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Sample records for beta ray flux

  1. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  2. Beta rays and neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    It was over 30 years between the first observation of the enigmatic process of beta decay and the first postulation of the neutrino. It took a further 26 years until the first neutrino was detected and yet another 27 until the electroweak theory was confirmed by the discovery of W and Z particles. This article traces some of the puzzles and paradoxes associated with the history of the neutrino. (author)

  3. Personnel monitoring for beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piesch, E.; Johns, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    The practical considerations which have to be taken into account in the design of personnel monitors intended to measure doses resulting from exposure to beta rays are discussed. These include the measurement of doses in situations involving either fairly uniform or non-uniform irradiation and of doses to the male gonads. (UK)

  4. A semiconductor beta ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bom, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of energy spectra of beta particles emitted from nuclei in beta-decay processes provides information concerning the mass difference of these nuclei between initial and final state. Moreover, experimental beta spectra yield information on the feeding of the levels in the daughter nucleus. Such data are valuable in the construction and checking of the level schemes. This thesis describes the design, construction, testing and usage of a detector for the accurate measurement of the mentioned spectra. In ch. 2 the design and construction of the beta spectrometer, which uses a hyper-pure germanium crystal for energy determination, is described. A simple wire chamber is used to discriminate beta particles from gamma radiation. Disadvantages arise from the large amounts of scattered beta particles deforming the continua. A method is described to minimize the scattering. In ch. 3 some theoretical aspects of data analysis are described and the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of the summation of annihilation radiation are compared with experiments. Ch. 4 comprises the results of the measurements of the beta decay energies of 103-108 In. 87 refs.; 34 figs.; 7 tabs

  5. Comic ray flux anisotropies caused by astrospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, K.; Strauss, R. D.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.

    2016-09-01

    Huge astrospheres or stellar wind bubbles influence the propagation of cosmic rays at energies up to the TeV range and can act as small-scale sinks decreasing the cosmic ray flux. We model such a sink (in 2D) by a sphere of radius 10 pc embedded within a sphere of a radius of 1 kpc. The cosmic ray flux is calculated by means of backward stochastic differential equations from an observer, which is located at r0, to the outer boundary. It turns out that such small-scale sinks can influence the cosmic ray flux at the observer's location by a few permille (i.e. a few 0.1%), which is in the range of the observations by IceCube, Milagro and other large area telescopes.

  6. Beta ray backscattering studies for thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M; Sharma, K K [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1979-01-01

    Back-scattering of beta rays from /sup 204/Tl (Esub(..beta..)max = 740 keV) and /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y (Esub(..beta..)max =550 and 2250 keV) has been studied in an improved reflection geometry, using annular sources, from a number of elemental targets with Z values ranging from 13 to 82. Source to target and target to detector geometry factors are 0.0225 and 0.0282 respectively. Values of saturation back scattering thickness obtained in the two cases are 72 +- 10 and 190 +- 40 mg/cm/sup 2/ respectively. It is observed that the intensity of back scattered radiation varies linearly with thickness upto a value of 12 +- 2 mg/cm/sup 2/ in /sup 204/Tl and 17 +- 3 mg/cm/sup 2/ in /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y.

  7. Humidity measurement using alpha-ray and beta-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shigeaki; Kobayashi, Hisanobu

    1981-01-01

    Two new hygrometers using radioisotopes were proposed, and the results of tests are described. The one is a dew-point hygrometer utilizing the backscattering phenomena of beta-ray by dew, and the other is a hygrometer by measuring the variation of ionization current by alpha ray due to humidity. The backscattering of beta-ray depends on the atomic number of scatters and the energy of beta-ray. Therefore, the backscattering from dew on a gold plate is different from that from the gold itself. The temperature dependence of the backscattering intensity was measured with a GM counter. Decrease of the intensity was seen at the dew point. A control circuit was designed to measure the dew point automatically. The error of the measurement was within 1 degree C. An alpha-ray ionization hygrometer was constructed. The dependence of ionization current on humidity was measured with an operational amplifier. The resolution of humidity measurement was within 5 percent. (Kato, T.)

  8. SOFT CORONAL X-RAYS FROM {beta} PICTORIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, H. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Drake, J. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lisse, C. M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Robrade, J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M., E-mail: hguenther@cfa.harvard.edu [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universitaet Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, 21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    A-type stars are expected to be X-ray dark, yet weak emission has been detected from several objects in this class. We present new Chandra/HRC-I observations of the A5 V star {beta} Pictoris. It is clearly detected with a flux of (9 {+-} 2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} counts s{sup -1}. In comparison with previous data this constrains the emission mechanism and we find that the most likely explanation is an optically thin, collisionally dominated, thermal emission component with a temperature around 1.1 MK. We interpret this component as a very cool and dim corona, with log L{sub X} /L{sub bol} = -8.2 (0.2-2.0 keV). Thus, it seems that {beta} Pictoris shares more characteristics with cool stars than previously thought.

  9. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  10. Calculation of {beta}-ray spectra. Odd-odd nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1996-05-01

    In order to study {beta}-ray of atomic nucleus, it is natural to consider {beta}-ray data fundamental and important. In a recent experiment, Rudstam measured {beta}-ray spectra from short term nuclear fission product species in 1990. It is an important check point in theoretical study on {beta}-ray to investigate if these experimental data can be reproduced by any theoretical calculation. As there are several spectrum studies of {beta}-ray through decay heat for its various properties due to the general theory of the {beta}-decay, little descriptions can be found. In even such studies, spectra under high excitation state of daughter species difficult to measure and apt to short experimental results were treated with combination spectra composed of experimental and calculated values such as substitution of a part of the general theory with calculated value. In this paper, the {beta} spectra supposed by only the general theory was reported without using such data combination in order to confirm effectiveness of the theory. In particular, this report was described mainly on the results using recent modification of odd-odd nucleus species. (G.K.)

  11. High energy beta rays and vectors of Bilharzia and Fasciola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.J.; Akpa, T.C.; Dim, L.A.; Ogunsusi, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of the effects of high energy beta rays on Lymnea natalensis, the snail vector of Schistosoma haematobium have been conducted. Results show that in both stream and tap water, about 70% of the snails die when irradiated for up to 18 hours using a 15m Ci Sr-90 beta source. The rest of the snails die without further irradiation in 24 hours. It may then be possible to control the vectors of Bilharzia and Fasciola by using both the direct and indirect effects of high energy betas. (author)

  12. High energy beta rays and vectors of Bilharzia and Fasciola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.J.; Akpa, T.C.; Dim, L.A.; Ogunsusi, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of the effects of high energy beta rays on Lymnea natalensis, the snail vector of Schistosoma haematobium have been conducted. Results show that in both stream and tap water, about 70% of the snails die when irradiated for up to 18 hours using a 15m Ci Sr-90 beta source. The rest of the snails die without further irradiation in 24 hours. It may then be possible to control the vectors of Bilharzia and Fasciola by using both the direct and indirect effects of high energy betas.

  13. Simultaneous and separate, low background counting of beta rays and gamma rays using the phoswich principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhugh, M.R.; Utts, B.K.; Shoffner, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    A phoswich constructed using thin calcium fluoride optically coupled to a thicker sodium iodide crystal and operated with pulse shape analysis equipment can be used as an efficient low background counting assembly. Low background in the beta ray counting channel is achieved by judicious choice of pure materials in the assembly and by operating the analysis equipment so as to reject background events which occur simultaneously in the sodium iodide crystal. Careful survey of construction materials and methods has resulted in reducing beta ray counting background to 0.6 c/min for a 2-inch diameter assembly. The radioactivity of typical building materials will be discussed. A pulse shape analyzer has been constructed which provides separately adjusted time windows and separate output information for the beta ray and gamma ray channels. The dual channel capability combined with the low beta ray background reduces the sample counting time significantly for typical laboratory samples. (author)

  14. Is X-ray emissivity constant on magnetic flux surfaces?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granetz, R.S.; Borras, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the elongations and shifts of internal magnetic flux surfaces can be used to determine the q profile in elongated tokamak plasmas. X-ray tomography is thought to be a reasonable technique for independently measuring internal flux surface shapes, because it is widely believed that X-ray emissivity should be constant on a magnetic flux surface. In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the X-ray tomography diagnostic system consists of four arrays of 38 chords each. A comparison of reconstructed X-ray contours with magnetic flux surfaces shows a small but consistent discrepancy in the radial profile of elongation. Numerous computational tests have been performed to verify these findings, including tests of the sensitivity to calibration and viewing geometry errors, the accuracy of the tomography reconstruction algorithms, and other subtler effects. We conclude that the discrepancy between the X-ray contours and the magnetic flux surfaces is real, leading to the conclusion that X-ray emissivity is not exactly constant on a flux surface. (orig.)

  15. High energy cosmic rays: sources and fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the production of a unique energy spectrum of the high energy cosmic rays detected with air showers by shifting the energy estimates of different detectors. After such a spectrum is generated we fit the spectrum with three or four populations of cosmic rays that might be accelerated at different cosmic ray sources. We also present the chemical composition that the fits of the spectrum generates and discuss some new data sets presented this summer at the ICRC in Rio de Janeiro that may require new global fits.

  16. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kerry; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Vic; Zeitlin, Cary; Cleghorn, Tim; Cucinotta, Frank; Saganti, Premkumar; Atwell, William; Turner, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range

  17. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kerry [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: ktlee@ems.jsc.nasa.gov; Pinsky, Lawrence [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Andersen, Vic [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Zeitlin, Cary [National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cleghorn, Tim [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cucinotta, Frank [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A and M University, P.O. Box 519, Prairie View, TX 77446-0519 (United States); Atwell, William [The Boeing Company, Houston, TX (United States); Turner, Ron [Advancing National Strategies and Enabling Results (ANSER), Arlington, Virginia (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range.

  18. Comparison of nonflare solar soft x ray flux with 10.7-cm radio flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    The similarities and differences of the nonflare solar 1- to 8-A X ray flux and the daily 10.7-cm Ottawa solar radio flux are examined. The radio flux is shown to be much less sensitive than the soft X ray flux on the average to the coronal emission of active regions located near or beyond the solar chromospheric limb relative to regions near the center of the solar disk. This is caused by the solar soft X ray emission's being optically thin while much of the 10.7-cm active region emission is from optical depths of tauapprox.1. The radio flux includes a large quiet sun flux which is emitted mostly from the tenuous chromosphere-corona transition region (Tapprox.10 4 --10 6 0 K) and partly from the cooler portions of the quiet corona Tapprox.1.5 x 10 6 0 K. Conversely, the solar soft X ray flux has a very small quiet sun component

  19. Inverse Flux versus Pressure of Muons from Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, D.; Armendariz, R.

    2017-12-01

    When an incoming cosmic ray proton or atom collides with particles in earth's atmosphere a shower of secondary muons is created. Cosmic ray muon flux was measured at the Queensborough Community College using a QuarkNet detector consisting of three stacked scintillator muon counters and a three-fold coincidence trigger. Data was recorded during a three-day period during a severe weather storm that occurred from March 13-17, 2017. A computer program was created in Python to read the muon flux rate and atmospheric pressure sensor readings from the detector's data acquisition board. The program converts the data from hexadecimal to decimal, re-bins the data in a more suitable format, creates and overlays plots of muon flux with atmospheric pressure. Results thus far show a strong correlation between muon flux and atmospheric pressure. More data analysis will be done to verify the above conclusion.

  20. Spectral features in the cosmic ray fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The cosmic ray energy distributions contain spectral features, that is narrow energy regions where the slope of the spectrum changes rapidly. The identification and study of these features is of great importance to understand the astrophysical mechanisms of acceleration and propagation that form the spectra. In first approximation a spectral feature is often described as a discontinuous change in slope, however very valuable information is also contained in its width, that is the length of the energy interval where the change in spectral index develops. In this work we discuss the best way to define and parameterize the width a spectral feature, and for illustration discuss some of the most prominent known structures.

  1. X-ray scattering signatures of {beta}-thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desouky, Omar S. [Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT) (Egypt); Elshemey, Wael M. [Biophysics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: waelelshemey@yahoo.com; Selim, Nabila S. [Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT) (Egypt)

    2009-08-11

    X-ray scattering from lyophilized proteins or protein-rich samples is characterized by the presence of two characteristic broad peaks at scattering angles equivalent to momentum transfer values of 0.27 and 0.6 nm{sup -1}, respectively. These peaks arise from the interference of coherently scattered photons. Once the conformation of a protein is changed, these two peaks reflect such change with considerable sensitivity. The present work examines the possibility of characterizing the most common cause of hemolytic anaemia in Egypt and many Mediterranean countries; {beta}-thalassemia, from its X-ray scattering profile. This disease emerges from a genetic defect causing reduced rate in the synthesis of one of the globin chains that make up hemoglobin. As a result, structurally abnormal hemoglobin molecules are formed. In order to detect such molecular disorder, hemoglobin samples of {beta}-thalassemia patients are collected, lyophilized and measured using a conventional X-ray diffractometer. Results show significant differences in the X-ray scattering profiles of most of the diseased samples compared to control. The shape of the first scattering peak at 0.27 nm{sup -1}, in addition to the relative intensity of the first to the second scattering peaks, provides the most reliable signs of abnormality in diseased samples. The results are interpreted and confirmed with the aid of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of normal and thalassemia samples.

  2. Self-powered neutron and gamma-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Shields, R.B.; Lynch, G.F.; Cuttler, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of self-powered neutron detector was developed which is sensitive to both the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes. The emitter comprises two parts. The central emitter core is made of materials that generate high-energy electrons on exposure to neutrons. The outer layer acts as a gamma-ray/electron converter, and since it has a higher atomic number and higher back-scattering coefficient than the collector, increases the net outflow or emmission of electrons. The collector, which is around the emitter outer layer, is insulated from the outer layer electrically with dielectric insulation formed from compressed metal-oxide powder. The fraction of electrons given off by the emitter that is reflected back by the collector is less than the fraction of electrons emitted by the collector that is reflected back by the emitter. The thickness of the outer layer needed to achieve this result is very small. A detector of this design responds to external reactor gamma-rays as well as to neutron capture gamma-rays from the collector. The emitter core is either nickel, iron or titanium, or alloys based on these metals. The outer layer is made of platinum, tantalum, osmium, molybdenum or cerium. The detector is particularly useful for monitoring neutron and gamma ray flux intensities in nuclear reactor cores in which the neutron and gamma ray flux intensities are closely proportional, are unltimately related to the fission rate, and are used as measurements of nuclear reactor power. (DN)

  3. A scintillation detector for measuring inert gas beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hengchang; Yu Yunchang

    1989-10-01

    The inert gas beta ray scintillation detector, which is made of organic high polymers as the base and coated with compact fluorescence materials, is a lower energy scintillation detector. It can be used in the nuclear power plant and radioactive fields as a lower energy monitor to detect inert gas beta rays. Under the conditions of time constant 10 minutes, confidence level is 99.7% (3σ), the intensity of gamma rays 2.6 x 10 -7 C/kg ( 60 Co), and the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of this detector for 133 Xe 1.2 Bq/L. The measuring range for 133 Xe is 11.1 ∼ 3.7 x 10 4 Bq/L. After a special measure is taken, the device is able to withstand 3 x 10 5 Pa gauge pressure. In the loss-of-cooolant-accident, it can prevent the radioactive gas of the detector from leaking. This detector is easier to be manufactured and decontaminated

  4. Measurement of aerosol concentration with a beta-ray gage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzac, G. d'; Dubillot, J.

    1978-01-01

    Because dusts in suspension are a dangerous polluting agent, several methods have been used to monitor their concentration. Among these, the beta-ray gage enjoys a privileged position. The authors describe such a gage and discuss the conditions to be observed for it to be capable of giving results comparable to those obtained with manual gravimetric methods. The satisfactory results obtained led to standardization of the method and a whole range of instruments based on this principle are employed in pollution supervising networks and for continuously monitoring industrial emissions [fr

  5. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of 90 Sr/ 90 Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The P1approximation in the transport of beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Idoeta, R.; Herranz, M.

    1994-01-01

    A validation test for the p1 approximation to the linear transport of electrons in planar geometry has been performed. The p1 approximation is shown to be a good option for the description of the transport of beta rays with endpoint energies between 400kev and 3.5Mev through aluminium foils . This approximation together with the use of only elastic interactions of electrons with atoms has found good agreement with experimental results . A calculation has been made of the fraction of transmitted electrons through foils, solving the transport equation for planar geometry in the p1 approximation and assuming that only elastic scattering processes take place. The boundary condition at the entrance of the foil was a collimated beta source, while at the end of the foil has been adopted a vaccum boundary condition.Sources considered are those for which experimental and calculated spectrum shapes are known to agree. The calculated fractional transmission through different absorber thicknesses is found to have an exponential shape . Besides this fact the attenuation coefficients found ,when compared with those empirically obtained, agree to within 5%. 1 fig.; 4 refs. (author)

  7. Solar /flare/ cosmic ray proton fluxes in the recent past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, T.R.; Nautiyal, C.M.; Padia, J.T.; Rao, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining the average solar cosmic ray (SCR) proton fluxes which occurred in the last few million yr from He-3 samples from suitable lunar rocks is presented. Specimens removed from 0.3-1.5, 5-7, and 7-9 mm depths of the lunar surface were cleaned to reveal the feldspar grains of interest and heated for stepwise mass-spectrometric analyses. The 200 micron or greater grains were outgassed at 600, 1000, 1200, and 1600 C and noble gas data were recorded, along with isotopic ratio data. He-3 is assumed to have been degassed completely from rocks shocked by an impact event and diffusion losses are negligible due to the 90 C or less temperature exposures on the lunar surface. Thus the presence of He-3 is indicative of cosmic ray incidence, and known galactic cosmic ray production abundances for He-3 can be subtracted from the total He-3 observed, yielding the SCR flux results, which, when combined with exposure data, yield a history of SCR events

  8. SN 1987A gamma-ray line profiles and fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Burrows, A.; The, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Results for the time dependence of the line profiles and integrated fluxes for the 0.847 and 1.238 MeV gamma rays from the decay of cobalt to excited states of iron are presented for several models of the ejectum of SN 1987A. The relatively early detection of these lines has led several workers to propose that some degree of mixing has brought the cobalt closer to the electron-scattering photosphere than standard models predict. Constraints on the amount of mixing from recent observations are discussed using calculations of the energy-integrated line fluxes as a function of time since the explosion. Implications for the line profiles at various times are considered, and it is found that they show strong time dependences and are quite sensitive to the degree of mixing. The two primary effects are Doppler broadening due to the presence of radioactive material at higher velocities and a strong blueshift at early times resulting from optical depth effects. These results have important implications for gamma-ray observations, especially with high-resolution germanium instruments. Finally, the consequences of the fragmentation of the debris for the early emergence of the gamma-ray lines are considered. 32 refs

  9. Flux and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays: beyond homogeneous models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Guilhem

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I study the consequence of non homogeneously distributed cosmic ray sources in the Milky way. The document starts with theoretical and experimental synthesis. Firstly, I will describe the interstellar medium to understand the mechanism of propagation and acceleration of cosmic rays. Then, the detailed study of cosmic rays diffusion on the galactic magnetic field allows to write a commonly used propagation equation. I will recall the Steady-state solutions of this equation, then I will focus on the time dependant solutions with point-like sources. A statistical study is performed in order to estimate the standard deviation of the flux around its mean value. The computation of this standard deviation leads to mathematical divergences. Thus, I will develop statistical tools to bypass this issue. So i will discuss the effect of the granularity of cosmic ray sources. Its impact on cosmic ray spectrum can explain some recent features observed by the experiments CREAM and PAMELA.Besides, this thesis is focused on the study of the anisotropy of cosmic rays. I will recap experimental methods of measurements, and I will show how to connect theoretical calculation from propagation theories to experimental measurements. Then, the influence of the local environment on the anisotropy measurements will be discussed, particularly the effect of a local diffusion coefficient. Then, I will compute anisotropy and its variance in a framework of point-like local sources with the tools developed in the first part. Finally, the possible influence of local sources on the anisotropy is discussed in the light of the last experimental results. (author) [fr

  10. The gamma-ray-flux PDF from galactic halo substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-01

    One of the targets of the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a diffuse gamma-ray background from dark-matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. N-body simulations and theoretical arguments suggest that the dark matter in the Galactic halo may be clumped into substructure, rather than smoothly distributed. Here we propose the gamma-ray-flux probability distribution function (PDF) as a probe of substructure in the Galactic halo. We calculate this PDF for a phenomenological model of halo substructure and determine the regions of the substructure parameter space in which the PDF may be distinguished from the PDF for a smooth distribution of dark matter. In principle, the PDF allows a statistical detection of substructure, even if individual halos cannot be detected. It may also allow detection of substructure on the smallest microhalo mass scales, ∼ M ⊕ , for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Furthermore, it may also provide a method to measure the substructure mass function. However, an analysis that assumes a typical halo substructure model and a conservative estimate of the diffuse background suggests that the substructure PDF may not be detectable in the lifespan of Fermi in the specific case that the WIMP is a neutralino. Nevertheless, for a large range of substructure, WIMP annihilation, and diffuse background models, PDF analysis may provide a clear signature of substructure

  11. Optimal beta-ray shielding thicknesses for different therapeutic radionuclides and shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides. (authors)

  12. Modelling neutrino and gamma-ray fluxes in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballet, J; Cassam-Chenai, G; Maurin, G; Naumann, C

    2008-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate charged particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and to produce the majority of galactic cosmic rays, at least up to the 'knee' at 3-10 15 electron volts. In the framework of a hydrodynamic self-similar simulation of the evolution of young supernova remnants, its interaction with the ambient matter as well as the microwave and infrared background is studied. The photon spectra resulting from synchrotron and inverse Compton emission as well as from hadronic processes are calculated, as are the accompanying neutrino fluxes. Applying this method to the particular case of the SNR RXJ-1713, 7-3946, we find that its TeV emission can in principle be explained by pion decay if the ambient density is assumed to grow with increasing distance from the centre. The neutrino flux associated with this hadronic model is of a magnitude that may be detectable by a cubic-kilometre sized deep-sea neutrino telescope in the northern hemisphere. In this poster, a description of the supernova remnant simulation is given together with the results concerning RXJ-1713.

  13. Alpha/beta(gamma ray) discrimination and spillover quantification with a BaF2 scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A simple pulse shape discrimination technique was used to separate alpha and beta(gamma ray) interactions in a BaF 2 scintillator. The separation was not ideal, resulting in a 5.1% spillover of alpha interactions into the beta(gamma ray) channel and 11.9% spillover of beta(gamma ray) interactions into the alpha channel for a set pulse shape discriminator. The misclassification of events was reduced by post-processing the data using either a simple analytical technique or a more complex linear least squares technique. Both techniques typically reduced the difference between the expected and calculated interaction rates to <10% when the ratio of beta(gamma ray) to alpha count rate was less than 100 : 1. ((orig.))

  14. Calibration of a scintillation dosemeter for beta rays using an extrapolation ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakanen, A.T.; Sipilae, P.M.; Kosunen, A.

    2004-01-01

    A scintillation dosemeter is calibrated for 90 Sr/ 90 Y beta rays from an ophthalmic applicator, using an extrapolation ionization chamber as a reference instrument. The calibration factor for the scintillation dosemeter agrees with that given by the manufacturer of the dosemeter within ca. 2%. The estimated overall uncertainty of the present calibration is ca. 6% (2 sd). A calibrated beta-ray ophthalmic applicator can be used as a reference source for further calibrations performed in the laboratory or in the hospital

  15. The beta(+) decay and cosmic-ray half-life of Mn-54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacruz, M. T. F.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Garcia, A.; Larimer, R. M.; Lesko, K. T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    1993-03-01

    We performed a search for the beta(+) branch of Mn-54 decay. As a cosmic ray, Mn-54, deprived of its atomic electrons, can decay only via beta(+) and beta(-) decay, with a half-life of the order of 106 yr. This turns Mn-54 into a suitable cosmic chronometer for the study of cosmic-ray confinement times. We searched for coincident back-to-back 511-keV gamma-rays using two germanium detectors inside a Nal(Tl) annulus. An upper limit of 2 x 10-8 was found for the beta(+) decay branch, corresponding to a lower limit of 13.7 for the log ft value.

  16. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, E.L.; Metzger, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    A remote-sensing γ-ray spectrometer (GRS) is capable of measuring planetary surface composition through the detection of characteristic gamma rays. In addition, the planetary neutron leakage flux may be detected by means of a thin neutron absorber surrounding the γ-ray detector which converts the neutron flux into a γ-ray flux having a unique energy signature. The γ rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic γ rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and a variety of gamma rays arising from cosmic-ray particle interactions with the γ-ray spectrometer and spacecraft (SC). In this paper the amplitudes of planetary and non-planetary neutron fluxes are assessed and their impact on the sensitivity of measurement is calculated for a lunar orbiter mission and a comet nucleus rendezvous mission. For a 100 h observation period from an altitude of 100 km, a GRS on a lunar orbiter can detect a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002 cm -2 s -1 and measure the expected flux of approx.=0.6 cm -2 s -1 with an uncertainty of 0.001 cm -2 s -1 . A GRS rendezvousing with a comet at a distance equal to the radius of the comet's nucleus, again for a 100 h observation time, should detect a thermal neutron albedo flux at a level of 0.006 cm -2 s -1 and measure the expected flux of approx.=0.4 cm -2 s -1 with an uncertainty of 0.004 cm -2 s -1 . Mapping the planetary neutron flux jointly with the direct detection of H will not only provide a more accurate model for translating observed γ-ray fluxes into concentrations but will also extend the effective sampling depth and should provide a capability for simple stratigraphic modeling of hydrogen. (orig.)

  17. Detection of Beta-rays by using Plastic Scintillating Fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Hee

    2005-02-01

    Optical fibers have been used as sensing materials in various nuclear applications. Optical fiber sensors have proven to present several advantages as compared with other conventional sensors. They can be prepared in very small sizes and they are light enough to be easily put into very narrow channels such as between nuclear to be easily put into very narrow channels such as between nuclear fuel rods. No electrical power is needed to the sensor part so they are less susceptible to troubles in harsh environments such as underground and underwater. Optical fiber sensors cost relatively cheap to make, so that they are more suitable for multi-point radiation monitoring such as in nuclear power plants, accelerators, fusion study facilities. If one develops radiation sensors using scintillating optical fibers, that can directly measure the concentration of 3 H or 14 C in radioactive liquid, they can be useful tools to substitute the current liquid scintillation counters. They can be also used to measure the radioactivity of liquid radioactive wastes by dipping into the liquid wastes. Recently, several new scintillating materials of high density and low hygroscopicity have been found, and they can be transformed into good radiation-detection tools when they are combined with optical fibers. In this study, we have used commercially available plastic scintillating fibers of Bicron model BCF-12 (0.5mm, 1mm in diameter) to detect beta rays emitted from 3 H, 14 C. Several types of radiation sensors were constructed : each was constructed with thirty strands of the fibers being packed an aluminum tube. The optical signals generated inside the fiber bundle were converted into electrical pluses by a photomultiplier tube(PMT). The pulses were counted either through a non-coincidence circuit or a coincidence circuit. Two types of sensors were constructed for the non-coincidence counting. The open type (sensor A) is a sensor for which one end of the fibers is open and the other end

  18. Ray convergence in a flux-like propagation formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Chris H

    2013-06-01

    The energy flux formulation of waveguide propagation is closely related to the incoherent mode sum, and its simplicity has led to development of efficient computational algorithms for reverberation and target echo strength, but it lacks the effects of convergence or modal interference. By starting with the coherent mode sum and rejecting the most rapid interference but retaining beats on a scale of a ray cycle distance it is shown that convergence can be included in a hybrid formulation requiring minimal extra computation. Three solutions are offered by evaluating the modal intensity cross terms using Taylor expansions. In the most efficient approach the double summation of the cross terms is reduced to a single numerical sum by solving the other summation analytically. The other two solutions are a local range average and a local depth average. Favorable comparisons are made between these three solutions and the wave model Orca with, and without, spatial averaging in an upward refracting duct. As a by-product, it is shown that the running range average is very close to the mode solution excluding its fringes, given a relation between averaging window size and effective number of modes which, in turn, is related to the waveguide invariant.

  19. Association of Beta-2 Microglobulin with Inflammation and Dislipidemia in High-Flux Membrane Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçiu–Shufta, Valdete; Miftari, Ramë; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete; Haxhibeqiri, Shpend

    2016-01-01

    Background: Higher than expected cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients, has been attributed to dyslipidemia as well as inflammation. Beta2-Microglobulin (β2M) is an independent predictor of outcome for hemodialysis patients and a representative substance of middle molecules. Results: In 40 patients in high-flux membrane hemodialysis, we found negative correlation of β2M with high density lipoprotein (r=-0.73, p<0.001) and albumin (r= -0.53, p<0.001) and positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.69, p<0.001), parathyroid hormone (r=0.58, p < 0.05) and phosphorus (r= 0.53, p<0.001). There was no correlation of β2M with C- reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the follow-up period of three years, 6 out of 40 patients have died from cardiovascular events. Conclusion: In high-flux membrane hemodialysis patients, we observed a significant relationship of β2M with dyslipidemia and mineral bone disorders, but there was no correlation with inflammation. PMID:27994294

  20. Association of Beta-2 Microglobulin with Inflammation and Dislipidemia in High-Flux Membrane Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçiu-Shufta, Valdete; Miftari, Ramë; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete; Haxhibeqiri, Shpend

    2016-10-01

    Higher than expected cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients, has been attributed to dyslipidemia as well as inflammation. Beta2-Microglobulin (β2M) is an independent predictor of outcome for hemodialysis patients and a representative substance of middle molecules. In 40 patients in high-flux membrane hemodialysis, we found negative correlation of β2M with high density lipoprotein (r=-0.73, p<0.001) and albumin (r= -0.53, p<0.001) and positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.69, p<0.001), parathyroid hormone (r=0.58, p < 0.05) and phosphorus (r= 0.53, p<0.001). There was no correlation of β2M with C- reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the follow-up period of three years, 6 out of 40 patients have died from cardiovascular events. In high-flux membrane hemodialysis patients, we observed a significant relationship of β2M with dyslipidemia and mineral bone disorders, but there was no correlation with inflammation.

  1. Selective Beta and Gamma-ray Discrimination by CdWO{sub 4} and PlasticScintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation monitoring technique has been used for monitoring of decommissioning site of nuclear facility, radioactive waste disposal site, or in case of radioactivity accident. For rapid measurement of gamma-ray and beta-ray, many portable radiation detectors were developed but they are sensitive to specific radiation type. For example, portable detectors using NaI(Tl) or high purity germanium (HPGe) are suitable to detect gamma-ray. Otherwise, Geiger-müller (GM) tube or ionization chamber are suitable to detect all-types of radiation but it is hard to determine which particle is detected in the detector. In this reason, phoswich detectors for discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray were developed by using pulse shape discrimination. In this study, another approach to discriminate the beta-ray and gamma-ray is carried out. Two scintillators are used, cadmium tungstate (CdWO{sub 4}) and plastic scintillator. They have huge difference in their effective atomic number and mass density, thus they have huge difference in their gamma-ray sensitivity while the sensitivity of beta-ray is similar. The characterization of beta-ray and gamma-ray discrimination by using this characteristics is include. A technique of discrimination between beta-ray and gamma-ray was suggested. The method was verified by Monte Carlo simulation and experiment. This work showed feasibility on in field measurement of radiation with discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray.

  2. Graphite mixed magnesium borate TL dosemeters for beta ray dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokic, M; Christensen, Poul

    1984-01-01

    Sintered MgB4O7:Dy dosemeters with graphite contents from 1 to 10% were investigated for application for personnel dosimetry. Data are given on dose response, dose threshold, reproducibility, beta energy response and fading. Furthermore, results from practical field experiments are presented...

  3. Self-powered neutron and γ-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    According to the invention there is provided a self-powered neutron and γ-ray flux detector, comprising: a) an emitter core wire; b) an emitter outer layer around the core wire and of different metal thereto; c) a metal collector around the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer; and d) dielectric insulation electrically insulating the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer from the metal collector. The improvement comprises: a) the overall diameter of the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer is at least of the order of 0.4 mm in diameter; b) the emitter outer layer covers only of the order of l0 percent of the order of 90 percent of the emitter core wire surface area and comprises at least one band around the emitter core wire and is of a thickness in the range of the order 0.02 mm to of the order of 0.07 mm; and c) the metal of the emitter core wire, the metal of the emitter outer layer, the metal of the metal collector, the overall diameter of the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer and the surface area of the emitter core wire that is covered by the emitter outer layer are selected so that the detector has a prompt fraction in the range of the order of 90 percent to of the order of 96 percent and has a dynamic response which substantially matches the dynamic response of the power in the fuel of the nuclear reactor in which the detector is to be used

  4. {beta}-Ray angular distribution from purely nuclear spin aligned {sup 20}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomo, T., E-mail: nagatomo@riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Matsuta, K. [Osaka University (Japan); Minamisono, K. [NSCL/MSU (United States); Sumikama, T. [Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Mihara, M. [Osaka University (Japan); Ozawa, A.; Tagishi, Y. [University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogura, M.; Matsumiya, R.; Fukuda, M. [Osaka University (Japan); Yamaguchi, M.; Yasuno, T.; Ohta, H.; Hashizume, Y. [University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fujiwara, H. [Osaka University (Japan); Chiba, A. [University of Tsukuba (Japan); Minamisono, T. [Fukui University of Technology (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    The alignment correlation term in the {beta}-ray angular distribution from purely nuclear spin aligned {sup 20}F has been measured to test the G-parity conservation law which is one of the fundamental symmetries in the weak nucleon current. We utilized the hyperfine interaction of {sup 20}F in an MgF{sub 2} single crystal and successfully created the pure alignment from the polarization by means of the spin manipulation technique based on the {beta}-NMR method.

  5. Design of a tritium gas cell for beta-ray induced X-ray spectrometry using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Masanori, E-mail: masahara@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Organization for Promotion of Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Abe, Shinsuke; Matsuyama, Masao [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Organization for Promotion of Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Aso, Tsukasa [Electronics and Computer Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, 1-2 Ebie-neriya, Imizu City, Toyama 933-0293 (Japan); Tatenuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawakami, Tomohiko; Ito, Takeshi [KAKEN Company Limited, 1044 Horimachi, Mito City, Ibaraki 310-0903 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Beta-ray induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS) is a method for tritium gas analysis. • Gas cell for BIXS was designed by Monte Carlo simulations. • The optimum thickness of the gold layer on a beryllium window was around 150 nm. • This simulation model considered the self-absorption with increasing the cell length. - Abstract: One of the methods used for tritium gas analysis is beta-ray induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS). Gas cell design is important in this method. The structure of the gas cell for BIXS was optimized by Monte Carlo simulation of beta-ray induced X-ray spectra in various window geometries using the Geant4 tool kit (version 10.01.p02). The simulated spectrum from tritium decay fitted the observed one, and the simulation model was used to obtain the cell parameters for BIXS. The optimum thickness of the gold layer on a beryllium window was around 150 nm. This simulation model also considered the relationship between self-absorption by hydrogen gas and the cell length. Self-absorption increased with increasing cell length and the relationship between the sample pressure and cell length was formulated.

  6. New detection modules for gamma, beta and X-ray cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azman, S.; Bolle, E.; Dang, K.Q.; Dang, W.; Dietzel, K.I.; Froberg, T.; Gaarder, P.E.; Gjaerum, J.A.; Haugen, S.H.; Hellum, G.; Henriksen, J.R.; Johanson, T.M.; Kobbevik, A.; Maehlum, G.; Meier, D.; Mikkelsen, S.; Ninive, I.; Oya, P.; Pavlov, N.; Pettersen, D.M.; Sundal, B.M.; Talebi, J.; Yoshioka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Ideas ASA is developing new detection modules for gamma, beta and X-ray cameras. Recent developments focus on modules using various semi-conductor materials (CZT, HgI, Si). The development includes ASIC design, detector module development, and implementation in camera heads. In this presentation we describe the characteristics of important ASICs and its properties in terms of electronic noise, and the modes for measuring signals (switched current modes, sparsified modes, self triggered modes). The ASICs are specific for detectors and applications. We describe recent developments using various semi - conductor materials. We describe important design aspects for medical applications and in life science (SPECT, beta, X-ray cameras)

  7. Comparison of VLBI radio core and X-ray flux densities of extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.D.; Marscher, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory revealed that most quasars, selected in a variety of ways, are strong x-ray emitters. Radio bright quasars are statistically more luminous in the x-ray than their radio-quiet counterparts. It was also found that the 90 GHz to soft x-ray spectral index has a very small dispersion for sources selected by their strong millimeter emission. This implies a close relationship between compact radio flux density and x-ray emission. Strong correlations have been found between the arcsecond scale flux densities and soft x-ray fluxes. It is suggested that the correlation can be explained if the soft x-rays were produced by the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process within the compact radio emitting region. (author)

  8. Phoswich Detector for Simultaneous Counting of Alpha- and Beta-ray in a Pipe during Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, B.K.; Kim, G.H.; Woo, Z.H.; Jung, Y.H.; Oh, W.Z.; Lee, K.W.; Han, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A great quantity of waste has been generated during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These wastes are contaminated with various types of alpha, beta, and gamma nuclides. The contamination level of the decommissioning wastes must be surveyed for free release, but it is very difficult to monitor the radioactive contamination level of the pipe inside using conventional counting methods because of the small diameter. In this study a Phoswich detector for simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta-rays in a pipe was developed. The Phoswich detector is convenient for monitoring of alpha and beta contamination using only a single detector, which was composed of thin cylindrical ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator. The scintillator for counting an alpha particle has been applied a cylindrical polymer composite sheet, having a double layer structure of an inorganic scintillator ZnS(Ag) layer adhered onto a polymer sub-layer. The sub-layer in an alpha particle counting sheet is made of polysulfone, working as a mechanical and optical support. The ZnS(Ag) layer is formed by coating a ternary mixture of ZnS(Ag), cyano resin as a binder and solvent onto the top of a sub-layer via the screen printing method. The other layer for counting a beta particle used a commercially available plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator was simulated by using the Monte Carlo simulation method for detection of beta radiation emitted from internal surfaces of small diameter pipe. Simulation results predicted the optimum thickness and geometry of plastic scintillator at which energy absorption for beta radiation was maximized. Characteristics of the detector fabricated were also estimated. As a result, it was confirmed that detector capability was suitable for counting the beta ray. The overall counting results reveal that the developed Phoswich detector is efficient for simultaneous counting of alpha and beta ray in a pipe. (authors)

  9. Measurements of additional X-ray flux in South Atlantic magnetic anomaly region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.M.

    1968-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the calculation of the additional X-ray flux (20 - 150 KeV), produced by electron precipitation in the South Atlantic anomaly region. The kind of detector and the technique employed in the observations of this flux, utilizing stratospheric balloons as a means of transport of the payload across the anomaly region, are described. The results of two balloon launchins in Sao Jose dos Campos in July 1968, with the expected flux, are compared. (author) [pt

  10. Measurement of cosmic ray flux in the China Jinping underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yucheng; Hao Xiqing; Yue Qian

    2013-01-01

    The China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) is the deepest underground laboratory running in the world at present. In such a deep underground laboratory, the cosmic ray flux is a very important and necessary parameter for rare-event experiments. A plastic scintillator telescope system has been set up to measure the cosmic ray flux. The performance of the telescope system has been studied using the cosmic rays on the ground laboratory near the CJPL. Based on the underground experimental data taken from November 2010 to December 2011 in the CJPL, which has an effective live time of 171 days, the cosmic ray muon flux in the CJPL is measured to be (2.0±0.4)×10 -10 /(cm 2 ·s). The ultra-low cosmic ray background guarantees an ideal environment for dark matter experiments at the CJPL. (authors)

  11. THE X-RAY FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AS SEEN BY CHANDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilsen, J.; Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands))" data-affiliation=" (Astronomical Institute, Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands))" >Markoff, S.; Nowak, M. A.; Baganoff, F. K.; Dexter, J.; Witzel, G.; Barrière, N.; Li, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Fragile, P. C.; Gammie, C.; Goldwurm, A.; Grosso, N.; Haggard, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate Q = (5.24 ± 0.08) × 10 –3  counts s –1 , and a variable component, represented by a power law process (dN/dF∝F –ξ , ξ=1.92 −0.02 +0.03 ). This slope matches our recently reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.8 −0.6 +0.8 ×10 −14  erg s –1  cm –2 and a shape parameter σ = 2.4 ± 0.2, but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely in the inner accretion flow. We confirm that at the faint end, the variable component contributes ∼10% of the apparent quiescent flux, as previously indicated by our statistical analysis of X-ray flares in these Chandra observations. Our flux distribution provides a new and important observational constraint on theoretical models of Sgr A*, and we use simple radiation models to explore the extent to which a statistical comparison of the X-ray and infrared can provide insights into the physics of the X-ray emission mechanism

  12. Characteristic tests of ionization chamber and GM counter survey meters for beta-rays, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Shin-ichi; Bingo, Kazuyoshi; Kajimoto, Yoichi

    1979-03-01

    To estimate a beta-ray absorbed dose rate of contaminated skin, measurements were done twice by a survey meter without and with a filter, keeping the distance from the contaminated skin surface to the survey meter at 10 mm. The absorbed dose rate was obtained multiplying a net reading (equals a reading of survey meter's indicator measured without the filter minus that measured with the filter) by a multiplying factor. Calibrations were made with reference plane sources of natural uranium, 198 Au and 204 Tl, varying their area. The five types of ionization chamber survey meters had nearly same multiplying factors when the diameter of source was larger than the diameter of the chamber cylinder. Estimation of the absorbed doses due to beta-emitting nuclides was possible when the measured value without filter was larger by 20% or more than that of with filter. In the case of small sources, the multiplying factor varied significantly with area of the source. The multiplying factors agreed within +-30% in the respective types i.e. manufacturers and in maximum beta-ray energies from 0.7 up to 2.5 MeV. In the source to detector distance of 1 cm +-0.2 cm, the multiplying factor varied within +-20%. The multiplying factor of a GM counter survey meter varied with beta-ray energy, the multiplying factor for uranium was 1/3 that of 204 Tl. (author)

  13. Calibration of TLD cards to beta ray spectra of 32P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shachar, B.; German, U.; Naim, E.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the evaluation of TLD chips are received in nC, and we need to transform these values to mGy, in order to obtain the penetrating and the non-penetrating dose. The calibration factors were determined experimentally by irradiation the TLD chips with an uranium source. Beta rays having other spectra can cause incorrect values when estimating the non-penetrating dose. If the spectrum of the beta source is known, a specific evaluation of the calibration factor can be performed. In this report, the estimation of the calibration factor for a 32 P source is presented. LiF:Ti,Mg TLD cards were irradiated calibrated source of 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 204 Tl and non-calibrated source of 32 P, in order to find the beta correction factor for the spectrum of 32 P. Calculations of the beta correction factor were performed too, by applying the Loevinger equations to the geometry of the TLD chips used in our routine measurements. The calculated values of the beta correction factors are lower than the experimental ones. When comparing the ratios, between the beta factors of 32 P and 90 Sr/ 90 Y received from the experiments and from the calculation, we found them to be constant up to ±5%. (authors) 15 refs, 2 figs, 6 tabs

  14. Extended gamma-ray sources around pulsars constrain the origin of the positron flux at Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Barber, A. S.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.

    2017-01-01

    The unexpectedly high flux of cosmic ray positrons detected at Earth may originate from nearby astrophysical sources, dark matter, or unknown processes of cosmic-ray secondary production. We report the detection, using the HighAltitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), of extended tera-electron volt gamma-ray emission coincident with the locations of two nearby middle-aged pulsars (Geminga and PSR B0656+14). The HAWC observations demonstrate that these pulsars are indeed local sources of ac...

  15. Lunar radionuclide records of average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes over the last ten million years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Because changes in solar activity can modify the fluxes of cosmic-ray particles in the solar system, the nature of the galactic and solar cosmic rays and their interactions with matter are described and used to study the ancient sun. The use of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites and lunar samples as detectors of past cosmic-ray variations are discussed. Meteorite records of the history of the galactic cosmic rays are reviewed. The fluxes of solar protons over various time periods as determined from lunar radionuclide data are presented and examined. The intensities of solar protons emitted during 1954 to 1964 (11-year solar cycle number 19) were much larger than those for 1965 to 1975 (solar cycle 20). Average solar-proton fluxes determined for the last one to ten million years from lunar 26 Al and 53 Mn data show little variation and are similar to the fluxes for recent solar cycles. Lunar activities of 14 C (and preliminary results for 81 Kr) indicate that the average fluxes of solar protons over the last 10 4 (and 10 5 ) years are several times larger than those for the last 10 6 to 10 7 years; however, cross-section measurements and other work are needed to confirm these flux variations

  16. Time-resolved X-ray PIV technique for diagnosing opaque biofluid flow with insufficient X-ray fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    X-ray imaging is used to visualize the biofluid flow phenomena in a nondestructive manner. A technique currently used for quantitative visualization is X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although this technique provides a high spatial resolution (less than 10 µm), significant hemodynamic parameters are difficult to obtain under actual physiological conditions because of the limited temporal resolution of the technique, which in turn is due to the relatively long exposure time (~10 ms) involved in X-ray imaging. This study combines an image intensifier with a high-speed camera to reduce exposure time, thereby improving temporal resolution. The image intensifier amplifies light flux by emitting secondary electrons in the micro-channel plate. The increased incident light flux greatly reduces the exposure time (below 200 µs). The proposed X-ray PIV system was applied to high-speed blood flows in a tube, and the velocity field information was successfully obtained. The time-resolved X-ray PIV system can be employed to investigate blood flows at beamlines with insufficient X-ray fluxes under specific physiological conditions. This method facilitates understanding of the basic hemodynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Toward optimal X-ray flux utilization in breast CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Hansen, Per Christian; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2011-01-01

    A realistic computer-simulation of a breast computed tomography (CT) system and subject is constructed. The model is used to investigate the optimal number of views for the scan given a fixed total X-ray fluence. The reconstruction algorithm is based on accurate solution to a constrained......, TVminimization problem, which has received much interest recently for sparse-view CT data....

  18. Calculation of the flux density of gamma rays above the surface of Venus and the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this article the authors present the results of calculating the flux density of unscattered gamma rays as a function of height above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth. At each height they calculate the areas which will collect a certain fraction of the gamma rays. The authors calculate the spectra of scattered gamma rays, as well as their integrated fluxes at various heights above the surface of Venus. They consider how the atmosphere will affect the recording of gamma rays. Their results enable them to evaluate the optimal conditions for measuring the gamma-ray fields above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth and to determine the area of the planet which can be investigated in this way. These results are also necessary if they are to determine the elemental composition of the rock from the characteristic recorded spectrum of gamma radiation

  19. Relation between gamma-ray emission, radio bursts, and proton fluxes from solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomichev, V.V.; Chertok, I.M.

    1985-01-01

    Data on solar gamma-ray flares, including 24 flares with gamma-ray lines, recorded up to June 1982, are analyzed. It is shown that from the point of view of radio emission the differences between flares with and without gamma-ray lines has a purely quantitative character: the former are accompanied by the most intense microwave bursts. Meter type II bursts are not a distinctive feature of flares with gamma-ray lines. Pulsed flares, regardless of the presence or absence of gamma-ray lines, are not accompanied by significant proton fluxes at the earth. On the whole, contrary to the popular opinion in the literature, flares with gamma-ray lines do not display a deficit of proton flux in interplanetary space in comparison with similar flares without gamma-ray lines. The results of quantitative diagnostics of proton flares based on radio bursts are not at variance with the presence of flares without detectable gamma-ray emission in lines but with a pronounced increase in the proton flux at the earth. 23 references

  20. Long-term and transient time variation of cosmic ray fluxes detected in Argentina by CARPET cosmic ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mendonça, R. R. S.; Raulin, J.-P.; Bertoni, F. C. P.; Echer, E.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Fernandez, G.

    2011-07-01

    We present results obtained at El Leoncito (CASLEO, San Juan, Argentina) with the CARPET charged particles detector installed in April 2006. The observed modulation of the cosmic ray flux is discussed as a function of its time variability and it is related to longer solar activity variations and to shorter variations during solar and geomagnetic transient activity. Short period (few minutes, few hours) cosmic ray modulation events are observed during rain time (precipitation) and significant variations of the atmospheric electric field. Complementary observations of the atmospheric electric field indicate that its time variations play an important role in the detected cosmic ray event.

  1. Influences of Sr-90 beta-ray irradiation on electrical characteristics of carbon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasani, H. [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghi Ahmadi, M., E-mail: ahmadi1351@gmail.com [Nano-Technology Research Center, Nano-Electronic Group, Physics Department, Urmia University, 57147 Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Khoda-bakhsh, R., E-mail: r.khodabakhsh16@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); RezaeiOchbelagh, D. [Departments of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ismail, Razali [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-03-28

    This work is concerned with the low cost fabrication of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), and its application to beta ray detection. The structural and morphological properties of the CNPs were obtained by spectral and microscopy techniques. A system based on CNPs application in the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) junction platform, which acts as a beta-ray (β-ray) sensor, is fabricated. The prototype is characterised by modelling, Monte Carlo simulation, and electrical investigations. Changes to the electrical behaviour of the proposed MSM system due to β-ray irradiation are validated by experimental results in both Ohmic and non-Ohmic (Schottky) contacts. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX code, which showed that most of the β-ray energies are deposited into CNPs and electrodes. However, in the Ohmic contact, because the β-ray is induced, the current of CNPs is decreased. The reduction of the current might be due to the change of the carrier properties by increasing the scattering of electrons. The current-density equation for electrons was employed for understanding the effects of β-ray in Ohmic contact of CNPs. On the contrary, in the Schottky contact case, CNPs current was increased with constant voltage when biased by β-ray irradiation. In this paper, the electron–hole generation using β-rays is dominant when compared to other significant effects of radiation exposure on semiconducting CNP-based Schottky contact. Hence, the current increment of CNPs can be justified by electron–hole generation in the depletion region.

  2. Proceedings of the International Symposium Advances in alpha, Beta- and Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) is an association of radionuclide metrology laboratories whose membership is composed of delegates of these laboratories together with other scientists actively engaged in the study and applications of radioactivity. The scientific activities are carried out in the frame of six Working Groups. Two of them, the Alpha-Particle Spectrometry and the Gamma-and Beta-ray Spectrometry Working Groups held a common workshop in Pushkin, St. Petersburg, 18 to 20 September 1996, under the title Advances in Alpha-Beta-and Gamma-Ray Sepectrometry, at the kind invitation of the D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology. More than 30 people from 14 laboratories attended the meeting, and nineteen oral communications were presented, from which twelve were retained for publication an are included in these proceedings. (Author)

  3. Moeller scattering and the measurement of beta-ray longitudinal polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliwer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Two problems that are inherent in the measurement of longitudinal polarization of beta rays via Moeller scattering (Bhabha scattering for positrons) are the low signal-to-noise ratio due to the electron-nucleon-scattered background and the small fraction of electrons that are polarized in the target. The present article shows how to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio by the collection of Moeller-scattered events using a thick-lens beta-ray spectrometer where the entrance baffle is set very narow to accommodate the relativistically contracted cone of Moeller events; this in turn minimizes the electron-nucleon-scattered background and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio. In the case of positrons, recent studies of electron channeling in crystals suggest a target that will reduce Bhabha scattering from the large fraction of unpolarized inner-shell electrons and predominantly pick off the polarized fraction of target electrons. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of Beta-leptinotarsin-h and the Effects of Calcium Flux Antagonists on its Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crosland, Richard D; Fitch, Richard W; Hines, Harry B

    2005-01-01

    ...+ influx through presynaptic Ca2+ channels. Analysis of partial amino acid sequences revealed that beta-leptinotarsin-h is a unique protein with significant similarity to only one other protein, the juvenile hormone esterase of Leptinotarsa...

  5. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray fluxes and cosmogenic neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2013-04-15

    We discuss the possible origin of the two neutrino shower events reported by the IceCube Collaboration at the Neutrino 2012 conference in Kyoto, Japan. The suspicion early on was that these two events are due to cosmogenic neutrinos and possibly by electron antineutrinos generating the Glashow resonance. The difference of the energy of the W{sup −} in the resonance and the energy estimates of the detected cascade events makes this assumption unlikely. The conclusion then may be that these high energy neutrinos are produced at sources of high energy cosmic rays such as Active Galactic Nuclei.

  6. Strontium-90 induced squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva: beta flux measurements from the mandible and teeth surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, N.J.; Swartz, L.; Spangler, W.L.; Book, S.A.; Chrisp, C.E.; Hines, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-two of 387 dogs exposed to 90 Sr in utero and by continuous ingestion to 540 days developed squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva. Eleven of the 22 tumors were observed in dogs ingesting 12 μCi/day. No gingival tumors were observed in dogs ingesting less than 1.25 μCi/day, but 3 were observed at this level. The teeth of these animals acquire a 90 Sr burden which is not removed by skeletal remodeling. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to determine the beta radiation flux from teeth and bone into adjacent gingival tissue

  7. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  8. THE X-RAY FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AS SEEN BY CHANDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, J. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Markoff, S. [Astronomical Institute, " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, M. A.; Baganoff, F. K. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Dexter, J. [Department of Astronomy, Hearst Field Annex, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Witzel, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Barrière, N. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Li, Y. [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Degenaar, N. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Fragile, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Gammie, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Goldwurm, A. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, F-75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Grosso, N. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Haggard, D., E-mail: jneilsen@space.mit.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, AC# 2244, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate Q = (5.24 ± 0.08) × 10{sup –3} counts s{sup –1}, and a variable component, represented by a power law process (dN/dF∝F {sup –ξ}, ξ=1.92{sub −0.02}{sup +0.03}). This slope matches our recently reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +0.8}×10{sup −14} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} and a shape parameter σ = 2.4 ± 0.2, but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely in the inner accretion flow. We confirm that at the faint end, the variable component contributes ∼10% of the apparent quiescent flux, as previously indicated by our statistical analysis of X-ray flares in these Chandra observations. Our flux distribution provides a new and important observational constraint on theoretical models of Sgr A*, and we use simple radiation models to explore the extent to which a statistical comparison of the X-ray and infrared can provide insights into the physics of the X-ray emission mechanism.

  9. Increase in γ-ray flux at balloon altitude during magnetic disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.M; Rai, D.B.; Palmeira, R.A.R.; Trivedi, N.B.; Costa, J.M. da.

    1974-01-01

    Balloon observations of γ-rays (0.9 - 18 MeV) and charged particle (>=0.7 MeV) flux made at Sao Jose dos campos (23 0 14'S, 45 0 51'W) on quiet and magnetically disturbed days in October 1973 are presented and discussed. The γ-ray flux during the disturbed period shows a considerable increase compared to the quiet day observations. The charged particles count rate also shows an increase but to a much smaller extent. The increase in the γ-ray flux is attributed to the bremsstrahlung of precipitating high energy electrons from the inner radiation belt. A spectral analysis of the count rate of γ-rays shows that the increase in the flux is more pronounced on the low energy end (0.9 - 20 MeV) of the spectrum which lends further support to the bremsstrahlung explanation. Based on the photon spectrum in the range 0.9 - 18 MeV the spectrum of the precipitating electron causing the γ-ray emission is calculated. The photon spectrum is of the form dN/dE α E sup( - 2.2) in the range 0.9 - 2.5 MeV and dN/dE approximately E sup( - 1.1) in the range 7.0 - 18 MeV. Thus it may be concluded that the increase in the γ-ray flux is due to the precipitation of electrons of the inner radiation belt with E > 20 MeV

  10. Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

    1963-06-01

    Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

  11. Monitoring the radon flux from gold-mine dumps by gamma-ray mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindsay, R; de Meijer, RJ; Maleka, PP; Newman, RT; Motlhabane, TGK; de Villiers, D

    The exhalation of radon from the large mine dumps at the gold mines in South Africa is a potential health hazard. Determination of radon fluxes from these dumpsites is problematic due to the scatter in the data in time and place and the cost involved in getting a representative sample. gamma-ray

  12. Induced Double-Beta Processes in Electron Fluxes as Resonance Reactions in Weak Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of induced double-beta processes in electron beams is developed. It is shown that a resonance mechanism of the excitation of the ground state of an intermediate nucleus is realized in them, this mechanism being described in the single-state-dominance approximation, where the process in question is broken down into two stages, the excitation of a dominant state and its decay. This approximation is valid irrespective of the features of this state, both for allowed (for a 1 + state of the intermediate nucleus) and for forbidden transitions. An analysis of the resonance mechanism reveals that its inclusion in double-beta-decay processes requires introducing additional diagrams that describe the gamma decay of virtual intermediate states. The inclusion of such corrections may lead to a decrease in the expected half-life and to a change in the beta spectrum. Effects associated with the interference between the two stages of a double-beta process are estimated, and it is shown that their influence can be significant if the time interval between these stages is less than or on the order of the lifetime of the dominant state

  13. Comparisons of experimental beta-ray spectra important to decay heat predictions with ENSDF [Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File] evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1990-03-01

    Graphical comparisons of recently obtained experimental beta-ray spectra with predicted beta-ray spectra based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File are exhibited for 77 fission products having masses 79--99 and 130--146 and lifetimes between 0.17 and 23650 sec. The comparisons range from very poor to excellent. For beta decay of 47 nuclides, estimates are made of ground-state transition intensities. For 14 cases the value in ENSDF gives results in very good agreement with the experimental data. 12 refs., 77 figs., 1 tab

  14. Hard X-ray Flux from Low-Mass Stars in the Cygnus OB2 Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramazza, M.; Drake, J. J.; Micela, G.; Flaccomio, E.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the X-ray emission in the 20-40 keV band expected from the flaring low-mass stellar population in Cygnus OB2 assuming that the observed soft X-ray emission is due to a superposition of flares and that the ratio of hard X-ray to soft X-ray emission is described by a scaling found for solar flares by Isola and co-workers. We estimate a low-mass stellar hard X-ray flux in the 20-40 keV band in the range ~7×1031-7×1033 erg/s and speculate the limit of this values. Hard X-ray emission could lie at a level not much below the current observed flux upper limits for Cygnus OB2. Simbol-X, with its broad energy band (10-100 keV) and its sensitivity should be able to detect this emission and would provide insights into the hard X-ray production of flares on pre-main sequence stars.

  15. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  16. Preliminary investigation of changes in x-ray multilayer optics subjected to high radiation flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockaday, M.P.; Blake, R.L.; Grosso, J.S.; Selph, M.M.; Klein, M.M.; Matuska, W. Jr.; Palmer, M.A.; Liefeld, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of metal multilayers was exposed to high x-ray flux using Sandia National Laboratories' PROTO II machine in the gas puff mode. Fluxes incident on the multilayers above 700 MW/cm 2 in total radiation, in nominal 20 ns pulses, were realized. The neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines were used to probe the x-ray reflectivity properties of the multilayers as they underwent change of state during the heating pulse. A fluorescer-fiber optic-streak camera system was used to monitor the changes in x-ray reflectivity as a function of time and irradiance. Preliminary results are presented for a W/C multilayer. Work in progress to model the experiment is discussed. 13 refs., 4 figs

  17. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nautiyal, C.M.; Rao, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed

  18. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  20. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  1. On evaluated nuclear data for beta-delayed gamma rays following of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarini, Leonardo de H.; Caldeira, Alexandre D., E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a new type of information available in ENDF is discussed. During a consistency check of the evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 performed at the Nuclear Data Subdivision of the Institute for Advanced Studies, the size of the files for some materials drew the attention of one of the authors. Almost 94 % of all available information for these special nuclear materials is used to represent the beta-delayed gamma rays following fission. This is the first time this information is included in an ENDF version. (author)

  2. Initial response of an automatic dew-point hygrometer using [beta]-ray backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Shigeaki (Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes the initial response of an automatic dew-point hygrometer using [beta]-ray backscattering. The response time after starting of measurement was evaluated in which the dew point measured with the hygrometer reached a value of 90 percent of the correct dew point in its response. Theoretical calculation was made by means of the loop transfer function of a control system employed in the hygrometer. The response times ranged from 1.7 min to 16 min corresponding to the dew point of 47.5degC and -6degC, respectively, and agreed well with experimental ones. (author).

  3. On evaluated nuclear data for beta-delayed gamma rays following of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mencarini, Leonardo de H.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of information available in ENDF is discussed. During a consistency check of the evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 performed at the Nuclear Data Subdivision of the Institute for Advanced Studies, the size of the files for some materials drew the attention of one of the authors. Almost 94 % of all available information for these special nuclear materials is used to represent the beta-delayed gamma rays following fission. This is the first time this information is included in an ENDF version. (author)

  4. Analytical investigation of energy spectrums of beta rays emitted from 90Sr and 204Tl radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectra of beta rays emitted from 90 Sr and 204 Tl radioisotopes were obtained by using a silicon surface barrier detector with a 1000 μm depleted layer and 50 mm 2 effective area. The detector response function is interpreted by making use of range distributions of mono-energetic electrons in matter and by assuming a linear energy loss along the range in the depleted layer of the detector. An analytical expression is given for pulse height distribution obtained in the surface barrier detector. A good agreement is observed between the experimental results and theoretical interpretation. (author)

  5. Finding AGN in Deep X-ray Flux States with Swift

    OpenAIRE

    Grupe, Dirk; Komossa, S.; Bush, Mason; Pruett, Chelsea; Ernst, Sonny; Barber, Taylor; Carter, Jen; Schartel, Norbert; Rodriguez, Pedro; Santos-Lleó, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We report on our ongoing project of finding Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that go into deep X-ray flux states detected by Swift. Swift is performing an extensive study on the flux and spectral variability of AGN using Guest Investigator and team fill-in programs followed by triggering XMM_Newton for deeper follow-up observations. So far this program has been very successful and has led to a number of XMM-Newton follow up observations, including Mkn 335, PG 0844+349, and RX J2340.8-5329. Recent...

  6. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  7. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  8. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed

  9. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockaday, M.Y.P.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5 0 and 10 0 to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm 2 and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm 2 . 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs

  10. The Correlation between Hard X-Ray Peak Flux and Soft X-Ray Peak Flux in the Outburst Rise of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, W.; van der Klis, M.; Fender, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer pointed observations of the outbursts of black hole and neutron star soft X-ray transients in which an initial low/hard state, or ``island'' state, followed by a transition to a softer state was observed. In three sources-the black hole transient XTE

  11. Compact high-flux two-stage solar collectors based on tailored edge-ray concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robert P.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Ries, Harald

    1995-08-01

    Using the recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach for the design of compact two-stage high-flux solar collectors--a focusing primary reflector and a nonimaging TERC secondary reflector--we present: 1) a new primary reflector shape based on the TERC approach and a secondary TERC tailored to its particular flux map, such that more compact concentrators emerge at flux concentration levels in excess of 90% of the thermodynamic limit; and 2) calculations and raytrace simulations result which demonstrate the V-cone approximations to a wide variety of TERCs attain the concentration of the TERC to within a few percent, and hence represent practical secondary concentrators that may be superior to corresponding compound parabolic concentrator or trumpet secondaries.

  12. Cosmic ray muon flux at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, F.E., E-mail: fgray@regis.ed [Regis University, Department of Physics and Computational Science, 3333 Regis Blvd., Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Department of Physics, 1523 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Ruybal, C.; Totushek, J. [Regis University, Department of Physics and Computational Science, 3333 Regis Blvd., Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Mei, D.-M.; Thomas, K. [University of South Dakota, Department of Physics, 414 E. Clark St., Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Zhang, C. [University of South Dakota, Department of Physics, 414 E. Clark St., Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); China Three Gorges University, College of Science, Yichang 443002 (China)

    2011-05-11

    Measuring the muon flux is important to the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake, for which several low background experiments are being planned. The nearly vertical cosmic ray muon flux was measured in three locations at this laboratory: on the surface (1.149{+-}0.017 x10{sup -2} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}), at the 800 ft (0.712 km w.e.) level (2.67{+-}0.06 x10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}), and at the 2000 ft (1.78 km w.e.) level (2.56{+-}0.25 x10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}). These fluxes agree well with model predictions.

  13. Cosmic ray muon flux at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, F.E.; Ruybal, C.; Totushek, J.; Mei, D.-M.; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the muon flux is important to the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake, for which several low background experiments are being planned. The nearly vertical cosmic ray muon flux was measured in three locations at this laboratory: on the surface (1.149±0.017 x10 -2 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 ), at the 800 ft (0.712 km w.e.) level (2.67±0.06 x10 -6 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 ), and at the 2000 ft (1.78 km w.e.) level (2.56±0.25 x10 -7 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 ). These fluxes agree well with model predictions.

  14. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A.M.

    2016-11-11

    Results characterizing GaAs p{sup +}-i-n{sup +} mesa photodiodes with a 10 µm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 µm and 400 µm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm{sup 2} to 67 nA/cm{sup 2} at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. {sup 55}Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 µm diameter device and one 400 µm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 µm and 740 eV using the 400 µm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. {sup 63}Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 µm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  15. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  16. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  17. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  18. A Long Decay of X-Ray Flux and Spectral Evolution in the Supersoft Active Galactic Nucleus GSN 069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, X. W.; Wang, S. S.; Dou, L. M.; Jiang, N.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, T. G.

    2018-04-01

    GSN 069 is an optically identified very low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGN) that shows supersoft X-ray emission. The source is known to exhibit a huge X-ray outburst, with flux increased by more than a factor of ∼240 compared to the quiescence state. We report its long-term evolution in the X-ray flux and spectral variations over a timescale of ∼decade, using both new and archival X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton and Swift. The new Swift observations detected the source in its lowest level of X-ray activity since the outburst, a factor of ∼4 lower in the 0.2–2 keV flux than that obtained with the XMM-Newton observations nearly eight years ago. Combining with the historical X-ray measurements, we find that the X-ray flux is decreasing slowly. There seemed to be spectral softening associated with the drop of X-ray flux. In addition, we find evidence for the presence of a weak, variable, hard X-ray component, in addition to the dominant thermal blackbody emission reported before. The long decay of X-ray flux and spectral evolution, as well as the supersoft X-ray spectra, suggest that the source could be a tidal disruption event (TDE), though a highly variable AGN cannot be fully ruled out. Further continued X-ray monitoring would be required to test the TDE interpretation, by better determining the flux evolution in the decay phase.

  19. Analytical Model for Estimating the Zenith Angle Dependence of Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Sato

    Full Text Available A new model called "PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA version 4.0" was developed to facilitate instantaneous estimation of not only omnidirectional but also angular differential energy spectra of cosmic ray fluxes anywhere in Earth's atmosphere at nearly any given time. It consists of its previous version, PARMA3.0, for calculating the omnidirectional fluxes and several mathematical functions proposed in this study for expressing their zenith-angle dependences. The numerical values of the parameters used in these functions were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. The angular distributions of ground-level muons at large zenith angles were specially determined by introducing an optional function developed on the basis of experimental data. The accuracy of PARMA4.0 was closely verified using multiple sets of experimental data obtained under various global conditions. This extension enlarges the model's applicability to more areas of research, including design of cosmic-ray detectors, muon radiography, soil moisture monitoring, and cosmic-ray shielding calculation. PARMA4.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in the open-access EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic-ray Spectrum (EXPACS.

  20. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (TXRF) using the high flux SAXS camera

    CERN Document Server

    Wobrauschek, P; Pepponi, G; Bergmann, A; Glatter, O

    2002-01-01

    Combining the high photon flux from a rotating anode X-ray tube with an X-ray optical component to focus and monochromatize the X-ray beam is the most promising instrumentation for best detection limits in the modern XRF laboratory. This is realized by using the design of a high flux SAXS camera in combination with a 4 kW high brilliant rotating Cu anode X-ray tube with a graded elliptically bent multilayer and including a new designed module for excitation in total reflection geometry within the beam path. The system can be evacuated thus reducing absorption and scattering of air and removing the argon peak in the spectra. Another novelty is the use of a Peltier cooled drift detector with an energy resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV and 5 mm sup 2 area. For Co detection limits of about 300 fg determined by a single element standard have been achieved. Testing a real sample NIST 1643d led to detection limits in the range of 300 ng/l for the medium Z.

  1. Progress towards a measurement of the UHE cosmic ray electron flux using the CREST Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jim; Wakely, Scott; Coutu, Stephane; Geske, Matthew; Nutter, Scott; Tarle, Gregory; Park, Nahee; Schubnell, Michael; Gennaro, Joseph; Muller, Dietrich

    2012-07-01

    Electrons of energy beyond about 3 TeV have never been detected in the flux of cosmic rays at Earth despite strong evidence of their presence in a number of supernova remnants (e.g., SN 1006). The detection of high energy electrons at Earth would be extremely significant, yielding information about the spatial distribution of nearby cosmic ray sources. With the Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST), our collaboration has adopted a novel approach to the detection of electrons of energies between 2 and 50 TeV which results in a substantial increase in the acceptance and sensitivity of the apparatus relative to its physics size. The first LDB flight of the CREST detector took place in January 2012, with a float duration of approximately 10 days. In this paper we describe the flight performance of the instrument, and progress in the analysis of the data obtained in this flight.

  2. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  3. High heat flux x-ray monochromators: What are the limits?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.S.

    1997-06-01

    First optical elements at third-generation, hard x-ray synchrotrons, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), are subjected to immense heat fluxes. The optical elements include crystal monochromators, multilayers and mirrors. This paper presents a mathematical model of the thermal strain of a three-layer (faceplate, heat exchanger, and baseplate), cylindrical optic subjected to narrow beam of uniform heat flux. This model is used to calculate the strain gradient of a liquid-gallium-cooled x-ray monochromator previously tested on an undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). The resulting thermally broadened rocking curves are calculated and compared to experimental data. The calculated rocking curve widths agree to within a few percent of the measured values over the entire current range tested (0 to 60 mA). The thermal strain gradient under the beam footprint varies linearly with the heat flux and the ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient to the thermal conductivity. The strain gradient is insensitive to the heat exchanger properties and the optic geometry. This formulation provides direct insight into the governing parameters, greatly reduces the analysis time, and provides a measure of the ultimate performance of a given monochromator

  4. RAPID GAMMA-RAY FLUX VARIABILITY DURING THE 2013 MARCH CRAB NEBULA FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, M.; Buehler, R.; Hays, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Dutka, M. S.; Kerr, M.; Ojha, R.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a bright flare in the Crab Nebula detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The period of significantly increased luminosity occurred in 2013 March and lasted for approximately two weeks. During this period, we observed flux variability on timescales of approximately 5 hr. The combined photon flux above 100 MeV from the pulsar and its nebula reached a peak value of (12.5 ± 0.8) · 10 –6 cm –2 s –1 on 2013 March 6. This value exceeds the average flux by almost a factor of six and implies a ∼20 times higher flux for the synchrotron component of the nebula alone. This is the second brightest flare observed from this source. Spectral and temporal analysis of the LAT data collected during the outburst reveal a rapidly varying synchrotron component of the Crab Nebula while the pulsar emission remains constant in time

  5. GeV GAMMA-RAY FLUX UPPER LIMITS FROM CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Blasi, P.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium (ICM). Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the ICM, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with the decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from 2008 August to 2010 February. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV toward a sample of observed clusters (typical values (1-5) x10 -9 photon cm -2 s -1 ) considering both point-like and spatially resolved models for the high-energy emission and discuss how these results constrain the characteristics of energetic leptons and hadrons, and magnetic fields in the ICM. The volume-averaged relativistic-hadron-to-thermal energy density ratio is found to be <5%-10% in several clusters.

  6. Observation of the thunderstorm-related ground cosmic ray flux variations by ARGO-YBJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gao, W.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; D'Alessandro, F.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A correlation between the secondary cosmic ray flux and the near-earth electric field intensity, measured during thunderstorms, has been found by analyzing the data of the ARGO-YBJ experiment, a full coverage air shower array located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (4300 m a. s. l., Tibet, China). The counting rates of showers with different particle multiplicities (m =1 , 2, 3, and ≥4 ) have been found to be strongly dependent upon the intensity and polarity of the electric field measured during the course of 15 thunderstorms. In negative electric fields (i.e., accelerating negative charges downwards), the counting rates increase with increasing electric field strength. In positive fields, the rates decrease with field intensity until a certain value of the field EFmin (whose value depends on the event multiplicity), above which the rates begin increasing. By using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that this peculiar behavior can be well described by the presence of an electric field in a layer of thickness of a few hundred meters in the atmosphere above the detector, which accelerates/decelerates the secondary shower particles of opposite charge, modifying the number of particles with energy exceeding the detector threshold. These results, for the first time to our knowledge, give a consistent explanation for the origin of the variation of the electron/positron flux observed for decades by high altitude cosmic ray detectors during thunderstorms.

  7. Atmospheric gamma-ray observation with the BETS detectorfor calibrating atmospheric neutrino flux calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kasahara, K.; Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishimura, J.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Honda, M.; Ohuchi, T.; Midorikawa, S.; Yuda, T.

    2002-01-01

    We observed atmospheric gamma-rays around 10 GeV at balloon altitudes (15~25 km) and at a mountain (2770 m a.s.l). The observed results were compared with Monte Carlo calculations to find that an interaction model (Lund Fritiof1.6) used in an old neutrino flux calculation was not good enough for describing the observed values. In stead, we found that two other nuclear interaction models, Lund Fritiof7.02 and dpmjet3.03, gave much better agreement with the observations. Our data will serve for examining nuclear interaction models and for deriving a reliable absolute atmospheric neutrino flux in the GeV region.

  8. Measurement of boron and carbon fluxes in cosmic rays with the PAMELA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Naples " Federico II," I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A. [Department of Physics, University of Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N. [INFN, Sezione di Rome " Tor Vergata," I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Danilchenko, I. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, RU-115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-08-20

    The propagation of cosmic rays inside our galaxy plays a fundamental role in shaping their injection spectra into those observed at Earth. One of the best tools to investigate this issue is the ratio of fluxes for secondary and primary species. The boron-to-carbon (B/C) ratio, in particular, is a sensitive probe to investigate propagation mechanisms. This paper presents new measurements of the absolute fluxes of boron and carbon nuclei as well as the B/C ratio from the PAMELA space experiment. The results span the range 0.44-129 GeV/n in kinetic energy for data taken in the period 2006 July to 2008 March.

  9. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in 10 MeV-Electron irradiated spices, (2); [beta]-ray counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Tadashi; Furuta, Masakazu; Shibata, Setsuko; Matsunami, Tadao; Ito, Norio; Mizohata, Akira; Toratani, Hirokazu (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology); Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1994-02-01

    In order to check radioactivity of beta-emmitters produced by ([gamma], n) reactions which could occur at energies up to 10 MeV, black pepper, white pepper, red pepper, ginger and turmeric were irradiated with 10 MeV electron from a linear accelerator to a dose of 100 kGy. Beta-rays were counted using a 2[pi] gas flow counter and a liquid scintillation counter. Any induced radioactivity could not be detected in irradiated samples. When inorganic compounds containing the nuclides in the list were artificially added in the samples and were irradiated, the [beta]-activities were detected. From the amount of observed radioactivities of [beta]-emmitters produced in the compounds as photonuclear products, it is concluded that the induced radioactivity in natural samples by 10 MeV-electron irradiation were far smaller than natural radioactivity from [sup 40]K contained in the samples and, hence, its biological effects should be negligible. (author).

  10. Simultaneous measurements of helium and heavy nuclei fluxes in cosmic rays over Fort Churchill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, V.S.; Paruthi, S.; Kainth, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    We have made simultaneous measurements of fluxes of He an heavy nuclei (Z< or =10) in primary cosmic rays at three levels of solar activity. These nuclei have been studied in three nuclear emulsion stacks exposed over Fort Churchill, Canada, in 1963, 1964, and 1967. We had earlier reported our results on the heavy nuclei at the Hobart conference (Bhatia et al., 1971). Experimental results based on 1514 He nuclei tracks that were measured in these three stacks are presented in this paper. The experimentally obtained He and heavy nuclei differential energy spectra have been compared with the theoretically calculated near-earth spectra

  11. Variation of cosmic-ray flux and global cloud-coverage

    CERN Document Server

    Svensmark, H

    1998-01-01

    There has long been a search for a physical link between solar activity and the earth's climate. The most direct way the Sun could affect the Earth's climate would be through temporal changes in its luminosity, but observations have shown that these small to explain the observed temperature changes. This does not, however exclude the possibility of an indirect physical mechanism. In the talk it will be shown that the excellent correlations observed between solar activity parameters and climate c link between cosmic ray flux and global cloud cover.

  12. Interpretation of a correlation between the flux densities of extended hard x-rays and microwave solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.J.; Stewart, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    In a previous paper the authors showed that for extended bursts a good correlation exists between the observed 100 keV X-ray flux density and the 3.75 or 9.4 GHz microwave flux density. They now propose a source model for the extended bursts in which the microwave emission comes from thin shells at increasing heights for decreasing frequencies. This model with reasonable parameter values gives the observed microwave spectral characteristics and also explains why the X-ray and microwave flux densities are so well correlated

  13. American National Standard: neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose rate factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This Standard presents data recommended for computing biological dose rates due to neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are given; the energy range for the gamma-ray conversion factors is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Specifically, this Standard is intended for use by shield designers to calculate wholebody dose rates to radiation workers and the general public. Establishing dose-rate limits is outside the scope of this Standard. Use of this Standard in cases where the dose equivalents are far in excess of occupational exposure guidelines is not recommended

  14. ON THE ANTICORRELATION BETWEEN GALAXY LIGHT CONCENTRATION AND X-RAY-TO-OPTICAL FLUX RATIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povic, M.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Fernandez Lorenzo, M.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Cepa, J.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J. I.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) play an important role in many aspects of modern cosmology, and of particular interest is the issue of the interplay between AGNs and their host galaxy. Using X-ray and optical data sets, we have explored the properties of a large sample of AGNs in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field, and studied their evolution in relation with the evolution of their host galaxy. We present here an anticorrelation between X-ray-to-optical flux (X/O) ratio and galaxy light concentration (C), which has been found for the first time and might suggest that early-type galaxies, having poor matter supply to feed the AGN activity, have lower Eddington rates than those of late-type galaxies.

  15. Guidelines for the calibration of low energy photon sources at beta-ray brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Kerma Rate. In this document the latter recommendation is adopted. Both of the quantities give the same numerical value for the source strength and differ only in the units they are expressed. The recommended dose calculation method is discussed further in the text. Sealed beta-ray sources for brachytherapy treatments have been in use for few decades already. An example is application of 90 Sr/ 90 Y planar sources for ophthalmic brachytherapy treatments. For these types of treatments, a precise dose distribution within the eye globe is needed. Modern diagnostic techniques permit the determination of all volumes of interest in the eye, i.e. tumor and critical structures such as optic disc and iris with a high precision. It is therefore of importance to optimize the treatment by limiting the dose to these critical structures. A relatively new and rapidly developing field in brachytherapy is the use of beta-ray sources for prevention of restenosis, i.e. re-closing of artery, following coronary and peripheral artery interventional procedures such as angioplasty, atherectomy and stent implantation. The dosimetry of beta-ray sources for therapeutic applications is particularly difficult due to the short distances involved, being at the millimeter range, and the high dose gradients at such short distances. Further difficulties are caused by the non-uniform distribution of activity in the source itself, causing a highly irregular dose distribution. The aim of this report is to recommend methods for calibration of low energy photon sources and beta-ray sources used in brachytherapy treatments and to propose suitable detectors for this purpose. Dose calculation methods are given both for the photon sources and beta-ray sources covered in this report. The present report has been developed in close collaboration with the ICRU Report Committee on this subject. The ICRU is planning to publish a report on the calibration of the type of sources discussed here. The present report is to

  16. Storage of laser pulses in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity for high flux x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezawa, K.; Honda, Y.; Sasao, N.; Araki, S.; Higashi, Y.; Taniguchi, T.; Urakawa, J.; Nomura, M.; Sakai, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have a plan to produce a high flux x-ray for medical use by using a Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the lower pulses from a mode-locked laser are stored and enhanced. In this plan, the X-ray is produced from the Compton scattering of electrons in a storage ring with the laser light in the optical cavity. In order to increase X-ray flux, high power laser light is necessary. We show the enhancement of the laser power from the model locked laser with a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. (author)

  17. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  18. Low temperature X-ray imaging of magnetic flux patterns in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We present X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) microscopy results obtained at liquid nitrogen temperatures on the high-Tc superconductor YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ). The magnetic flux distribution arising from electric currents in the superconductor is detected and visualized using soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) as sensor layer and XMCD as contrast mechanism. It has been shown that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer directly corresponds to magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and hence can be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors [Stahl et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 104515 (2014)]. The existing scanning UHV X-ray microscopy setup MAXYMUS at the synchrotron BESSY II in Berlin has been upgraded for that purpose: we use a nitrogen based MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson Cryostat with temperature range from 75 K to 580 K. The capability of the method is demonstrated on two different superconducting samples, an optimally doped thin film and a melt-textured block.

  19. Measurement of hydrogen and helium isotopes flux in galactic cosmic rays with the PAMELA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formato, V., E-mail: valerio.formato@ts.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); University of Trieste, Department of Physics, I-34147 Trieste (Italy); Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G.C. [University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); Casolino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Rome “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); and others

    2014-04-01

    PAMELA is a satellite borne experiment designed to study with great accuracy cosmic rays of galactic, solar, and trapped nature, with particular focus on the antimatter component. The detector consists of a permanent magnet spectrometer core to provide rigidity and charge sign information, a Time-of-Flight system for velocity and charge information, a Silicon–Tungsten calorimeter and a Neutron detector for lepton/hadron identification. The velocity and rigidity information allow the identification of different isotopes for Z=1 and Z=2 particles in the energy range 100 MeV/n to 1 GeV/n. In this work we will present the PAMELA results on the H and He isotope fluxes based on the data collected during the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 to 2007. Such fluxes carry relevant information helpful in constraining parameters in galactic cosmic rays propagation models complementary to those obtained from other secondary to primary measurements such as the boron-to-carbon ratio.

  20. Counting efficiency for radionuclides decaying by beta and gamma-ray emission; Calculo de la eficiencia de recuento de nucleidos que experimentan desintegracion beta y desexcitacion gamma simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1988-07-01

    In this paper, counting efficiency vs figure of merit for beta and gamma-ray emitters has been computed. It is assumed that the decay scheme has only a gamma level and the beta-ray emission may be coincident with the gamma-rays or the internal-conversion electrons. The radionuclides tabulated are: 20 {sub 0}, 20{sub p}, 28{sub A}l, 35{sub p}, 41{sub A}r, 42{sub K}, 47{sub S}e, 62{sub F}e, 66{sub C}u, 81{sub G}e, 86{sub B}b, 108{sub R}u, 112{sub p}d, 121{sub S}n(Ni), 122{sub I}n, 129{sub I}, 141{sub C}e 171{sub T}m, 194{sub O}s, 2O3{sub H}g, 205{sub H}g, 210{sub p}b, 225{sub R}a, 142{sub p}r, 151{sub S}m, 244{sub A}m(m). It has been assumed that the liquid is a toluene based scintillator solution in standard glass vials containing 10 cm''3. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  2. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, M.U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S.A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The radionuclide 125 Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125 Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125 Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125 Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125 Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  3. Radiographic x-ray flux monitoring during explosive experiments by copper activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goosman, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    During radiographic experiments involving explosives, it is valuable to have a method of monitoring the X-ray flux ratio between the dynamic experiment and an X-ray taken of a static object for comparison. The standard method of monitoring with thermoluminescent detectors suffers the disadvantages of being sensitive to temperature, shock, UV radiation, cleanliness and saturation. We are studying an additional flux monitoring system which is not subject to any of the above disadvantages and is based upon the 63 Cu(photon,n) 62 Cu reaction. The 62 Cu has a 10 min. half-life and is counted by a nuclear pulse-counting system within a few minutes of an explosive test. 170 MicroCoulomb of 19.3 MeV electrons hitting 1.18mm of Ta produces X-rays which illuminate a 0.8mm thick by 1.6cm diameter Cu disk placed 46cm from the Ta. The activated Cu is placed in a counting system with a window between 400-600 keV and produces about 42500 counts in the first 100 sec counting period. Less than 0.2% of the initial activity is due to other reactions. Photo-induced neutrons in Be parts of the system are shown to produce a negligible effect in the Cu. The main disadvantage of the Cu activation is its sensitivity to electron energy. Monte-Carlo calculations of the excitation function for our accelerator are shown, along with excitation functions for three other configurations

  4. Radiographic x-ray flux monitoring during explosive experiments by copper activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goosman, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    During radiographic experiments involving explosives, it is valuable to have a method of monitoring the x-ray flux ratio between the dynamic experiment and an x-ray taken of a static object for comparison. The standard method of monitoring with thermoluminescent detectors suffers the disadvantages of being sensitive to temperature, shock, uv radiation, cleanliness and saturation. A flux monitoring system is being studied which is not subject to any of the above disadvantages and is based upon the 63Cu(photon,n)62Cu reaction. The 62Cu has a 10 min half life and is counted by a nuclear pulse counting system within a few minutes of an explosive test. 170 microcoulomb of 19.3 MeV electrons hitting 1.18 mm of Ta produces x-rays which illuminate a 0.8mm thick by 1.6 cm diameter Cu disk placed 46 cm from the Ta. The activated Cu is placed in a counting system with a window between 400 to 600 keV and produces about 42,500 counts in the first 100 sec. counting period. Less than 0.2% of the initial activity is due to other reactions. Photo-induced neutrons in Be parts of the system are shown to produce a negligible effect in the Cu. The main disadvantage of the Cu activation is its sensitivity to electron energy. Monte-Carlo calculations of the excitation function for our accelerator are shown, along with excitation functions for three other configurations

  5. Principal component analysis of solar flares in the soft X-ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuber, D.L.; Reichmann, E.J.; Wilson, R.M.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL

    1979-01-01

    Principal component analysis is a technique for extracting the salient features from a mass of data. It applies, in particular, to the analysis of nonstationary ensembles. Computational schemes for this task require the evaluation of eigenvalues of matrices. We have used EISPACK Matrix Eigen System Routines on an IBM 360-75 to analyze full-disk proportional-counter data from the X-ray event analyzer (X-REA) which was part of the Skylab ATM/S-056 experiment. Empirical orthogonal functions have been derived for events in the soft X-ray spectrum between 2.5 and 20 A during different time frames between June 1973 and January 1974. Results indicate that approximately 90% of the cumulative power of each analyzed flare is contained in the largest eigenvector. The first two largest eigenvectors are sufficient for an empirical curve-fit through the raw data and a characterization of solar flares in the soft X-ray flux. Power spectra of the two largest eigenvectors reveal a previously reported periodicity of approximately 5 min. Similar signatures were also obtained from flares that are synchronized on maximum pulse-height when subjected to a principal component analysis. (orig.)

  6. Methods for the reconstruction of large scale anisotropies of the cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Over, Sven

    2010-01-15

    In cosmic ray experiments the arrival directions, among other properties, of cosmic ray particles from detected air shower events are reconstructed. The question of uniformity in the distribution of arrival directions is of large importance for models that try to explain cosmic radiation. In this thesis, methods for the reconstruction of parameters of a dipole-like flux distribution of cosmic rays from a set of recorded air shower events are studied. Different methods are presented and examined by means of detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Particular focus is put on the implications of spurious experimental effects. Modifications of existing methods and new methods are proposed. The main goal of this thesis is the development of the horizontal Rayleigh analysis method. Unlike other methods, this method is based on the analysis of local viewing directions instead of global sidereal directions. As a result, the symmetries of the experimental setup can be better utilised. The calculation of the sky coverage (exposure function) is not necessary in this analysis. The performance of the method is tested by means of further Monte Carlo simulations. The new method performs similarly good or only marginally worse than established methods in case of ideal measurement conditions. However, the simulation of certain experimental effects can cause substantial misestimations of the dipole parameters by the established methods, whereas the new method produces no systematic deviations. The invulnerability to certain effects offers additional advantages, as certain data selection cuts become dispensable. (orig.)

  7. A new method for characterizing beta-ray ophthalmic applicator sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayeg, J.A.; Gregory, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is described which enables one to obtain detailed dose characteristics of 90Sr beta-ray ophthalmic applicators. A radiochromic radiation detector which is a solid-state solution of hexahydroxyethyl pararosaniline cyanide in a nylon polymer (i.e., thin foil), has been used to determine the surface dose rate and dose distribution of these sources. The detectors are rugged, easily handled, have an equivalent response (optical density per unit absorbed dose) to photons and electrons, and produce high-resolution images. They have been found useful for this application due to the high surface dose rates [0.10-1.0 Gy (H2O)/s] and their low sensitivity (approximately 10(4) Gy for an optical density of 1.0). The foils have been evaluated on a He-Ne scanning laser densitometer with a resolution of 0.3 mum. Comparison with NIST (formerly NBS) extrapolation ionization chamber measurements indicates surface dose-rate agreement within 6%. Spectral dosimetric characteristics are presented and discussed

  8. Preliminary soft x-ray studies of beta-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shek, M.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Miyano, K.E.; Ederer, D.L. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dong, Q.Y.; Callcott, T.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-06-01

    We have looked at beta-SiC with soft x-ray emission and photoemission spectroscopy. From the Si L{sub 23} and C K emissions, the Si s+d-like and C p partial density of states in the bulk valence band are identified, and compared with valence band photoemission. In addition to bulk electronic structural features, photoemission from a (3 {times} 2) Si-rich surface shows two surface-derived valence features at {approximately}{minus}2.6 and {approximately}{minus}1.6 eV relative to the Fermi level. The intensities of these valence features vary as those of surface Si 2p core level components shifted by {minus}0.5 eV and {minus}1.4 eV from the bulk-like SiC Si 2p core level. We have also used the Si L{sub 23} absorption edge as a probe of the unfilled states near the conduction, band minimum.

  9. 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, D. [Rush Univ. Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States). Therapeutic Radiology; Mustafi, R. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Schwartz, J.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The effect of 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D{sub 0} values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D{sub 0} values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 {mu}M) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 {mu}M were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo.

  10. A beta ray spectrometer based on a two-, or three-element silicon detector coincidence telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Weizman, Y.; Hirning, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of a beta ray energy spectrometer based on a two-or three-element silicon detector telescope is described. The front detector (A) is a thin, totally depleted, silicon surface barrier detector either 40 μm, 72 μm or 98 μm thick. The back detector (C) is a Li compensated silicon detector, 5000 μm thick. An additional thin detector can be inserted between these two detectors when additional photon rejection capability is required in intense photon fields. The capability of the spectrometer to reject photons is based on the fact that incident photons will have a small probability of simultaneously losing detectable energy in two detectors and an even smaller probability of losing detectable energy in all three detectors. Electrons, however, above a low energy threshold, will always record simultaneous, events in all three detectors. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of 70 keV with 60% efficiency increasing to 100% efficiency in the energy region between 150 keV and 2.5 MeV. (Author)

  11. Erzion interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhutov, Yu. N.

    2001-08-01

    It is discussed the interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT" for the momentum range P > P0 = 30 GeV/c by Erzions, hypothetical heavy stable penetrating hadrons, proposed to explain the anomalous vertical muons energy spectrum at small depth underground. Here it is shown that negative charge of p articles observed in "SKAT" is the same as predicted by theoretical Erzion model. The excess particles flux ( J ˜ 10-5 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 ) corresponds to the Erzion intensity observed by scintillation telescope in our previous experiment. The threshold momentum ( P0 ) and the track length threshold ( L0 = 50 cm of liquid BrF3C) are in good accordance with Erzion stop path as for the single charged particle with mass M ≅ 200 GeV/c2 . But to don't contradict with all previous charge ratio results for cosmic ray muons in 30 - 100 GeV/c momentum range it is necessary to propose for such particles the Solar sporadic origin taking to account that both Erzion observations were in the active Sun years (April 23,1979 & July, 1999). INTRODUCTION. 20 years ago to explain anomalous energy spectrum of vertical cosmic ray muons, observed at sea level and small depth underground (particles were started [4,5,6]. Later the theoretical model U(1)xSUl(2)xSU r(2)xSU(3) of such particles (Erzions) has been created in framework of "mirror" models [7,8], which without contradictions to elementary particles Standard Model has explained large kind of another anomalous results in cosmic rays and nuclear physics [9-19]. At last after almost 20 years Erzions search they have been observed due to small vertical original scintillation telescope "Doch-4" [20,21,22]. The observed Erz ions mass was ME = (175+/-25) GeV/c2 and intensity at sea level - JE = (1.8+/-0.4)ṡ10-6 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 (at EE ≤ 6 GeV, PE ≤ 50 GeV/c2 ). To confirm such Erzion discovery it was undertook the attempt of Erzions search on one of the largest bubble chamber (BC

  12. Correlation of Solar X-ray Flux and SID Modified VLF Signal Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Motivation ...……………………………………………………………………1-1 Background …………………………………………………………………….1-1 Research Objectives ……………………………………………………………1-3 II...SOLAR X-RAY FLUX AND SID MODIFIED VLF SIGNAL STRENGTH I. Introduction 1.1 Motivation The ionosphere greatly influences long wave radio...accomplished by a research group from Cambridge in the late 1940s. The group recorded the 16 kHz signal of the transmitter in Rugby , England, with the call

  13. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Pekárek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5 × 10 5 and 8 × 10 6 photons per mm 2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3 × 10 6 mm − 2 ·s − 1 . Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect.

  14. Design and manufacture of multi-electrode ion chamber for absolute photon-flux measurements of soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden

    2001-03-01

    In order to measure the absolute photon-flux of soft x-rays at the photon energy region from 500 eV to 1500 eV, a sealed gas ion chamber with multi-electrodes was designed and manufactured. Actually we succeeded in measuring the photon-flux at the soft x-ray beamline, BL23SU, in the SPring-8. This report concretely describes the design and the adjustment of the sealed gas ion chamber with multi-electrodes. (author)

  15. Quantitative relationship between VLF phase deviations and 1-8 A solar X-ray fluxes during solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, Y; Murata, H; Sato, T [Hyogo Coll. Of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1977-07-01

    An attempt is made to investigate the quantitative relationship between VLF phase deviations in SPA (sudden phase anomalies) events and associated solar X-ray fluxes in the 1 to 8 A band during solar flares. The phase deviations (..delta..phi) of the 18.6 kHz VLF wave transmitted from NLK, USA are used in this analysis which were recorded at Nishinomiya, Japan during the period June 1974 to May 1975. The solar X-ray fluxes (F/sub 0/) in the 1 to 8 A band are estimated from fsub(min) variations using the empirical expression given by Sato (J.Geomag.Geoelectr.;27: 95(1975)), because no observed data were available on the 1 to 8 a X-ray fluxes during the period of the VLF observation. The result shows that the normalized phase variation, ..delta..phi/coschisub(min), where chisub(min) represents the minimum solar zenith angle on the VLF propagation path, increases with increasing logF/sub 0/. A theoretical explanation for this is presented assuming that enhanced ionizations produced in the lower ionosphere by a monochromatic solar X-ray emission are responsible for the VLF phase deviations. Also it is found that a threshold X-ray flux to produce a detectable SPA effect is approximately 1.5 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ in the 1 to 8 a band.

  16. Calculation of gamma-rays and fast neutrons fluxes with the program Mercure-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Dupont, C.; Totth, B.

    1978-01-01

    The program MERCURE-4 evaluates gamma ray or fast neutron attenuation, through laminated or bulky three-dimensionnal shields. The method used is that of line of sight point attenuation kernel, the scattered rays being taken into account by means of build-up factors for γ and removal cross sections for fast neutrons. The integration of the point kernel over the range of sources distributed in space and energy, is performed by the Monte-Carlo method, with an automatic adjustment of the importance functions. Since it is operationnal the program MERCURE-4 has been intensively used for many various problems, for example: - the calculation of gamma heating in reactor cores, control rods and shielding screens, as well as in experimental devices and irradiation loops; - the evaluation of fast neutron fluxes and corresponding damage in structural materials of reactors (vessel steels...); - the estimation of gamma dose rates on nuclear instrumentation in the reactors, around the reactor circuits and around spent fuel shipping casks

  17. Upper limits of a cosmic infrared background flux as determined by X- and gamma-ray observations on M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Cambridge Univ.; Harwit, M.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1982-01-01

    Upper limits on the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions of M87 are derived using measurements of the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. The calculations are based on an inverse Compton scattering model initiated by radio-flux producing electrons. It is shown that the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions is similar than 2 eV cm -3 . (orig.)

  18. Determining the primary cosmic ray energy from the total flux of Cherenkov light measured at the Yakutsk EAS array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Knurenko, S. P.; Sleptsov, I. E.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for determining the energy of the primary particle that generates an extensive air shower (EAS) of comic rays based on measuring the total flux of Cherenkov light from the shower. Applying this method to Cherenkov light measurements at the Yakutsk EAS array has allowed us to construct the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range 10 15 - 3 x 10 19 eV

  19. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  20. Estimation of mineral concentration in bone samples by backscattering of beta-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, J.; Marten, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The method of using backscattered β-rays for the determination of density is used for the first time to measure the mineral concentration in specimens of bone and its usefulness as an aid in the diagnosis of osteopathies is investigated. The reliability of the technique is studied on the basis of methodical examinations employing model substances that are similar in composition to bone. For the geometry chosen for the measureing set-up, a calibration is carried out both for the determination of the effective atomic number and for the mineral concentration of measuring samples. The axial-symmetrical arrangement chose, permits the determination of the concentration to an accuracy of max. +-1% standard deviation. In agreement with computed deviations experiments confirm that with this set-up there is no dependence of the backscatter on sample density. After appropriate calibration, both mineral concentration and density can be measured in two suitable fixed positions of the beta source, sample and detector. The figure for mineral concentration calculated from the backscattering rates are compared with corresponding figure obtained with analytical chemical determinations. It can be seen that two methods have a high degree of agreement. The backscatter method seems to have the advantage of simplicity of the set-up that provides accurate results in thin specimens having a diameter of only 10 mm. With repect to measurements in bone, however, the method is limited to biopsy specimens obtained from compact bone. In such samples, however, both the absolute figure for mineral concentration can be determined and also its local variation in large parts of the skeleton examined. From the mineral concentration and density, the mineral content of the bone substance is computed; this provides differential diagnostic information on osteopathic conditions. (orig.) [de

  1. Evolution of cosmic ray fluxes during the rising phase of solar cycle 23: ULYSSES EPAC and COSPIN/KET observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heber, B.; Keppler, E.; Blake, J.B.; Fraenz, M.; Kunow, H.

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are entering the heliosphere from the interstellar medium, while anomalous cosmic rays are believed to be pickup ions accelerated at the heliospheric termination shock. Both particle species are modulated by the solar wind and the heliospheric magnetic field. Since 1997 solar activity increased and as a consequence the flux of galactic and anomalous cosmic ray decreased. In this paper we will discuss the variation of low energy anomalous cosmic rays as measured by the Ulysses Energetic Particle Composition Experiment (EPAC) and the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) on board Ulysses. Specifically we are addressing the question: Are there differences in the modulation of galactic and anomalous cosmic rays and what are possible implication for the modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere?

  2. Understanding the Effect of Atmospheric Density on the Cosmic Ray Flux Variations at the Earth Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Dayananda, Mathes; Zhang, Xiaohang; Butler, Carola; He, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    We report in this letter for the first time the numerical simulations of muon and neutron flux variations at the surface of the earth with varying air densities in the troposphere and stratosphere. The simulated neutron and muon flux variations are in very good agreement with the measured neutron flux variation in Oulu and the muon flux variation in Atlanta. We conclude from this study that the stratosphere air density variation dominates the effects on the muon flux changes while the density...

  3. The flux distribution from a 1.25m2 target aligned heliostat: comparison of ray tracing and experimental results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maliage, M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to validate SolTrace for concentrating solar investigations at CSIR by means of a test case: the comparison of the flux distribution in the focal spot of a 1.25 m2 target aligned heliostat predicted by the ray tracing...

  4. Measurement of gamma ray flux within the containment building at the first unit of Kori nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. W.; Kim, K. D.; Yoon, C. H.; Han, J. M.; Hu, Y. H. [Korea Hydraulic and Nuclear Power Company, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate gamma ray dose response of GM counter being used for monitoring of gamma ray field in nuclear power plants, gamma ray energy spectra and fluxes were obtained for three positions at the unit 1 of the Kori nuclear power station. By applying the response values of Eberline's E112B survey meter to the results, the doses represented on the survey meter were overestimated from 1.31 to 1.37 times when compared to the real doses for these three positions.

  5. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, Stephen; Stahl, Claudia; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The penetration of magnetic flux into the high-temperature superconductor YBCO has been observed using a new high-resolution technique based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Superconductors coated with thin soft magnetic layers of CoFeB are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope providing cooling of the sample down to 83 K under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electrical currents create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor which leads to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. X-ray absorption measurements with circular polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor via the ferromagnetic layer. In this work we present first images taken at 83K with high spatial resolution in the nanoscale.

  6. Investigating the suitability of GaAs:Cr material for high flux X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Duarte, D. D.; French, M. J.; Hart, M.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Novikov, V. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-insulating wafers of GaAs material with a thickness of 500μm have been compensated with chromium by Tomsk State University. Initial measurements have shown the material to have high resistivity (3 × 109Ωcm) and tests with pixel detectors on a 250 μm pitch produced uniform spectroscopic performance across an 80 × 80 pixel array. At present, there is a lack of detectors that are capable of operating at high X-ray fluxes (> 108 photons s-1 mm-2) in the energy range 5-50 keV. Under these conditions, the poor stopping power of silicon, as well as issues with radiation hardness, severely degrade the performance of traditional detectors. While high-Z materials such as CdTe and CdZnTe may have much greater stopping power, the formation of space charge within these detectors degrades detector performance. Initial measurements made with GaAs:Cr detectors suggest that many of its material properties make it suitable for these challenging conditions. In this paper the radiation hardness of the GaAs:Cr material has been measured on the B16 beam line at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron. Small pixel detectors were bonded to the STFC Hexitec ASIC and were irradiated with 3 × 108 photons s-1 mm-2 monochromatic 12 keV X-rays up to a maximum dose of 0.6 MGy. Measurements of the spectroscopic performance before and after irradiation have been used to assess the extent of the radiation damage.

  7. Computation of the Transmitted and Polarized Scattered Fluxes by the Exoplanet HD 189733b in X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Frédéric [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences, Boční II 1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Grosso, Nicolas, E-mail: frederic.marin@astro.unistra.fr [Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2017-02-01

    Thousands of exoplanets have been detected, but only one exoplanetary transit was potentially observed in X-rays from HD 189733A. What makes the detection of exoplanets so difficult in this band? To answer this question, we run Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations to estimate the amount of X-ray flux reprocessed by HD 189733b. Despite its extended evaporating atmosphere, we find that the X-ray absorption radius of HD 189733b at 0.7 keV, which is the mean energy of the photons detected in the 0.25–2 keV energy band by XMM-Newton , is ∼1.01 times the planetary radius for an atmosphere of atomic hydrogen and helium (including ions), and produces a maximum depth of ∼2.1% at ∼±46 minutes from the center of the planetary transit on the geometrically thick and optically thin corona. We compute numerically in the 0.25–2 keV energy band that this maximum depth is only of ∼1.6% at ∼±47 minutes from the transit center, and not very sensitive to the metal abundance, assuming that adding metals in the atmosphere would not dramatically change the density–temperature profile. Regarding a direct detection of HD 189733b in X-rays, we find that the amount of flux reprocessed by the exoplanetary atmosphere varies with the orbital phase, spanning between three and five orders of magnitude fainter than the flux of the primary star. Additionally, the degree of linear polarization emerging from HD 189733b is <0.003%, with maximums detected near planetary greatest elongations. This implies that both the modulation of the X-ray flux with the orbital phase and the scatter-induced continuum polarization cannot be observed with current X-ray facilities.

  8. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate ∼.05 V/rad responsivity with ≥1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ''peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10 5 to 10 7 n/cm 2 range indicate smearing over ∼1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels

  9. Rapid method of identification of {beta}-ray emitters and of {beta}-radioactive impurity dosage (1961); Methode rapide d'identification des emetteurs-{beta} et de dosage d'impuretes radioactives-{beta} (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gallic, Y; Legrand, J; Grinberg, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We describe a simple method of radioactive analysis, which allows an accurate determination of maximal energies of {beta}-emitters, and detection and titration of radioactive impurities in radionuclides as well. The method described, which uses a plastic scintillator, is based on the fact that the curve obtained by plotting the number of pulses measured against the threshold is a straight line, in the case of pure {beta}-emitters. We then derive a simple relation between the data of this straight line and the maximal energy of the {beta}-spectrum of the radionuclide under consideration. (authors) [French] Description d'une methode simple d'analyse radioactive, permettant de determiner avec precision l'energie maximum des emetteurs-{beta}, ainsi que de deceler et de doser les impuretes radioactives dans un radionuclide. La technique decrite utilise un scintillateur plastique. On exploite le fait que la courbe du nombre d'impulsions mesurees, en fonction du seuil de discrimination, est une droite, pour un emetteur-{beta} pur. Une relation simple entre les caracteristiques de cette droite et l'energie maximum du spectre-{beta} du radionuclide, correspondant, a ete etablie. (auteurs)

  10. Special features of the inverse-beta-decay reaction proceeding on a proton in a reactor-antineutrino flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeikin, V. I., E-mail: kopeikin46@yandex.ru; Skorokhvatov, M. D., E-mail: skorokhvatov-md@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The evolution of the reactor-antineutrino spectrum and the evolution of the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction in the course of reactor operation and after reactor shutdown are considered. The present-day status in determining the initial reactor-antineutrino spectrum on the basis of spectra of beta particles from mixtures of products originating from uranium and plutonium fission is described. A local rise of the experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos with respect to the expected spectrum is studied.

  11. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10{sup 13} photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO{sub 2} converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  12. Beta-glucan ameliorates gamma-rays induced oxidative injury in male Swiss albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.F.

    2011-01-01

    1,3-beta-D-Glucan is a natural polysaccharide derived from the cell walls of bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevsiae with immunoenhancing and potent antioxidant effects. This study investigated the pathways through which beta-glucan gavage treatment (50mg/kg) exerts its effect on radiation-induced oxidative damage in male rats. Beta-glucan was given orally to male rats; 3 hours post gamma-irradiation at dose 5Gy, for 10 and 20 days post-irradiation level were assayed, being remarkable indicators in cell oxidative stress. Results pointed out that irradiation at 5Gy significantly depressed all blood parameters, such as erythrocytes count (RBCs), hemoglobin content (Hb), hematocrit value (Hct), total leucocytes count and absolute lymphocytes and neutrophils counts, blood glutathione (GSH) level and conversely elevated level of serum ascorbyl radical (AsR), product of lipid peroxidation (MDA melanodialdehyde), triglycerides and cholesterol. Total leucocytes count and absolute lymphocytes and neutrophils counts, RBCs, Hb, Hct, blood GSH and serum MDA of irradiated animals receiving beta-glucan administration were exhibited significant differences compared to the irradiated group. Marrow count and the percentage of viability and spleenocytes viability were also significantly decreased. Beta-glucan treatment accelerates recovery of cell damage induced by ionizing irradiation through its potential immune-enhancing activity and free radical scavenging ability that is partially mediated through stimulation of immunohaematological system thus could play a role in regulating irradiation complications

  13. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  14. The imaging pin detector - a simple and effective new imaging device for soft x-rays and soft beta emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a new bidimensional imaging detector system for soft X and beta radiations is reported. Based on the detection of the differential induction signals on pickup electrodes placed around a point anode in a gas avalanche detector, the system described has achieved a spatial resolution of better than 1mm fwhm over a field of 30mm diameter while preserving excellent pulse height resolution. The present device offers considerable potential as a cheap and robust imaging system for applications in X-ray diffraction and autoradiography. (author)

  15. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the

  16. Investigation of beta ray attenuation in CaSO4:Dy(Tm)-teflon rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, P.P.

    1990-12-01

    Ultrathin discs were prepared from CaSO 4 :Dy(Tm)-teflon rods by cutting them with a microtom. The effect of cutting was studied experimentally. It was found that the cutting does not affect the TL signal of the discs, so one will be able to irradiate the rod and cut it afterwards which means that this method can be applied in the dosimetry of boundaries or to establish the energy of beta radiation. Depth dose distribution measurements were carried out by irradiating the rods with beta sources. (K.A.) 5 refs.; 6 figs

  17. RBE of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than myeloid leukemia in male CBA/H mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Jackson, J.S.; Dunford, D.W.

    1991-05-01

    Causes of death were examined for 5,206 male CBA/H mice which had previously been treated with tritiated water or with X rays at comparable doses and comparable dose rates. Data on induced myeloid leukemia had been examined in detail in a previous report. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than mye-loid leukemia. However, no consistent values for the tritium relative biological effectiveness were obtained. The values were spread over a wide range for different endpoints and were generally less reliable than those for induction of myeloid leukemia. A surprising decrease in time to death of animals without tumours was observed in the irradiated groups of mice. This observation suggests that a detailed review of recent data on non-specific life shortening in irradiated animals and humans might be useful

  18. Oscillations in the open solar magnetic flux with a period of 1.68 years: imprint on galactic cosmic rays and implications for heliospheric shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rouillard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of how the heliosphere modulates galactic cosmic ray (GCR fluxes and spectra is important, not only for studies of their origin, acceleration and propagation in our galaxy, but also for predicting their effects (on technology and on the Earth's environment and organisms and for interpreting abundances of cosmogenic isotopes in meteorites and terrestrial reservoirs. In contrast to the early interplanetary measurements, there is growing evidence for a dominant role in GCR shielding of the total open magnetic flux, which emerges from the solar atmosphere and enters the heliosphere. In this paper, we relate a strong 1.68-year oscillation in GCR fluxes to a corresponding oscillation in the open solar magnetic flux and infer cosmic-ray propagation paths confirming the predictions of theories in which drift is important in modulating the cosmic ray flux. Key words. Interplanetary physics (Cosmic rays, Interplanetary magnetic fields

  19. Observation of the suppression of the flux of cosmic rays above 4x10(19) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Backer, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Mer, H. Blu; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; Junior, W. J. M. de Mello; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; Garcia, B.; Gamez, D. Garcia; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; do Amaral, M. Goncalves; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, M.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Aguera, A. Lopez; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Lucero, A.; Garcia, R. Luna; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Mancenido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Bravo, O. Martinez; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Martino, J. Rodriguez; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; De Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdes; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 2.5 x 10(18) eV, derived from 20 000 events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory, is described. The spectral index gamma of the particle flux, J proportional to E(-gamma), at energies between 4 x 10(18) eV and 4 x 10(19) eV is 2.69 +/- 0.02(stat) +/-

  20. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high-energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiati Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to derive the inclusive differential spectra (yields of muons, muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos at the surface for energies between 80 GeV and hundreds of PeV. Using these results the differential flux and the flavor ratios of leptons were calculated. The air shower simulator CORSIKA 6.990 was used for showering and propagation of the secondary particles through the atmosphere, employing the established high energy hadronic interaction models SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJet-01 and QGSJet-II-03. We show that the performance of the interaction models allows makes it possible to predict the spectra within experimental uncertainties, while SIBYLL generally yields a higher flux at the surface than the QGSJet models. The calculation of the flavor and charge ratios has lead to inconsistent results, mainly influenced by the different representations of the K/π ratio within the models. The influence of the knee of cosmic rays is reflected in the secondary spectra at energies between 100 and 200 TeV. Furthermore, we could quantify systematic uncertainties of atmospheric muon- and neutrino fluxes, associated to the models of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and the interaction models. For most recent parametrizations of the cosmic ray primary spectrum, atmospheric muons can be determined with an uncertainty smaller than +15/-13% of the average flux. Uncertainties of the muon and electron neutrino fluxes can be calculated within an average error of +32/-22% and +25

  1. Change in the aldolase activity in rats' hearts after irradiation with. gamma. and. beta. rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukulyanskaya, M F; Borodina, G N

    1973-01-01

    The activity of aldolase fructoso-1-phosphate (I) and aldolase fructoso-1, 6-diphosphate (II) has been studied at various periods after total ..gamma.. and ..beta.. irradiation of rats at a dose of 42 rads. It has been shown that after ..gamma.. irradiation the activity of I increases in the supernatant liquid of the heart muscle homogenate, but drops sharply in the nuclei. In total, the activity of the homogenate did not change. The activity of II dropped for seven days, and after 1 hour and 30 days it was above the normal level. After ..beta.. radiation the activity of II is slowed down after 1, 7, and 15 days. These changes occur in all subcellular fractions. The authors note that the changes in the activity of aldolases are more sharply demarcated after ..gamma.. irradiation and are more substantial for II. (JPRS)

  2. High-resolution metallic magnetic calorimeters for {beta}-spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium and position resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2011-02-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass measurements and their advantages with respect to other approaches are discussed. In view of this application the development of an MMC optimized for {beta}-endpoint spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium is presented. A fully micro-fabricated X-ray detector is characterized and performs close to design values. Furthermore, a new technique to more efficiently couple rhenium absorbers mechanically and thermally to the sensor was developed and successfully tested. By employing a metallic contact, signal rise times faster than 5 {mu}s could be observed with superconducting rhenium absorbers. In addition to the single pixel detectors, an alternative approach of reading out multiple pixels was developed in this work, too. Here, the individual absorbers have a different thermal coupling to only one temperature sensor resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise time analysis is demonstrated for a four pixel MMC and a thermal model of the detector is provided. Unprecedented so far, an energy resolution of less than {delta}E{sub FWHM}<5 eV for 5.9 keV X-rays was achieved across all absorbers. (orig.)

  3. CERES Monthly Gridded Single Satellite Fluxes and Clouds (FSW) in HDF (CER_FSW_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Beta1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator); Barkstrom, Bruce R. (Principal Investigator)

    The Monthly Gridded Radiative Fluxes and Clouds (FSW) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The FSW is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous fluxes from the CERES CRS product for a month are sorted by 1-degree spatial regions and by the Universal Time (UT) hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-hour bin is determined and recorded on the FSW along with other flux statistics and scene information. The mean adjusted fluxes at the four atmospheric levels defined by CRS are also included for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. In addition, four cloud height categories are defined by dividing the atmosphere into four intervals with boundaries at the surface, 700-, 500-, 300-hPa, and the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA). The cloud layers from CRS are put into one of the cloud height categories and averaged over the region. The cloud properties are also column averaged and included on the FSW. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2000-03-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=1 degree; Horizontal_Resolution_Range=100 km - < 250 km or approximately 1 degree - < 2.5 degrees; Temporal_Resolution=1 month; Temporal_Resolution_Range=Monthly - < Annual].

  4. Discrepancies between soft x-ray emissivity contours and magnetic flux surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, M.C.; Granetz, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The soft x-ray diagnostic system of Alcator C-Mod, equipped with 152 detectors distributed in four arrays, is used to obtain iso-emissivity surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by giving their elongation and relative shift from the centre of the tokamak as functions of plasma radius. Flux surfaces, provided by magnetic diagnostics, have also been described with elongation and shift. Results from the comparison of the two sets of geometric parameters obtained from magnetic and x-ray diagnostics are presented. We find that, whereas the shifts obtained from these two diagnostic methods are always in good agreement, the corresponding elongation curves show different patterns. An agreement between elongations better than 2% is only found in a range of about 2 cm in minor radius. On the other hand, the elongations can differ by 10% towards the plasma edge and the plasma centre. Error bars for the x-ray diagnostic are obtained by propagating the effect of ± 1% random errors at the detector signals, and can amount to ± 1-2% of the estimated values near the edge and the centre of the plasma. The estimated uncertainties in the determination of elongation from magnetic flux surfaces are of the order of 4%. A series of tests and simulations performed to verify the accuracy of the X-ray diagnostic system is presented. The discrepancies found could imply the existence of asymmetries in impurity concentration. (Author)

  5. Indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy: a targeted approach to increase biological efficiency of x-rays based on energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaria, Sianne; Corde, Stéphanie; Lerch, Michael L F; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Tehei, Moeava

    2015-10-21

    Despite the use of multimodal treatments incorporating surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, local control of gliomas remains a major challenge. The potential of a new treatment approach called indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy using the synergy created by combining methotrexate (MTX) with bromodeoxyuridine (BrUdR) under optimum energy x-ray irradiation is assessed. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells pre-treated with 0.01 μM MTX and/or 10 μM BrUdR were irradiated in vitro with 50 kVp, 125 kVp, 250 kVp, 6 MV and 10 MV x-rays. The cytotoxicity was assessed using clonogenic survival as the radiobiological endpoint. The photon energy with maximum effect was determined using radiation sensitization enhancement factors at 10% clonogenic survival (SER10%). The cell cycle distribution was investigated using flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide staining. Incorporation of BrUdR in the DNA was detected by the fluorescence of labelled anti-BrUdR antibodies. The radiation sensitization enhancement exhibits energy dependence with a maximum of 2.3 at 125 kVp for the combined drug treated cells. At this energy, the shape of the clonogenic survival curve of the pharmacological agents treated cells changes substantially. This change is interpreted as an increased lethality of the local radiation environment and is attributed to supplemented inhibition of DNA repair. Radiation induced chemo-beta therapy was demonstrated in vitro by the targeted activation of combined pharmacological agents with optimized energy tuning of x-ray beams on 9 L cells. Our results show that this is a highly effective form of chemo-radiation therapy.

  6. Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Aharmim, B; Peeters, S J M; SNO Collaboration,

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between $-1 \\le \\cos{\\theta}_{\\rm zenith} \\le 0.4$ in a tota...

  7. The Local Time Dependence of the Anisotropic Solar Cosmic Ray Flux

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smart, D. F

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the solar cosmic radiation flux over the earth is not uniform, but the result of complex phenomena involving the interplanetary magnetic field, the geomagnetic field and latitude...

  8. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  9. Study of cosmic ray interaction model based on atmospheric muons for the neutrino flux calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, T.; Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the hadronic interaction for the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by summarizing the accurately measured atmospheric muon flux data and comparing with simulations. We find the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes respond to errors in the π-production of the hadronic interaction similarly, and compare the atmospheric muon flux calculated using the HKKM04 [M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043008 (2004).] code with experimental measurements. The μ + +μ - data show good agreement in the 1∼30 GeV/c range, but a large disagreement above 30 GeV/c. The μ + /μ - ratio shows sizable differences at lower and higher momenta for opposite directions. As the disagreements are considered to be due to assumptions in the hadronic interaction model, we try to improve it phenomenologically based on the quark parton model. The improved interaction model reproduces the observed muon flux data well. The calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux will be reported in the following paper [M. Honda et al., Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).

  10. Analysis of alloys and salt solutions by 'beta'-ray back-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadur, A; Maji, K D; Kumar, R [National Metallurgical Lab., Jamshedpur (India)

    1975-07-01

    This investigation reports the results of a study undertaken to assess the suitability of using the GM counter for measuring the intensity of ..beta..-backscattered radiation to determine the chemical composition of binary solid alloys, and aqueous salt solutions containing a metallic radical. The results indicate that the technique is not suitable for the determination of the composition of binary alloys since the error is in the range of 1.2 to 2.3 wt-% metal. The technique can be conveniently adapted for aqueous salt solutions where the maximum error is approximately 0.2 wt-% metal for metallic elements with atomic number greater than 20.

  11. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Aeromonas hydrophilia metallo-[beta]-lactamase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, N.; Toney, J.H.; Fitzgerald, P.M.D. (Merck)

    2010-07-20

    The CphA metallo-{beta}-lactamase from Aeromonas hydrophilia has been expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals exhibit orthorhombic symmetry (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = 40.75, b = 42.05, c = 128.88 {angstrom}. There is one monomer in the asymmetric unit and the solvent content is estimated to be 44% by volume. A data set extending to 1.8 {angstrom} has been measured.

  12. THE TRANSIENT ACCRETING X-RAY PULSAR XTE J1946+274: STABILITY OF X-RAY PROPERTIES AT LOW FLUX AND UPDATED ORBITAL SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST and Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kühnel, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian; Falkner, Sebastian; Kreykenbohm, Ingo [Dr. Karl Remeis-Observatory and ECAP, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Sternwartstr. 7, Bamberg (Germany); Caballero, Isabel [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, CEA DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Finger, Mark H. [Universities Space Research Association, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Jenke, Peter J. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Grinberg, Victoria [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Klochkov, Dmitry [Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universität Tübingen (IAAT), Sand 1, Tübingen (Germany); Terada, Yukikatsu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Simo-Ohkubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); and others

    2015-12-10

    We present a timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 observed with Suzaku during an outburst decline in 2010 October and compare with previous results. XTE J1946+274 is a transient X-ray binary consisting of a Be-type star and a neutron star with a 15.75 s pulse period in a 172 days orbit with 2–3 outbursts per orbit during phases of activity. We improve the orbital solution using data from multiple instruments. The X-ray spectrum can be described by an absorbed Fermi–Dirac cut-off power-law model along with a narrow Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV and a weak Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) at ∼35 keV. The Suzaku data are consistent with the previously observed continuum flux versus iron line flux correlation expected from fluorescence emission along the line of sight. However, the observed iron line flux is slightly higher, indicating the possibility of a higher iron abundance or the presence of non-uniform material. We argue that the source most likely has only been observed in the subcritical (non-radiation dominated) state since its pulse profile is stable over all observed luminosities and the energy of the CRSF is approximately the same at the highest (∼5 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1}) and lowest (∼5 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}) observed 3–60 keV luminosities.

  13. A study on radiation safety measures for the use of high-energy beta-ray sources in medical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Jo [Cheju National Univ., Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The scope of this study consists of : an investigation of the current application status of medical radioisotopes, Sr-90, Ho-166, Re-188, which emit beta-rays of energy greater than 1.5 Mev, analyses of the environments under which the above isotopes are used, estimation of personal radiation doses by using the MCNP-4C computer code for the situations in which high radiation doses might be probable, review of the USA's regulations related to safe use of the radioisotopes, investigation of past over-expose cases reported in the internet, analysis of the current domestic regulations, suggestion of safety measures necessary for the use of the radioisotopes.

  14. Numerical modeling of the sensitivity of x-ray driven implosions to low-mode flux asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H H; Clark, D S; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Edwards, M J; Haan, S W; Jones, O S; Spears, B K; Marinak, M M; Town, R P J; Norreys, P A; Suter, L J

    2013-02-15

    The sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions, of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1], to low-mode flux asymmetries is investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P(4), resulting from low-order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the deuterium and tritium (DT) "ice" layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of implosion kinetic energy to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing the neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images of the hot spot self-emission indicate that P(4) shapes may be unquantifiable for DT layered capsules. Instead the positive P(4) asymmetry "aliases" itself as an oblate P(2) in the x-ray images. Correction of this apparent P(2) distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed postshot two-dimensional simulations.

  15. Internal structure and stability of an interstellar cloud heated by an external flux of soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabano, Yutaka; Tosa, Makoto

    1975-01-01

    We study the properties of an interstellar gas cloud which is heated by an external flux of soft X-rays and has a uniform pressure distribution. The heating flux is significantly attenuated inside the cloud even for a rather small cloud, and the central region of the cloud is much cooler and denser than that heated uniformly, hence the cloud can be compressed easier. The stability of such a gas cloud and its implications for the process of star formation are discussed on the basis of the two-phase model of the interstellar medium. The large scale galactic shock seems important as a triggering mechanism for the formation of a dense cloud and for the gravitational collapse leading to star formation. (author)

  16. Angular dependence of Ll, L $\\alpha$ , L $\\beta$ and L $\\gamma$ X-ray differential and fluorescence cross-sections for Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg and Tl

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, L; Kurucu, Y; Karabulut, A; Sahin, Y; 10.1016/S0969-806X(02)00501-7

    2003-01-01

    Ll, L alpha , L beta and L gamma X-ray differential cross-sections, fluorescence cross-sections and L/sub i/-subshell ( sigma /sub L1/, sigma /sub L2/, and sigma /sub L3/) fluorescence cross-sections were measured for Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg, and Tl at an excitation energy of 59.6 keV using a Si(Li) detector. The differential cross-sections for these elements have been measured at different angles varying from 54 degrees to 153 degrees at intervals of 9 degrees . The Ll and L alpha groups in the L X-ray lines are found to be spatially anisotropic, while those in the L beta and L gamma peaks are isotropic. Experimental and theoretical values of L X-ray fluorescence cross- sections and L/sub i/-subshell X-ray fluorescence cross-sections were compared. (20 refs).

  17. Measurement of the ultra high energy cosmic ray flux from data of very inclined showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembinski, Hans Peter

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the derivation of the energy dependent flux of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from data of very inclined air showers observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory. It focuses on the event class of very inclined air showers with zenith angles larger than 60 . The lateral ground profile of these showers is muon dominated and not radially symmetric around the shower axis due to geomagnetic deflections and other effects. The dependency of this profile on the direction, energy and mass of the cosmic ray is discussed with a mixture of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and a simplified analytical model of the air shower cascade. It is found in agreement with other studies that the normalized shape of the muon density profile is approximately universal over the range of cosmic ray energies and masses measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory, that the amplitude of the profile is almost proportional to the cosmic ray energy, and that its shower-to-shower fluctuations are sensitive to the mass composition of the cosmic rays. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of the ultra high energy cosmic ray flux from data of very inclined showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Hans Peter

    2009-12-03

    This work describes the derivation of the energy dependent flux of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from data of very inclined air showers observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory. It focuses on the event class of very inclined air showers with zenith angles larger than 60 . The lateral ground profile of these showers is muon dominated and not radially symmetric around the shower axis due to geomagnetic deflections and other effects. The dependency of this profile on the direction, energy and mass of the cosmic ray is discussed with a mixture of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and a simplified analytical model of the air shower cascade. It is found in agreement with other studies that the normalized shape of the muon density profile is approximately universal over the range of cosmic ray energies and masses measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory, that the amplitude of the profile is almost proportional to the cosmic ray energy, and that its shower-to-shower fluctuations are sensitive to the mass composition of the cosmic rays. (orig.)

  19. Analytical Model for Estimating Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes Nearly Anytime and Anywhere in the World: Extension of PARMA/EXPACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Sato

    Full Text Available By extending our previously established model, here we present a new model called "PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA version 3.0," which can instantaneously estimate terrestrial cosmic ray fluxes of neutrons, protons, ions with charge up to 28 (Ni, muons, electrons, positrons, and photons nearly anytime and anywhere in the Earth's atmosphere. The model comprises numerous analytical functions with parameters whose numerical values were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower (EAS simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. The accuracy of the EAS simulation was well verified using various experimental data, while that of PARMA3.0 was confirmed by the high R2 values of the fit. The models to be used for estimating radiation doses due to cosmic ray exposure, cosmic ray induced ionization rates, and count rates of neutron monitors were validated by investigating their capability to reproduce those quantities measured under various conditions. PARMA3.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in an open-access software program EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic ray Spectrum (EXPACS. Because of these features, the new version of PARMA/EXPACS can be an important tool in various research fields such as geosciences, cosmic ray physics, and radiation research.

  20. Continuous gamma-ray spectrometry in the fast flux test facility (FFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.; Moore, F.S. Jr.; Bunch, W.L.; McElroy, W.N.; Sheen, E.M.

    1980-03-01

    In-core Compton-recoil γ-ray spectrometry was carried out in FFTF at very low power in the In-Reactor Thimble (IRT). The lower-energy electron spectrum at the FFTF-IRT midplane and the unfolded γ-ray spectrum are shown. 2 figures

  1. Estimation of electron temperature of micropinch discharge plasma according to attenuation of X-ray flux in photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averin, M.S.; Bajkov, A.Yu.; Bashutin, O.A.; Vovchenko, E.D.; Dmitrusenko, A.S.; Savelov, A.S.; Li San-wei

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray flux generated by the micropinch discharge on the heavy-current pulsed micropinch device Zona-2 is investigated. The study of the spatial structure and the spectral composition of X radiation of the micropinch plasma is carried out by means of the experimental installation which consists of the three-channel camera-obscure, the set of absorbing filters (Ti-Fe, Fe-Cu, Zn-Se filters) , two focusing spherical spectrographs and the plastic scintillation detector NE111. The spatial distribution of the electron temperature is determined on plasma images in X-rays behind different filters. The form of attenuation curves gives the evidence of the presence of two groups of electrons with different energies in the micropinch range: the thermal electron temperature ∼ 1.9 ± 0.7 keV and the epithermal electron temperature ∼ 20 ± 8 keV [ru

  2. Flux decay during thermonuclear X-ray bursts analysed with the dynamic power-law index method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuttila, J.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Nättilä, J.; Motta, S. E.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Cumming, A.; Poutanen, J.

    2017-08-01

    The cooling of type-I X-ray bursts can be used to probe the nuclear burning conditions in neutron star envelopes. The flux decay of the bursts has been traditionally modelled with an exponential, even if theoretical considerations predict power-law-like decays. We have analysed a total of 540 type-I X-ray bursts from five low-mass X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We grouped the bursts according to the source spectral state during which they were observed (hard or soft), flagging those bursts that showed signs of photospheric radius expansion (PRE). The decay phase of all the bursts were then fitted with a dynamic power-law index method. This method provides a new way of probing the chemical composition of the accreted material. Our results show that in the hydrogen-rich sources the power-law decay index is variable during the burst tails and that simple cooling models qualitatively describe the cooling of presumably helium-rich sources 4U 1728-34 and 3A 1820-303. The cooling in the hydrogen-rich sources 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-536, and GS 1826-24, instead, is clearly different and depends on the spectral states and whether PRE occurred or not. Especially the hard state bursts behave differently than the models predict, exhibiting a peculiar rise in the cooling index at low burst fluxes, which suggests that the cooling in the tail is much faster than expected. Our results indicate that the drivers of the bursting behaviour are not only the accretion rate and chemical composition of the accreted material, but also the cooling that is somehow linked to the spectral states. The latter suggests that the properties of the burning layers deep in the neutron star envelope might be impacted differently depending on the spectral state.

  3. Decay heat of 235U fission products by beta- and gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Love, T.A.; McConnell, J.W.; Peelle, R.W.

    1976-09-01

    The fast-rabbit facilities of the ORRR were used to irradiate 1- to 10-μg samples of 235 U for 1, 10, and 100 s. Released power is observed using nuclear spectroscopy to permit separate observations of emitted β and γ spectra in successive time intervals. The spectra were integrated over energy to obtain total decay heat and the β- and γ-ray results are summed together. 10 fig, 2 tables

  4. Discovery and X-ray crystallographic analysis of a spiropiperidine iminohydantoin inhibitor of beta-secretase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, James C; Stauffer, Shaun R; Rittle, Kenneth E; Ngo, Phung L; Yang, ZhiQiang; Selnick, Harold G; Graham, Samuel L; Munshi, Sanjeev; McGaughey, Georgia B; Holloway, M Katharine; Simon, Adam J; Price, Eric A; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Lai, Ming-Tain; Espeseth, Amy S; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Wolfe, Abigail; Pietrak, Beth; Zuck, Paul; Levorse, Dorothy A; Hazuda, Daria; Vacca, Joseph P

    2008-10-23

    A high-throughput screen at 100 microM inhibitor concentration for the BACE-1 enzyme revealed a novel spiropiperidine iminohydantoin aspartyl protease inhibitor template. An X-ray cocrystal structure with BACE-1 revealed a novel mode of binding whereby the inhibitor interacts with the catalytic aspartates via bridging water molecules. Using the crystal structure as a guide, potent compounds with good brain penetration were designed.

  5. Energy and flux measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays observed during the first ANITA flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoorlemmer, H.; Belov, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; García-Fernández, D.; Bugaev, V.; Wissel, S. A.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Carvalho Jr., W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Heber, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kowalski, J.; Lam, J.; Learned, J. G.; Link, J. T.; Lusczek, E.; Matsuno, S.; Mercurio, B. C.; Miki, C.; Miočinović, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C. J.; Ng, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Palladino, K.; Rauch, B. F.; Roberts, J.; Reil, K.; Rotter, B.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Urdaneta, D.; Varner, G. S.; Vieregg, A. G.; Walz, D.; Wu, F.; Zas, E.

    2016-04-01

    The first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment recorded 16 radio signals that were emitted by cosmic-ray induced air showers. The dominant contribution to the radiation comes from the deflection of positrons and electrons in the geomagnetic field, which is beamed in the direction of motion of the air shower. For 14 of these events, this radiation is reflected from the ice and subsequently detected by the ANITA experiment at a flight altitude of ~36 km. In this paper, we estimate the energy of the 14 individual events and find that the mean energy of the cosmic-ray sample is 2.9 × 1018 eV, which is significantly lower than the previous estimate. By simulating the ANITA flight, we calculate its exposure for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We estimate for the first time the cosmic-ray flux derived only from radio observations and find agreement with measurements performed at other observatories. In addition, we find that the ANITA data set is consistent with Monte Carlo simulations for the total number of observed events and with the properties of those events.

  6. Photodiode array for position-sensitive detection using high X-ray flux provided by synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucha, A.; Bonin, D.; Dartyge, E.; Flank, A. M.; Fontaine, A.; Raoux, D.

    1984-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides a high intensity source over a large range of wavelengths. This is the prominent quality that has laid the foundations of the EXAFS development (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure). EXAFS data can be collected in different ways. A full scan requires 5 to 10 min, compared to the one-day data collection of a conventional Bremsstrahlung X-ray tube. Recently, by using the new photodiode array (R 1024 SFX) manufactured by Reticon, it has been possible to reduce the data collection time to less than 100 ms. The key elements of this new EXAFS method are a dispersive optics combined with a position sensitive detector able to work under very high flux conditions. The total aperture of 2500 μm × 25 μm for each pixel is well suited to spectroscopic applications. Besides its high dynamic range (> 10 4) and its linearity, the rapidity of the readout allows a flux of 10 9-10 10 photons/s over the 1024 sensing elements.

  7. Search for a flux of cosmic-ray magnetic monopoles with an eight-channel superconducting detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M.E.; Cabrera, B.; Taber, M.A.; Gardner, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    A superconducting detector for cosmic-ray magnetic monopoles originally designed with a cross section of 1.5 m 2 (averaged over 4π solid angle) for double-coincident events was active from 5 May 1987 to 5 August 1988. The detector consists of eight independent inductive gradiometers located on the surface of an octagonal prism. The conductor is niobium-titanium foil and the current sensors are rf SQUID's. The signal-to-noise ratio for a single Dirac charge is greater than 50 in a 0.05-Hz bandwidth, and low-noise data was obtained over 547 days of continuous cryogenic operation. Of this time, we obtained ∼50% live time. Open circuits in portions of two gradiometers and occasional coupling of disturbances in adjacent gradiometers reduce the active sensing area to 1.1 m 2 . A closed-cycle helium liquefier eliminates helium transfers and increases the stability of the data. Anticoincidence instrumentation includes strain gauges, a flux-gate magnetometer, an ultrasonic motion detector, and a wideband rms rf voltmeter. The exposure to date represents a limit on the flux of cosmic-ray magnetic monopoles of 7.2x10 -13 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 at a 90% confidence level, eliminating most of the phase space for monopole plasma oscillation theories

  8. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bxmarket hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  9. Transforming growth factor beta 1 expression and inflammatory cells in tooth extraction socket after X-ray irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhan Hardani Putra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiographic examination is often used in dentistry to evaluate tooth extraction complications. X-ray used in radiographic examination, however, has negative effects, including damage to DNA and inflammatory response during wound healing process. Purpose: This study aimed to analyze the effects of X-ray irradiation on transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1 expression and number of inflammatory cells in tooth extraction sockets. Method: Thirty rats were divided into three groups, which consist of control group (with a radiation of 0 mSv, treatment group 1 (with a radiation of 0.08 mSv, and treatment group 2 (with a radiation of 0.16 mSv. These rats in each group were sacrificed on days 3 and 5 after treatment. Inflammatory cells which were observed in this research were PMN, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were used to calculate the number of inflammatory cells and TGF-ß1 expression. Obtained data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software with one way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD tests. Result: There was no significant decrease in the number of PMN. On the other hand, there were significant decreases in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes in the sacrificed group on day-5 with the radiation of 0.16 mSv. Similarly, the most significant decreased expression of TGF-ß1 was found in the group sacrificed on day 5 with the radiation of 0.16 mSv. Conclusion: X-ray irradiation with 0.08 mSv and 0.16 mSv doses can decrease TGF-ß1 expression and number of inflammatory cells in tooth extraction sockets on day 3 and 5 post extraction.

  10. Research Applications of Beta-Particle Techniques: Back-Scattering and X-Ray Excitation; Applications de l'irradiation beta dans la recherche: retrodiffusion et excitation de rayons X; Primenenie metodov beta-chastits v issledovatel'skoj rabote: obratnoe rasseyanie i vozbuzhdenie rentgenovskikh luchej; Aplicacion de la irradiacion beta en la investigacion: retrodispersion y excitacion de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R H [Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, University of California, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1962-01-15

    Studies in this Laboratory during the past seven years have established precise relationships for the back-scattering of beta-particles and these methods have been supplemented by techniques using isotope-excited X-rays. Such X-ray techniques have received wide attention and in many cases have revolutionized industrial gauging practices. This report is concerned with applications to precise absorptiometry, thickness of films, the identification and quantitative estimation of substances by absorption-edge measurements, and to paper chromatography. In the latter, chromatograms can be evaluated by beta-absorption, by X-ray absorption, or by excitation of X-rays in the various zones by beta-bombardment. These alternative approaches are compared and evaluated. Some microchemical techniques have been examined, and, either by beta-absorption or by beta-excitation of X-rays, small amounts of substances can be identified and determined. The lower limits of detection are not as small as one can achieve by tracer techniques, but there are numerous advantages, the primary one being that one deals with sealed sources from which contamination is virtually impossible. For all these phenomena precise equations have been developed from the data - some empirical, and others substantially fundamental. It is interesting that these equations accurately predict optimum source parameters as established by other investigators both in the United States and abroad. It is believed that these techniques confirm the opinion that radioactive isotopes have tremendous scientific and technical promise. As far as X-ray sources are concerned, it may be said that everything in X-ray technology, other than crystal-structure elucidation, can be done more simply by these means. With multi-curie sources, even the latter may eventually be possible. (author) [French] Les etudes qui se poursuivent depuis sept ans au Laboratoire de Los Alamos ont permis d'etablir des rapports precis pour la retrodiffusion

  11. Calculation of gamma-ray flux density above the Venus and Earth surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    Calculational results of dependence of flux density of nonscattered gamma-quanta on the height above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces are presented in the paper. Areas, where a certain part of gamma quanta is accumulated, are calaculted for each height. Spectra of scattered gamma quanta and their integral fluxes at different heights above the Venera planet surface are calculated. Effect of the atmosphere on gamma radiation recorded is considered. The results obtained allow to estimate optimal conditions for measuring gamma-fields above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces, to determine the area of the planet surface investigated. They are also necessary to determine the elementary composition of the rock according to the characteristic gamma radiation spectrum recorded

  12. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in the assessment of liver iron in patients with beta thalassaemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterton, B.E.; Thomas, C.M.; Schultz, C.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Beta thalassaemia major is a condition in which anaemia from abnormal haemoglobin production causes bone marrow expansion and frequently reduced bone mineral density. These patients have a chronic requirement for transfusion which results in tissue iron overload which may cause organ damage. Increased X-ray attenuation in the liver was noted in patients undergoing whole body DEXA for the assessment of bone density and it was assumed that this was related to liver iron stores. The aim of this study was to determine if useful information about liver iron could be obtained from these studies. Method: Using a Lunar DPXL, whole body scanning was performed in 16 patients (eight male) age 19-32 with Beta Thalassaemia. As well as calculating indices of total body composition, regions of interest were placed over the visualised liver. The 'bone mineral content' (BMC),g and bone mineral density (BMD),g/cm 2 were calculated over the liver regions, with the assumption that the calculation related to mineral in the region of interest. The results were compared with the serum ferritin as an indirect measure of body iron stores. Results showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.85) between 'BMD' in the liver region and ferritin. Conclusion: Despite the known difficulties with equating iron stores and ferritin, and possible confounders on liver density, such as fibrosis, the high correlation suggests that DEXA may have a place in the assessment of iron deposition, and be more cost effective than other technologies such as MRI and CT. Prospective studies with invasive measurements of liver iron will be needed to determine this. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  13. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means

  14. The performance of a hybrid spark chamber beta-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takahiko; Watanabe, Tamaki

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a hybrid spark chamber for measuring β-ray emitting radionuclide distribution on a plane source, which was developed to improve the instability of usual self-triggering spark chambers. The chamber consists of a parallel plate spark chamber gap and a parallel plate proportional chamber gap composed of mesh electrodes in the same gas space, and is operated by flowing gas, a mixture of argon and ethanol saturated vapor at 0 0 C, continuously through it. Instability is due to the occurrence of spurious sparks not caused by incident particles and it became conspicuous in the small intensity of incident particles. The hybrid spark chamber enabled us to obtain good counting plateau, that is, good stability for especially small intensity of β-rays and even for the background by setting up gas multiplication in the proportional chamber gap moderately high. Good spatial resolution less than 1 mm was obtained for 3 H and 14 C by keeping the distance between the chamber cathode and the source less than 1 mm. In order to obtain good spatial resolution, it is desirable to keep the overvoltage as small as possible while small overvoltage results in the deterioration of the uniformity of sensitivity. It was found by theoretical estimation and experiment that for a given large overvoltage the spatial resolution was improved by increasing the gas multiplication in the proportional chamber gap. The hybrid spark chamber has a relatively long dead time. When there being a number of active spots having different activities in a detection area, the sparking efficiency of a weak active spot also decreases by large counting loss due to the total strong activity. (auth.)

  15. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  16. An Indication of Anisotropy in Arrival Directions of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays through Comparison to the Flux Pattern of Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Luz, R. J. Barreira; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalani, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cerutti, A. C. Cobos; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farmer, J.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fenu, F.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaïor, R.; García, B.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Halliday, R.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Jurysek, J.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemmerich, N.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; Lago, B. L.; LaHurd, D.; Lang, R. G.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Presti, D. Lo; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lorek, R.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Merenda, K. -D.; Michal, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Morlino, G.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlin, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Poh, J.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Ridky, J.; Riehn, F.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schröder, S.; Schulz, A.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Soriano, J. F.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strafella, F.; Streich, A.; Suarez, F.; Durán, M. Suarez; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šupík, J.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; Berg, A. M. van den; Vliet, A. van; Varela, E.; Cárdenas, B. Vargas; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Ventura, C.; Quispe, I. D. Vergara; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiedeński, M.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2018-02-01

    A new analysis of the dataset from the Pierre Auger Observatory provides evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays on an intermediate angular scale, which is indicative of excess arrivals from strong, nearby sources. The data consist of 5514 events above 20 EeV with zenith angles up to 80 deg recorded before 2017 April 30. Sky models have been created for two distinct populations of extragalactic gamma-ray emitters: active galactic nuclei from the second catalog of hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL) and starburst galaxies from a sample that was examined with Fermi-LAT. Flux-limited samples, which include all types of galaxies from the Swift-BAT and 2MASS surveys, have been investigated for comparison. The sky model of cosmic-ray density constructed using each catalog has two free parameters, the fraction of events correlating with astrophysical objects and an angular scale characterizing the clustering of cosmic rays around extragalactic sources. A maximum-likelihood ratio test is used to evaluate the best values of these parameters and to quantify the strength of each model by contrast with isotropy. It is found that the starburst model fits the data better than the hypothesis of isotropy with a statistical significance of 4.0 sigma, the highest value of the test statistic being for energies above 39 EeV. The three alternative models are favored against isotropy with 2.7-3.2 sigma significance. The origin of the indicated deviation from isotropy is examined and prospects for more sensitive future studies are discussed.

  17. An Indication of Anisotropy in Arrival Directions of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays through Comparison to the Flux Pattern of Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalani, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cobos Cerutti, A. C.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farmer, J.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fenu, F.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaïor, R.; García, B.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Halliday, R.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Jurysek, J.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemmerich, N.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; Lago, B. L.; LaHurd, D.; Lang, R. G.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lo Presti, D.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Lorek, R.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Merenda, K.-D.; Michal, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Morlino, G.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlin, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Poh, J.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Ridky, J.; Riehn, F.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schröder, S.; Schulz, A.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Soriano, J. F.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strafella, F.; Streich, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šupík, J.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Ventura, C.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiedeński, M.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A new analysis of the data set from the Pierre Auger Observatory provides evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays on an intermediate angular scale, which is indicative of excess arrivals from strong, nearby sources. The data consist of 5514 events above 20 {EeV} with zenith angles up to 80° recorded before 2017 April 30. Sky models have been created for two distinct populations of extragalactic gamma-ray emitters: active galactic nuclei from the second catalog of hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL) and starburst galaxies from a sample that was examined with Fermi-LAT. Flux-limited samples, which include all types of galaxies from the Swift-BAT and 2MASS surveys, have been investigated for comparison. The sky model of cosmic-ray density constructed using each catalog has two free parameters, the fraction of events correlating with astrophysical objects, and an angular scale characterizing the clustering of cosmic rays around extragalactic sources. A maximum-likelihood ratio test is used to evaluate the best values of these parameters and to quantify the strength of each model by contrast with isotropy. It is found that the starburst model fits the data better than the hypothesis of isotropy with a statistical significance of 4.0σ, the highest value of the test statistic being for energies above 39 {EeV}. The three alternative models are favored against isotropy with 2.7σ–3.2σ significance. The origin of the indicated deviation from isotropy is examined and prospects for more sensitive future studies are discussed. Any correspondence should be addressed to .

  18. Measurement Over Large Solid Angle of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, H. F., III; Schwitters, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in portable muon detectors have made cosmic ray imaging practical for many diverse applications. Working muon attenuation detectors have been built at the University of Texas and are already successfully being used to image tunnels, structures, and Mayan pyramids. Most previous studies have focused on energy measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum from of 1 GeV or higher. We have performed an accurate measurement of the ultra-low energy (muon spectrum down to the acceptance level of our detector, around one hundred MeV. Measurements include angular dependence, with acceptance approaching horizontal. Measurements were made underwater using a custom enclosure in Lake Travis, Austin, TX. This measurement will allow more accurate predictions and simulations of attenuation for small (muon tomography.

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of OXA-17, an extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase conferring severe antibiotic resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H., E-mail: msgjhlee@mju.ac.kr; Sohn, S. G., E-mail: sgsohn@mju.ac.kr; Jung, H. I., E-mail: jhinumber1@hanmail.net; An, Y. J., E-mail: anyj0120@hanmail.net; Lee, S. H., E-mail: sangheelee@mju.ac.kr [Myongji University, Drug Resistance Proteomics Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    OXA-17, an extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase (ESBL) conferring severe antibiotic resistance, hydrolytically inactivates {beta}-lactam antibiotics, inducing a lack of eradication of pathogenic bacteria by oxyimino {beta}-lactams and not helping hospital infection control. Thus, the enzyme is a potential target for developing antimicrobial agents against pathogens producing ESBLs. OXA-17 was purified and crystallized at 298 K. X-ray diffraction data from OXA-17 crystal have been collected to 1.85 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal of OXA-17 belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.37, b = 101.12, and c = 126.07 A. Analysis of the packing density shows that the asymmetric unit probably contains two molecules with a solvent content of 54.6%.

  20. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhengbao

    2012-10-09

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SU-78 is an intergrowth of SU-78A and SU-78B and contains interconnected 12-ring channels in three directions. The two polymorphs are built from the same building layer, similar to that for the zeolite beta family. The layer stacking in SU-78, however, is different from those in zeolite beta polymorph A, B, and C, showing new zeolite framework topologies. SU-78 is thermally stable up to 600 °C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. A self-consistent model of cosmic-ray fluxes and positron excess: roles of nearby pulsars and a sub-dominant source population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: jjagdish@uj.ac.za, E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2017-09-01

    The cosmic-ray positron flux calculated using the cosmic-ray nuclei interactions in our Galaxy cannot explain observed data above 10 GeV. An excess in the measured positron flux is therefore open to interpretation. Nearby pulsars, located within sub-kiloparsec range of the Solar system, are often invoked as plausible sources contributing to the excess. We show that an additional, sub-dominant population of sources together with the contributions from a few nearby pulsars can explain the latest positron excess data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). We simultaneously model, using the DRAGON code, propagation of cosmic-ray proton, Helium, electron and positron and fit their respective flux data. Our fit to the Boron to Carbon ratio data gives a diffusion spectral index of 0.45, which is close to the Kraichnan turbulent spectrum.

  2. A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from spin-modulated counting rates of cosmic ray telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, K.C.; Lin, Y.C.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from data collected by cosmic ray telescopes on spinning spacecraft but without sectored accumulators is presented. Application of this method to specific satellite data demonstrates that it requires no prior assumption on the form of angular distribution of the fluxes; furthermore, self-consistency ensures the validity of the results thus obtained. The examples show perfect agreement with the corresponding magnetic field directions

  3. X-Ray Microdiffraction as a Probe to Reveal Flux Divergences in Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolenak, R.; Tamura, N.; Patel, J. R.

    2006-02-01

    Most reliability issues in interconnect systems occur at a local scale and many of them include the local build-up of stresses. Typical failure mechanisms are electromigration and stress voiding in interconnect lines and fatigue in surface acoustic wave devices. Thus a local probe is required for the investigation of these phenomena. In this paper the application of the Laue microdiffraction technique to investigate flux divergences in interconnect systems will be described. The deviatoric strain tensor of single grains can be correlated with the local microstructure, orientation and defect density. Especially the latter led to recent results about the correlation of stress build-up and orientation in Cu lines and electromigration-induced grain rotation in Cu and Al lines.

  4. Microdiffraction: X-rays as a probe to reveal flux divergences ininterconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spolenak, R.; Tamura, N.; Patel, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Most reliability issues in interconnect systems occur at a local scale and many of them include the local build-up of stresses. Typical failure mechanisms are electromigration and stress voiding in interconnect lines and fatigue in surface acoustic wave devices. Thus a local probe is required for the investigation of these phenomena. In this paper the application of the Laue microdiffraction technique to investigate flux divergences in interconnect systems will be described. The deviatoric strain tensor of single grains can be correlated with the local microstructure, orientation and defect density. Especially the latter led to recent results about the correlation of stress build-up and orientation in Cu lines and electromigration-induced grain rotation in Cu and Al lines.

  5. MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

  6. Measurement of integrated flux of cosmic ray muons at sea level using the INO-ICAL prototype detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, S.; Acharya, B.S.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N.K.; Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to set-up a magnetized Iron-CALorimeter (ICAL) to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with precise measurements of oscillations parameters. The ICAL uses 50 kton iron as target mass and about 28800 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) of 2 m × 2 m in area as active detector elements. As part of its R and D program, a prototype detector stack comprising 12 layers of RPCs of 1 m × 1 m in area has been set-up at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) to study the detector parameters using cosmic ray muons. We present here a study of muon flux measurement at sea level and lower latitude. (Site latitude: 18°54'N, longitude: 72°48'E.)

  7. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series X(t). The branching ratio b(x) is defined as b(x)=E[xi(x)/x]. The random variable xi(x) is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x, so xi(x)=[X(t+1) | X(t)=x]. If b(x)>1, the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x, while if b(x)efficient market hypothesis." For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, b(x) is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where b(x) approximately equal 1, which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for X(t) and for xi(x). For the BTW model the distribution of xi(x) is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x. Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where b(x) is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model-supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  8. The X-ray to [Ne V]3426 flux ratio: discovering heavily obscured AGN in the distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Mignoli, M.; Iwasawa, K.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of using the ratio between the 2-10 keV flux and the [Ne V]3426 emission line flux (X/NeV) as a diagnostic diagram to discover heavily obscured, possibly Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the distant Universe. While it is on average about one order of magnitude fainter than the more commonly used [O III]5007 emission line, the [Ne V]3426 line can be observed with optical spectroscopy up to z~1.5, whereas the [O III]5007 line is redshifted out of the optical bands already at z~0.8. First, we calibrated a relation between X/NeV and the cold absorbing column density NH using a sample of 74 bright, nearby Seyferts with both X-ray and [Ne V] data available in the literature and for which the column density is determined unambiguously. Similar to what is found for the X-ray to [O III]5007 flux ratio (X/OIII), we found that the X/NeV ratio decreases towards high column densities, as expected if [Ne V]3426 emission is a good tracer of the AGN intrinsic power. Essentially all local Seyferts with X/NeV values below 15 are found to be Compton-thick objects. At X/NeV values below 100, the percentage of Compton-thick nuclei decreases to ~50%, but ~80% of the considered sample is still absorbed with NH > 1023 cm-2. Second, we applied this diagnostic diagram to different samples of distant obscured and unobscured QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). SDSS blue, unobscured, type-1 QSOs in the redshift range z = [0.1-1.5] indeed show X/NeV values typical of unobscured Seyfert 1s in the local Universe. Conversely, SDSS type-2 QSOs at z~0.5 classified either as Compton-thick or Compton-thin on the basis of their X/OIII ratio, would have mostly been classified in the same way based on the X/NeV ratio. We applied the X/NeV diagnostic diagram to 9 SDSS obscured QSOs in the redshift range z = [0.85-1.31], selected by means of their prominent [Ne V]3426 line (rest EW > 4 Å) and observed with Chandra ACIS-S for 10ks each (8 of them as part

  9. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. III. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güver, Tolga [Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Beyazıt, 34119, Istanbul (Turkey); Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marshall, Herman [Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Guainazzi, Matteo [European Space Astronomy Centre of ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Díaz-Trigo, Maria [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-09-20

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826–238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE /PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE /PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE /PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE /PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  10. LISA Pathfinder test-mass charging during galactic cosmic-ray flux short-term variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Telloni, D.

    2015-02-01

    Metal free-floating test masses aboard the future interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection in space are charged by galactic and solar cosmic rays with energies \\gt 100 MeV/n. This process represents one of the main sources of noise in the lowest frequency band (\\lt 10-3 Hz) of these experiments. We study here the charging of the LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) gold-platinum test masses due to galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and helium nuclei with the Fluka Monte Carlo toolkit. Projections of the energy spectra of GCRs during the LISA-PF operations in 2015 are considered. This work was carried out on the basis of the solar activity level and solar polarity epoch expected for LISA-PF. The effects of GCR short-term variations are evaluated here for the first time. Classical Forbush decreases, GCR variations induced by the Sun rotation, and fluctuations in the LISA-PF frequency bandwidth are discussed.

  11. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  12. Badhwar - O'Neill 2014 Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux Model Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Slaba, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model is based on GCR measurements from particle detectors. The model has mainly been used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BON14 model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model also incorporates an empirical time delay function to account for the lag of the solar activity to reach the boundary of the heliosphere. This technical paper describes the most recent improvements in parameter fits to the BON model (BON14). Using a comprehensive measurement database, it is shown that BON14 is significantly improved over the previous version, BON11.

  13. A 4{pi} Anticoincidence Arrangement for Measurements of Beta-Ray Emitting Isotopes; Montage a Anticoiencidence 4{pi} pour la Mesure des Radioisotopes Emetteurs Beta; 4{pi} sistema schetchikov antisovpadenij dlya izmerenij beta-izluchayushchikh izotopov; Aparato de Recuento 4{pi} en Anticoincidencia para Medir Emisores Beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srdoc, D. [Institute ' ' Ruder Boskovic' ' , Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1965-10-15

    A 4{pi} anticoincidence, low-background counting system consisting of two specially designed parallel plate counters and a bridge anticoincidence circuit is described. Each counter is of a flat, mica window ''pancake'' type. The diameter of the counters is much larger than the gap between the plates. Good counting properties are obtained in spite of the unusual counter geometry, owing to the flexibility of the counter shape design when a neon-halogen mixture is used. The counters are so arranged that both windows face the sample, leaving a narrow slit for the sample holder. The sample is spread on a thin metalized plastic film. The pulses from both counters due to beta-particles coming from the sample are recorded, giving a 4{pi} counting geometry. The pulses due to cosmic particles triggering both counters simultaneously cancel out in a simple bridge anticoincidence arrangement, thus eliminating the need for an electronic circuit. Furthermore, the parallel plate counters used here for beta-particle counting possess a markedly reduced sensitivity to gamma-rays near the threshold voltage, resulting in a further lowering of the background. Sources of beta-particles of higher energies, as well as gamma-ray sources, can also be measured by the described system, because in the proposed geometry there is no possibility of triggering both counters simultaneously, as is the case with the conventional guard-counter arrangements. (author) [French] Le memoire decrit un ensemble de mesure a anticolhcidence 4{pi}, ayant un faible bruit de fond, compose de deux compteurs speciaux a plateaux paralleles relies par un pont d'anticofncidence. Ces deux compteurs sont de type circulaire plat a fenetre de mica. Le diametre du compteur est tres superieur a l'espace entre les plaques. Malgre sa geometrie inusitee, l'appareil a des proprietes de comptage satisfaisantes en raison de la souplesse que lui conferent ses caracteristiques lorsqu'on utilise un melange halogene-neon. Les

  14. The Effect of a Non-Isotropic Flux of Very High Energy Cosmic Rays on the values of Mean Shower Maxima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoudifar, Pantea; Tabari, Keihanak Rowshan

    2015-01-01

    In our previous works we described a statistical method to interpret the results of extensive air shower simulations. For an isotropically distributed flux of cosmic rays, we used this method to deduce diagrams of mean values of shower maxima versus energy decades. To have a more realistic result, we considered the effect of a non-isotropic flux of cosmic rays at different energy ranges. This effect was considered as a weight factor deduced from a set of observed data. We discussed about the effect of this weight factor on our final resulted diagrams of mean shower maxima and for different interaction models compared the resulted distributions of very high energy cosmic ray's mass composition

  15. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  16. Design and characteristics of beta-excited X-ray sources; Caracteristiques des sources de rayons X excitees par des particules beta; Konstruktsiya i kharakteristiki beta-vozbuzhdennykh istochnikov rentgenovskikh luchej; Diseno y caracteristicas de las fuentes de rayos X excitadas por particulas beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filosofo, I; Reiffel, L; Stone, C A; Voyvodic, L [Physics Division, Armour Research Foundation, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1962-01-15

    The paper reports on recent work on beta-excited X-ray sources. Results of detailed experimental investigation on the X-rays produced by the fission products Pm{sup 147}, Kr{sup 85} and Sr{sup 90} are described. X-ray yields and spectral distributions have been studied for target materials ranging from copper to uranium and in a variety of source-target geometries (transmission target, reflection target, sandwich target, intimate source-target mixtures). To interpret the experimental results, an analytical treatment of the processes involved in X-ray production by beta particles has been developed and is outlined. By taking into account bremsstrahlung, K-shell ionization, and fluorescent X-ray excitation, a convenient mathematical formulation may be derived for photon spectra and yields as functions of maximum {beta}-energy, target thickness and source configuration. The agreement between calculated and experimentally determined yields is excellent and confirms the merit of the analysis. It thus becomes possible to optimize the design of isotopic X-ray sources for specific applications. Kr{sup 85} and Pm{sup 147} prototype sources have been designed and 'their performance in thickness and composition-analysis measurements is discussed. A high level Pm{sup 147} source for industrial radiography has also been designed and its performance, along with the utility of image intensifiers to extend its applicability, is considered. Finally, a general review of potentialities, advantages and limitations of isotopic X-ray sources is given. (author) [French] Le memoire rend compte des recents travaux sur les sources de rayons X excitees par des particules beta. Il donne les resultats d'une etude experimentale detaillee sur les rayons X emis par les produits de fission {sup 147}Pm, {sup 85}Kr et {sup 90}Sr. Les auteurs ont etudie l'emission et la distribution spectrale des rayons X pour des cibles allant du cuivre a l'uranium, et ce dans plusieurs geometries source

  17. Towards a comprehensive X-ray approach for studying the photosynthetic manganese complex-XANES, K{alpha}/K{beta}/K{beta}-satellite emission lines, RIXS, and comparative computational approaches for selected model complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaharieva, I; Chernev, P; Risch, M; Gerencser, L; Haumann, M; Dau, H [Free University Berlin, FB Physik, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Berggren, G; Shevchenko, D; Anderlund, M [Dept. of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Uppsala University, Box 523, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Weng, T C, E-mail: holger.dau@fu-berlin.d, E-mail: michael.haumann@fu-berlin.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    Advanced X-ray spectroscopy experiments can contribute to elucidation of the mechanism of water oxidation in biological (tetra-manganese complex of Photosystem II) and artificial systems. Although the electronic structure of the catalytic metal site is of high interest, it is experimentally not easily accessible. Therefore, we and other researchers are working towards a comprehensive approach involving a combination of methods, namely (1) quantitative analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra collected at the K-edge and, in the long run, at the L-edge of manganese; (2) high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of K{alpha} and K{beta} lines, (3) two-dimensional resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra. Collection of these spectroscopic data sets requires state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facilities as well as experimental strategies to minimize the radiation-induced modifications of the samples. Data analysis requires the use and development of appropriate theoretical tools. Here, we present exemplary data collected for three multi-nuclear synthetic Mn complexes with the Mn ions in the oxidation states II, III, and IV, and for Mn{sup VII} of the permanganate ion. Emission spectra are calculated for the Mn{sup VII} ion using both multiple-scattering (MS) approach and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT).

  18. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Levi, G.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  19. Dose-response relationship for the induction of structural chromosome aberrations in human spermatozoa after in vitro exposure ti tritium. beta. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiguchi, Yujiroh; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Kazuya (Asahikawa Medical College (Japan). Department of Biological Sciences)

    1990-02-01

    THe effects of tritium (HTO) {beta}-rays on human sperm chromosomes were studied using our interspecific in vitro fertilization system between human spermatozoa and zona-free hamster oocytes. Semen samples were treated with media containing 1.53-24.3 mCi/ml HTO for about 80 min. 1290 spermatozoa from the controls and 1842 spermatozoa from the irradiated groups were karyotyped. The incidence of spermatozoa with structural chromosome aberrations increased linearly with increasing dosage. Breakage-type aberrations occurred far more frequently than exchange-type. Chromosome-type aberrations appeared far more frequently than chromatid-ype. All of these types of aberrations showed linear dose-dependent increases. The RBE valus of HTO {beta}-rays relative to X-rays were calculated for the above-mentioned 5 indices, respectively. Their RBE values franged from 1.89 to 3.00 when the absorbed dose was estimated to be the minimum, whereas the values ranged between 1.04 and 1.65 when the absorbed dose was estimated to be the maximum. (author). 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs.

  20. Measurement of the gamma ray flux between 50 and 350 GeV from the Mrk 501 Blazar with the experiment CELESTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, E.

    2005-10-01

    The blazar Mrk 501 has a non-thermal emission spectrum with 2 components. The first one, located between radio waves and X-rays, is due to the synchrotron emission of the magnetized jet, while the second one, emitted in the high energy gamma-ray domain, is still not fully understood. Until 1999, this last domain had only been covered between 100 MeV and 4 GeV as well as above 300 GeV. This energy gap was filled by the creation of the CELESTE experiment, recording Cherenkov emission produced by gamma-rays between 50 and 350 GeV penetrating the atmosphere. Mrk 501, which has a variable emission, was observed in 2000 and 2001, and was detected in 2000. A flux has been calculated which constrains the high energy emission models, presented in this thesis. Crab nebula flux measurements validate the method since this source is the standard candle for atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Analysis cuts for Mrk 501 are determined using data from the blazar Mrk 421, which has nearly the same declination as Mrk 501. Finally, improved detector simulations were used to calculate the effective area of the instrument, taking the atmosphere quality into account, yielding the flux for Mrk 501 during observations taken between April and June 2000. This flux was compared with a synchrotron self-Compton emission model and with data taken in X-rays. It shows that Mrk 501 was slightly more active during this period compared to the remainder of the year and to the year 2001. A flux upper limit is calculated for other measurements. This is the first measurement in the energy range 50 - 350 GeV (this range represents the limits in energy for which the trigger rate, that is the convolution between the source spectrum and the effective area of the instrument, is higher than 20% of the trigger maximum). It helps to constrain the position of the inverse Compton emission maximum and tends to favor, in this particular case, X- and gamma-ray emission processes from 2 different electron populations

  1. RBE [relative biological effectiveness] of tritium beta radiation to gamma radiation and x-rays analyzed by both molecular and genetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta radiation to 60 Co gamma radiation was determined using sex-linked recessive lethals (SLRL) induced in Drosophila melanogaster spermatozoa as the biological effect. The SLRL test, a measure of mutations induced in germ cells transmitted through successive generations, yields a linear dose-response curve in the range used in these experiments. From these ratios of the slopes of the 3 H beta and the 60 Co gamma radiation linear dose response curves, an RBE of 2.7 is observed. When sources of error are considered, this observation suggests that the tritium beta particle is 2.7 ± 0.3 times more effective per unit of energy absorbed in inducing gene mutations transmitted to successive generation than 60 Co gamma radiation. Ion tracks with a high density of ions (high LET) are more efficient than tracks with a low ion density (low LET) in inducing transmissible mutations, suggesting interaction among products of ionization. Molecular analysis of x-ray induced mutations shows that most mutations are deletions ranging from a few base pairs as determined from sequence data to multi locus deletions as determined from complementation tests and Southern blots. 14 refs., 1 fig

  2. X-ray investigations of sulfur-containing fungicides. II. Intramolecular forces governing the conformation of four novel alpha-phenylazo- and alpha-phenylhydrazono-beta-ketosulfones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf , W M

    2001-02-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of four novel beta-ketosulfones, phenyl benzoyl(phenylhydrazono)methyl sulfone (I), phenyl benzoyl(4-nitrophenylhydrazono)methyl sulfone (II), (benzoyl)(phenyl)(phenylazo)methyl phenyl sulfone (III) and (benzoyl)(phenyl)(3-chlorophenylazo)methyl 4-tolyl sulfone (IV), have been investigated using X-ray analysis and density functional theory supplemented by ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. The conformations of (I) and (II) are stabilized by strong intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds formed between the sulfonyl and the alpha-hydrazono moieties. The following increase of a positive charge on the S atoms is compensated via pi-conjugation and stereoelectronic back-donation from the nearby beta-carbonyl group. Compounds (III) and (IV) adopt a strongly distorted propeller shape with pivotal tetrahedral C1 atoms. Distortion mostly follows from the approximate coplanarity of the alpha-azophenyl and alpha-phenyl moieties opposite each other. The main stereoelectronic interactions involve the donation of electron density from the alpha-azo N2 towards the sulfonyl S and the beta-carbonyl C2 atoms.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of the Neutron and Gamma-Ray Flux Spectra in a Neutronics Mock-Up of the HCPB Test Blanket Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, K.; Freiesleben, H.; Poenitz, E.; Klix, A.; Unholzer, S.; Batistoni, P.; Fischer, U.; Leichtle, D.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear parameters of a breeding blanket, such as tritium production rate, nuclear heating, activation and dose rate, are calculated by integral folding of an energy dependent cross section (or coefficient) with the neutron (or gamma-ray) flux energy spectra. The uncertainties of the designed parameters are determined by the uncertainties of both the cross section data and the flux spectra obtained by transport calculations. Also the analysis of possible discrepancies between measured and calculated integral nuclear parameter represents a two-step procedure. First, the energy region and the amount of flux discrepancies has to be found out and second, the cross section data have to be checked. To this end, neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra in a mock-up of the EU Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeder Test Blanket Module (TBM), irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons, were measured and analysed by means of Monte Carlo transport calculations. The flux spectra were determined for the energy ranges that are relevant for the most important nuclear parameters of the TBM, which are the tritium production rate and the shielding capability. The fast neutron flux which determines the tritium production on 7 Li and dominates the shield design was measured by the pulse-height distribution obtained from an organic liquid scintillation detector. Simultaneously, the gamma-ray flux spectra were measured. The neutron flux at lower energies, down to thermal, which determines the tritium production on 6 Li, was measured with time-of-arrival spectroscopy. For this purpose, the TUD neutron generator was operated in pulsed mode (pulse width 10 μs, frequency 1 kHz) and the neutrons arriving at a 3 He proportional counter in the mock-up were recorded as a function of time after the source neutron pulse. The spectral distributions for the two positions in the mock-up, where measurements were carried out, were calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNP, version 5, and nuclear data from the

  4. Beta-ray depth dose in tissue equivalent material due to gaseous radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schadt, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of the absorbed dose to skin from beta particles emitted by the radionuclides in gaseous effluents from boiling water nuclear power reactors is investigated in this dissertation. Using the radionuclide release patterns of F. Brutschy and the beta dosimetry methods of M. Berger, an equation is derived which gives the dose rate in rads per day when the total radionuclide concentration is one microcurie per gram of air. The coefficients in the equation are presented for a wide range of reactor gas hold-up times (48 minutes to 6 days) and plume environmental transit time (0.5 to 60 minutes). The beta dose rates at the skin surface are found to range from 3.9 to 26.7 rads per day. An upper limit of the relative standard deviation in the dose rate is estimated to be 30 percent. The techniques used to develop the equation are applied to data from the Millstone Nuclear Power Station obtained during the summer of 1972. The beta dose at a site 1.7 miles from the reactor is determined to have been 675 millirads per year at the skin surface and 476 millirads per year at a depth of 200 micrometers. At a site 5.1 miles from the reactor these dose rates were 138 and 100 millirads per year respectively

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of beta-alanine synthase from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobritzsch, D.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Andersen, Birgit

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes and some bacteria, the third step of reductive pyrimidine catabolism is catalyzed by beta-alanine synthase (EC 3.5.1.6). Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri were obtained using sodium citrate as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2...

  6. Precision Measurement of the Helium Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays of Rigidities 1.9 GV to 3 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Korkmaz, M. A.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, Hu; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. A precise measurement of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1.9 GV to 3 TV based on 50 million events is presented and compared to the proton flux. The detailed variation with rigidity of the helium flux spectral index is presented for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at rigidities larger than 100 GV. The rigidity dependence of the helium flux spectral index is similar to that of the proton spectral index though the magnitudes are different. Remarkably, the spectral index of the proton to helium flux ratio increases with rigidity up to 45 GV and then becomes constant; the flux ratio above 45 GV is well described by a single power law.

  7. Fermentation characteristics in conversion of organic acids obtained by oxidation of low-rank coals to poly({beta}-hydroxybutyrate) using A. eutrophus cells with some analysis on metabolic flux distribution; Kattan no ekisosanka de erareru yukisan wo suiso saikin wo riyoshite pori {beta}-hidorokishi rakusan (PHB) ni henkansaseru tameno baiyo kogakuteki kento to taisha ryusoku bunpu shisutemu kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, Shoko.; Shin, Huidong.; Shimizu, Kazuyuki. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Biochemical engineering and science; Mae, Kazuhiro.; Miura, Koichi. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1999-03-10

    Fermentation characteristics are investigated for the conversion of glycolate, acetate, formate, and malonate obtained by the oxidation of low-rank coals to poly ({beta}-hydrox butyrate) (PHB) using A. eutrophus cells. Based on the cultivation experiments using one of the organic acids as a sole carbon source, it is found that acetate is the most effectively converted to PHB. When mixed organic acids are used, formate is preferentially consumed, followed by acetate, and finally glycolate. Although malate can not be utilized, it is implied that it might change the pathway flux distributions based on the metabolic flux analysis. Namely, it shows competitive inhibition to succinate dehydrogenase so that its addition during fermentation results in flux reduction from succinate to maleic acid as well as glyoxylate flux and gluconeogenesis flux. It is also found that NADPH generated from isocitrate is preferentially utilized for the reaction from {alpha}-ketoglutarate to glutamate when NH{sub 3} concentration is high, while it is eventually used for the PHB production from acetoacetyl CoA as NH{sub 3} concentration decreases. (author)

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a thermostable glycoside hydrolase family 43 beta-xylosidase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Puspaningsih, Ni Nyoman Tri

    2007-01-01

    The main enzymes involved in xylan-backbone hydrolysis are endo-1,4-beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase. beta-Xylosidase converts the xylo-oligosaccharides produced by endo-1,4-beta-xylanase into xylose monomers. The beta-xylosidase from the thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08, a member of

  9. Quality control of total alpha and beta activity analysis in water using the Proportional Counter of Gaseous Flux technique; Controle de qualidade das análises de atividades alfa e beta total em água pela técnica do Contador Proporcional de Fluxo Gasoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Alberto P.; Bastos, Thiago M.R.; Santos, Thiago O.; Filho, Crescêncio A.S.; França, Elvis J. de, E-mail: albertopereiran@gmail.com, E-mail: thiagomrbastos@gmail.com, E-mail: thiago_cbufpe@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: candrade@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The analytical capacity of the CRCN (Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste) for quantification of total alpha and beta concentrations in water samples using the Proportional Counter of Gaseous Flux is presented. To demonstrate the traceability of the results, the National Intercomparison Program (PNI) samples were used, promoted by the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) from which the Regional Nuclear Science Center of the Northeast (CRCN-NE) participates since 2011. The results reported to the PNI demonstrate the analytical capacity of the CRCN to detect the emission of alpha and beta radioactivities in water within the potability standards in analytical detection of quantification in radioactivity by the technique of the Proportional Flow Counter.

  10. Time Variabilities of Solar Wind Ion Fluxes and of X-ray and EUV Emissions from Comet Hyakutake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.; Cravens, T.; Lisse, C.; Ipavich, F.; von Steiger, R.; Shah, P.; Armstrong, T.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions from comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2 made by the Rontgen X-ray satellite (ROSAT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) revealed a total X-ray luminosity of about 500 MW.

  11. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  12. Effects of coronal regions on the x-ray flux and ionization conditions in the winds of ob supergiants and of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassinelli, J.P.; Olson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    The anomalously strong O VI and N V lines in O stars and the C IV lines in B supergiants may be due to Auger ionization by X-rays from a thin coronal zone at the base of the cool stellar winds. We determine the size of a corona that is necessary to produce the overall ionization conditions in zeta Pup as has been deduced by Olson from line profile analysis. In the ionization balance calculations we account for diffuse radiation field in the wind and for the large optical depths in the He II continuum due to radiative and Auger ionization edges of abundant elements. The X-ray flux transmitted through the wind is calculated and compared with upper limits derived for upper limits derived for zeta Pup observations from ANS and Uhuru satellites. It is found that a coronal zone with a temperature of 5x10 6 K and a volume emission measure of 10 58 cm -3 can produce the required ionization in a wind having a temperature of 30,000--35,000 K. The emergent X-ray flux bears little resemblance to the coronal emissivity because of the opacity of the wind. The X-ray flux nearly reaches the upper limits derived from the ANS observations and, at several energy bands, should be detectable by the HEAO B satellite. A simplified analysis of the Auger ionization process is developed and applied to other Of and OB supergiants. We find that the model can explain the presence of C IV and Si IV in supergaints with effective temperatures as low as 12,000 K and can explain the appearance of O VI and N V lines in early type supergiants as late as BO.5 and B2, respectively

  13. BETA digital beta radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikov, N.V.; Kosinov, G.A.; Fedorov, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    Portable transportable digital beta radiometer providing for measuring beta-decay radionuclide specific activity in the range from 5x10 -9 up to 10 -6 Cu/kg (Cu/l) with error of ±25% is designed and introduced into commercial production for determination of volume and specific water and food radioactivity. The device specifications are given. Experience in the BETA radiometer application under conditions of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone has shown that it is convenient for measuring specific activity of the order of 10 -8 Cu/kg, and application of a set of different beta detectors gives an opportunity to use it for surface contamination measurement in wide range of the measured value

  14. High-Resolution Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for beta-Spectroscopy on 187-Rhenium and Position Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass mea...

  15. The use of cosmic-ray muons in the energy calibration of the Beta-decay Paul Trap silicon-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsh, T. Y.; Perez Galvan, A.; Burkey, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J. A.; Gallant, A.; Heckmaier, E.; Levand, A. F.; Savard, G.

    2018-04-01

    This article presents an approach to calibrate the energy response of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) for low-energy nuclear-science experiments by utilizing cosmic-ray muons. For the 1-mm-thick detectors used with the Beta-decay Paul Trap, the minimum-ionizing peak from these muons provides a stable and time-independent in situ calibration point at around 300 keV, which supplements the calibration data obtained above 3 MeV from sources. The muon-data calibration is achieved by comparing experimental spectra with detailed Monte Carlo simulations performed using GEANT4 and CRY codes. This additional information constrains the calibration at lower energies, resulting in improvements in quality and accuracy.

  16. Time and dose-related changes in the thickness of pig skin after irradiation with single doses of [sup 90]Sr/[sup 90]Y [beta]-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezvani, M.; Hamlet, R.; Hopewell, J.W.; Sieber, V.K. (Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    Time-related changes in pig skin thickness have been evaluated using a non-invasive ultrasound technique after exposure to a range of single doses of [sup 90]Sr/[sup 90]Yr [beta]-rays. The reduction in relative skin thickness developed in two distinct phases: the first was between 12 and 20 weeks postirradiation. No further changes were then seen until 52 weeks postirradiation when a second phase of skin thinning was observed. This was complete after 76 weeks and no further changes in relative skin thickness were seen in the maximum follow up period of 129 weeks. The timings of these phases of damage were independent of the radiation dose, however, the severity of both phases of radiation-induced skin thinning were dose related. (Author).

  17. High-energy x-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A–E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps Te...

  18. A high-energy, high-flux source of gamma-rays from all-optical non-linear Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corvan, D.J., E-mail: dcorvan01@qub.ac.uk; Zepf, M.; Sarri, G.

    2016-09-01

    γ-Ray sources are among the most fundamental experimental tools currently available to modern physics. As well as the obvious benefits to fundamental research, an ultra-bright source of γ-rays could form the foundation of scanning of shipping containers for special nuclear materials and provide the bases for new types of cancer therapy. However, for these applications to prove viable, γ-ray sources must become compact and relatively cheap to manufacture. In recent years, advances in laser technology have formed the cornerstone of optical sources of high energy electrons which already have been used to generate synchrotron radiation on a compact scale. Exploiting the scattering induced by a second laser, one can further enhance the energy and number of photons produced provided the problems of synchronisation and compact γ-ray detection are solved. Here, we report on the work that has been done in developing an all-optical and hence, compact non-linear Thomson scattering source, including the new methods of synchronisation and compact γ-ray detection. We present evidence of the generation of multi-MeV (maximum 16–18 MeV) and ultra-high brilliance (exceeding 10{sup 20} photons s{sup −1}mm{sup −2}mrad{sup −2} 0.1% BW at 15 MeV) γ-ray beams. These characteristics are appealing for the paramount practical applications mentioned above. - Highlights: • How synchrotron radiation can be produced in an all optical setting using laser-plasmas. • Generating high-energy, high-flux gamma ray beams. • Presenting results from a recent NLTS experimental campaign. • Reveal insight into the experimental techniques employed.

  19. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    OpenAIRE

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Tjus, Julia Becker; Desiati, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to...

  20. Precision Measurement of the ($e^+ + e^−$) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray ($e^+ + e^−$) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million ($e^+ + e^−$) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=−3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  1. Precision Measurement of the (e++e-) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ =-3.170 ±0.008 (stat+syst)±0.008 (energy scale) .

  2. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-11-28

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  3. Hard alpha-keratin degradation inside a tissue under high flux X-ray synchrotron micro-beam: a multi-scale time-resolved study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Emilie; Gourrier, Aurélien; Doucet, Jean; Briki, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    X-rays interact strongly with biological organisms. Synchrotron radiation sources deliver very intense X-ray photon fluxes within micro- or submicro cross-section beams, resulting in doses larger than the MGy. The relevance of synchrotron radiation analyses of biological materials is therefore questionable since such doses, million times higher than the ones used in radiotherapy, can cause huge damages in tissues, with regard to not only DNA, but also proteic and lipid organizations. Very few data concerning the effect of very high X-ray doses in tissues are available in the literature. We present here an analysis of the structural phenomena which occur when the model tissue of human hair is irradiated by a synchrotron X-ray micro-beam. The choice of hair is supported by its hierarchical and partially ordered keratin structure which can be analysed inside the tissue by X-ray diffraction. To assess the damages caused by hard X-ray micro-beams (1 microm(2) cross-section), short exposure time scattering SAXS/WAXS patterns have been recorded at beamline ID13 (ESRF) after various irradiation times. Various modifications of the scattering patterns are observed, they provide fine insight of the radiation damages at various hierarchical levels and also unexpectedly provide information about the stability of the various hierarchical structural levels. It appears that the molecular level, i.e. the alpha helices which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and the alpha-helical coiled coils which are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, is more sensitive to radiation than the supramolecular architecture of the keratin filament and the filament packing within the keratin associated proteins matrix, which is stabilized by disulphide bonds. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia - Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of approx. 8 R(sub G), which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L(sub Edd) approx. 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  5. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE INNER DISK RADIUS WITH FLUX IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SERPENS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1046 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: ft8320@wayne.edu [X-Ray Astrophysics Lab, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ∼8 R {sub G}, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L / L {sub Edd} ∼ 0.4–0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  6. APPLE-3: improvement of APPLE for neutron and gamma-ray flux, spectrum and reaction rate plotting code, and of its code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitu; Maki, Koichi; Seki, Yasushi.

    1991-03-01

    A code APPLE was produced in 1976 for calculating and plotting tritium breeding ratio and tritium production rate distributions. That code was improved as 'APPLE-2' in 1982, to calculate and plot not only tritium breeding ratio but also distributions of neutron and gamma-ray fluxes, their spectra, nuclear heating rates and other reaction rates, and dose rate distributions during operation and after shutdown in 1982. The code APPLE-2 can calculate and plot these nuclear properties derived from neutron and gamma-ray fluxes by ANISN (one dimensional transport code), DOT3.5 (two dimensional transport code) and MORSE (three dimensional Monte Carlo code). We revised the code APPLE-2 as 'APPLE-3' by adding many functions to the APPLE-2 code in accordance with users' requirements proposed in recent progress of fusion reaction nuclear design. With minor modification of APPLE-2, a number of inconsistencies have been found between the code manual and the input data in the code. In the present report, the new functions added to APPLE-2 and improved users' manual are explained. (author)

  7. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of {beta}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} optical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kesler, V.G.; Kokh, A.E.; Pokrovsky, L.D

    2004-02-29

    An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study has been performed for (0 0 1) BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The crystal surface has been polished mechanically and cleaned by chemical etching. In XPS observation, depth profiling has been produced by sputtering with Ar{sup +} 3 keV ions. Photoelectron binding energies of original element core levels and valence band have been measured as a function of sputtering time. The persistence of binding energies of barium and boron core levels and valence band structure has been found. For O 1 s core level the formation of new spectral components with lower binding energies has been revealed.

  9. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E.; Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G.; Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Pellinen, D.; Watts, P.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  10. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G. [California at Davis Univ., CA (United States); Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Pellinen, D.; Watts, P. [Bechtel Nevada Corporation, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  11. Determination of beta-ray emitter concentrations in bioassay samples of the victims in JCO criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Yoshito

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of neutron-induced β-ray emitters in the hair, blood, urine and bone of three workers severely exposed to neutrons in JCO criticality accident were measured with a low background β-ray spectrometer (Pico β) and liquid scintillation counter for the purpose of neutron dose estimation. 32 P is generated by the fast neutron of 2.5 MeV and over in sulfur with (n, p) reaction. Since content of sulfur in hair is high as compared with the other human tissues, we tried to estimate fast neutron fluence to the body surface of the victims using concentrations of 32 P and stable sulfur in their hair. The result shows that two workers, who were exposed to the higher neutron radiation than another worker, received higher doses of irradiation to the frontal side of their trunks than to the heads. For a more detailed mapping of neutron fluence in the body, the measurements of 32 P and 45 Ca induced by (n, γ) reaction in bone were carried out. The results show that one worker (worker A) received a higher dose of neutrons at the frontal right side of the trunk, and that the dose decreased with the distance from the central part of the body. The other (worker B) seems to have gotten a higher dose of irradiation in the face, hands and waist. High amount of 32 P was detected in urine of the workers, and the concentration gradient among three workers showed a similar tendency to the estimated neutron dose from 24 Na in blood. Therefore, radioactivity of 32 P in urine could be used for estimating the neutron exposure dose. Moreover, the activity can be easily determined by scintillation counting, and urine is less invading bioassay sample that can be collected by non-medical stuffs. (author)

  12. X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors grown by the vertical Bridgman technique: Energy, temperature and high flux effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbene, L., E-mail: leonardo.abbene@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Gerardi, G.; Turturici, A.A.; Raso, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Benassi, G. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, Reggio Emilia 42019 (Italy); Bettelli, M. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Zambelli, N. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, Reggio Emilia 42019 (Italy); Zappettini, A. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Principato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, CdZnTe (CZT) is one of the key materials for the development of room temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, we present the results of spectroscopic investigations on new boron oxide encapsulated vertical Bridgman (B-VB) grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy. Several detectors, with the same electrode layout (gold electroless contacts) and different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm), were realized: the cathode is a planar electrode covering the detector surface (4.1×4.1 mm{sup 2}), while the anode is a central electrode (2×2 mm{sup 2}) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors are characterized by electron mobility-lifetime product (µ{sub e}τ{sub e}) values ranging between 0.6 and 1·10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V and by low leakage currents at room temperature and at high bias voltages (38 nA/cm{sup 2} at 10000 V/cm). The spectroscopic response of the detectors to monochromatic X-ray and gamma ray sources ({sup 109}Cd, {sup 241}Am and {sup 57}Co), at different temperatures and fluxes (up to 1 Mcps), was measured taking into account the mitigation of the effects of incomplete charge collection, pile-up and high flux radiation induced polarization phenomena. A custom-designed digital readout electronics, developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), able to perform a fine pulse shape and height analysis even at high fluxes, was used. At low rates (200 cps) and at room temperature (T=25 °C), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution FWHM around 4% at 59.5 keV, for comparison an energy resolution of 3% was measured with Al/CdTe/Pt detectors by using the same electronics (A250F/NF charge sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal ENC of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (750 kcps), energy resolution values of 7% and 9% were measured, with throughputs of 2% and 60% respectively. No radiation polarization phenomena were

  13. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurin, D.

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  14. Probing Very High Energy Prompt Muon and Neutrino fluxes and the cosmic ray knee via Underground Muons

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Raj; Panda, Sukanta

    2005-01-01

    We calculate event rate and demonstrate the observational feasibility of very high energy muons (1-1000 TeV) in a large mass underground detector operating as a pair-meter. This energy range corresponds to surface muon energies of $\\sim$(5 TeV - 5000 TeV) and primary cosmic ray energies of $\\sim$ (50 TeV - 5 $\\times 10^4$ TeV). Such measurements would significantly assist in an improved understanding of the prompt contribution to $\

  15. An expert system for the conception of industrial gauges based on beta, gamma or X ray transmission (JANU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tola, F.

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge based software (named JANU expert system) for radiogauges design mainly density, thickness, mass per unit area, level and two-phase flows gauges, was prepared recently. Its aim is to optimise the different components of a transmission gauge (radioactive source, detector, electronic device, collimators and shielding), taking into account parameters and constraints linked to the configuration (nature and composition of materials, presence of shields and walls, ...), as well as users requirements (accuracy, counting time, beam collimating, duration of tests, ...). The database includes characteristics of radionuclides and industrial sources, photon cross sections, build-up factors, specific dose constants, physical properties of elements, usual scintillation detectors and shielding materials. It allows the determination of the most suited emitter, as well as a precise characterisation of a given emitter, including required source activity, expected counting rates, dose rates, etc. It has been extended to X rays generators, voltage and current intensity replacing in this case the energy and activity of the source. Information supplied by JANU has been validated by applications developed during the past 30 years. Its choices have always revealed most judicious and in general, numerical results in good agreement with experiments. Thus, it has become an essential and reliable tool for gauge designers. (author)

  16. Effect of tea catechins on the structure of lipid membrane and beta-ray induced lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, M.; Haga, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Okuno, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibiting effect of four tea catechins, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on the lipid peroxidation induced by β-ray in tritiated water was examined using a spin probe method. 16-Doxylstearic acid (16NS) was incorporated into the liposome prepared from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and the rate of the decrease of ESR intensity of 16NS was used as a measure of the inhibiting effect. In the low concentration region below 10 -5 M, catechins showed their inhibitions on the lipid peroxidation according to the order of ECG>EGCG>EC>EGC. This result was explained by a model that the initiator of the peroxidation is the hydroxyl radical (·OH) and the catechins adsorbed on the lipid membrane surface acting as scavengers of ·OH. In the high concentration range, however, the effect was diverse and it decreased with the increase of it in the case of EGCG. EGCG in this range was considered to enter into the interior of the membrane and break the structure, which causes the decrease of 16NS. Observation with transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that the size of the liposome became larger with the increasing concentration of EGCG and finally it was broken into fragments, showing that EGCG broadened the area of the liposome as expected from the result of ESR. (author)

  17. Geomagnetic modulation of the late Pleistocene cosmic-ray flux as determined by 10Be from Blake Outer Ridge marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, L.R.; Donahue, D.; Damon, P.E.; Sonett, C.P.; Biddulph, D.; Burr, G.

    2000-01-01

    The cosmic-ray flux incident upon the Earth during the late Pleistocene, 20-60 kyr B.P., was studied by measuring the cosmogenic radionuclide 10 Be from a marine sediment core at site CH88-10P on the Blake Outer Ridge. The paleointensity of the geomagnetic field for this core was determined by various methods. The variance in the concentration of 10 Be in the authigenic fraction of the sediments from Blake Ridge closely correlates with the inverse of the variance in the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field. The 10 Be signal lags, up to 1000 years of sedimentation, the measured paleointensity of the sediments. In contrast, the data from several other elements, some climatically sensitive, and from beryllium show relationship neither to 10 Be nor to the paleomagnetic data. The relationship between 10 Be concentration and the dipole field intensity (M/M o ) as measured in the sediments is consistent with theoretical models

  18. Investigation of the properties of the flux and interaction of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays by the method of local-muon-density spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A. G.; Gromushkin, D. M.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Mannocchi, G.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G.; Chernov, D. V.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for studying extensive air showers is considered. The method is based on the phenomenology of the localmuon density. It is shown that measurement ofmuon-density spectra at various zenith angles makes it possible to obtain information about the energy spectrum, mass composition, and interaction of cosmic rays over a broad range of energies (10 15 -10 18 eV) by using a single array of comparatively small size. The results obtained from a comparison of experimental data on muon bundles from the DECOR coordinate detector with the results of simulation performed under various assumptions on the properties of the primary flux and for various hadron-interaction models are presented, and possible versions of the interpretation of these results are discussed.

  19. The Discovery of an Outburst and Pulsed X-ray Flux from SMC X-2 from RXTE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Corbet, R H D; Coe, M J; Laycock, S; Handler, G

    2001-01-01

    Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All Sky Monitor observations of SMC X-2 show that the source experienced an outburst in January to April 2000 reaching a peak luminosity of greater than ~10^38 ergs s^-1. RXTE Proportional Counter Array observations during this outburst reveal the presence of pulsations with a 2.37s period. However, optical photometry of the optical counterpart showed the source to be still significantly fainter than it was more than half a year after the outburst in the 1970s when SMC X-2 was discovered.

  20. Monte-Carlo method applied to the energy loss calculation of the gamma rays isotropic flux in the NaI(tau l) cylindrical scintillator between 0.5-20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.M.; Dutra, S.L.G.; Palmeira, R.A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the 'Monte Carlo' method, a determination was made of the response function of a NaI cylindrical crystal when exposed to an omnidirectional γ ray flux in the range 0.5 - 20 MeV. Improvements over previous similar calculations include considerations of the bremsstrahlung and multiple scattering processes in the slowing down of the secondary electrons. These calculations will be applied to the problem of determining the energy spectrum of an incident gamma ray flux from the measured response of the crystal in the space [pt

  1. Beta decay of Cu-56

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borcea, R; Aysto, J; Caurier, E; Dendooven, P; Doring, J; Gierlik, M; Gorska, M; Grawe, H; Hellstrom, M; Janas, Z; Jokinen, A; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; La Commara, M; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G; Mayet, P; Nieminen, A; Nowacki, F; Penttila, H; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Schlegel, C; Schmidt, K; Schwengner, R; Sawicka, M

    2001-01-01

    The proton-rich isotope Cu-56 was produced at the GSI On-Line Mass Separator by means of the Si-28(S-32, p3n) fusion-evaporation reaction. Its beta -decay properties were studied by detecting beta -delayed gamma rays and protons. A half-Life of 93 +/- 3 ms was determined for Cu-56. Compared to the

  2. The application of {beta}-ray excitation fluorescence to the measurement of the thickness of deposits and to analysis; Applications de la fluorescence excitee au moyen des rayons {beta} a la mesure des epaisseurs des depots et a l'analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Seibel, G [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1961-07-01

    Principles of the method are first outlined and the instrumentation used is described. The different types of radiation detectors are subject of a detailed study. As a source of {beta}-radiation {sup 90}(Sr + Y) was used as well as {sup 147}Pm. Great care was taken to eliminate back-diffused electrons by deflection by a strong permanent magnet. The method was applied to the measurement of the thickness of deposits of Cr, Zn, Sn, Cd and Cu on iron as well as Zn, Cr, Ag and Au on copper and the results obtained are discussed. An attempt was made, to use {beta}-X-ray fluorescence for the analysis of minerals, iron ore and glass and for routine control of Si-Mn, Si-Ca, Fe-Mn and Fe-W. Finally the method of {beta}-X-ray fluorescence is compared with normal-X-ray fluorescence and possibilities of further development are cited. (author) [French] Les principes de la methode et l'instrumentation utilisee sont presentes. On decrit en particulier les detecteurs de rayonnement utilises. Comme source de rayonnement on utilise {sup 90}(Sr + Y) et {sup 147}Pm. Pour eliminer les electrons retrodiffuses on utilise un aimant permanent place sur le trajet du faisceau. La methode est appliquee a la mesure des epaisseurs des depots metalliques tels que le Cr, Zn, Sn, Cd et Cu sur fer et le Zn, Cr, Ag et Au sur cuivre. D'autre part, la fluorescence {beta}-X etait utilisee pour l'analyse des minerais et des verres et pour le controle des alliages Fe-Mn, Fe-W, Si-Mn, Si-Ca. Enfin, on passe a une comparaison entre la fluorescence {beta}-X et la fluorescence X normale et on discute les possibilites d'un developpement futur. (auteur)

  3. Secondary cosmic-ray e+- from 1 to 100 GeV in the upper atmosphere and interstellar space, and interpretation of a recent e+ flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, C.D.; Buffington, A.

    1976-01-01

    Secondary fluxes of cosmic-ray e from the decay of mesons produced by nuclear interactions are calculated for depths under 10 g cm -2 of atmosphere or interstellar space for energies from 1 to 100 GeV. Secondary meson spectra applicable for energies > or =5 GeV are obtained from the recently measured spectra of Carey et al. using Monte Carlo techniques. An analytic model is presented which identifies all essential parameters and enables easy calculation of efluxes for various parameter values. This model is used to interpret the e + measurement of Buffington, Orth, and Smoot. We find the mean thickness of interstellar and source material to be 4.3 (+1.8,-1.2) g cm -2 for cosmic-ray e + above 4 GeV. This result is difficult to reconcile with the recently proposed two-containment-volume propagation models of Cowsik and Wilson; Rengarajan, Stephens, and Verma; and Meneguzzi: all of the models predict a result near 1.8 g cm -2 at these energies due to the energy dependence of the measured (Li+Be+B)/(C+O) ratio. Single-containment-volume (galactic) models invoking an energy-dependent leakage lifetime are compatible with the e + data, but lack a mechanism to explain the energy dependence

  4. Speculative Betas

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison Hong; David Sraer

    2012-01-01

    We provide a model for why high beta assets are more prone to speculative overpricing than low beta ones. When investors disagree about the common factor of cash-flows, high beta assets are more sensitive to this macro-disagreement and experience a greater divergence-of-opinion about their payoffs. Short-sales constraints for some investors such as retail mutual funds result in high beta assets being over-priced. When aggregate disagreement is low, expected return increases with beta due to r...

  5. Determination of the gamma-ray flux of the stopped WWR-SM reactor by color center production in LiF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Kalannov, M.U.; Ibragimova, E.M.; Karabaev, Kh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Gamma-radiation with a wide energy spectrum, accompanying neutron flux in the nuclear reactor, is known to result in radiation heating of materials. It is usually detected either by calorimetry or by an ionizing chamber maintained in the active zone while the reactor works and high-energy neutrons also contribute into ionization. The aim of this research was to separate the gamma-component from the neutron flux upon stopping the WWR-SM reactor and to determine the gamma-intensity both with the ionization chamber and the well-known dosimeter LiF crystal, and also by comparing with the effect of monochromatic 60 Co gamma-radiation of the known flux and dose. For LiF with small Z the photoelectric effect is weak, and Compton scattering prevails. Both the optical absorption and photo-luminescence techniques together with micro-hardness and X-ray diffraction analysis were used for measuring the structure defect generation rate in the irradiated crystals, which is proportional to the gamma-intensity. Fluorine vacancy trapping electron is the well-known stable F-center responsible for the isolated absorption band at 250 nm and induced by radiolysis mechanism. The sequential irradiations and measurements were done within 150 hours after the moment of the reactor quenching. The dose dependence of the absorption band was found to be linear up to the dose of 10 6 R. The F-center concentration as a measure of an accumulated dose was calculated by the Smakula formula. At higher doses another band at 440 nm appears like that for 60 Co irradiation, which is responsible for unstable F 2 and F 3 centers formed due to coagulation of F-centers. X-diffraction analysis revealed twin structure in (111) plane. Yet the micro-hardness of the gamma-irradiated samples did not change noticeably. For higher doses the photo-luminescence band at 650 nm was also used as a dosimetric item. The luminescence kinetics has a fast nanosecond scale component and a weak tail in a microsecond

  6. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Observations of the Galactic Center: Quantifying the Extreme Ultraviolet/Soft X-ray Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    2018-04-01

    It has long been shown that the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of the ionizing stars of H II regions can be estimated by comparing the observed line emission to detailed models. In the Galactic Center (GC), however, previous observations have shown that the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) of the local photon field is strange, producing both very low excitation ionized gas (indicative of ionization by late O stars) and also widespread diffuse emission from atoms too highly ionized to be found in normal H II regions. This paper describes the analysis of all GC spectra taken by Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph and downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. In it, H II region densities and abundances are described, and serendipitously discovered candidate planetary nebulae, compact shocks, and candidate young stellar objects are tabulated. Models were computed with Cloudy, using SEDs from Starburst99 plus additional X-rays, and compared to the observed mid-infrared forbidden and recombination lines. The ages inferred from the model fits do not agree with recent proposed star formation sequences (star formation in the GC occurring along streams of gas with density enhancements caused by close encounters with the black hole, Sgr A*), with Sgr B1, Sgr C, and the Arches Cluster being all about the same age, around 4.5 Myr old, with similar X-ray requirements. The fits for the Quintuplet Cluster appear to give a younger age, but that could be caused by higher-energy photons from shocks from stellar winds or from a supernova.

  7. A mini X-ray generator as an alternative to a 90Sr/90Y beta source in luminescence dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out an investigation to test whether mini X-ray generators are a suitable alternative to radioactive sources in luminescence dating. The study has mainly been motivated by the need for high dose rates (similar to 1 Gy/s) to make dating of older samples using regeneration protocols...... with a sample of thermally sensitized sedimentary quartz suggest that we can use beta and X-ray irradiation interchangeably from the point of view of construction of growth curves by the single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. Conductivity of ion dielectrics during the mean flux-density electron- and X-ray pulse radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajsburd, D.I.; Mesyats, G.A.; Naminov, V.L.; Tavanov, Eh.G.

    1982-01-01

    Conductivity of ion dielectrics under electron and X-ray pulse radiation is investigated. Investigations have been conducted in the range of average beam densities in which extinction of low-energy conductivity takes place. Thin plates of alkali-halogen crystals have been used as samples. Small-dimensional accelerator with controlled beam parameters: 1-20 ns, 0.1-2000 A/cm 2 , 0.3-0.5 MeV has been used for radiation. Temperature dependence of conductivity current pulse is determined. Time resolution of 10 - 10 s is achieved. In the 70-300 K range it practically coincides with radiation pulse. An essential inertial constituent is observed below 300 K. It is shown that at average beam densities a comparable contribution into fast conductivity is made by intracentre conductivity independent of temperature and high-temperature conductivity which decreases with temperature with activation energy equal to the energy of short-wave background. That is why amplitude of fast constituent decreases with temperature slower than high-energy conductivity

  9. Assessment of the structural integrity of a prototypical instrumented IFMIF high flux test module rig by fully 3D X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiseanu, Ion [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Laboratory NILPRP, P.O. Box MG-36, R-77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: tiseanu@infim.ro; Simon, Martin [Hans Waelischmiller GmbH (HWM), Schiessstattweg 16, D-88677 Markdorf (Germany); Craciunescu, Teddy; Mandache, Bogdan N. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Laboratory NILPRP, P.O. Box MG-36, R-77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Heinzel, Volker; Stratmanns, Erwin; Simakov, Stanislaw P.; Leichtle, Dieter [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit IRS, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    An inspection procedure to assess the mechanical integrity of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray microtomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the high flux test module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules, which wear electric heaters and thermocouples, are housed in rigs. To assure a well-defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactured at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two microtomography facilities: a compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and a high-end industrial tomography facility with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a directional microfocus X-ray source (U = 220 kV and I = 300 {mu}A) the geometry resolution was about 30 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements is sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. The space resolution and the overall

  10. Assessment of the structural integrity of a prototypical instrumented IFMIF high flux test module rig by fully 3D X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiseanu, Ion; Simon, Martin; Craciunescu, Teddy; Mandache, Bogdan N.; Heinzel, Volker; Stratmanns, Erwin; Simakov, Stanislaw P.; Leichtle, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    An inspection procedure to assess the mechanical integrity of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray microtomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the high flux test module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules, which wear electric heaters and thermocouples, are housed in rigs. To assure a well-defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactured at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two microtomography facilities: a compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and a high-end industrial tomography facility with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a directional microfocus X-ray source (U = 220 kV and I = 300 μA) the geometry resolution was about 30 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements is sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. The space resolution and the overall

  11. Assessment of the Structural Integrity of a Prototypical Instrumented IFMIF High Flux Test Module Rig by Fully 3D X-Ray Microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiseanu, I.; Craciunescu, T.; Mandache, B.N.; Simon, M.; Heinzel, V.; Stratmanns, E.; Simakov, S.P.; Leichtle, D.

    2006-01-01

    An inspection procedure to asses the mechanical integrity of IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray micro-tomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the High Flux Test Module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules which wear electric heaters and thermocouples are housed in rigs. To assure a well defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactures at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two micro-tomography facilities, our compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and two high-end industrial tomography facilities with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a microfocus X-ray source (U=220 kV and I=300 μA) the geometry resolution was about 30-50 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements should be sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. Space resolution could be further improved if one

  12. Investigation of Deuterium Loaded Materials Subject to X-Ray Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa L.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Martin, Richard E.; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Chait, Arnon; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Penney, Nicholas; hide

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented from an exploratory study involving x-ray irradiation of select deuterated materials. Titanium deuteride plus deuterated polyethylene, deuterated polyethylene alone, and for control, hydrogen-based polyethylene samples and nondeuterated titanium samples were exposed to x-ray irradiation. These samples were exposed to various energy levels from 65 to 280 kV with prescribed electron flux from 500 to 9000 µA impinging on a tungsten braking target, with total exposure times ranging from 55 to 280 min. Gamma activity was measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and for all samples no gamma activity above background was detected. Alpha and beta activities were measured using a gas proportional counter, and for select samples beta activity was measured with a liquid scintillator spectrometer. The majority of the deuterated materials subjected to the microfocus x-ray irradiation exhibited postexposure beta activity above background and several showed short-lived alpha activity. The HPE and nondeuterated titanium control samples exposed to the x-ray irradiation showed no postexposure alpha or beta activities above background. Several of the samples (SL10A, SL16, SL17A) showed beta activity above background with a greater than 4s confidence level, months after exposure. Portions of SL10A, SL16, and SL17A samples were also scanned using a beta scintillator and found to have beta activity in the tritium energy band, continuing without noticeable decay for over 12 months. Beta scintillation investigation of as-received materials (before x-ray exposure) showed no beta activity in the tritium energy band, indicating the beta emitters were not in the starting materials.

  13. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  14. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhengbao; Han, Yu; Zhao, Lan; Huang, Shiliang; Zheng, Qiyu; Lin, Shuangzheng; Cõ rdova, Armando C.; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Junliang

    2012-01-01

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single

  15. Beta spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryak, P.; Zderadicka, J.; Plch, J.; Kokta, L.; Novotna, P.

    1977-01-01

    For the purpose of beta spectrometry, a semiconductor spectrometer with one Si(Li) detector cooled with liquid nitrogen was designed. Geometrical detection efficiency is about 10% 4 sr. The achieved resolution for 624 keV conversion electrons of sup(137m)Ba is 2.6 keV (FWHM). A program was written in the FORTRAN language for the correction of the deformation of the measured spectra by backscattering in the analysis of continuous beta spectra. The method permits the determination of the maximum energy of the beta spectrum with an accuracy of +-5 keV. (author)

  16. Beta Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may not work as effectively for people of African heritage and older people, especially when taken without ... conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/beta-blockers/ART-20044522 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  17. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  18. {beta}-Delayed proton-decay study of {sup 20}Mg and its implications for the {sup 19}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Na breakout reaction in X-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.P., E-mail: J.P.Wallace@sms.ed.ac.uk [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Woods, P.J.; Lotay, G. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Alharbi, A.; Banu, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); David, H.M.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Under astrophysical conditions of high temperature and density, such as for example found in X-ray bursts, breakout can occur from the hot CNO cycles into the rapid proton capture process. A key breakout route is via the sequence {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Na. The {sup 19}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Na reaction rate is expected to be dominated by a single resonance at 457(3) keV. The identity of the resonance has been under discussion for a long time, with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} and 3{sup +} assignments suggested. In this study of the {beta}-delayed proton decay of {sup 20}Mg we report a new, significantly more stringent, upper limit on the {beta}-decay branch to this state of 0.02% with a confidence level of 90%. This makes a 1{sup +} assignment highly unlikely and favours a 3{sup +} assignment for which no branch is expected to be observed. The 3{sup +} state is predicted to have a significantly higher resonance strength, and to produce a proportionately higher {sup 19}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Na reaction rate in X-ray burst conditions.

  19. Sawtooth crashes at high beta on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, B; Huysmans, G T.A.; Sips, A C.C. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Nave, M F.F. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    1994-07-01

    The sawtooth crashes on JET display features which depend on beta. The main observation is a transient bulging of flux surfaces (duration inferior to 30 microsec.), which is predominantly on the low field side and extends to larger radii as beta increases. This phenomenon reaches the plasma boundary when beta{sub N} exceeds 0.5 and in these cases is followed by an ELM within 50 microsec. These sawtooth/ELM events limit plasma performance. Modelling of mode coupling shows qualitative agreement between observations of the structure of the sawtooth precursor and the calculated internal kink mode at high beta. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Detection of gamma rays using scintillation optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. W.; Hong, S. B.

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating optical fibers have several advantages over other conventional materials used for radiation detection. We have used glass and plastic scintillating fibers to detect gamma rays emitted from 60 Co and 137 Cs, and beta rays from 90 Sr. The sensors are constructed of single strand or multi-strand fibers of 1 mm diameter. The glass scintillating fiber used contains cerium-activated lithium-silicate as scintillating material and the plastic scintillating fiber used is Bicron model BCF-12. In this paper, we report the pulse-height spectra obtained by both sensor types, and analyze them in the aspect of their usability for radiation detectors. Our investigation suggests that the glass fiber can be used to develop gamma ray detectors which will function in high and low gamma ray flux environments. Use of the sensor for the beta ray detection was not satisfactory. The plastic fiber sensor did not work satisfactorily for the weak gamma sources, but did produce somewhat promising results. The scintillating plastic fiber offers some feasibility as beta ray sensor material

  1. Reconnection of a Kinking Flux Rope Triggering the Ejection of a Microwave and Hard X-Ray Source. 2. Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    apex. The external field is thus mainly poloidal, with the ratio between toroidal and poloidal components at the flux rope apex being Bet/ Bep = 0.075...eruption involved a kink-unstable flux rope that had a high twist of Φ & 6π. This yields a coherent framework to understand the inverse gamma shape...leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement n 218816

  2. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  3. Irradiation and development of the nuclear emulsions exposed to intense fluxes of thermal neutrons with {gamma} rays; Irradiation et developpement des emulsions nucleaires exposees a des flux intenses de neutrons thermiques, accompagnes de rayons {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, H; Bonnet, A; Cohen, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    The thermal neutron fluxes provided by nuclear reactors permit the survey of relatively rare phenomenons, and dosage of very weak quantities of some elements. One of the most favorable detection technique are constituted by the use of the nuclear emulsions. one can mention: - the dosage of uranium by counting in the emulsion the number of traces due to fission fragments after irradiation. - The dosage of the lithium and the boron as trace amounts with the help of nuclear reactions (n, {alpha}) and thermal neutrons. - The research of reactions (n, {alpha}) or (n, p) of very weak cross section for middle or heavy elements. These different applications require however important neutrons fluxes. It had therefore obliged us to search for the most favorable irradiation and development of the emulsions conditions, to get the best visibility of the trajectories and decrease the phenomena of fog on the emulsion, which prevents any observation. (M.B.) [French] Les flux de neutrons thermiques fournis par les reacteurs nucleaires permettent l'etude de phenomenes relativement rares, et le dosage de tres faibles quantites de certains elements. Un des moyens de detection les plus favorables est constitue par l'utilisation des emulsions nucleaires. on peut citer: - le dosage de l'uranium par comptage dans l'emulsion du nombre de traces dues aux fragments de fission apres irradiation. - Le dosage du lithium et du bore a l'etat de traces a l'aide des reactions (n, {alpha}) sous l'action des neutrons thermiques. - La recherche de reactions (n,{alpha}) ou (n,p) de tres faible section efficace pour des elements moyens ou lourds. Ces differentes applications necessite cependant des flux de neutrons important. On a donc ete amene a rechercher les conditions les plus favorables d'irradiation et de developpement des emulsions, de maniere a obtenir la meilleure visibilite des trajectoires et diminuer les phenomenes de voile de l'emulsion, qui empeche toute observation. (M.B.)

  4. Development of beta reference radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Zhaoyong; Cai Shanyu; Li Yanbo; Yin Wei; Feng Jiamin; Sun Yuhua; Li Yongqiang

    1997-09-01

    A system of beta reference radiation has been developed, that is composed of 740 MBq 147 Pm beta source, 74 MBq and 740 MBq 90 Sr + 90 Y β sources, compensation filters, a source handling tool, a source jig, spacing bars, a shutter, a control unit and a beta dose meter calibration stand. For 740 MBq 147 Pm and 74 MBq 90 Sr + 90 Y beta reference radiations with compensation filters and 740 MBq 90 Sr + 90 Y beta reference radiation without compensation filter, at 20 cm, 30 cm and 30 cm distance separately; the residual energy of maximum is 0.14 MeV, 1.98 MeV and 2.18 MeV separately; the absorbed dose to tissue D (0.07) is 1.547 mGy/h (1996-05-20), 5.037 mGy/h (1996-05-10) and 93.57 mGy/h (1996-05-15) separately; the total uncertainty is 3.0%, 1.7% and 1.7% separately. For the first and the second beta reference radiation, the dose rate variability in the area of 18 cm diameter in the plane perpendicular to the beta-ray beam axis is within +-6% and +-3% separately. (3 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.)

  5. Irradiation and development of the nuclear emulsions exposed to intense fluxes of thermal neutrons with {gamma} rays; Irradiation et developpement des emulsions nucleaires exposees a des flux intenses de neutrons thermiques, accompagnes de rayons {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, H.; Bonnet, A.; Cohen, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    The thermal neutron fluxes provided by nuclear reactors permit the survey of relatively rare phenomenons, and dosage of very weak quantities of some elements. One of the most favorable detection technique are constituted by the use of the nuclear emulsions. one can mention: - the dosage of uranium by counting in the emulsion the number of traces due to fission fragments after irradiation. - The dosage of the lithium and the boron as trace amounts with the help of nuclear reactions (n, {alpha}) and thermal neutrons. - The research of reactions (n, {alpha}) or (n, p) of very weak cross section for middle or heavy elements. These different applications require however important neutrons fluxes. It had therefore obliged us to search for the most favorable irradiation and development of the emulsions conditions, to get the best visibility of the trajectories and decrease the phenomena of fog on the emulsion, which prevents any observation. (M.B.) [French] Les flux de neutrons thermiques fournis par les reacteurs nucleaires permettent l'etude de phenomenes relativement rares, et le dosage de tres faibles quantites de certains elements. Un des moyens de detection les plus favorables est constitue par l'utilisation des emulsions nucleaires. on peut citer: - le dosage de l'uranium par comptage dans l'emulsion du nombre de traces dues aux fragments de fission apres irradiation. - Le dosage du lithium et du bore a l'etat de traces a l'aide des reactions (n, {alpha}) sous l'action des neutrons thermiques. - La recherche de reactions (n,{alpha}) ou (n,p) de tres faible section efficace pour des elements moyens ou lourds. Ces differentes applications necessite cependant des flux de neutrons important. On a donc ete amene a rechercher les conditions les plus favorables d'irradiation et de developpement des emulsions, de maniere a obtenir la meilleure visibilite des trajectoires et diminuer les phenomenes de voile de l'emulsion, qui

  6. A new detector for the measurement of neutron flux in nuclear reactors; Nouvelle methode de mesure des flux de neutrons dans les reacteurs atomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L; Labeyrie, J; Tarassenko, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The detector described is designed for the instantaneous measurement of thermal neutron fluxes, in the presence of high {gamma} ray activity; this detector can withstand temperatures as high as 500 deg. C. It is based on the following principle: radioactive atoms resulting from heavy-nucleus fission are carried by a gas flow to a detector recording their {beta} and {gamma} disintegration. Thermal neutron fluxes as low as few neutrons per cm{sup 2} per second can be measured. This detector may be used to control a nuclear reactor, to plot the thermal flux distribution with an excellent definition (1 mm{sup 2}) for fluxes higher than 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/s. The time response of the system to a sharp variation of flux is limited, in case of large fluxes, to the transit time of the gas flow between the fission product emitter and the detector; of the order of one tenth of a sec per meter of piping. The detector may also be applied for spectroscopy of fission products eider than 0,1 s. (author)Fren. [French] On decrit un appareil permettant la mesure instantanee des flux de neutrons thermiques accompagnes de flux intenses de rayons {gamma} et situes dans des enceintes pouvant etre portees a des temperatures superieures a 500 deg. C. On utilise la radioactivite des atomes resultant de la fission des noyaux lourds; ces atomes sont entraines par un courant gazeux vers un detecteur de radioactivite qui enregistre leurs desintegrations {beta} et {gamma}. On peut mesurer des flux partir de quelques neutrons thermiques par cm{sup 2} et par seconde. L'appareil permet de suivre la puissance d'un reacteur atomique, de tracer des cartes de densite de neutrons avec une tres bonne definition (1 mm{sup 2}) dans le cas de flux superieurs a 10{sup 8} cm{sup 2}/s. Le temps de reponse du systeme a une variation du flux de neutrons est limite, poes flux importants, par le temps de transit du gaz entre l'emetteur de produits de fission et le detecteur: soit quelques dizaines de

  7. Absorbed dose calculation from beta and gamma rays of 131I in ellipsoidal thyroid and other organs of neck with MCNPX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The 131I radioisotope is used for diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. In optimized Iodine therapy, a specific dose must be reached to the thyroid gland with minimum radiation to the cervical spine, cervical vertebrae, neck tissue, subcutaneous fat and skin. Dose measurement inside the alive organ is difficult therefore the aim of this research was dose calculation in the organs by MCNPX code. Materials and Methods: First of all, the input file for MCNPX code has been prepared to calculate F6 and F8 tallies for ellipsoidal thyroid lobes with long axes is tow times of short axes which the 131I is distributed uniformly inside the lobes. Then the code has been run for F6 and F8 tallies for variation of lobe volume from 1 to 25 milliliters. From the output file of tally F6, the gamma absorbed dose in ellipsoidal thyroid, spinal neck, neck bone, neck tissue, subcutaneous fat layer and skin for the volume lobe variation from 1 ml to 25 ml have been derived and the graphs are drew. As well as, form the output of F8 tally the absorbed energy of beta in thyroid and soft tissue of neck is obtained and listed in the table and then absorbed dose of bate has been calculated. Results: The results of this research show that for constant activity in thyroid, the absorbed dose of gamma decreases about 88.3% in thyroid, 6.9% at soft tissue, 19.3% in adipose layer and 17.4% in skin, but it increases 32.1% in spinal of neck and 32.3% in neck bone when the lobe volume varied from 1 to 25 milliliters. For the same situation, the beta absorbed dose decreases 95.9% in thyroid and 64.2% in soft tissue. Conclusion: For the constant activity in thyroid by increasing the thyroid volume, absorbed dose of gamma in thyroid and soft tissue of neck, adipose layer under the skin and skin of neck decreased, but it increased at spinal of neck and neck bone. Also, by increasing of the lobe volume in constant activity, the beta absorbed dose

  8. X-ray structures of progesterone receptor ligand binding domain in its agonist state reveal differing mechanisms for mixed profiles of 11beta-substituted steroids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusher, S.J.; Raaijmakers, H.C.A.; Vu-Pham, D.; Kazemier, B.; Bosch, R.; McGuire, R.; Azevedo, R.; Hamersma, H.; Dechering, K.; Oubrie, A.; Duin, M. van; Vlieg, J. de

    2012-01-01

    We present here the x-ray structures of the progesterone receptor (PR) in complex with two mixed profile PR modulators whose functional activity results from two differing molecular mechanisms. The structure of Asoprisnil bound to the agonist state of PR demonstrates the contribution of the ligand

  9. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of metastable intermediates of beta-lactoglobulin isolated after heat-induced aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrotta, R.; Arleth, L.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering was used for studying intermediate species, isolated after heat-induced aggregation of the A variant of bovine P-lactoglobulin. The intermediates were separated in two fractions, the heated metastable dimer and heated metastable oligomers larger than the dimer. The pa...

  10. Electron-positron pair production by gamma-rays in an anisotropic flux of soft photons, and application to pulsar polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Guillaume; Mottez, Fabrice; Bonazzola, Silvano

    2018-02-01

    Electron-positron pair production by collision of photons is investigated in view of application to pulsar physics. We compute the absorption rate of individual gamma-ray photons by an arbitrary anisotropic distribution of softer photons, and the energy and angular spectrum of the outgoing leptons. We work analytically within the approximation that 1 ≫ mc2/E > ɛ/E, with E and ɛ the gamma-ray and soft-photon maximum energy and mc2 the electron mass energy. We give results at leading order in these small parameters. For practical purposes, we provide expressions in the form of Laurent series which give correct reaction rates in the isotropic case within an average error of ˜ 7 per cent. We apply this formalism to gamma-rays flying downward or upward from a hot neutron star thermally radiating at a uniform temperature of 106 K. Other temperatures can be easily deduced using the relevant scaling laws. We find differences in absorption between these two extreme directions of almost two orders of magnitude, much larger than our error estimate. The magnetosphere appears completely opaque to downward gamma-rays while there are up to ˜ 10 per cent chances of absorbing an upward gamma-ray. We provide energy and angular spectra for both upward and downward gamma-rays. Energy spectra show a typical double peak, with larger separation at larger gamma-ray energies. Angular spectra are very narrow, with an opening angle ranging from 10-3 to 10-7 radians with increasing gamma-ray energies.

  11. Excitation of K X-rays for a wide range of elements (25 ≤ Z ≤ 82) by direct interaction of beta particles from phosphorus-32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of low-medium and high-Z elements from manganese to lead were investigated via their K α employing 75 μCi of 32 P. This was accomplished by preparing various synthetic mixtures of elements in the range 25 ≤Z≤82, then simply introducing 32 P solution to form source-samples. The advantages of excitation with 32 P, a pure β-emitter with a β max. energy at 1709 keV, include the following: excitation of all the K α x-rays from manganese to lead; the relative sensitivities of the K x-rays are all within one order of magnitude; the source itself does not produce any spectral lines; and the background can be greatly reduced by filtering. Excitation with 32 P is compared with that of a conventional 109 Cd source and some possible applications are discussed. (author)

  12. Beta decay of 22O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.; Dufour, J.P.; Moral, R. del; Fleury, A.; Jean, D.; Pravikoff, M.S.; Delagrange, H.; Geissel, H.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hanelt, E.

    1989-01-01

    The beta-gamma spectroscopic study of 22 O is presented. This nucleus, produced as a projectile-like fragment from the interaction of a 60 MeV/n 40 Ar beam with a Be target, has been separated by the LISE spectrometer. Several gamma rays from 22 O decay have been observed, from which a half-life of (2.25±0.15) s has been determined. Accurate excitation energies have been deduced for several states in 22 F. A partial beta decay scheme of 22 O has been established. Experimental results have been compared with shell model calculations. (orig.)

  13. Testing joint inversion techniques of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux at a well-characterized site for use in the detection of subsurface density structures beneath volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosburn, K.; Roy, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining accurate static and time-dependent shallow subsurface density structure beneath volcanic, hydrogeologic, and tectonic targets can help illuminate active processes of fluid flow and magma transport. A limitation of using surface gravity measurements for such imaging is that these observations are vastly underdetermined and non-unique. In order to hone in on a more accurate solution, other data sets are needed to provide constraints, typically seismic or borehole observations. The spatial resolution of these techniques, however, is relatively poor, and a novel solution to this problem in recent years has been to use attenuation of the cosmic ray muon flux, which provides an independent constraint on density. In this study we present a joint inversion of gravity and cosmic ray muon flux observations to infer the density structure of a target rock volume at a well-characterized site near Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA. We investigate the shallow structure of a mesa formed by the Quaternary ash-flow tuffs on the Pajarito Plateau, flanking the Jemez volcano in New Mexico. Gravity measurements were made using a Lacoste and Romberg D meter on the surface of the mesa and inside a tunnel beneath the mesa. Muon flux measurements were also made at the mesa surface and at various points within the same tunnel using a muon detector having an acceptance region of 45 degrees from the vertical and a track resolution of several milliradians. We expect the combination of muon and gravity data to provide us with enhanced resolution as well as the ability to sense deeper structures in our region of interest. We use Bayesian joint inversion techniques on the gravity-muon dataset to test these ideas, building upon previous work using gravity inversion alone to resolve density structure in our study area. Both the regional geology and geometry of our study area is well-known and we assess the inferred density structure from our gravity-muon joint inversion within this known

  14. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zodivaz, A.M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J.E.R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E.W.; Tapping, K.F.; Air Force Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario)

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard x rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard x ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy x rays. The hardest x ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at x rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz

  15. Experimental search for second-class currents. Beta-ray angular distributions from aligned nuclei /sup 12/B and /sup 12/N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, K; Minamisono, T; Nojiri, Y; Masuda, Y [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1978-01-01

    The ..beta..-energy dependent angular distributions, W(theta) asymptoticaly equals 1 +- P(1 + ..cap alpha../sub +-/E)P/sub 1/(cos theta) + A..cap alpha../sub +-/EP/sub 2/(cos theta), from the aligned nuclei /sup 12/B and /sup 12/N have been measured. Positive A/sup +/ and negative A/sup -/ alignments were successively produced, by use of NMR, after every other production period of polarized nuclei through nuclear reactions; A/sup +/ - A/sup -/ asymptoticaly equals 0.26 for /sup 12/B and /sup +/A/sup +/ - A/sup - +/ asymptoticaly equals 0.55 for /sup 12/N with p asymptoticaly equals 0. The results are ..cap alpha../sub -/(/sup 12/B) = 0.02/sub 5/ +- 0.03/sub 4/%/MeV, /sup +/..cap alpha../sub +/(/sup 12/N)/sup +/ = 0.27/sub 7/ +- 0.05/sub 2/%/MeV, and ..cap alpha../sub -/ - ..cap alpha../sub +/ = 0.30/sub 2/ +- 0.06/sub 2/%/MeV assuming ..cap alpha../sub +/<0. In comparison with available data for CVC test in the mass-12 triad and theoretical predictions, the present ..cap alpha../sub -/ - ..cap alpha../sub +/ value is consistent within 20% level with predictions of the CVC theory and with absence of second-class induced-tensor currents.

  16. Evaluation of the self-absorption of 14C beta-rays in gel-suspension samples by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, G.; Nagao, K.; Okai, T.; Matoba, M.

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the self-absorption of the β-rays from 14 C in a gel-suspension sample, the Monte Carlo code, simulating the sequence of stages occurring in the sample, has been developed. The trajectory of the electron was calculated by the continuous slowing down approximation and the multiple Coulomb scattering theory. The effects of the self-absorption, strong quenching and particle size distribution of calcium carbonate on the output counting efficiency and the shape of the energy spectrum were evaluated. (author)

  17. The Open Flux Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  18. The Open Flux Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Henney, C. J. [Air Force Research Lab/Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Arge, C. N. [Science and Exploration Directorate, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Derosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Yeates, A. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Owens, M. J., E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-10

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  19. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g"-"1). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  20. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: ferreira@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g{sup -1}). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  1. Culture engineering examination and metabolism flux distribution system analysis for madding to convert into poly {beta}- hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) using the hydrogen bacteria of organic acid got in liquid-phase oxidation of lignite; Kattan no ekiso sanka de erareru yukisan wo suiso saikin wo riyoshite pori {beta}-hidorokishi rakusan(PHB) ni henkan saseru tameno baiyo kogakuteki kento to taisha ryusoku bunpu shisutemu kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, Kinko; Seki, Suito; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Mae, Kazuhiro; Miura, Koichi

    1999-04-05

    The culture engineering examination for madding to convert into poly {beta} - hydroxy Wisteria (PHB) which glycolic acid. Acetic acid, ant acid, malonic acid got in liquid-phase oxidation of lignite are raw material of biodegradable plastic using hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus was carried out. It was proven that acetic acid was the most efficiently converted into the PHB as a result of cultivating these organic acid as a single carbon source. And, it was utilized to the bacterial cell at the order of ant acid, acetic acid, glycolic acid, when it was cultivated in mixing organic acid, and it was proven to convert into the PHB. Though the malonic acid was not utilized for the bacterial cell breeding, it was indicated that as the result which analyzed metabolism flow distribution by calculating using the culture data, the succinate dehydrogenase of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) circuit received competitive inhibition, when this is added in culture middle point, and that the flux of griot lysyl acid route and gluconeogenesis route lowers. And, it was proven that it was utilized in the route which comes to the PHB synthesis from acetoacetyl CoA with the lowering of the ammonia concentration on NADPH produced from the isocitric acid, though it was prior consumed to the glutamic acid of tricarboxylic acid cycle in the route, if ammonia concentration is high. (translated by NEDO)

  2. Beta Emission and Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-13

    Bremsstrahlung is continuous radiation produced by beta particles decelerating in matter; different beta emitters have different endpoint energies; high-energy betas interacting with high-Z materials will more likely produce bremsstrahlung; depending on the data, sometimes all you can say is that a beta emitter is present.

  3. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, C; Weber, G; Märtin, R; Höfer, S; Kämpfer, T; Stöhlker, Th

    2016-04-01

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays - such as laser-generated plasmas - is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  4. Search for time-dependent fluctuations in cosmic ray flux with the AMS-01 detector and construction of the AMS-02 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Paniccia, Mercedes

    La découverte au début du vingtième siècle de l’existence d’un flux de particules énergétiques provenant de l’espace a engendré un vif intérêt auprès de la communauté scientifique de l’époque, donnant naissance à de nouvelles branches d’étude, dont la physique des particules est l’exemple le plus éclatant. La formulation d’un modèle pouvant expliquer l’origine et le spectre du rayonnement cosmique et aussi décrire les mécanismes de propagation et d’accélération dans l’espace interstellaire et interplanétaire, a nécessité l’effort conjoint de différents domaines: la physique des particules, la physique des plasmas, l’astrophysique, la physique solaire et la géophysique. L’analyse de l’enorme quantité de données collectées au sujet de rayons cosmiques au moyen de détecteurs au sol, en ballon et dans l’espace, combinée avec les observations des événements astrophysiques, solaires et géophysiques, a permis d’expliquer la plupart des propriétés des...

  5. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by {beta}-particle excitation of X fluorescent rays; Nouveaux developpements de l'analyse et de la mesure des epaisseurs par excitation des raies de fluorescence X au moyen de particules {beta}; Novye usovershenstvovaniya analiza i izmereniya plotnosti putem vozbuzhdeniya fluorestsiruyushchikh spektrov rentgenovskogo lucha beta-chastitsami; Nuevos adelantos en el analisis y la medicion de espesores mediante la excitacion de rayos X por particulas beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France); Seibel, G [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie, St-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1962-01-15

    The method of analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by {beta}-X fluorescence which we previously described has been further developed. Using Pm{sup 147} and Kr{sup 85} sources, it is possible to reduce the background observed with Sr{sup 90}. We quote the results obtained for various thickness measurements of metal deposits, an analysis of the solutions, and the continuous measurement of calcium and iron in core samples. We describe experiments made for analysis of the X-radiation by crystal. (author) [French] Le procede d'analyse et de mesure des epaisseurs de depots par fluorescence {beta}-X que nous avons precedemment decrit a fait l'objet de nouveaux developpements. L'emploi de sources de {sup 147}Pm et de {sup 85}Kr permet de reduire le bruit de fond que l'on observe avec le {sup 90}Sr. Nous donnons les resultats obtenus pour diverses mesures d'epaisseurs de depots metalliques, l'analyse des solutions et la mesure en continu du calcium et du fer dans les carottes de minerais. Nous decrivons les essais effectues en vue d'analyser le rayonnement X au moyen d'un cristal. (author) [Spanish] Los autores han introducido nuevos perfeccionamientos en su procedimiento de analisis y de medicion de espesores de depositos por fluorescencia de rayos X excitada por particulas beta. La utilizacion de fuentes de {sup 147}Pm y de {sup 85}Kr permite reducir la actividad de fondo que se observa empleando {sup 90}Sr. Los autores exponen los resultados obtenidos en materia de mediciones de espesores de depositos metalicos, analisis de soluciones y medicion continua del calcio y del hierro en muestras de minerales extraidas por sondeo. Tambien describen los ensayos realizados con miras a analizar los rayos X por medio de un cristal. (author) [Russian] Protsess analiza i izmereniya plotnosti sloev putem fluorestsiruyushchikh beta- i rentgenovskikh luchej, kotoryj opisyvalsya nami ran'she, byl predmetom novykh usovershenstvovanij. Ispol'zovanie istochnikov prometeya-147 i

  6. Beta-decay of {sup 56}Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdhane, M.; Baumann, P.; Knipper, A.; Walter, G. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Janas, Z.; Plochocki, A. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Experimental Physics; Aeystoe, J.; Dendooven, P.; Jokinen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Pentilae, H. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Liu, W.; Grawe, H.; Hu, Z.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gorska, M. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Experimental Physics]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fujita, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Brown, B.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1998-02-01

    By measuring positrons and {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays emitted from mass-separated sources, the decay of {sup 56}Cu(4{sup +},T{sub z}=-1,T=1) to states in the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 56}Ni was studied for the first time. The half-life of {sup 56}Cu was measured to be 78(15) ms, and four {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays were assigned to its decay. The resulting experimental data on Fermi and Gamow-Teller strength are compared with shell-model predictions. (orig.)

  7. Microscopic beta and gamma data for decay-heat needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    Microscopic beta and gamma data for decay-heat needs are defined as absolute-intensity spectral distributions of beta and gamma rays following radioactive decay of radionuclides created by, or following, the fission process. Four well-known evaluated data files, namely the US ENDF/B-V, the UK UKFPDD-2, the French BDN (for fission products), and the Japanese JNDC Nuclear Data Library, are reviewed. Comments regarding the analyses of experimental data (particularly gamma-ray data) are given; the need for complete beta-ray spectral measurements is emphasized. Suggestions on goals for near-term future experimental measurements are presented. 34 references

  8. High-precision radiosurgical dose delivery by interlaced microbeam arrays of high-flux low-energy synchrotron X-rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Serduc

    Full Text Available Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT is a preclinical form of radiosurgery dedicated to brain tumor treatment. It uses micrometer-wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beams on the basis of spatial beam fractionation. Due to the radioresistance of normal brain vasculature to MRT, a continuous blood supply can be maintained which would in part explain the surprising tolerance of normal tissues to very high radiation doses (hundreds of Gy. Based on this well described normal tissue sparing effect of microplanar beams, we developed a new irradiation geometry which allows the delivery of a high uniform dose deposition at a given brain target whereas surrounding normal tissues are irradiated by well tolerated parallel microbeams only. Normal rat brains were exposed to 4 focally interlaced arrays of 10 microplanar beams (52 microm wide, spaced 200 microm on-center, 50 to 350 keV in energy range, targeted from 4 different ports, with a peak entrance dose of 200Gy each, to deliver an homogenous dose to a target volume of 7 mm(3 in the caudate nucleus. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of rats showed a highly localized increase in blood vessel permeability, starting 1 week after irradiation. Contrast agent diffusion was confined to the target volume and was still observed 1 month after irradiation, along with histopathological changes, including damaged blood vessels. No changes in vessel permeability were detected in the normal brain tissue surrounding the target. The interlacing radiation-induced reduction of spontaneous seizures of epileptic rats illustrated the potential pre-clinical applications of this new irradiation geometry. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations performed on a human-sized head phantom suggested that synchrotron photons can be used for human radiosurgical applications. Our data show that interlaced microbeam irradiation allows a high homogeneous dose deposition in a brain target and leads to a confined tissue necrosis while sparing

  9. High Flux Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting X-Ray Imaging Arrays with CdTe and CdZnTe for Clinical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wessel, Jan C.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Dorholt, Ole; Danielsen, Roar

    2013-06-01

    We have fabricated fast room-temperature energy dispersive photon counting x-ray imaging arrays using pixellated cadmium zinc (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductors. We have also fabricated fast application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) with a two dimensional (2D) array of inputs for readout from the CdZnTe sensors. The new CdTe and CdZnTe sensors have a 2D array of pixels with a 0.5 mm pitch and can be tiled in 2D. The new 2D ASICs have four energy discriminators per pixel with a linear energy response across the entire dynamic range for clinical CT. The ASICs can also be tiled in 2D and are designed to fit within the active area of the 2D sensors. We have measured several important performance parameters including; an output count rate (OCR) in excess of 20 million counts per second per square mm, an energy resolution of 7 keV full width at half maximum (FWHM) across the entire dynamic range, and a noise floor less than 20 keV. This is achieved by directly interconnecting the ASIC inputs to the pixels of the CdTE and CdZnTe sensors incurring very little additional capacitance. We present a comparison of the performance of the CdTe and CdZnTe sensors including the OCR, FWHM energy resolution, and noise floor. (authors)

  10. High energy neutrinos: sources and fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark DE 19716 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We discuss briefly the potential sources of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and show estimates of the neutrino fluxes that they can produce. A special attention is paid to the connection between the highest energy cosmic rays and astrophysical neutrinos.

  11. Soft X-ray Tangential Imaging of the NSTX Core Plasma by Means of a MPGD Pin-hole Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacella, D.; Leigheb, M.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Kaita, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    A fast X-ray system based on a Micro Pattern Gas Detector has been used, for the first time, to investigate emission from the plasma core of the National Spherical Tokamak eXperiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The results presented in this work demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure with a time resolution of the order of 1 ms the curvature and the elongation of the X-ray iso-emissivity contours, under various plasma conditions. Also, comparisons with the magnetic surface structure calculated by the EFIT code show good agreement between reconstructed flux surface and the soft X-ray emissions (SXR) for poloidal beta values up to 0.6. For greater values of beta, X-ray iso-emissivity contours become circular, while magnetic flux surface reconstructions yield elongation 1.5 < k < 2.2. The X-ray images have been acquired with a (statistical) signal to noise ratio (SNR) per pixel of about 30. Thanks to the direct and efficient X-ray conversion and its operation in a photon counting mode, this new diagnostic tool allows the routine investigation of the plasma core with a sampling rate of 1 kHz and extremely high SNR under all experimental conditions in NSTX

  12. Experimental studies and modeling of X-Rays multilayer mirrors damages under high X-Ray flux generated by a laser-plasma experiment; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l`endommagement des miroirs multicouches X soumis a de hauts flux de rayonnement X dans le cadre de l`experience plasma-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guern, F

    1996-05-24

    We have been able with this work to point out characterize X-Rays multilayers mirrors damages. We have designed two experimental set-up which have been installed in the HELIOTROPE experimental chamber of the OCTAL facility located at the CEA in Limeil-Valenton. We have demonstrated that X-Rays multilayer mirrors properties were drastically modified by X-Rays emitted by a golden laser plasma. We have, more precisely, introduced the damage speed concept to quantify the expansion of the multilayer mirror period. We have been able to classify different multilayer mirrors in function of their resistance to damage and we have demonstrated that a silicate layer deposited on a mirror allowed to increase his resistance to damage. In a second part we have developed a simulation tool in order to simulate the X-Rays multilayer mirrors optical properties modifications. We have therefore coupled a thermo-mechanic code with an optical program. The results of the simulations are in a rather good agreement with the experiments and can be used to predict, before experiments, the multilayer mirror behavior under X-Rays irradiation. (author) 55 refs.

  13. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  14. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Beta Thalassemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Beta Thalassemia What's in this ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Print en español Beta talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  15. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  16. The cosmic ray proton, helium and CNO fluxes in the 100 TeV energy region from TeV muons and EAS atmospheric Cherenkov light observations of MACRO and EAS-TOP

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M; Ambrosio, M; Antolini, R; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, F; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bergamasco, L; Bernardini, P; Bertaina, M; Bilokon, H; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Castagnoli, C; Castellina, A; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Chiavassa, A; Choudhary, B C; Cini, G; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Di Sciascio, G; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fulgione, W; Fusco, P; Galeotti, P; Ghia, P L; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iacovacci, M; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Mannocchi, G; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Morello, C; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Navarra, G; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Saavedra, O; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Stamerra, A; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Trinchero, G C; Vakili, M; Valchierotti, S; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2004.01.005

    2004-01-01

    The primary cosmic ray (CR) proton, helium and CNO fluxes in the energy range 80-300 TeV are studied at the National Gran Sasso Laboratories by means of EAS-TOP (Campo Imperatore, 2005 m a.s.l.) and MACRO (deep underground, 3100 m w.e., the surface energy threshold for a muon reaching the detector being E/sub mu //sup th/ approximately=1.3 TeV). The measurement is based on: (a) the selection of primaries based on their energy/nucleon (i.e., with energy/nucleon sufficient to produce a muon with energy larger than 1.3 TeV) and the reconstruction of the shower geometry by means of the muons recorded by MACRO in the deep underground laboratories; (b) the detection of the associated atmospheric Cherenkov light (C.l.) signals by means of the C.l. detector of EAS-TOP. The C.l. density at core distance r>100 m is directly related to the total primary energy E/sub 0/. Proton and helium ("p+He") and proton, helium and CNO ("p +He+CNO") primaries are thus selected at E/sub 0/ approximately=80 Te V, and at E/sub 0/ appro...

  17. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward......-looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  18. Background studies of high energy γ rays from (n,γ) reactions in the CANDLES experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Akutagawa, K.; Batpurev, T.; Chan, W. M.; Dokaku, F.; Fushimi, K.; Kakubata, H.; Kanagawa, K.; Katagiri, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Khai, B. T.; Kino, H.; Kinoshita, E.; Kishimoto, T.; Hazama, R.; Hiraoka, H.; Hiyama, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Moser, M.; Nomachi, M.; Ogawa, I.; Ohata, T.; Sato, H.; Shamoto, K.; Shimada, M.; Shokati, M.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Takihira, Y.; Tamagawa, Y.; Tozawa, M.; Teranishi, K.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Tsuzuki, M.; Umehara, S.; Wang, W.; Yoshida, S.; Yotsunaga, N.

    2018-07-01

    High energy γ rays with several MeV produced by (n,γ) reactions can be a trouble for low background measurements in the underground laboratories such as double beta decay experiments. In the CANDLES project, which aimed to observe the neutrino-less double beta decay from 48Ca, γ rays caused by (n,γ) reactions were found to be the most significant background. The profile of the background was studied by measurements with a neutron source and a simulation with a validity check of neutron processes in Geant4. The observed spectrum of γ rays from (n,γ) reactions was well reproduced by the simulated spectra, which were originated from the surrounding rock and a detector tank made of stainless steel. The environmental neutron flux was derived by the observed event rate of γ rays from (n,γ) reactions using the simulation. The thermal and non-thermal neutron flux were found to be (1.3 ± 0.6) ×10-6 cm-2s-1 and (1.1 ± 0.5) ×10-5 cm-2s-1 , respectively. It is necessary to install an additional shield to reduce the background from (n,γ) reaction to the required level.

  19. L{sub {iota}}, L{sub {alpha}}, L{sub {beta}} and L{sub {gamma}} X-ray fluorescence cross-sections of heavy elements for the exciting photons energy 38.18, 43.95, 50.21 and 59.5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastug, Arif [Department of Physics Education, College of Education, Erzincan University, 24030 Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: abastug40@hotmail.com

    2008-03-15

    The cross-sections for the production of L{sub {iota}}, L{sub {alpha}}, L{sub {beta}} and L{sub {gamma}} X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi by photons with energies in the range 38-59.5 keV have been measured, using a standard doublereflection experimental set-up. Measurements have been performed using an annular 241 Am primary source and X-ray emitting secondary-exciter system. Experimental cross-sections have been compared with the theoretically calculated values of L X-ray cross-sections and fairly good agreement is observed between the experimental and theoretical values.

  20. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories; Calibracion de fuentes de fotones y rayos beta usadas en braquiterapia. Guia de procedimiento estandarizados en Laboratorios Secundarios de Calibracion Dosimetrica (LSCD) y en hospitales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    after cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  1. The measurements of thermal neutron flux distribution in a paraffin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The term `thermal flux' implies a Maxwellian distribution of velocity and energy corresponding to the most probable velocity of 2200 ms-1 at 293.4 K. In order to measure the thermal neutron flux density, the foil activation method was used. Thermal neutron flux determination in paraffin phantom by counting the emitted rays of ...

  2. Ideal flux field dielectric concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Botella, Angel

    2011-10-01

    The concept of the vector flux field was first introduced as a photometrical theory and later developed in the field of nonimaging optics; it has provided new perspectives in the design of concentrators, overcoming standard ray tracing techniques. The flux field method has shown that reflective concentrators with the geometry of the field lines achieve the theoretical limit of concentration. In this paper we study the role of surfaces orthogonal to the field vector J. For rotationally symmetric systems J is orthogonal to its curl, and then a family of surfaces orthogonal to the lines of J exists, which can be called the family of surfaces of constant pseudopotential. Using the concept of the flux tube, it is possible to demonstrate that refractive concentrators with the shape of these pseudopotential surfaces achieve the theoretical limit of concentration.

  3. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets........S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...

  4. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    -section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics......Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross...

  5. Beta limits for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, F.J.; Miller, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    ETF (Engineering Test Facility) one-dimensional transport simulations indicate that a volume-average beta of 4% is required for ignition. It is therefore important that theoretical beta limits, determined by requiring equilibria to be stable to all ideal modes, exceed 4%. This paper documents an ideal MHD analysis wherein it is shown that, with appropriate plasma cross-sectional shape and current profile optimization, operation near 5% is possible. The critical beta value, however, depends on the functional form used for ff', which suggests that higher critical betas could be achieved by directly optimizing the safety factor profile. (author)

  6. Simulated progress in double-beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, H.S.; Arthur, R.J.; Avignone, F.T.

    1993-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code has been developed to accurately simulate double-beta decay measurements. Coincident gamma rays, beta spectra, and angular correlations have been added to adequately simulate a complete 100 Mo nuclear decay and provide corrections to experimentally determined detector efficiencies. This code has been used to strip certain low-background spectra obtained in the Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, for the purpose of extremely sensitive materials assay for the construction of new, large, enriched germanium detectors. Assays as low as 9 μBq/g of 210 Pb in lead shielding were obtained

  7. Beta-energy averaging and beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatelatos, M.G.; England, T.R.

    1976-07-01

    A simple yet highly accurate method for approximately calculating spectrum-averaged beta energies and beta spectra for radioactive nuclei is presented. This method should prove useful for users who wish to obtain accurate answers without complicated calculations of Fermi functions, complex gamma functions, and time-consuming numerical integrations as required by the more exact theoretical expressions. Therefore, this method should be a good time-saving alternative for investigators who need to make calculations involving large numbers of nuclei (e.g., fission products) as well as for occasional users interested in restricted number of nuclides. The average beta-energy values calculated by this method differ from those calculated by ''exact'' methods by no more than 1 percent for nuclides with atomic numbers in the 20 to 100 range and which emit betas of energies up to approximately 8 MeV. These include all fission products and the actinides. The beta-energy spectra calculated by the present method are also of the same quality

  8. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm/sup 2/, of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A /sup 90/Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (..mu..P) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined.

  9. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm 2 , of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A 90 Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (μP) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined

  10. High beta tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, R.A.; Berger, D.P.; Charlton, L.A.; Hogan, J.T.; Munro, J.K.; Nelson, D.B.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Sigmar, D.J.; Strickler, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    MHD equilibrium, stability, and transport calculations are made to study the accessibility and behavior of ''high beta'' tokamak plasmas in the range β approximately 5 to 15 percent. For next generation devices, beta values of at least 8 percent appear to be accessible and stable if there is a conducting surface nearby

  11. Sorting out Downside Beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); P. van Vliet (Pim); S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDownside risk, when properly defined and estimated, helps to explain the cross-section of US stock returns. Sorting stocks by a proper estimate of downside market beta leads to a substantially larger cross-sectional spread in average returns than sorting on regular market beta. This

  12. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...

  13. Beta decay to the second 2+ excited state of 122Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takeo; Yamada, Shigeru

    1976-01-01

    The first-forbidden beta transition in Sb-122 was studied by the angular correlation experiment and the beta-spectra. The special precautions were paid for counting the beta particles having energy lower than 750 keV in the beta-gamma angular correlation measurement. The sources of Sb-122 were obtained by irradiating enriched Sb-121 in the Kyoto University reactor. The reduced beta coefficient R(E) was obtained from the angular correlation function. The beta spectrum measurement was performed with a sector type double focusing beta-ray spectrometer. The R(E) values for the beta transitions were analyzed by using the simplex method as used by Manthuruthil and Poirier to compare the angular correlation data with the exact formula given by Morita and Morita. Sets of the nuclear matrix parameters thus obtained show that the condition for the cancellation effect is satisfied in the beta transition. (Kato, T.)

  14. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Beta thalassemia Beta thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  15. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  16. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  17. Silencing of beta-carotene hydroxylase increases total carotenoid and beta-carotene levels in potato tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzichini Daniele

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-carotene is the main dietary precursor of vitamin A. Potato tubers contain low levels of carotenoids, composed mainly of the xanthophylls lutein (in the beta-epsilon branch and violaxanthin (in the beta-beta branch. None of these carotenoids have provitamin A activity. We have previously shown that tuber-specific silencing of the first step in the epsilon-beta branch, LCY-e, redirects metabolic flux towards beta-beta carotenoids, increases total carotenoids up to 2.5-fold and beta-carotene up to 14-fold. Results In this work, we silenced the non-heme beta-carotene hydroxylases CHY1 and CHY2 in the tuber. Real Time RT-PCR measurements confirmed the tuber-specific silencing of both genes . CHY silenced tubers showed more dramatic changes in carotenoid content than LCY-e silenced tubers, with beta-carotene increasing up to 38-fold and total carotenoids up to 4.5-fold. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in the immediate product of beta-carotene hydroxylation, zeaxanthin, but not of the downstream xanthophylls, viola- and neoxanthin. Changes in endogenous gene expression were extensive and partially overlapping with those of LCY-e silenced tubers: CrtISO, LCY-b and ZEP were induced in both cases, indicating that they may respond to the balance between individual carotenoid species. Conclusion Together with epsilon-cyclization of lycopene, beta-carotene hydroxylation is another regulatory step in potato tuber carotenogenesis. The data are consistent with a prevalent role of CHY2, which is highly expressed in tubers, in the control of this step. Combination of different engineering strategies holds good promise for the manipulation of tuber carotenoid content.

  18. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  19. Signatures of cosmic-ray interactions on the solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckel, D.; Stanev, Todor; Gaisser, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    The fluxes of neutrinos, gamma rays, antiprotons, neutrons, and antineutrons that result from collisions of high-energy Galactic cosmic rays with the solar atmosphere are estimated. The results are sensitive to assumptions about cosmic-ray transport in the magnetic fields of the inner solar system. The high-energy photon flux should be observable by the Gamma Ray Observatory. The neutrino flux should produce less than one event per year in the next generation of neutrino telescopes. The antiproton flux is unobservable against the Galactic background. The neutron and antineutron fluxes are detectable only if neutrons produced in terrestrial cosmic-ray events may be discriminated against.

  20. Weak interaction studies from nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, M.

    1981-01-01

    The studies performed at the theoretical nuclear physics division of the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, are reported. Electron spin density and internal conversion process, nuclear excitation by electron transition, beta decay, weak charged current, and beta-ray angular distributions in oriented nuclei have been studied. The relative intensity of internal conversion electrons for the case in which the radial wave functions of orbital electrons are different for electron spin up and down was calculated. The calculated value was in good agreement with the experimental one. The nuclear excitation following the transition of orbital electrons was studied. The calculated probability of the nuclear excitation of Os 189 was 1.4 x 10 - 7 in conformity with the experimental value 1.7 x 10 - 7 . The second class current and other problems on beta-decay have been extensively studied, and described elsewhere. Concerning weak charged current, the effects of all induced terms, the time component of main axial vector, all partial waves of leptons, Coulomb correction for the electrons in finite size nuclei, and radiative correction were studied. The beta-ray angular distribution for the 1 + -- 0 + transition in oriented B 12 and N 12 was investigated. In this connection, investigation on the weak magnetism to include all higher order corrections for the evaluation of the spectral shape factors was performed. Other works carried out by the author and his collaborators are also explained. (Kato, T.)

  1. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh self powered neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juna, Byung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hoan Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Rhodium (Rh) self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) are widely used for on line monitoring of local neutron flux. Its signal is slower than the actual variation of neutron flux owing to a delayed {beta} decay of the Rh activation product, but real time monitoring is possible by solving equations between the neutron reaction rate in the detector and its signal. While the measuring system is highly reliable, the accuracy depends on the method solving the equations and accuracy of the parameters in the equations. The uncertain parameters are the contribution of gamma rays to the signal, and the branching ratios of Rh 104 and Rh 104m after the neutron absorption of Rh 103. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh SPNDs has been quite successful for neutron transmutation doping (NTD) at HANARO. We revisited the initial data used for the verification of a real time monitoring system, to refine algorithm for a better solution and to check the parameters for correctness. As a result, we suggest an effective way to determine the prompt parameter.

  2. Beta-structures in fibrous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajava, Andrey V; Squire, John M; Parry, David A D

    2006-01-01

    The beta-form of protein folding, one of the earliest protein structures to be defined, was originally observed in studies of silks. It was then seen in early studies of synthetic polypeptides and, of course, is now known to be present in a variety of guises as an essential component of globular protein structures. However, in the last decade or so it has become clear that the beta-conformation of chains is present not only in many of the amyloid structures associated with, for example, Alzheimer's Disease, but also in the prion structures associated with the spongiform encephalopathies. Furthermore, X-ray crystallography studies have revealed the high incidence of the beta-fibrous proteins among virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Here we describe the basic forms of the beta-fold, summarize the many different new forms of beta-structural fibrous arrangements that have been discovered, and review advances in structural studies of amyloid and prion fibrils. These and other issues are described in detail in later chapters.

  3. Proton microprobe analysis of pancreatic. beta. cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindh, U [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.; Juntti-Berggren, L; Berggren, P O; Hellman, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Freeze-dried pancreas sections from obese hyperglycemic mice were subjected to proton bombardment and the elemental contents in the ..beta.. cells and the exocrine part were obtained from the characteristic X-rays emitted. Quantitative data were provided for 18 different elements. The mole ratio between K and Na exceeded 10, implying that neither the sample preparation nor the irradiation had induced significant diffuse changes. With the demonstration of this high K/Na ratio it seems likely that also the ..beta.. cells are equipped with an efficient Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump. The ..beta.. cells contained about 70 mmoles Cl per litre cell water. Observed amounts of Ca and Mg were equivalent to those previously recorded by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The significant role of Zn for the storage of insulin was emphasized by the demonstration of 3 times as much of this element in the ..beta.. cells as compared with the exocrine pancreas. In addition, the sensitivity of the proton microprobe enabled measurements of various trace elements such as Rb, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb not previously demonstrated in the pancreatic ..beta.. cells.

  4. Beta particle measurement fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The necessary concepts for understanding beta particle behavior are stopping power, range, and scattering. Dose as a consequence of beta particle interaction with tissue can be derived and explained by these concepts. Any calculations of dose, however, assume or require detailed knowledge of the beta spectrum at the tissue depth of calculation. A rudimentary knowledge of the incident spectrum can be of use in estimating dose, interpretating dose measuring devices and designing protection. The stopping power and range based on the csda will give a conservative estimate in cases of protection design, as scattering will reduce the range. Estimates of dose may be low because scattering effects were neglected

  5. Electrets for beta radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.L.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Mascarenhas, S.

    1983-01-01

    Electret dosimetry has been reviewed by Gross. A cylindrical electret ionization-chamber type dosimeter has been studied for X and gamma rays and neutrons. The principle of the dosimeter is electret charge compensation due to ionization in the chamber volume. Electret ionization chambers can be designed with one or more electrets and in various shapes. This study is concerned with a simple system, similar to a cylindrical ionization chamber (sensitive volume: 3,5 cm 3 ) using teflon electrets. Aluminum and lucite were used as wall-materials. Other experiences were performed using chambers without wall, i.e., without defined sensitive volume. The teflon electrets were obtained by Corona discharge in the gas surrounding them. The measurement of the electret charge was made by induction using a co-axial insulated metal chamber connected to an electrometer Keithley 610C. By measuring the charge before and after irradiation it is possible to obtain a calibration curve: charge (Q) versus absorbed dose (D) for the dosimeter. The irradiation setup used was the Beta Secondary Standard System of IPEN calibration laboratory with four beta sources: 90 Sr 90 Y (74 and 1850 MBq), 204 Tl (18,5 MBq) and 147 Pm (518 MBq). In some cases a 85 Kr source was also used. The electrets were tested in different radiation field geometries: electret axis parallel and perpendicular to the field. In conclusion, depending on the wall material and radiation field geometry, the teflon electret detector can be used for different dose interval determinations, using beta radiation

  6. Structure of .beta.-galactosidase complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hašek, Jindřich; Lipovová, P.; Spiwok, V.; Strnad, Hynek; Králová, B.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 137-138 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500500512 Keywords : .beta.-galactosidase * X-ray diffraction * cold-active enzyme Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  7. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Anyhow, the 'multi-isotope' ansatz is needed to compensate for matrix element ... The neccessary half-life requirement to touch this ... site energy depositions (like double beta decay) and multiple site interactions (most of.

  8. Beta-Carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (COPD). It is also used to improve memory and muscle strength. Some people use beta-carotene ... to reduce the chance of death and night blindness during pregnancy, as well as diarrhea and fever ...

  9. Double beta decay: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2006-01-01

    The results obtained so far and those of the running experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The plans for second generation experiments, the techniques to be adopted and the expected sensitivities are compared and discussed

  10. Ultra high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wdowczyk, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental data on ultra high energy γ-rays are reviewed and a comparison of the properties of photon and proton initiated shower is made. The consequences of the existence of the strong ultra high energy γ-ray sources for other observations is analysed and possible mechanisms for the production of ultra high energy γ-rays in the sources are discussed. It is demonstrated that if the γ-rays are produced via cosmic ray interactions the sources have to produce very high fluxes of cosmic ray particles. In fact it is possible that a small number of such sources can supply the whole Galactic cosmic ray flux

  11. $\\beta$ decay of $^{47}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Bergmann, U C; Brown, B A; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Dillmann, I; Hallmann, O; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Gaudefroy, L; Köster, U; Kratz, K L; Pfeiffer, B; Sorlin, O; 10.1103/PhysRevC.70.024304

    2004-01-01

    Information on beta -decay properties of neutron-rich /sup 47/Ar was obtained at the ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity. This was achieved by a combination of a plasma-ion source with a cooled transfer line and subsequent mass separation. A doubly charged beam was used in order to improve the signal-to-background ratio associated with multi-charged noble gas fission products. The identification of the /sup 47/Ar gamma -ray transitions was performed by comparing the spectra obtained from direct proton bombardment of the target and of the neutron converter. New excited levels in the daughter /sup 47/K nucleus corresponding to the negative-parity states were observed. The obtained data are compared to the result of large-scale shell model calculations and quasiparticle random-phase approximation predictions. (29 refs).

  12. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  13. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  14. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, J.; Koss, T.; Lord, J.; Strausz, S.; Wilkes, J.; Woosley, J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes

  15. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  16. Biodegradable films containing {alpha}-tocopherol/{beta}-cyclodextrin complex; Filmes biodegradaveis contendo {alpha}-tocoferol complexado em {beta}-ciclodextrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Caroline; Martelli, Silvia M.; Soldi, Valdir, E-mail: vsoldi@qmc.ufsc.br [Lab. de Materiais Polimericos (POLIMAT), Dept. de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Barreto, Pedro L.M. [Lab. de Reologia (REOLAB), Dept. de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The growing environmental concern about pollution and the need to reduce dependence of plastic industry in relation to non-renewable resources has increased the interest of both researchers and industry in the use of biopolymers. In this work {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complexes were prepared and characterized. In order to obtain polymeric active biofilms, the {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complex was incorporated into a polymeric matrix of carboxymethylcellulose. The {beta}-cyclodextrin/{alpha}-tocopherol complex was characterized through of X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The physicochemical properties of the films incorporated with the complex were evaluated through mechanical and colorimetric analysis and moisture sorption isotherm. (author)

  17. Solar-cosmic-ray variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The maximum flux of particles from solar events that should be considered in designing the shielding for a space habitation is discussed. The activities of various radionuclides measured in the top few centimeters of lunar rocks are used to examine the variability of solar cosmic ray fluxes over the last five million years. 10 references

  18. LOFT gamma densitometer background fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimesey, R.A.; McCracken, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Background gamma-ray fluxes were calculated at the location of the γ densitometers without integral shielding at both the hot-leg and cold-leg primary piping locations. The principal sources for background radiation at the γ densitometers are 16 N activity from the primary piping H 2 O and γ radiation from reactor internal sources. The background radiation was calculated by the point-kernel codes QAD-BSA and QAD-P5A. Reasonable assumptions were required to convert the response functions calculated by point-kernel procedures into the gamma-ray spectrum from reactor internal sources. A brief summary of point-kernel equations and theory is included

  19. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  20. The refined 2.0 A X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between bovine beta-trypsin and CMTI-I, a trypsin inhibitor from squash seeds (Cucurbita maxima). Topological similarity of the squash seed inhibitors with the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor from potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, W; Greyling, H J; Huber, R; Otlewski, J; Wilusz, T

    1989-01-02

    The stoichiometric complex formed between bovine beta-trypsin and the Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor I (CMTI-I) was crystallized and its X-ray crystal structure determined using Patterson search techniques. Its structure has been crystallographically refined to a final R value of 0.152 (6.0-2.0 A). CMTI-I is of ellipsoidal shape; it lacks helices or beta-sheets, but consists of turns and connecting short polypeptide stretches. The disulfide pairing is CYS-3I-20I, Cys-10I-22I and Cys-16I-28I. According to the polypeptide fold and disulfide connectivity its structure resembles that of the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor from potatoes. Thirteen of the 29 inhibitor residues are in direct contact with trypsin; most of them are in the primary binding segment Val-2I (P4)-Glu-9I (P4') which contains the reactive site bond Arg-5I-Ile-6I and is in a conformation observed also for other serine proteinase inhibitors.

  1. Beta-decay of {sup 103}In: evidence for the Gamow-Teller resonance near {sup 100}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karny, M. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Experimental Physics; Batist, L.; Brown, B.A. [and others

    1998-04-01

    The {beta} decay of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 103}In was investigated by using total absorption {gamma}-ray spectrometry on mass-separated sources. The measurement reveals a high-lying resonance of the {beta}-decay strength in striking disagreement with high-resolution {gamma}-ray data. The result is discussed in comparison with shell-model predictions. (orig.)

  2. Labelling of. beta. -endorphin (. beta. -END) and. beta. -lipotropin (. beta. -LPH) by /sup 125/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deby-Dupont, G.; Joris, J.; Franchimont, P. (Universite de Liege (Belgique)); Reuter, A.M.; Vrindts-Gevaert, Y. (Institut des Radioelements, Fleurus (Belgique))

    1983-01-01

    5 ..mu..g of human ..beta..-endorphin were labelled with 2 mCi /sup 125/I by the chloramine T technique. After two gel filtrations on Sephadex G-15 and on Sephadex G-50 in phosphate buffer with EDTA, Trasylol and mercapto-ethanol, a pure tracer was obtained with a specific activity about 150 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g.Kept at + 4/sup 0/C, the tracer remained utilizable for 30 days without loss of immunoreactivity. The labelling with lactoperoxydase and the use of another gel filtration method (filtration on Aca 202) gave a /sup 125/I ..beta..-END tracer with the same immunoreactivity. The binding of this tracer to the antibody of an anti-..beta..-END antiserum diluted at 1/8000 was 32% with a non specific binding of 2%. 5 ..mu..g of human ..beta..-lipotropin were labelled with 0.5 mCi /sup 125/I by the lactoperoxydase method. After two gel filtrations on Sephadex G-25 and on Sephadex G-75 in phosphate buffer with EDTA, Trasylol and mercapto-ethanol, a pure tracer with a specific activity of 140 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g was obtained. It remained utilizable for 30 days when kept at + 4/sup 0/C. Gel filtration on Aca 202 did not give good purification, while gel filtration on Aca 54 was good but slower than on Sephadex G-75. The binding to antibody in absence of unlabelled ..beta..-LPH was 32% for an anti-..beta..-LPH antiserum diluted at 1/4000. The non specific binding was 2.5%.

  3. Plasma beta HCG determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L.B.D.; Pinto, J.C.M.; Linhares, E.; Linhares, Estevao

    1981-01-01

    There are three important indications for the early diagnosis of pregnancy through the determination of the beta sub-unit of chorionic gonadotrophin using radioimmunoassay: 1) some patient's or doctor's anxiety to discover the problem; 2) when it will be necessary to employ diagnostic or treatment procedures susceptible to affect the ovum; and 3) in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhoea, uterine hemorrhage and abdominal tumors. Other user's are the diagnosis of missed absortion, and the diagnosis and follow-up of chrorioncarcinoma. The AA. studied 200 determinations of plasma beta-HCG, considering the main difficulties occuring in the clinical use of this relevant laboratory tool in actual Obstetrics. (author) [pt

  4. Relation between the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} and 0{nu}{beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Petr [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F1, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-12-16

    A formal relation between the GT part of the nuclear matrix elements M{sub GT}{sup 0{nu}} of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay and the closure matrix elements M{sub cl}{sup 2{nu}} of 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is established. This relation is based on the integral representation of these quantities in terms of their dependence on the distance r between the two nucleons undergoing transformation. We also discuss the difficulties in determining the correct values of the closure 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay matrix elements.

  5. Cosmic rays on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted. (GSCH)

  6. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  7. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  8. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements

  10. Beta thalassemia - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is a globin gene disorder that results in a diminished rate of synthesis of one or more of the globin chains. About 1.5% of the global population (80 to 90 million people are carriers of beta Thalassemia. More than 200 mutations are described in beta thalassemia. However not all mutations are common in different ethnic groups. The only effective way to reduce burden of thalassemia is to prevent birth of homozygotes. Diagnosis of beta thalassemia can be done by fetal DNA analysis for molecular defects of beta thalassemia or by fetal blood analysis. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only available curative approach for Thalassemia. Many patients with thalassemia in underdeveloped nations die in childhood or adolescence. Programs that provide acceptable care, including transfusion of safe blood and supportive therapy including chelation must be established.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i8.11609 Journal of Pathology of Nepal; Vol.4,No. 8 (2014 663-671

  11. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepke, A.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental observation of neutrino oscillations and thus neutrino mass and mixing gives a first hint at new particle physics. The absolute values of the neutrino mass and the properties of neutrinos under CP-conjugation remain unknown. The experimental investigation of the nuclear double beta decay is one of the key techniques for solving these open problems

  12. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades...... in the expansion of the beta cell mass in human pregnancy, and the relative roles of endocrine factors and nutrients....

  13. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  14. Multiple Beta Spectrum Analysis Method Based on Spectrum Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Uk Jae; Jung, Yun Song; Kim, Hee Reyoung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    When the sample of several mixed radioactive nuclides is measured, it is difficult to divide each nuclide due to the overlapping of spectrums. For this reason, simple mathematical analysis method for spectrum analysis of the mixed beta ray source has been studied. However, existing research was in need of more accurate spectral analysis method as it has a problem of accuracy. The study will describe the contents of the separation methods of the mixed beta ray source through the analysis of the beta spectrum slope based on the curve fitting to resolve the existing problem. The fitting methods including It was understood that sum of sine fitting method was the best one of such proposed methods as Fourier, polynomial, Gaussian and sum of sine to obtain equation for distribution of mixed beta spectrum. It was shown to be the most appropriate for the analysis of the spectrum with various ratios of mixed nuclides. It was thought that this method could be applied to rapid spectrum analysis of the mixed beta ray source.

  15. X and gamma ray backgroud observations in Antarctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, U.B.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric X amd gamma rays are products of complex electromagnetic interation between charged particles and atmospheric constituents. The latitudinal dependence of the cosmic rays secondaries, auroral and South Atlantic Anomaly phenomena produce flux variations, especially the later temporal flux variations. We propose to discuss these variations in relevance to balloon flight observations of X and gamma ray atmospheric background at polar latitudes. (author) [pt

  16. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  17. Relation between X-Ray and γ-Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using γ-ray band data detected by Fermi Large Area Tele- scope (LAT) and X-ray band data for 78 blazars, we find a medium cor- relation between X-ray and γ-ray fluxes in the average state. A medium anticorrelation is also found between X-ray (1 KeV) mean spectral index αx and γ-ray mean spectral index αγ for ...

  18. Misleading Betas: An Educational Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, James; Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The dual-beta model is a generalization of the CAPM model. In the dual-beta model, separate beta estimates are provided for up-market and down-market days. This paper uses the historical "Anscombe quartet" results which illustrated how very different datasets can produce the same regression coefficients to motivate a discussion of the…

  19. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from atmospheric neutrino data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Maltoni, M.; Rojo, J.

    2006-06-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation. (author)

  20. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from atmospheric neutrino data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Concepcion; Maltoni, Michele; Rojo, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation

  1. Natural triple beta-stranded fibrous folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraki, Anna; Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Van Raaij, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    A distinctive family of beta-structured folds has recently been described for fibrous proteins from viruses. Virus fibers are usually involved in specific host-cell recognition. They are asymmetric homotrimeric proteins consisting of an N-terminal virus-binding tail, a central shaft or stalk domain, and a C-terminal globular receptor-binding domain. Often they are entirely or nearly entirely composed of beta-structure. Apart from their biological relevance and possible gene therapy applications, their shape, stability, and rigidity suggest they may be useful as blueprints for biomechanical design. Folding and unfolding studies suggest their globular C-terminal domain may fold first, followed by a "zipping-up" of the shaft domains. The C-terminal domains appear to be important for registration because peptides corresponding to shaft domains alone aggregate into nonnative fibers and/or amyloid structures. C-terminal domains can be exchanged between different fibers and the resulting chimeric proteins are useful as a way to solve structures of unknown parts of the shaft domains. The following natural triple beta-stranded fibrous folds have been discovered by X-ray crystallography: the triple beta-spiral, triple beta-helix, and T4 short tail fiber fold. All have a central longitudinal hydrophobic core and extensive intermonomer polar and nonpolar interactions. Now that a reasonable body of structural and folding knowledge has been assembled about these fibrous proteins, the next challenge and opportunity is to start using this information in medical and industrial applications such as gene therapy and nanotechnology.

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 20}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, M.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Howard, A.M.; Kirsebom, O.S.; Munch, M.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus C (Denmark); Andreyev, A.; Wadsworth, R. [University of York, Department of Physics, York (United Kingdom); Borge, M.J.G. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cederkaell, J. [Lund University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Witte, H. de; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. van [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU-Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Fraile, L.M.; Vedia, V. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Madrid (Spain); Greenlees, P.T.; Konki, J.; Rahkila, P. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Judson, D.S.; Page, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jonson, B.; Lindberg, S.; Nilsson, T. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kurcewicz, J.; Madurga, M.; Rapisarda, E. [CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Lazarus, I.; Pucknell, V. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Lica, R. [CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Rotaru, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Turturica, A. [' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Marroquin, I.; Nacher, E.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); Sotty, C. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU-Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Warr, N. [Universitaet Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: IDS Collaboration

    2016-10-15

    Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 20} Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with the ISOLDE Decay Station (IDS) setup including both charged-particle and gamma-ray detection capabilities. A total of 27 delayed proton branches were measured including seven so far unobserved. An updated decay scheme, including three new resonances above the proton separation energy in {sup 20}Na and more precise resonance energies, is presented. Beta-decay feeding to two resonances above the Isobaric Analogue State (IAS) in {sup 20}Na is observed. This may allow studies of the 4032.9(2.4) keV resonance in {sup 19}Ne through the beta decay of {sup 20}Mg, which is important for the astrophysically relevant reaction {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne. Beta-delayed protons were used to obtain a more precise value for the half-life of {sup 20}Mg, 91.4(1.0) ms. (orig.)

  3. Interaction with beta-arrestin determines the difference in internalization behavor between beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T; Kawasaki, A; Nagao, T; Kurose, H

    2000-09-15

    The beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) shows the resistance to agonist-induced internalization. As beta-arrestin is important for internalization, we examine the interaction of beta-arrestin with beta(1)AR with three different methods: intracellular trafficking of beta-arrestin, binding of in vitro translated beta-arrestin to intracellular domains of beta(1)- and beta(2)ARs, and inhibition of betaAR-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities by beta-arrestin. The green fluorescent protein-tagged beta-arrestin 2 translocates to and stays at the plasma membrane by beta(2)AR stimulation. Although green fluorescent protein-tagged beta-arrestin 2 also translocates to the plasma membrane, it returns to the cytoplasm 10-30 min after beta(1)AR stimulation. The binding of in vitro translated beta-arrestin 1 and beta-arrestin 2 to the third intracellular loop and the carboxyl tail of beta(1)AR is lower than that of beta(2)AR. The fusion protein of beta-arrestin 1 with glutathione S-transferase inhibits the beta(1)- and beta(2)AR-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities, although inhibition of the beta(1)AR-stimulated activity requires a higher concentration of the fusion protein than that of the beta(2)AR-stimulated activity. These results suggest that weak interaction of beta(1)AR with beta-arrestins explains the resistance to agonist-induced internalization. This is further supported by the finding that beta-arrestin can induce internalization of beta(1)AR when beta-arrestin 1 does not dissociate from beta(1)AR by fusing to the carboxyl tail of beta(1)AR.

  4. Atmospheric electron flux at airplane altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, R.; Chiba, J.; Ogawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Nishimura, J.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a new detector to systematically measure the cosmic-ray electron flux at airplane altitudes. We loaded a lead-glass-based electron telescope onto a commercial cargo airplane. The first experiment was carried out using the air route between Narita (Japan) and Sydney (Australia); during this flight we measured the electron flux at various altitudes and latitudes. The thresholds of the electron energies were 1, 2, and 4 GeV. The results agree with a simple estimation using one-dimensional shower theory. A comparison with a Monte Carlo calculation was made

  5. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  6. Low-beta investment strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Olaf; Kuntz, Laura-Chloé

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates investment strategies that exploit the low-beta anomaly. Although the notion of buying low-beta stocks and selling high-beta stocks is natural, a choice is necessary with respect to the relative weighting of high-beta stocks and low-beta stocks in the investment portfolio. Our empirical results for US large-cap stocks show that this choice is very important for the risk-return characteristics of the resulting portfolios and their sensitivities to common risk factors. W...

  7. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  8. Neutrophil beta-2 microglobulin: an inflammatory mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O W; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Borregaard, N

    1990-01-01

    Beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2m) constitutes the light invariant chain of HLA class I antigen, and is a constituent of mobilizable compartments of neutrophils. Two forms of beta 2m exist: native beta 2m and proteolytically modified beta 2m (Des-Lys58-beta 2m), which shows alpha mobility in crossed ...

  9. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-01-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  10. Beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Origa Raffaella

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands, dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes, gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely

  11. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...... that the present practice of avoiding samples above a depth of 0.3 m may be over-cautious...

  12. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A; Pascual, P

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  13. Study of formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vikas; Kaur, Jagjeet; Parganiha, Yogita; Suryanarayana, N S; Murthy, K V R

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence properties of Eu(3+) doped different host matrix phosphors (SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9). The phosphor is prepared by high temperature solid state reaction method. The method is suitable for large scale production and fixed concentration of boric acid using as a flux. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and the crystallite size calculated by Scherer's formula. The prepared phosphor characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), thermoluminescence (TL) and Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) techniques. The prepared phosphors for different concentration of Eu(3+) ions were examined by TL glow curve for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. The UV 254nm source used for UV irradiation, Sr(90) source was used for beta irradiation and Co(60) source used for gamma irradiation. SrY2O4:Eu(3+)and Y4Al2O9:Eu(3+) phosphors which shows both higher temperature peaks and lower temperature peaks for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. Here UV irradiated sample shows the formation of shallow trap (surface trapping) and the gamma irradiated sample shows the formation of deep trapping. The estimation of trap formation was evaluated by knowledge of trapping parameters. The trapping parameters such as activation energy, order of kinetics and frequency factor were calculated by peak shape method. Here most of the peak shows second order of kinetics. The effect of gamma, beta and UV exposure on TL studies was also examined and it shows linear response with dose which indicate that the samples may be useful for TL dosimetry. Formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors is discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  15. High beta experiments in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1994-09-01

    High beta experiments were performed in the low-aspect-ratio helical device CHS with the volume-averaged equilibrium beta up to 2.1 %. These values (highest for helical systems) are obtained for high density plasmas in low magnetic field heated with two tangential neutral beams. Confinement improvement given by means of turning off gas puffing helped significantly to make high betas. Magnetic fluctuations increased with increasing beta, but finally stopped to increase in the beta range > 1 %. The coherent modes appearing in the magnetic hill region showed strong dependence on the beta values. The dynamic poloidal field control was applied to suppress the outward plasma movement with the plasma pressure. Such an operation gave fixed boundary operations of high beta plasmas in helical systems. (author)

  16. Coroutine Sequencing in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    In object-oriented programming, a program execution is viewed as a physical model of some real or imaginary part of the world. A language supporting object-oriented programming must therefore contain comprehensive facilities for modeling phenomena and concepts form the application domain. Many...... applications in the real world consist of objects carrying out sequential processes. Coroutines may be used for modeling objects that alternate between a number of sequential processes. The authors describe coroutines in BETA...

  17. COM Support in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Component technologies based on binary units of independent production are some of the most important contributions to software architecture and reuse during recent years. Especially the COM technologies and the CORBA standard from the Object Management Group have contributed new and interesting...... principles for software architecture, and proven to be useful in parctice. In this paper ongoing work with component support in the BETA language is described....

  18. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results

  19. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  20. Radiation synthesis of gelatin/CM-chitosan/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Ying [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu Ling, E-mail: lingxu@pku.edu.cn [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Xiangmei; Zhao Yinghui [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: sc-wei@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhai Maolin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-05-01

    A series of biodegradable composite scaffolds was fabricated from an aqueous solution of gelatin, carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) by radiation-induced crosslinking at ambient temperature. Ultrasonic treatment on the polymer solutions significantly influenced the distribution of {beta}-TCP particles. An ultrasonic time of 20 min, followed by 30 kGy irradiation induced a crosslinked scaffold with homogeneous distribution of {beta}-TCP particles, interconnected porous structure, sound swelling capacity and mechanical strength. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis indicated that {beta}-TCP successfully incorporated with the network of gelatin and CM-chitosan. In vivo implantation of the scaffold into the mandible of beagle dog revealed that the scaffolds had excellent biocompatibility and the presence of {beta}-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration. The comprehensive results of this study paved way for the application of gelatin/CM-chitosan/{beta}-TCP composite scaffolds as candidate of bone tissue engineering material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation induced a crosslinked scaffold with interconnected porous structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasonic time of 20 min led to homogenerously distribution of {beta}-TCP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing amount of {beta}-TCP would restrict the swelling properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper fraction of {beta}-TCP will promote the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid of {beta}-TCP promoted the bone regeneration of the mandibles of beagle dogs.

  1. Beta-spectrometer with Si-detectors for the study of 144Ce-144Pr decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, I. E.; Bakhlanov, S. V.; Bazlov, N. V.; Chmel, E. A.; Derbin, A. V.; Drachnev, I. S.; Kotina, I. M.; Muratova, V. N.; Pilipenko, N. V.; Semyonov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Yeremin, V. K.

    2018-05-01

    Here we present the specifications of a newly developed beta-spectrometer, based on full absorption Si(Li) detector and thin transmission detector, allowing one to perform efficient separation beta-radiation and accompanying X-rays and gamma radiation. Our method is based on registration of coincident events from both detectors. The spectrometer can be used for precision measurements of various beta-spectra, namely for the beta-spectrum shape study of 144Pr, which is considered to be an advantageous anti-neutrino source for sterile neutrino searches.

  2. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.; Tatar, E.; Bacon, J.D.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Green, J.A.; Hogan, G.E.; Ito, T.M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.L.; Mortenson, R.; Pasukanics, F.E.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Teasdale, W.; Saltus, M.; Back, H.O.; Cottrell, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  3. The FLUKA atmospheric neutrino flux calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G.; Montaruli, T.; Sala, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo model is here described in all details, starting from the latest data on primary cosmic ray spectra. The importance of a 3-D calculation and of its consequences have been already debated in a previous paper. Here instead the focus is on the absolute flux. We stress the relevant aspects of the hadronic interaction model of FLUKA in the atmospheric neutrino flux calculation. This model is constructed and maintained so to provide a high degree of accuracy in the description of particle production. The accuracy achieved in the comparison with data from accelerators and cross checked with data on particle production in atmosphere certifies the reliability of shower calculation in atmosphere. The results presented here can be already used for analysis by current experiments on atmospheric neutrinos. However they represent an intermediate step towards a final release, since this calculation does not yet include the...

  4. Enantioselective synthesis of alpha,beta-disubstituted-beta-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Prabagaran, Narayanasamy; Ghorpade, Sandeep G; Jasperse, Craig P

    2003-10-01

    Highly diastereoselective and enantioselective addition of N-benzylhydroxylamine to imides 17 and 20-30 produces alpha,beta-trans-disubstituted N-benzylisoxazolidinones 19 and 31-41. These reactions proceed in 60-96% ee with 93-99% de's using 5 mol % of Mg(NTf2)2 and ligand 18. The product isoxazolidinones can be hydrogenolyzed directly to provide alpha,beta-disubstituted-beta-amino acids.

  5. Analytic, High-beta Solutions of the Helical Grad-Shafranov Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Reiman, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    We present analytic, high-beta (β ∼ O(1)), helical equilibrium solutions for a class of helical axis configurations having large helical aspect ratio, with the helix assumed to be tightly wound. The solutions develop a narrow boundary layer of strongly compressed flux, similar to that previously found in high beta tokamak equilibrium solutions. The boundary layer is associated with a strong localized current which prevents the equilibrium from having zero net current

  6. Continuous magnetic flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A method and means for altering the intensity of a magnetic field by transposing flux from one location to the location desired fro the magnetic field are examined. The device described includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, is dimensioned to be insertable into one of the cavities and to substantially fill the cavity. Magnetic flux is first trapped in the cavities by establishing a magnetic field while the superconducting material is above the critical temperature at which it goes superconducting. Thereafter, the temperature of the material is reduced below the critical value, and then the exciting magnetic field may be removed. By varying the ratios of the areas of the two cavities, it is possible to produce a field having much greater flux density in the second, smaller cavity, into which the flux transposed.

  7. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  8. Flux shunts for undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    Undulators for high-performance applications in synchrotron-radiation sources and periodic magnetic structures for free-electron lasers have stringent requirements on the curvature of the electron's average trajectory. Undulators using the permanent magnet hybrid configuration often have fields in their central region that produce a curved trajectory caused by local, ambient magnetic fields such as those of the earth. The 4.6 m long Advanced Light Source (ALS) undulators use flux shunts to reduce this effect. These flux shunts are magnetic linkages of very high permeability material connecting the two steel beams that support the magnetic structures. The shunts reduce the scalar potential difference between the supporting beams and carry substantial flux that would normally appear in the undulator gap. Magnetic design, mechanical configuration of the flux shunts and magnetic measurements of their effect on the ALS undulators are described

  9. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  10. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  11. Beta measurement evaluation and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Rathbun, L.A.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1986-01-01

    This program focuses on the resolution of problems associated with the field measurement of the beta dose component at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The change in DOE programs, including increased efforts in improved waste management and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of facilities, coupled with beta measurement problems identified at Three Mile Island has increased the need to improve beta measurements. In FY 1982, work was initiated to provide a continuing effort to identify problems associated with beta dose assessment at DOE facilities. The problems identified resulted in the development of this program. The investigation includes (1) an assessment of measurement systems now in use, (2) development of improved calibration systems and procedures, (3) application of innovative beta dosimetry concepts, (4) investigation of new instruments or concepts for monitoring and spectroscopy, and (5) development of recommendations to assure an adequate beta measurement program within DOE facilities

  12. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux; Propagation des rayons cosmiques dans un modele de diffusion: une nouvelle estimation des parametres de diffusion et du flux d'antiprotons secondaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurin, D

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  13. Conditional Betas and Investor Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando D. Chague

    2013-01-01

    We derive theoretical expressions for market betas from a rational expectation equilibrium model where the representative investor does not observe if the economy is in a recession or an expansion. Market betas in this economy are time-varying and related to investor uncertainty about the state of the economy. The dynamics of betas will also vary across assets according to the assets' cash-flow structure. In a calibration exercise, we show that value and growth firms have cash-flow structures...

  14. Intermittent fasting preserves beta-cell mass in obesity-induced diabetes via the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Javaheri, Ali; Godar, Rebecca J; Murphy, John; Ma, Xiucui; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Mahadevan, Jana; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Saftig, Paul; Marshall, Connie; McDaniel, Michael L; Remedi, Maria S; Razani, Babak; Urano, Fumihiko; Diwan, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and progressive beta cell failure. In islets of mice with obesity-induced diabetes, we observe increased beta cell death and impaired autophagic flux. We hypothesized that intermittent fasting, a clinically sustainable therapeutic strategy, stimulates autophagic flux to ameliorate obesity-induced diabetes. Our data show that despite continued high-fat intake, intermittent fasting restores autophagic flux in islets and improves glucose tolerance by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta cell survival, and nuclear expression of NEUROG3, a marker of pancreatic regeneration. In contrast, intermittent fasting does not rescue beta-cell death or induce NEUROG3 expression in obese mice with lysosomal dysfunction secondary to deficiency of the lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2 or haplo-insufficiency of BECN1/Beclin 1, a protein critical for autophagosome formation. Moreover, intermittent fasting is sufficient to provoke beta cell death in nonobese lamp2 null mice, attesting to a critical role for lysosome function in beta cell homeostasis under fasting conditions. Beta cells in intermittently-fasted LAMP2- or BECN1-deficient mice exhibit markers of autophagic failure with accumulation of damaged mitochondria and upregulation of oxidative stress. Thus, intermittent fasting preserves organelle quality via the autophagy-lysosome pathway to enhance beta cell survival and stimulates markers of regeneration in obesity-induced diabetes.

  15. Measurement of gross beta radioactivity in high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Lin Cansheng; Zhang Xianzi; Chen Guoan; Zhang Chonghai

    1992-01-01

    Using beta plastic scintillation counter of low level background, gross beta radioactivity of twelve samples for high-level liquid waste is determined directly. Beta efficiency curves of plastic scintillation counter for four mass thickness are calibrated in advance. Determining gross beta radioactivity, gross efficiency of the scintillation counter for various energy beta ray is calculated via weighted mean method with the ratio of radioactivity for each nuclide. The ratio of radioactivity for nuclides which have gamma disintegration is determined in terms of the radioactivity measured by gamma spectrometer. The ratio of the radioactivity for 90 Sr which has purity beta disintegration is calculated in terms of half life time approximation. The ratio of the radioactivity for 147 Pm which also has purity disintegration is calculated by means of apparent cooling-time approximation. The uncertainty of results for the present work is about +-15%

  16. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtel, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The most striking feature of the celestial sphere when viewed in the frequency range of γ-rays is the emission from the galactic plane, which is particularly intense in the galactic longitudinal region from 300 0 to 50 0 . The longitudinal and latitudinal distributions are generally correlated with galactic structural features and when studied in detail suggest a non-uniform distribution of cosmic rays in the galaxy. Several point γ-ray sources have now been observed, including four radio pulsars. This last result is particularly striking since only one radio pulsar has been seen at either optical or X-ray frequencies. Nuclear γ-ray lines have been seen from the Sun during a large solar flare and future satellite experiments are planned to search for γ-ray lines from supernovae and their remnants. A general apparently diffuse flux of γ-rays has also been seen whose energy spectrum has interesting implications; however, in view of the possible contribution of point sources and the observation of galactic features such as Gould's belt, its interpretation must await γ-ray experiments with finer spatial and energy resolution, as well as greater sensitivity. (Auth.)

  17. Dynamic returns of beta arbitrage

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Mafalda

    2017-01-01

    This thesis studies the patterns of the abnormal returns of the beta strategy. The topic can be helpful for professional investors, who intend to achieve a better performance in their portfolios. Following the methodology of Lou, Polk, & Huang (2016), the COBAR measure is computed in order to determine the levels of beta arbitrage in the market in each point in time. It is argued that beta arbitrage activity can have impact on the returns of the beta strategy. In fact, it is demonstrated that...

  18. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some fo...... it is possible to implement plug-ins in BETA and even inherit from Java classes. In the paper the two approaches are described together with part of the mapping from BETA to Java class files. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15710661...

  19. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-07

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  20. Identification of active anti-inflammatory principles of beta- beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chromatography. Components of the extracts were identified by thin layer chromatography (TLC) scanner and UV-visible spectroscopy, using scopoletin as standard. Results: ... basic coumarin skeleton ring structure reduce ... Figure 2: Thin-layer chromatogram: (1) Ethanol extract; (2) Dichloromethane fraction; (3) Beta-beta.

  1. Improved limits on beta(-) and beta(-) decays of Ca-48

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bakalyarov, A.; Balysh, A.; Barabash, AS.; Beneš, P.; Briancon, C.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V.; Hubert, F.; Hubert, P.; Korolev, NA.; Kosjakov, VN.; Kovalík, Alojz; Lebedev, NA.; Novgorodov, A. F.; Rukhadze, NI.; Štekl, NI.; Timkin, VV.; Veleshko, IE.; Vylov, T.; Umatov, VI.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 9 (2002), s. 545-547 ISSN 0021-3640 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : beta decay * double beta decay * Ca-48 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2002

  2. Conversion of beta-methylbutyric acid to beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyric acid by Galactomyces reessii.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, I Y; Nissen, S L; Rosazza, J P

    1997-01-01

    beta-Hydroxy-beta-methylbutyric acid (HMB) has been shown to increase strength and lean mass gains in humans undergoing resistance-exercise training. HMB is currently marketed as a calcium salt of HMB, and thus, environmentally sound and inexpensive methods of manufacture are being sought. This study investigates the microbial conversion of beta-methylbutyric acid (MBA) to HMB by cultures of Galactomyces reessii. Optimal concentrations of MBA were in the range of 5 to 20 g/liter for HMB produ...

  3. Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements on ASDEX Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, L; Geiger, B; Bilato, R; Maraschek, M; Odstrčil, T; Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McCarthy, P J; Mertens, V; Schuhbeck, K H

    2016-05-01

    Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements are now available on ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to the majority of diamagnetic flux measurements on other tokamaks, no analog summation of signals is necessary for measuring the change in toroidal flux or for removing contributions arising from unwanted coupling to the plasma and poloidal field coil currents. To achieve the highest possible sensitivity, the diamagnetic measurement and compensation coil integrators are triggered shortly before plasma initiation when the toroidal field coil current is close to its maximum. In this way, the integration time can be chosen to measure only the small changes in flux due to the presence of plasma. Two identical plasma discharges with positive and negative magnetic field have shown that the alignment error with respect to the plasma current is negligible. The measured diamagnetic flux is compared to that predicted by TRANSP simulations. The poloidal beta inferred from the diamagnetic flux measurement is compared to the values calculated from magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes. The diamagnetic flux measurement and TRANSP simulation can be used together to estimate the coupled power in discharges with dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating.

  4. Meromorphic flux compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, Cesar [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Guanajuato,Carretera Salamanca-Valle de Santiago Km 3.5+1.8 Comunidad de Palo Blanco,Salamanca (Mexico); Loaiza-Brito, Oscar [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guanajuato,Loma del Bosque No. 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre C.P 37150 León, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-04-26

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  5. Meromorphic flux compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  6. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  7. Development of SiC Neutron Detector Assembly to Measure the Neutron Flux of the Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Se Hwan; Park, June Sic; Shin, Hee Sung; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    At present, the conventional detector to measure the neutron at harsh environment is a Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND). Rhodium(Rh)-103 is in the SPND. When neutron is incident on the Rhodium, the neutron capture reaction occurs, and the Rh-103 is converted to Rh-104. The Rh-104 is decayed to Pd-104 by {beta}-decay, and electrons are generated as the decay products. Because of the half life of Rh-104, approximately 5 minutes are required for the SPND output to reach the equilibrium condition. Therefore the on-line monitoring of the nuclear reactor state is limited if the neutron flux in the reactor core is monitored with the SPND. Silicon carbide (SiC) has the possibility to be developed as neutron detector at harsh environment, because the SiC can be operative at high temperature and high neutron flux conditions. Previously, the basic operation properties of the SiC detector were studied. Also, the radiation response of the SiC detector was studied at high neutron and gamma dose rate. The measurement results for an ex-core neutron flux monitor or a neutron flux monitor of the spent fuel were published. The SiC detector was also developed as neutron detector to measure the fissile material with active interrogation method. However, the studies about the development of SiC detector are still limited. In the present work, the radiation damage effect of the SiC detector was studied. The detector structure was determined based on the study, and a neutron detector assembly was made with the SiC detectors. The neutron and gamma-ray response of the detector assembly is presented in this paper. The detector assembly was positioned in the HANARO research reactor core, the performance test was done. The preliminary results are also included in this paper

  8. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  9. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  10. The best-beta CAPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, L.

    2006-01-01

    The issue of 'best-beta' arises as soon as potential errors in the Sharpe-Lintner-Black capital asset pricing model (CAPM) are acknowledged. By incorporating a target variable into the investor preferences, this study derives a best-beta CAPM (BCAPM) that maintains the CAPM's theoretical appeal and

  11. BETA SPECTRA. I. Negatrons spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1978-01-01

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 62 negatrons emitters have been computed introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. These spectra are plotted vs. energy, once normal i sed, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (Author)

  12. Review of the beta situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1982-01-01

    This note lists some of the possible causes of beta limitation in tokamak and discusses what is known and what is involved in investigating them. The motivation for preparing this note is the observed degradation of confinement with increasing beta poloidal β/sub p/ and beam power P/sub b/ in ISX-B

  13. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  14. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  15. Low-energy cosmic rays in the Orion region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1998-01-01

    The recently observed nuclear gamma-ray line emission from the Orion complex implies a high flux of low-energy cosmic rays (LECR) with unusual abundance. This cosmic ray component would dominate the energy density, pressure, and ionising power of cosmic rays, and thus would have a strong impact...

  16. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Hidaka, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    1990-02-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutrino fluxes of atmospheric origin is made taking into account the muon polarization effect on neutrinos from muon decay. We calculate the fluxes with energies above 3 MeV for future experiments. There still remains a significant discrepancy between the calculated (ν e +antiν e )/(ν μ +antiν μ ) ratio and that observed by the Kamiokande group. However, the ratio evaluated at the Frejus site shows a good agreement with the data. (author)

  17. Effects of quartz on crystallization behavior of mold fluxes and microstructural characteristics of flux film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Liu; Xiuli, Han; Mingduo, Li; Di, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Mold fluxes are mainly prepared using cement clinker, quartz, wollastonite, borax, fluorite, soda ash and other mineral materials. Quartz, as one of the most common and essential materials, was chosen for this study to analyze itseffects on crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate, crystal incubation time, crystallization ratio and phases of flux film. We used the research methods of process mineralogy with the application of the single hot thermocouple technique, heat flux simulator, polarizing microscope, X-ray diffraction, etc. Results: By increasing the quartz content from 16 mass% to 24 mass%, the crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate and crystallization ratio of flux film decreased, and the crystal incubation time was extended. Meanwhile, the mineralogical structure of the flux film changed, with a large amount of wollastonite precipitation and a significant decrease in the cuspidine content until it reached zero. This showed a steady decline in the heat transfer control capacity of the flux film. The reason for the results above is that, by increasing the quartz content, the silicon-oxygen tetrahedron network structure promoted a rise in viscosity and restrained ion migration, inhibiting crystal nucleation and growth, leading to the weakening of the crystallization and a decline in the crystallization ratio.

  18. γ ray astronomy with muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.; Stanev, T.; Yodh, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    Although γ ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard γ ray spectra there is a relative open-quotes enhancementclose quotes of muons from γ ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower γ rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons N μ , which is thus proportional to the primary γ ray energy. With γ ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the γ close-quote s of about 1%, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by 10 4 . The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal, and by γ ray detectors such as MILAGRO. TeV muons from γ ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy γ rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal, and MILAGRO detectors. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Interactions between two beta-sheets. Energetics of beta/beta packing in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K C; Némethy, G; Rumsey, S; Tuttle, R W; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-20

    The analysis of the interactions between regularly folded segments of the polypeptide chain contributes to an understanding of the energetics of protein folding. Conformational energy-minimization calculations have been carried out to determine the favorable ways of packing two right-twisted beta-sheets. The packing of two five-stranded beta-sheets was investigated, with the strands having the composition CH3CO-(L-Ile)6-NHCH3 in one beta-sheet and CH3CO-(L-Val)6-NHCH3 in the other. Two distinct classes of low-energy packing arrangements were found. In the class with lowest energies, the strands of the two beta-sheets are aligned nearly parallel (or antiparallel) with each other, with a preference for a negative orientation angle, because this arrangement corresponds to the best complementary packing of the two twisted saddle-shaped beta-sheets. In the second class, with higher interaction energies, the strands of the two beta-sheets are oriented nearly perpendicular to each other. While the surfaces of the two beta-sheets are not complementary in this arrangement, there is good packing between the corner of one beta-sheet and the interior part of the surface of the other, resulting in a favorable energy of packing. Both classes correspond to frequently observed orientations of beta-sheets in proteins. In proteins, the second class of packing is usually observed when the two beta-sheets are covalently linked, i.e. when a polypeptide strand passes from one beta-sheet to the other, but we have shown here that a large contribution to the stabilization of this packing arrangement arises from noncovalent interactions.

  20. Bayesian modeling and prediction of solar particles flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedecius, Kamil; Kalova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    An autoregression model was developed based on the Bayesian approach. Considering the solar wind non-homogeneity, the idea was applied of combining the pure autoregressive properties of the model with expert knowledge based on a similar behaviour of the various phenomena related to the flux properties. Examples of such situations include the hardening of the X-ray spectrum, which is often followed by coronal mass ejection and a significant increase in the particles flux intensity

  1. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted {beta}-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of {beta}/{gamma} radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  2. Study of $\\beta$-delayed neutron decay of $^{8}$He

    CERN Multimedia

    The goal of the present proposal is to study $\\beta$-delayed neutron decay branch of $^{8}$He. The energy spectra of the emitted neutrons will be measured in the energy range of 0.1 – 6 MeV using the VANDLE spectrometer. Using coincident $\\gamma$-ray measurement, components of the spectrum corresponding to transitions to the ground- and first- excited states of $^{7}$Li will be disentangled. The new data will allow us to get a more complete picture of the $\\beta$-decay of $^{8}$He and to clarify the discrepancy between the B(GT) distributions derived from the $\\beta$-decay and $^{8}$He(p, n)$^{8}$Li reaction studies.

  3. Extração, estruturas e propriedades de alfa- e beta-quitina Extraction, structures and properties of alpha- AND beta-chitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio P. Campana-Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The fact that alpha- and beta-chitin adopt different arrays in the solid state is explored to emphasize their different properties and distinct spectral characteristics and X ray diffraction patterns. The methods for their extraction from the biomass in view of the preservation of their native structures and aiming to fulfill the claims of purity and uniformity for potential applications are discussed. The different arrays adopted by alpha- and beta-chitin also result in distinct reactivities toward the deacetylation reaction. Thus, the deacetylation of beta-chitin is more efficient owing to the better accessibility to amide groups due to the lower crystallinity of this polymorph.

  4. Thermal neutron flux measurements using neutron-electron converters; Mesure de flux de neutrons thermiques avec des convertisseurs neutrons electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Meur, R; Lecomte, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The operation of neutron-electron converters designed for measuring thermal neutron fluxes is examined. The principle is to produce short lived isotopes emitting beta particles, by activation, and to measure their activity not by extracting them from the reactor, but directly in the reactor using the emitted electrons to deflect the needle of a galvanometer placed outside the flux. After a theoretical study, the results of the measurements are presented; particular attention is paid to a new type of converter characterized by a layer structure. The converters are very useful for obtaining flux distributions with more than 10{sup 7} neutrons cm{sup -2}*sec{sup -1}. They work satisfactorily in pressurized carbon dioxide at 400 Celsius degrees. Some points still have to be cleared up however concerning interfering currents in the detectors and the behaviour of the dielectrics under irradiation. (authors) [French] On examine le fonctionnement de convertisseurs neutrons electrons destines a des mesures de flux de neutrons thermiques. Le principe est de former par activation des isotopes a periodes courtes et a emission beta et de mesurer leur activite non pas en les sortant du reacteur, mais directement en pile, utilisant les electrons emis pour faire devier l'aiguille d'un galvanometre place hors flux. Apres une etude theorique, on indique des resultats de mesures obtenus, en insistant particulierement sur un nouveau type de convertisseur, caracterise par sa structure stratifiee. Les convertisseurs sont tres interessants pour tracer, des cartes de flux a partir de 10{sup 7} neutrons cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1}. Ils sont utilisables pour des flux de 10{sup 14} neutrons cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1}. Ils fonctionnent correctement dans du gaz carbonique sous pression a 400 C. Des points restent cependant a eclaircir concernant les courants parasites dans les detecteurs et le comportement des dielectriques pendant leur irradiation. (auteur)

  5. X-rays as a probe of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. X-rays as a probe of the Universe · Probing the Universe ….. Flux = sT4 umax = 1011 T (in Kelvin) · History of x-ray astronomy · X-ray Production · X-ray spectra · Celestial sphere as seen by UHURU (1970) · Slide 8 · X-rays from accreting binary systems · Slide 10 · Neutron stars: Black Hole: · Primary X-ray ...

  6. Optical performance evaluation of a solar furnace by measuring the highly concentrated solar flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunjin; Chai, Kwankyo; Kim, Jongkyu; Lee, Sangnam; Yoon, Hwanki; Yu, Changkyun; Kang, Yongheack

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated optical performance of a solar furnace in the KIER (Korea Institute of Energy Research) by measuring the highly concentrated solar flux with the flux mapping method. We presented and analyzed optical performance in terms of concentrated solar flux distribution and power distribution. We investigated concentration ratio, stagnation temperature, total power, and concentration accuracy with help of a modeling code based on the ray tracing method and thereby compared with other solar furnaces. We also discussed flux changes by shutter opening angles and by position adjustment of reflector facets. In the course of flux analysis, we provided a better understanding of reference flux measurement for calibration, reflectivity measurement with a portable reflectometer, shadowing area consideration for effective irradiation, as well as accuracy and repeatability of flux measurements. The results in the present study will help proper utilization of a solar furnace by facilitating comparison between flux measurements at different conditions and flux estimation during operation

  7. Derivatives of the Incomplete Beta Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Boik

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The incomplete beta function is defined as where Beta(p, q is the beta function. Dutka (1981 gave a history of the development and numerical evaluation of this function. In this article, an algorithm for computing first and second derivatives of Ix,p,q with respect to p and q is described. The algorithm is useful, for example, when fitting parameters to a censored beta, truncated beta, or a truncated beta-binomial model.

  8. Observing long colour flux tubes in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, G S; Schlichter, C; Bali, G S; Schilling, K; Schlichter, C

    1995-01-01

    We present results of a high statistics study of the chromo field distribution between static quarks in SU(2) gauge theory on lattices of volumes 16^4, 32^4, and 48^3*64, with physical extent ranging from 1.3 fm up to 2.7 fm at beta=2.5, beta=2.635, and beta=2.74. We establish string formation over physical distances as large as 2 fm. The results are tested against Michael's sum rules. A detailed investigation of the transverse action and energy flux tube profiles is provided. As a by-product, we obtain the static lattice potential in unpreceded accuracy.

  9. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, E.; Maitra, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  10. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  11. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio [CERN, Theory Unit, CH-1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Marescotti, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, I-10125, Turin (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds.

  12. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio; Marescotti, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds

  13. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino fluxes, which are responsible for the main background in proton decay experiments, have been calculated by two independent methods. There are discrepancies between the two sets of results regarding latitude effects and up-down asymmetries, especially for neutrino energies Esub(ν) < 1 GeV. (author)

  14. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime. With the Nusselt number and the mixing length scales, we get the Nusselt number and Reynolds number (w'd/ν) scalings: and or. and. scaling expected to occur at extremely high Ra Rayleigh-Benard convection. Get the ultimate regime ...

  15. GCR flux 9-day variations with LISA Pathfinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimani, C; Benella, S; Fabi, M; Finetti, N; Telloni, D

    2017-01-01

    Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) energy spectra in the heliosphere vary on the basis of the level of solar activity, the status of solar polarity and interplanetary transient magnetic structures of solar origin. A high counting rate particle detector (PD) aboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) allows for the measurement of galactic cosmic-ray and solar energetic particle (SEP) integral fluxes at energies > 70 MeV n −1 up to 6500 counts s −1 . Data are gathered with a sampling time of 15 s. A study of GCR flux depressions associated with the third harmonic of the Sun rotation period (∼ 9 days) is presented here. (paper)

  16. Charged particle flux near the Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernov, S.N.; Tverskoj, B.A.; Yakovlev, V.A.

    1974-01-01

    The data on cosmic ray fluxes, obtained for the first time in the areocentric orbit by means of the 'Mars-2' satellite are given and discussed. The measurements were carried out on the variable solar cosmic ray flux background from December 14, 1971, to June 1, 1972. For this reason it is difficult to strictly separate local increases in the soft particle fluxes near the planet (electrons with Esub(e)>0.1 and 0.3MeV and protons with Esub(p)>1 and 5MeV) from the variation of corresponding particles of a solar origin. The detected intensities exceed the background which is caused by detection of particles of a galactic origin even at the complete overlap of the counter aperture by the planet. The possible causes of the detected irregularities in an intensity are discussed. It has been established definitely that neither Mars nor Venus have radiation belts at an election energy of Esub(e)>100KeV and proton energy of Esup(p)>1

  17. Contribution of External Gamma Rays to SPND at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B. G.; Cho, D. K.; Kim, M. S.; Kang, G. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) have been widely used for monitoring the neutron flux in reactors as well as in irradiation facilities. In its simplest form, the detector operates on the basis of directly measuring the beta decay current following neutron capture. The neutron capture cross-section of {sup 103}Rh, which is used for an emitter of the SPND, is 142.13 barns for thermal neutron (0.0253 eV). After neuron capture of {sup 103}Rh, the compound nuclei of {sup 104}Rh (92.6%) and {sup 104}mRh (7.4%) are produced. The sensitivity of SPND is generally defined as. The influence of water in the irradiation basket on the external gamma rays is determined by calculations of neutron capture reaction and photon interaction rates at various irradiation positions in HANARO. Since it is not easy to correct the contribution of the external gamma rays to the current signal by measurements at the research reactor, it is advantageous to reduce materials such as water at the irradiation position.

  18. BETA (Bitter Electromagnet Testing Apparatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Evan M.; Birmingham, William J.; Rivera, William F.; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.

    2017-10-01

    The Bitter Electromagnet Testing Apparatus (BETA) is a 1-Tesla (T) prototype of the 10-T Adjustable Long Pulse High-Field Apparatus (ALPHA). These water-cooled resistive magnets use high DC currents to produce strong uniform magnetic fields. Presented here is the successful completion of the BETA project and experimental results validating analytical magnet designing methods developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory (DPL). BETA's final design specifications will be highlighted which include electromagnetic, thermal and stress analyses. The magnet core design will be explained which include: Bitter Arcs, helix starters, and clamping annuli. The final version of the magnet's vessel and cooling system are also presented, as well as the electrical system of BETA, which is composed of a unique solid-state breaker circuit. Experimental results presented will show the operation of BETA at 1 T. The results are compared to both analytical design methods and finite element analysis calculations. We also explore the steady state maximums and theoretical limits of BETA's design. The completion of BETA validates the design and manufacturing techniques that will be used in the succeeding magnet, ALPHA.

  19. Illumination system for X-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    An X-ray lithography system is described, comprising: a point source of X-Ray radiation; a wafer plane disposed in spaced relation to the point source of X-Ray radiation; a mask disposed between the point source of X-Ray radiation and the wafer plane whereby X-Ray radiation from the point source of X-ray radiation passes through the mask to the water plane; and X-Ray absorbent means mounted between the point source of X-Ray radiation and the wafer plane, the X-Ray absorbent means being of quadratically absorption from maximum absorption at the center to minimum absorption at the edge so as to have a radial absorption gradient profile to compensate for radial flux variation of the X-Ray radiation

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of spheromak plasma in spheroidal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi.

    1985-11-01

    The MHD equilibrium configurations of spheromak plasmas in a spheroidal flux conserver are determined by use of a pressure distribution whose derivative dp/dψ vanishes on the magnetic axis, and by use of an optimized distribution. Here p is the pressure and ψ is the flux function. These equilibria are shown to be stable for symmetric modes. The stability for localized modes is investigated by the Mercier criterion. The values of the maximum beta ratio β max are evaluated for both pressure distributions and are shown to become about two times larger by optimization. If the condition, q axis max are found to be less than 30 %. The oblate spheroidal flux conserver is shown to be better than the toroidal conserver with a rectangular cross section from the standpoint of stability. (author)

  1. beta. and. gamma. -comparative dose estimates on Enewetak Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crase, K.W.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Robison, W.L. (California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore National Lab.)

    1982-05-01

    Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific is used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and ..gamma..-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Enewetak Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the ..beta.. and low energy ..gamma..-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a ..beta..-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to ..beta..- or low energy ..gamma..-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is reduced by vegetation. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey. Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the ..beta..'s or low energy ..gamma..'s, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  2. beta- and gamma-Comparative dose estimates on Eniwetok Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crase, K.W.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Robison, W.L.

    1982-05-01

    Eniwetok Atoll is one of the Pacific atolls used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and gamma-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Eniwetok Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the beta and low energy gamma-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a beta-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to beta- or low energy gamma-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is somewhat dependent on ground cover, since a minimal amount of vegetation will reduce it significantly from that over bare soil, but thick stands of vegetation have little effect on any further reductions. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey (En73). Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the beta's or low energy gamma's, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  3. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  4. Preventive Effects of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methyl Butyrate

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ravanbakhsh; N. Torabi; M. Foadoddini

    2016-01-01

    Aims: One of the major factors in sudden cardiac arrest is the initiation and continuation of deadly arrhythmias during ischemia. It is known that beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) has useful effects such as anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects in the skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of HMB on the ventricular arrhythmias due to the ischemia. Materials & Methods: In the experimental study, 30 Wistar male rats were randomly div...

  5. Dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources; Dosimetria de fuentes {beta} extensas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Lallena R, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  6. Sigma beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure beta decays of the sigma particle. Sigmas produced by stopping a K - beam in a liquid hydrogen target decayed in the following reactions: Kp → Σπ; Σ → Neν. The electron and pion were detected by wire spark chambers in a magnetic spectrometer and by plastic scintillators, and were differentiated by a threshold gas Cherenkov counter. The neutron was detected by liquid scintillation counters. The data (n = 3) shell electrons or the highly excited electrons decay first. Instead, it is suggested that when there are two to five electrons in highly excited states immediately after a heavy ion--atom collision the first transitions to occur will be among highly excited Rydberg states in a cascade down to the 4s, 4p, and 3d-subshells. If one of the long lived states becomes occupied by electrons promoted during the collision or by electrons falling from higher levels, it will not decay until after the valence shell decays. LMM rates calculated to test the methods used are compared to previous works. The mixing coefficients are given in terms of the states 4s4p, 45sp+-, and 5s5p. The applicability of Cooper, Fano, and Prats' discussion of the energies and transition rates of doubly excited states is considered

  7. Double Beta Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2008-01-01

    The importance of neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (DBD) is stressed in view of the recent results of experiments on neutrino oscillations which indicate that the difference between the squared masses of two neutrinos of different flavours is finite [For a recent review including neutrino properties and recent results see: Review of Particle Physics, J. of Phys. G: Nuclear and Particle Physics 33, 1]. As a consequence the mass of at least one neutrino has to be different from zero and it becomes imperative to determine its absolute value. The various experimental techniques to search for DBD are discussed together with the difficult problems of the evaluation of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. The upper limits on neutrino mass coming from the results of the various experiments are reported together with the indication for a non zero value by one of them not confirmed so far. The two presently running experiments on neutrinoless DBD are briefly described together with the already approved or designed second generation searches aiming to reach the values on the absolute neutrino mass indicated by the results on neutrino oscillations

  8. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the low-luminosity and X-ray-rich burst GRB 040223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlynn, S.; Hanlon, L.; Foley, S. [College Univ., Dublin (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Department of Experimental Physics; McBreen, S. [ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Astrophysics Mission Division, RSSD of ESA; Moran, L. [Southampton Univ., Southampton (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Preece, R. [Alabama Univ., Huntsville (United States); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Williams, O.R. [SCI-SDG, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Science Operation and Data Systems Division of ESA-ESTEC

    2005-07-15

    GRB 040223 was observed by INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton. GRB 040223 has a peak flux of (1.6{+-}0.13) x 10{sup -8} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, a fluence of (4.4{+-}0.4) x 10{sup -7} ergs cm{sup -2} and a steep photon power law index of -2.3{+-}0.2, in the energy range 20-200 keV. The steep spectrum implies it is an X-ray-rich GRB with emission up to 200 keV and E{sub peak} < 20 keV. If E{sub peak} is < 10 keV, it would qualify as an X-ray flash with high-energy emission. The X-ray data has a spectral index {beta}{sub x} = -1.7{+-}0.2, a temporal decay of t{sup -0.75{+-}}{sup 0.25} and a large column density of 1.8 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. The luminosity-lag relationship was used to obtain a redshift z 0.1{sub -0.02}{sup +0.04}. The isotropic energy radiated in {gamma}-rays and X-ray luminosity after 10 hours are factors of 1000 and 100 less than classical GRBs. GRB 040223 is consistent with the extrapolation of the Amati relation into the region that includes XRF 030723 and XRF 020903.

  9. Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented

  10. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  11. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  12. (beta-HC CG) in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    Urothelial tumour samples were obtained from all the 86 patients requiring surgical ..... and/or urine beta HCG appears to be an efficient diagnostic marker for the ..... collected all urothelial tumour specimens for storage, cutting and staining.

  13. Beta-glucans and cholesterol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Petr; Vannucci, Luca; Větvička, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 4 (2017), s. 1799-1808 ISSN 1107-3756 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cholesterol * beta-glucans * diet Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.341, year: 2016

  14. Radioisotope indicator, type BETA 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duszanski, M.; Pankow, A.; Skwarczynski, B.

    1975-01-01

    The authors describe a radioisotope indicator, type BETA 2, constructed in the ZKMPW Works to be employed in mines for counting, checking, signalling the presence and positioning of cars, as well as monitoring the state of some other equipment. (author)

  15. Improving the resolution of beta scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiktas, C.; Selvi, S.; Yegin, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the performance of a modified beta-ray spectrometer using a pulse shape analyzer/timing single channel analyzer and related electronics, thereby preserving the low energy electron tail in measurement of the scattered electron spectra from an n-type Si wafer target. Comparison of measurements with the scattering spectra calculated by the Monte Carlo program EGS4 indicates good agreement across a significant part of the spectrum, an exception being for the energy region 30-100 keV. Re-evaluation of existing scattering cross-sections would be useful, as would possible geometrical effects of the scattering arrangement used herein. Present efforts seek to contribute to the evaluation of electron scattering cross-sections and improvement in theoretical models

  16. Optical and X-ray studies of Compact X-ray Binaries in NGC 5904

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalotia, Vanshree; Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard

    2018-06-01

    Due to their high stellar densities, globular cluster systems trigger various dynamical interactions, such as the formation of compact X-ray binaries. Stellar collisional frequencies have been correlated to the number of X-ray sources detected in various clusters and we hope to measure this correlation for NGC 5904. Optical fluxes of sources from archival HST images of NGC 5904 have been measured using a DOLPHOT PSF photometry in the UV, optical and near-infrared. We developed a data analysis pipeline to process the fluxes of tens of thousands of objects using awk, python and DOLPHOT. We plot color magnitude diagrams in different photometric bands in order to identify outliers that could be X-ray binaries, since they do not evolve the same way as singular stars. Aligning previously measured astrometric data for X-ray sources in NGC 5904 from Chandra with archival astrometric data from HST will filter out the outlier objects that are not X-ray producing, and provide a sample of compact binary systems that are responsible for X-ray emission in NGC 5904. Furthermore, previously measured X-ray fluxes of NGC 5904 from Chandra have also been used to measure the X-ray to optical flux ratio and identify the types of compact X-ray binaries responsible for the X-ray emissions in NGC 5904. We gratefully acknowledge the support from the Illinois Space Grant Consortium.

  17. The early X-ray afterglows of optically bright and dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi-Qing

    2006-01-01

    A systematical study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift has been presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs. Among them 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes ($F_{X}$), the gamma-ray fluxes ($S_{\\gamma}$), and the ratio ($R_{\\gamma, X}$) for both the D-GRBs and B-GRBs are similar. The differences of these distributions for the two kinds of GRBs shoul...

  18. Design and production of sintered {beta}-tricalcium phosphate 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Carlos F.L. [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Silva, Abilio P. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespaciais, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Lopes, Luis [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Pires, Ines [Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica - Lisboa (IDMEC Lisboa/IST/UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, Ilidio J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal)

    2012-07-01

    The characteristics of sintered {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffolds produced by 3D printing were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, uniaxial compression tests and cytotoxicity tests, using human osteoblast cells. The results reported include details of the {beta}-TCP scaffolds' porosity, density, phase stability, mechanical behavior and cytotoxic profile. Collectively, these properties are fundamental for the future application of these scaffolds as bone substitutes for individualized therapy. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) 3D scaffolds were produced by rapid prototyping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffold properties were assessed by SEM, FTIR, XRD and by mechanical tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxic profile of the scaffolds was characterized by in vitro assays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffolds have good properties for its application as bone substitutes for individualized therapy.

  19. Physics of magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Priest, E. R.; Lee, L. C.

    The present work encompasses papers on the structure, waves, and instabilities of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), photospheric flux tubes (PFTs), the structure and heating of coronal loops, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds, flux ropes in planetary ionospheres, the magnetopause, magnetospheric field-aligned currents and flux tubes, and the magnetotail. Attention is given to the equilibrium of MFRs, resistive instability, magnetic reconnection and turbulence in current sheets, dynamical effects and energy transport in intense flux tubes, waves in solar PFTs, twisted flux ropes in the solar corona, an electrodynamical model of solar flares, filament cooling and condensation in a sheared magnetic field, the magnetopause, the generation of twisted MFRs during magnetic reconnection, ionospheric flux ropes above the South Pole, substorms and MFR structures, evidence for flux ropes in the earth magnetotail, and MFRs in 3D MHD simulations.

  20. Extração, estruturas e propriedades de alfa- e beta-quitina

    OpenAIRE

    Campana-Filho,Sergio P.; Britto,Douglas de; Curti,Elisabete; Abreu,Fernanda R.; Cardoso,Marcia B.; Battisti,Marcos V.; Sim,Priscilla C.; Goy,Rejane C.; Signini,Roberta; Lavall,Rodrigo L.

    2007-01-01

    The fact that alpha- and beta-chitin adopt different arrays in the solid state is explored to emphasize their different properties and distinct spectral characteristics and X ray diffraction patterns. The methods for their extraction from the biomass in view of the preservation of their native structures and aiming to fulfill the claims of purity and uniformity for potential applications are discussed. The different arrays adopted by alpha- and beta-chitin also result in distinct reactivities...

  1. Continuous measurement of neutron flux with the help of a converter; Mesure continue des flux de neutrons a l'aide d'un dispositif convertisseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, P; Sciers, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The device described in this report is working from this following principle: an element, the thermal neutron activate of which has a short period and is emitter of a {beta} particle, is surrounded with a dielectric which is itself surrounded by a conducting metal. {beta} particles are stopped in the conducting metal. Thus an electric current rises between the emitter element and the collector metal. The experimental study has been-done with rhodium as emitter. The linearity as function of thermal flux of the power of the pile, the accuracy, the efficiency of the device have been measured and are satisfactory. Just the stability of the measure equipment is not very good. This method gives, us at moment the instantaneous flux and the integrated flux, is well adapted for the measurements in pile to execute on loops. It is possible to continue to perfect the process. (authors) [French] Le dispositif decrit dans ce rapport fonctionne d'apres le principe suivant: un corps, dont le produit d'activation en neutrons thermiques a une courte periode et est emetteur d'une particule {beta}, est entoure d'un dielectrique lui-meme entoure d'un metal conducteur. Les particules {beta} sont arretees dans le metal conducteur. Il y a ainsi naissance d'un courant electrique entre le corps emetteur et le metal collecteur. L'etude experimentale a ete menee avec le rhodium comme emetteur. La linearite en fonction du flux thermique, de la puissance de la pile, la precision, le rendement du dispositif ont ete mesures et sont satisfaisants. Seule la stabilite de l'appareillage de mesure n'est pas tres bonne. Cette methode, qui peut nous donner a tout instant le flux instantane et le flux integre, est tout a fait adaptee aux mesures en pile a effectuer. sur des boucles. On peut poursuivre la mise au point du procede. (auteurs)

  2. Ultra high-energy cosmic ray composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longley, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Soudan 2 surface-underground cosmic ray experiment can simultaneously measure surface shower size, underground muon multiplicity, and underground muon separation for ultra high energy cosmic ray showers. These measurements are sensitive to the primary composition. Analysis for energies from 10 1 to 10 4 TeV favors a light flux consisting of predominantly H and He nuclei

  3. Cosmic Ray Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological observations do not require the dark matter particles to be absolutely stable. If they are indeed unstable, their decay into Standard Model particles might occur at a sufficiently large rate to allow the indirect detection of dark matter through an anomalous contribution to the high energy cosmic ray fluxes. We analyze the implications of the excess in the total electron plus positron flux and the positron fraction reported by the Fermi and PAMELA collaborations, respectively, for the scenario of decaying dark matter. We also discuss the constraints on this scenario from measurements of other cosmic ray species and the predictions for the diffuse gamma ray flux and the neutrino flux. In particular, we expect a sizable dipole-like anisotropy which may be observed in the near future by the Fermi-LAT.

  4. Ultraviolet photometry of the Cepheid beta Doradus from the ANS satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Lub, J; Pel, J W; Wesselius, P R

    1979-01-01

    Extensive satellite (ANS) and ground-based (VBLUW-system) photometry is presented for the Cepheid. These data cover the wavelength range 5500-1800 AA. The ANS photometry does not confirm the evidence for shock waves as found by Hutchinson et al. from OAO-2 ultraviolet photometry of beta Doradus. A comparison of the theoretical fluxes of Kurucz with the observed energy distributions of beta Doradus gives very good agreement in the wavelength range 5500-3300 AA. In the ultraviolet the agreement is still satisfactory around maximum light, but towards lower temperatures there appear discrepancies, particularly shortly after light minimum. The difference in these discrepancies on the rising and on the falling branches of the lightcurve indicates that the observed excess ultraviolet flux is probably partly due to that the observed excess ultraviolet flux is probably partly due to dynamical effects in the moving atmosphere of the Cepheid. (25 refs).

  5. Handling low radiation beta rays. No grave concerned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranab Kumar Mallick; Chandrasekher Chakrabotrty

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Autoradiography was done in monitoring the kinetics of spermatocytes labeled from their 'S' period with a view to estimating the duration of individual stages of meiosis and spermiogenesis in a large number of vertebrates from Fish to Mammals since 1970's during our research work in other University and the Genetics Laboratory, University of Burdwan, West Bengal. A pilot study was engineered by injecting intraperitoneally, or intratesticularly, or even directly into blood vessels in any vertebrate without any distinction of mammal or non-mammal, 05 μ Ci of 3 H TDR (Sp. Act. 14600 m ci/mM, BARC, Trombay). Exclusive studies had been made using isotopes at the level of Karyotypes and individual chromosomes were identified through autoradiography, Banding and Fluorescence microscopy but no chromosomal aberration has been noticed.

  6. Tables of double beta decay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyak, V.I. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)]|[Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Zdesenko, Y.G. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1995-12-31

    A compilation of experimental data on double beta decay is presented. The tables contain the most stringent known experimental limits or positive results of 2{beta} transitions of 69 natural nuclides to ground and excited states of daughter nuclei for different channels (2{beta}{sup -}; 2{beta}{sup +}; {epsilon}{beta}{sup +}; 2{epsilon}) and modes (0{nu}; 2{nu}; 0{nu}M) of decay. (authors). 189 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Beta Instability and Stochastic Market Weights

    OpenAIRE

    David H. Goldenberg

    1985-01-01

    An argument is given for individual firm beta instability based upon the stochastic character of the market weights defining the market portfolio and the constancy of its beta. This argument is generalized to market weighted portfolios and the form of the stochastic process generating betas is linked to that of the market return process. The implications of this analysis for adequacy of models of beta nonstationarity and estimation of betas are considered in light of the available empirical e...

  8. Cosmic rays and the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfendale, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    It is inevitable that there is a close connection between cosmic rays and the ISM insofar as the propagation of cosmic rays is conditioned by the magnetic field in the ISM and the cosmic rays interact with the gas (and photon fluxes) in this medium. This paper deals with both topics. Propagation effects manifest themselves as an anisotropy in arrival directions and a review is given of anisotropy measurements and their interpretation. The status of studies of cosmic ray interactions is examined whit particular reference to the information about the ISM itself which comes from observations of the flux of secondary γ-rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with gas, the situation regarding molecular as in the Inner Galaxy being of particular concern

  9. Signal and background studies for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay in GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay in Ge-76, by operating bare HPGe detectors in ultra-pure liquid Ar. This dissertation presents a first decomposition of the background measured in the current data-taking phase. The background at the energy of interest was found to be dominated by 214 Bi, 208 Tl and 42 K gamma-rays, with secondary contributions from 42 K and 214 Bi beta-rays, and 210 Po alpha-rays. For the forthcoming upgrade of the apparatus, a new HPGe detector design (BEGe) has been studied, with focus on its capability of suppressing the identified backgrounds through pulse shape analysis. This included the development of a comprehensive modeling of the detectors and the experimental characterization of their response to surface interactions. The achieved results show that GERDA can improve the present limit on the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life by an order of magnitude.

  10. Emergence of Twisted Magnetic Flux Related Sigmoidal Brightening ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    We have examined the morphological properties of a sigmoid associated with an SXR. (soft X ray) flare. The sigmoid is cospatial with the EUV (extreme ultra violet) images and in the optical part lies along an S shaped Hα filament. The photoheliogram shows flux emergence within an existing δ type sunspot which has.

  11. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  12. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Current status of personnel monitoring for beta particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-01-01

    From 1975 to 1982, a concerted effort was made to develop a uniform procedure to test the performance of personnel dosimetry processors throughout the United States. The heart of this effort is a standard developed by the Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) and adopted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as ANSI N13.11-1982. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored a five year pilot study of this Standard which included three trial tests in which approximately 80 dosimetry processors participated. The Standard has made several contributions to the art and science of personnel monitoring for beta particles. First, the Standard defines test categories for beta particles and mixtures of beta particles plus gamma rays in addition to test categories for other types of radiation. Second, it defines a reference beta-particle source for test purposes. Third, it provides test criteria which are used to determine acceptable performance by a processor. The pilot study provided information on the state of the art of personnel monitoring within the bounds of the Standard. In addition, since the pilot study was advertised as the forerunner of a future mandatory certification program for dosimetry processors throughout the United States, considerable attention was given to personnel monitoring in general, and beta particles in particular. This paper discusses specific contibutions of the HPSSC/ANSI Standard and the pilot study to beta-particle dosimetry. The results of the three tests of the pilot study are summarized. The paper also amplifies on the needs to define the monitoring particle sources clearly

  14. Cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    In this talk I will review results of cosmic ray observations at the highest energies. This year the new results on energy spectra, composition and the study of arrival directions of cosmic ray primaries came from the Telescope Array collaboration. I present these results in comparison with measurements done by other recent experiments and discuss their implications for the search of cosmic ray sources. Some related results in gamma-ray astronomy and selected recent advances in theory are also covered. (author)

  15. Critical heat flux evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1995-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  16. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Eiji; Tai, Ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the measuring accuracy and the reponse time within an allowable range in accordance with the change of neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Constitution: Neutron fluxes within a nuclear reactor pressure vessel are detected by detectors, converted into pulse signals and amplified in a range switching amplifier. The amplified signals are further converted through an A/D converter and digital signals from the converter are subjected to a square operation in an square operation circuit. The output from the circuit is inputted into an integration circuit to selectively accumulate the constant of 1/2n, 1 - 1/2n (n is a positive integer) respectively for two continuing signals to perform weighing. Then, the addition is carried out to calculate the integrated value and the addition number is changed by the chane in the number n to vary the integrating time. The integrated value is inputted into a control circuit to control the value of n so that the fluctuation and the calculation time for the integrated value are within a predetermined range and, at the same time, the gain of the range switching amplifier is controlled. (Seki, T.)

  17. Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

    2015-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

  18. Development of a new family of conformationally restricted peptides as potent nucleators of beta-turns. Design, synthesis, structure, and biological evaluation of a beta-lactam peptide analogue of melanostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Claudio; Aizpurua, Jesus M; Benito, Ana; Miranda, José Ignacio; Fratila, Raluca M; Matute, Carlos; Domercq, Maria; Gago, Federico; Martin-Santamaria, Sonsoles; Linden, Anthony

    2003-12-31

    Novel enantiopure (i)-(beta-lactam)-(Gly)-(i+3) peptide models, defined by the presence of a central alpha-alkyl-alpha-amino-beta-lactam ring placed as the (i+1) residue, have been synthesized in a totally stereocontrolled way by alpha-alkylation of suitable N-[bis(trimethylsilyl)methyl]-beta-lactams. The structural properties of these beta-lactam pseudopeptides have been studied by X-ray crystallography, Molecular Dynamics simulation, and NOESY-restrained NMR simulated annealing techniques, showing a strong tendency to form stable type II or type II' beta-turns either in the solid state or in highly coordinating DMSO solutions. Tetrapeptide models containing syn- or anti-alpha,beta-dialkyl-alpha-amino-beta-lactam rings have also been synthesized and their conformations analyzed, revealing that alpha-alkyl substitution is essential for beta-turn stabilization. A beta-lactam analogue of melanostatin (PLG amide) has also been prepared, characterized as a type-II beta-turn in DMSO-d6 solution, and tested by competitive binding assay as a dopaminergic D2 modulator in rat neuron cultured cells, displaying moderate agonist activity in the micromolar concentration range. On the basis of these results, a novel peptidomimetic design concept, based on the separation of constraint and recognition elements, is proposed.

  19. Smart Beta or Smart Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kenneth Lillelund; Steenstrup, Søren Resen

    2016-01-01

    that smart beta investing probably will do better than passive market capitalization investing over time, we believe many are coming to a conclusion too quickly regarding active managers. Institutional investors are able to guide managers through benchmarks and risk frameworks toward the same well......Smart beta has become the flavor of the decade in the investment world with its low fees, easy access to rewarded risk premiums, and appearance of providing good investment results relative to both traditional passive benchmarks and actively managed funds. Although we consider it well documented......-documented smart beta risk premiums and still motivate active managers to avoid value traps, too highly priced small caps, defensives, etc. By constructing the equity portfolios of active managers that resemble the most widely used risk premiums, we show that the returns and risk-adjusted returns measures...

  20. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic high-energy neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    Production spectra of high-energy neutrinos from galactic cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray interactions with microwave blackbody photons are presented and discussed. These production processes involve the decay of charged pions and are thus related to the production of cosmic γ-rays from the decay of neutral pions. Estimates of the neutrino fluxes from various diffuse cosmic sources are then made, and the reasons for significant differences with previous estimates are discussed. Small predicted event rates for a DUMAND type detection system, combined with a possible significant flux of prompt neutrinos from the atmosphere above 50 TeV, may make the study of diffuse extraterrestrial neutrinos more difficult than previously thought