enders

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In Chagas disease serious cardiac dysfunction can appear. We specifically studied the cardiac function by evaluating: ventricle contractile force and norepinephrine response, affinity and density of beta-adrenergic receptors, dynamic properties of myocardial membranes, and electrocardiography. Albino swiss mice (n = 250 were infected with 55 trypomastigotes, Tulahuen strain and studied at 35, 75, and 180 days post-infection, that correspond to the acute, indeterminate, and chronic phase respectively. Cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors' affinity, myocardial contractility, and norepinephrine response progressively decreased from the acute to the chronic phase of the disease (p < 0.01. The density (expressed as fmol/mg.prot of the receptors was similar to non-infected mice (71.96 ± 0.36 in both the acute (78.24 ± 1.67 and indeterminate phases (77.28 ± 0.91, but lower in the chronic disease (53.32 ± 0.71. Electrocardiographic abnormalities began in the acute phase and were found in 65% of the infected-mice during the indeterminate and chronic phases. Membrane contents of triglycerides, cholesterol, and anisotropy were similar in all groups. A quadratic correlation between the affinity to beta-adrenergic receptors and cardiac contractile force was obtained. In conclusion the changes in cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors suggests a correlation between the modified beta-adrenergic receptors affinity and the cardiac contractile force.

  11. Yeast as a model system for mammalian seven-transmembrane segment receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeansonne, N.E. [East Carolina Univ. Medical School, Greenville, NC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Investigators have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to study the {beta}-adrenergic receptor, the T-cell receptor pathway, initiation of mammalian DNA replication, initiation of mammalian transcription, secretion, the CDC2 kinase system, cell cycle control, and aging, as well as the function of oncogenes. This list continues to growth with the discovery of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding homologue in yeast, an Rb binding protein homologue, and a possible yeast arrestin. Yeast is relatively easy to maintain, to grow, and to genetically manipulate. A single gene can be overexpressed, selectively mutated or deleted from its chromosomal location. In this way, the in vivo function of a gene can be studied. It has become reasonable to consider yeast as a model system for studying the seven transmembrane segments (7-TMS) receptor family. Currently, subtypes of the {beta}-adrenergic receptor are being studied in yeast. The receptor and its G{sub {alpha}}-G-protein, trigger the mating pheromone receptor pathway. This provides a powerful assay for determining receptor function. Studies expressing the muscarinic cholinergic receptor in yeast are underway. The yeast pheromone receptor belongs to this receptor family, sharing sequences and secondary structure homology. An effective strategy has been to identify a yeast pathway or process which is homologous to a mammalian system. The pathway is delineated in yeast, identifying other genetic components. Then yeast genes are used to screen for human homologues of these components. The putative human homologues are then expressed in yeast and in mammalian cells to determine function. When this type of {open_quotes}mixing and matching{close_quotes} works, yeast genetics can be a powerful tool. 115 refs.

  12. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  13. Pharmacometabolomics reveals racial differences in response to atenolol treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Wikoff

    Full Text Available Antihypertensive drugs are among the most commonly prescribed drugs for chronic disease worldwide. The response to antihypertensive drugs varies substantially between individuals and important factors such as race that contribute to this heterogeneity are poorly understood. In this study we use metabolomics, a global biochemical approach to investigate biochemical changes induced by the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol in Caucasians and African Americans. Plasma from individuals treated with atenolol was collected at baseline (untreated and after a 9 week treatment period and analyzed using a GC-TOF metabolomics platform. The metabolomic signature of atenolol exposure included saturated (palmitic, monounsaturated (oleic, palmitoleic and polyunsaturated (arachidonic, linoleic free fatty acids, which decreased in Caucasians after treatment but were not different in African Americans (p<0.0005, q<0.03. Similarly, the ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate was significantly decreased in Caucasians by 33% (p<0.0001, q<0.0001 but was unchanged in African Americans. The contribution of genetic variation in genes that encode lipases to the racial differences in atenolol-induced changes in fatty acids was examined. SNP rs9652472 in LIPC was found to be associated with the change in oleic acid in Caucasians (p<0.0005 but not African Americans, whereas the PLA2G4C SNP rs7250148 associated with oleic acid change in African Americans (p<0.0001 but not Caucasians. Together, these data indicate that atenolol-induced changes in the metabolome are dependent on race and genotype. This study represents a first step of a pharmacometabolomic approach to phenotype patients with hypertension and gain mechanistic insights into racial variability in changes that occur with atenolol treatment, which may influence response to the drug.

  14. The role of adrenergic receptors in the motility of duodenum and choledochoduodenal junction in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blichowski, A; Andrzejewski, W; Gaszyński, W; Kozulski, W

    1977-01-01

    The role of adenergic receptors in the motility of duodenum and choledochoduodenal junction in the pig. Acta Physiol. Pol., 1977, 28 (6): 521-528. The choldeochoduodenal junction in the Vietnamese pig is functionally and anatomically a part of duodenal wall. In view of this, investigations were carried out for establishing the role of adrenergic receptors in the development of motor function of this part of the intestinal tract. The experiments were performed on domestic Vietnamese pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) and they showed that after stimulation of alpha and beta adrenergic receptors the motor activity of the duodenal muscular coat and the choledochoduodenal junction is inhibited. The obtained results suggest similar reactions of the adrenergic receptors in both examined parts of the intestinal tract in the pig.

  15. Toll-like receptor 9 mediated responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kristine Ohm

    Full Text Available Altered cardiac Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 signaling is important in several experimental cardiovascular disorders. These studies have predominantly focused on cardiac myocytes or the heart as a whole. Cardiac fibroblasts have recently been attributed increasing significance in mediating inflammatory signaling. However, putative TLR9-signaling through cardiac fibroblasts remains non-investigated. Thus, our aim was to explore TLR9-signaling in cardiac fibroblasts and investigate the consequence of such receptor activity on classical cardiac fibroblast cellular functions. Cultivated murine cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with different TLR9 agonists (CpG A, B and C and assayed for the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα], CXCL2 and interferon α/β. Expression of functional cardiac fibroblast TLR9 was proven as stimulation with CpG B and -C caused significant CXCL2 and TNFα-release. These responses were TLR9-specific as complete inhibition of receptor-stimulated responses was achieved by co-treatment with a TLR9-antagonist (ODN 2088 or chloroquine diphosphate. TLR9-stimulated responses were also found more potent in cardiac fibroblasts when compared with classical innate immune cells. Stimulation of cardiac fibroblasts TLR9 was also found to attenuate migration and proliferation, but did not influence myofibroblast differentiation in vitro. Finally, results from in vivo TLR9-stimulation with subsequent fractionation of specific cardiac cell-types (cardiac myocytes, CD45+ cells, CD31+ cells and cardiac fibroblast-enriched cell-fractions corroborated our in vitro data and provided evidence of differentiated cell-specific cardiac responses. Thus, we conclude that cardiac fibroblast may constitute a significant TLR9 responder cell within the myocardium and, further, that such receptor activity may impact important cardiac fibroblast cellular functions.

  16. Ionotropic GABA Receptors and Distal Retinal ON and OFF Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the vertebrate retina, visual signals are segregated into parallel ON and OFF pathways, which provide information for light increments and decrements. The segregation is first evident at the level of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in distal retina. The activity of large populations of ON and OFF bipolar cells is reflected in the b- and d-waves of the diffuse electroretinogram (ERG. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, acting through ionotropic GABA receptors in shaping the ON and OFF responses in distal retina, is a matter of debate. This review summarized current knowledge about the types of the GABAergic neurons and ionotropic GABA receptors in the retina as well as the effects of GABA and specific GABAA and GABAC receptor antagonists on the activity of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in both nonmammalian and mammalian retina. Special emphasis is put on the effects on b- and d-waves of the ERG as a useful tool for assessment of the overall function of distal retinal ON and OFF channels. The role of GABAergic system in establishing the ON-OFF asymmetry concerning the time course and absolute and relative sensitivity of the ERG responses under different conditions of light adaptation in amphibian retina is also discussed.

  17. Direct control of peripheral lipid deposition by CNS GLP-1 receptor signaling is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and blunted in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Morgan, Donald A; Varela, Luis; Haynes, William G; Patterson, James T; Disse, Emmanuel; Pfluger, Paul T; López, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; DiMarchi, Richard; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2009-05-06

    We investigated a possible role of the central glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor system as an essential brain circuit regulating adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and lipid metabolism independent from feeding behavior. Both lean and diet-induced obesity mice were used for our experiments. GLP-1 (7-36) amide was infused in the brain for 2 or 7 d. The expression of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism was measured by real-time PCR or Western blot. To test the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system may be responsible for informing adipocytes about changes in CNS GLP-1 tone, we have performed direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity combined with experiments in genetically manipulated mice lacking beta-adrenergic receptors. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GLP-1 in mice directly and potently decreases lipid storage in white adipose tissue. These effects are independent from nutrient intake. Such CNS control of adipocyte metabolism was found to depend partially on a functional sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the effects of CNS GLP-1 on adipocyte metabolism were blunted in diet-induced obese mice. The CNS GLP-1 system decreases fat storage via direct modulation of adipocyte metabolism. This CNS GLP-1 control of adipocyte lipid metabolism appears to be mediated at least in part by the sympathetic nervous system and is independent of parallel changes in food intake and body weight. Importantly, the CNS GLP-1 system loses the capacity to modulate adipocyte metabolism in obese states, suggesting an obesity-induced adipocyte resistance to CNS GLP-1.

  18. Fcγ Receptor Heterogeneity in Leukocyte Functional Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies participate in defense of the organism from all types of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. IgG antibodies recognize their associated antigen via their two Fab portions and are in turn recognized though their Fc portion by specific Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on the membrane of immune cells. Multiple types and polymorphic variants of FcγR exist. These receptors are expressed in many cells types and are also redundant in inducing cell responses. Crosslinking of FcγR on the surface of leukocytes activates several effector functions aimed toward the destruction of pathogens and the induction of an inflammatory response. In the past few years, new evidence on how the particular IgG subclass and the glycosylation pattern of the antibody modulate the IgG–FcγR interaction has been presented. Despite these advances, our knowledge of what particular effector function is activated in a certain cell and in response to a specific type of FcγR remains very limited today. On one hand, each immune cell could be programmed to perform a particular cell function after FcγR crosslinking. On the other, each FcγR could activate a particular signaling pathway leading to a unique cell response. In this review, I describe the main types of FcγRs and our current view of how particular FcγRs activate various signaling pathways to promote unique leukocyte functions. PMID:28373871

  19. Melanocortin receptors as novel effectors of macrophage responses in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal B Patel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have crucial functions in initiating the inflammatory reaction in a strict temporal and spatial manner to provide a ‘clear-up’ response required for resolution. Hormonal peptides such as melanocortins modulate macrophage reactivity and attenuate inflammation ranging from skin inflammation to joint disease and reperfusion injury. The melanocortins (e.g. ACTH and αMSH elicit regulatory properties through activation of a family of GPCRs, the MC receptors; MC1-MC5. Several studies have focused on MC1 and MC3 as anti-inflammatory receptors expressed on cells of the macrophage lineage. We review here elements of the melanocortin pathway with particular attention to macrophage function in anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving inflammatory settings. Evidence shows that ACTH, αMSH and other MC agonists can activate MC1 and MC3 on macrophage through cAMP and/or NFκB-dependent mechanisms to abrogate pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and NO and enhance anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and HO-1. Melanocortins and their receptors regulate inflammation by inhibiting leukocyte recruitment to and interaction with inflamed tissue. An intensely exciting addition to this field of research has been the ability of an αMSH analogue; AP214 to activate MC3 expressed on macrophage to enhance their clearance of both zymosan particles and apoptotic neutrophils thus putting melanocortins in line with other pro-resolving mediators. The use of mouse colonies mutated or nullified for MC1 or MC3, respectively as well as availability of selective MC receptor agonist/antagonists have been key to deciphering mechanisms by which elements of the melanocortin system play a role in these phenomena. We review here melanocortin pathway components with attention to the macrophage, reiterating receptor targets required for pro-resolving properties. The overall outcome will be identification of selective MC agonists as a strategy for innovative anti

  20. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. III. Difference between the receptor-adenylate cyclase regulating systems in AH130 cells and cultured normal rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, F; Matsunaga, T; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1986-10-01

    The responsiveness to three beta-adrenergic agonists, isoproterenol (IPN), epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) in AH13O cells was examined compared with that in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. As regards to the activation of adenylate cyclase in the cell homogenates, the relative affinity of the three agonists was in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells and IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in cultured normal liver cells. While the efficacies of the three agonists were similar in cultured liver cells, those of NE and Epi were markedly lower than that of IPN in AH13O cells and were increased to the similar level of IPN by pretreatment with phentolamine, but not with prazosin. Clonidine inhibited the activation of adenylate cyclase by IPN in AH13O cells. When cells were preincubated with islet-activating protein (IAP), the activity of adenylate cyclase in the presence or absence of agonist in both cell lines increased. In IAP-treated AH13O cells, the efficacies of NE and Epi became close to that of IPN. Adenylate cyclase in IAP-treated AH13O cells was activated by GTP in a dose-dependent manner, but that in IAP-treated cultured liver cells was not. In the presence of IPN, biphasic (activatory and inhibitory) effects of GTP on the cyclase were observed, and the inhibitory phase was eliminated by the IAP-treatment in both cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Cardiac beta-receptors in experimental Chagas' disease Receptores beta cardíacos na doença de Chagas experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E. Enders

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Chagas' disease (45 to 90 days post-infection showed serious cardiac alterations in the contractility and in the pharmacological response to beta adrenergic receptors in normal and T. cruzi infected mice (post-acute phase. Chagasic infection did not change the beta receptors density (78.591 ± 3.125 fmol/mg protein and 73.647 ± 2.194 fmol/mg protein for controls but their affinity was significantly diminished (Kd = 7.299 ± 0.426 nM and Kd = 3.759 ± 0.212 nM for the control p Estudaram-se os receptores beta cardíacos de camundongos infectados pelo Trypanosoma cruzi na fase pós-aguda da doença de Chagas para estabelecer em que medida os mesmos contribuem a gerar respostas anômalas às catecolaminas observadas nestes miocardios. Utilizara-se 3-H/DHA para a marcação dos receptores beta cardíacos dos camundongos normais e dos infectados na fase pós-aguda (45 a 90 dias pós-infecção. O número dos sítios de fixação foi similar nos dois grupos, 78.591 ± 3.125 fmol/mg. Proteína nos chagásicos e 73.647 ± 2.194 fmol/mg. Proteína no grupo controle. Em vez disso, a afinidade verificou-se significativamente diminuida no grupo chagásico (Kd = 7.299 ± 0.426 nM respeito do controle (Kd = 3.759 ± 0.212 nM p < 0.001. Os resultados obtidos demonstram que as modificações observadas na estimulação adrenérgica do miocárdio chagásico se correlacionam com a menor afinidade dos receptores beta cardíacos e que estas alterações exerceriam uma parte determinante para as consequências funcionais que são detectadas na fase crônica.

  2. Treatment Resistant Depression with Loss of Antidepressant Response: Rapid—Acting Antidepressant Action of Dextromethorphan, A Possible Treatment Bridging Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) may have ketamine—like rapid—acting, treatment—resistant, and conventional antidepressant effects.1,2 This reports our initial experience with DM in unipolar Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A patient with treatment—resistant MDD (failing adequate trials of citalopram and vortioxetine) with loss of antidepressant response (to fluoxetine and bupropion) twice experienced a rapid—acting antidepressant effect within 48 hours of DM administration and lasting 7 days, sustained up to 20 days with daily administration, then gradually developing labile loss of antidepressant response over the ensuing 7 days. Upon full relapse in DSM-5 MDD while taking 600 mg/day of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor bupropion XL, a 300 mg oral loading dose of DM was given, followed by 60 mg po bid after an additional dose—finding period, without side effects. DM exhibited a ketamine—like rapid—acting antidepressant effect, thought to be mediated by mTOR activation (related to NMDA PCP site antagonism, sigma-1 and beta adrenergic receptor stimulation) and 5HTT inhibition, resulting in AMPA receptor trafficking, and dendritogenesis, spinogenesis, synaptogenesis, and increased neuronal survival (related to NMDA antagonism and sigma-1 and mTOR signaling). This report appears to be the first report of a rapid—acting effect in unipolar MDD and adds to antidepressant effects observed in the retrospective chart review of 77 patients with Bipolar II Disorder (Kelly and Lieberman 2014). If replicated, there is some reason to think that the administration of other agents with DM, such as lithium or D-cycloserine, might prolong the duration of the rapid-antidepressant effect. PMID:27738380

  3. Sequestration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Facilitation by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) and attenuation by a dominant-negative mutant of GRK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Kurose, H; Nagao, T

    1994-12-23

    Sequestration of m2 receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes), which was assessed as loss of N-[3H]methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) binding activity from the cell surface, was examined in COS 7 and BHK-21 cells that had been transfected with expression vectors encoding the m2 receptor and, independently, vectors encoding a G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) (beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1) or a GRK2 dominant-negative mutant (DN-GRK2). The sequestration of m2 receptors became apparent when the cells were treated with 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. In this case, approximately 40% or 20-25% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on COS 7 or BHK-21 cells, respectively, were sequestered with a half-life of 15-25 min. In cells in which GRK2 was also expressed, the sequestration became apparent in the presence of 10(-7) M carbamylcholine. Approximately 40% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on both COS 7 and BHK-21 cells were sequestered in the presence of 10(-6) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. When DN-GRK2 was expressed in COS 7 cells, the proportion of [3H]NMS binding sites sequestered in the presence of 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine was reduced to 20-30%. These results indicate that the phosphorylation of m2 receptors by GRK2 facilitates their sequestration. These results are in contrast with the absence of a correlation between sequestration and the phosphorylation of beta-adrenergic receptors by the GRK2 and suggests that the consequences of phosphorylation by GRK2 are different for different receptors.

  4. The thyroid hormone receptors modulate the skin response to retinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura García-Serrano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids play an important role in skin homeostasis and when administered topically cause skin hyperplasia, abnormal epidermal differentiation and inflammation. Thyroidal status in humans also influences skin morphology and function and we have recently shown that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs are required for a normal proliferative response to 12-O-tetradecanolyphorbol-13-acetate (TPA in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have compared the epidermal response of mice lacking the thyroid hormone receptor binding isoforms TRα1 and TRβ to retinoids and TPA. Reduced hyperplasia and a decreased number of proliferating cells in the basal layer in response to 9-cis-RA and TPA were found in the epidermis of TR-deficient mice. Nuclear levels of proteins important for cell proliferation were altered, and expression of keratins 5 and 6 was also reduced, concomitantly with the decreased number of epidermal cell layers. In control mice the retinoid (but not TPA induced parakeratosis and diminished expression of keratin 10 and loricrin, markers of early and terminal epidermal differentiation, respectively. This reduction was more accentuated in the TR deficient animals, whereas they did not present parakeratosis. Therefore, TRs modulate both the proliferative response to retinoids and their inhibitory effects on skin differentiation. Reduced proliferation, which was reversed upon thyroxine treatment, was also found in hypothyroid mice, demonstrating that thyroid hormone binding to TRs is required for the normal response to retinoids. In addition, the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 and the chemotactic proteins S1008A and S1008B were significantly elevated in the skin of TR knock-out mice after TPA or 9-cis-RA treatment and immune cell infiltration was also enhanced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since retinoids are commonly used for the treatment of skin disorders, these results demonstrating that TRs

  5. Vascular adrenergic receptor responses in skeletal muscle in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechler, F.; Mastaglia, F.L.

    1981-02-01

    The pharmacological responses of vascular adrenergic receptors to intravenously administered epinephrine, phentolamine, and propranolol were assessed by measuring muscle blood flow (MBF) changes in the tibialis anterior muscle using the xenon 133 clearance technique and were compared in 8 normal subjects and 11 patients with myotonic dystrophy. In cases with advanced involvement of the muscle, the resting MBF was reduced and was not significantly altered by epinephrine before or after alpha- or beta-receptor blockade. In patients in whom the tibialis anterior muscle was normal or only minimally affected clinically, a paradoxical reduction in the epinephrine-induced increase in MBF was found after alpha blockade by phentolamine, and the epinephrine-induced MBF increase was not completely blocked by propranolol as in the normal subjects. These findings point to functional alteration in the properties of vascular adrenergic receptors in muscle in myotonic dystrophy. While this may be another manifestation of a widespread cell membrane defect in the disease, the possibility that the changes are secondary to the myotonic state cannot be excluded.

  6. Mechanisms of immune regulation by norepinephrine and cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Norepinephrine has previously been demonstrated by this laboratory to potentiate the in vitro T-dependent antibody response through the stimulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors. The role of {beta}-adrenergic receptor subtypes in norepinephrine-induced potentiation of the antibody responses was examined with selective {beta}-adrenergic antagonists. The antagonists were metoprolol ({beta}{sub 1}-selective), ICI 118-551 ({beta}{sub 2}-selective), and propranolol ({beta}-non-selective). Both propranolol and ICI 118-551 blocked norepinephrine-induced potentiation of the antibody response, but metoprolol was ineffective. Receptor binding competition of antagonists with the radioligant, ({sup 3}H)CGP-12177 was examined and results were analyzed with the computer program, LIGAND. Competition by ICI 118-551 identified 75% {beta}{sub 2}- and 25% {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors on splenic mononuclear cells. Enriched T lymphocytes exhibited 75% {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors, while enriched B lymphocytes contained 90% {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors as identified by ICI 118-551. Greater than twice as many total receptors were identified on B lymphocytes than T lymphocytes. A T cell lymphoma contained about 60% {beta}{sub 2}-receptors, while 100% were {beta}{sub 2} receptors on a B cell lymphoma, as assessed by ICI 118-551. Results support a heterogeneous {beta}-adrenergic receptor population on T lymphocytes and a more homogeneous {beta}{sub 2}-population on B lymphocytes.

  7. Toll-like receptor responses in IRAK-4-deficient neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen, Robin; Drewniak, Agata; Tool, Anton T J; Jansen, Machiel; van Houdt, Michel; Geissler, Judy; van den Berg, Timo K; Chapel, Helen; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2010-01-01

    Human neutrophils were found to express all known Toll-like receptors (TLRs) except TLR3 and TLR7. IRAK-4-deficient neutrophils were tested for their responsiveness to various TLR ligands. Essentially all TLR responses in neutrophils, including the induction of reactive oxygen species generation, adhesion, chemotaxis and IL-8 secretion, were found to be dependent on IRAK-4. Surprisingly, the reactivity towards certain established TLR ligands, imiquimod and ODN-CpG, was unaffected by IRAK-4 deficiency, demonstrating their activity is independent of TLR. TLR-4-dependent signaling in neutrophils was totally dependent on IRAK-4 without any major TRIF-mediated contribution. We did not observe any defects in killing capacity of IRAK-4-deficient neutrophils for Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, suggesting that microbial killing is primarily TLR independent.

  8. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs, and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0 and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III. Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs, i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor, and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR, due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse

  9. Serum metabolites predict response to angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, Michelle J.; Heinzel, Andreas; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Dallmann, Guido; Rossing, Kasper; Andersen, Steen; Mayer, Bernd; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Individual patients show a large variability in albuminuria response to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Identifying novel biomarkers that predict ARB response may help tailor therapy. We aimed to discover and validate a serum metabolite classifier that predicts albuminuria response

  10. Prevention of adenosine A2A receptor activation diminishes beat-to-beat alternation in human atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Cristina E; Llach, Anna; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Tarifa, Carmen; Barriga, Montserrat; Wiegerinck, Rob F; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benitéz, Raúl; Montiel, José; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and linked to increased adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression and activation. Here we tested whether this may favor atrial arrhythmogenesis by promoting beat-to-beat alternation and irregularity. Patch-clamp and confocal calcium imaging was used to measure the beat-to-beat response of the calcium current and transient in human atrial myocytes. Responses were classified as uniform, alternating or irregular and stimulation of Gs-protein coupled receptors decreased the frequency where a uniform response could be maintained from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.01 for beta-adrenergic receptors and from 1.4 ± 0.1 to 0.5 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.05 for A2ARs. The latter was linked to increased spontaneous calcium release and after-depolarizations. Moreover, A2AR activation increased the fraction of non-uniformly responding cells in HL-1 myocyte cultures from 19 ± 3 to 51 ± 9 %; p < 0.02, and electrical mapping in perfused porcine atria revealed that adenosine induced electrical alternans at longer cycle lengths, doubled the fraction of electrodes showing alternation, and increased the amplitude of alternations. Importantly, protein kinase A inhibition increased the highest frequency where uniform responses could be maintained from 0.84 ± 0.12 to 1.86 ± 0.11 Hz; p < 0.001 and prevention of A2AR-activation with exogenous adenosine deaminase selectively increased the threshold from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.2 ± 0.1 Hz; p = 0.001 in myocytes from patients with AF. In conclusion, A2AR-activation promotes beat-to-beat irregularities in the calcium transient in human atrial myocytes, and prevention of A2AR activation may be a novel means to maintain uniform beat-to-beat responses at higher beating frequencies in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Lipolytic response of adipocytes to epinephrine in sedentary and exercise-trained subjects: sex-related differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampes, F; Riviere, D; Beauville, M; Marceron, M; Garrigues, M

    1989-01-01

    Adipose tissue lipolytic activity is increased in endurance-trained subjects, but little is known about the mechanisms of this increase. To understand more fully the mechanisms involved and to discover whether sex-related differences exist, biopsies of fat were performed in the periumbilical region of 20 sedentary subjects (10 women (W) and 10 men (M)) and 20 trained subjects (10 W, 10 M); the in vitro response to epinephrine of the collagenase-isolated fat cells was studied. Glycerol release, chosen as an adipocyte lipolysis indicator, was measured by bioluminescence. Dose-response curves with epinephrine (alpha 2 and beta agonist), with isoproterenol (beta agonist) and epinephrine + propranolol and adenosine deaminase, were studied. Epinephrine-induced lipolysis was enhanced in trained subjects and this was due to an increased efficiency of the beta-adrenergic pathway. However, differences were found between the two sexes. In trained men, the lipolysis increase resulted from the enhancement of the beta-adrenergic pathway efficiency without any significant decrease in the alpha 2-adrenergic pathway efficiency. In trained women, the lipolysis increase was not only due to the enhancement of the beta-adrenergic pathway efficiency (which was greater than in trained men), but also to a significant decrease in the alpha 2-adrenergic pathway efficiency. Despite the decrease, the alpha 2-adrenergic pathway remained more efficient in trained women than in trained men, as was the case in sedentary subjects. It is concluded that endurance training led to better lipid mobilization and that this effect seemed greater in women than in men.

  12. GabaB receptors activation in the NTS blocks the glycemic responses induced by carotid body receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Mónica; Montero, Sergio; Cadenas, José Luis; Lara, José Jesús; Tejeda-Chávez, Héctor Rafael; Alvarez-Buylla, Ramón; de Alvarez-Buylla, Elena Roces

    2008-08-18

    The carotid body receptors participate in glucose regulation sensing glucose levels in blood entering the cephalic circulation. The carotid body receptors information, is initially processed within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and elicits changes in circulating glucose and brain glucose uptake. Previous work has shown that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in NTS modulates respiratory reflexes, but the role of GABA within NTS in glucose regulation remains unknown. Here we show that GABA(B) receptor agonist (baclofen) or antagonists (phaclofen and CGP55845A) locally injected into NTS modified arterial glucose levels and brain glucose retention. Control injections outside NTS did not elicit these responses. In contrast, GABA(A) agonist and antagonist (muscimol or bicuculline) produced no significant changes in blood glucose levels. When these GABAergic drugs were applied before carotid body receptors stimulation, again, only GABA(B) agonist or antagonist significantly affected glycemic responses; baclofen microinjection significantly reduced the hyperglycemic response and brain glucose retention observed after carotid body receptors stimulation, while phaclofen produced the opposite effect, increasing significantly hyperglycemia and brain glucose retention. These results indicate that activation of GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors in the NTS modulates the glycemic responses after anoxic stimulation of the carotid body receptors, and suggest the presence of a tonic inhibitory mechanism in the NTS to avoid hyperglycemia.

  13. Prefrontal Cortical Kappa Opioid Receptors Attenuate Responses to Amygdala Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Hanks, Ashley N; Scott, Liam; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Hughes, Zoë A; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2015-12-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have been implicated in anxiety and stress, conditions that involve activation of projections from the basolateral amygdala (BLA) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Although KORs have been studied in several brain regions, their role on mPFC physiology and on BLA projections to the mPFC remains unclear. Here, we explored whether KORs modify synaptic inputs from the BLA to the mPFC using in vivo electrophysiological recordings with electrical and optogenetic stimulation. Systemic administration of the KOR agonist U69,593 inhibited BLA-evoked synaptic responses in the mPFC without altering hippocampus-evoked responses. Intra-mPFC U69,593 inhibited electrical and optogenetic BLA-evoked synaptic responses, an effect blocked by the KOR antagonist nor-BNI. Bilateral intra-mPFC injection of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI increased center time in the open field test, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. The data demonstrate that mPFC KORs negatively regulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA-mPFC pathway and anxiety-like behavior. These findings provide a framework whereby KOR signaling during stress and anxiety can regulate the flow of emotional state information from the BLA to the mPFC.

  14. Cytisine induces autonomic cardiovascular responses via activations of different nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Fan; Lacroix, Carly; Freeling, Jessica

    2010-04-19

    Nicotinic cholinergic receptors mediate autonomic transmission at ganglia. However, whether different subtypes of nicotinic cholinergic receptors expressed in autonomic ganglia elicit distinct roles in mediating sympathetic and parasympathetic regulations remain to be defined. In this study, we observed that different subtypes of nicotinic receptors were responsible for the sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular responses. In urethane anesthetized mice, intravenous injection with cytisine, a non-selective nicotinic agonist, induced a brief but pronounced decrease in heart rate, followed by increases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. The bradycardic response was blocked by atropine, and the pressor response was blocked by prazosin, confirming that these responses were parasympathetic and sympathetic activities, respectively. Hexamethonium, a ganglionic blocker, blocked both sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Pretreatment with methyllycaconitine citrate, a selective alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated cytisine-induced sympathetic response with little effect on the parasympathetic response. In contrast, pretreatment with dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide, a selective alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, blocked cytisine-induced parasympathetic response but not the sympathetic response. Pretreatment with dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide also blocked baroreflex associated parasympathetic bradycardic response. Moreover, treatment with nicotine induced a bradycardic response without a significant pressor response, which was also attenuated by dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide. Collectively, these data suggest that different nicotinic receptors play distinct roles in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia. Specifically, activations of alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors are involved in cytisine-induced cardiovascular sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, respectively.

  15. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  16. Phosphorylation and chronic agonist treatment atypically modulate GABAB receptor cell surface stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Pitcher, Julie A; Scott, Mark G H; Calver, Andrew R; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J; Couve, Andrés

    2004-03-26

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. The dynamic control of the cell surface stability of GABA(B) receptors is likely to be of fundamental importance in the modulation of receptor signaling. Presently, however, this process is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that GABA(B) receptors are remarkably stable at the plasma membrane showing little basal endocytosis in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. In addition, we show that exposure to baclofen, a well characterized GABA(B) receptor agonist, fails to enhance GABA(B) receptor endocytosis. Lack of receptor internalization in neurons correlates with an absence of agonist-induced phosphorylation and lack of arrestin recruitment in heterologous systems. We also demonstrate that chronic exposure to baclofen selectively promotes endocytosis-independent GABA(B) receptor degradation. The effect of baclofen can be attenuated by activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or co-stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, we show that increased degradation rates are correlated with reduced receptor phosphorylation at serine 892 in GABA(B)R2. Our results support a model in which GABA(B)R2 phosphorylation specifically stabilizes surface GABA(B) receptors in neurons. We propose that signaling pathways that regulate cAMP levels in neurons may have profound effects on the tonic synaptic inhibition by modulating the availability of GABA(B) receptors.

  17. Phorbol ester and atrial natriuretic peptide receptor response on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1992-04-01

    At least two types of receptors for natriuretic peptides have been reported: biologically active receptors coupled with guanylate cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]-B receptors) and clearance receptors (ANP-C receptors). To elucidate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ANP-B receptors, vascular smooth muscle cells in culture were treated with phorbol ester. Incubation with receptor agonists and phorbol ester led to the desensitization of receptor-mediated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ANP-B receptor response) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Although a PKC inhibitor and downregulation of PKC by long-term incubation of cells with phorbol esters blocked the phorbol ester-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response, they did not block the ANP-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response. In addition, when desensitization by phorbol esters was observed, ANP was still capable of desensitization. These observations suggest that the mechanism for regulating ANP-B receptor sensitivity may be both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent and mediated by phorbol esters and ANP, respectively.

  18. DMPD: Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086373 Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Immunobiolog... responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Authors Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Publication Immunobiology

  19. Increase in epinephrine-induced responsiveness during microgravity simulated by head-down bed rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, P; Galitzky, J; Thalamas, C; Langin, D; Lafontan, M; Senard, J M; Berlan, M

    1999-11-01

    The epinephrine (Epi)-induced effects on the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and metabolic functions were studied in men before and during a decrease in SNS activity achieved through simulated microgravity. Epi was infused at 3 graded rates (0.01, 0.02, and 0. 03 microg. kg(-1). min(-1) for 40 min each) before and on the fifth day of head-down bed rest (HDBR). The effects of Epi on the SNS (assessed by plasma norepinephrine levels and spectral analysis of systolic blood pressure and heart rate variability), on plasma levels of glycerol, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose and insulin, and on energy expenditure were evaluated. HDBR decreased urinary norepinephrine excretion (28.1 +/- 4.2 vs. 51.5 +/- 9.1 microg/24 h) and spectral variability of systolic blood pressure in the midfrequency range (16.3 +/- 1.9 vs. 24.5 +/- 0.9 normalized units). Epi increased norepinephrine plasma levels (P < 0.01) and spectral variability of systolic blood pressure (P < 0.009) during, but not before, HDBR. No modification of Epi-induced changes in heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were observed during HDBR. Epi increased plasma glucose, insulin, and NEFA levels before and during HDBR. During HDBR, the Epi-induced increase in plasma glycerol and lactate levels was more pronounced than before HDBR (P < 0.005 and P < 0.001, respectively). Epi-induced energy expenditure was higher during HDBR (P < 0.02). Our data suggest that the increased effects of Epi during simulated microgravity could be related to both the increased SNS response to Epi infusion and/or to the beta-adrenergic receptor sensitization of end organs, particularly in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.

  20. A common haplotype in the G-protein-coupled receptor gene GPR74 is associated with leanness and increased lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlman, Ingrid; Dicker, Andrea; Jiao, Hong

    2007-01-01

    0.36; P=.036) among those selected for obese or lean phenotypes. The ATAG haplotype was associated with increased adipocyte lipid mobilization (lipolysis) in vivo and in vitro. In human fat cells, GPR74 receptor stimulation and inhibition caused a significant and marked decrease and increase......, respectively, of lipolysis, which could be linked to catecholamine stimulation of adipocytes through beta -adrenergic receptors. These findings suggest that a common haplotype in the GPR74 gene protects against obesity, which, at least in part, is caused by a relief of inhibition of lipid mobilization from...... with protection against obesity in two samples selected for obese and lean phenotypes (odds ratio for obesity 0.48 and 0.62; nominal P=.0014 and .014; n=1,013 and 1,423, respectively). In a population-based sample, it was associated with lower waist (P=.02) among 3,937 men and with obesity protection (odds ratio...

  1. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a novel beta-adrenergic blocker withdrawal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcsányi, János; Jávor, Kinga; Arabadzisz, Hrisula; Zsoldos, András; Wagner, Vince; Sármán, Balázs

    2013-02-17

    The authors describe two cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy developing after an abrupt withdrawal of carvedilol and bisoprolol. Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute and reversible cardiac dysfunction without coronary artery disease. It is triggered by acute emotional or physical stress, drugs or drug withdrawal. The immediate discontinuation of the long acting vasodilator beta-blocker, carvedilol has not yet been described to cause takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The authors recommend cautious withdrawal of beta-blockers.

  2. Serotonin receptors: Subtypes, functional responses and therapeutic relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractRecent, rapid progress in the molecular biology of serotonin (5-HT) receptors requires conceptual re-thinking with respect to receptor classification. Thus, based on operational criteria (agonist and antagonist rank order), as well as transduction mechanisms involved and the structure of

  3. In vivo identification of eugenol-responsive and muscone-responsive mouse odorant receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Timothy S; Adipietro, Kaylin; Titlow, William B; Breheny, Patrick; Walz, Andreas; Mombaerts, Peter; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-11-19

    Our understanding of mammalian olfactory coding has been impeded by the paucity of information about the odorant receptors (ORs) that respond to a given odorant ligand in awake, freely behaving animals. Identifying the ORs that respond in vivo to a given odorant ligand from among the ∼1100 ORs in mice is intrinsically challenging but critical for our understanding of olfactory coding at the periphery. Here, we report an in vivo assay that is based on a novel gene-targeted mouse strain, S100a5-tauGFP, in which a fluorescent reporter selectively marks olfactory sensory neurons that have been activated recently in vivo. Because each olfactory sensory neuron expresses a single OR gene, multiple ORs responding to a given odorant ligand can be identified simultaneously by capturing the population of activated olfactory sensory neurons and using expression profiling methods to screen the repertoire of mouse OR genes. We used this in vivo assay to re-identify known eugenol- and muscone-responsive mouse ORs. We identified additional ORs responsive to eugenol or muscone. Heterologous expression assays confirmed nine eugenol-responsive ORs (Olfr73, Olfr178, Olfr432, Olfr610, Olfr958, Olfr960, Olfr961, Olfr913, and Olfr1234) and four muscone-responsive ORs (Olfr74, Olfr235, Olfr816, and Olfr1440). We found that the human ortholog of Olfr235 and Olfr1440 responds to macrocyclic ketone and lactone musk odorants but not to polycyclic musk odorants or a macrocyclic diester musk odorant. This novel assay, called the Kentucky in vivo odorant ligand-receptor assay, should facilitate the in vivo identification of mouse ORs for a given odorant ligand of interest.

  4. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy.

  5. Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in the Antidepressant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Sanchez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT3 receptors are the only ligand-gated ion channel of the 5-HT receptors family. They are present both in the peripheral and central nervous system and are localized in several areas involved in mood regulation (e.g., hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. Moreover, they are involved in regulation of neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression (e.g., dopamine or GABA. Clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that 5-HT3 receptors may be a relevant target in the treatment of affective disorders. 5-HT3 receptor agonists seem to counteract the effects of antidepressants in non-clinical models, whereas 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, present antidepressant-like activities. In addition, several antidepressants, such as mirtazapine, also target 5-HT3 receptors. In this review, we will report major advances in the research of 5-HT3 receptor’s roles in neuropsychiatric disorders, with special emphasis on mood and anxiety disorders.

  6. Neural network analysis of the information content in population responses from human periodontal receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Benoni B.; Trulsson, Mats

    1992-07-01

    Understanding of the information processing in some sensory systems is hampered for several reasons. First, some of these systems may depend on several receptor types with different characteristics, and the crucial features of natural stimuli encoded by the receptors are rarely known with certainty. Second, the functional output of sensory processing is often not well defined. The human tooth is endowed with several types of sensory receptors. Among these, the mechanoreceptors located in the periodontal ligaments have been implicated in force encoding during chewing and biting. Individual receptors cannot, however, code unambiguously either the direction or the magnitude of the applied forces. Neuronal responses recorded in single human nerve fibers from periodontal receptors were fed to multi-layered feed-forward networks. The networks were trained with error back-propagation to identify specific features of the force stimuli that evoked the receptor responses. It was demonstrated that population responses in periodontal receptors contain information about both the point of attack and the direction of applied forces. It is concluded that networks may provide a powerful tool to investigate the information content in responses from biological receptor populations. As such, specific hypotheses with respect to information processing may be tested using neural networks also in sensory systems less well understood than, for instance, the visual system.

  7. Kinetics of Receptor-Ligand Interactions in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mian Long; Shouqin Lü; Ganyun Sun

    2006-01-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions in blood flow are crucial to initiate the biological processes as inflammatory cascade,platelet thrombosis, as well as tumor metastasis. To mediate cell adhesions, the interacting receptors and ligands must be anchored onto two apposing surfaces of two cells or a cell and a substratum, i.e., the two-dimensional (2D) binding, which is different from the binding of a soluble ligand in fluid phase to a receptor, i.e., three-dimensional (3D) binding. While numerous works have been focused on 3D kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in immune systems, 2D kinetics and its regulations have less been understood, since no theoretical framework and experimental assays have been established until 1993. Not only does the molecular structure dominate 2D binding kinetics, but the shear force in blood flow also regulates cell adhesions mediated by interacting receptors and ligands. Here we provided the overview of current progresses in 2D bindings and regulations. Relevant issues of theoretical frameworks, experimental measurements, kinetic rates and binding affinities, and force regulations,were discussed.

  8. The Effects of Histamine H3 Receptors on Contractile Responses on Rat Gastric Fundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aşkın Hekimoğlu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the effects of histamine receptors on the gastrointestinal system smooth muscle contractions and the role of histamine H3 receptors on these effects. İsolated rat gastric fundus preparations were hanged on isolated organ bath and histamine receptor agonist and anthagonists were added to the bath solution and the electrical field stimulation-induced contractile responses were evaluated. In our study groups after blocking one of the histamine receptors H1, H2,H3; contractile responses were observed. Then, other two receptors were blocked one by one or combination of them to observe the changes on the contractile responses given to the electrical stimulation .To blocke histamine receptors pyrilamine (10-6м as H1 receptor blocker, famotidine (10-6м as H2 receptor blocker and thioperamide (10-5м as H3 receptor blocker and various combination of them were used. All groups were treated with H3 receptor anthagonist thioperamide (10-5м and agonist (R-α-methylhistamine (RMHA on 10-8, 10-7, 10-6 ve 10-5 molar concentrations cumulatively to observe its mediator effects on contractile responses. We suggested that (R-α-methylhistamine mediates the inhibition on the contractile effects of rat gastric fundus. This conclusion was supported by these findings: a the selective agonists (RMHA caused a dumping of the contractile effect of acetylcholine; b the effect of (RMHA was prevented by the selective H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide.

  9. Differential effects of M1 muscarinic receptor blockade and nicotinic receptor blockade in the dorsomedial striatum on response reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavos, Arianna; Jih, Jane; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The present studies determined whether blockade of M1-like muscarinic or nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the dorsomedial striatum affects acquisition or reversal learning of a response discrimination. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. In the acquisition phase, a rat learned to turn to the left or to the right. In the reversal learning phase, a rat learned to turn in the opposite direction as required during acquisition. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of the M1-like muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine infused into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Experiment 2 examined the effects of the nicotinic cholinergic antagonist, mecamylamine injected into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Bilateral injections of pirenzepine at 10 µg, but not 1 µg, selectively impaired reversal learning. Analysis of the errors indicated that pirenzepine treatment did not impair the initial shift, but increased reversions back to the original response choice following the initial shift. Bilateral injections of mecamylamine, 6 or 18 µg, did not affect acquisition or reversal learning. The results suggest that activation of M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, but not nicotinic cholinergic receptors, in the dorsomedial striatum is important for facilitating the flexible shifting of response patterns. PMID:15302131

  10. Modified Ribose Receptor Response in Isolated Diatom Frustules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, Carly R.

    2011-08-26

    Diatoms are a distinctive group of microalgae with the unique ability to produce a highly-ordered biosilica matrix, known as the frustule. Diatoms hold significant potential in the biotechnology field as a silica scaffold for embedding proteins. In this study, we analyzed the funtionalization of biosilica with a receptor complex through genetic modification of the diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Through the use of Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the receptor was shown to remain active in transformed frustules after the inner cellular contents were removed. In addition to protein functionality, growth conditions for T. pseudonana were optimized. Untransformed cultures receiving aeration grew more rapidly than stagnant untransformed cultures. Surprisingly, transformed cultures grew more quickly than untransformed cultures. This study demonstrates isolated diatom frustules provide an effective scaffold for embedded receptor complexes. Through this research, we provide the groundwork for the development of new biosensors for use in diagnostics and environmental remediation.

  11. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  12. Tonic sympathetic support of metabolic rate is attenuated with age, sedentary lifestyle, and female sex in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C; Seals, D R; Monroe, M B; Day, D S; Shapiro, L F; Johnson, D G; Jones, P P

    2001-09-01

    We recently demonstrated in young adult humans that the sympathetic nervous system contributes to the control of resting metabolic rate via tonic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. In the present follow-up study we determined the respective effects of age, habitual exercise status, and sex on this regulatory mechanism. Resting metabolic rate (ventilated hood, indirect calorimetry) was determined in 55 healthy sedentary or endurance exercise-trained adults, aged 18-35 or 60-75 yr (29 men and 26 women), before (baseline) and during the infusion of either a nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol) or saline (control). Relative to baseline values, during beta-adrenergic receptor antagonism resting metabolic rate adjusted for fat-free mass was reduced to a lesser extent in older (mean +/- SE, -130 +/- 46 kJ/d) compared with young (-297 +/- 46) adults, sedentary (-151 +/- 50) compared with endurance exercise-trained (-268 +/- 46) adults, and women (-105 +/- 33) compared with men (-318 +/- 50; all P < 0.01). Reductions in resting metabolic rate during beta-adrenergic receptor antagonism were positively related to higher baseline resting metabolic rate and plasma catecholamine concentrations and negatively related to adiposity (all P < 0.05). Resting metabolic rate was unchanged in response to saline control in all groups. These results provide experimental support for the hypothesis that aging, sedentary living, and female sex are associated with attenuated sympathetic nervous system support of resting metabolic rate in healthy adult humans.

  13. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs.

  14. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A

    2001-01-01

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affini...

  15. Human psychometric and taste receptor responses to steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellfritsch, Caroline; Brockhoff, Anne; Stähler, Frauke; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2012-07-11

    Steviol glycosides, the sweet principle of Stevia Rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni, have recently been approved as a food additive in the EU. The herbal non-nutritive high-potency sweeteners perfectly meet the rising consumer demand for natural food ingredients in Europe. We have characterized the organoleptic properties of the most common steviol glycosides by an experimental approach combining human sensory studies and cell-based functional taste receptor expression assays. On the basis of their potency to elicit sweet and bitter taste sensations, we identified glycone chain length, pyranose substitution, and the C16 double bond as the structural features giving distinction to the gustatory profile of steviol glycosides. A comprehensive screening of 25 human bitter taste receptors revealed that two receptors, hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14, mediate the bitter off-taste of steviol glycosides. For some test substances, e.g., stevioside, we observed a decline in sweet intensity at supra-maximum concentrations. This effect did not arise from allosteric modulation of the hTAS1R2/R3 sweet taste receptor but might be explained by intramolecular cross-modal suppression between the sweet and bitter taste component of steviol glycosides. These results might contribute to the production of preferentially sweet and least bitter tasting Stevia extracts by an optimization of breeding and postharvest downstream processing.

  16. Unraveling the high- and low-sensitivity agonist responses of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Ahring, Philip K; Christensen, Jeppe K;

    2011-01-01

    interfaces, the (a4)(3)(ß2)(2) receptor contains a third low-sensitivity agonist binding site in the a4a4 interface. Occupation of this site is required for full activation and is responsible for the widened dynamic response range of this receptor subtype. By site-directed mutagenesis, we show that three...... residues, which differ between the a4ß2 and a4a4 sites, control agonist sensitivity. The results presented here provide a basic insight into the function of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which enables modulation of the receptors with hitherto unseen precision; it becomes possible to rationally...

  17. DMPD: Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18064347 Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. Aranc...Epub 2007 Nov 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immu...ne responses. PubmedID 18064347 Title Toll-like receptors are key participants in

  18. Physical exercise, β-adrenergic receptors, and vascular response

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Sérgio Silva; Angelina Zanesco

    2010-01-01

    O exercício aeróbio promove efeitos benéficos na prevenção e tratamento de doenças como hipertensão arterial, aterosclerose, insuficiência venosa e doença arterial periférica. Os receptores β-adrenérgicos estão presentes em várias células. No sistema cardiovascular, promovem inotropismo e cronotropismo positivo cardíaco e relaxamento vascular. Embora os efeitos do exercício tenham sido investigados em receptores cardíacos, estudos focados nos vasos são escassos e controversos. Esta revis...

  19. Nature's knockout: the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D R; Liu, C; Reppert, S M

    1996-11-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction and influences the timing of circadian rhythms. The Mel1a and Mel1b receptors are the high-affinity melatonin receptors present in mammals. Unexpectedly, the Mel1b receptor gene of the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, cannot encode a functional receptor; two nonsense mutations are present within the coding region. Southern blot analysis indicates that this is a single copy gene. The Mel1b receptor gene is nonfunctional in outbred populations of P. sungorus and Phodopus campbelli. Siberian hamsters lacking a functional Mel1b receptor nevertheless show seasonal reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin, indicating that the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for these responses. These data support the hypothesis that the Mel1a receptor, which does encode a functional receptor in this species, mediates reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin.

  20. Mas receptor overexpression increased Ang-(1-7) relaxation response in renovascular hypertensive rat carotid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivon, V C; Aires, R D; Santiago, L B; Ramalho, L Z N; Cortes, S F; Lemos, V S

    2015-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important factor in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Mas receptor, Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-activated receptor, is an important RAS component and exerts protective effects in the vasculature. Ang-(1-7) vascular effects and Mas receptor expression in carotid from renovascular hypertensive (2K-1C) rats is not clear. In the present study we investigated Mas receptor vasodilator response activated by Ang-(1-7) in the carotid rings from sham and 2K-1C rats. Changes in isometric tension were recorded on organ chamber. Mas receptors expression was investigated in carotid by Western blot. Nitric oxide production was evaluated by 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and eNOS expression and activity by immunofluoresce and western blot, respectively. Ang-(1-7) induced concentration-dependent vasodilator effect in carotid rings from sham and 2K-1C, which the hypertension increased vasodilatation response. In the 2K-1C carotid rings, A-779 (Mas receptor antagonist) reduced but not abolish the vasodilator effect of Ang-(1-7). Corroborating, Mas receptor protein expression was significantly increased in the 2K-1C rats. L-NAME and ibuprofen decreased Ang-(1-7) vasodilator response and L-NAME plus ibuprofen practically abolish the remaining vasodilatation response. Nitric oxide production is increased due increased of eNOS expression and pSer(1177) activity. Our results demonstrated that renovascular hypertension increased Mas receptors expression and nitric oxide production in the rats carotid which, consequently increased Ang-(1-7)-vasorelaxant response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a prominent feature of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disease in the CNS, yet the stimuli that drive this response are not known. There is growing appreciation that signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which is key to generating innate responses to infection,...... to neuroinflammation. Udgivelsesdato: Dec-6...

  2. The use of occupation isoboles for analysis of a response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtype-induced mouse stomach contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2008-06-01

    Smooth muscle contains multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes, including M2 and M3. M2 receptors outnumber M3 receptors. Based on the potency of subtype selective anticholinergics, contraction is mediated by the M3 subtype. However, results from knockout (KO) mice show that the M2 receptor mediates approximately 45% of the contractile response produced by the M3 receptor. The traditional theory of one receptor mediating a response does not allow assessment of interactions between receptors when more than one receptor participates in a response. Our study was performed using a novel analysis method based on dual receptor occupancy to determine how M2 and M3 receptor subtypes interact to mediate contraction in mouse stomach. Cumulative carbachol concentration contractile responses were determined for wild-type, M2-KO, and M3-KO stomach body smooth muscle. Using affinity constants for carbachol at M2 and M3 cholinergic receptors, the concentration values were converted to fractional receptor occupation. The resulting occupation-effect relations showed maximum effects for the M2 and M3 subtypes, respectively. These occupation-effect relations allow determination of the additive (expected) isobole based on this dual occupancy, thereby providing a curve (mathematically derived) for comparison against the experimentally derived value in wild type. The actual values determined experimentally in the wild type were not statistically significantly different from that predicted by the isobole. This confirms that the interaction between these mutually occupied receptors is additive. The new method of analysis also expands the traditional Schild theory that was based on a single receptor type to which the agonist and antagonist bind.

  3. Olfactory receptor and neural pathway responsible for highly selective sensing of musk odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Mika; Yoshikawa, Keiichi; Takai, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Ai; Takeuchi, Haruki; Sakano, Hitoshi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Musk odorants are used widely in cosmetic industries because of their fascinating animalic scent. However, how this aroma is perceived in the mammalian olfactory system remains a great mystery. Here, we show that muscone, one musk odor secreted by various animals from stink glands, activates a few glomeruli clustered in a neuroanatomically unique anteromedial olfactory bulb. The muscone-responsive glomeruli are highly specific to macrocyclic ketones; interestingly, other synthetic musk odorants with nitro or polycyclic moieties or ester bonds activate distinct but nearby glomeruli. Anterodorsal bulbar lesions cause muscone anosmia, suggesting that this region is involved in muscone perception. Finally, we identified the mouse olfactory receptor, MOR215-1, that was a specific muscone receptor expressed by neurons innervating the muscone-responsive anteromedial glomeruli and also the human muscone receptor, OR5AN1. The current study documents the olfactory neural pathway in mice that senses and transmits musk signals from receptor to brain.

  4. Modulatory effect of adenosine receptors on the ascending and descending neural reflex responses of rat ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schusdziarra Volker

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenosine is known to act as a neuromodulator by suppressing synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous system. Both the release of adenosine within the small intestine and the presence of adenosine receptors on enteric neurons have been demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to characterize a possible involvement of adenosine receptors in the modulation of the myenteric reflex. The experiments were carried out on ileum segments 10 cm in length incubated in an single chambered organ bath, and the reflex response was initiated by electrical stimulation (ES. Results ES caused an ascending contraction and a descending relaxation followed by a contraction. All motility responses to ES were completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, indicating that they are mediated by neural mechanisms. Atropine blocked the contractile effects, whereas the descending relaxation was significantly increased. The A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine increased the ascending contraction, whereas the ascending contraction was reduced by the A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Activation of the A1 receptor further reduced the descending relaxation and the latency of the peristaltic reflex. The A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine increased ascending contraction, whereas descending relaxation remained unchanged. For A2A and A3 receptors, we found contradictory effects of the agonists and antagonists, thus there is no clear physiological role for these receptors at this time. Conclusions This study suggests that the myenteric ascending and descending reflex response of the rat small intestine is modulated by release of endogenous adenosine via A1 receptors.

  5. Influence of drug treatment on glucocorticoid receptor levels in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hong; GUO Wei-zao; YAN Zhi-hong; LI Di; LU Cui-lian

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid signaling exerts major roles in inflammation, metabolism and depression, which are three crucial factors accompanying or underlying coronary heart disease. Although accumulating evidence indicates the influence of glucocorticoids on the pathology and treatment of coronary heart disease, there is still a dearth of pharmaceutical mechanisms for this relationship. This study aimed to investigate the influence of drug treatment on glucocorticoid receptor levels in coronary heart disease.Methods Eighty hospitalized patients (average age (59.0 7.5) years, 46 male and 34 female) with coronary heart disease were categorized into four groups with 20 members in each according to one of the four drugs they were treated with. The four drugs were: nitrated derivative isosorbide dinitrate, the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol, the calcium antagonist nifedipine, and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin. Glucocorticoid receptor protein levels of peripheral blood lymphocytes were tested using immunoblotting analysis before and after one month of treatment. Results Immunoblotting analysis showed increased glucocorticoid receptor levels after treatment with metoprolol and nifedipine. There were no statistically significant changes of glucocorticoid receptor levels after treatment with isosorbide dinitrate or lovastatin, although there were trends of up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression after both treatments.Conclusions Both the beta-blocker and the calcium blocker can increase glucocorticoid receptor levels after chronic administration. This effect suggests a mechanism for their anti-inflammatory and other therapeutic roles for coronary heart disease and comorbid disorders.

  6. Excitatory amino acid receptors in the basolateral amygdala regulate anxiety responses in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdyk, T J; Shekhar, A

    1997-08-01

    Blocking GABA(A) receptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) elicits increases in heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and anxiety responses by enhancing a glutamate mediated excitation. The present study was conducted to determine the role of the ionotropic glutamate receptors within the BLA in regulating HR, BP and experimental anxiety. Blocking basal glutamate excitation had no significant effect on HR or BP, but did elicit a significant anxiolytic-like effect.

  7. Reduced emotional and corticosterone responses to stress in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ide, Soichiro; Sora,Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Minami, Masabumi; Uhl, George R.; Ishihara, Kumatoshi

    2009-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms of emotional modulation in the nervous system by opioids remain to be elucidated, although the opioid system is well known to play important roles in the mechanisms of analgesia and drug dependence. In the present study, we conducted behavioral tests of anxiety and depression and measured corticosterone concentrations in both male and female μ-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice to reveal the involvement of μ-opioid receptors in stress-induced emotional responses. M...

  8. Effect of Deletion of the Prostaglandin EP2 Receptor on the Anabolic Response to Prostaglandin E2 and a Selective EP2 Receptor Agonist

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Shilpa; Alander, Cynthia; Zhan, Peili; Gao, Qi; Pilbeam, Carol; Raisz, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Studies using prostaglandin E receptor (EP) agonists indicate that prostaglandin (PG) E2 can have anabolic effects through both EP4 and EP2 receptors. We previously found that the anabolic response to a selective EP4 receptor agonist (EP4A, Ono Pharmaceutical) was substantially greater than to a selective EP2 receptor agonist (EP2A) in cultured murine calvarial osteoblastic cells. To further define the role of the EP2 receptor in PG-mediated effects on bone cells, we examined the effects of E...

  9. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Víctor M; Capilla, Almudena; Varela, María J; de la Rocha, Arlet M Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C; Barreiro, R Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling dampens the HPA axis response to restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanson, Nathan K; Herman, James P

    2015-10-15

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of the neural portion of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and signals through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In the current studies we investigated the role of hypothalamic paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of the HPA axis response to restraint stress in rats. Direct injection of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) into the PVN prior to restraint leads to blunting of the HPA axis response in awake animals. Consistent with this result, infusion of the group I receptor antagonist hexyl-homoibotenic acid (HIBO) potentiates the HPA axis response to restraint. The excitatory effect of blocking paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate signaling is blocked by co-administration of dexamethasone into the PVN. However, the inhibitory effect of DHPG is not affected by co-administration of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM-251 into the PVN. Together, these results suggest that paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling acts to dampen HPA axis reactivity. This effect appears to be similar to the rapid inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids at the PVN, but is not mediated by endocannabinoid signaling.

  11. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M Campa

    Full Text Available The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  12. Addressing the Inflammatory Response to Clinically Relevant Polymers by Manipulating the Host Response Using ITIM Domain-Containing Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Slee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue contacting surfaces of medical devices initiate a host inflammatory response, characterized by adsorption of blood proteins and inflammatory cells triggering the release of cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, in an attempt to clear or isolate the foreign object from the body. This normal host response contributes to device-associated pathophysiology and addressing device biocompatibility remains an unmet need. Although widespread attempts have been made to render the device surfaces unreactive, the establishment of a completely bioinert coating has been untenable and demonstrates the need to develop strategies based upon the molecular mechanisms that define the interaction between host cells and synthetic surfaces. In this review, we discuss a family of transmembrane receptors, known as immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM-containing receptors, which show promise as potential targets to address aberrant biocompatibility. These receptors repress the immune response and ensure that the intensity of an immune response is appropriate for the stimuli. Particular emphasis will be placed on the known ITIM-containing receptor, Signal Regulatory Protein Alpha (SIRPα, and its cognate ligand CD47. In addition, this review will discuss the potential of other ITIM-containing proteins as targets for addressing the aberrant biocompatibility of polymeric biomaterials.

  13. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  14. T cell proliferative responses to malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde haptenated protein are scavenger receptor mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W

    2003-10-01

    Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) haptenated proteins have been described in disease processes related to prolonged oxidative stress (via malondialdehyde production), such as alcohol liver disease (ALD), non-alcoholic non-steatohepatitis (NASH) and atherosclerosis. Experimentally, high titer IgG1 antibody responses are seen after immunization without adjuvant; however, T cell proliferative responses and the role of scavenger receptors in this immunogenicity has not previously been described. In this study, T cell proliferative responses to the carrier protein, but not the MAA hapten itself, were identified in vitro. Moreover, these T proliferative responses were inhibited when MAA-hen egg lysozyme (HEL) was co-immunized with excess scavenger receptor ligand polyG (poly-guanylic acid), implicating the role of (a) scavenger receptor(s) in initiating the T helper cell response. Activated B cells were unable to process and present MAA-HEL preferentially to T cells, while thioglycollate-elicited (but not Con A-elicited) macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) did so with approximately 32-fold less MAA-HEL than native antigen necessary to initiate equal proliferative responses. While this preferential processing and presentation may be related to several factors, preferential binding of MAA haptenated proteins mediated by scavenger receptors may be one mechanism. IL-4 was absent from the supernatants of T proliferative assays despite a strong IgG1 response in vivo, although the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed. Since the modification of proteins by the MAA have previously been shown to occur after ethanol consumption in vivo, the ability of MAA haptens to experimentally enhance immune responses, specifically humoral and T cell responses, may represent mechanisms by which autoimmune phenomena found in ALD occur.

  15. EFFECTS OF SULPIRIDE-INDUCED D2 DOPAMINE RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ON IMMUNE RESPONSIVENESS OF RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of catecholamine receptors (D2 dopamine was investigated in restraint stress, influence immune system, with concomitant changes in immune response. Adults rats pretreated once with LPS (a bacterial product (25μg/250μl, i.p., produce an immune response, were subjected to i.p. injection with sulpiride (4 mg/kg b.w., i.p., a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptors, after 3 days postimmunization. After 18 days later, we assessed the total protein number, antibody titer, lymphocyte number and albumin/globulin ratio. In summary, we provide that D2 dopamine receptor blockade impaired immune responsiveness in restraint stress.

  16. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    different from that elicited by FGF-2. In contrast to FGF-induced degradation of endocytic FGFR1, NCAM promotes the stabilization of the receptor, which is recycled to the cell surface in a Rab11- and Src-dependent manner. In turn, FGFR1 recycling is required for NCAM-induced sustained activation of various...... effectors. Furthermore, NCAM, but not FGF-2, promotes cell migration, and this response depends on FGFR1 recycling and sustained Src activation. Our results implicate NCAM as a nonconventional ligand for FGFR1 that exerts a peculiar control on the intracellular trafficking of the receptor, resulting...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  17. Decreased serotonin2C receptor responses in male patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Ae; Jayathilake, Karuna; Sim, Min Young; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-03-30

    Serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors in brain affect psychosis, reward, substance abuse, anxiety, other behaviors, appetite, body temperature, and other physiological measures. They also have been implicated in antipsychotic drug efficacy and side effects. We previously reported that the hyperthermia following administration of MK-212, a predominantly 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist, was diminished in a small sample of patients with schizophrenia (SCH), suggesting decreased 5-HT(2C) receptor responsiveness. We have now studied the responses to oral MK-212 and placebo in a larger sample of unmedicated male SCH (n = 69) and normal controls (CON) (n = 33), and assessed the influence of comorbid substance abuse (SA) on oral body temperature, behavioral responses, etc. The placebo-adjusted oral body temperature response to MK-212 was significantly lower in SCH compared to CON and not significantly different between the SCH with or without SA. Some behavioral responses to MK-212, e.g. self-rated feelings of increased anxiety, depression and decreased calmness, or good overall feeling, were significantly lower in the SCH patients compared to CON. These results add to the evidence for diminished 5-HT(2C) receptor responsiveness in SCH patients compared to CON and are consistent with reported association of HTR(2C) polymorphisms, leading to decreased expression or function of the HTR(2C) in patients with SCH.

  18. Elevated glucose concentration and natriuretic peptides receptor response on vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Minami, M; Ikeda, M; Horio, T; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1995-12-01

    1. Hyperglycaemia is believed to be a major cause of diabetic vascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis. In order to elucidate the effect of hyperglycaemia on vascular response in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), the natriuretic peptides receptor responses to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) which are thought to suppress atherosclerosis were studied under high glucose (HG:22.2 mmol/L) conditions. 2. The total number of cells in SHR is higher and natriuretic peptides receptor response is smaller than that of cells in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. Membrane bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in HG or SHR is higher compared to that of cells in normal glucose (NG:5.6 mmol/L) or WKY. Cells cultured in HG for at least 2 passages had higher total cell number and receptor mediated cGMP formation were suppressed compared to cells cultured in NG both in SHR and WKY. Specific PKC inhibitor PKC (19-36) 1 mu mol/L prevented HG induced suppression of natriuretic peptides response. 3. These results show that hyperglycaemia may be linked to suppressed natriuretic peptides receptor response which is caused by increased PKC activity both in WKY and SHR. This suppressed response may cause the accelerated atherosclerosis by hyperglycaemia.

  19. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  20. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinrong [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Gary [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Minviluz [Columbia, MO; Zhang, Xuecheng [Columbia, MO

    2012-01-17

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  1. Regulation of CYP3A4 by pregnane X receptor: The role of nuclear receptors competing for response element binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istrate, Monica A., E-mail: monicai@scripps.edu [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany); Nussler, Andreas K., E-mail: nuessler@uchir.me.tum.de [Department of Traumatology, Technical University Munich, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Eichelbaum, Michel, E-mail: michel.eichelbaum@ikp-stuttgart.de [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany); Burk, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.burk@ikp-stuttgart.de [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-03-19

    Induction of the major drug metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 by xenobiotics contributes to the pronounced interindividual variability of its expression and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. It is mainly mediated by PXR, which regulates CYP3A4 expression by binding to several specific elements in the 5' upstream regulatory region of the gene. Induction itself shows a marked interindividual variability, whose underlying determinants are only partly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements in CYP3A4, as a potential non-genetic mechanism contributing to interindividual variability of induction. By in vitro DNA binding experiments, we showed that several nuclear receptors bind efficiently to the proximal promoter ER6 and distal xenobiotic-responsive enhancer module DR3 motifs. TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII further demonstrated dose-dependent repression of PXR-mediated CYP3A4 enhancer/promoter reporter activity in transient transfection in the presence and absence of the PXR inducer rifampin, while VDR showed this effect only in the absence of treatment. By combining functional in vitro characterization with hepatic expression analysis, we predict that TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII show a strong potential for the repression of PXR-mediated activation of CYP3A4 in vivo. In summary, our results demonstrate that nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements interferes with PXR-mediated expression and induction of CYP3A4 and thereby contributes to the interindividual variability of induction.

  2. Cannabis, cannabidiol, and epilepsy--from receptors to clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Bebin, E Martina

    2014-12-01

    Recreational cannabis use in adults with epilepsy is widespread. The use of cannabis for medicinal purposes is also becoming more prevalent. For this purpose, various preparations of cannabis of varying strengths and content are being used. The recent changes in the legal environment have improved the availability of products with high cannabidiol (CBD) and low tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations. There is some anecdotal evidence of their potential efficacy, but the mechanisms of such action are not entirely clear. Some suspect an existence of synergy or "entourage effect" between CBD and THC. There is strong evidence that THC acts via the cannabinoid receptor CB1. The mechanism of action of CBD is less clear but is likely polypharmacological. The scientific data support the role of the endocannabinoid system in seizure generation, maintenance, and control in animal models of epilepsy. There are clear data for the negative effects of cannabis on the developing and mature brain though these effects appear to be relatively mild in most cases. Further data from well-designed studies are needed regarding short- and long-term efficacy and side effects of CBD or high-CBD/low-THC products for the treatment of seizures and epilepsy in children and adults.

  3. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  4. Quantitation of the Contractile Response Mediated by Two Receptors: M2 and M3 Muscarinic Receptor-Mediated Contractions of Human Gastroesophageal Smooth MuscleS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M2 receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M3 density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M2 and M3 receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M2 and M3 receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M2 muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M3 receptor predominantly mediates contraction. PMID:19126780

  5. Quantitation of the contractile response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions of human gastroesophageal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Vegesna, Anil K; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M(2) receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M(3) density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M(2) and M(3) receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M(2) muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M(3) receptor predominantly mediates contraction.

  6. Mediation of ACTH and prolactin responses to 5-HTP by 5-HT2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartside, S E; Cowen, P J

    1990-04-10

    Serotonin has a facilitatory role in the role of prolactin and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion. The serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) dose dependently (30-100 mg/kg i.p.) increased plasma prolactin and ACTH in the male rat. Prolactin and ACTH responses to 5-HTP (100 mg/kg) were attenuated by pretreatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, metergoline (0.5 mg/kg), and by the selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, ritanserin (0.4 mg/kg), ketanserin (2.5 mg/kg), ICI (5.0 mg/kg) and spiperone (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT1 receptor antagonists, propranolol (40 mg/kg) and pindolol (4.0 mg/kg), failed to antagonize the prolactin and ACTH responses to 5-HTP (100 mg/kg), as did the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, BRL 43694 (1.0 mg/kg). The results suggest that the prolactin and ACTH responses to 5-HTP in the male rat are mediated by 5-HT2 receptors.

  7. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  8. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo eOtvos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC. In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399. The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400 was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400 at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  9. Estrogen receptor alpha binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor response element and negatively interferes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonofiglio, Daniela; Gabriele, Sabrina; Aquila, Saveria; Catalano, Stefania; Gentile, Mariaelena; Middea, Emilia; Giordano, Francesca; Andò, Sebastiano

    2005-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the repressive effects exerted by estrogen receptors (ER) on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma-mediated transcriptional activity remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to provide new insight into the crosstalk between ERalpha and PPARgamma pathways in breast cancer cells. Using MCF7 and HeLa cells as model systems, we did transient transfections and electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies to evaluate the ability of ERalpha to influence PPAR response element-mediated transcription. A possible direct interaction between ERalpha and PPARgamma was ascertained by co-immunoprecipitation assay, whereas their modulatory role in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway was evaluated by determining PI3K activity and AKT phosphorylation. As a biological counterpart, we investigated the growth response to the cognate ligands of both receptors in hormone-dependent MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our data show for the first time that ERalpha binds to PPAR response element and represses its transactivation. Moreover, we have documented the physical and functional interactions of ERalpha and PPARgamma, which also involve the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K. Interestingly, ERalpha and PPARgamma pathways have an opposite effect on the regulation of the PI3K/AKT transduction cascade, explaining, at least in part, the divergent response exerted by the cognate ligands 17beta-estradiol and BRL49653 on MCF7 cell proliferation. ERalpha physically associates with PPARgamma and functionally interferes with PPARgamma signaling. This crosstalk could be taken into account in setting new pharmacologic strategies for breast cancer disease.

  10. Analysis of the heat shock response in mouse liver reveals dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARalpha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallanat, B.; Anderson, S.P.; Brown-Borg, H.M.; Ren, H.; Kersten, A.H.; Jonnalagadda, S.; Srinivasan, S.; Corton, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by heat shock (HS) through

  11. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul eMaheshwari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by antiepileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV+ fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV+ cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near two-fold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild type littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg2+ induced network discharges in wild type but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy.

  12. The slope parameter of concentration-response curves used as a touchstone for the existence of spare receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agneter, E; Singer, E A; Sauermann, W; Feuerstein, T J

    1997-09-01

    The present work was stimulated by findings of a large reserve of presynaptic alpha2-autoreceptors in rat neocortex by different investigators and our own group, using classical models of receptor agonism. The mathematical background of these classical models seems erroneous since the asymmetry that spare receptors introduce into concentration-response curves is not considered appropriately. This asymmetry leads to a steepening of curve fits based on the logistic function. Therefore, the slope parameter c of a logistically fitted concentration-response curve can be used as a touchstone for the existence of spare receptors. Spare receptors induce a c > 1. Concentration-response data of the alpha2-autoreceptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release in rat neocortex slices were re-analysed. The estimates of the slope parameter c of logistically fitted concentration-response curves obtained after treatment of rats with either vehicle or N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) to achieve an irreversible inactivation of alpha2-autoreceptors, were not compatible with the existence of a large receptor reserve. A model for nonlinear regression analysis developed under the a priori assumption of spare receptors confirmed the absence of spare receptors. Evaluation methods which neglect the alteration of the geometrical form of concentration-response curves due to non-proportionality between receptor occupation and relative response do not seem appropriate to quantify spare receptors. These methods may detect spare receptors where they do not exist.

  13. Engineering T Cells with Customized Therapeutic Response Programs Using Synthetic Notch Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Kole T; Williams, Jasper Z; Morsut, Leonardo; Rupp, Levi J; Kolinko, Isabel; Choe, Joseph H; Walker, Whitney J; McNally, Krista A; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-10-06

    Redirecting T cells to attack cancer using engineered chimeric receptors provides powerful new therapeutic capabilities. However, the effectiveness of therapeutic T cells is constrained by the endogenous T cell response: certain facets of natural response programs can be toxic, whereas other responses, such as the ability to overcome tumor immunosuppression, are absent. Thus, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic cells could be improved if we could custom sculpt immune cell responses. Synthetic Notch (synNotch) receptors induce transcriptional activation in response to recognition of user-specified antigens. We show that synNotch receptors can be used to sculpt custom response programs in primary T cells: they can drive a la carte cytokine secretion profiles, biased T cell differentiation, and local delivery of non-native therapeutic payloads, such as antibodies, in response to antigen. SynNotch T cells can thus be used as a general platform to recognize and remodel local microenvironments associated with diverse diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  15. Phylogeny of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling: Adapting the Innate Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Jeffrey M.; Racioppi, Luigi; Jones, Corbin D.; Masci, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptors represent a largely evolutionarily conserved pathogen recognition machinery responsible for recognition of bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and viral pathogen associated microbial patterns and initiation of inflammatory response. Structurally the Toll-like receptors are comprised of an extracellular leucine rich repeat domain and a cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor domain. Recognition takes place in the extracellular domain where as the cytoplasmic domain triggers a complex signal network required to sustain appropriate immune response. Signal transduction is regulated by the recruitment of different intracellular adaptors. The Toll-like receptors can be grouped depending on the usage of the adaptor, MyD88, into MyD88-dependent and MyD88 independent subsets. Herein, we present a unique phylogenetic analysis of domain regions of these receptors and their cognate signaling adaptor molecules. Although previously unclear from the phylogeny of full length receptors, these analyses indicate a separate evolutionary origin for the MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signaling pathway and provide evidence of a common ancestor for the vertebrate and invertebrate orthologs of the adaptor molecule MyD88. Together these observations suggest a very ancient origin of the MyD88-dependent pathway Additionally we show that early duplications gave rise to several adaptor molecule families. In some cases there is also strong pattern of parallel duplication between adaptor molecules and their corresponding TLR. Our results further support the hypothesis that phylogeny of specific domains involved in signaling pathway can shed light on key processes that link innate to adaptive immune response. PMID:23326591

  16. Effects of regional phentolamine on hypoxic vasodilatation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, C J; Minson, C T; Joyner, M J; Halliwill, J R

    2001-12-01

    1. Limb vascular beds exhibit a graded dilatation in response to hypoxia despite increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. We investigated the extent to which sympathetic vasoconstriction can mask hypoxic vasodilatation and assessed the relative contributions of beta-adrenergic and nitric oxide (NO) pathways to hypoxic vasodilatation. 2. We measured forearm blood flow responses (plethysmography) to isocapnic hypoxia (arterial saturation approximately 85%) in eight healthy men and women (18-26 years) after selective alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine) of one forearm. Subsequently, we measured hypoxic responses after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine and propranolol) and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade coupled with NO synthase inhibition (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA). 3. Hypoxia increased forearm vascular conductance by 49.0 +/- 13.5% after phentolamine (compared to +16.8 +/- 7.0% in the control arm without phentolamine, P < 0.05). After addition of propranolol, the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia was reduced by approximately 50%, but dilatation was still present (+24.7 +/- 7.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). When L-NMMA was added, there was no further reduction in the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia (+28.2 +/- 4.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). 4. Thus, selective regional alpha-adrenergic blockade unmasked a greater hypoxic vasodilatation than occurs in the presence of functional sympathetic nervous system responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, approximately half of the hypoxic vasodilatation in the forearm appears to be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways. Finally, since considerable dilatation persists in the presence of both beta-adrenergic blockade and NO synthase inhibition, it is likely that an additional vasodilator mechanism is activated by hypoxia in humans.

  17. The bradykinin B2 receptor in the early immune response against Listeria infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Bader, M.; Boele, L.C.L.; Kleij, D. van der

    2009-01-01

    The endogenous danger signal bradykinin was recently found implicated in the development of immunity against parasites via dendritic cells. We here report an essential role of the B2 (B2R) bradykinin receptor in the early immune response against Listeria infection. Mice deficient in B2R (B2R-/- mice

  18. Markedly impaired humoral immune response in mice deficient in complement receptors 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, H; Holers, V M; Li, B; Fung, Y; Mariathasan, S; Goellner, J; Strauss-Schoenberger, J; Karr, R W; Chaplin, D D

    1996-04-16

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) have been implicated as regulators of B-cell activation. We explored the role of these receptors in the development of humoral immunity by generating CR1- and CR2-deficient mice using gene-targeting techniques. These mice have normal basal levels of IgM and of IgG isotypes. B- and T-cell development are overtly normal. Nevertheless, B-cell responses to low and high doses of a T-cell-dependent antigen are impaired with decreased titers of antigen-specific IgM and IgG isotypes. This defect is not complete because there is still partial activation of B lymphocytes during the primary immune response, with generation of splenic germinal centers and a detectable, although reduced, secondary antibody response. These data suggest that certain T-dependent antigens manifest an absolute dependence on complement receptors for the initiation of a normally robust immune response.

  19. Leptin responsiveness to energy restriction: genetic variation in the leptin receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Rossum, van C.T.M.; Graaf, de C.; Hoebee, B.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Kok, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Serum leptin concentrations are an important afferent signal in energy balance homeostasis. It has been speculated that the leptin responsiveness to energy restriction is affected by the functionality of the leptin receptor. The purpose of this analysis was to explore the effect of polymorphisms in

  20. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli...

  1. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  2. Public T cell receptors confer high-avidity CD4 responses to HIV controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Benati, Daniela; Galperin, Moran; Lambotte, Olivier; Gras, Stéphanie; Lim, Annick; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Nouël, Alexandre; Campbell, Kristy-Anne; Lemercier, Brigitte; Claireaux, Mathieu; Hendou, Samia; Lechat, Pierre; De Truchis, Pierre; Boufassa, Faroudy; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The rare patients who are able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of therapy show signs of a particularly efficient cellular immune response. To identify the molecular determinants that underlie this response, we characterized the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire directed at Gag293, the most immunoprevalent CD4 epitope in the HIV-1 capsid. HIV controllers from the ANRS CODEX cohort showed a highly skewed TCR repertoire that was characterized by a p...

  3. Integrated Regulation of Toll-like Receptor Responses by Notch and Interferon-γ Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) responses are regulated to avoid toxicity and achieve coordinated responses appropriate for the cell environment. We found that Notch and TLR pathways cooperated to activate canonical Notch target genes, including transcriptional repressors Hes1 and Hey1, and to increase production of canonical TLR-induced cytokines TNF, IL-6 and IL-12. Cooperation by these pathways to increase target gene expression was mediated the Notch pathway component and transcription factor RB...

  4. Muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the mucosal response to neural stimulation of guinea pig ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, H.V.; Tien, X.Y.; Wallace, L.J.; Cooke, H.J.

    1987-09-01

    Muscarinic receptors involved in the secretory response evoked by electrical stimulation of submucosal neutrons were investigated in muscle-stripped flat sheets of guinea pig ileum set up in flux chambers. Neural stimulation produced a biphasic increase in short-circuit current due to active chloride secretion. Atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperadine methiodide (4-DAMP) (10/sup -7/ M) were more potent inhibitors of the cholinergic phase of the response than was pirenzepine. Dose-dependent increases in base-line short-circuit current were evoked by carbachol and bethanechol; 4-hydroxy-2-butynyl trimethylammonium chloride (McN A343) produced a much smaller effect. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of McN A343 but did not alter the responses of carbachol and bethanechol. McN A343 significantly reduced the cholinergic phase of the neurally evoked response and caused a rightward shift of the carbachol dose-response curve. All muscarinic compounds inhibited (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to membranes from muscosal scrapings, with a rank order of potency of 4-DAMP > pirenzepine > McN A343 > carbachol > bethanechol. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from submucosal neurons mediates chloride secretion by interacting with muscarinic cholinergic receptors that display a high binding affinity for 4-DAMP. Activation of neural muscarinic receptors makes a relatively small contribution to the overall secretory response.

  5. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses.

  6. Immune response genes receptors expression and polymorphisms in relation to multiple sclerosis susceptibility and response to INF-β therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Rehab A; Rezk, Noha A; Amer, Mona M; Fathy, Hala A

    2016-09-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β is one of the disease modifying drugs used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. A predictive marker that indicates good or poor response to the treatment is highly desirable. We aimed to investigate the relation between the immune response genes receptors (IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5) expression and their polymorhic variants and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility as well as the response to IFN-β therapy. The immune response genes receptors expression and genotyping were analyzed in 80 patients with MS, treated with IFN-β and in 110 healthy controls. There was a significant decrease of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA expression and a significant increase of CCR5 mRNA expression in MS patients compared with the control group. Also, the level of IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5 mRNA expression was found to be significantly lower in the responders than nonresponders. Carriers of IFNAR1 18417 C/C genotype and C allele had an increased risk of developing MS. There was a significant relation between CCR5 Δ32 allele and IFN-β treatment response in MS patients. Our results highlighted the significance of IFNAR and CCR5 genes in multiple sclerosis risk and the response to IFN-β therapy. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):727-734, 2016.

  7. Dopamine D2 receptors preferentially regulate the development of light responses of the inner retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ning; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Retinal light responsiveness measured via electroretinography undergoes developmental modulation and is thought to be critically regulated by both visual experience and dopamine. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether the dopamine D2 receptor regulates the visual experience-dependent functional development of the retina. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinograms from wild type mice and mice with a genetic deletion of the gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor raised under normal cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrate that mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially increases the amplitude of the inner retinal light responses evoked by high intensity light measured as oscillatory potentials in adult mice. During postnatal development, all three major components of electroretinograms, the a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increase with age. Comparatively, mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially reduces the age-dependent increase of b-waves evoked by low intensity light. Light deprivation from birth reduces the amplitude of b-waves and completely diminishes the increased amplitude of oscillatory potentials. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the dopamine D2 receptor plays an important role in the activity-dependent functional development of the mouse retina. PMID:25393815

  8. Pattern Recognition Receptors and the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Fitzgerald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs, the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  9. Pattern recognition receptors and the innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Kaminski, John J; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2011-06-01

    The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins) and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  10. Alpha adrenergic receptor mediation of cardiovascular and metabolic responses to alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackett, D.J.; Gauvin, D.V.; Lerner, M.R.; Holloway, F.H.; Wilson, M.F. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (United States) Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1992-02-26

    The role of alpha adrenergic receptors in acute cardiovascular and metabolic responses to alcohol (ETOH) have not been clearly defined. In this study two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were given intravenous phentolamine mesylate or saline prior to intragastric alcohol to blockade of alpha receptors during alcohol intoxication in conscious rats. ETOH alone evoked an increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), heart rate (HR), and blood glucose concentrations (G) and a decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), central venous pressure (CVP), respiration rate (RR) and cardiac stroke volume (SV). Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) peaked at 30 min and remained elevated for the four hrs of monitoring. Phentolamine pretreatment produced a decrease in MAP and SV and an increase in HR. However, antagonism of the alpha receptor blocked the decrease in CO and the increase in SVR and G. The decrease in CVP was unaffected. Surprisingly, the early rise and peak in BAC in the phentolamine treated group was attenuated, but was the same as the untreated group during the final 3 hrs. These data suggest that alpha receptors are significant mediators of cardiovascular and glucoregulatory responses elicited by alcohol. Furthermore, alpha receptor blockade appears to effect the absorption and/or distribution of intragastrically administered alcohol.

  11. Modulation of JB6 Mouse Epidermal Cell Transformation Response by the Prostaglandin F2 Alpha Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Thomas J.; Markillie, Lye MENG.; Chrisler, William B.; Vielhauer, George A.; Regan, John W.

    2002-12-01

    Prostaglandin F2a (PGF2a) has been associated with the modulation of clonal selection processes in the mouse skin model of carcinogenesis. We have investigated whether JB6 mouse epidermal cells express a functional PGF2a receptor (FP) coupled to the regulation of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of JB6 cells with a FP receptor ligand (fluprostenol) potently (pM-nM) increased anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, as determined by a battery of in vitro assays. Treatment of JB6 cells with PGF2a and fluprostenol increased inositol phospholipid accumulation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activity, consistent with FP receptor-related signaling. FP receptor mRNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and a radiolabel binding assay determined the average specific [3H]PGF2a binding to be 8.25 + 0.95 fmol/mg protein. Treatment of cells with fluprostenol as a single exposure resulted in a significant increase in anchorage-dependent and -independent growth in media containing low (0.1-0.5%), but not high (5%) concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS). In contrast, treatment of cells with fluprostenol at two day intervals resulted in a more robust growth response under anchorage-dependent conditions only in media containing low FBS concentrations; and under anchorage-independent conditions only in media containing high FBS concentrations. ERK activation and colony size were increased by cotreatment of JB6 cells with EGF and fluprostenol to a greater extent than either treatment alone, while the cotreatment effect on colony number appeared to be simply additive. In summary, FBS concentration and signal oscillation exert pronounced effects on the biological response to a FP receptor agonist. The data raise the possibility that the FP receptor may independently contribute to clonal selection processes, but may play a more important role as a response modifier.

  12. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  13. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia Expresion aberrante de receptores de glucagón en tejido adrenal de un paciente con síndrome de Cushing e hiperplasia adrenal macronodular indedependiente de ACTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH is a rare cause of Cushing´s syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein- coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing´s syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient´s adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing´s syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.La hiperplasia adrenal macronodular bilateral independiente de ACTH (HAMIA es una causa infrecuente de Síndrome de Cushing, caracterizada por lesiones adrenales bilaterales, hipercortisolismo y ACTH plasmática suprimida. La síntesis de cortisol estaría regulada a través de ligandos de receptores asociados a proteína G que se expresan en forma aberrante en la corteza de las glándulas adrenales. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar

  14. Response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria in tomato involves regulation of ethylene receptor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardi, J A; Tieman, D M; Lund, S T; Jones, J B; Stall, R E; Klee, H J

    2000-05-01

    Although ethylene regulates a wide range of defense-related genes, its role in plant defense varies greatly among different plant-microbe interactions. We compared ethylene's role in plant response to virulent and avirulent strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). The ethylene-insensitive Never ripe (Nr) mutant displays increased tolerance to the virulent strain, while maintaining resistance to the avirulent strain. Expression of the ethylene receptor genes NR and LeETR4 was induced by infection with both virulent and avirulent strains; however, the induction of LeETR4 expression by the avirulent strain was blocked in the Nr mutant. To determine whether ethylene receptor levels affect symptom development, transgenic plants overexpressing a wild-type NR cDNA were infected with virulent X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Like the Nr mutant, the NR overexpressors displayed greatly reduced necrosis in response to this pathogen. NR overexpression also reduced ethylene sensitivity in seedlings and mature plants, indicating that, like LeETR4, this receptor is a negative regulator of ethylene response. Therefore, pathogen-induced increases in ethylene receptors may limit the spread of necrosis by reducing ethylene sensitivity.

  15. Nuclear receptor 4a3 (nr4a3 regulates murine mast cell responses and granule content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Garcia-Faroldi

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor 4a3 (Nr4a3 is a transcription factor implicated in various settings such as vascular biology and inflammation. We have recently shown that mast cells dramatically upregulate Nuclear receptor 4a3 upon activation, and here we investigated the functional impact of Nuclear receptor 4a3 on mast cell responses. We show that Nuclear receptor 4a3 is involved in the regulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion in mast cells following activation via the high affinity IgE receptor. Moreover, Nuclear receptor 4a3 negatively affects the transcript and protein levels of mast cell tryptase as well as the mast cell's responsiveness to allergen. Together, these findings identify Nuclear receptor 4a3 as a novel regulator of mast cell function.

  16. {beta}1-Adrenergic receptor activation induces mouse cardiac myocyte death through both L-type calcium channel-dependent and -independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongyu; Gao, Hui; Kubo, Hajime; Berretta, Remus M; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac diseases persistently increase the contractility demands of cardiac myocytes, which require activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent increases in myocyte Ca(2+) transients. Persistent exposure to sympathetic and/or Ca(2+) stress is associated with myocyte death. This study examined the respective roles of persistent beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) agonist exposure and high Ca(2+) concentration in myocyte death. Ventricular myocytes (VMs) were isolated from transgenic (TG) mice with cardiac-specific and inducible expression of the beta(2a)-subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel (LTCC). VMs were cultured, and the rate of myocyte death was measured in the presence of isoproterenol (ISO), other modulators of Ca(2+) handling and the beta-adrenergic system, and inhibitors of caspases and reactive oxygen species generation. The rate of myocyte death was greater in TG vs. wild-type myocytes and accelerated by ISO in both groups, although ISO did not increase LTCC current (I(Ca-L)) in TG-VMs. Nifedipine, an LTCC antagonist, only partially prevented myocyte death. These results suggest both LTCC-dependent and -independent mechanisms in ISO induced myocyte death. ISO increased the contractility of wild type and TG-VMs by enhancing sarcoplasmic reticulum function and inhibiting sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and CaMKII partially protected myocyte from death induced by both Ca(2+) and ISO. Caspase and reactive oxygen species inhibitors did not, but beta(2)-AR activation did, reduce myocyte death induced by enhanced I(Ca-L) and ISO stimulation. Our results suggest that catecholamines induce myocyte necrosis primarily through beta(1)-AR-mediated increases in I(Ca-L), but other mechanisms are also involved in rodents.

  17. Gender differences in response of hippocampus to chronic glucocorticoid stress: role of glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Howard H; Payne, H Ross; Wang, Bin; Brady, Scott T

    2006-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) play critical roles in the pathophysiological reactions to environmental stress. In brain, morphological changes were examined in hippocampal CA3 neurons with 2 weeks of chronic elevation of GC in male and female mice. Molecular correlates and underlying mechanisms paralleling these morphologic changes in hippocampus were investigated. Although the hippocampal neurons in the CA3 area in male mice atrophy with chronically elevated GC, female mice show minimal morphological changes with comparable GC regimens. These sexual morphological differences correlate with differences in the postsynaptic dense protein (PSD95) as well as the spectrum of glutamate receptors induced by GC treatment in male and female mice, including NMDA, AMPA, and KA receptors. These findings suggest that synaptic receptor composition is adapted to the unique physiological requirements of males and females and illuminate underlying mechanisms of GC/stress responses in the brain.

  18. Regulation of Toll-like receptors-dependent inflammatory response 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kowalczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a pivotal part of our innate immune response. They recognize a wide variety of pathogens and instigate an immune response, thus facilitating the removal of the disease-causing agent. Due to the intense nature of this response its strict control is of keyimportance, as a prolonged inflammatory signal leads to carcinogenesis and autoimmune disorders. The signaling cascade initiated by the activated TLR is complex and consists of multiple stages. It involves a variety of adaptor proteins, protein kinases and effector transcription factors. The number of stages in this process enables many possible checkpoints and ways of regulation. Signal modulation involves differentiated expression of TLRs, splicing variants of their adaptorproteins, enzymes modifying proteins engaged in the cascade and many more. This review focuses on endogenous factors responsible for controlling the TLR-dependent inflammatory response as well as on pharmacological therapies designed for regulating the innate immune response.  

  19. Human mast cells express multiple EP receptors for prostaglandin E2 that differentially modulate activation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunli; Beller, Elizabeth M; Bagga, Savita; Boyce, Joshua A

    2006-04-15

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) blocks mast-cell (MC)-dependent allergic responses in humans but activates MCs in vitro. We assessed the functions of the EP receptors for PGE2 on cultured human MCs (hMCs). hMCs expressed the EP3, EP2, and EP4 receptors. PGE2 stimulated the accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and suppressed both Fc epsilonRI-mediated eicosanoid production and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generation. PGE2 also caused phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), exocytosis, and production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), as well as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) when protein kinase A (PKA) was inhibited. An EP3 receptor-selective agonist, AE-248, mimicked PGE2-mediated ERK phosphorylation, exocytosis, and eicosanoid formation. Selective agonists of both EP2 and EP4 receptors (AE1-259-01 and AE-329, respectively) stimulated cAMP accumulation. No selective agonist, alone or in combination, was as effective as PGE2. AE-248, AE1-259-01, and AE-329 all inhibited Fc epsilonRI-mediated TNF-alpha generation, while AE1-259-01 blocked eicosanoid production. PGE2 caused the expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) by a pathway involving PKA and ERK. Thus, while PGE2 activates MCs through EP3 receptors, it also counteracts Fc epsilonRI-mediated eicosanoid production through EP2 receptors and PKA, and blocks cytokine transcription. These functions explain the potency of PGE2 as a suppressor of early- and late-phase allergic responses.

  20. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  1. Structural Basis for Platelet Collagen Responses by the Immune-type Receptor Glycoprotein VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horii,K.; Kahn, M.; Herr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of circulating platelets by exposed vessel wall collagen is a primary step in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke, and drugs to block platelet activation have successfully reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In humans and mice, collagen activation of platelets is mediated by glycoprotein VI (GPVI), a receptor that is homologous to immune receptors but bears little sequence similarity to known matrix protein adhesion receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of the collagen-binding domain of human GPVI and characterize its interaction with a collagen-related peptide. Like related immune receptors, GPVI contains 2 immunoglobulin-like domains arranged in a perpendicular orientation. Significantly, GPVI forms a back-to-back dimer in the crystal, an arrangement that could explain data previously obtained from cell-surface GPVI inhibition studies. Docking algorithms identify 2 parallel grooves on the GPVI dimer surface as collagen-binding sites, and the orientation and spacing of these grooves precisely match the dimensions of an intact collagen fiber. These findings provide a structural basis for the ability of an immunetype receptor to generate signaling responses to collagen and for the development of GPVI inhibitors as new therapies for human cardiovascular disease.

  2. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, J M; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence.

  3. The response to sulpiride in social anxiety disorder: D2 receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline; Bhikha, Shamina; Colhoun, Helen; Carter, Frances; Frampton, Chris; Porter, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) have a hypoactive central dopaminergic system. Supporting this there have been reports from neuroimaging studies of reduced striatal D2 receptor binding in subjects with SAD. The aim of this study was to investigate D2 receptor sensitivity in patients with SAD compared with a group of matched, healthy controls using a neuroendocrine challenge with the selective D2 antagonist, sulpiride. D2 receptor function was assessed in 23 subjects with generalized SAD and 23 matched, healthy controls using a challenge with 400 mg of a selective D2 antagonist, sulpiride in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Response to sulpiride was measured by the change in prolactin level and changes in self-rated measures of social anxiety, mood and the ability to experience pleasure. There was no significant difference in prolactin response to sulpiride between the two groups. Sulpiride resulted in no effect in either the SAD or healthy control group on measures of social anxiety, mood or the ability to experience pleasure. Contrary to our hypothesis, in this study we found no evidence of reduced D2 receptor function in subjects with SAD compared with healthy controls.

  4. A regulatory role for macrophage class A scavenger receptors in TLR4-mediated LPS responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunying; Wermeling, Fredrik; Sundqvist, Johanna; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Tryggvason, Karl; Pikkarainen, Timo; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of microbial components by TLR, key sensors of infection, leads to induction of inflammatory responses. We found that, in vivo, TLR4 engagement by LPS induces up-regulation of the class A scavenger receptors (SR) macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) and SR-A, which occurs, at least in the case of MARCO, via both MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. When challenging mice with a low dose of LPS followed by a high dose, class A SR-deficient mice showed a higher survival rate than WT mice. This was paired with increased production of IL-10 and anti-LPS Ab, as well as increased activation status of marginal zone B cells. However, the receptors were not crucial for survival when challenging mice i.p. with Neisseria meningitidis or Listeria monocytogenes, but they were found to contribute to microbial capture and clearance. This indicates physiological significance for the up-regulation of class A SR during early stages of bacterial infection. Thus, we believe that we have revealed a mechanism where SR regulate the activation status of the immune system and are involved in balancing a proper immune response to infection. This regulation could also be important in maintaining tolerance since these receptors have been shown to be involved in regulation of self-reactivity.

  5. Microglia are required for astroglial toll-like receptor 4 response and for optimal TLR2 and TLR3 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas Hellesøe; Draeby, Dina; Owens, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond as stron......Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond...... as strongly as microglia to TLR agonists remains contentious. In this study, we have rigorously purified astrocytes to determine their capacity for autonomous TLR response, in absence of microglia. We used flow cytometry and differential adhesion as well as a myeloid lineage-specific suicide gene to purify...

  6. 血管紧张素转化酶基因多态性与β受体阻滞剂治疗慢性心力衰竭患者预后的关系%Relationship between the polymorphism of angiotensin-converting enzyme and the prognosis of chronic heart failure patients treated with beta-adrenergic receptor blockers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茵; 方壮伟; 方团育; 吴智勇; 董吁钢; Dennis M. McNamara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme ( ACE) polymor phisms and the prognosis of chronic heart failure( CHF) patients treatcd with β-blockers. Method: ACE I/D gene polymorphisms in 432 CHF- patients with systolic dysfunction (LVEF<0. 45) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) , and 26. 43±18. 19 months follow-up time were viewed to assess the end point of death in 432 CHD patients. At the same time, in diffcrent ACE I/D genotypes, relationships between the survival rate of CHF patients and β-blockers treatment were analyzed, too. Result: The survival of ACE D allele was significantly attenuated compared to Ⅰ allele (P=0. 027). In homozygous ACE DD patients, treatment withβ-blocker was associat ed with a significant improvement in survival rate(P=0. 003). However, In other patients treated with β-block ers , no obvious improvement of survival rate was viewcd in ACE Ⅱ、ID、DD genotype patients(P=0. 196). On the other hand, for patients without β-blockers treatment,there was a tendency of attenuation for survival rate in ACE DD not in ACE Ⅱ and ID patients, but with no statistical significance (P=0. 091). Conclusion : It shows that ACE DD genotype in CHF paticnts has significantly lower survival rate than in other genotype patients, which could be used as a predictive factor of prognosis for CHF patients, further,β-blocker therapy effects are related with ACE I/D gene polymorphisms, and β-blockers benefits ACE DD genotype patients most effcctively.%目的:探讨血管紧张素转化酶(ACE)基因多态性与β受体阻滞剂治疗心力衰竭患者预后的关系.方法:用聚合酶链式反应方法(PCR)检测432例收缩功能障碍性心力衰竭[左室射血分数(LVEF)<0.45]患者的ACE基因型,前瞻性随访所有患者(26.43±18.19)个月, 随访终点是死亡.分析不同ACE I/D基因分型中β受体阻滞剂治疗与慢性心力衰竭患者生存率的关系.结果:ACE D等位基因的生存率比Ⅰ等位基因明显降低(P=0.027);在ACE DD基因型中有β受体阻滞剂治疗组比无β受体阻滞剂治疗组的生存率明显增高(P=0.003);有β受体阻滞剂治疗组ACE II、ID、DD 3种基因型的生存率无差异(P=0.196);无β受体阻滞剂治疗组ACE DD基因型的生存率比II、ID有明显降低的趋势,但无显著性差异(P=0.091).结论:在慢性心力衰竭患者中,ACE DD基因型患者的生存率明显降低,β受体阻滞剂治疗效果与ACE I/D基因多态性有相关性,ACE DD基因型获益更大.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the toll-like receptor 4, in a MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinical...

  8. Stress-based modulation of the immune response in molluscan hemocytes: a two-receptor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Barcia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In molluscs, hemocytes perform the molecular mechanisms related to immunity. These cells have the ability to respond to the different varieties of stress by modulating their responses. The stressors may be bacterial toxins, cytokines or growth factors, and even physical agents such as changes in temperature or oxygen partial pressure. In the first place, hemocytes synthesise catecholamines, which, in turn, modify the immune response in terms of phagocytosis or nitric oxide synthesis. According to studies on the hemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, we propose a model for a sequential action where the IL-2 receptor and its wide agonist specificity play an important role. Also, α and β-adrenergic receptors suggest the functioning of a return-to-hemocyte mechanism. The model is proposed taking into account the possible relationship between the pathways mediated by cAMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C in hemocytes.

  9. Nicotine enhances alcohol intake and dopaminergic responses through β2* and β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, Stefania; Marti, Fabio; Morel, Carole; Perrier, Carole; Torquet, Nicolas; Pons, Stephanie; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Faure, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are the most widely co-abused drugs. Both modify the activity of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) and lead to an increase in DA release in the Nucleus Accumbens, thereby affecting the reward system. Evidences support the hypothesis that distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular target of acetylcholine (ACh) and exogenous nicotine, are also in addition implicated in the response to alcohol. The precise molecular and neuronal substrates of this interaction are however not well understood. Here we used in vivo electrophysiology in the VTA to characterise acute and chronic interactions between nicotine and alcohol. Simultaneous injections of the two drugs enhanced their responses on VTA DA neuron firing and chronic exposure to nicotine increased alcohol-induced DA responses and alcohol intake. Then, we assessed the role of β4 * nAChRs, but not β2 * nAChRs, in mediating acute responses to alcohol using nAChR subtypes knockout mice (β2−/− and β4−/− mice). Finally, we showed that nicotine-induced modifications of alcohol responses were absent in β2−/− and β4−/− mice, suggesting that nicotine triggers β2* and β4 * nAChR-dependent neuroadaptations that subsequently modify the responses to alcohol and thus indicating these receptors as key mediators in the complex interactions between these two drugs. PMID:28332590

  10. Chitinase 3-like 1 Regulates Cellular and Tissue Responses via IL-13 Receptor α2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Hua He

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH 18 gene family have been conserved over species and time and are dysregulated in inflammatory, infectious, remodeling, and neoplastic disorders. This is particularly striking for the prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1, which plays a critical role in antipathogen responses where it augments bacterial killing while stimulating disease tolerance by controlling cell death, inflammation, and remodeling. However, receptors that mediate the effects of GH 18 moieties have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Chi3l1 binds to interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2 and that Chi3l1, IL-13Rα2, and IL-13 are in a multimeric complex. We also demonstrate that Chi3l1 activates macrophage mitogen-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B/AKT, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and regulates oxidant injury, apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammasome activation, antibacterial responses, melanoma metastasis, and TGF-β1 production via IL-13Rα2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, IL-13Rα2 is a GH 18 receptor that plays a critical role in Chi3l1 effector responses.

  11. Dopamine D1 receptors are responsible for stress-induced emotional memory deficit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Bi; Li, Chaocui; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2012-03-01

    It is established that stress impairs spatial learning and memory via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Dopamine D1 receptors were also shown to be responsible for a stress-induced deficit of working memory. However, whether stress affects the subsequent emotional learning and memory is not elucidated yet. Here, we employed the well-established one-trial step-through task to study the effect of an acute psychological stress (induced by tail hanging for 5, 10, or 20 min) on emotional learning and memory, and the possible mechanisms as well. We demonstrated that tail hanging induced an obvious stress response. Either an acute tail-hanging stress or a single dose of intraperitoneally injected dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390) significantly decreased the step-through latency in the one-trial step-through task. However, SCH23390 prevented the acute tail-hanging stress-induced decrease in the step-through latency. In addition, the effects of tail-hanging stress and/or SCH23390 on the changes in step-through latency were not through non-memory factors such as nociceptive perception and motor function. Our data indicate that the hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors mediated the stress-induced deficit of emotional learning and memory. This study may have clinical significance given that psychological stress is considered to play a role in susceptibility to some mental diseases such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  12. Isolated NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses express both LTP and LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Berger, T W; Barrionuevo, G

    1992-04-01

    1. The possibility of use-dependent, long-lasting modifications of pharmacologically isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was examined by intracellular recordings from granule cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in vitro. In the presence of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinaxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) robust, long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials was induced by brief, high (50 Hz) and lower (10 Hz) frequency tetanic stimuli of glutamatergic afferents (60 +/- 6%, n = 8, P less than 0.001 and 43 +/- 12%, n = 3, P less than 0.05, respectively). 2. Hyperpolarization of granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 50-Hz tetanic stimuli reversibly blocked the induction of LTP (-6 +/- 2%, n = 6, P greater than 0.05) indicating that simultaneous activation of pre- and postsynaptic elements is a prerequisite for potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. In contrast, hyperpolarization of the granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 10-Hz tetanic stimuli resulted in long-term depression (LTD) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials (-34 +/- 8%, n = 8, P less than 0.01). 3. We also studied the role of [Ca2+]i in the induction of LTP and LTD of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. Before tetanization, [Ca2+]i was buffered by iontophoretic injections of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). BAPTA completely blocked the induction of LTP (3 +/- 5%, n = 13) and partially blocked LTD (-14.8 +/- 6%, n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  14. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  15. Anterior cingulate serotonin 1B receptor binding is associated with emotional response inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær; Dam, Vibeke Høyrup

    2017-01-01

    -HT1BR would be positively associated with false alarms (failures to inhibit nogo responses) in the context of aversive (angry and fearful) facial expressions. Across groups, we found that frontal cortex 5-HT1BR binding was positively correlated with false alarms when angry faces were go stimuli......-offender controls, completed an emotional Go/NoGo task requiring inhibition of prepotent motor responses to emotional facial expressions. We also measured cerebral serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) binding with [(11)C]AZ10419369 positron emission tomography within regions of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that 5...

  16. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  17. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; Part I. Blood pressure and heart rate effects in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H

    1991-02-01

    The effect of an alcoholic extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis on blood pressure and heart rate was determined in rats anesthetized with pentobarbital and compared with that of histamine. The extract induced hypotension, accompanied at high doses by tachycardia. Hypotension after histamine was more transient and was not accompanied by changes in heart rate. Experiments with a variety of autonomic antagonists revealed that extract-induced hypotension was not mediated by histamine H2, muscarinic, or beta-adrenergic receptors, but involved an H1 mechanism. After H1 blockade, the depressor response was reversed to a pressor effect, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The increase in heart rate was due in part to H1 and in part to beta-adrenergic receptor activation. It was suggested that imidazole derivatives could be responsible for the depressor effect observed. The pressor response could be caused by these or other components of the extract.

  18. The effect of chronic in vivo infusion of forskolin on noradrenergic receptor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdak, P D; Browne, R G

    1985-01-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene isolated from the plant Coleus forskolii, activates the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase, resulting in a hormone receptor-independent increase in the intracellular production of cyclic AMP. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of chronic in vivo infusion of forskolin on noradrenergic neuronal activity. Forskolin was infused into the right lateral ventricle of male Sprague Dawley rats via Alzet osmotic minipumps (model 2001) for 7 days. Chronic infusion of forskolin resulted in a decrease in norepinephrine-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in the limbic forebrain. Chronic infusion of forskolin also resulted in a decrease in the Bmax for 3H-dihydroalprenolol (3H-DHA) binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, with no apparent change in the Kd values. These data suggest the possibility of a novel therapeutic approach to modulating receptor sensitivity, and that chronic infusion of forskolin may be a useful model for studying the role of cyclic AMP in the control of neuronal activity.

  19. Effects of kappa opioid receptor-selective agonists on responses of pelvic nerve afferents to noxious colorectal distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X; Sengupta, J N; Gebhart, G F

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of kappa-opioid receptor selective agonists on responses of mechanosensitive afferent fibers in the pelvic nerve. Single-fiber recordings were made from pelvic nerve afferents in the decentralized S1 dorsal root of the rat. A total of 572 afferent fibers in the S1 dorsal root were identified by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve; 252 (44%) responded to noxious colorectal distension (CRD; 80 mmHg). Of these 252 fibers that responded to CRD, 100 were studied further. All 100 fibers gave monotonic increases in firing to increasing pressures of CRD. Eighty-eight fibers had low thresholds for response (mean: 3 mmHg) and 12 fibers had high-thresholds for response (mean: 28 mmHg). Responses of 17 fibers also were tested after instillation of 5% mustard oil (MO) into the colon. The resting activity of 16/17 fibers significantly increased after MO instillation; 13 (77%) also exhibited sensitization of responses to graded CRD when tested 30 min after intracolonic MO instillation. The effects of kappa1-opioid receptor preferring agonists (U50,488H, U69,593 and U62,066), the kappa2-opioid receptor preferring agonist bremazocine, and the kappa3-opioid receptor preferring agonist naloxone benzoylhydrazone (nalBzoH) were tested on responses of 64 mechanosensitive afferent fibers to noxious CRD. All five agonists dose-dependently inhibited afferent fiber responses to noxious CRD. Doses producing inhibition to 50% of the control response to CRD did not differ among the five agonists, ranging from approximately 4 to 15 mg/kg. The effects of kappa1, kappa2, and kappa3 receptor agonists were attenuated by naloxone; two kappa-opioid receptor-selective antagonists were ineffective. There were no differences in the dose-response relationships of these drugs for fibers recorded from untreated and irritant-treated colons. Conduction velocities of the fibers remained unaffected after high doses of all tested agonists. In an in vitro

  20. Slit2-Robo4 receptor responses inhibit ANDV directed permeability of human lung microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2013-08-01

    Hantaviruses nonlytically infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause edematous and hemorrhagic diseases. Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), and Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Hantaviruses enhance vascular endothelial growth factor directed EC permeability resulting in the disassembly of inter-endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). Recent studies demonstrate that Slit2 binding to Robo1/Robo4 receptors on ECs has opposing effects on AJ disassembly and vascular fluid barrier functions. Here we demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits ANDV and HTNV induced permeability and AJ disassembly of pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMECs) by interactions with Robo4. In contrast, Slit2 had no effect on the permeability of ANDV infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Analysis of Robo1/Robo4 expression determined that PMECs express Robo4, but not Robo1, while HUVECs expressed both Robo4 and Robo1 receptors. SiRNA knockdown of Robo4 in PMECs prevented Slit2 inhibition of ANDV induced permeability demonstrating that Robo4 receptors determine PMEC responsiveness to Slit2. Collectively, this data demonstrates a selective role for Slit2/Robo4 responses within PMECs that inhibits ANDV induced permeability and AJ disassembly. These findings suggest Slit2s utility as a potential HPS therapeutic that stabilizes the pulmonary endothelium and antagonizes ANDV induced pulmonary edema.

  1. Modeling Interactions among Individual P2 Receptors to Explain Complex Response Patterns over a Wide Range of ATP Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shu; Grol, Matthew W; Grutter, Peter H; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular ATP acts on the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels and several members of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled receptors to mediate intercellular communication among many cell types including bone-forming osteoblasts. It is known that multiple P2 receptors are expressed on osteoblasts (P2X2,5,6,7 and P2Y1,2,4,6). In the current study, we investigated complex interactions within the P2 receptor network using mathematical modeling. To characterize individual P2 receptors, we extracted data from published studies of overexpressed human and rodent (rat and mouse) receptors and fit their dependencies on ATP concentration using the Hill equation. Next, we examined responses induced by an ensemble of endogenously expressed P2 receptors. Murine osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells) were loaded with fluo-4 and stimulated with varying concentrations of extracellular ATP. Elevations in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) were monitored by confocal microscopy. Dependence of the calcium response on ATP concentration exhibited a complex pattern that was not explained by the simple addition of individual receptor responses. Fitting the experimental data with a combination of Hill equations from individual receptors revealed that P2Y1 and P2X7 mediated the rise in [Ca(2+)]i at very low and high ATP concentrations, respectively. Interestingly, to describe responses at intermediate ATP concentrations, we had to assume that a receptor with a K 1∕2 in that range (e.g. P2Y4 or P2X5) exerts an inhibitory effect. This study provides new insights into the interactions among individual P2 receptors in producing an ensemble response to extracellular ATP.

  2. Modeling interactions among individual P2 receptors to explain complex response patterns over a wide range of ATP concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available EExtracellular ATP acts on the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels and several members of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled receptors to mediate intercellular communication among many cell types including bone-forming osteoblasts. It is known that multiple P2 receptors are expressed on osteoblasts (P2X2,5,6,7 and P2Y1,2,4,6. In the current study, we investigated complex interactions within the P2 receptor network using mathematical modeling. To characterize individual P2 receptors, we extracted data from published studies of overexpressed human and rodent (rat and mouse receptors and fit their dependencies on ATP concentration using the Hill equation. Next, we examined responses induced by an ensemble of endogenously expressed P2 receptors. Murine osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells were loaded with fluo-4 and stimulated with varying concentrations of extracellular ATP. Elevations in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i were monitored by confocal microscopy. Dependence of the calcium response on ATP concentration exhibited a complex pattern that was not explained by the simple addition of individual receptor responses. Fitting the experimental data with a combination of Hill equations from individual receptors revealed that P2Y1 and P2X7 mediated the rise in [Ca2+]i at very low and high ATP concentrations, respectively. Interestingly, to describe responses at intermediate ATP concentrations, we had to assume that a receptor with a K1/2 in that range (e.g. P2Y4 or P2X5 exerts an inhibitory effect. This study provides new insights into the interactions among individual P2 receptors in producing an ensemble response to extracellular ATP.

  3. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xudong, E-mail: 081022009@fudan.edu.cn [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Li Yajuan [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Yin Yaobing; Yu Decai [College of Science, Hebei University of Engineering, 199 South street of Guangming, Handan 056038 (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and {sup 1}HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F{sup -} could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel kind receptor for selective recognition of fluoride had been designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its organogel was also fluoride-responsive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  4. Alteration of airway responsiveness mediated by receptors in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic E3 rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wen LONG; Xu-dong YANG; Lei CAO; She-min LU; Yong-xiao CAO

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Airway hyperresponsiveness is a constant feature of asthma.The aim of the present study was to investigate airway hyperreactivity mediated by contractile and dilative receptors in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced model of rat asthma.Methods:Asthmatic E3 rats were prepared by intraperitoneal injection with OVA/aluminum hydroxide and then challenged with intranasal instillation of OVA-PBS two weeks later.The myograph method was used to measure the responses of constriction and dilatation in the trachea,main bronchi and lobar bronchi.Results:In asthmatic E3 rata,β2 adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle pre-contracted with 5-HT was inhibited,and there were no obvious difference in relaxation compared with normal E3 rats.Contraction of lobar bronchi mediated by 5-HT and sarafotoxin 6c was more potent than in the trachea or main bronchi.Airway contractions mediated by the endothelin (ET)A receptor,ETB receptor and M3 muscarinic receptor were augmented,and the augmented contraction was most obvious in lobar bronchi.The order of efficacy of contraction for lobar bronchi induced by agonists was ET-1,sarafotoxin 6c>ACh>5-HT.OX8 (an antibody against CD8+ T cells) strongly shifted and 0X35 (an antibody against CD4+ T cells) modestly shifted isoprenaline-induced concentration-relaxation curves in a nonparallel fashion to the left with an increased Rmax in asthmatic rats and sarafotoxin 6c-induced concentration-contractile curves to the right with a decreased Emax.Conclusion:The inhibition of airway relaxation and the augmentation of contraction mediated by receptors contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and involve CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

  5. HVEM: An unusual TNF receptor family member important for mucosal innate immune responses to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM or CD270) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), and therefore it is also known as TNFRSF14. We have recently provided evidence showing a novel signaling pathway downstream of HVEM leading to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation in epithelial cells. As STAT3 regulates the expression of genes important for host defense in epithelial cells, as well as the differentiation of retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt+ Th17 and innate lymphoid cells (ILC), our finding that HVEM activates STAT3 has revealed fresh insights into the potential regulatory function of HVEM in different cellular contexts. Therefore, although further investigations will be required, HVEM is emerging as a major player in mucosal host defense, capable of regulating several cellular responses.

  6. Atypical Chemokine Receptors and Their Roles in the Resolution of the Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonecchi, Raffaella; Graham, Gerard J.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key mediators of the inflammatory process regulating leukocyte extravasation and directional migration into inflamed and infected tissues. The control of chemokine availability within inflamed tissues is necessary to attain a resolving environment and when this fails chronic inflammation ensues. Accordingly, vertebrates have adopted a number of mechanisms for removing chemokines from inflamed sites to help precipitate resolution. Over the past 15 years, it has become apparent that essential players in this process are the members of the atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) family. Broadly speaking, this family is expressed on stromal cell types and scavenges chemokines to either limit their spatial availability or to remove them from in vivo sites. Here, we provide a brief review of these ACKRs and discuss their involvement in the resolution of inflammatory responses and the therapeutic implications of our current knowledge. PMID:27375622

  7. The association of thromboxane A2 receptor with lipid rafts is a determinant for platelet functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardó, A; Vallés, J; Latorre, A; Santos, M T

    2014-08-25

    We have investigated the presence of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor associated with lipid rafts in human platelets and the regulation of platelet function in response to TXA2 receptor agonists when lipid rafts are disrupted by cholesterol extraction. Platelet aggregation with TXA2 analogs U46619 and IBOP was almost blunted in cholesterol-depleted platelets, as well as αIIbβ3 integrin activation and P-selectin exposure. Raft disruption also inhibited TXA2-induced cytosolic calcium increase and nucleotide release, ruling out an implication of P2Y12 receptor. An important proportion of TXA2 receptor (40%) was colocalized at lipid rafts. The presence of the TXA2 receptor associated with lipid rafts in platelets is important for functional platelet responses to TXA2.

  8. Failure of long-term digitalization to prevent rapid ventricular response in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galun, E; Flugelman, M Y; Glickson, M; Eliakim, M

    1991-04-01

    Digitalis is frequently prescribed to patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation to reduce the ventricular rate during subsequent paroxysms. To verify the validity of this assumption, we determined the ventricular rate during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in 13 patients receiving long-term digoxin therapy (mean plasma digoxin level + 1.28 +/- 0.4 ng/ml) and compared it with that of a group of 14 patients who had not taken digoxin or beta-adrenergic and calcium-blocking agents before the attack. The treated and the untreated groups were similar statistically. The mean ventricular rate of the digitalized patients was 121 +/- 15 beats per minute, while that of the patients in the control group was 118 +/- 16 beats per minute. It is concluded that long-term digoxin therapy is not effective in reducing the ventricular response in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation despite adequate therapeutic levels.

  9. Characterisation of chemosensory trigeminal receptors in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss: responses to chemical irritants and carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettam, Jessica J; McCrohan, Catherine R; Sneddon, Lynne U

    2012-02-15

    Trigeminally innervated, mechanically sensitive chemoreceptors (M) were previously identified in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, but it is not known whether these receptors are responsive only to noxious, chemical irritants or have a general chemosensory function. This study aimed to characterise the stimulus-response properties of these receptors in comparison with polymodal nociceptors (P). Both P and M gave similar response profiles to acetic acid concentrations. The electrophysiological properties were similar between the two different afferent types. To determine whether the receptors have a nociceptive function, a range of chemical stimulants was applied to these receptors, including non-noxious stimuli such as ammonium chloride, bile, sodium bicarbonate and alarm pheromone, and potentially noxious chemical irritants such as acetic acid, carbon dioxide, low pH, citric acid, citric acid phosphate buffer and sodium chloride. Only irritant stimuli evoked a response, confirming their nociceptive function. All receptor afferents tested responded to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the form of mineral water or soda water. The majority responded to 1% acetic acid, 2% citric acid, citric acid phosphate buffer (pH 3) and 5.0 mol l(-1) NaCl. CO(2) receptors have been characterised in the orobranchial cavity and gill arches in fish; however, this is the first time that external CO(2) receptors have been identified on the head of a fish. Because the fish skin is in constant contact with the aqueous environment, contaminants with a low pH or hypercapnia may stimulate the nociceptive system in fish.

  10. Methylphenidate enhances NMDA-receptor response in medial prefrontal cortex via sigma-1 receptor: a novel mechanism for methylphenidate action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate (MPH, commercially called Ritalin or Concerta, has been widely used as a drug for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Noteworthily, growing numbers of young people using prescribed MPH improperly for pleasurable enhancement, take high risk of addiction. Thus, understanding the mechanism underlying high level of MPH action in the brain becomes an important goal nowadays. As a blocker of catecholamine transporters, its therapeutic effect is explained as being due to proper modulation of D1 and α2A receptor. Here we showed that higher dose of MPH facilitates NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission via a catecholamine-independent mechanism, in layer V∼VI pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (PFC. To indicate its postsynaptic action, we next found that MPH facilitates NMDA-induced current and such facilitation could be blocked by σ1 but not D1/5 and α2 receptor antagonists. And this MPH eliciting enhancement of NMDA-receptor activity involves PLC, PKC and IP3 receptor mediated intracellular Ca(2+ increase, but does not require PKA and extracellular Ca(2+ influx. Our additional pharmacological studies confirmed that higher dose of MPH increases locomotor activity via interacting with σ1 receptor. Together, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MPH facilitates NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission via σ1 receptor, and such facilitation requires PLC/IP3/PKC signaling pathway. This novel mechanism possibly explains the underlying mechanism for MPH induced addictive potential and other psychiatric side effects.

  11. The octopamine receptor Octβ2R regulates ovulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwa Lim

    Full Text Available Oviposition is induced upon mating in most insects. Ovulation is a primary step in oviposition, representing an important target to control insect pests and vectors, but limited information is available on the underlying mechanism. Here we report that the beta adrenergic-like octopamine receptor Octβ2R serves as a key signaling molecule for ovulation and recruits protein kinase A and Ca(2+/calmodulin-sensitive kinase II as downstream effectors for this activity. We found that the octβ2r homozygous mutant females are sterile. They displayed normal courtship, copulation, sperm storage and post-mating rejection behavior but were unable to lay eggs. We have previously shown that octopamine neurons in the abdominal ganglion innervate the oviduct epithelium. Consistently, restored expression of Octβ2R in oviduct epithelial cells was sufficient to reinstate ovulation and full fecundity in the octβ2r mutant females, demonstrating that the oviduct epithelium is a major site of Octβ2R's function in oviposition. We also found that overexpression of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit or Ca(2+/calmodulin-sensitive protein kinase II led to partial rescue of octβ2r's sterility. This suggests that Octβ2R activates cAMP as well as additional effectors including Ca(2+/calmodulin-sensitive protein kinase II for oviposition. All three known beta adrenergic-like octopamine receptors stimulate cAMP production in vitro. Octβ1R, when ectopically expressed in the octβ2r's oviduct epithelium, fully reinstated ovulation and fecundity. Ectopically expressed Octβ3R, on the other hand, partly restored ovulation and fecundity while OAMB-K3 and OAMB-AS that increase Ca(2+ levels yielded partial rescue of ovulation but not fecundity deficit. These observations suggest that Octβ2R have distinct signaling capacities in vivo and activate multiple signaling pathways to induce egg laying. The findings reported here narrow the knowledge gap and offer insight into novel

  12. GPR55 regulates cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated responses in human neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nariman A B Balenga; Maria Waldhoer; Elma Aflaki; Julia Kargl; Wolfgang Platzer; Ralf Schr(o)der; Stefanie Bl(a)ttermann; Evi Kostenis; Andrew J Brown; Akos Heinemann

    2011-01-01

    The directional migration of neutrophils towards inflammatory mediators,such as chemokines and cannabinoids,occurs via the activation of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) and is a highly organized process.A crucial role for controlling neutrophil migration has been ascribed to the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R),but additional modulatory sites distinct from CB2R have recently been suggested to impact CB2R-mediated effector functions in neutrophils.Here,we provide evidence that the recently de-orphanized 7TM/GPCR GPR55potently modulates CB2R-mediated responses.We show that GPR55 is expressed in human blood neutrophils and its activation augments the migratory response towards the CB2R agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG),while inhibiting neutrophil degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.Using HEK293 and HL60 cell lines,along with primary neutrophils,we show that GPR55 and CB2R interfere with each other's signaling pathways at the level of small GTPases,such as Rac2 and Cdc42.This ultimately leads to cellular polarization and efficient migration as well as abrogation of degranulation and ROS formation in neutrophils.Therefore,GPR55 limits the tissueinjuring inflammatory responses mediated by CB2R,while it synergizes with CB2R in recruiting neutrophils to sites of inflammation.

  13. PTH1 receptor is involved in mediating cellular response to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Candelario

    Full Text Available The molecular pathways by which long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA influence skeletal health remain elusive. Both LCPUFA and parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTH1R are known to be involved in bone metabolism while any direct link between the two is yet to be established. Here we report that LCPUFA are capable of direct, PTH1R dependent activation of extracellular ligand-regulated kinases (ERK. From a wide range of fatty acids studied, varying in chain length, saturation, and position of double bonds, eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic fatty acids (DHA caused the highest ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, EPA potentiated the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH(1-34 in a superagonistic manner. EPA or DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by the PTH1R antagonist and by knockdown of PTH1R. Inhibition of PTH1R downstream signaling molecules, protein kinases A (PKA and C (PKC, reduced EPA and DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation indicating that fatty acids predominantly activate G-protein pathway and not the β-arrestin pathway. Using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and a genetically engineered PTH1R sensor (PTH-CC, we detected conformational responses to EPA similar to those caused by PTH(1-34. PTH1R antagonist blocked the EPA induced conformational response of the PTH-CC. Competitive binding studies using fluorescence anisotropy technique showed that EPA and DHA competitively bind to and alter the affinity of PTH1 receptor to PTH(1-34 leading to a superagonistic response. Finally, we showed that EPA stimulates protein kinase B (Akt phosphorylation in a PTH1R-dependent manner and affects the osteoblast survival pathway, by inhibiting glucocorticoid-induced cell death. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LCPUFAs, EPA and DHA, can activate PTH1R receptor at nanomolar concentrations and consequently provide a putative molecular mechanism for the action of fatty acids in bone.

  14. Identification of a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates: differential chemotactic response towards receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacal, Jesús; Alfonso, Carlos; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E; Morel, Bertrand; Conejero-Lara, Francisco; Rivas, Germán; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L; Krell, Tino

    2010-07-23

    We report the identification of McpS as the specific chemoreceptor for 6 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and butyrate in Pseudomonas putida. The analysis of the bacterial mutant deficient in mcpS and complementation assays demonstrate that McpS is the only chemoreceptor of TCA cycle intermediates in the strain under study. TCA cycle intermediates are abundantly present in root exudates, and taxis toward these compounds is proposed to facilitate the access to carbon sources. McpS has an unusually large ligand-binding domain (LBD) that is un-annotated in InterPro and is predicted to contain 6 helices. The ligand profile of McpS was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry of purified recombinant LBD (McpS-LBD). McpS recognizes TCA cycle intermediates but does not bind very close structural homologues and derivatives like maleate, aspartate, or tricarballylate. This implies that functional similarity of ligands, such as being part of the same pathway, and not structural similarity is the primary element, which has driven the evolution of receptor specificity. The magnitude of chemotactic responses toward these 7 chemoattractants, as determined by qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays, differed largely. Ligands that cause a strong chemotactic response (malate, succinate, and fumarate) were found by differential scanning calorimetry to increase significantly the midpoint of protein unfolding (T(m)) and unfolding enthalpy (DeltaH) of McpS-LBD. Equilibrium sedimentation studies show that malate, the chemoattractant that causes the strongest chemotactic response, stabilizes the dimeric state of McpS-LBD. In this respect clear parallels exist to the Tar receptor and other eukaryotic receptors, which are discussed.

  15. Asymmetric cleavage of beta-carotene yields a transcriptional repressor of retinoid X receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Orasanu, Gabriela; Sukhova, Galina; Lau, Evan; Berger, Joel P; Tang, Guangwen; Krinsky, Norman I; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Plutzky, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    beta-Carotene and its metabolites exert a broad range of effects, in part by regulating transcriptional responses through specific nuclear receptor activation. Symmetric cleavage of beta-carotene can yield 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA), the natural ligand for the nuclear receptor RXR, the obligate heterodimeric partner for numerous nuclear receptor family members. A significant portion of beta-carotene can also undergo asymmetric cleavage to yield apocarotenals, a series of poorly understood naturally occurring molecules whose biologic role, including their transcriptional effects, remains essentially unknown. We show here that beta-apo-14'-carotenal (apo14), but not other structurally related apocarotenals, represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and RXR activation and biologic responses induced by their respective agonists both in vitro and in vivo. During adipocyte differentiation, apo14 inhibited PPARgamma target gene expression and adipogenesis, even in the presence of the potent PPARgamma agonist BRL49653. Apo14 also suppressed known PPARalpha responses, including target gene expression and its known antiinflammatory effects, but not if PPARalpha agonist stimulation occurred before apo14 exposure and not in PPARalpha-deficient cells or mice. Other apocarotenals tested had none of these effects. These data extend current views of beta-carotene metabolism to include specific apocarotenals as possible biologically active mediators and identify apo14 as a possible template for designing PPAR and RXR modulators and better understanding modulation of nuclear receptor activation. These results also suggest a novel model of molecular endocrinology in which metabolism of a parent compound, beta-carotene, may alternatively activate (9-cisRA) or inhibit (apo14) specific nuclear receptor responses.

  16. Genomic association analysis identifies multiple loci influencing antihypertensive response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Schwartz, Gary L; Chapman, Arlene B; Chai, High Seng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2012-06-01

    To identify genes influencing blood pressure response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker, single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genome-wide association analysis of the response to candesartan were validated by opposite direction associations with the response to a thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. We sampled 198 white and 193 blacks with primary hypertension from opposite tertiles of the race-sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to candesartan. There were 285 polymorphisms associated with the response to candesartan at P<10(-4) in whites. A total of 273 of the 285 polymorphisms, which were available for analysis in a separate sample of 196 whites, validated for opposite direction associations with the response to hydrochlorothiazide (Fisher χ(2) 1-sided P=0.02). Among the 273 polymorphisms, those in the chromosome 11q21 region were the most significantly associated with response to candesartan in whites (eg, rs11020821 near FUT4, P=8.98 × 10(-7)), had the strongest opposite direction associations with response to hydrochlorothiazide (eg, rs3758785 in GPR83, P=7.10 × 10(-3)), and had the same direction associations with response to candesartan in the 193 blacks (eg, rs16924603 near FUT4, P=1.52 × 10(-2)). Also notable among the 273 polymorphisms was rs11649420 on chromosome 16 in the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel subunit SCNN1G involved in mediating renal sodium reabsorption and maintaining blood pressure when the renin-angiotensin system is inhibited by candesartan. These results support the use of genomewide association analyses to identify novel genes predictive of opposite direction associations with blood pressure responses to inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin and renal sodium transport systems.

  17. Noradrenaline blocks potassium conductance in rat dentate granule cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, H L; Rose, G M

    1987-07-22

    The actions of noradrenaline and the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, were studied on the dentate gyrus in hippocampal slices from rats using extra- and intracellular recording. These agents facilitated field EPSPs (excitatory postsynaptic potentials) and population spikes evoked by perforant path stimulation. Intracellular recording revealed an attenuation of the long lasting afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and the accommodation of cell discharge in response to depolarizing current injection. It is suggested that beta-receptor activation blocks a calcium-dependent potassium current.

  18. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  19. Molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of histamine H₁-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    There is argument whether non-sedative properties of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (antihistamines) are determined by their active extrusions from the brain via P-glycoprotein or their restricted penetration through the blood-brain barrier. We have reported that sedative and non-sedative antihistamines can be well discriminated by measuring changes in their binding to H1 receptors upon receptor internalization in intact cells, which depends on their membrane-penetrating ability. In this study, molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of antihistamines were evaluated by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. Multiple regression analyses were applied to construct a QSAR model, taking internalization-mediated changes in the binding of antihistamines as objective variables and their structural descriptors as explanatory variables. The multiple regression model was successfully constructed with two explanatory variables, i.e., lipophilicity of the compounds at physiological pH (logD) and mean information content on the distance degree equality (IDDE) (r(2) = 0.753). The constructed model discriminated between sedative and non-sedative antihistamines with 94% accuracy for external validation. These results suggest that logD and IDDE concerning lipophilicity and molecular shapes of compounds, respectively, predominantly determine the membrane-penetrating ability of antihistamines for their side effects on the central nervous system.

  20. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  1. Development of GR/MR Chimeric Receptors and Their Response to Steroid Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qiman; Yang Qunying; Elisabeth Martinez; Guo Sandui

    2000-01-01

    We have established an effective and reliable technique of developing GR/MR chimeric receptors by DNA homologous recombination. To develop the method we transformed several different E. coli strains with a linearized plasmid containing full length of mGR(mouse GR) and hormone binding domain(HBD) of rMR(rat MR), the linear DNA undergoes recombination due to the homology of the mGR and the rMR and recircularize , and propagation in E. coli. PCR was performed to screen correct construction in which fusion between GR and MR took place. The constructs were digested with appropriate restriction endonucleases to test probable fusion sites of GR and HBD of MR. Precise fusion sites of GR and MR for constructs AB1157 # 2 , AB1157 # 18, AB 1157 # 22, AB1157 # 32, CMK603 # 6 were verified by DNA sequencing. Trans fection of COS- 7 cells with the constructs and subsequent treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with steroid hormones were carried out, the results showed that the constructs gave response to tested hormones. The study suggested that the GR/MR chimeric receptors can give rise to fusion proteins and their interactive function between hormone and receptor.

  2. Non-canonical Glucocorticoid Receptor Transactivation of gilz by Alcohol Suppresses Cell Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hang Pong; Jennings, Scott; Wang, Jack; Molina, Patricia E.; Nelson, Steve; Wang, Guoshun

    2017-01-01

    Acute alcohol exposure suppresses cell inflammatory response. The underlying mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we report that alcohol was able to activate glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in the absence of glucocorticoids (GCs) and upregulated glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (gilz), a prominent GC-responsive gene. Such a non-canonical activation of GR was not blocked by mifepristone, a potent GC competitor. The proximal promoter of gilz, encompassing five GC-responsive elements (GREs), was incorporated and tested in a luciferase reporter system. Deletion and/or mutation of the GREs abrogated the promoter responsiveness to alcohol. Thus, the GR–GRE interaction transduced the alcohol action on gilz. Alcohol induced GR nuclear translocation, which was enhanced by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor fomepizole, suggesting that it was alcohol, not its metabolites, that engendered the effect. Gel mobility shift assay showed that unliganded GR was able to bind GREs and such interaction withstood clinically relevant levels of alcohol. GR knockout via CRISPR/Cas9 gene targeting or GILZ depletion via small RNA interference diminished alcohol suppression of cell inflammatory response to LPS. Thus, a previously unrecognized, non-canonical GR activation of gilz is involved in alcohol modulation of cell immune response. PMID:28638383

  3. Non-canonical Glucocorticoid Receptor Transactivation of gilz by Alcohol Suppresses Cell Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Pong Ng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute alcohol exposure suppresses cell inflammatory response. The underlying mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we report that alcohol was able to activate glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling in the absence of glucocorticoids (GCs and upregulated glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (gilz, a prominent GC-responsive gene. Such a non-canonical activation of GR was not blocked by mifepristone, a potent GC competitor. The proximal promoter of gilz, encompassing five GC-responsive elements (GREs, was incorporated and tested in a luciferase reporter system. Deletion and/or mutation of the GREs abrogated the promoter responsiveness to alcohol. Thus, the GR–GRE interaction transduced the alcohol action on gilz. Alcohol induced GR nuclear translocation, which was enhanced by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor fomepizole, suggesting that it was alcohol, not its metabolites, that engendered the effect. Gel mobility shift assay showed that unliganded GR was able to bind GREs and such interaction withstood clinically relevant levels of alcohol. GR knockout via CRISPR/Cas9 gene targeting or GILZ depletion via small RNA interference diminished alcohol suppression of cell inflammatory response to LPS. Thus, a previously unrecognized, non-canonical GR activation of gilz is involved in alcohol modulation of cell immune response.

  4. Lipoteichoic acid induces unique inflammatory responses when compared to other toll-like receptor 2 ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Long

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs recognize evolutionarily-conserved molecular patterns originating from invading microbes. In this study, we were interested in determining if microbial ligands, which use distinct TLR2-containing receptor complexes, represent unique signals to the cell and can thereby stimulate unique cellular responses. Using the TLR2 ligands, R-FSL1, S-FSL1, Pam2CSK4, Pam3CSK4, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA, we demonstrate that these ligands activate NF-kappaB and MAP Kinase pathways with ligand-specific differential kinetics in murine macrophages. Most strikingly, LTA stimulation of these pathways was substantially delayed when compared with the other TLR2 ligands. These kinetics differences were associated with a delay in the LTA-induced expression of a subset of genes as compared with another TLR2 ligand, R-FSL1. However, this did not translate to overall differences in gene expression patterns four hours following stimulation with different TLR2 ligands. We extended this study to evaluate the in vivo responses to distinct TLR2 ligands using a murine model of acute inflammation, which employs intravital microscopy to monitor leukocyte recruitment into the cremaster muscle. We found that, although R-FSL1, S-FSL1, Pam2CSK4, and Pam3CSK4 were all able to stimulate robust leukocyte recruitment in vivo, LTA remained functionally inert in this in vivo model. Therefore distinct TLR2 ligands elicit unique cellular responses, as evidenced by differences in the kinetic profiles of signaling and gene expression responses in vitro, as well as the physiologically relevant differences in the in vivo responses to these ligands.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor gene inactivation in dopamine-innervated areas selectively decreases behavioral responses to amphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eParnaudeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The meso-cortico-limbic system, via dopamine release, encodes the rewarding and reinforcing properties of natural rewards. It is also activated in response to abused substances and is believed to support drug-related behaviors. Dysfunctions of this system lead to several psychiatric conditions including feeding disorders and drug addiction. These disorders are also largely influenced by environmental factors and in particular stress exposure. Stressors activate the corticotrope axis ultimately leading to glucocorticoid hormone (GCs release. GCs bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed including within the meso-cortico-limbic tract. While the GR within dopamine-innervated areas drives cocaine’s behavioral responses, its implication in responses to other psychostimulants such as amphetamine has never been clearly established. Moreover, while extensive work has been made to uncover the role of this receptor in addicted behaviors, its contribution to the rewarding and reinforcing properties of food has yet to be investigated. Using mouse models carrying GR gene inactivation in either dopamine neurons or in dopamine-innervated areas, we found that GR in dopamine responsive neurones is essential to properly build amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. c-Fos quantification in the nucleus accumbens further confirmed defective neuronal activation following amphetamine injection. These diminished neuronal and behavioral responses to amphetamine may involve alterations in glutamate transmission as suggested by the decreased MK801-elicited hyperlocomotion and by the hyporeactivity to glutamate of a subpopulation of medium spiny neurons. In contrast, GR inactivation did not affect rewarding and reinforcing properties of food suggesting that responding for natural reward under basal conditions is preserved in these mice.

  6. Selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially alter the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas, M C; Cabas, I; García-Alcázar, A; Meseguer, J; Mulero, V; García-Ayala, A

    2016-05-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic estrogen used in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen (Tmx), a selective estrogen-receptor modulator used in hormone replacement therapy, and G1, a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) selective agonist, differentially increased the hepatic vitellogenin (vtg) gene expression and altered the immune response in adult gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) males. However, no information exists on the effects of these compounds on the immune response of juveniles. This study aims, for the first time, to investigate the effects of the dietary intake of EE2, Tmx or G1 on the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles and the capacity of the immune system of the specimens to recover its functionality after ceasing exposures (recovery period). The specimens were immunized with hemocyanin in the presence of aluminium adjuvant 1 (group A) or 120 (group B) days after the treatments ceased (dpt). The results indicate that EE2 and Tmx, but not G1, differentially promoted a transient alteration in hepatic vtg gene expression. Although all three compounds did not affect the production of reactive oxygen intermediates, they inhibited the induction of interleukin-1β (il1b) gene expression after priming. Interestingly, although Tmx increased the percentage of IgM-positive cells in both head kidney and spleen during the recovery period, the antibody response of vaccinated fish varied depending on the compound used and when the immunization was administered. Taken together, our results suggest that these compounds differentially alter the capacity of fish to respond to infection during ontogeny and, more interestingly, that the adaptive immune response remained altered to an extent that depends on the compound.

  7. Involvement of mu opioid receptors of periaqueductal gary (PAG) in acupuncture inhibition of noxious blood pressure response in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M; Xu, W; Chen, W; He, L

    1994-01-01

    Strong electric shock stimulation of the rabbit front paw elicited a pressor blood pressure response regarded as noxious response. Ligands of mu opioid receptors were microinjected into the PAG to observe their effects on acupunture inhibition of the pressor response. (1) Ohmefentanyl (OMF), a mu agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor response. Mu antagonist TCTAP greatly enhanced the pressor response. (2) Electroacupuncture (EA) significantly inhibited the pressor response, the inhibition being readily reversed by TCTAP. The response after TCTAP was significantly greater than that of the control before EA. The results suggest that noxious stimulation is able to activate the mu opioid receptor of the PAG to modulate the noxious response and EA is able to enhance the activation.

  8. Association of estrogen receptor-alpha and vitamin D receptor genotypes with therapeutic response to calcium in postmenopausal Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-lin ZHANG; Yue-juan QIN; Qi-ren HUANG; Jin-wei HE; Miao LI; Qi ZHOU; Yun-qiu HU; Yu-juan LIU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between calcium treatment in postmenopausal women and estrogen receptoralpha (ER-alpha) Xba Ⅰ and Pvu Ⅱ genotype and vitamin D receptor (VDR) Apa Ⅰ genotype. METHODS: One hundred fifteen postmenopausal Chinese women of Han population were enrolled and treated with calcichew-D3(1000 mg calcium and 400 U vitamin D3) daily for 1 year. At entry and after 1 year treatment, the bone mineral density (BMD), serum and urinary bone turnover biochemical markers were evaluated. ER-alpha and VDR genotype were analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: After 1 year of calcium supplementation, a significant increase of BMD and a marked reduction in serum ALP and PTH levels, and a significant increase of serum 25-(OH) vitamin D level were observed (P<0.01 or P<0.05). At entry and after 1 year of treatment, no significant association was found between Xba Ⅰ, Pvu Ⅱ, and Apa Ⅰ genotypes and BMD in L1-4,Neck, and Troch, and all bone turnover marker levels. However, the percentage of change (median, QR) in Neck BMD was significantly different in homozygous XX [-4.14 (from -6.54 to -1.34)] in comparison with Xx [1.72(from -1.12 to 3.20)] (P<0.001) or xx [1.22 (from -1.74 to 3.06)] Xba Ⅰ ER-alpha genotype (P=0.001).CONCLUSION: Women with ER-α Xba Ⅰ genotype XX may have a higher risk of relatively fast bone mass loss in femoral neck after menopause and that they may have a poor responsiveness to calcium supplementation. The changes in BMD are not associated with ER-alpha Pvu Ⅱ genotype and VDR Apa Ⅰ genotype after 1 year of calcium supplementation.

  9. Evaluation of GABA Receptors of Ventral Tegmental Area in Cardiovascular Responses in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Rasoulpanah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ventral tegmental area (VTA is well known for its role in cardiovascular control. It is demonstrated that about 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic though their role in cardiovascular control is not yet understood. This study is carried out to find the effects of GABA A and GABA B receptors on cardiovascular response of the VTA. Methods: Experiments were performed on urethane anesthetized male Wistar rats. Drugs were microinjected unilaterally into the VTA. The average changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were compared between the case and the control groups using t test and with the pre-injection values using paired t test. Results: Microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist (500, 1500 and 2500 pmol/100nl into the VTA had no significant effect on MAP and HR compared with the saline group and pre-injection values. Injection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 and 200 pmol/100 nl, a GABAA antagonist, caused a significant increase in the MAP (11.1±1.95mmHg, P<0.5 and a decrease in HR (-32.07±10.2, P<0.01. Microinjection of baclofen a GABAB receptor agonist (500 or 1000 pmole/100 nl and phaclofen a GABAB receptor antagonist (500 or 1000 pmole/100 nl had no significant effects on MAP and HR. Conclusion: For the first time it was demonstrated that GABA system of the VTA inhibits the cardiovascular system through the activation of GABAA but not the GABAB receptors.

  10. α1A-adrenergic receptor mediated pressor response to phenylephrine in anesthetized rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qi; ZHU Weizhong; L(U) Zhizhen; ZHANG Youyi; HAN Qide

    2004-01-01

    To determine which subtype of α1A-adrenergic receptors plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure, with α1A-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in perfused hindlimb as a control, we compared the inhibitory effects of various α1A-adrenergic receptor selective antagonists on the vasopressure responses to phenylephrine between the mean arterial pressure and hindlimb perfusion pressure in anesthetized rats. In Normotensive Wistar rats, the results showed that the inhibitory effects (dose ratios of ED50, Dr) of α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonist (prazosin, Dr 13.5 ± 3.6 vs.15.1 ± 4.3, n = 11), α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonist (5- methyl-urapidil, Dr 2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 3.7 ± 2.3, n = 12; RS-17053, Dr 3.2 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 3.3, n =12) and α1D- adrenoceptor selective antagonist (BMY7378, Dr 1.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.8, n = 8) on phenylephrine- induced increases of perfusion pressure in the autoperfused femoral beds were the same as that in the mean arterial blood pressure in normotensive Wistar rats. The inhibitory effects of antagonists (RS-17053, Dr 3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9, n = 5; BMY7378, Dr 1.7±0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5, n = 8) in spontaneous hypertensive rats were similar with the Wistar rats. These results suggest that the mean arterial pressure induced by phenylephrine was mainly mediated by α1A-adrenergic receptor in both the anesthetized Wistar rats and spontaneous hypertensive rats.

  11. A Salbutamol responsive myopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, A

    2011-05-01

    Background: Reversibility of weakness is rare in inherited muscle disease and suggests a channelopathy as the underlying pathology. Improvement in muscle strength after treatment with beta-adrenergic agonists has been documented in hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis and only very recently in the congenital myasthenic syndromes. The exact mechanism of action is not understood. \\r\

  12. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  13. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathers, C.M.; Spivey, W.H.; Levin, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO.

  14. Intrinsic disorder as a generalizable strategy for the rational design of highly responsive, allosterically cooperative receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anna J.; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Control over the sensitivity with which biomolecular receptors respond to small changes in the concentration of their target ligand is critical for the proper function of many cellular processes. Such control could likewise be of utility in artificial biotechnologies, such as biosensors, genetic logic gates, and “smart” materials, in which highly responsive behavior is of value. In nature, the control of molecular responsiveness is often achieved using “Hill-type” cooperativity, a mechanism in which sequential binding events on a multivalent receptor are coupled such that the first enhances the affinity of the next, producing a steep, higher-order dependence on target concentration. Here, we use an intrinsic-disorder–based mechanism that can be implemented without requiring detailed structural knowledge to rationally introduce this potentially useful property into several normally noncooperative biomolecules. To do so, we fabricate a tandem repeat of the receptor that is destabilized (unfolded) via the introduction of a long, unstructured loop. The first binding event requires the energetically unfavorable closing of this loop, reducing its affinity relative to that of the second binding event, which, in contrast occurs at a preformed site. Using this approach, we have rationally introduced cooperativity into three unrelated DNA aptamers, achieving in the best of these a Hill coefficient experimentally indistinguishable from the theoretically expected maximum. The extent of cooperativity and thus the steepness of the binding transition are, moreover, well modeled as simple functions of the energetic cost of binding-induced folding, speaking to the quantitative nature of this design strategy. PMID:25288724

  15. Diet-induced obesity reduces the responsiveness of the peripheral taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda B Maliphol

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a growing epidemic that causes many serious health related complications. While the causes of obesity are complex, there is conclusive evidence that overconsumption coupled with a sedentary lifestyle is the primary cause of this medical condition. Dietary consumption is controlled by appetite which is in turn regulated by multiple neuronal systems, including the taste system. However, the relationship between taste and obesity has not been well defined. Growing evidence suggests that taste perception in the brain is altered in obese animals and humans, however no studies have determined if there are altered taste responses in the peripheral taste receptor cells, which is the initiation site for the detection and perception of taste stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used C57Bl/6 mice which readily become obese when placed on a high fat diet. After ten weeks on the high fat diet, we used calcium imaging to measure how taste-evoked calcium signals were affected in the obese mice. We found that significantly fewer taste receptor cells were responsive to some appetitive taste stimuli while the numbers of taste cells that were sensitive to aversive taste stimuli did not change. Properties of the taste-evoked calcium signals were also significantly altered in the obese mice. Behavioral analyses found that mice on the high fat diet had reduced ability to detect some taste stimuli compared to their littermate controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that diet-induced obesity significantly influences peripheral taste receptor cell signals which likely leads to changes in the central taste system and may cause altered taste perception.

  16. Attenuated renovascular constrictor responses to angiotensin II in adenosine 1 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Hashimoto, Seiji; Briggs, Josie

    2003-01-01

    In the present experiments we examined the renovascular constrictor effects of ANG II in the chronic and complete absence of A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) using mice with targeted deletion of the A1AR gene. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not different between A1AR +/+ and A1AR -/- mice under...... and increased renal vascular resistance significantly more in A1AR +/+ than in A1AR -/- mice. Perfused afferent arterioles isolated from A1AR +/+ mice constricted in response to bath ANG II with an EC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(-10) mol/l, whereas a right shift in the dose-response relationship with an EC50 of 7.......3 +/- 1.2 x 10(-10) mol/l (P resistance...

  17. Phytoestrogens induce differential estrogen receptor alpha- or Beta-mediated responses in transfected breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D M; Besselink, E; Henning, S M; Go, V L W; Heber, D

    2005-09-01

    Increased intake of phytoestrogens may be associated with a lower risk of cancer in the breast and several other sites, although there is controversy surrounding this activity. One of the mechanisms proposed to explain the activity of phytoestrogens is their ability to bind and activate human estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and human estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Nine phytoestrogens were tested for their ability to transactivate ERalpha or ERbeta at a range of doses. Mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were co-transfected with either ERalpha or ERbeta, and an estrogen-response element was linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Dose-dependent responses were compared with the endogenous ligand 17beta-estradiol. Purified genistein, daidzein, apigenin, and coumestrol showed differential and robust transactivation of ERalpha- and ERbeta-induced transcription, with an up to 100-fold stronger activation of ERbeta. Equol, naringenin, and kaempferol were weaker agonists. When activity was evaluated against a background of 0.5 nM 17beta-estradiol, the addition of genistein, daidzein, and resveratrol superstimulated the system, while kaempferol and quercetin were antagonists at the highest doses. This transfection assay provides an excellent model to evaluate the activation of ERalpha and ERbeta by different phytoestrogens in a breast cancer context and can be used as a screening bioassay tool to evaluate the estrogenic activity of extracts of herbs and foods.

  18. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  19. Receptor pre-clustering and T cell responses: insights into molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eCastro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available T~cell activation, initiated by T~cell receptor (TCR mediated recognition of pathogen derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC, shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR-pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T~cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR-pMHC binding and TCR triggering an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterise the pre-clustering of T~cell receptors (TCRs on the surface of T~cells, motivated by the experimentally-observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T~cells. We extend a recently-introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T~cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signalling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favouring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T~cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models.

  20. Amygdala responses to salient social cues vary with oxytocin receptor genotype in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusak, Hilary A.; Furman, Daniella J.; Kuruvadi, Nisha; Shattuck, David W.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Joshi, Anand A.; Etkin, Amit; Thomason, Moriah E.

    2015-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder are linked to altered limbic morphology, dysregulated neuroendocrine function, and heightened amygdala responses to salient social cues. Oxytocin appears to be a potent modulator of amygdala reactivity and neuroendocrine responses to psychosocial stress. Given these stress regulatory effects, there is increasing interest in understanding the role of oxytocin in vulnerability to stress-related clinical disorders. The present study examines the impact of a common functional variant within the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene (rs2254298) on structure and function of the amygdala in a high-risk sample of urban, low-income, minority youth with a high incidence of early life stress (ELS). Compared to G/G homozygotes, youth carrying the OXTR A-allele showed increased amygdala volume, reduced behavioral performance, and heightened amygdala response during two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks that involved viewing socially-relevant face stimuli. Higher amygdala response was related to ELS in A-alleles carriers but not G/G homozygotes. These findings underscore a series of relationships among a common oxytocin system gene variant, ELS exposure, and structure and function of the amygdala in early life. Heightened amygdala response to salient social cues in OXTR A-allele carriers may elevate risk for emotional psychopathology by increasing amygdala involvement in disambiguating environmental cues, particularly for individuals with ELS. PMID:26477647

  1. Polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor genes influence antibody responses to cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arav-Boger Ravit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is an important medical problem that has yet no current solution. A clinical trial of CMV glycoprotein B (gB vaccine in young women showed promising efficacy. Improved understanding of the basis for prevention of CMV infection is essential for developing improved vaccines. Results We genotyped 142 women previously vaccinated with three doses of CMV gB for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in TLR 1-4, 6, 7, 9, and 10, and their associated intracellular signaling genes. SNPs in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRA and integrins were also selected based on their role in binding gB. Specific SNPs in TLR7 and IKBKE (inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit epsilon were associated with antibody responses to gB vaccine. Homozygous carriers of the minor allele at four SNPs in TLR7 showed higher vaccination-induced antibody responses to gB compared to heterozygotes or homozygotes for the common allele. SNP rs1953090 in IKBKE was associated with changes in antibody level from second to third dose of vaccine; homozygotes for the minor allele exhibited lower antibody responses while homozygotes for the major allele showed increased responses over time. Conclusions These data contribute to our understanding of the immunogenetic mechanisms underlying variations in the immune response to CMV vaccine.

  2. Glucocorticoid receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decrease endocrine and behavioral stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sriparna; Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Dolgas, C Mark; Myers, Brent; Herman, James P

    2014-07-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, leading to adrenocortical secretion of glucocorticoids. The magnitude and duration of the HPA axis response is mediated in large part by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) abundantly expresses the GR and is a key brain region for processing autonomic and endocrine stress responses. This study tests the hypothesis that GR within the NTS plays an important role in inhibiting stress-induced endocrine and behavioral responses. Cohorts of rats received bilateral micropellet (30 μg) implantations of crystalline corticosterone, mifepristone (a GR antagonist) or cholesterol (control) directed into the region of the NTS, and were subsequently subjected to either acute psychogenic (restraint) stress or chronic variable stress (CVS). We found that NTS GR antagonism increased acute stress-induced corticosterone levels, whereas GR activation within the NTS attenuated this response. Following CVS, basal and 15 min post-restraint plasma corticosterone levels were increased by NTS GR antagonism, which was associated with an increase in Fos immunoreactivity within the PVN. Using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), we assessed the effect of NTS GR inhibition on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, respectively. GR inhibition within the NTS decreased open arm exploratory behavior in the EPM and increased immobility in the FST relative to controls. Together, the findings reveal a novel role of NTS GR signaling for inhibiting both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress.

  3. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis.

  4. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

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    Jessica D Cecil

    Full Text Available Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis.

  5. Acute overactive endocannabinoid signaling induces glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and novel cannabinoid receptor 1 responsive genes.

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    Maxwell A Ruby

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids regulate energy balance and lipid metabolism by stimulating the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1. Genetic deletion and pharmacological antagonism have shown that CB1 signaling is necessary for the development of obesity and related metabolic disturbances. However, the sufficiency of endogenously produced endocannabinoids to cause hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, independent of food intake, has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that a single administration of isopropyl dodecylfluorophosphonate (IDFP, perhaps the most potent pharmacological inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, increases hepatic triglycerides (TG and induces insulin resistance in mice. These effects involve increased CB1 signaling, as they are mitigated by pre-administration of a CB1 antagonist (AM251 and in CB1 knockout mice. Despite the strong physiological effects of CB1 on hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, little is known about the downstream targets responsible for these effects. To elucidate transcriptional targets of CB1 signaling, we performed microarrays on hepatic RNA isolated from DMSO (control, IDFP and AM251/IDFP-treated mice. The gene for the secreted glycoprotein lipocalin 2 (lcn2, which has been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance, was among those most responsive to alterations in CB1 signaling. The expression pattern of IDFP mice segregated from DMSO mice in hierarchal cluster analysis and AM251 pre-administration reduced (>50% the majority (303 of 533 of the IDFP induced alterations. Pathway analysis revealed that IDFP altered expression of genes involved in lipid, fatty acid and steroid metabolism, the acute phase response, and amino acid metabolism in a CB1-dependent manner. PCR confirmed array results of key target genes in multiple independent experiments. Overall, we show that acute IDFP treatment induces hepatic TG accumulation and insulin resistance, at least in part through the CB1 receptor, and

  6. Serotonin 1A receptor binding and treatment response in late-life depression.

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    Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; Butters, Meryl A; Ziolko, Scott K; Moses-Kolko, Eydie; Mazumdar, Sati; Mulsant, Benoit H; Houck, Patricia R; Lopresti, Brian J; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Reynolds, Charles F

    2004-12-01

    Depression in late life carries an increased risk of dementia and brittle response to treatment. There is growing evidence to support a key role of the serotonin type 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor as a regulator of treatment response, particularly the 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). We used [11C]WAY 100635 and positron emission tomography (PET) to test our hypothesis that 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the DRN and prefrontal cortex is altered in elderly depressives and that these measures relate to treatment responsivity. We studied 17 elderly subjects with untreated (nonpsychotic, nonbipolar) major depression (four men, 13 women; mean age: 71.4+/-5.9) and 17 healthy control subjects (eight men, nine women; mean age: 70.0+/-6.7). Patients were subsequently treated with paroxetine as part of a clinical trial of maintenance therapies in geriatric depression. [11C]WAY 100635 PET imaging was acquired and binding potential (BP) values derived using compartmental modeling. We observed significantly diminished [11C]WAY 100635 binding in the DRN in depressed (BP = 2.31+/-0.90) relative to control (BP = 3.69+/-1.56) subjects (p = 0.0016). Further, the DRN BP was correlated with pretreatment Hamilton Depression Rating Scores (r = 0.60, p = 0.014) in the depressed cohort. A trend level correlation between DRN binding and time to remission (r = 0.52, p = 0.067) was observed in the 14 depressed patients for whom these data were available. Our finding of decreased [11C]WAY 100635 binding in the brainstem region of the DRN in elderly depressed patients supports evidence of altered 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor function in depression. Further, this work indicates that dysfunction in autoreceptor activity may play a central role in the mechanisms underlying treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in late-life depression.

  7. Reduced emotional and corticosterone responses to stress in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

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    Ide, Soichiro; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Minami, Masabumi; Uhl, George R; Ishihara, Kumatoshi

    2010-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms of emotional modulation in the nervous system by opioids remain to be elucidated, although the opioid system is well known to play important roles in the mechanisms of analgesia and drug dependence. In the present study, we conducted behavioral tests of anxiety and depression and measured corticosterone concentrations in both male and female mu-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice to reveal the involvement of mu-opioid receptors in stress-induced emotional responses. MOP-KO mice entered more and spent more time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze compared with wild-type mice. MOP-KO mice also displayed significantly decreased immobility in a 15 min tail-suspension test compared with wild-type mice. Similarly, MOP-KO mice exhibited significantly decreased immobility on days 2, 3, and 4 in a 6 min forced swim test conducted for 5 consecutive days. The increase in plasma corticosterone concentration induced by tail-suspension, repeated forced swim, or restraint stress was reduced in MOP-KO mice compared with wild-type mice. Corticosterone levels were not different between wild-type and MOP-KO mice before stress exposure. In contrast, although female mice tended to exhibit fewer anxiety-like responses in the tail-suspension test in both genotypes, no significant gender differences were observed in stress-induced emotional responses. These results suggest that MOPs play an important facilitatory role in emotional responses to stress, including anxiety- and depression-like behavior and corticosterone levels.

  8. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  9. The Effects of Serotonin Receptor Antagonists on Contraction and Relaxation Responses Induced by Electrical Stimulation in the Rat Small Intestine

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    Farajian Mashhadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The main source of 5-HT in body is in enterchromafin cells of intestine, different studies mentioned different roles for endogenous 5-HT and receptors involved and it is not clearified the mechanism of action of endogenous 5-HT. Objectives To study the role of endogenous 5-HT on modulation of contraction and relaxation responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS in different regions of the rat intestine. Materials and Methods Segments taken from the rat duodenum, jejunum, mid and terminal ileum were vertically mounted, connected to a transducer and exposed to EFS with different frequencies in the absence and presence of various inhibitors of enteric mediators i. e. specific 5-HT receptor antagonists. Results EFS-induced responses were sensitive to TTX and partly to atropine, indicating a major neuronal involvement and a cholinergic system. Pre-treatment with WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and granisetron up to 10.0 µM, GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, methysergide and ritanserin up to 1.0 µM, failed to modify responses to EFS inall examined tissues. In the presence of SB258585 1.0 µM (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist there was a trend to enhance contraction in the proximal part of the intestine and reduce contraction in the distal part. Pre-treatment with SB269970A 1.0 µM (5-HT7 receptor antagonist induced a greater contractile response to EFS at 0.4 Hz only in the duodenum. Conclusions The application of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists, applied at concentrations lower than 1.0 µM did not modify the EFS-induced contraction and relaxation responses, whichsuggests the unlikely involvement of endogenous 5-HT in mediating responses to EFS in the described test conditions.

  10. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen facilitation of baroreflex heart rate responses in conscious mice.

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    Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Xue, Baojian; Newton, Leslie G; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen facilitates baroreflex heart rate responses evoked by intravenous infusion of ANG II and phenylephrine (PE) in ovariectomized female mice. The present study aims to identify the estrogen receptor subtype involved in mediating these effects of estrogen. Baroreflex responses to PE, ANG II, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were tested in intact and ovariectomized estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) with (OvxE+) or without (OvxE-) estrogen replacement. Wild-type (WT) females homozygous for the ERalpha(+/+) were used as controls. Basal mean arterial pressures (MAP) and heart rates were comparable in all the groups except the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. This group had significantly smaller resting MAP, suggesting an effect of estrogen on resting vascular tone possibly mediated by the ERbeta subtype. Unlike the WT females, estrogen did not facilitate baroreflex heart rate responses to either PE or ANG II in the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. The slope of the line relating baroreflex heart rate decreases with increases in MAP evoked by PE was comparable in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-6.97 +/- 1.4 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1)) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+ (-6.18 +/- 1.3) mice. Likewise, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardic responses to ANG II was similar in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-3.87 +/- 0.5) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+(-2.60 +/- 0.5) females. Data suggest that estrogen facilitation of baroreflex responses to PE and ANG II is predominantly mediated by ERalpha subtype. A second important observation in the present study is that the slope of ANG II-induced baroreflex bradycardia is significantly blunted compared with PE in the intact as well as the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ females. We have previously reported that this ANG II-mediated blunting of cardiac baroreflexes is observed only in WT males and not in ovariectomized WT females independent of their estrogen replacement status. The present data suggest that in females lacking ERalpha, ANG II causes blunting of cardiac baroreflexes similar to males and may be

  11. GSNO Reductase and β2 Adrenergic Receptor Gene-gene Interaction: Bronchodilator Responsiveness to Albuterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Shweta; Que, Loretta G.; Yang, Zhonghui; Liu, Limin; Eng, Celeste; Kim, Sung O.; Kumar, Gunjan; Thyne, Shannon; Chapela, Rocio; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Avila, Pedro C.; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Short-acting inhaled β2-agonists such as albuterol are used for bronchodilation and are the mainstay of asthma treatment worldwide. There is significant variation in bronchodilator responsiveness to albuterol not only between individuals but also across racial/ethnic groups. The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is the target for β2-agonist drugs. The enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), which regulates levels of the endogenous bronchodilator S-nitrosoglutathione, has been shown to modulate the response to β2-agonists. Objective We hypothesized that there are pharmacogenetic interactions between GSNOR and β2AR gene variants which are associated with variable response to albuterol. Methods We performed family-based analyses to test for association between GSNOR gene variants and asthma and related phenotypes in 609 Puerto Rican and Mexican families with asthma. In addition, we tested these subjects for pharmacogenetic interaction between GSNOR and β2AR gene variants and responsiveness to albuterol using linear regression. Cell transfection experiments were performed to test the potential effect of the GSNOR gene variants. Results Among Puerto Ricans, several GSNOR SNPs and a haplotype in the 3′UTR were significantly associated with increased risk for asthma and lower bronchodilator responsiveness (p = 0.04 to 0.007). The GSNOR risk haplotype affects expression of GSNOR mRNA and protein, suggesting a gain of function. Furthermore, gene-gene interaction analysis provided evidence of pharmacogenetic interaction between GSNOR and β2AR gene variants and the response to albuterol in Puerto Rican (p = 0.03), Mexican (p = 0.15) and combined Puerto Rican and Mexican asthmatics (p = 0.003). Specifically, GSNOR+17059*β2AR+46 genotype combinations (TG+GG*AG and TG+GG*GG) were associated with lower bronchodilator response. Conclusion Genotyping of GSNOR and β2AR genes may be a useful in identifying Latino subjects, who might benefit from adjuvant

  12. Age-dependent maturation of Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine responses in Gambian infants.

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    Sarah Burl

    Full Text Available The global burden of neonatal and infant mortality due to infection is staggering, particularly in resource-poor settings. Early childhood vaccination is one of the major interventions that can reduce this burden, but there are specific limitations to inducing effective immunity in early life, including impaired neonatal leukocyte production of Th1-polarizing cytokines to many stimuli. Characterizing the ontogeny of Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated innate immune responses in infants may shed light on susceptibility to infection in this vulnerable age group, and provide insights into TLR agonists as candidate adjuvants for improved neonatal vaccines. As little is known about the leukocyte responses of infants in resource-poor settings, we characterized production of Th1-, Th2-, and anti-inflammatory-cytokines in response to agonists of TLRs 1-9 in whole blood from 120 Gambian infants ranging from newborns (cord blood to 12 months of age. Most of the TLR agonists induced TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in cord blood. The greatest TNFα responses were observed for TLR4, -5, and -8 agonists, the highest being the thiazoloquinoline CLO75 (TLR7/8 that also uniquely induced cord blood IFNγ production. For most agonists, TLR-mediated TNFα and IFNγ responses increased from birth to 1 month of age. TLR8 agonists also induced the greatest production of the Th1-polarizing cytokines TNFα and IFNγ throughout the first year of life, although the relative responses to the single TLR8 agonist and the combined TLR7/8 agonist changed with age. In contrast, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 responses to most agonists were robust at birth and remained stable through 12 months of age. These observations provide fresh insights into the ontogeny of innate immunity in African children, and may inform development of age-specific adjuvanted vaccine formulations important for global health.

  13. Race and sex differences in cardiovascular α-adrenergic and β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in men and women with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Andrew; Hill, LaBarron K; Blumenthal, James A; Johnson, Kristy S; Hinderliter, Alan L

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension is associated with unfavorable changes in adrenergic receptor responsiveness, but the relationship of race and sex to adrenergic receptor responsiveness in the development of cardiovascular disease is unclear. This study examined α-adrenergic and ß-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in African-American and white men and women with untreated high blood pressure (BP) (HBP) and with normal BP. The study sample comprised 161 African-American and white men and women in the age range 25-45 years. Isoproterenol, a nonselective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist, was administered intravenously to determine the bolus dose required to increase heart rate by 25 bpm, an index of β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. Similarly, phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, was administered to determine the bolus dose required to increase BP by 25 mmHg, an index of vascular α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. HBP (P responsiveness, with a similar trend observed for African-American race (P = 0.07). Conversely, α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness was increased in association with HBP (P responsiveness, whereas conversely α1-adrenergic receptors exhibit increased responsiveness. This pattern of receptor changes is especially evident in men and African-Americans, is exacerbated by obesity, and may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Further neuroendocrine evidence of enhanced vasopressin V3 receptor responses in melancholic depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, T G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In situations of chronic stress vasopressin plays an important role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of anterior pituitary vasopressin V3 receptors in maintaining the hypercortisolism seen in melancholic depression. METHOD: Fourteen patients with major depression and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy comparison subjects were recruited. Desmopressin (ddAVP) 10 microg was given intravenously and ACTH and cortisol release was monitored for 120 min. RESULTS: The mean +\\/- S.E.M. ACTH response in the depressives was 28.4 +\\/- 4.3 ng\\/l and in the healthy subjects was 18.8 +\\/- 4.9 ng\\/l (P = 0.04). The mean +\\/- S.E.M. cortisol response in the depressives was 261.8 +\\/- 46.5 nmol\\/l and in the healthy subjects was 107.3 +\\/- 26.1 nmol\\/l (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with major depression have augmented ACTH and cortisol responses to desmopressin indicating enhanced V3 responsivity.

  15. Androgen receptor status predicts response to chemotherapy, not risk of breast cancer in Indian women

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    Chakraborty Anurupa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerably little is known about the biological role and clinical significance of androgen receptor expression in breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to characterize AR-CAG repeat genotypes in a cohort of women with breast cancer and to determine the influence of AR on response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and clinical outcome. Materials and methods Genotyping of the AR CAG repeat region was done on 70 patients and 80 healthy aged- matched female controls. To assess response to NACT, tissue samples from 30 LABC cases were evaluated quantitatively by real time for AR mRNA expression. The clinical response was correlated with both the pre and post chemotherapy AR expression. The CAG alleles did not show differences between cases and controls when the mean of short, long and average length of both CAG alleles was considered. However, analysis when done defining short allele as CAGn Conclusions Although, expansion of the CAGn in the AR gene doesn't show any major effect on breast cancer risk, patients with positive AR expression, pre neoadjuvant chemotherapy, were found to be good responders and a decrease in mRNA level of AR gene related to the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis could serve as an important independent predictor of response to NACT.

  16. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.

  17. Toll-like receptor 7 controls the anti-retroviral germinal center response.

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    Edward P Browne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines that can enhance immunity to viral pathogens is an important goal. However, the innate molecular pathways that regulate the strength and quality of the immune response remain largely uncharacterized. To define the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling in control of a model retroviral pathogen, Friend virus (FV, I generated mice in which the TLR signaling adapter Myd88 was selectively deleted in dendritic cell (DC or in B cell lineages. Deletion of Myd88 in DCs had little effect on immune control of FV, while B cell specific deletion of Myd88 caused a dramatic increase in viral infectious centers and a significantly reduced antibody response, indicating that B cell-intrinsic TLR signaling plays a crucial role, while TLR signaling in DCs is less important. I then identified the single-stranded RNA sensing protein TLR7 as being required for antibody-mediated control of FV by analyzing mice deficient in TLR7. Remarkably, B cells in infected TLR7-deficient mice upregulated CD69 and CD86 early in infection, but failed to develop into germinal center B cells. CD4 T cell responses were also attenuated in the absence of TLR7, but CD8 responses were TLR7 independent, suggesting the existence of additional pathways for detection of retroviral particles. Together these results demonstrate that the vertebrate immune system detects retroviruses in vivo via TLR7 and that this pathway regulates a key checkpoint controlling development of germinal center B cells.

  18. Inhibition of a slow synaptic response by a metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Lüthi, A; Gähwiler, B H

    1993-11-22

    The effects of a novel antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors were investigated in CA3 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slice cultures of the rat. Earlier experiments showed that selective activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors with low concentrations of an agonist, 1S, 3R-1-amino-cyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), induced an inward current associated with a decrease in membrane conductance and inhibition of the slow calcium-dependent potassium current. These responses were strongly and reversibly reduced by the antagonist, (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 0.5-1 mM). In the presence of antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors, stimulation of the afferent mossy fibres evoked postsynaptic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells which paralleled those observed with exogenously applied metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, i.e. a slow inward current and a reduction of calcium-dependent potassium current. Both responses were greatly reduced by bath-applied MCPG (1 mM). These results show that MCPG acts as an effective antagonist at metabotropic glutamate receptors coupled to potassium conductances in the hippocampus. Furthermore, they confirm that glutamate release from presynaptic terminals can modulate postsynaptic properties by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  19. Exercício físico, receptores β-adrenérgicos e resposta vascular Physical exercise, β-adrenergic receptors, and vascular response

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    Alexandre Sérgio Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O exercício aeróbio promove efeitos benéficos na prevenção e tratamento de doenças como hipertensão arterial, aterosclerose, insuficiência venosa e doença arterial periférica. Os receptores β-adrenérgicos estão presentes em várias células. No sistema cardiovascular, promovem inotropismo e cronotropismo positivo cardíaco e relaxamento vascular. Embora os efeitos do exercício tenham sido investigados em receptores cardíacos, estudos focados nos vasos são escassos e controversos. Esta revisão abordará os efeitos do exercício físico sobre os receptores β-adrenérgicos vasculares em modelos animais e humanos e os mecanismos celulares envolvidos na resposta relaxante. Em geral, os estudos mostram resultantes conflitantes, onde observam diminuição, aumento ou nenhum efeito do exercício físico sobre a resposta relaxante. Assim, os efeitos do exercício na sensibilidade β-adrenérgica vascular merecem maior atenção, e os resultados mostram que a área de fisiopatologia vascular é um campo aberto para a descoberta de novos compostos e avanços na prática clínica.Aerobic exercise promotes beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of diseases such as arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, venous insufficiency, and peripheral arterial disease. β-adrenergic receptors are present in a variety of cells. In the cardiovascular system, β-adrenergic receptors promote positive inotropic and chronotropic response and vasorelaxation. Although the effect of exercise training has been largely studied in the cardiac tissue, studies focused on the vascular tissue are rare and controversial. This review examines the data from studies using animal and human models to determine the effect of physical exercise on the relaxing response mediated by β-adrenergic receptors as well as the cellular mechanisms involved in this response. Studies have shown reduction, increase, or no effect of physical exercise on the relaxing response

  20. A translational approach to clinical practice via stress-responsive glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustini, Bruno; Cleare, Anthony J.; Young, Allan H.

    2017-01-01

    A recent article by Kwan and colleagues could elegantly demonstrate the necessary interaction between neuronal serotonin (5-HT) systems and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), producing an adequate stress response, in this case, responding to hypoxia with an increase in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). There is an intricate system connecting brain, body and mind and this exchange is only possible when all these systems—nervous, endocrine, and immune—have receptors on critical cells to receive information (via messenger molecules) from each of the other systems. There is evidence that the expression and function of GR in the hippocampus, mainly MR, is regulated by the stimulation of 5-HT receptors. Stressful stimuli increase 5-HT release and turnover in the hippocampus, and it seems reasonable to suggest that some of the changes in mineralocorticoid and GR expression may be mediated, in part at least, by the increase in 5-HT. Also serotonin and HPA axis dysfunctions have already been implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Early life stress (ELS) can have profound impact on these systems and can predispose subjects to a variety of adult metabolic and psychiatric conditions. It is important to analyze the mechanisms of this complex interaction and its subsequent programming effects on the stress systems, so that we can find new ways and targets for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Different areas of research on basic biological sciences are now being integrated and this approach will hopefully provide several new insights, new pharmacological targets and improve our global understanding of these highly debilitating chronic conditions, that we now call mental disorders. PMID:28275643

  1. Telomerase activity, estrogen receptors (α, β), Bcl-2 expression in human breast cancer and treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Ortiz, Blanca; Astudillo-De la Vega, Horacio; Castillo-Medina, Sebastian; Malacara, JM; Benitez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Background The mechanism for maintaining telomere integrity is controlled by telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that specifically restores telomere sequences, lost during replication by means of an intrinsic RNA component as a template for polymerization. Among the telomerase subunits, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) is expressed concomitantly with the activation of telomerase. The role of estrogens and their receptors in the transcriptional regulation of hTERT has been demonstrated. The current study determines the possible association between telomerase activity, the expression of both molecular forms of estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) and the protein bcl-2, and their relative associations with clinical parameters. Methods Tissue samples from 44 patients with breast cancer were used to assess telomerase activity using the TRAP method and the expression of ERα, ERβ and bcl-2 by means of immunocytochemical techniques. Results Telomerase activity was detected in 59% of the 44 breast tumors examined. Telomerase activity ranged from 0 to 49.93 units of total product generated (TPG). A correlation was found between telomerase activity and differentiation grade (p = 0.03). The only significant independent marker of response to treatment was clinical stage. We found differences between the frequency of expression of ERα (88%) and ERβ (36%) (p = 0.007); bcl-2 was expressed in 79.5% of invasive breast carcinomas. We also found a significant correlation between low levels of telomerase activity and a lack of ERβ expression (p = 0.03). Conclusion Lower telomerase activity was found among tumors that did not express estrogen receptor beta. This is the first published study demonstrating that the absence of expression of ERβ is associated with low levels of telomerase activity. PMID:16911782

  2. Telomerase activity, estrogen receptors (α, β, Bcl-2 expression in human breast cancer and treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malacara JM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism for maintaining telomere integrity is controlled by telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that specifically restores telomere sequences, lost during replication by means of an intrinsic RNA component as a template for polymerization. Among the telomerase subunits, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase is expressed concomitantly with the activation of telomerase. The role of estrogens and their receptors in the transcriptional regulation of hTERT has been demonstrated. The current study determines the possible association between telomerase activity, the expression of both molecular forms of estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ and the protein bcl-2, and their relative associations with clinical parameters. Methods Tissue samples from 44 patients with breast cancer were used to assess telomerase activity using the TRAP method and the expression of ERα, ERβ and bcl-2 by means of immunocytochemical techniques. Results Telomerase activity was detected in 59% of the 44 breast tumors examined. Telomerase activity ranged from 0 to 49.93 units of total product generated (TPG. A correlation was found between telomerase activity and differentiation grade (p = 0.03. The only significant independent marker of response to treatment was clinical stage. We found differences between the frequency of expression of ERα (88% and ERβ (36% (p = 0.007; bcl-2 was expressed in 79.5% of invasive breast carcinomas. We also found a significant correlation between low levels of telomerase activity and a lack of ERβ expression (p = 0.03. Conclusion Lower telomerase activity was found among tumors that did not express estrogen receptor beta. This is the first published study demonstrating that the absence of expression of ERβ is associated with low levels of telomerase activity.

  3. Partial blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in recurrently hypoglycemic rats.

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    LaGamma, Edmund F; Kirtok, Necla; Chan, Owen; Nankova, Bistra B

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia can impair the normal counterregulatory hormonal responses that guard against hypoglycemia, leading to hypoglycemia unawareness. This pathological condition known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main adverse consequence that prevents individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus from attaining the long-term health benefits of tight glycemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the progressive loss of the epinephrine response to subsequent bouts of hypoglycemia, a hallmark sign of HAAF, are largely unknown. Normally, hypoglycemia triggers both the release and biosynthesis of epinephrine through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) on the adrenal glands. We hypothesize that excessive cholinergic stimulation may contribute to impaired counterregulation. Here, we tested whether administration of the nAChR partial agonist cytisine to reduce postganglionic synaptic activity can preserve the counterregulatory hormone responses in an animal model of HAAF. Compared with nicotine, cytisine has limited efficacy to activate nAChRs and stimulate epinephrine release and synthesis. We evaluated adrenal catecholamine production and secretion in nondiabetic rats subjected to two daily episodes of hypoglycemia for 3 days, followed by a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp on day 4. Recurrent hypoglycemia decreased epinephrine responses, and this was associated with suppressed TH mRNA induction (a measure of adrenal catecholamine synthetic capacity). Treatment with cytisine improved glucagon responses as well as epinephrine release and production in recurrently hypoglycemic animals. These data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of ganglionic nAChRs may be promising as a translational adjunctive therapy to avoid HAAF in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Clomipramine enhances the cortisol response to 5-HTP: implications for the therapeutic role of 5-HT2 receptors.

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    Sargent, P A; Quested, D J; Cowen, P J

    1998-11-01

    We measured the cortisol response to the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan, (5-HTP) in seven patients with major depression before and after 8 weeks treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine. The cortisol response to 5-HTP was significantly increased following clomipramine treatment, suggesting that clomipramine, like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), enhances this 5-HT2 receptor mediated response. Because other tricyclic antidepressants do not increase 5-HTP-mediated cortisol release, it seems unlikely that enhancement of 5-HT2 receptor function is a critical mechanism for antidepressant action. However, facilitation of neurotransmission at 5-HT2 receptors could account for the efficacy of clomipramine and SSRIs in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder and also for their liability to cause orgasmic dysfunction.

  5. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

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    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  6. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

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    James J Burston

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2 receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation

  7. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burston, James J; Sagar, Devi Rani; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng; King, Emma; Brailsford, Louis; Turner, Jenna M; Hathway, Gareth J; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Kendall, David A; Lichtman, Aron; Chapman, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation of chronic OA

  8. Biphasic Effects of Cannabinoids in Anxiety Responses: CB1 and GABAB Receptors in the Balance of GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurotransmission

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    Rey, Alejandro Aparisi; Purrio, Martin; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Lutz, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Biphasic effects of cannabinoids have been shown in processes such as feeding behavior, motor activity, motivational processes and anxiety responses. Using two different tests for the characterization of anxiety-related behavior (elevated plus-maze and holeboard), we first identified in wild-type C57BL/6N mice, two doses of the synthetic CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist CP-55,940 with anxiolytic (1 μg/kg) and anxiogenic properties (50 μg/kg), respectively. To clarify the role of CB1 receptors in this biphasic effect, both doses were applied to two different conditional CB1 receptor knockout (KO) mouse lines, GABA-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in forebrain GABAergic neurons) and Glu-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in cortical glutamatergic neurons). We found that the anxiolytic-like effects of the low dose of cannabinoids are mediated via the CB1 receptor on cortical glutamatergic terminals, because this anxiolytic-like response was abrogated only in Glu-CB1-KO mice. On the contrary, the CB1 receptor on the GABAergic terminals is required to induce an anxiogenic-like effect under a high-dose treatment because of the fact that this effect was abolished specifically in GABA-CB1-KO mice. These experiments were carried out in both sexes, and no differences occurred with the doses tested in the mutant mice. Interestingly, the positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptor with GS-39783 was found to largely abrogate the anxiogenic-like effect of the high dose of CP-55,940. Our results shed new light in further understanding the biphasic effects of cannabinoids at the molecular level and, importantly, pave the way for the development of novel anxiolytic cannabinoid drugs, which may have favorable effect profiles targeting the CB1 receptor on glutamatergic terminals. PMID:22850737

  9. Progesterone receptor expression declines in the guinea pig uterus during functional progesterone withdrawal and in response to prostaglandins.

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    Toni N Welsh

    Full Text Available Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone

  10. Differential CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor-inotropic response of rat isolated atria: endogenous signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Del Zar, Claudia F; Borda, Enri

    2005-06-15

    In this study, we have determined the contractile effects of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation on rat isolated atria and the different signaling pathways involved. Anandamide did not has significantly effect on atria contractility, however, the treatment with both CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists, the endocannabinoids triggered stimulation or inhibition on contractility respectively. The ACEA stimulation of CB1 receptor exerted decrease on contractility, that significantly correlated with the decrement of cAMP and the stimulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the accumulation of cyclic GMP (cGMP). On the contrary, JWH 015 stimulation of CB2 receptor triggered positive contractile response that significantly correlated with the increase cAMP production. The inhibiton of adenylate cyclase activity impaired the JWH 015 activation of CB1 receptor induced positive contractile effect, while inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), NOS and soluble nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive guanylate cyclase blocked the dose-response curves of ACEA on contractility. Those inhibitors also attenuated the CB1 receptor-dependent increase in activation of NOS and cGMP accumulation. These results suggest that CB2 receptor agonist mediated positive contractile effect associated with increased production on cAMP while CB1 receptor agonist mediated decrease on contractility associated with decreased cAMP accumulation and increase production of NO and cGMP; that occur secondarily to stimulation of PLC, NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase. Data give pharmacological evidence for the existence of functional CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in rat isolated atria and may contribute to a better understanding the effects of cannabinoids in the cardiovascular system.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors impair innate immune responses to Toll-like receptor agonists and to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thierry; Lugrin, Jérôme; Le Roy, Didier; Goy, Geneviève; Mombelli, Matteo; Koessler, Thibaud; Ding, Xavier C; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Reymond, Marlies Knaup; Miconnet, Isabelle; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Calandra, Thierry

    2011-01-27

    Regulated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs), histone acetylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling chromatin structure, DNA accessibility, and gene expression. HDAC inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells and are used as anticancer agents. Here we describe the effects of HDAC inhibitors on microbial sensing by macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and host defenses against infection in vivo. HDAC inhibitors down-regulated the expression of numerous host defense genes, including pattern recognition receptors, kinases, transcription regulators, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and costimulatory molecules as assessed by genome-wide microarray analyses or innate immune responses of macrophages and dendritic cells stimulated with Toll-like receptor agonists. HDAC inhibitors induced the expression of Mi-2β and enhanced the DNA-binding activity of the Mi-2/NuRD complex that acts as a transcriptional repressor of macrophage cytokine production. In vivo, HDAC inhibitors increased the susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections but conferred protection against toxic and septic shock. Thus, these data identify an essential role for HDAC inhibitors in the regulation of the expression of innate immune genes and host defenses against microbial pathogens.

  12. Gold-nanoparticle-based assay for instantaneous detection of nuclear hormone receptor-response elements interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yen Nee; Su, Xiaodi; Liu, Edison T; Thomsen, Jane S

    2010-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as colorimetric probes for biosensing, relying on their unique particle size-dependent and/or interparticle distance-dependent extinction spectrum and solution color. Herein, we describe an AuNP-based colorimetric assay to detect binding interactions between nuclear hormone receptors and their corresponding DNA-binding elements, particularly the human estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) and their cognate estrogen response elements (EREs). We found that the protein-DNA (ER-ERE) complexes can stabilize citrate anion-capped AuNPs against salt-induced aggregation to a larger extent than the protein (ER) or the DNA (ERE) alone, due to their unique molecular size and charge properties that provide a strong electrosteric protection. Moreover, our results show that the extent of stabilization is sequence-dependent and can distinguish a single base variation in the ERE associated with minor changes in protein-DNA binding affinity. With this assay, many important parameters of protein-DNA binding events (e.g., sequence selectivity, distinct DNA binding properties of protein subtypes, binding stoichiometry, and sequence-independent transient binding) can be determined instantly without using labels, tedious sample preparations, and sophisticated instrumentation. These benefits, in particular the high-throughput potential, could enable this assay to become the assay of choice to complement conventional techniques for large scale characterization of protein-DNA interactions, a key aspect in biological research.

  13. Estrogen receptor genes in gastropods: phylogenetic divergence and gene expression responses to a synthetic estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Hansson, Maria C

    2016-11-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to affect development and reproduction in gastropods. However, one is today lacking basic understanding of the Molluscan endocrine system and one can therefore not fully explain these EDC-induced affects. Furthermore, only a few genes that potentially may be connected to the endocrine system have been sequenced in gastropods. An example is the estrogen receptor gene (er) that have been identified in a restricted number of freshwater and marine gastropods. Here, we have identified a new partial coding sequence of an estrogen receptor gene (er) in the European common heterobranch Radix balthica. The following phylogenetic analysis divided the ers of heterobranchs and ceanogastropods in two branches. Furthermore, exposure to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) showed that exposure could significantly affect er expression level in the heterobranch R. balthica. This paper is the first that phylogenetically compares gastropods' er, basal er expression profiles, and transcriptional estrogenic responses in gastropods from two different evolutionary groups.

  14. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  15. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa; Herr, Christian; Niederstraßer, Julia; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy)-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage.

  16. Maternal endotoxin-induced fetal growth restriction in rats: Fetal responses in toll-like receptor

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    Banun Kusumawardani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis as a major etiology of periodontal disease can produce virulence factor, lipopolysaccharide/LPS, which is expected to play a role in the intrauterine fetal growth. Trophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface actively participates in response to infection through the expression of a family of natural immune receptors, toll-like receptor (TLR. Purpose: the aims of study were to identify endotoxin concentration in maternal blood serum of Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected pregnant rats, to characterize the TLR-4 expression in trophoblast cells, and to determine its effect on fetal growth. Methods: Female rats were infected with live-Porphyromonas gingivalis at concentration of 2 x 109 cells/ml into subgingival sulcus area of the maxillary first molar before and/or during pregnancy. They were sacrified on 14th and 20th gestational day. Fetuses were evaluated for weight and length. Endotoxin was detected by limulus amebocyte lysate assay in the maternal blood serum. The TLR-4 expression in trophoblast cells was detected by immunohistochemistry. Impaired renal vascular response to a D-1-like receptor agonist but not to an ACE inhibitor in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P.A.M.; Navis, Ger Jan; De Jong, P.E.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    1999-01-01

    The natriuretic response to a dopamine 1-like receptor agonist is blunted in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Whether the renal vasodilator response to D-1-like receptor stimulation in SHRs is defective also is unclear. To determine whether the renal hemodynamic response to a D-1-like recepto

  17. Suppression of the inflammatory response in experimental arthritis is mediated via estrogen receptor alpha but not estrogen receptor beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulos, John; Vijn, Peter; van Doorn, Cindy; Hofstra, Claudia L.; Veening-Griffioen, Desiree; de Graaf, Jan; Dijcks, Fred A.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The immune modulatory role of estrogens in inflammation is complex. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogens have been described. Estrogens bind both estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and beta. The contribution of ER alpha and ER beta to ER-mediated immune modulation was studied

  18. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Moeldrup, A.; Serup, P.; Nielsen, J.H. (Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)); Mathews, L.S.; Norstedt, G. (Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden))

    1990-09-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells.

  19. Acute-phase responses in transgenic mice with CNS overexpression of IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, J; Sundgren-Andersson, A K; Tingsborg, S; Ostlund, P; Engfors, C; Alheim, K; Bartfai, T; Iverfeldt, K; Schultzberg, M

    1999-03-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is an endogenous antagonist that blocks the effects of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta by occupying the type I IL-1 receptor. Here we describe transgenic mice with astrocyte-directed overexpression of the human secreted IL-1ra (hsIL-1ra) under the control of the murine glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Two GFAP-hsIL-1ra strains have been generated and characterized further: GILRA2 and GILRA4. These strains show a brain-specific expression of the hsIL-1ra at the mRNA and protein levels. The hsIL-1ra protein was approximated to approximately 50 ng/brain in cytosolic fractions of whole brain homogenates, with no differences between male and female mice or between the two strains. Furthermore, the protein is secreted, inasmuch as the concentration of hsIL-1ra in the cerebrospinal fluid was 13 (GILRA2) to 28 (GILRA4) times higher in the transgenic mice than in the control animals. To characterize the transgenic phenotype, GILRA mice and nontransgenic controls were injected with recombinant human IL-1beta (central injection) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, peripheral injection). The febrile response elicited by IL-1beta (50 ng/mouse icv) was abolished in hsIL-1ra-overexpressing animals, suggesting that the central IL-1 receptors were occupied by antagonist. The peripheral LPS injection (25 micrograms/kg ip) triggered a fever in overexpressing and control animals. Moreover, no differences were found in LPS-induced (100 and 1,000 micrograms/kg ip; 1 and 6 h after injection) IL-1beta and IL-6 serum levels between GILRA and wild-type mice. On the basis of these results, we suggest that binding of central IL-1 to central IL-1 receptors is not important in LPS-induced fever or LPS-induced IL-1beta and IL-6 plasma levels.

  1. The role of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in the apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, D; Antolovich, M; Smith, K M

    2001-08-01

    Several previous studies have suggested that the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) on the mitochondrial surface was an important target for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study we compared PBR affinity vs photodynamic efficacy of protoporphyrin-IX (PP-IX) and two structural analogs, PP-III and PP-XIII, using murine leukemia L1210 cells in culture. The results indicate that the three agents have approximately equal hydrophobicity, affinity for L1210 cells and ability to initiate photodamage leading to an apoptotic response. But only PP-IX had significant affinity for the PBR. These data indicate that the relationship between PDT efficacy and PBR affinity may hold only for sensitizers with the PP-IX configuration.

  2. Resveratrol modulates the inflammatory response via an estrogen receptor-signal integration network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Srinivasan, Sathish; Bruno, Nelson E; Parent, Alexander A; Hughes, Travis S; Pollock, Julie A; Gjyshi, Olsi; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Houtman, René; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Conkright, Michael D; Nettles, Kendall W

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has beneficial effects on aging, inflammation and metabolism, which are thought to result from activation of the lysine deacetylase, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the cAMP pathway, or AMP-activated protein kinase. In this study, we report that resveratrol acts as a pathway-selective estrogen receptor-α (ERα) ligand to modulate the inflammatory response but not cell proliferation. A crystal structure of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) as a complex with resveratrol revealed a unique perturbation of the coactivator-binding surface, consistent with an altered coregulator recruitment profile. Gene expression analyses revealed significant overlap of TNFα genes modulated by resveratrol and estradiol. Furthermore, the ability of resveratrol to suppress interleukin-6 transcription was shown to require ERα and several ERα coregulators, suggesting that ERα functions as a primary conduit for resveratrol activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02057.001 PMID:24771768

  3. Sex, Receptors and Attachment: A Review of Individual Factors Influencing Response to Oxytocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai S Macdonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As discussed in the larger review in this special issue (MacDonald and Feifel, intranasal oxytocin (IN OT is demonstrating a growing potential as a therapeutic agent in psychiatry. Importantly, research suggests that a variety of individual factors may influence a person’s response to OT. In this mini-review, I provides a review of three: (1 sex and hormonal status; (2 genetic variation in aspects of the OT system (i.e. OT receptors; and (3 attachment history. Each of these factors will be important to monitor as we strive to develop a richer understanding of OT's role in human development, brain-based disease, and the potential for individualized, OT-targeted treatments.

  4. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is associated with the cortisol awakening response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Gustav R; Fisher, Patrick M; Dyssegaard, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin signalling is considered critical for an appropriate and dynamic adaptation to stress. Previously, we have shown that prefrontal serotonin transporter (SERT) binding is positively associated with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) (Frokjaer et al., 2013), which is an index...... and serotonin signaling in vivo in humans. We suggest that higher synaptic serotonin concentration, here indexed by lower 5-HT4r binding, supports HPA-axis dynamics, which in healthy volunteers is reflected by a robust CAR....... of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis output dynamics. Here, we investigated in healthy individuals if cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4r) binding, reported to be a proxy for serotonin levels, is associated with CAR. Thirty healthy volunteers (25 males, age range 20-56 years) underwent 5-HT4r PET...

  5. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  6. Public T cell receptors confer high-avidity CD4 responses to HIV controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, Daniela; Galperin, Moran; Lambotte, Olivier; Gras, Stéphanie; Lim, Annick; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Nouël, Alexandre; Campbell, Kristy-Anne; Lemercier, Brigitte; Claireaux, Mathieu; Hendou, Samia; Lechat, Pierre; de Truchis, Pierre; Boufassa, Faroudy; Rossjohn, Jamie; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Chakrabarti, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    The rare patients who are able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of therapy show signs of a particularly efficient cellular immune response. To identify the molecular determinants that underlie this response, we characterized the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire directed at Gag293, the most immunoprevalent CD4 epitope in the HIV-1 capsid. HIV controllers from the ANRS CODEX cohort showed a highly skewed TCR repertoire that was characterized by a predominance of TRAV24 and TRBV2 variable genes, shared CDR3 motifs, and a high frequency of public clonotypes. The most prevalent public clonotypes generated TCRs with affinities at the higher end of values reported for naturally occurring TCRs. The high-affinity Gag293-specific TCRs were cross-restricted by up to 5 distinct HLA-DR alleles, accounting for the expression of these TCRs in HIV controllers of diverse genetic backgrounds. Transfer of these TCRs to healthy donor CD4+ T cells conferred high antigen sensitivity and polyfunctionality, thus recapitulating key features of the controller CD4 response. Transfer of a high-affinity Gag293-specific TCR also redirected CD8+ T cells to target HIV-1 capsid via nonconventional MHC II restriction. Together, these findings indicate that TCR clonotypes with superior functions are associated with HIV control. Amplification or transfer of such clonotypes may contribute to immunotherapeutic approaches aiming at a functional HIV cure.

  7. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data. PMID:26029367

  8. Ethnic differences in response to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Emiliano; Baselga, José

    2006-05-10

    The identification of somatic mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and their correlation with response to EGFR inhibitors has become an important event in the fields of cancer genetics and therapeutics. The initial observation of a higher response to gefitinib and erlotinib in patients of Asian origin was followed by the discovery that they harbor more frequent EGFR mutations in NSCLC; this raises the issue of ethnic diversity in the pathogenesis of given tumors. In a similar fashion, amplification of the closely related HER2 gene, which could also have implications for the treatment of NSCLC, is also more frequent in East Asian patients. On the other hand, EGFR gene amplification may be more prevalent in Western populations. The implication of these findings is that ethnicity may indicate different genetic backgrounds in common tumors that may influence clinical outcome and response to therapy. Therefore, in clinical trials with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and other molecular-targeted therapies, the inclusion of a global population appears to be required.

  9. GH deficiency status combined with GH receptor polymorphism affects response to GH in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsesia, Armand; Chatelain, Pierre; Stevens, Adam; Peterkova, Valentina A; Belgorosky, Alicia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Antoniazzi, Franco; Koledova, Ekaterina; Wojcik, Jerome; Farmer, Pierre; Destenaves, Benoit; Clayton, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Meta-analysis has shown a modest improvement in first-year growth response to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) for carriers of the exon 3-deleted GH receptor (GHRd3) polymorphism but with significant interstudy variability. The associations between GHRd3 and growth response to r-hGH over 3 years in relation to severity of GH deficiency (GHD) were investigated in patients from 14 countries. Treatment-naïve pre-pubertal children with GHD were enrolled from the PREDICT studies (NCT00256126 and NCT00699855), categorized by peak GH level (peak GH) during provocation test: ≤4 μg/l (severe GHD; n=45) and >4 to GH level. GH peak level (higher vs lower) and GHRd3 (fl/fl vs d3 carriers) combined status was associated with height change over 3 years (PGH had lower growth than subjects with fl/fl (median difference after 3 years -3.3 cm; -0.3 SDS). Conversely, GHRd3 carriers with higher peak GH had better growth (+2.7 cm; +0.2 SDS). Similar patterns were observed for GH-dependent biomarkers. GE profiles were significantly different between the groups, indicating that the interaction between GH status and GHRd3 carriage can be identified at a transcriptomic level. This study demonstrates that responses to r-hGH depend on the interaction between GHD severity and GHRd3 carriage.

  10. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh, which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic and allergen-induced (extrinsic airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax or minimally (AIRmin to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation.

  11. Activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2012-09-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A(1) receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it is likely that adenosine operating via A(1) receptors in the NTS may differentially inhibit regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors. Therefore, in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 37) we compared regional sympathoinhibition evoked by the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (activated with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT(3) receptor agonist phenylbiguanide, PBG, 1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors [microinjections of N(6)-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl]. Activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors evoked differential, dose-dependent sympathoinhibition (RSNA>ASNA>LSNA), and decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. These differential sympathetic responses were uniformly attenuated in dose-dependent manner by microinjections of CPA into the NTS. Volume control (n = 11) and blockade of adenosine receptor subtypes in the NTS via 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT, 1 nmol in 100 nl) (n = 9) did not affect the reflex responses. We conclude that activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors uniformly inhibits neural and cardiovascular cardiopulmonary chemoreflex responses. A(1) adenosine receptors have no tonic modulatory effect on this reflex under normal conditions. However, when adenosine is released into the NTS (i.e., during stress or severe hypotension/ischemia), it may serve as negative feedback regulator for depressor and sympathoinhibitory reflexes

  12. Murinization of internalin extends its receptor repertoire, altering Listeria monocytogenes cell tropism and host responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Huan Tsai

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is an invasive foodborne pathogen that leads to severe central nervous system and maternal-fetal infections. Lm ability to actively cross the intestinal barrier is one of its key pathogenic properties. Lm crosses the intestinal epithelium upon the interaction of its surface protein internalin (InlA with its host receptor E-cadherin (Ecad. InlA-Ecad interaction is species-specific, does not occur in wild-type mice, but does in transgenic mice expressing human Ecad and knock-in mice expressing humanized mouse Ecad. To study listeriosis in wild-type mice, InlA has been "murinized" to interact with mouse Ecad. Here, we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, murinized InlA (InlA(m mediates not only Ecad-dependent internalization, but also N-cadherin-dependent internalization. Consequently, InlA(m-expressing Lm targets not only goblet cells expressing luminally-accessible Ecad, as does Lm in humanized mice, but also targets villous M cells, which express luminally-accessible N-cadherin. This aberrant Lm portal of entry results in enhanced innate immune responses and intestinal barrier damage, both of which are not observed in wild-type Lm-infected humanized mice. Murinization of InlA therefore not only extends the host range of Lm, but also broadens its receptor repertoire, providing Lm with artifactual pathogenic properties. These results challenge the relevance of using InlA(m-expressing Lm to study human listeriosis and in vivo host responses to this human pathogen.

  13. Effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 phosphorylation in response to FTY720 during neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingxiang; Garris, Christopher S.; Moreno, Monica A.; Griffin, Christina W.; Han, May H.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya), a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator, is one of the first-line immunomodulatory therapies for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Human S1PR1 variants have been reported to have functional heterogeneity in vitro, suggesting that S1PR1 function may influence FTY720 efficacy. In this study, we examined the influence of S1PR1 phosphorylation on response to FTY720 in neuroinflammation. We found that mice carrying a phosphorylation-defective S1pr1 gene [S1PR1(S5A) mice] were refractory to FTY720 treatment in MOG35-55-immunized and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models. Long-term treatment with FTY720 induced significant lymphopenia and suppressed Th17 response in the peripheral immune system via downregulating STAT3 phosphorylation in both WT and S1PR1(S5A) mice. However, FTY720 did not effectively prevent neuroinflammation in the S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice as a result of encephalitogenic cells expressing C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Combined treatment with FTY720 and anti-CCR6 delayed disease progression in S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice, suggesting that CCR6-mediated cell trafficking can overcome the effects of FTY720. This work may have translational relevance regarding FTY720 efficacy in MS patients and suggests that cell type–specific therapies may enhance therapeutic efficacy in MS. PMID:27699272

  14. Regulation of the human prostacyclin receptor gene by the cholesterol-responsive SREBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Elizebeth C; Kinsella, B Therese

    2012-11-01

    Prostacyclin and its prostacyclin receptor, the I Prostanoid (IP), play essential roles in regulating hemostasis and vascular tone and have been implicated in a range cardio-protective effects but through largely unknown mechanisms. In this study, the influence of cholesterol on human IP [(h)IP] gene expression was investigated in cultured vascular endothelial and platelet-progenitor megakaryocytic cells. Cholesterol depletion increased human prostacyclin receptor (hIP) mRNA, hIP promoter-directed reporter gene expression, and hIP-induced cAMP generation in all cell types. Furthermore, the constitutively active sterol-response element binding protein (SREBP)1a, but not SREBP2, increased hIP mRNA and promoter-directed gene expression, and deletional and mutational analysis uncovered an evolutionary conserved sterol-response element (SRE), adjacent to a known functional Sp1 element, within the core hIP promoter. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed direct cholesterol-regulated binding of SREBP1a to this hIP promoter region in vivo, and immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated that cholesterol depletion significantly increases hIP expression levels. In conclusion, the hIP gene is directly regulated by cholesterol depletion, which occurs through binding of SREBP1a to a functional SRE within its core promoter. Mechanistically, these data establish that cholesterol can regulate hIP expression, which may, at least in part, account for the combined cardio-protective actions of low serum cholesterol through its regulation of IP expression within the human vasculature.

  15. The CRF family of neuropeptides and their receptors - mediators of the central stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Nina; Chen, Alon; Deussing, Jan M

    2017-03-01

    Dysregulated stress neurocircuits, caused by genetic and/or environmental changes, underlie the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major physiological activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and consequently a primary regulator of the mammalian stress response. Together with its three family members, urocortins (UCNs) 1, 2, and 3, CRF integrates the neuroendocrine, autonomic, metabolic and behavioral responses to stress by activating its cognate receptors CRFR1 and CRFR2. Here we review the past and current state of the CRH/CRHR field, ranging from pharmacological studies to genetic mouse models and virus-mediated manipulations. Although it is well established that CRF/CRFR1 signaling mediates aversive responses, including anxiety and depression-like behaviors, a number of recent studies have challenged this viewpoint by revealing anxiolytic and appetitive properties of specific CRF/CRFR1 circuits. In contrast, the UCN/CRFR2 system is less well understood and may possibly also exert divergent functions on physiology and behavior depending on the brain region,underlying circuit, and/or experienced stress conditions. A plethora of available genetic tools, including conventional and conditional mouse mutants targeting CRF system components, has greatly advanced our understanding about the endogenous mechanisms underlying HPA system regulation and CRH/UCN-related neuronal circuits involved in stress-related behaviors. Yet, the deailed pathways and molecular mechanism by which the CRH/UCN-system translates negative or positive stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely understood. The utilization of future complementary methodologies, such as cell-type specific Cre-driver lines, viral and optogenetic tools will help to further dissect the function of genetically defined CRH/UCN neurocircuits in the context of adaptive and maladaptive stress responses. Copyright

  16. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Lei, XiaoFeng [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Takenobu [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Human Pathology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  17. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, NF-kappa B, and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element-binding protein in lung neutrophils occurs by differing mechanisms after hemorrhage or endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, E; Arcaroli, J; Shenkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Acute lung injury is frequently associated with sepsis or blood loss and is characterized by a proinflammatory response and infiltration of activated neutrophils into the lungs. Hemorrhage or endotoxemia result in activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and NF-kappa B in lung neutrophils as well as increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha and macrophage-inflammatory peptide-2, by these cells. Activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway occurs in stress responses and is involved in CREB activation. In the present experiments, hemorrhage or endotoxemia produced increased activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)1/2 and ERK2 (p42), but not of ERK1 (p44), in lung neutrophils. ERK1, ERK2, and MEK1/2 were not activated in peripheral blood neutrophils after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase led to further increase in the activation of MEK1/2 and ERK2 in lung neutrophils after hemorrhage, but not after endotoxemia. Alpha-adrenergic blockade before hemorrhage resulted in increased activation in lung neutrophils of MEK1/2, ERK1, ERK2, and CREB, but decreased activation of NF-kappa B. In contrast, alpha-adrenergic blockade before endotoxemia was associated with decreased activation of MEK1/2, ERK2, and CREB, but increased activation of NF-kappa B. Beta-adrenergic blockade before hemorrhage did not alter MEK1/2 or ERK1 activation in lung neutrophils, but decreased activation of ERK2 and CREB, while increasing activation of NF-kappa B. Beta-adrenergic inhibition before endotoxemia did not affect activation of MEK1/2, ERK1, ERK2, CREB, or NF-kappa B. These data indicate that the pathways leading to lung neutrophil activation after hemorrhage are different from those induced by endotoxemia.

  18. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  19. Evaluation of the contribution of multiple DAMPs and DAMP receptors in cell death-induced sterile inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Kono, Hajime; Patel, Zubin; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Rock, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models.

  20. Evaluation of the contribution of multiple DAMPs and DAMP receptors in cell death-induced sterile inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kataoka

    Full Text Available When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3, ATP (and its receptor P2X7, antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e, and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2. We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models.

  1. Genotypes of NK cell KIR receptors, their ligands, and Fcγ receptors in the response of neuroblastoma patients to Hu14.18-IL2 immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, David C; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Kolesar, Jill; Lorentzen, David; Gan, Jacek; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Shusterman, Suzanne; Gillies, Stephen D; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Yang, Richard; Gadbaw, Brian; DeSantes, Kenneth B; London, Wendy B; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Sondel, Paul M

    2010-12-01

    Response to immunocytokine (IC) therapy is dependent on natural killer cells in murine neuroblastoma (NBL) models. Furthermore, killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)/KIR-ligand mismatch is associated with improved outcome to autologous stem cell transplant for NBL. Additionally, clinical antitumor response to monoclonal antibodies has been associated with specific polymorphic-FcγR alleles. Relapsed/refractory NBL patients received the hu14.18-IL2 IC (humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody linked to human IL2) in a Children's Oncology Group phase II trial. In this report, these patients were genotyped for KIR, HLA, and FcR alleles to determine whether KIR receptor-ligand mismatch or specific FcγR alleles were associated with antitumor response. DNA samples were available for 38 of 39 patients enrolled: 24 were found to have autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch; 14 were matched. Of the 24 mismatched patients, 7 experienced either complete response or improvement of their disease after IC therapy. There was no response or comparable improvement of disease in patients who were matched. Thus KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch was associated with response/improvement to IC (P = 0.03). There was a trend toward patients with the FcγR2A 131-H/H genotype showing a higher response rate than other FcγR2A genotypes (P = 0.06). These analyses indicate that response or improvement of relapsed/refractory NBL patients after IC treatment is associated with autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch, consistent with a role for natural killer cells in this clinical response.

  2. No hypothermic response to serotonin in 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hedlund, P. B.; Danielson, P. E.; Thomas, E. A.; Slanina, K.; Carson, M.J.; Sutcliffe, J G

    2003-01-01

    With data from recently available selective antagonists for the 5-HT7 receptor, it has been hypothesized that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced hypothermia is mediated by the 5-HT7 receptor, an effect previously attributed to other receptor subtypes. It has been established that the biologically active lipid oleamide allosterically interacts with the 5-HT7 receptor to regulate its transmission. The most well characterized effects of oleamide administration are induction of sleep and hypother...

  3. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities.

  4. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibition on radiation response in canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Fernanda B; Morrison, Jodi A; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2016-05-31

    Radiation therapy is a palliative treatment modality for canine osteosarcoma, with transient improvement in analgesia observed in many cases. However there is room for improvement in outcome for these patients. It is possible that the addition of sensitizing agents may increase tumor response to radiation therapy and prolong quality of life. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression has been documented in canine osteosarcoma and higher EGFR levels have been correlated to a worse prognosis. However, effects of EGFR inhibition on radiation responsiveness in canine osteosarcoma have not been previously characterized. This study examined the effects of the small molecule EGFR inhibitor erlotinib on canine osteosarcoma radiation responses, target and downstream protein expression in vitro. Additionally, to assess the potential impact of treatment on tumor angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in conditioned media were measured. Erlotinib as a single agent reduced clonogenic survival in two canine osteosarcoma cell lines and enhanced the impact of radiation in one out of three cell lines investigated. In cell viability assays, erlotinib enhanced radiation effects and demonstrated single agent effects. Erlotinib did not alter total levels of EGFR, nor inhibit downstream protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. On the contrary, erlotinib treatment increased phosphorylated Akt in these osteosarcoma cell lines. VEGF levels in conditioned media increased after erlotinib treatment as a single agent and in combination with radiation in two out of three cell lines investigated. However, VEGF levels decreased with erlotinib treatment in the third cell line. Erlotinib treatment promoted modest enhancement of radiation effects in canine osteosarcoma cells, and possessed activity as a single agent in some cell lines, indicating a potential role for EGFR inhibition in the treatment of a subset of osteosarcoma patients. The relative radioresistance of

  5. Loss of melanocortin-4 receptor function attenuates HPA responses to psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Karen K; Mul, Joram D; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Egan, Ann E; Begg, Denovan P; Halcomb, Kristen; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2014-04-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), well-known for its role in the regulation of energy balance, is widely expressed in stress-regulatory brain regions, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the medial amygdala (MeA). In agreement with this, MC4R has been implicated in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA) regulation. The present work investigated the role of chronic Mc4r function to modulate basal HPA axis tone and to facilitate acute HPA responses to psychological stress, using a novel rat model with Mc4r loss-of-function. In this study, adult male rats were placed into 3 groups (n=15/group) according to genotype [wild-type (WT); heterozygous mutant (HET); and homozygous mutant (HOM)]. Basal (pre-stress) plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were measured in the AM and PM, and the HPA axis response to restraint was assessed in the AM. Rats were perfused at 2h after restraint to assess the effect of loss of MC4R on stress-induced c-Fos immunolabeling in stress-regulatory brain regions. We find that basal (non-stress) AM and PM plasma ACTH and corticosterone showed a normal diurnal rhythm that was not altered according to genotype. Consistent with this, adrenal and thymus weights were unaffected by genotype. However, the plasma ACTH and corticosterone responses to restraint were significantly reduced by loss of MC4R function. Likewise, stress-induced c-Fos immunolabeling in both PVH and MeA was significantly reduced by loss of Mc4r function. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous MC4R signaling contributes to the HPA axis response to stress. Because MC4R plays a critical role in the regulation of energy balance, the present work suggests that it may also serve as an important communication link between brain metabolic and stress systems.

  6. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with insulin resistance and response to vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Reema; von Hurst, Pamela R; Stonehouse, Welma; Love, Donald R; Higgins, Colleen M; Coad, Jane

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and insulin resistance and the effects of these SNPs on changes in insulin sensitivity in response to vitamin D supplementation. The research described here was an extension of the Surya study. Genotyping of the Cdx-2, FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI SNPs was carried out on 239 South Asian women in New Zealand using polymerase chain reaction-based techniques. Associations of these genotypes and 3' end haplotypes with insulin resistance were determined using multiple regression analysis. Associations between SNP genotypes and responses in insulin sensitivity to vitamin D supplementation (4000 IU vitamin D(3) per day) were also determined for a subset (81) of these women. BsmI BB, ApaI AA, and TaqI tt genotypes were significantly associated with lower insulin resistance compared with BsmI bb, ApaI aa, and TaqI TT, respectively, in the cohort of 239 women. Furthermore, homozygosity of the haplotypes baT and BAt was associated with higher and lower insulin resistance, respectively, compared with no copies of their respective alleles. Of the 81 subjects who were supplemented with vitamin D, women with the FokI Ff genotype showed a significantly greater improvement in insulin sensitivity (increase of 29.4 [2.9, 38.1]) compared with women with the FokI FF genotype (increase of 2.3 [-11.5, 10.1]). This study has highlighted the association of vitamin D responsiveness and insulin resistance with VDR gene polymorphisms. This is the first study to determine associations between all three. Genotyping of the VDR gene may provide a predictive measure for insulin resistance in response to vitamin D intervention.

  7. Beta-receptor activation increases sodium current in guinea pig heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-wei WANG; Zhi-fang YANG; Yin ZHANG; Jian-min YANG; Yuan-mou LIU; Ci-zhen LI

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To study the influence of β-receptor activation on sodium channel current and the physiological significance of increased sodium current with regard to the increased cardiac output caused by sympathetic excitation.Methods: Multiple experimental approaches, including ECG, action potential recording with conventional microelectrodes, whole-cell current measurements, single-channel recordings, and pumping-force measurements, were applied to guinea pig hearts and isolated ventricular myocytes.Results: Isoprenaline was found to dose-dependently shorten QRS waves, increase the amplitude and the Vmaxof action potentials, aug-ment the fast sodium current, and increase the occurrence frequencies and open time constants of the long-open and burst modes of the sodium channel. Increased levels of membrane-permeable cAMP have similar effects. In the presence of a calcium channel blocker, TTX reversed the increased pumping force produced by isoprenaline.Conclusion: Beta-adrenergic modulation increases the inward sodium current and accelerates the conduction velocity within the ventri-cles by changing the sodium channel modes, which might both be conducive to the synchronous contraction of the heart and enhance its pumping function.

  8. Augmentation of radiation response by motesanib, a multikinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruser, T.J.; Wheeler, D.L.; Armstrong, E.A.; Iida, M.; Kozak, K.R.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Bussink, J.; Coxon, A.; Polverino, A.; Harari, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Motesanib is a potent inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1, 2, and 3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and Kit receptors. In this report we examine the interaction between motesanib and radiation in vitro and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

  9. Effects of antalarmin, a CRF receptor 1 antagonist, on fright reaction and endocrine stress response in crucian carp (Carassius carassius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lastein, Stine; Höglund, Erik; Overli, Oyvind

    2008-01-01

    and stress reactions in non-mammalian vertebrates are largely unknown. Crucian carp displays the olfactory-mediated fright reaction, a stereotypic behavioral response to waterborne cues from damaged skin of conspecifics. This reaction shows several similarities to basic components of avoidance behavior......The corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors show striking homogeneity throughout the vertebrate subphylum. In mammals, the CRF1 receptor (CRFR1) plays an important role in mediating behavioral and endocrine responses to fear and stress. The specific roles of this receptor subtype in fear...... in mammals. In the present study, we applied the non-peptide CRFR1 antagonist, antalarmin, to crucian carp 1 h before exposure to conspecific skin extract. This treatment resulted in a suppression of the fright reaction. After skin extract exposure, antalarmin treatment also lead to lower plasma cortisol...

  10. Candida albicans phospholipomannan triggers inflammatory responses of human keratinocytes through Toll-like receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Chen, Qing; Shen, Yongnian; Liu, Weida

    2009-07-01

    The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the recognition of Candida albicans components and activation of innate immunity. Phospholipomannan (PLM), a glycolipid, is expressed at the surface of C. albicans cell wall, which acts as a member of the pathogen-associated molecular patterns family. In this study, we sought to clarify whether C. albicans-native PLM could induce an inflammation response in human keratinocytes and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of cultured human primary keratinocytes to PLM led to the increased gene expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8). PLM hydrolysed with beta-d-mannoside mannohydrolase failed to induce gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8. PLM up-regulated the mRNA and protein levels of TLR2, whereas the mRNA level of TLR4 was not altered. Keratinocytes challenged with PLM resulted in the activation of NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) including p38. Anti-TLR2 neutralizing antibody, NFkappaB and p38MAPK inhibitors blocked the PLM-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8 in keratinocytes, but no such effect was observed in pretreatment with anti-TLR4-neutralizing antibody and lipopolysaccharide inhibitor (polymyxin B). These data suggest C. albicans-native PLM may contribute to the inflammatory responses of cutaneous candidiasis in the TLR2-NF-kappaB and p38MAPK signalling pathway dependent manner.

  11. GENETIC VARIATION IN THE ALPHA1B - ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR AND VASCULAR RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefurin, Abiodun; Ghimire, Laxmi V.; Kohli, Utkarsh; Muszkat, Mordechai; Sofowora, Gbenga G.; Li, Chun; Levinson, Rebecca T.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Stein, C. Michael; Kurnik, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    α1B- adrenergic receptors contribute to vasoconstriction in humans. We tested the hypothesis that variation in the ADRA1B gene contributes to interindividual variability and ethnic differences in adrenergic vasoconstriction. We measured dorsal hand vein responses to increasing doses of phenylephrine in 64 Caucasians and 41 African-Americans and genotyped 34 ADRA1B variants. We validated findings in another model of catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction, the increase in mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) during a cold pressor test (CPT). One ADRA1B variant, rs10070745, present in 14 African-American heterozygotes but not in Caucasians, was associated with a lower phenylephrine ED50 (geometric mean [95% CI], 144 [69–299] ng/ml) compared to 27 African-American non-carriers (208 [130–334] ng/ml; P=0.015) and contributed to the ethnic differences in ED50. The same variant was also associated with a greater ΔMAP during CPT (P=0.008). In conclusion, ADRA1B rs10070745 was significantly associated with vasoconstrictor responses after adrenergic stimulation and contributed to the ethnic difference in phenylephrine sensitivity. PMID:27089938

  12. Stress Induces a Shift Towards Striatum-Dependent Stimulus-Response Learning via the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Susanne; Klumpers, Floris; Schröder, Tobias Navarro; Oplaat, Krista T; Krugers, Harm J; Oitzl, Melly S; Joëls, Marian; Doeller, Christian F; Fernández, Guillén

    2016-12-21

    Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 21 December 2016; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.262.

  13. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xudong; Li, Yajuan; Yin, Yaobing; Yu, Decai

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and (1)HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F(-) could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  14. Schistosomiasis differentially affects vasoconstrictor responses: up-regulation of 5-HT receptor-mediated aorta contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen D'Arc dos Santos Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, classified by the World Health Organization as a neglected tropical disease, is an intravascular parasitic disease associated to a chronic inflammatory state. Evidence implicating inflammation in vascular dysfunction continues to mount, which, broadly defined, reflects a failure in the control of intracellular Ca2+ and consequently, vascular contraction. Therefore, we measured aorta contraction induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and endothelin-1 (ET-1, two important regulators of vascular contraction. Isometric aortic contractions were determined in control and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. In the infected animals, 5-HT induced a 50% higher contraction in relation to controls and we also observed an increased contraction in response to Ca2+ mobilisation from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Nevertheless, Rho kinase inhibition reduced the contraction in response to 5-HT equally in both groups, discarding an increase of the contractile machinery sensitivity to Ca2+. Furthermore, no alteration was observed for contractions induced by ET-1 in both groups. Our data suggest that an immune-vascular interaction occurs in schistosomiasis, altering vascular contraction outside the mesenteric portal system. More importantly, it affects distinct intracellular signalling involved in aorta contraction, in this case increasing 5-HT receptor signalling.

  15. Nuclear Control of the Inflammatory Response in Mammals by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandard, Stéphane; Patsouris, David

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of a very large number of biological processes including inflammation. Using specific examples, this paper focuses on the interplay between PPARs and innate immunity/inflammation and, when possible, compares it among species. We focus on recent discoveries establishing how inflammation and PPARs interact in the context of obesity-induced inflammation and type 2 diabetes, mostly in mouse and humans. We illustrate that PPARγ ability to alleviate obesity-associated inflammation raises an interesting pharmacologic potential. In the light of recent findings, the protective role of PPARα and PPARβ/δ against the hepatic inflammatory response is also addressed. While PPARs agonists are well-established agents that can treat numerous inflammatory issues in rodents and humans, surprisingly very little has been described in other species. We therefore also review the implication of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease; acute-phase response; and central, cardiac, and endothelial inflammation and compare it along different species (mainly mouse, rat, human, and pig). In the light of the data available in the literature, there is no doubt that more studies concerning the impact of PPAR ligands in livestock should be undertaken because it may finally raise unconsidered health and sanitary benefits. PMID:23577023

  16. Nuclear Control of the Inflammatory Response in Mammals by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Mandard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of a very large number of biological processes including inflammation. Using specific examples, this paper focuses on the interplay between PPARs and innate immunity/inflammation and, when possible, compares it among species. We focus on recent discoveries establishing how inflammation and PPARs interact in the context of obesity-induced inflammation and type 2 diabetes, mostly in mouse and humans. We illustrate that PPARγ ability to alleviate obesity-associated inflammation raises an interesting pharmacologic potential. In the light of recent findings, the protective role of PPARα and PPARβ/δ against the hepatic inflammatory response is also addressed. While PPARs agonists are well-established agents that can treat numerous inflammatory issues in rodents and humans, surprisingly very little has been described in other species. We therefore also review the implication of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease; acute-phase response; and central, cardiac, and endothelial inflammation and compare it along different species (mainly mouse, rat, human, and pig. In the light of the data available in the literature, there is no doubt that more studies concerning the impact of PPAR ligands in livestock should be undertaken because it may finally raise unconsidered health and sanitary benefits.

  17. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreoshi Pal Choudhuri

    Full Text Available Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5' ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP. The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex.

  18. Toll-like receptor responses to Peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and water buffalo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakthivel Dhanasekaran

    Full Text Available Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV. Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR. We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors

  19. Toll-like receptor responses to Peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and water buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Sakthivel; Biswas, Moanaro; Vignesh, Ambothi R; Ramya, R; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G; Raja, Angamuthu; Kataria, Ranjit S; Parida, Satya; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Subbiah, Elankumaran

    2014-01-01

    Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR). We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL) 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN) α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors might provide

  20. Cloning of opioid receptors in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and their involvement in regulation of stress and immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadzinska, M.K.; Hermsen, G.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals opiate alkaloids and endogenous opioid peptides exert their physiological and pharmacological actions through opioid receptors (MOR, DOR and KOR) expressed not only on neuroendocrine cells but also on leukocytes. Therefore, opioids can modulate the immune response. We cloned and sequenced

  1. Polymorphisms of innate pattern recognition receptors, response to interferon-beta and development of neutralizing antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Christian; Oturai, Annette B; Sørensen, Per Soelberg;

    2010-01-01

    Interferon-beta therapy of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis involves repeated 'immunizations' with exogenous protein solutions. Innate pattern recognition receptors play an important role in immune responses towards foreign substances and may thus be related to treatment outcome....

  2. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS...

  3. Changes in plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists in response to adrenaline infusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Ostrowski, K.; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of adrenaline in the response of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonists (ra) to extreme physiological conditions such as trauma and exercise, we examined the concentrations in the plasma of these cytokines during an adrenaline infusion. Given the fact th...

  4. Dimers of G-Protein Coupled Receptors as Versatile Storage and Response Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Parker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The status and use of transmembrane, extracellular and intracellular domains in oligomerization of heptahelical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are reviewed and for transmembrane assemblies also supplemented by new experimental evidence. The transmembrane-linked GPCR oligomers typically have as the minimal unit an asymmetric ~180 kDa pentamer consisting of receptor homodimer or heterodimer and a G-protein αβγ subunit heterotrimer. With neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors, this assembly is converted to ~90 kDa receptor monomer-Gα complex by receptor and Gα agonists, and dimers/heteropentamers are depleted by neutralization of Gαi subunits by pertussis toxin. Employing gradient centrifugation, quantification and other characterization of GPCR dimers at the level of physically isolated and identified heteropentamers is feasible with labeled agonists that do not dissociate upon solubilization. This is demonstrated with three neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors and could apply to many receptors that use large peptidic agonists.

  5. Estrogen receptor 2b deficiency impairs the antiviral response of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Azucena; Liarte, Sergio; Gómez-González, Nuria E; Cabas, Isabel; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2015-11-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated the ability of some endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) to alter the physiology of zebrafish, the immune-reproductive interaction has received little attention in this species. In this study, we used a homozygous line carrying an insertion of 8 amino acids in the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor 2b gene (esr2b) to further understand the role of estrogen signaling on innate immunity. Adult mutant fish showed distorted sexual ratios related with alterations in testicular morphology and supraphysiological testosterone and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels. Immunity-wise, although esr2b mutant fish showed unaltered antibacterial responses, they were unable to mount an effective antiviral response upon viral challenge. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that mutant fish were able to induce the genes encoding major antiviral molecules, including Ifnphi1, Ifnphi2, Infphi3, Mxb and Mxc, and the negative feedback regulator of cytokine signaling Socs1. Notably, although esr2b mutant larvae showed a similar resistance to SVCV infection to their wild type siblings, waterborne E2 increased their viral susceptibility. Similarly, the exposure of adult wild type zebrafish to E2 also resulted in increased susceptibility to SVCV infection. Finally, the administration of recombinant Ifnphi1 hardly reversed the higher viral susceptibility of esr2b mutant zebrafish, suggesting that elevated socs1 levels impair Ifn signaling. All together, these results uncover an important role for E2 and Esr signaling in the fine-tuning of sexual hormone balance and the antiviral response of vertebrates.

  6. Inactivation of GABAA receptor is related to heat shock stress response in organism model Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Gabriela; Elizalde, Alejandro; Trujillo, Xochitl; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Mendoza-Magaña, María Luisa; Hernandez-Chavez, Abel; Hernandez, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying oxidative stress (OS) resistance are not completely clear. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a good organism model to study OS because it displays stress responses similar to those in mammals. Among these mechanisms, the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway is thought to affect GABAergic neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of heat shock stress (HS) on GABAergic activity in C. elegans. For this purpose, we tested the effect of exposure to picrotoxin (PTX), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), hydrogen peroxide, and HS on the occurrence of a shrinking response (SR) after nose touch stimulus in N2 (WT) worms. Moreover, the effect of HS on the expression of UNC-49 (GABAA receptor ortholog) in the EG1653 strain and the effect of GABA and PTX exposure on HSP-16.2 expression in the TJ375 strain were analyzed. PTX 1 mM- or H2O2 0.7 mM-exposed worms displayed a SR in about 80 % of trials. GABA exposure did not cause a SR. HS prompted the occurrence of a SR as did PTX 1 mM or H2O2 0.7 mM exposure. In addition, HS increased UNC-49 expression, and PTX augmented HSP-16.2 expression. Thus, the results of the present study suggest that oxidative stress, through either H2O2 exposure or application of heat shock, inactivates the GABAergic system, which subsequently would affect the oxidative stress response, perhaps by enhancing the activity of transcription factors DAF-16 and HSF-1, both regulated by the IIS pathway and related to hsp-16.2 expression.

  7. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  8. PD-1- and CTLA-4-based inhibitory chimeric antigen receptors (iCARs) divert off-target immunotherapy responses.

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    Fedorov, Victor D; Themeli, Maria; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-12-11

    T cell therapies have demonstrated long-term efficacy and curative potential for the treatment of some cancers. However, their use is limited by damage to bystander tissues, as seen in graft-versus-host disease after donor lymphocyte infusion, or "on-target, off-tumor" toxicities incurred in some engineered T cell therapies. Nonspecific immunosuppression and irreversible T cell elimination are currently the only means to control such deleterious responses, but at the cost of abrogating therapeutic benefits or causing secondary complications. On the basis of the physiological paradigm of immune inhibitory receptors, we designed antigen-specific inhibitory chimeric antigen receptors (iCARs) to preemptively constrain T cell responses. We demonstrate that CTLA-4- or PD-1-based iCARs can selectively limit cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and proliferation induced through the endogenous T cell receptor or an activating chimeric receptor. The initial effect of the iCAR is temporary, thus enabling T cells to function upon a subsequent encounter with the antigen recognized by their activating receptor. iCARs thus provide a dynamic, self-regulating safety switch to prevent, rather than treat, the consequences of inadequate T cell specificity.

  9. Differential body weight and feeding responses to high-fat diets in rats and mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors.

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    Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jie; Behles, R Ryan; Hyun, Jayson; Kopin, Alan S; Moran, Timothy H

    2007-07-01

    Prior data demonstrated differential roles for cholecystokinin (CCK)1 receptors in maintaining energy balance in rats and mice. CCK1 receptor deficiency results in hyperphagia and obesity of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats but not in mice. To ascertain the role of CCK1 receptors in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, we compared alterations in food intake, body weight, fat mass, plasma glucose, and leptin levels, and patterns of hypothalamic gene expression in OLETF rats and mice lacking CCK1 receptors in response to a 10-wk exposure to HFD. Compared with Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) control rats, OLETF rats on HFD had sustained overconsumption over the 10-wk period. High fat feeding resulted in greater increases in body weight and plasma leptin levels in OLETF than in LETO rats. In situ hybridization determinations revealed that, while HFD reduced neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression in both the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of LETO rats, HFD resulted in decreased NPY expression in the Arc but not in the DMH of OLETF rats. In contrast to these results in OLETF rats, HFD increased food intake and induced obesity to an equal degree in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. NPY gene expression was decreased in the Arc in response to HFD, but was not detectable in the DMH in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. Together, these data provide further evidence for differential roles of CCK1 receptors in the controls of food intake and body weight in rats and mice.

  10. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors.

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    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-05-01

    Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide(AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22◦C, a moderate dose of LPS (25 - 100 μg kg−1 I.V.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ∼100 minpostinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 μg kg - 1 I.P.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine(40mg kg−1 I.P.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg−1 I.P.).However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6mg kg−1 I.P.) or SLV319 (15mg kg−1 I.P.)blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered I.C.V. at a dose (4.6 μg) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by I.C.V. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-α. In contrast to rimonabant,the I.C.V. administration of AEA (50 μg) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, I.C.V. AEAdid not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermo effector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis.

  11. Atypical signaling and functional desensitization response of MAS receptor to peptide ligands.

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    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1-7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1-7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data suggest

  12. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

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    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  13. Kinin B1 receptors mediate depression-like behavior response in stressed mice treated with systemic E. coli lipopolysaccharide

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    Campos Maria M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinin B1 receptors are inducible molecules up-regulated after inflammatory stimuli. This study evaluated the relevance of kinin B1 receptors in a mouse depression behavior model. Methods Mice were exposed to a 5-min swimming session, and 30 min later they were injected with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Depression-like behavior was assessed by determining immobility time in a tail suspension test. Different brain structures were collected for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Anhedonia was assessed by means of a sucrose intake test. Results Our protocol elicited an increase in depression-like behavior in CF1 mice, as assessed by the tail-suspension test, at 24 h. This behavior was significantly reduced by treatment with the selective B1 receptor antagonists R-715 and SSR240612. Administration of SSR240612 also prevented an increase in number of activated microglial cells in mouse hippocampus, but did not affect a reduction in expression of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The increased immobility time following LPS treatment was preceded by an enhancement of hippocampal and cortical B1 receptor mRNA expression (which were maximal at 1 h, and a marked production of TNFα in serum, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (between 1 and 6 h. The depression-like behavior was virtually abolished in TNFα p55 receptor-knockout mice, and increased B1 receptor mRNA expression was completely absent in this mouse strain. Furthermore, treatment with SSR240612 was also effective in preventing anhedonia in LPS-treated mice, as assessed using a sucrose preference test. Conclusion Our data show, for the first time, involvement of kinin B1 receptors in depressive behavioral responses, in a process likely associated with microglial activation and TNFα production. Thus, selective and orally active B1 receptor antagonists might well represent promising pharmacological tools for depression therapy.

  14. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

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    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  15. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated neurotransmission in major depression: Implications for anhedonia, anxiety and treatment response.

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    Peciña, Marta; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T; Heffernan, Joseph; Peciña, Susana; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2017-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the brain's reward circuit has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and in both, cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. Still, a direct relationship between measures of DA neurotransmission and reward-related deficits in patients with depression has not been demonstrated. To gain insight into the symptom-specific alterations in the DA system in patients with depression, we used positron emission tomography (PET) and the D2/3 receptor-selective radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride in twenty-three non-smoking un-medicated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients and sixteen healthy controls (HC). We investigated the relationship between D2/3 receptor availability and baseline measures of depression severity, anxiety, anhedonia, and cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. We found that, compared to controls, patients with depression showed greater D2/3 receptor availability in several striatal regions, including the bilateral ventral pallidum/nucleus accumbens (vPAL/NAc), and the right ventral caudate and putamen. In the depressed sample, D2/3 receptor availability in the caudal portion of the ventral striatum (NAc/vPAL) correlated with higher anxiety symptoms, whereas D2/3 receptor availability in the rostral area of the ventral striatum correlated negatively with the severity of motivational anhedonia. Finally, MDD non-remitters showed greater baseline anxiety, greater D2/3 availability in the NAc/vPAL, and greater placebo-induced DA release in the bilateral NAc. Our results demonstrate abnormally high D2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum of patients with MDD, which seem to be associated with comorbid anxiety symptoms and lack of response to antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

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    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  17. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness

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    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10−5–10−2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12–16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation mainly

  18. Olfactory receptor cells on the cockroach antennae: responses to the direction and rate of change in food odour concentration.

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    Hinterwirth, Armin; Zeiner, Reinhard; Tichy, Harald

    2004-06-01

    In insects, information about food odour is encoded by olfactory receptor cells with characteristic response spectra, located in several types of cuticular sensilla. Within short, hair-like sensilla on the cockroach's antenna, antagonistic pairs of olfactory receptor cells shape information inflow to the CNS by providing excitatory responses for both increases and decreases in food odour concentration. The segregation of food odour information into parallel ON and OFF responses suggests that temporal concentration changes become enhanced in the sensory output. When food odour concentration changes slowly and continuously up and down with smooth transition from one direction to another, the ON and OFF olfactory cells not only signal a succession of odour concentrations but also the rate with which odour concentration happens to be changing. Access to the values of such cues is of great use to an insect orientating to an odour source. With them they may extract concentration gradients from odour plumes.

  19. Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling in Yeast Mating Pheromone Response.

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    Alvaro, Christopher G; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-04-08

    The DNAs encoding the receptors that respond to the peptide mating pheromones of the budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiaewere isolated in 1985, and were the very first genes for agonist-binding heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to be cloned in any organism. Now, over 30 years later, this yeast and its receptors continue to provide a pathfinding experimental paradigm for investigating GPCR-initiated signaling and its regulation, as described in this retrospective overview.

  20. E3 ubiquitin ligases Pellinos as regulators of pattern recognition receptor signaling and immune responses.

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    Medvedev, Andrei E; Murphy, Michael; Zhou, Hao; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-07-01

    Pellinos are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligases discovered for their role in catalyzing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Pelle, an interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase homolog in the Drosophila Toll pathway. Subsequent studies have revealed the central and non-redundant roles of mammalian Pellino-1, Pellino-2, and Pelino-3 in signaling pathways emanating from IL-1 receptors, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, T- and B-cell receptors. While Pellinos ability to interact with many signaling intermediates suggested their scaffolding roles, recent findings in mice expressing ligase-inactive Pellinos demonstrated the importance of Pellino ubiquitin ligase activity. Cell-specific functions of Pellinos have emerged, e.g. Pellino-1 being a negative regulator in T lymphocytes and a positive regulator in myeloid cells, and details of molecular regulation of receptor signaling by various members of the Pellino family have been revealed. In this review, we summarize current information about Pellino-mediated regulation of signaling by pattern recognition receptors, T-cell and B-cell receptors and tumor necrosis factor receptors, and discuss Pellinos roles in sepsis and infectious diseases, as well as in autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic disorders. We also provide our perspective on the potential of targeting Pellinos with peptide- or small molecule-based drug compounds as a new therapeutic approach for septic shock and autoimmune pathologies.

  1. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

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    Bo Yoon Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE. MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent.

  2. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-10-13

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent.

  3. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist suppresses neurotrophin response in injured rat brain.

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    DeKosky, S T; Styren, S D; O'Malley, M E; Goss, J R; Kochanek, P; Marion, D; Evans, C H; Robbins, P D

    1996-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces astrocytic and microglial activation and proliferation and augmented production of the cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The increase in NGF temporally follows the increase in IL-1 beta, suggesting that the IL-1 beta up-regulation after trauma directly induces the increase in NGF. We examined the effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist protein (IL-1ra) on microglial proliferation and NGF production in rat cortex, following two different models of TBI. Rabbit fibroblasts infected with a retroviral vector containing the human IL-1ra gene were implanted into the wound cavity immediately following a cortical stab wound or 6 hours after a weight drop-induced trauma. Both microglial proliferation and NGF up-regulation were decreased significantly in animals receiving IL-1ra-expressing cells compared with animals receiving naive (untransfected) fibroblasts. These data demonstrate that the increase in NGF after central nervous system trauma is directly mediated through IL-1 beta and that blocking IL-1 beta following brain injury leads to suppression of an NGF-mediated reparative response. Such blockade of inflammation, however, may prove to be of significant therapeutic benefit in human brain injury and other inflammatory states.

  4. Dbo/Henji Modulates Synaptic dPAK to Gate Glutamate Receptor Abundance and Postsynaptic Response.

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    Manyu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In response to environmental and physiological changes, the synapse manifests plasticity while simultaneously maintains homeostasis. Here, we analyzed mutant synapses of henji, also known as dbo, at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. In henji mutants, NMJ growth is defective with appearance of satellite boutons. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the synaptic membrane region is expanded. The postsynaptic density (PSD houses glutamate receptors GluRIIA and GluRIIB, which have distinct transmission properties. In henji mutants, GluRIIA abundance is upregulated but that of GluRIIB is not. Electrophysiological results also support a GluR compositional shift towards a higher IIA/IIB ratio at henji NMJs. Strikingly, dPAK, a positive regulator for GluRIIA synaptic localization, accumulates at the henji PSD. Reducing the dpak gene dosage suppresses satellite boutons and GluRIIA accumulation at henji NMJs. In addition, dPAK associated with Henji through the Kelch repeats which is the domain essential for Henji localization and function at postsynapses. We propose that Henji acts at postsynapses to restrict both presynaptic bouton growth and postsynaptic GluRIIA abundance by modulating dPAK.

  5. Roles of dopamine receptors in mediating acute modulation of immunological responses in Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

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    Chang, Zhong-Wen; Ke, Zhi-Han; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) was found to influence the immunological responses and resistance to pathogen infection in invertebrates. To clarify the possible modulation of DA through dopamine receptors (DAR) against acute environmental stress, the levels of DA, glucose and lactate in the haemolymph of Macrobrachium rosenbergii under hypo- and hyperthermal stresses were measured. The changes in immune parameters such as total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and phagocytic activity (PA) were evaluated in prawns which received DAR antagonists (SCH23390, SCH, D1 antagonist; domperidone, DOM, D2 antagonist; chlorpromazine, CH, D1+2 antagonist) followed by hypo- (15 °C) and hyperthermal (34 °C) stresses. In addition, pharmacological analysis of the effect DA modulation was studied in haemocytes incubated with DA and DAR antagonists. The results revealed a significant increase in haemolymph DA accompanied with upregulated levels of glucose and lactate in prawns exposed to both hypo- and hyperthermal stresses in 2 h. In addition, a significant decrease in RBs per haemocyte was noted in prawns which received DAR antagonists when they exposed to hyperthermal stress for 30 min. In in vitro test, antagonism on RBs, SOD and GPx activity of haemocytes were further evidenced through D1, D1, D1+D2 DARs, respectively, in the meantime, no significant difference in PO activity and PA was observed among the treatment groups. These results suggest that the upregulation of DA, glucose and lactate in haemolymph might be the response to acute thermal stress for the demand of energy, and the DAR occupied by its antagonistic action impart no effect on immunological responses except RBs in vivo even though the modulation mediated through D1 DAR was further evidenced in RBs, SOD and GPx activities in vitro. It is therefore concluded that thermal

  6. Durability of the Rituximab Response in Acetylcholine Receptor Autoantibody-Positive Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeson, Kimberly R; Kumar, Aditya; Keung, Benison; DiCapua, Daniel B; Grodinsky, Emily; Patwa, Huned S; Stathopoulos, Panos A; Goldstein, Jonathan M; O'Connor, Kevin C; Nowak, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission, is treated by an array of immunotherapeutics, many of which are nonspecific. Even with current therapies, a subset of patients has medically refractory MG. The benefits of B-cell-targeted therapy with rituximab have been observed in MG; however, the duration of these benefits after treatment is unclear. To evaluate the durability of response to rituximab in the treatment of acetylcholine receptor autoantibody-positive (AChR+) generalized MG. This retrospective case series study included 16 patients with AChR+ MG referred to an MG clinic from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2015. The patients were treated with rituximab and followed up for 18 to 84 months after treatment. Assessment of long-term clinical response, durability of response and/or relapse rate, AChR autoantibody levels, adverse effects, and inflammatory markers. In the 16 patients (6 men and 10 women; median age, 42 [range, 18-69] years), clinical improvement was observed in parallel with complete withdrawal or reduction of other immunotherapies, with all patients achieving complete stable remission, pharmacologic remission, or minimal manifestations based on the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America postintervention status criteria. Nine patients (56%) had a relapse during a mean follow-up of 36 (range, 24-47) months. Seven patients (44%) remained relapse free with a mean follow-up of 47 (range, 18-81) months since the last rituximab treatment. All values were normalized to a pretreatment anti-AChR antibody level of 100% and the mean levels after each rituximab cycle were calculated. A 33% decrease was seen after cycle 1 of rituximab treatment (100% vs 67%; P = .004); 20% after cycle 2 (compared with cycle 1) (67% vs 47%; P = .008); and 17% after cycle 3 (compared with cycle 2) (47% vs 30%; P = .02). However, the serum cytokine levels measured were found to be unchanged. Rituximab therapy appears to be an

  7. Evolution of estrogen receptors in ray-finned fish and their comparative responses to estrogenic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Saki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Lange, Anke; Ogino, Yukiko; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ihara, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kobayashi, Tohru; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens play fundamental roles in regulating reproductive activities through estrogen receptors (ESRs), and disruption of estrogen signaling is now of global concern for both wildlife and human health. To date, ESRs of only a limited number of species have been characterized. We investigated the functional diversity and molecular basis or ligand sensitivity of ESRs among ray-finned fish species (Actinopterygii), the most variable group within vertebrates. We cloned and characterized ESRs from several key species in the evolution of ray-finned fish including bichir (Polypteriformes, ESR1 and ESR2) at the basal lineage of ray-finned fish, and arowana (Osteoglossiformes, ESR1 and ESR2b) and eel (Anguilliformes, ESR1, ESR2a and ESR2b) both belonging to ancient early-branching lineages of teleosts, and suggest that ESR2a and ESR2b emerged through teleost-specific whole genome duplication, but an ESR1 paralogue has been lost in the early lineage of euteleost fish species. All cloned ESR isoforms showed similar responses to endogenous and synthetic steroidal estrogens, but they responded differently to non-steroidal estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (e.g., ESR2a exhibits a weaker reporter activity compared with ESR2b). We show that variation in li