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Sample records for beta emitting radionuclides

  1. Exposure of bremsstrahlung from beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjunatha, H.C. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560056, Karnataka (India)], E-mail: manjunathhc@rediffmail.com; Rudraswamy, B. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560056, Karnataka (India)

    2009-02-15

    There has been an increased interest in beta therapeutic nuclear medicine, which emits relatively high-energy (>1 MeV) {beta}-rays and the production in vivo of Bremsstrahlung sufficient for external imaging, the produced Bremsstrahlung radiation hazard warrants evaluation. The Bremsstrahlung dose from patient administered {beta}-ray emitted radionuclide has been calculated by extending the national council on Radiation Protection and measurement model of a point source in air to account for biologic elimination of activity. We have estimated the probability of bremsstrahlung production, specific Bremsstrahlung constant (defined by Zanzonico et al.) and activity (A{sub release}) in bone cortical, bone compact, different regions of tooth enamel (enamel dentin junction (EDJ), enamel middle surface, enamel inner surface), different regions of dentin (outer surface, middle surface, enamel dentin junction (EDJ)), soft tissue, lungs and skeleton for different therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclide. In the present calculations we have used modified atomic number (Z{sub mod}) defined for bremsstrahlung process. Proper localization and quantification of incorporated beta emitters in bone and tooth are possible, because Bremsstrahlung production is greater in bone and tooth than soft tissue due to their high modified atomic number (Z{sub mod}). Radionuclide therapy with pure {beta}-ray emitters emitted in bone, tooth, soft tissue, lungs and skeleton does not require medical confinement of patients for radiation protection.

  2. Toxicity studies of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of total dose and dose rate on the effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides is being studied in laboratory animals. The radionuclides are inhaled either in a relatively soluble form (90SrCl2, 144CeCl3, 91YCl3 or 137CsCl) or in a relatively insoluble form in fused aluminosilicate particles. The organs affected depend on the solubility and chemical characteristics of the radio isotopes. Studies with young adult dogs are complemented with comparable studies in other species (mice, rats and Syrian hamsters), with animals of different ages and with animals repeatedly exposed to 144Ce

  3. Toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides: an experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental approach to evaluation of the toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in laboratory animals is described. These radionuclides are being studied in both relatively soluble (90SrCl2, 144CeCl3, 91YCl3 or 137CsCl) and relatively insoluble aerosol forms (90Y, 91Y, 144Ce or 90Sr in fused aluminosilicate particles). Initial lung or whole-body radionuclide burdens were selected to result in early deaths due to severe lesions at the highest exposure levels, and more subtle changes, such as neoplasia, at the lower levels. The organs affected vary depending on the solubility and chemical characteristics of the isotope. For radionuclides inhaled in relatively soluble forms, long-term effects have been seen in the liver, skeleton, respiratory tract and other tissues. In contrast, long-term effects seen in the dogs exposed to relatively insoluble forms have been mainly associated with the lung and contiguous tissues. In all experiments, emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the influence of radiation dose rate and total dose on the resulting dose-response relationship. Over the mid-range of exposure levels, it will be possible to compare the radiation dose and biological response relationships for the several radioactive aerosols with their different radiation dose patterns. These studies with young adult dogs are complemented with comparable studies in other species (mice, rats and Syrian hamsters) and with animals of different ages (immature, aged). This basic approach, with emphasis on factors that alter the resulting radiation dose pattern, offers the maximum likelihood of meeting the continuing, and not always predictable, needs for information on the toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides that may be encountered in nuclear industry operations

  4. Toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides: an experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental approach to evaluation of the toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in experimental animals is described. Graded levels of these radionuclides are being studied in both relatively soluble (90SrCl2, 144CeCl3, 91YCl3, 137CsCl) and relatively insoluble forms (90Y, 91Y, 144Ce and 90Sr in fused clay particles). Initial lung or whole-body activity burdens were selected to result in early deaths due to severe lesions at the highest levels, deaths at later times with moderate to marked pathologic changes and more subtle changes such as neoplasia at the lower levels. The organs affected vary depending on the solubility and chemical characteristics of the isotope. For radionuclides inhaled in relatively soluble forms, long-term effects have been seen in the liver, skeleton, and other tissues in addition to some pulmonary effects. In contrast, long-term effects seen in the dogs exposed to relatively insoluble forms have been mainly associated with the lung and contiguous tissues. In the latter experiments, emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the influence of radiation dose rate and total dose on the resulting dose-response relationship. Over the mid-range of the relationship between radiation dose and biological response, it will be possible to compare the relationships for the several radioactive aerosols with their different radiation dose patterns. These studies with young adult dogs are complemented with comparable studies in other species (mice, Syrian hamsters) and with animals of different ages (immature, aged). This basic approach, with emphasis on factors that alter the resulting radiation dose pattern, offers the maximum likelihood of meeting the continuing, and not always predictable, needs for information on the toxicity of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides that may be encountered in nuclear industry operations. (U.S.)

  5. Toxicity studies of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides - status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of total dose and dose rate pattern on the effects of inhaled β-emitting radionuclides is being studied in laboratory animals. The inhaled radionuclides were either in a relatively soluble form (90SrCl2, 144CeCl3, 91YCl3, or 137CsCl), or in a relatively insoluble form in fused aluminosilicate particles. The organs affected depend on the solubility and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides. Studies with young adult dogs are complemented by comparable studies in other species (mice, rats, and Syrian hamsters), with animals of different ages and animals repeatedly exposed to 144Ce. 12 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  6. A search for cosmogenic production of $\\beta$-neutron emitting radionuclides in water

    CERN Document Server

    Dazeley, S; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N S; Jaffke, P; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Sweany, M

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first results of WATCHBOY, a water Cherenkov detector designed to measure the yield of $\\beta$-neutron emitting radionuclides produced by cosmic ray muons in water. In addition to the $\\beta$-neutron measurement, we also provide a first look at isolating single-$\\beta$ producing radionuclides following showering muons as a check of the detection capabilities of WATCHBOY. The data taken over $207$ live days indicates a $^{9}$Li production yield upper limit of $1.9\\times10^{-7}\\mu^{-1}g^{-1}\\mathrm{cm}^2$ at $\\sim400$ meters water equivalent (m.w.e.) overburden at the $90\\%$ confidence level. In this work the $^{9}$Li signal in WATCHBOY was used as a proxy for the combined search for $^{9}$Li and $^{8}$He production. This result will provide a constraint on estimates of antineutrino-like backgrounds in future water-based antineutrino detectors.

  7. Simulation of the dose rate per activity of beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose rate per activity was simulated for 10 beta-emitting radionuclides and for different activity distributions (point source, areal sources and a semi-infinite volume source). The results are given for 7 different distances from the source (from 0.01 to 2 m) for both contributions: the beta- and electron-emission, and the X- and gamma-emission. Data are provided for both operational quantities and organ doses: Hp(0.07), Hp(3), Hp(10), Hskin and Hlens. Finally, a software application to interpolate the dose rate per activity due to the beta-emission of arbitrary radionuclides is presented and a simple superposition of these data and of gamma-ray dose constants to calculate the total dose rate is described. (authors)

  8. Comparison of bone tumors induced by beta-emitting or alpha-emitting radionuclides: Schemes of pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life-span studies in Beagle dogs have documented the occurrence of bone tumors following exposure to bone-seeking alpha- or beta-emitting radionuclides administered by different routes of exposure. Bone tumors from dogs in four different life-span studies were analyzed according to tumor phenotype, tumor location, radiographic appearance, incidence of metastasis, and association with radiation osteodystrophy. Marked differences in these parameters were observed that did not correlate with differences in radionuclide type, route of exposure, or duration of radionuclide uptake. Radiation osteodystrophy, which is postulated to be a preneoplastic lesion, was not a significant component in one of the studies. Analysis of the data from these four studies suggests that at least two different mechanisms of bone tumor pathogenesis occur for radiation-induced bone tumors. (author)

  9. Measurement of beta emitting radionuclides in dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides for diagnostics purposes like Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67 and In-111 are measured by using ionization type of dose calibrators. Therapeutic radionuclides, which emit both beta and gamma rays are detected by the same type of dose calibrators. Other therapeutic products like Y-90, P-32 and Sr-89 are pure beta emitters and they are gaining wider utility because various new therapy radiopharmaceuticals are being developed. The type of container material, like glass or plastic, may seriously affect radioactivity measurement due to attenuation, Since it is crucial to give the exact amount of radioactivity to the patient for therapy purposes, dedicated dose calibrators are specially manufactured for the measurement of these radionuclides. But these measuring systems are not widely available in nuclear medicine centers where therapy is applied to the patient. It is a known fact that dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments can be calibrated for vials and syringes using standard sources of the same radioisotope. The method of calibration of Y-90 measurement for two ionization chamber dose calibrators available in the institute will be summarized in this presentation. (author)

  10. A system for intercomparing standard solutions of beta-particle emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for intercomparing standard solutions of pure beta-particle emitting radionuclides is described. The CIEMAT/NIST technique of beta-particle efficiency tracing is based on establishing a parameter in a simple calculational model, using a 3H standard with comparable quenching. To produce a 3H-in-scintillator standard which is reasonably stable over the period of the measurements, we first standardized 3H-hexadecane solution by comparison with 3H-water standardized by gas counting. In the second phase of the work, the 3H-hexadecane solution was used to standardize 14C-hexadecane and 99Tc-tricaprylamine (TCA). Measurements were made under similar geometrical and quenching conditions for each radionuclide with a commercial scintillator and a conventional liquid-scintillation counter with two phototubes operating in coincidence. The technique was then tested at different sites in the area using a set of flame-sealed vials and state-of-the-art liquid-scintillation counters. Initial results for the 90Tc-TCA and the 1981 99Tc, Standard Material (SRM) 4288 show an agreement to within 0.30%. (orig.)

  11. Nasal carcinomas in beagle dogs after inhalatioon of relatively soluble forms of beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to relatively soluble forms of three beta-emitting radionuclides and are being held for life span observation to evaluate hazards associated with nuclear power production. Dogs were exposed to graded activity levels of 91YCl3, 144CeCl3 or 90SrCl2. With 91YCl3 and 144CeCl3, significant radiation dose was delivered to liver, respiratory tract, and skeleton. With 90SrCl2, the dose was essentially to skeleton. Nasal cavity squamous cell carcinomas have been the most frequent neoplasms in the 91Y and one of the most frequent in the 144Ce study while relatively few have been seen after 90Sr exposure. Also one nasal cavity hemangiosarcoma was seen in the 144Ce study. The 90Sr-exposed dogs have survived longer after exposure and have higher skeletal radiation doses than do the dogs exposed to 91Y or 144Ce. The greater incidence of nasal carcinomas can be explained by the finding of high concentrations of the lanthanides, 91Y and 144Ce, associated with the nasal turbinate epithelium

  12. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Gray, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from /sup 147/Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from /sup 90/Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from 147Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from 90Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Effective local control of malignant melanoma by intratumoural injection of a beta-emitting radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    tumours demonstrated central necrosis and peripheral residual cells with progressive cytoplasmic and nuclear swelling without apoptotic features. Expression of proteins and mRNAs of p53 and bax increased until 3 days, as compared with 48 h for p21; thereafter, the expression gradually decreased. TUNEL-positive nuclei could be seen from 2 days until 2 weeks after treatment. Flow cytometry did not demonstrate an increase in apoptotic features as compared with the control animals. In conclusion, intratumoural injection of the unsealed beta-emitting radionuclide 166Ho appears to be a promising alternative radiotherapeutic modality for the local control of malignant melanoma. The main cell death mechanisms with this technique seem to be radiation-induced central necrosis and peripheral growth arrest or secondary necrosis of tumour cells, rather than apoptosis. (orig/MG) (orig.)

  15. Studies on stabilities of some human chorionic gonadotropin complexes with {beta}-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Moumita [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Kamalika [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sen, Souvik [Malda Town Divisional Railway Hospital, Malda 732102 (India); Lahiri, Susanta, E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone, whose one of the structural subunits is identical to that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). As a consequence, the receptors of TSH also act as receptor for hCG hormone. Keeping in mind this interesting property of hCG we have studied the complex formation ability of various no-carrier-added {beta}-emitting isotopes of {sup 61}Cu (3.3 h), {sup 62}Zn (9.2 h), {sup 90}Nb (14.60 h) and {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) with hCG molecule. Stability of the hCG-M (M=metal ions) complexes was investigated by dialysis with respect to triple distilled water and ringer lactate solution, which has the same composition as extracellular fluid.

  16. Dose per unit cumulated activity (S-values) for e− and beta emitting radionuclides in cancer cell models calculated by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell dosimetry is relevant regarding new efforts in specific molecular radiotherapy using Auger, CE and beta emitters. Absorbed dose in cells can be obtained by means of the dose per unit cumulated activity (S-values), together with the activity distribution. In this work, Monte Carlo simulation codes PENELOPE and MCNPX were used to obtain cellular S-values for point and extended sources of electrons and beta emitting radionuclides in the nucleus of breast (MDA-MB231, MCF7) and prostate (PC3) cancer cell models. - Highlights: • Cellular S-values were calculated using Penelope and MCPNX Monte Carlo codes. • S-values were obtained for e− and beta emitting radionuclides in cancer cell models. • Breast (MDA-MB231, MCF7) and prostate (PC3) cancer cell models were investigated. • Results are relevant for specific targeted molecular radiotherapy cell dosimetry

  17. Life-span health effects of relatively soluble forms of internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a large research effort to study the lifetime health risks of inhaled radionuclides, Beagle dogs inhaled 90SrCl2 or 144CeCl3 or were injected intravenously with 137CsCl. Because these three compounds were soluble in body fluids, the resulting widely differing patterns of radionuclide distribution and dose reflected tissue affinities of the elements involved. Long-term health effects, predominantly cancers, were seen in the organs receiving the highest doses. Investigations are continuing on the extent to which other less irradiated organs may have also been affected

  18. Screening procedures for alpha, beta and gamma emitting radionuclides in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gross actinide and beta screening methods currently used by the Bioassay Laboratory at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories have been documented and tested. The gross gamma method has also been documented. The gross actinide method was tested with Th-nat, Pu-239, Np-237, Am-241 and Cm-244 and the average percent recoveries were 90, 99, 45, 72 and 78, respectively. The gross beta method was tested with Sr-90/Y-90, Ce-144/Pr-144, Pm-147 and Ba-133 and the average percent recoveries were 78, 100, 46 and 46, respectively. Detection limits for the gross actinide (alpha) method are found to be about 0.4 mBq and about 39 mBq for the gross beta method

  19. Influence of variations in dose and dose rates on biological effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects of inhaled β-emitting radionuclides, 90Y, 91Y, 144Ce and 90Sr, are being investigated in beagle dogs that received single acute exposures at 12 to 14 months of age. The aerosols studied have included 91YC13,144CeC13, 90SrC12, and 90Y, 91Y, 144Ce or 90Sr in aluminosilicate particles. Thus, 91YCl3, 144CeCl3 and the aluminosilicate containing radionuclide particles all resulted in significant exposures to lung; 91YC13, 144CeC13 an 90SrC12 resulted in significant exposures to bone; 91YC13 and 144 CeC13 resulted in significant exposures to liver. The higher initial doserate exposures have been more effective than low dose-rate exposures on a per-rad basis in producing early effects. To date (144CeO2, it was observed that, on a μCi initial lung burden per kilogram body weight basis, mice did not develop pulmonary tumours whereas beagle dogs did. To fid out the reason for this observation mice have been repeatedly exposed by inhalation to 144CeO2 to maintain lung burdens of 144Ce that resulted in radiation dose rates similar to that observed in beagle dogs. Several of the repeatedly exposed mice developed malignant pulmonary tumours. Thus, with similar dose rates and cumulative doses to the lung, mice and dogs responded in a similar manner to chronic β radiation

  20. Comparison of the effects of inhaled alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides on pulmonary function in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterations of pulmonary function in representative groups of dogs developing nonneoplastic lung disease, after single inhalation exposures to cerium-144 or plutonium-238 in relatively insoluble particulate forms, were compared. The inhaled particles had similar aerodynamic diameters and effective half-lives of retention in the lung. The mean initial lung burdens of the 144Ce- and 238Pu-exposed groups were 51 and 0.65 μCi/kg of body weight, respectively. Because of the respective ranges of the beta emissions from 144Ce and the alpha emissions from 238Pu, the lungs of the 144Ce-exposed dogs were relatively uniformly irradiated, whereas only approximately 6% of the lung tissue of rates to the 238Pu-exposed dogs was irradiated. The calculated average dose rates to the irradiated tissue were similar for both radionuclides. Pulmonary function was measured serially without sedation. Both groups developed progressive, restrictive lung disease, which ended in death from pulmonary failure. Dogs that inhaled 144Ce had an early reduction of CO diffusing capacity followed by a progressive mechanical and gas-exchange impairment similar to that reported for dogs and men exposed to external irradiation. Dogs that inhaled 238Pu had increased respiratory frequencies which often persisted for months before mechanical and gas-exchange abnormalities became evident

  1. Acute toxicity of beta-emitting radionuclides that may be released in a reactor accident and ingested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckling, weanling, and adult rats received 106Ru--106Rh by gavage and adult beagle dogs ingested 106Ru--106Rh to determine the toxicity of this high-energy (1.4 MeV av) β-emitting nuclide pair. The LD50's for suckling, weanling, and adult rats were 1.5, 18, and 9.0 mCi/kg, respectively. Adult rats were given 147Pm by gavage to determine if a low-energy (0.06 MeV av) β emitter could also cause death by damaging the bowel. The LD50 of 147Pm in rats was about 5 Ci/kg. The calculated radiation doses absorbed in the target cells at the LD50 level were approximately the same for the two radionuclides (3500 rad), although the doses at the mucosal surface differed widely. The LD50 for 106Ru--106Rh in dogs was about 3.5 mCi/kg. Dosimeters placed beneath the mucosa in dogs indicated that the radiation dose to the target cells that caused death from 106Ru--106Rh was about the same as it was for rats. The signs of intestinal injury, their duration, and the probabilities of tissue repair were much different in the dog than in the rat. The midcolon and lower colon of dogs were usually denuded at focal sites after ingestion of 2.5 to 4.0 mCi/kg, and frequently that damage was irreversible. The fatal consequence of severe mucosal damage was averted in two dogs by colectomy and an ileorectal anastomosis

  2. Assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. Recommendations and proposals for lines of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system with well-established relevance for the management and prevention of exposures. Despite this, there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that this system is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures, particularly when incorporated radionuclides decay, emitting electrons. Criticisms of the system particularly pertain to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides, the intake of which can occur during environmental and industrial exposures or, simply, during a medical use of ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. These debates result from a lack of data in the fields of dosimetry and toxicology of these radionuclides. Auger and beta emitters can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of electrons in matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions, not taken into account in conventional dosimetry methods, which make the assumption of uniform energy depositions. These specific physical and biochemical features of some of these radionuclides seem to influence their cellular toxicity directly. It is thus established that intranuclear distribution of iodine-125 is more effective for the induction of mutations or even cell death than a cytosolic distribution. This point is explained by the very short range of Auger electrons in matter (around a few dozen nm), which, in the case of an intranuclear distribution, would deliver all of their energy in the vicinity of the DNA, which, if affected, would be detrimental to the survival of the cell. The observation

  3. Comparison of the effects of inhaled alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides on pulmonary function of the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary function changes of representative dogs after inhalation of a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles and 238PuO2 were compared. Both radionuclide forms had approximately the same effective half-life, but the 238PuO2 irradiated 11 percent of the lung while the 144Ce irradiated 100 percent. Both groups developed restrictive lung disease progressing to pulmonary failure but the sequence of functional changes differed. The first change in dogs that inhaled 144Ce was a reduced CO diffusing capacity followed later by changes in breathing pattern, lung compliance and alveolar-capillary O2 exchange. The first change in dogs that inhaled 238PuO2 was an increase in respiratory frequency which persisted for several months before nearly simultaneous changes in diffusing capacity, compliance and gas mixing. An impairment in alveolar-capillary O2 exchange occurred later in dogs that inhaled 238PuO2. Functional alterations of both groups in pulmonary failure were similar. The differences in the pattern of functional changes were thought to be related to differences in dose pattern, but the exact relationships are unknown

  4. Significance of residual activity due to long-lived beta emitting radionuclides in reflectors and biological shield of research reactor, CIRUS - for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor system and structural components (SSCs) develop residual activity due to neutron irradiation during the operation of the reactor. The neutron activated components, are of significance in any planning of decommissioning of the reactors. Within the wide spectrum of radionuclides representing the radioactive inventory of a shut down nuclear facility, there are several radionuclides, mainly long lived, low energy beta emitters which pose a concern in long term waste management program. Even though in terms of radiation level, 60Co will be most predominant after few years of shutdown, long lived activation products like 59Ni, 63Ni, 55Fe, 14C and 3H etc. contribute to major activity on the irradiated structural components and would be of concern in the long term waste management. Quantification of such nuclides are essential for release of materials for reuse and recycling as per the clearance levels prescribed by the regulatory body. An attempt is made in this work to evaluate the significance of such radionuclides in the Graphite reflector and concrete bio-shield of CIRUS. (author)

  5. Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, cancer treatments mainly rely on surgery or external beam radiation to remove or destroy bulky tumors. Chemotherapy is given when tumours cannot be removed or when dissemination is suspected. However, these approaches cannot permanently treat all cancers and relapse occurs in up to 50% of the patients’ population. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) are effective against some disseminated and metastatic diseases, although they are rarely curative. Most preclinical and clinical developments in this field have involved electron-emitting radionuclides, particularly iodine-131, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The large range of the electrons emitted by these radionuclides reduces their efficacy against very small tumour cell clusters or isolated tumour cells present in residual disease and in many haematological tumours (leukaemia, myeloma). The range of alpha particles in biological tissues is very short, less than 0.1 mm, which makes alpha emitters theoretically ideal for treatment of such isolated tumour cells or micro-clusters of malignant cells. Thus, over the last decade, a growing interest for the use of alpha-emitting radionuclides has emerged. Research on targeted alpha therapy (TAT) began years ago in Nantes through cooperation between Subatech, a nuclear physics laboratory, CRCNA, a cancer research centre with a nuclear oncology team and ITU (Karlsruhe, Germany). CD138 was demonstrated as a potential target antigen for Multiple Myeloma, which is a target of huge clinical interest particularly suited for TAT because of the disseminated nature of the disease consisting primarily of isolated cells and small clusters of tumour cells mainly localized in the bone marrow. Thus anti-CD138 antibodies were labelled with bismuth-213 from actinium-225/bismuth-213 generators provided by ITU and used to target multiple myeloma cells. In vitro studies showed cell cycle arrest, synergism with chemotherapy and very little induction

  6. The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to short-range Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. State of the art and proposals for lines of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system although there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that it is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures. One of the specific issues of internal exposure involves short-range radiations such as Auger and beta particles. Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to their chemical nature and the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of the low-energy electrons in biological matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions and exacerbate radiotoxic responses at cellular level. These particularities in energy distribution and cellular responses are not taken into account by the conventional methods for the assessment of risk. Alternative systems have been proposed, based on dosimetry conducted at the cellular or even molecular level, whose purpose is to determine the energy deposition occurring within the DNA molecule. However, calculation of absorbed doses at the molecular level is not sufficient to ensure a better assessment of the risks incurred. Favouring such a microdosimetric approach for the risk assessments would require a comprehensive knowledge of the biological targets of radiation, the dose–response relationships at the various levels of organisation, and the mechanisms leading from cellular energy deposition to the appearance of a health detriment. The required knowledge is not fully available today and it is not yet possible to link an intracellular energy deposition to a probability of occurrence of health effects or to use methods based on cellular

  7. Monte Carlo investigation of single cell beta dosimetry for intraperitoneal radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, A M [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Kirkby, C [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Riauka, T A [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B G [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); McQuarrie, S A [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, 3118 Dentistry/Pharmacy Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada)

    2004-05-21

    Single event spectra for five beta-emitting radionuclides (Lu-177, Cu-67, Re-186, Re-188, Y-90) were calculated for single cells from two source geometries. The first was a surface-bound isotropically emitting point source and the second was a bath of free radioactivity in which the cell was submerged. Together these represent a targeted intraperitoneal radionuclide therapy. Monoenergetic single event spectra were calculated over an energy range of 11 keV to 2500 keV using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. Radionuclide single event spectra were constructed by weighting monoenergetic single event spectra according to radionuclide spectra appropriate for each source geometry. In the case of surface-bound radioactivity, these were radionuclide beta decay spectra. For the free radioactivity, a continuous slowing down approximation spectrum was used that was calculated based on the radionuclide decay spectra. The frequency mean specific energy per event increased as the energy of the beta emitter decreased. This is because, at these energies, the stopping power of the electrons decreases with increasing energy. The free radioactivity produced a higher frequency mean specific energy per event than the corresponding surface-bound value. This was primarily due to the longer mean path length through the target for this geometry. This information differentiates the radionuclides in terms of the physical process of energy deposition and could be of use in the radionuclide selection procedure for this type of therapy.

  8. The assay of encapsulated beta-gamma emitting waste: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a discussion of the techniques and instrumentation available for the determination of Beta-Gamma emitting radionuclides in encapsulated radioactive waste. Where applicable, consideration has been given to the practical difficulties associated with the assay of certain waste forms. The levels of detection have been estimated but further work is required in this and other areas. A suggestion is made for incorporating the beta-gamma assay in the same facility as an alpha assay. (author)

  9. Metabolism and biological effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of much of the current and planned research on the toxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides is directed toward the complexities of actual and potential conditions of occupational environmental exposures of human beings. These, as well as the more limited studies on mechanisms of biological transport and effects, should increase our ability to predict health risks more accurately and to deal more confidently with human exposures, if and when they occur

  10. Assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. Recommendations and proposals for lines of research; L'evaluation et la gestion des risques associes aux expositions aux radionucleides emetteurs Auger et beta. Avis et propositions de pistes de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system with well-established relevance for the management and prevention of exposures. Despite this, there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that this system is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures, particularly when incorporated radionuclides decay, emitting electrons. Criticisms of the system particularly pertain to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides, the intake of which can occur during environmental and industrial exposures or, simply, during a medical use of ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. These debates result from a lack of data in the fields of dosimetry and toxicology of these radionuclides. Auger and beta emitters can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of electrons in matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions, not taken into account in conventional dosimetry methods, which make the assumption of uniform energy depositions. These specific physical and biochemical features of some of these radionuclides seem to influence their cellular toxicity directly. It is thus established that intranuclear distribution of iodine-125 is more effective for the induction of mutations or even cell death than a cytosolic distribution. This point is explained by the very short range of Auger electrons in matter (around a few dozen nm), which, in the case of an intranuclear distribution, would deliver all of their energy in the vicinity of the DNA, which, if affected, would be detrimental to the survival of the cell. The observation

  11. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire's theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer.

  12. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  13. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  14. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael C L

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is co...

  15. List of strong gamma-rays emitted from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a compilation of intense gamma-rays, with energy value greater than 1 keV, emitted from decay of radioactive nuclides. These gamma-rays are three strongest of gamma-rays originating from each radionuclide. These gamma-rays are listed in the order of increasing energy. The table contains the energy and the intensity of the gamma-rays, the parent nuclide, the decay mode and the half-life of the parent nuclide and the total number of gamma-rays originating from the nuclide, and is also accompanied with energies and intensities of other two of the three gamma-rays in the same row. The list can be used as a quick guide to identify radionuclides in gamma-ray spectrometry. An annex contains the list of radionuclides having no measured gamma-ray intensities, together with energy values of the gamma-rays. The numerical values given in the list are taken from the values adopted in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, as of February 1991. The list has also been prepared on a floppy diskette. (author)

  16. An advanced method of activity determination of large area beta emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented advanced method of activity determination of large area beta emitting sources is based on a version of efficiency tracing method using a test foil placed between the source and a conventional large area detector. It is shown that the total efficiency of the measuring system may depend on a dimensionless parameter derived from the difference in count rates caused by inserting the test foil while other disturbing effects are mostly reduced or compensated. - Highlights: • Efficiency tracing transmission method of beta activity determination. • Efficiency determined by means of a parameter independent of initial absorption conditions. • Parameter is derived from two counting results obtained with using a test foil. • Particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide standard sources

  17. Dose point kernels for beta-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the dose point kernel corresponding to a specific radionuclide is required to calculate the spatial dose distribution produced in a homogeneous medium by a distributed source. Dose point kernels for commonly used radionuclides have been calculated previously using as a basis monoenergetic dose point kernels derived by numerical integration of a model transport equation. The treatment neglects fluctuations in energy deposition, an effect which has been later incorporated in dose point kernels calculated using Monte Carlo methods. This work describes new calculations of dose point kernels using the Monte Carlo results as a basis. An analytic representation of the monoenergetic dose point kernels has been developed. This provides a convenient method both for calculating the dose point kernel associated with a given beta spectrum and for incorporating the effect of internal conversion. An algebraic expression for allowed beta spectra has been accomplished through an extension of the Bethe-Bacher approximation, and tested against the exact expression. Simplified expression for first-forbidden shape factors have also been developed. A comparison of the calculated dose point kernel for 32P with experimental data indicates good agreement with a significant improvement over the earlier results in this respect. An analytic representation of the dose point kernel associated with the spectrum of a single beta group has been formulated. 9 references, 16 figures, 3 tables

  18. Proficiency test of Ukrainian laboratories determination of gamma emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a world wide basis, it is now essential that laboratories participate in proficiency testing schemes that will provide an interpretation and assessment of results which is transparent to the participating laboratory and its 'users'. Participation in proficiency testing exercises provides also laboratories with an objective means of assessing and documenting the reliability of the data they are producing. Since the 1960s the International Atomic Energy Agency has played an important role assisting laboratories in Member States to improve the quality of their analytical results and their traceability to basic standards. This is accomplished through the provision of matrix reference materials and validated procedures, training in the implementation of quality control, and the evaluation of measurement performance by the organization of proficiency tests and intercomparison exercises. The Chemistry Unit is actively involved in the production and characterization of matrix reference materials of terrestrial origin, widely used for method and measurement validation and organization of proficiency tests and intercomparison exercises. The Chemistry Unit is a part of the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory. Within the frame of IAEA TC-project UKR/9/023 'Improvement of Environmental Radiation Monitoring' upon a request of State Committee of Nuclear Regulation of Ukraine (SCNRU) a proficiency test was organized and conducted by the Chemistry Unit. The proficiency test was addressed to assess the analytical performance of 7 laboratories from Ukraine on the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides in spiked soil and water. Soil and water test materials were prepared according to a validated procedure by the Chemistry Unit staff with the participation of a fellow from Ukrainian Hydrometeorological institute during his fellowship programme in Seibersdorf Laboratories. In January 2006 the 8 sets of test samples (1 soil sample and 4 water samples) and 6 soil

  19. Natural γ-ray-emitting radionuclides in Egyptian cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.M.EL-ARABI; A.ABBADY; A.H. EL-KAMEL; A. NOSIER; A. MOUSTAFA

    2005-01-01

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the raw materials have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to radionuclides of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K was found to be (20±4), (11± 2),(320±18) (gypsum), (41±8), (27±5), (410±27) (clay), (58±11), (18±3), (321±20) (iron ore) and (37.6±6), (11.8±3),phate resistant cement (S.R.C.), clinker and white cement, while the mean specific activities of 226Ra and 232Th are activities (concentrations) are in the same range as the data released in other countries. The calculated radiation hazard parameters for all the samples are still lower than the acceptable values in Egypt and other countries.

  20. Precise Proportional Counting of Beta-Ray Emitting Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of beta-ray emitting liquids are often assayed using an all-glass G-M counter where the liquid is placed between an outer cylinder and the counting tube (Veall-type counter). Besides the well-known disadvantages of G-M tubes, these jacketed counters are difficult to handle, fragile and apt to change their counting characteristics. A methane-flow proportional counter was developed in our Laboratory specifically for β-emitting liquid samples. The liquid is placed in a plastic cylinder with a bottom of aluminized mylar foil (1 mg/cm2). This vessel is screwed into the top of a circular proportional counter. In case of contamination, the vessel can be replaced. When the bottom foil is exchanged, a calibration curve, giving the efficiency as a function of the measured weight per unit area, may be used to obtain a new value for the efficiency. This counter was used successfully for the assay of 32P, 204Tl and 35S solutions giving results reproducible to ±0.2%. Compared with the jacketed counter, the counting efficiency of our counter is higher for low-energy β-emitters although somewhat lower for high-energy β-emitters. (author)

  1. Natural γ-ray-emitting radionuclides in Egyptian cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the raw materials have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to radionuclides of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K was found to be (20 ± 4), (11 ± 2), (320 ± 18) (gypsum), (41 ± 8), (27 ± 5), (410 ± 27) (clay), (58 ± 11), (18 ± 3), (321 ± 20) (iron ore) and (37.6 ± 6), (11.8 ± 3), (178.6 ± 15) Bq·kg-1 (Portland cement), respectively. 40K concentration could not be detected in slag, limestone, sul- phate resistant cement (S.R.C.), clinker and white cement, while the mean specific activities of 226Ra and 232Th are (239 ± 16), (48.7 ± 7); (31.5 ± 5), (10 ± 2); (47 ± 7), (20 ± 5); (23 ± 5), (10.4 ± 3) and (23 ± 5), (11 ± 3) Bq·kg-1, respectively. The activities (concentrations) are in the same range as the data released in other countries. The calculated radiation hazard parameters for all the samples are still lower than the acceptable values in Egypt and other countries. (authors)

  2. The removal of alpha-emitting radionuclides from liquid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World-wide experience on the removal of alpha-emitting radionuclides from liquid waste streams is reviewed with particular emphasis on waste streams from reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuel and on countries other than the United Kingdom. Current practice concentrates on the use of precipitation and evaporation, either singly or in combination, for the treatment of these waste streams. (author)

  3. Activity concentrations and mean annual effective dose from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Lebanese diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the primary factor contributing to the internal effective dose in the human organism is contaminated food, the control of radionuclides in food represents the most important means of protection. This study was conducted to determine the levels of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to gamma-emitting radioisotopes. The activity concentrations of gamma-emitting radioisotopes have been measured in food samples that represent the market basket of an adult urban population in Lebanon. The artificial radionuclide 137Cs was measured above detection limits in only fish, meat and milk-based deserts. The most abundant natural radionuclide was 40K (31-121 Bq kg-1), with the highest content in fish and meat samples. The annual mean effective dose contributed by 40K in the reference typical diet was estimated equal to 186 μSv y-1, a value reasonably consistent with findings reported by several other countries. (authors)

  4. Bioaccumulation of gamma emitting radionuclides in Polysiphonia fucoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents the results of a study on the bioaccumulation abilities of Polysiphonia fucoides, a red algae specific to the southern Baltic Sea, towards (of) gamma emitting isotopes. A laboratory experiment was carried out to determine changes in the activities of some isotopes - 54Mn, 57Co, 65Zn, 110mAg, 113Sn, 134Cs, 137Cs and 241Am - occurring in P. fucoides exposed to a seawater medium containing these isotopes over the course of 1 month. All analyzed isotopes showed the greatest increase of radioactive activity in plant tissue in the first 24 h of exposure. The temporary concentration factors of cesium isotopes were increasing linearly during the experiment from 114 to 274 in the case of 137Cs, and from 144 to 351 in the case of 134Cs. The level of the initial concentration factor of cesium isotopes in the plant proved to be independent of the initial concentration of the isotope in seawater and it took the lowest (125 dm3 kg-1) level among the studied isotopes. In the case of a mixture of gamma emitting isotopes, a linear relation between the individual isotope activity in P. fucoides and its initial concentration in seawater was established after the first day of exposure; the isotopes initial concentration factors ranged from 767 to 874 dm3 kg-1. Having reached the maximal concentration level, a statistically significant decline in radioactivity concentrations of the five isotopes in the plant tissue was observed. A half-life of biological removal of the isotopes from the plant tissue was established at: 3.8 days in the case of 54Mn, 4 days-57Co, 4 days-60Co, 4.2 days-137Cs and 241Am-3.5 days. (author)

  5. Faunal effects on the distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides in four forested soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four forested, well drained surface horizons of soils representing the range of textures located in the Lake Erie Basin of Southern Ontario were sampled in 1 cm increments to a depth of 15 cm. Gamma emitting radionuclides of natural sources, 40K, 214Bi (238U daughter), and 208Tl (232Th daughter), are distributed as a function of texture over the 15 cm depth. Increasing clay content results in increased retention of these isotopes. The 40K distribution is a result of the amount of organic carbon present. Increased organic carbon results in increased weathering and lower 40K values. Differing earthworm activity results in distinct distributions of 137Cs, a gamma emitting radionuclide from bomb fallout, within the four soils. Larger numbers and biomass of anecic earthworms in finer textured soils result in a linear distribution of 137Cs with depth. Endogeous species in the coarsest textured soil result in little incorporation of 137Cs with depth

  6. A practical experimental approach for the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents a practical and cost saving approach for the experimental efficiency calibration of a coaxial n-type high-purity germanium detector (HPGe), with the intended use in routine laboratory measurements of all gamma emitting radionuclides in different environmental volumetric samples. The calibration was performed using the 238U and 232Th natural radionuclide chains in secular equilibrium, and additionally KCl salt of analytical purity, covering the energy range between 26 and 1461 keV. The performance evaluation in the worldwide proficiency test (PT) organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2013 confirmed the reliability of the analytical measurement results provided by this experimental approach for both natural and artificial radionuclides. Yet, further consideration is needed in the low energy range regarding the effect of the sample composition on the self-absorption and geometry corrections

  7. Statistical analysis of gamma-emitting radionuclide concentrations for three fields in southern Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1988, the spatial variability of the natural gamma-emitting radionuclides (238U, 232Th, and 40K) and the artificial radionuclide 137Cs were studied in three near-level unfertilized fields in Saskatchewan, Canada. One field was used as a native (uneroded) control site; the other two sites have been cultivated, one since 1979 and the other since at least the 1940s. The two cultivated sites have been eroded by aeolian processes and tillage practices. Autocorrelation analysis indicated that most of the radionuclides were not serially correlated for the two depth increments sampled (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm). Autocorrelation is a necessary procedure when equally spaced transect sampling is employed, since sample independence cannot be assumed. Robust and nonrobust statistical summaries are presented for the selected gamma-emitting radionuclide concentrations. Robust statistical estimates of location and dispersion are favored when distributions are not normal or when the distribution is skewed. Median concentrations for the three fields indicated that 238U, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs were similar to areas in the U.S. and to other areas in southern Saskatchewan. Median 238U activity concentrations were between 31.4 and 34.1 Bq kg-1; 232Th concentrations were between 29.6 and 31.2 Bq kg-1; 40K concentrations were between 471 and 502 Bq kg-1; and 137Cs concentrations were between 10.0 and 12.6 Bq kg-1. The variability of natural radionuclides in a given field for a specific depth increment was generally low, with coefficients of variation less than or equal to 10%. The variability of 137Cs concentrations was greater, ranging from 18% to 23%. Nonparametric tests indicated a significant decrease in 214Bi concentration (238U indicator corrected for 222Rn) with depth of the 1979 field, and an increase in 228 Ac (232Th) with depth in the 1940s field

  8. Report of a Technical Meeting on ''Alpha emitting radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapy''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the high potential of α-emitters for future development of radionuclide therapy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a Technical Meeting on ‘Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy’, from June 24 to 28, 2013, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna with the purpose of gathering eminent Experts in the field and discuss with them the status and future perspectives of the field. Sixteen Experts and two External Observers from ten different countries, and four IAEA Technical Officers attended this meeting. Outstanding lectures have been presented covering all relevant aspects of α-therapy, which were followed by extensive discussions and analysis. Selected arguments encompassed production methods and availability of alpha-emitting radionuclides, labelling chemistry of alpha-emittting radioelements, design and development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals, physical principles of alpha-particle dosimetry and advanced dosimetric models, biological effects of alpha radiation at the cellular level, on-going preclinical and clinical studies with new radiopharmaceuticals, results of clinical trials on the use of radium-223 chloride solutions for the treatment of metastatic bone cancer. The broad scientific background of invited components of the Experts’ panel conferred a strong interdisciplinary trait to the overall discussion and stimulated a critical analysis of this emerging unexplored field. Results of this comprehensive overview on alpha therapy, including recommendations to the Agency on suitable initiatives that may help to promote and spread the knowledge to Members States on this emerging therapeutic modality, are summarized in the present Report

  9. Radioactivity Determination of Sealed Beta-Emitting Sources by Surface Dose Measurements and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four primary radiation measurement systems considered to be necessary for the modern radionuclide measurement laboratory are gas-flow proportional counters, liquid scintillation counters, Si spectrometer systems, and Ge spectrometer systems. A national institute of standards recognized by BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures) use these measurement systems have some limitation. For a gas-filled detector, the source size should not be larger than that determined by the counter geometry and the measurements are limited to sources with the activities of less than 20,000 Bq. A liquid scintillation detector can only be used to measure an activity of liquid mixture isotope. Therefore it can't be used to measure activities of sealed sources. Further it is quite difficult to measure a radioactivity of beta-isotope accurately due to self-absorption and scattering. In particular an radioactivity generated by a nuclear reactor is approximately calculated by using target material compositions, cross-sections, and neutron flux, which the nuclear reactor. However, the results from this approach involve a high uncertainty. We develop a Monte Carlo applied radioactivity determination for beta sources. The extrapolation ion-chamber was used to measure the surface dose rate for a standard source. The Sr/Y-90 standard source is calibrated by NIST used for this study. There was about 1.7% difference in the reference dose rates measured by the two techniques. These difference and relative errors were comparable to those of other studies. It should be noticed that the area of collecting electrode was nine times larger than that of radiation field. It the diameter of the source is smaller than the area of collecting electrode, the source should be located at a sufficiently large distance from the detector surface so that the radiation field at the detector surface was larger than the area of collecting electrode. In addition, beta particles from the applicator interact

  10. A search for cosmogenic production of β-neutron emitting radionuclides in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, S.; Askins, M.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Shokair, T. M.; Jaffke, P.; Rountree, S. D.; Sweany, M.

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the first results of WATCHBOY, a water Cherenkov detector designed to measure the yield of β-neutron emitting radionuclides produced by cosmic ray muons in water. In addition to the β-neutron measurement, we also provide a first look at isolating single-β producing radionuclides following muon-induced hadronic showers as a check of the detection capabilities of WATCHBOY. The data taken over 207 live days indicates a 9Li production yield upper limit of 1.9 ×10-7μ-1g-1cm2 at ~400 m water equivalent (m.w.e.) overburden at the 90% confidence level. In this work the 9Li signal in WATCHBOY was used as a proxy for the combined search for 9Li and 8He production. This result will provide a constraint on estimates of antineutrino-like backgrounds in future water-based antineutrino detectors.

  11. On the spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay in few-electron atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2015-01-01

    Ionization of light atoms and ions during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay is considered. We determine the velocity/momentum spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay in one-electron tritium atom. The same method can be applied to describe velocity/momentum distributions of secondary electrons emitted from $\\beta^{-}$-decaying few-electron atoms and molecules.

  12. Final report proficiency test on the determination of α, β and γ-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proficiency test on the determination of α, β and γ-emitting radionuclides was organised within the frame of the Technical Cooperation project: RAS/9/024 'Environmental Radiation Monitoring and Regional Data Base' to evaluate the analytical performance of 14 laboratories from 12 Asian countries. This report summarises the performance evaluation of the participating laboratories. Analytical data evaluation of this proficiency test showed that 58% of all reported results obtained a 'Passed' final score for both the trueness and precision criteria applied to this exercise. (author)

  13. Application of Monte Carlo simulation to the standardization of positron emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1967, the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory (LNM) at the Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN) in Sao Paulo, Brazil, has developed radionuclide standardization methods and measurements of the Gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay by means of 4πβ-γ coincidence system, a high accuracy primary method for determining disintegration rate of radionuclides of interest. In 2001 the LNM started a research field on modeling, based on Monte Carlo method, of all the system components, including radiation detectors and radionuclide decay processes. This methodology allows the simulation of the detection process in a 4πβ-γ system, determining theoretically the observed activity as a function of the 4πβ detector efficiency, enabling the prediction of the behavior of the extrapolation curve and optimizing a detailed planning of the experiment before starting the measurements. One of the objectives of the present work is the improvement of the 4π proportional counter modeling, presenting a detailed description of the source holder and radioactive source material, as well as absorbers placed around the source. The simulation of radiation transport through the detectors has been carried out using code MCNPX. The main focus of the present work is on Monte Carlo modeling of the standardization of positron emitting radionuclides associated (or not) with electron capture and accompanied (or not) by the emission of Gamma radiation. One difficulty in this modeling is to simulate the detection of the annihilation Gamma ray, which arise in the process of positron absorption within the 4π detector. The methodology was applied to radionuclides 18F and 22Na. (author)

  14. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136. Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrin, Steven [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations of neutrino flavor oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass. Since the discovery of these oscillations, much progress has been made at mea- suring the neutrino mass-squared differences and lepton mixing angles that character- ize them. However, the origin and absolute scale of neutrino masses remain unknown. Unique among fermions, neutrinos can be Majorana particles, which could provide an explanation for neutrino masses. Discovery of a hypothetical process known as neutrinoless double beta decay would show that neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine the mass scale for neutrinos. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is a series of experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The first experiment, EXO-200, began operation in 2011 and makes use of 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in 136Xe. The analysis presented here makes use of data from EXO-200 to obtain a more precise measurement of the half-life for the two-neutrino-emitting mode of double beta decay than previously reported. The analysis also sets limits on the half-lives for exotic, Majoron-emitting modes of neutrinoless double beta decay. Data from EXO-200 is also used to produce a measurement of the cosmic muon flux at the WIPP under- ground site where EXO-200 is located.

  15. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecting malignant tumors in children. However, the radiation dose from positron-emitting radionuclide to the pediatric population is a matter of concern since children are at a particularly high risk when exposed to ionizing radiation.Methods: The authors evaluate the absorbed fractions and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergy photons/electrons as well as S-values of 9 positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124) in 48 source regions for 10 anthropomorphic pediatric hybrid models, including the reference newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-yr-old male and female models, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code.Results: The self-absorbed SAFs and S-values for most organs were inversely related to the age and body weight, whereas the cross-dose terms presented less correlation with body weight. For most source/target organ pairs, Rb-82 and Y-86 produce the highest self-absorbed and cross-absorbed S-values, respectively, while Cu-64 produces the lowest S-values because of the low-energy and high-frequency of electron emissions. Most of the total self-absorbed S-values are contributed from nonpenetrating particles (electrons and positrons), which have a linear relationship with body weight. The dependence of self-absorbed S-values of the two annihilation photons varies to the reciprocal of 0.76 power of the mass, whereas the self-absorbed S-values of positrons vary according to the reciprocal mass.Conclusions: The produced S-values for common positron-emitting radionuclides can be exploited for the assessment of radiation dose delivered to the pediatric population from various PET

  16. Directional distributions of beta-rays emitted from oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique ultralow-temperature nuclear orientation facility was developed with which the directional distributions of β-rays emitted from statically polarized nuclei can be observed, for the first time, at many angles with respect to the polarization axis. Nuclei can be polarized in bulk by imbedding them in an appropriate ferromagnetic host, which is cooled to near absolute zero temperature and is magnetized to saturation with an externally applied field. The polarization axis is defined by the direction of this applied field. The two distinguishing features of the new system are the following: the necessary temperature of about 0.010K can be maintained very accurately for as long as is necessary by a 3He/4He dilution refrigerator; and the polarization axis can be rotated, while the source and the detector are kept stationary, by varying the external fields applied by intersecting magnetic loops. These loops leak a negligible amount of magnetic flux into the region traversed by the β rays, and thus leave β-ray trajectories essentially unaltered. In the first experiment performed on the facility, the angular dependence of the parity-violating term in the directional distribution function for β rays emitted from polarized 60Co nuclei was directly measured for the first time. The results were found to be consistent with the accepted theories of nuclear β decay. Additional fundamental experiments possible with this new facility involving parity violation, isospin nonconservation, and time-reversal invariance are discussed

  17. NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (NESHAP) SUBPART H RADIONUCLIDES POTENTIAL TO EMIT CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EARLEY JN

    2008-07-23

    This document provides an update of the status of stacks on the Hanford Site and the potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions that could occur with no control devices in place. This review shows the calculations that determined whether the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) received by the maximum public receptor as a result of potential emissions from any one of these stacks would exceed 0.1 millirem/year. Such stacks require continuous monitoring of the effluent, or other monitoring, to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative code (WAC) 246-247-035(1)(a)(ii) and WAC 246-247-075(1), -(2), and -(6). This revised update reviews the potential-to-emit (PTE) calculations of 31 stacks for Fluor Hanford, Inc. Of those 31 stacks, 11 have the potential to cause a TEDE greater than 0.1 mrem/year.

  18. Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge

    has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of......In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Augerelectron- emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Augeremitter 119Sb has been identified......-energy cyclotron, two new ”High Power” cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finiteelement- analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of...

  19. NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (NESHAP) SUBPART H; RADIONUCLIDES POTENTIAL-TO-EMIT CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an update of the status of stacks on the Hanford Site and the potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions that could occur with no control devices in place. This review shows the calculations that determined whether the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) received by the maximum public receptor as a result of potential emissions from any one of these stacks would exceed 0.1 millirem/year. Such stacks require continuous monitoring of the effluent, or other monitoring, to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative code (WAC) 246-247-035(1)(a)(ii) and WAC 246-247-075(1), -(2), and -(6). This revised update reviews the potential-to-emit (PTE) calculations of 31 stacks for Fluor Hanford, Inc. Of those 31 stacks, 11 have the potential to cause a TEDE greater than 0.1 mrem/year

  20. Spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during the nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay of the tritium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss ionization of the final ${}^{3}$He$^{+}$ ion during the nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay of the tritium atom. The velocity spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during such a decay is derived in the explicit form. Our method allows one to determine both the relative and absolute probabilities of formation of the final states with certain velocities of secondary electrons.

  1. Health effect of exposure to internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health effect of exposure on human population to internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides and their decay products has been considered as most hazardous radiation effect. However, the harmful late effects by the intake of radioactive nuclides are not definite in the epidemiological and clinical viewpoint. Only two cases, radium and thorium, have since long been noted for their deletrious effects to man. As the former, it has been first reported that dial workers in USA using 226Ra can suffer from 'radiumjaw' which is a cancer of the bone of jaws. Another radium isotope, 224Ra, was used for a medical reason as therapy against turberculosis of bone to German children during the years 1946∼1950, and has given rise to bone cancer. As the latter, Thorotrast (the commercial name of a colloidal thorium dioxide preparation), introduced for angiography in 1929 and utilized until about 1950, was found to cause malignant hepatic tumors, liver cirrhosis and blood diseases such as some kinds of leukemia and anemia. In Japan, the former cases have seldom found though, the latter cases are assumed over 1000. Especially, Thorotrast administered war-wounded ex-servicemen in World War II have been beyond 300 persons. The epidemiological and clinico-pathological studies have been demonstrated by the research Group on Biological Effect of Thorium in Special Project Research on Energy, Japan, as a fundamental study of the safe treatment of nuclear fuel materials. The resultant data of the study and risk evaluation of liver cancer for Japanese Thorotrast administered patients are reviewed related to that of another alpha-emitting radionuclides. (author)

  2. Abscopal induction of leukaemia and osteosarcoma following administration of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, B.I. (Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    Alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides can induce leukaemia and/ or osteosarcoma in mice. Furthermore, plutonium-239, given to male mice before mating with normal females, while not directly leading to leukaemia in the progeny does lead to enhanced susceptibility to leukaemogenic agents. In the first case, the amounts of radionuclide are very small in experimental terms; and zero in the case of transgenerational activity. In both cases, the development of the disorders is remote in time and location relative to that of the contaminating radionuclide, making interpretation of the mechanisms and estimation of radiation risk problematic. It is necessary, then, to address questions involving the basis of haemopoiesis itself. Cellular kinetics of the development of blood from the pluripotent stem cells to the mature functional cells are outlined, describing compensatory proliferation mechanisms and extensive movement of cells throughout the marrow space. The locations of potential oncogenic target cells are identified and the nature of the stromal microenvironment that regulates haemopoiesis is defined. Plutonium-239, given to male mice, targets spermatogenesis at the stem cell level leaving unidentified damage that is inherited by his offspring. This leaves the offspring susceptible to a leukaemogenic agent encountered later in life. The characteristics of this, corroborated by consideration of the cellular kinetics, are of an inherited genomic instability. Cells of the microenvronment, inheriting the same genetic damage, probably act in the role of an enhancing 'bystander'. In adult mice, the mechanisms are different. Bone turnover results in radioactivity being gradually transported through the marrow by long-lived macrophages. A model based on temporal microdistributions of activity, defining specific target cell regions, is able to illustrate that considering bone marrow as a uniform mass of cells is inadequate to describe the observed

  3. Safety significant class determination of continuous air monitors at facilities handling alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role and use of continuous air monitors typically fall under the responsibility of institutional radiation protection programs established to maintain stochastic effects to workers at acceptable levels. This practice has led to a general perception that acute serious worker injury is not credible even with high intakes of alpha-emitting radionuclides. Using data derived from animal studies, release masses potentially causing serious worker injury are estimated. Serious pulmonary injuries to unprotected individuals are credible from airborne alpha-emitting transuranic release levels ranging between 0.1 and 10 GBq (2.7 to 270 mCi). Safety-significant designation of continuous air monitor systems should be considered at facilities where releases of these magnitudes are possible. Such designations should enhance the formality of continuous air monitor usage and ultimately improve the reliability of these systems. Serious pulmonary injuries are not considered possible from airborne releases of 235U, 238U, and 232Th due to airborne mass-loading limitations

  4. Assessment of gamma, beta and alpha-particle-emitting nuclides in marine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the physical properties of radionuclides different systems must be used for their measurement. Most convenient is if gamma spectrometry can be used by germanium, Silicon or Scintillation detectors (eg. NaI). If, however, the main emission consists of beta or alpha particles or low-energy photons as is the case for radionuclides decaying by electron capture, radiochemical separation and specific source preparations must be undertaken. In such cases also the radiochemical yield must be determined. The radiochemical part mainly follows the lines presented by prof. T. Jaakkola, Department of Radiochemistry, Helsinki, Finland, at a course in radioecology in Lurid, 1991. For very long-lived radionuclides other methods such as mass spectrometry are superior although often associated with sophisticated expensive instrumentation. (author)

  5. Calibration of radionuclides with decay trough beta emission or electron capture by liquid scintillation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work is reported a methodology a methodology for pure beta and electron capture radionuclides standardization, suing liquid scintillation technique. In this sense the CIEMAT/NIST method, recently utilized by international laboratories, was implemented and the lack in the Laboratorio Nacional das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI, of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, for adequate methodology to standardize this kind if radionuclides was filled, fact that was not present with alpha and gamma radionuclides. The implementation procedure evaluation was provided by concentration activity determination of the following radionuclides: 14 C and 90 Sr, pure beta emitters; 55 Fe, electron capture decay; 204 Tl, electron capture and beta decay and 60 Co, beta-gamma emitter. In this way, a careful analysis of the implementation procedure with these radionuclides types, ranging on a broad energy spectral, was possible. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. Besides this intercomparisons, one was provided with a 204 Tl solution, utilized in the international comparison recently promoted by BIPM, and another one with a 60 C solution calibrated in LNMRI/CNEN previously by a relative calibration system, with a well type pressurized ionization chamber, and an absolute beta-gamma coincidence system, with a pill-box type proportional counter 4 π geometry, coupled with a scintillator system with a sodium iodide cristal of 4x4 inches. The comparisons among LNMRI/CNEN results and the reference values, showed a small deviation of 1,32% for 14 C, 0,40% for 60 Co, 1,12% for 55 Fe, 0,10% for 90 Sr and 0,73% for 204 Tl. For the BIPM solution the deviation was 0,46% and for 60 Co

  6. Standards of compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides approved as established techniques for medical use. 2009 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the establishment of positron emission tomography (PET) diagnosis as a routinely used clinical diagnostic tool, the compliances of manufacture regulations under the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principle for PET radiopharmaceuticals are necessary. For this purpose, the Subcommittee on Medical Application of Positron Emitting Radionuclides, Medical Science and Pharmaceutical Committee, in Japan Radioisotope Association has made the Standards for Compounds Labeled with Emitting Radionuclides Approved as Established Techniques for Medical Use'. At present, there are two standards; ones for 15O gases and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) (2001 revision), whose studies have been approved by National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and another for other 10 PET agents (1999 version). Thus, to promote more safe and effective application of compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides produced in the hospital, the Subcommittee on Medical Application of Positron Emitting Radionuclides of Medical Science and Pharmaceutical Committee in Japan Radioisotope Association has reviced standards by unifying processes and specifications of 15 compounds including 12 compounds that have been already approved as 'compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as established techniques for medical use' in the committee (18FDG, 15O-oxygen, 15O-carbon monoxide, 15O-carbon dioxide, 11C-monoxide, 13N-nitrogen, 13N-ammonia, 15O-water, 11C-L-methionine, 11C-sodium acetate, 11C-N-methyl-spiperone, and 11C-choline) and three newly compounds approved at 2009 (18F-sodium fluoride, 11C-raclopride, and 11C-flumazenil). This guideline includes the general notices, general rules for preparations, general tests for the quality control, quality of each PET agents, guideline for manufacturing environment and manufacturing process at manufacturing facilities of PET agents. (author)

  7. Measurement of activity of the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclides in activated components of a medical cyclotron plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An identification and activity evaluation of the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclides in activated parts of a medical cyclotron plant by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry were performed. The use of LaBr3:Ce scintillation and HPGe detectors was examined in order to solve the measurement problems due to high activity of some components used inside a plant provided with an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 cyclotron. For each component, the identification of some key-radionuclides allows to evaluate the surface dose behaviour as function of decay time. The largest activity values are related to radionuclides with half-life of 70-80 days, while radionuclides with higher half-lives represent less than 10 per cent of the total activity. The surface dose rate will be reduced to about 1/1000 of the starting value after a decay period of approximately 3 years, with a relatively safety at product disposal work. (author)

  8. A method to label seeds and seedlings using gamma-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The A major obstacle limiting field studies in plant population biology is that there is no way of uniquely labeling or identifying the seeds produced by a mother plant so that her seedlings can be distinguished from the offspring of other conspecific plants. This article describes experiments undertaken to develop gamma—emitting radionuclide labels that are injected into a plant and are incorporated into the developing seeds and subsequent seedlings. The nuclides were used singly and in combination since each nuclide has unique spectral peaks that can be used to distinguish it from other nuclides. Five species were used: Phaseolus vulgaris, Polygonum pensylvanicum, Impatiens capensis, Bidens frondosa, and B. connata. Easily detectable levels of 58cobalt, 60cobalt, 134cesium, 137cesium, and 75selenium were incorporated by seeds of the five species. The incorporation of 54manganese and 65zinc varied among the species. 88Yttrium, 125antimony, and 85strontium were weak or not present as labels, depending on the species, while 110silver and 46scandium were never found in the seeds. Bean seedlings showed readily detectable amounts of nuclide label, while the nuclides apparently leached out of the Impatiens seedlings. The quantities of nuclides used in these experiments were so low that there was no effect of radiation on plant performance. (author)

  9. Calculation of personal dose equivalent for positron-emitting radionuclides using Monte Carlo code EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion coefficients, H'(d,α)/φ, for monoenergetic positrons and positron-emitting radionuclides were calculated by using the user code UCICRPM of the Monte Carlo code EGS5 to estimate the radiation dose for medical staff involved in positron emission tomography examinations. From these coefficients, the dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths in a soft tissue for a straight-line source of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) were calculated by using the developed user code UCF18DOSE. The dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths were measured by using a personal dosemeter (DOSE 3) under the same conditions as those considered in the calculation. The calculated dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths were 0.116 and 0.0352 pSv min-1 Bq-1, respectively, at 20 cm from the 18F-FDG injection tube. (authors)

  10. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  11. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development of this

  12. Development of positron-emitting radionuclides for imaging with improved positron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in positron cameras and positron ring detectors for transverse-section reconstruction have created renewed interest in positron-emitting radionuclides. This paper reports on: (1) generator-produced 82Rb, (2) cyclotron-produced 62Zn, and (3) reactor produced 64Cu. Investigation of the 82Sr(25d)-82Rb(75s) generator determined the elution characteristics for Bio-Rex 70, a weakly acidic carbocylic cation exchanger, using 2% NaCl as the eluent. The yield of 82Rb and the breakthrough of 82Sr were determined for newly prepared columns and for long-term elution conditions. Spallation-produced 82Sr was used to charge a compact 82Rb generator to obtain multi-millicurie amounts of 82Rb for myocardial imaging. Zinc accumulates in the islet cells of the pancreas and in the prostate. Zinc-62 was produced by protons on Cu foil and separated by column chromatography. Zinc-62 was administered as the amino acid chelates and as the ZnCl2 to tumour and normal animals. Tissue distribution was determined for various times after intravenous injection. Pancreas-liver images of 62Zn-histidine uptake were obtained in animals with the gamma camera and the liver uptake of 99Tcsup(m)-sulphur colloid was computer subtracted to image the pancreas alone. The positron camera imaged uptake of 62Zn-histidine in the prostate of a dog at 20h. 64Cu was chelated to asparagine, a requirement of leukaemic cells, and administered to lymphoma mice. Uptake in tumour and various tissues was determined and compared with the uptake of 67Ga-citrate under the same conditions. 64Cu-asparagine had better tumour-to-soft tissue ratios than 67Ga-citrate. (author)

  13. Atmospheric deposition of long-lived Beta radionuclides over the territory of Bulgaria during the last decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of atmospheric radioactivity are discussed and compared. Radon isotopes and their daughters' dominate the natural background of beta activity in the surface air. The man-made radionuclides, much of them beta emitters, started to contaminate regionally and globally the environment after 1940's due to the atmospheric nuclear bomb tests. Additional significant sources of technogenic radionuclides in the atmosphere were nuclear accidents with pronounced examples of Chernobyl and Fukushima. The Bulgarian network for atmospheric radioactivity monitoring has been developing since 1959 in the frame of the state Hydro-meteorological service, now National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology. It includes daily measurements of aerosol beta activity and deposition immediately and 120h after the sampling. The time and space variations of deposited beta activity, based on long term data records are presented and impact assessment of the different sources is given. The role of precipitation in deposition of radionuclides is evaluated. (author)

  14. Extrapolation ionisation chamber measurements on beta-emitting sources produced for the CEGB collaborative radiobiology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the structure and application of an extrapolation ionisation chamber used for measuring dose-rates from plane and point beta-emitting sources. These measurements form the basis of the dosimetry for a collaborative radiobiological study of skin to study both stochastic and non-stochastic effects. A small sample from the wide range of measurements undertaken in the programme has been selected to illustrate the procedures involved. The extrapolation chamber is currently being automated and it is intended that this report should provide a source reference to the basis of the measurements made between 1977-86. (author)

  15. Calculation of beta induced Bremsstrahlung exposure from therapeutic radionuclide 198Au in tissues, DNA and RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold-198 (βmax= 0.96 MeV (98.6%), γmax= 0.412 MeV (95.5%) and T1/2 = 2.7 days) is a well-known therapeutic beta emitter in the field of nuclear medicine, and is being used for the treatment of many different cancers. In the present study, the Bremsstrahlung exposure induced by 198Au in different human tissues, DNA and RNA has been calculated. The specific Bremsstrahlung constant (ΓBr), Probability of energy loss by beta during Bremsstrahlung emission (PBr) and Bremsstrahlung activity (Arelease)Br were estimated. We strongly recommend these parameters should be considered in absorbed dose calculations of radionuclide therapy via 198Au. (orig.)

  16. Counting efficiency for radionuclides decaying by beta and gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, counting efficiency vs figure of merit for beta and gamma-ray emitters has been computed. It is assumed that the decay scheme has only a gamma level and the beta-ray emission may be coincident with the gamma-rays or the internal-conversion electrons. The radionuclides tabulated are: 20O, 20F, 28Al, 35P,41Ar, 42K, 47Se, 62Fe, 66Cu, 81Ge, 86Rb, 104Rh, 108Ru, 112Pd, 121Sn(m), 122In, 129I, 141Ce, 142Pr, 151Sm, 170Tm, 171Tm, 194Os, 203Hg, 205Hg, 210Pb, 225Ra, 244Am(m). It has been assumed that the liquid is a toluene based scintillator solution in standard glass vials containing 10 cm3. (Author)

  17. Field performance test of Pass, an instrument for the rapid assay of plutonium and other γ-ray emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field performance test was conducted at the INEL with the mobile Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) that was developed for the analysis of samples from sites or facilities potentially contaminated with plutonium, other actinides, and γ-ray emitting activation and fission-product radionuclides. The performance test and results are described for the Photon Analyis Spectrometer System (PASS), one of three RTML assay systems. This system consists of a thin-window, n-type Ge spectrometer, that automatically analyzes soil, smear, and air particulate-filter samples for actinides emitting L x rays, and for activation and fission products that emit Γ rays. The measurements were blind and performed with 11-g soil samples gathered from the Cold Test Pit and with spiked samples containing known mixtures of 239Pu, 241Am, 60Co, and 137Cs. In the spiked samples the plutonium activity concentrations ranged from ∼75 to ∼500 pCi/g while the other radionuclides ranged from ∼10 to ∼130 pCi/g. Lower limits of detection (LLDs) were verified to be 1, 5, 5, and 40 pCi/g for 241Am, 60Co, 137Cs, and 239Pu respectively. Results from the performance test are presented. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. The ATM kinase signaling induced by the low-energy {beta}-particles emitted by {sup 33}P is essential for the suppression of chromosome aberrations and is greater than that induced by the energetic {beta}-particles emitted by {sup 32}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Jason S.; Yue Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion, Suite 2.6, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States); Hu Jing [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion, Suite 2.6, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States); Bakkenist, Christopher J., E-mail: bakkenistcj@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion, Suite 2.6, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion, Suite 2.6, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase whose activity is increased in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Here we examine ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to either {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-orthophosphate under conditions typically employed in metabolic labelling experiments. We calculate that the absorbed dose of IR delivered to a 5 cm x 5 cm monolayer of cells incubated in 2 ml media containing 1 mCi of the high-energy (1.70 MeV) {beta}-particle emitter {sup 32}P-orthophosphate for 30 min is {approx}1 Gy IR. The absorbed dose of IR following an otherwise identical exposure to the low-energy (0.24 MeV) {beta}-particle emitter {sup 33}P-orthophosphate is {approx}0.18 Gy IR. We show that low-energy {beta}-particles emitted by {sup 33}P induce a greater number of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) and greater ATM kinase signaling than energetic {beta}-particles emitted by {sup 32}P. Hence, we demonstrate that it is inappropriate to use {sup 33}P-orthophosphate as a negative control for {sup 32}P-orthophosphate in experiments investigating DNA damage responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly, we show that ATM accumulates in the chromatin fraction when ATM kinase activity is inhibited during exposure to either radionuclide. Finally, we also show that chromosome aberrations accumulate in cells when ATM kinase activity is inhibited during exposure to {approx}0.36 Gy {beta}-particles emitted by {sup 33}P. We therefore propose that direct cellular exposure to {sup 33}P-orthophosphate is an excellent means to induce and label the IR-induced, ATM kinase-dependent phosphoproteome.

  19. A sensitive and quantitative biosensing method for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolterbeek, H.Th.; Meer, A.J.G.M. van der [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.

    1996-11-01

    A quantitative and sensitive biosensing method has been developed for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the element in the biosensor and the determination of the element level in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Measurements were performed with floating water plants (Azolla filiculoides Lamk., Spirodela polyrhiza/Lemna sp.) and the fully submerged water plant Ceratophyllum demersum L., which were sampled from ditch water. Concentrations of elements and radionuclides were determined in both water and biosensor plants, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ICP-MS, and {gamma}-ray spectrometry, respectively. For the latter, both 1 litre samples (Marinelli-geometry) and 1 cm{sup 3} samples (well-type detectors) were applied in measurements. (author).

  20. Comments on IAEA-CU-2006-11 proficiency test on the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides in filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Center for Ecotoxicological Researches of Montenegro participated last year in the IAEA-CU-2006-11 Proficiency Test on the Determination of Gamma Emitting Radionuclides in Air Filters. Test was organized as a part of the IAEA Project RER/8/009 Air pollution monitoring in Mediterranean region. In our analyses of the test samples obtained from IAEA, we have found very obvious proofs that a significant quantity of radionuclides has been transferred from the inner filter papers - samples, to the outer - protective ones. For example, for Cs isotopes this transfer goes up to 40 % of the activity of a sample. The Test Report, published by IAEA, confirms indirectly our conclusion. It follows from that Report that the most of participating laboratories have had results which are bellow the 'exact' values given by the IAEA test organizers

  1. Assessment of the risk associated with the gamma-emitting radionuclides from the soil of two cities in Central Karakorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Northern Areas of Pakistan is known for its relatively higher radioactivity level. No study has been conducted for Nagar, which is located at 2,590 m above sea level (ASL) and Shigar at 2,300 m ASL. Soil samples were collected from the two cities and gamma-emitting radionuclides were assayed using gamma-ray spectrometry. The average activity concentrations, average air absorbed dose rate, average annual effective dose and three hazard indices namely the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and internal hazard index were calculated. The risk to human was estimated using the excess life-time cancer risk for people living in the two cities. (author)

  2. Report on the IAEA-CU-2006-04 ALMERA proficiency test on the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the interlaboratory exercise described in this report, 195 test samples (matrix reference materials) were prepared and distributed to the participating laboratories in June 2006. Laboratories were sent samples containing known activities of gamma emitting radionuclides in three matrices (soil, grass and water), and were requested to return the results within three days of receipt of the samples (short-term reporting). The participating laboratories were requested to analyse the samples employing the methods used in their routine work, so that their performance on the test samples could be directly related to the real performance of the rapid reporting

  3. Control of the risk of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides during an outage in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of the risk of external exposure of EDF PWR plant maintenance workers by alpha-emitting radionuclides is based on identification and quantification of the contamination of the systems. Appropriate arrangements are made to ensure protection on the basis of the prior analysis of the risk. In 2001, an experiment carried out at Cattenom Power Plant during a unit outage in the presence of a leaking fuel, based on measurement of alpha-emitting radionuclides, made it possible to determine a realistic factor for the resuspension of particles. On the basis of the experimental results, a resuspension factor of 10-6 m-1 for operational radiological protection was adopted. In the case of this unit outage, an appropriate surveillance system using this resuspension factor for workers was set in place in collaboration with the occupational medicine and radiological protection department. It was based on prior estimation of the level of alpha contamination, and confirmed by swipe measurements, atmospheric surveillance by monitors, and collective analysis by nose blow samples from workers selected on the basis of their workstations, as well as supplementary individual measurements (monitoring of faeces). This surveillance made it possible to validate an appropriate work area monitoring system, as well as the means of individual and collective protection adopted, and to establish that there was no contamination of staff by actinides during the unit outage. (authors)

  4. Study of a 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system for absolute radionuclide activity measurement using plastic scintillators; Estudo de um sistema de coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} para a medida absoluta de atividade de radionuclideos empregando cintiladores plasticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piuvezam Filho, Helio

    2007-07-01

    The present work was intended to study a coincidence system 4{pi}(PS){beta}-{gamma} for absolute activity measurement using plastic scintillators in 4{pi} geometry. Along with experiments on the coincidence system, simulations were also performed applying the Monte Carlo Method, by means of codes PENELOPE and ESQUEMA. These simulations were performed in order to calculate the extrapolation curve of the coincidence system 4{pi}(PS){beta}-{gamma} and compare it to experimental data. A new geometry was proposed to the coincidence system adding up a second photomultiplier tube to the previous system for improving light collection from the plastic scintillator, as this system presented limitations in the minimum detected energy due to the presence of electronic noise and low gain. The results show that an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained, as well as in the minimum detected energy. Moreover, there was an increase in the detection efficiency. With these modifications, it is now possible to calibrate radionuclides which emit low energy electrons or X-rays, increasing the number of radionuclides that can be standardized with this type of system.(author)

  5. Metrological parameters of the unified calibration whole-body phantom with gamma-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unified phantom UP-02T models children aged 2, 6 and 14 years, and adults with a body mass of 70, 90 and 110 kg with incorporated radionuclides. It is intended for calibration of whole-body counters with the investigated person in the standing and lying positions as well as sitting straight or stooping down. The phantom consists of a set of polyethylene rectangular blocks with masses 0.88 and 0.40 kg. A set of solid rod radionuclide sources, 6 mm in diameter, are inserted inside the blocks. Two sources are inserted in each block. The blocks are connected by means of fixing arms. The principal advantage of the solid phantom as compared to the phantoms that contain radioactive solutions is the safety of operation and the possibility of replacement of the radionuclide sources if it is necessary. The unified phantom was verified against the BOMAB calibration phantom and compared to the REMCAL type phantom. (author)

  6. Modeling the effects of repeated systemic administrations of small activity amounts In radionuclide therapy with beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Good results for radionuclide therapy treatments where repeated short time spaced systemic injection of small activity amounts are given have been reported. Bone marrow and kidneys are usually considered as dose-limiting organs in radionuclide therapy. The treatments in radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be optimized if irradiation effects in those one might be estimated. Xeno-grafted mice is the often biological model used during the evaluation of candidates for radionuclide therapy. A mathematical model of tumor cell kinetics was combined with another one reported for marrow cell kinetics which allows the calculation of marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to different irradiation schemes. Radionuclide therapy treatment with repeated administrations with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta emitters were simulated. The effects on fast-growing and slow-growing tumors were evaluated, as well as radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. For more realistic estimation of absorbed dose in mice organs the cross-irradiation due to high energy beta particles was included into the MIRD's formula. Tumor and kidneys responses to the irradiation were estimated on the linear-quadratic model framework which was adapted for a multi-exponential dose rate function describing radionuclide therapy treatments with repeated administrations. Published values for murine tumors kinetics, marrows cellular turnover rates and radiosensitivities were used during the calculations. Iso-effective schemes were also determined varying the interval between fractions and the number of administration. For a given tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and absorbed dose in kidneys an optimal regime of radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be found. The mathematical model presented here allows the prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia, the effects on kidneys and the tumor cell response to various treatment schemes

  7. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ceballos, M.A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lozano, R.L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Kim, Y.I. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Uljin 767-813 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.M.; Kim, S.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Yeh, S.-W. [Department of Environmental Marine Science, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolivar, J.P., E-mail: bolivar@uhu.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Baskaran, M. [Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  8. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: ► Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. ► Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. ► Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. ► Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. ► Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  9. ALMERA Proficiency Test: Determination of Gamma Emitting Radionuclides in Simulated Air Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentration of radionuclides in air is a critical factor in assessing the air quality and the potential impact of possible pollutants. Air is in fact one of the main pathways for human exposure to radioactivity. Radioactivity may be present in the atmosphere due to natural processes; intentional (low level) anthropogenic release; or as a consequence of nuclear or radiological incident. The resulting environmental impact should be considered carefully to ensure safety and compliance with environmental regulations. A reliable determination of radionuclides in air is necessary for regular monitoring of air quality to comply with radiation protection and environmental regulations. This proficiency test (PT) is one of the series of the ALMERA network proficiency tests organised on regular basis by the Terrestrial Environment Laboratory in Seibersdorf, designed to assess the technical capacity of ALMERA Members in analysing radionuclides to identify any analytical problems and to support ALMERA laboratories to maintain their preparedness to provide rapid and reliable analytical results. The range of simulated air filters used in this PT for analysis has been mainly at environmental level. The PT set consisted of four filters. The participating laboratories were requested to analyze Mn-54, Co-57, Fe-59, Co-60, Zn-65, Cd-109, Ba-133, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-152 and Am-241 in filters 01, 02 and 03. The participants were informed that only some of the listed radionuclides were present in the filters and the levels of the radionuclides were such that they could be measured within a 6-hour measurement period using a conventional HPGe gammaspectrometer of 35% relative efficiency. Filter 04, was containing only Co-60 and Ba-133 with known activities to the participants, had to be used as a control for the efficiency calibration. The tasks of IAEA were to prepare and distribute the simulated air filters to the participating laboratories, to collect and interpret

  10. Gamma emitting radionuclides in fruits and vegetables produced in the Canary Islands: domestic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determine the possible effects due to ingestion of radionuclides that can be found in health food is of interest from the viewpoint of radiation protection of the population. these determinations and analysis of the consequences on the health of people and jobs has led to studies that have had consequences in the form of rules to follow and values have to be attended to limit dictated by national and international agencies. (Author)

  11. Bioaccumulation of gamma emitting radionuclides in red algae from the Baltic Sea under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Zalewska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioaccumulation ability of radionuclides 51Cr, 54Mn, 57Co, 60Co, 65Zn, 85Sr, 109Cd, 110mAg, 113Sn, 137Cs and 241Am in two red algae species from the southern Baltic Sea - Polysiphonia fucoides and Furcellaria lumbricalis - was determined under laboratory conditions. P. fucoides demonstrated better bioaccumulative properties towards most of the investigated radionuclides. As a result, P. fucoides can be recommended as a good bioindicator of radioactive environmental pollution. The bioaccumulation of radionuclides in F. lumbricalis was studied during an extended laboratory experiment. The initial extensive uptake of radioisotopes was followed by the rapid removal of cations; in general, concentrations tended to decrease with time. 137Cs displayed a different behaviour, its concentration in the algae increasing over time mainly due to its large ion radius; this is a factor that could be responsible for the stronger mechanical and chemical bonding of Cs+ and that could hamper the movement of ions in both directions.

  12. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, September 1, 1977--April 30, 1978. [/sup 99m/Tc, positron-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1978-05-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: chemistry studies designed to achieve a more complete understanding of the fundamental chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future radiopharmaceuticals incorporating the radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc; the development of new radiopharmaceuticals intended to improve image quality and lower radiation doses by the use of short-lived radionuclides and disease-specific agents; the development of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides which offer advantages in transverse section imaging of regional physiological processes; and studies of the toxic effects of particulate radiation.

  13. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

  14. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of different positron emitting radionuclides incorporated in a soft tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out where compounds with positron-emitters radionuclides, like FDG (18F), Acetate (11C), and Ammonium (13N), were incorporated into a soft tissue volume, in the aim to estimate the type of particles produced their energies, their mean free paths, and the absorbed dose at different distances with respect to the center of the volume. The volume was modeled with a radius larger than the maximum range of positrons in order to produce 0.511 keV annihilation gamma-ray photons. With the obtained results the equivalent dose, in various organs and tissues able to metabolize different radiopharmaceutical drugs, can be estimated. (Author)

  16. Quantitative analysis of gamma ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Seop; Kim, Hee Gon; Ahn, Guk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma ray spectroscopy. The full energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as function of the photon energy for an HRGs detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1{approx}6x10'6'Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface.

  17. Quantitative analysis of gamma-ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Kim, Hee-Gon; Ahn, Guk-Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma-ray spectroscopy. The full-energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as a function of the photon energy for an HPGe detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20 cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1-6 x 10{sup 6} Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface.

  18. Quantitative analysis of gamma ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma ray spectroscopy. The full energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as function of the photon energy for an HRGs detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1∼6x10'6'Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface

  19. Preliminary identification of contaminating α- and β-emitting radionuclides in nuclear facilities to be decommissioned through Digital Autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous publications, we presented how Digital Autoradiography (DA) could be of the most useful help in a preparation to decommissioning context: with this technique, a radiological mapping of the facility to dismantle can be obtained at a rate of around 2 weeks/100 m2. The technique is sensitive to all types of radioactivity (including α and 3H- or 14C-emitted β) and to both labile and fixed radioactivity. The method (radiosensitive screens exposure followed by a scanning step at the laboratory in a small-size device) neither involves nuclear material transportation, neither produces wastes, nor requires operators' presence during signal acquisition. The purpose is to accurately locate possible contamination spots, in order to relevantly perform targeted sampling and thus limit destructive analyses runs at the laboratory. In the latest developments, additional methods were implemented to analyze various nuclear samples (wastes, blocks, rubbles, pieces of furniture, drilled cores...) through this technique, to preliminary check for contamination, and to evaluate contamination location, homogeneity, and activity. These methods have proven themselves relevant and useful to build appropriate analyses and optimized decontamination protocols at the LASE (Laboratory of Analyses and Operators' Support). In this paper, we propose a new autoradiographic tool providing the identification of the contaminating radionuclide of a sample or an area, based on the stacking of several screens. The decrease of the signal screen after screen could be considered specific to one radionuclide. Modeling results obtained through Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) were in excellent agreement with experimental results obtained with sealed sources. Moreover, a method was developed to scan all the screens in the stack in only one run (instead of as many runs as screens) to shorten analysis duration. In the case of non-penetrating radiations (α particles, 3H- or 14C-emitted

  20. External exposure doses due to gamma emitting natural radionuclides in some Egyptian building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moharram, B.M. [Engineering Physics and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Suliman, M.N. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Zahran, N.F. [Center Laboratory for Elemental and Isotopic Analysis, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Shennawy, S.E. [Engineering Physics and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); El Sayed, A.R., E-mail: aymanrabie2002@yahoo.co.in [Engineering Physics and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt)

    2012-01-15

    Using of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K and their progeny results in an external exposures of the housing of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for typical Egyptian rooms are calculated using the analytical method and activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in some building materials. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling assumed. Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K content in eight samples representative Clay soil and different building materials used in most recent Egyptian building were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The specific activity for {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, from the selected samples, were in the range 14.15-60.64, 2.75-84.66 and 7.35-554.4 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. The average indoor absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 0.005 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} to 0.071 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation varies from 0.025 to 0.345 mSv. An outdoor dose rate for typical building samples in addition to some radiological hazards has been introduced for comparison. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K content in different building materials measured using HR-ICPMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical simulation technique has been employed to room models to evaluate indoor specific absorbed dose rates in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparing the results

  1. Problems in labeling receptor ligands and related compounds with positron emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the clinical application of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, there can be a need for tracer preparation several times a day, or in the case of some compounds such as 0-15 labeled water, several times an hour. This type of production schedule means that special emphasis must be placed both on reducing radiation dose to the chemist and on performing rapid quality control of products. The production, reduction of radiation dose, and quality control of oxygen-15 labeled oxygen, carbon monoxide and water, as well as carbon-11 labeled glucose and palmitic acid are used as examples for compounds being produced routinely for PET studies at Washington University

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of different positron emitting radionuclides incorporated in a soft tissue volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya D, H.; Martinez O, S. A. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Av. Central del Norte 39-115, 150003 Tunja, Boyaca (Colombia); Sevilla M, A. C. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo CRYOMAG, 111321 Bogota D. C. (Colombia); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: grupo.finuas@uptc.edu.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out where compounds with positron-emitters radionuclides, like FDG ({sup 18}F), Acetate ({sup 11}C), and Ammonium ({sup 13}N), were incorporated into a soft tissue volume, in the aim to estimate the type of particles produced their energies, their mean free paths, and the absorbed dose at different distances with respect to the center of the volume. The volume was modeled with a radius larger than the maximum range of positrons in order to produce 0.511 keV annihilation gamma-ray photons. With the obtained results the equivalent dose, in various organs and tissues able to metabolize different radiopharmaceutical drugs, can be estimated. (Author)

  3. The assessment of low-level contamination from gamma-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate a new analytical technique to improve the radionuclide activity estimate from area measurements of small-area spectral peaks obtained using multi-channel spectrometry. These improvements are based on the application of Bayesian peak fitting, a method of peak fitting that allows the information contained in a spectrum to be used more fully than is possible with the method of gross counting currently employed. The study carried out showed that activity estimates and confidence intervals for activity could be more precisely defined, and the time-related costs reduced up to 50% when making activity measurements by the peak-fitting method (for a fixed detection limit) instead of gross counting. Testing of the method under real conditions would be the logical follow-up to the work achieved

  4. Strand breaks in plasmid DNA following positional changes of Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our studies is to elucidate the kinetics of DNA strand breaks caused by low-energy Auger electron emitters in close proximity to DNA. Previously we have studied the DNA break yields in plasmids after the decay of indium-111 bound to DNA or free in solution. In this work, we compare the DNA break yields in supercoiled DNA of iodine-125 decaying close to DNA following DNA intercalation, minor-groove binding, or surface binding, and at a distance form DNA. Supercoiled DNA, stored at 4 C to accumulate radiation dose from the decay of 125I, was then resolved by gel electrophoresis into supercoiled, nicked circular, and linear forms, representing undamaged DNA, single-strand breaks, and double-strand breaks respectively. DNA-intercalated or groove-bound 125I is more effective than surface-bound radionuclide or 125I free in solution. The hydroxyl radical scavenger DMSO protects against damage by 125I free in solution but has minimal effect on damage by groove-bound 125I. (orig.)

  5. Activity Concentrations and Dose Assessment of Gamma Emitting Radionuclides in Canned Tuna and Sardines Produced after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Zaid Q; Al-Masoud, Fahad I; Ababneh, Anas M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the radioactivity concentrations of gamma emitting radionuclides in canned tuna and sardines that were produced after the Fukushima nuclear accident and to assess the resulting radiation doses to the public. Fifty-eight brands of canned tuna and sardines consumed in the Middle East and produced from different parts of the world were analyzed using a germanium detector. Cesium-137 (137Cs) was not detected above the minimum detectable activity in any of the samples. Natural radionuclides 40K, 226Ra and 228Ra were detected with wide activity concentration ranges and with average values of (in Bq kg(-1) wet weight): 68 ± 36, 0.31 ± 0.45, 0.34 ± 0.25, respectively, in tuna samples and with averages of 129 ± 67, 0.20 ± 0.33, 0.60 ± 0.31 in sardine samples. The results of the activity concentrations of 40K and 226Ra showed some regional dependence. Tuna samples produced in Europe have almost twice the concentration of 40K and half the concentration of 226Ra as compared to samples produced in either East or South Asia and North America. Moreover, sardine samples produced in North Africa and Europe have almost twice the concentrations of 40K and 226Ra as those produced in East or South Asia and North America. Dose assessment due to ingestion of canned seafood was also performed, and the committed effective dose was found to be well within the worldwide average. PMID:26606067

  6. Experimental determination of the gamma emitting radionuclides in the environment samples (soil, vegetation, sediments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioisotopes are introduced into the environment as part of authorised nuclear activities. The environmental factors considered are: surface water, drinking water, soil, sediments and spontaneous vegetation. The immobilisation of these radioactive elements in uppermost soil layers represents a problem for human health since they can easily be incorporated in the food chain. The control and maintaining under the permitted limits of the emissions, may be a first step towards the total recovery of contaminated areas. The paper presents the study about the determination of gamma emitting radioisotopes from the soil, vegetation and sediments samples around the ICSI Rm Valcea area. Those are necessary for the determination of the 'background level' before the commissioning of Cryogenic Pilot Plant for Deuterium and Tritium Separation . The determination of gamma radioisotopes from environment samples was carried out by a usual gamma-spectrometry system consisting of a high purity germanium (HPGe) solid state detector (65% relative efficiency), preamplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and multichannel analyser of the spectra. (authors)

  7. Subcellular Distribution of Gallium-67 and other Auger-emitting Radionuclides in Human and Animal Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subcellular distributions of the Auger-emitting radiopharmaceuticals 67Ga citrate, 111In-bleomycin, 63Zn-bleomycin, 123/125/I-Conray and 123/125I-Biligram in human and animal tumours and normal tissues were studied using differential centrifugation. For 67Ga, at 19 to 54 h after injection, the observed subcellular distribution patterns were similar in all the tissues studied with 2-5% of the total tissue radioactivity being associated with the cell nuclei. For 63Zn and 111In administered as the bleomycin complex or as chloride, as well as for the X ray contrast media 135/125I-Conray and 123/125I-Biligram the fraction associated with the nuclei was only 1-2%. The studies indicate that, for the 67Ga, 111In, 63Zn complexes or compounds studied, only γ1 to 4% of the Auger emissions are likely to arise in the cell nucleus. (author)

  8. Dosimetry of bone metastases in targeted radionuclide therapy with alpha-emitting 223Ra-dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra-dichloride is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical used in the treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer. Image-based dosimetric studies remain challenging because the emitted photons are few. The aim of this study was to implement a methodology for in-vivo quantitative planar imaging, and to assess the absorbed dose to lesions using the MIRD approach. The study included nine Caucasian patients with 24 lesions (6 humeral head lesions, 4 iliac wing lesions, 2 scapular lesions, 5 trochanter lesions, 3 vertebral lesions, 3 glenoid lesions, 1 coxofemoral lesion). The treatment consisted of six injections (one every 4 weeks) of 50 kBq per kg body weight. Gamma-camera calibrations for 223Ra included measurements of sensitivity and transmission curves. Patients were statically imaged for 30 min, using an MEGP collimator, double-peak acquisition, and filtering to improve the image quality. Lesions were delineated on 99mTc-MDP whole-body images, and the ROIs superimposed on the 223Ra images after image coregistration. The activity was quantified with background, attenuation, and scatter correction. Absorbed doses were assessed deriving the S values from the S factors for soft-tissue spheres of OLINDA/EXM, evaluating the lesion volumes by delineation on the CT images. In 12 lesions with a wash-in phase the biokinetics were assumed to be biexponential, and to be monoexponential in the remainder. The optimal timing for serial acquisitions was between 1 and 5 h, between 18 and 24 h, between 48 and 60 h, and between 7 and 15 days. The error in cumulated activity neglecting the wash-in phase was between 2 % and 12 %. The mean effective half-life (T1/2eff) of 223Ra was 8.2 days (range 5.5-11.4 days). The absorbed dose (D) after the first injection was 0.7 Gy (range 0.2-1.9 Gy). Considering the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles (RBE = 5), DRBE = 899 mGy/MBq (range 340-2,450 mGy/MBq). The percent uptake of 99mTc and 223Ra

  9. Simultaneous determination of alpha-emitting radionuclides of thorium and plutonium in human tissues including bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of environmental, i.e., non-occupational, levels of α-emitting isotopes of thorium and plutonium in human lung, lymph nodes, liver, kidney, thyroid, spleen, gonads, and bone. Known amounts of soft tissues (5-850 g) spiked with 1-2 dpm tracers of 229Th and 242Pu are wet ashed with nitric acid, and H2SO4 with occasional addition of HNO3 and H2O2. Th and Pu are coprecipitated with 10 mg of Fe carrier by gradual addition of ammonium hydroxide. The precipitate is dissolved in HNO3 and adjusted to 4 M. Th and Pu are co-extracted into 25% (v/v) trilaurylamine in xylene. Th is backwashed with 10 M HCl and the Pu is back-extracted with 2 M H2SO4. Th and Pu are electrodeposited separately on platinum planchets and determined by α spectrometry. Bone samples are wet ashed with nitric acid and H2O2, after spiking with 229Th and 242Pu tracers. Th and Pu are coprecipitated with calcium oxalate by adding oxalic acid. The precipitate is heated at 5500C, dissolved in nitric acid, and adjusted to 4 M. Then extractions, back-extractions, electrodeposition and measurements are performed as described for soft tissues. The recovery for Th ranged from 30 to 93% with a mean of 55% and for Pu from 32 to 94% with a mean of 71%. 4 figures, 2 tables

  10. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  11. Radionuclide, scintillation cocktail and chemical/color quench influence on discriminator setting in gross alpha/beta measurements by LSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross alpha/beta measurements in drinking waters enable radiochemical composition analysis in environmental studies providing efficient screening method that can indicate whether water contains elevated levels of any radionuclide. Routine gross alpha/beta activity monitoring in drinking waters has been carried out for a few years in laboratory for low-level radioactivity measurements in Novi Sad according to ASTM method, performing measurements on liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220 which can simultaneously generate alpha/beta spectra of samples by Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA circuit). In this paper, PSA discriminator impact was investigated to ensure obtaining of accurate and reliable alpha/beta activities. One novelty of presented work is PSA parameter setup with two combinations of radionuclides (241Am, 226Ra and 90Sr/90Y) with varying activity concentrations. Performed experiments also make contribution to investigations on the manner in which chemical and color quench affect optimal PSA parameter setting and further on, their altogether influence on gross alpha/beta activity measurements. Nitromethane, 15.8 M nitric acid and water, as well as yellow and yellow-orange dye, were used as quenching agents in order to test PSA/interference factor behavior in the presence of quenchers with different quenching strengths. Variation of PSA setting in quenched samples with two different commercially available cocktails (Ultima Gold LLT and OptiPhase HiSafe 3) was also tested. Lastly, application i.e. assessment of obtained PSA-SQP(E) correlation on the obtained results of activity concentrations of few artesian well water samples and colored spiked samples, based on the measured SQP(E) value of samples, has been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Thorough study on influence of relevant factors on optimal PSA level in gross alpha/beta measurements in waters is presented. • Experiments were performed on liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220™ according to

  12. Somatostatin-receptor-targeted {alpha}-emitting {sup 213}Bi is therapeutically more effective than {beta}{sup -}-emitting {sup 177}Lu in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Tapan K. [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Norenberg, Jeffrey P. [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)]. E-mail: jpnoren@unm.edu; Anderson, Tamara L. [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Prossnitz, Eric R. [Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Stabin, Michael G. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Atcher, Robert W. [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Introduction: Advance clinical cancer therapy studies of patients treated with somatostatin receptor (sstr)-targeted [DOTA{sup 0}-Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide (DOTATOC) labeled with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) {beta}{sup -}-emitters have shown overall response rates in the range of 15-33%. In order to improve outcomes, we sought to compare the therapeutic effectiveness of sstr-targeted high-LET {alpha}-emitting {sup 213}Bi to that of low-LET {beta}{sup -}-emitting {sup 177}Lu by determining relative biological effectiveness (RBE) using the external {gamma}-beam of {sup 137}Cs as reference radiation. Methods: Sstr-expressing human pancreatic adenocarcinoma Capan-2 cells and A549 control cells were used for this study. The effects of different radiation doses of {sup 213}Bi and {sup 177}Lu labeled to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid and sstr-targeted DOTATOC were investigated with a clonogenic cell survival assay. Apoptosis was measured using the Cell Death Detection ELISA{sup PLUS} 10x kit. Results: Using equimolar DOTATOC treatment with concurrent irradiation with a {sup 137}Cs source as reference radiation, the calculated RBE of [{sup 213}Bi]DOTATOC was 3.4, as compared to 1.0 for [{sup 177}Lu]DOTATOC. As measured in terms of absorbance units, [{sup 213}Bi]DOTATOC caused a 2.3-fold-greater release of apoptosis-specific mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes than [{sup 177}Lu]DOTATOC at the final treatment time of 96 h (P<.001) in sstr-expressing Capan-2 cells. Conclusions: In conclusion, at the same absorbed dose, [{sup 213}Bi]DOTATOC is therapeutically more effective in decreasing survival than is [{sup 177}Lu]DOTATOC in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells due to its comparatively higher RBE.

  13. Guidelines and recommendations for practices of their clinical use of standards of compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides approved as established techniques. 2009 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent advancement and prevalance of clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) have forced us to review previous manuscript of Standards of compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides approved as established techniques for medical use and recommendations on practices of their clinical use'. Subcommittee on Medical Application of Positron Emitting Radionuclides of Medical Science and Pharmaceutical Committee in Japan Radioisotope Association has reviewed standards and recommendations for clinical use. Similar to the previous version of recommendations on practices of clinical use, this version includes 'clinical purpose', 'principle of measurement', 'methods of administration', and 'radiation exposure' of particular PET pharmaceuticals. This version includes 12 PET ligands that have been already approved as 'compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as established techniques for medical use' in the committee (18fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG), 15O-oxygen, 15O-carbon monoxide, 15O-carbon dioxide, 11C-monoxide, 13N-nitrogen, 13N-ammonia, 15O-water, 11C-L-methionine, 11C-sodium acetate, 11C-N-methylspiperone and 11C-choline), and three newly approved compounds (18F-sodium fluoride, 11C-raclopride, and 11C-flumazenil) which have been required for clinical use in many medical institutes. Each medical institute should have a committee and establish internal system to account for conducting clinical use of radiolabeled compounds. (author)

  14. Search for Majoron-emitting modes of double-beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Beauchamp, E; Beck, D; Belov, V; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Chaves, J; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; Davis, J; DeVoe, R; Delaquis, S; Didberidze, T; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Jiang, X S; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Leonard, F; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Ouellet, C; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Rivas, A; Rowson, P C; Rozo, M P; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tosi, D; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vogel, P; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2014-01-01

    EXO-200 is a single phase liquid xenon detector designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{136}$Xe. Here we report on a search for various Majoron-emitting modes based on 100 kg$\\cdot$yr exposure of $^{136}$Xe. A lower limit of $T^{^{136}Xe}_{1/2} >1.2...10^{24}$ yr at 90% C.L. on the half-life of the spectral index = 1 Majoron decay was obtained, corresponding to a constraint on the Majoron-neutrino coupling constant of $||<$ (0.8-1.7)...10$^{-5}$.

  15. Automatic device for measuring {beta}-emitting sources: P.A.P.A. {beta}-meters; Dispositif automatique pour la mesure de sources emettrices de rayonnement {beta}: P.A.P.A. {beta} metres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomer, J.; Valentin, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1969-07-01

    The apparatus described is designed for measuring {beta}-emitting elements by the absorption method; it is suitable for carrying out a large number of routine analyses. A mechanical device pushes an aluminium absorption set automatically between the source and the detector; the movement is programmed for cutting on and off by a transistorized electronic unit, with printing out and punching of the results on tape; then this can be mathematically processed by a computer (tracing of absorption spectra, extrapolation and calculation of the activity). The detector is either a {beta}-probe or a proportional counter with a specially designed loop. For routine measurements, the accuracy obtained, with all corrections made, is from 5 to 8 per cent; the reproducibility is about 2 per cent. (authors) [French] L'appareillage decrit est destine aux mesures des elements emetteurs {beta} par la methode d'absorption et il permet d'effectuer, en routine, un nombre important de mesures. Un ensemble mecanique effectue le passage automatique, sous vide primaire, d'un jeu d'absorption en aluminium entre la source et le detecteur, ce passage est programme en pre-temps ou pre-coup par un ensemble electronique a transistors, avec impression et perforation sur bandes des resultats des mesures pour traitement mathematique par un ordinateur (trace du spectre d'absorption, extrapolation et calcul d'activite). Le detecteur est soit une sonde {beta}, soit un compteur proportionnel a boucle specialement realise. Sur des mesures de routine, la precision obtenue, toutes corrections effectuees, est de 5 a 8 pour cent et la reproductibilite de l'ordre de 2 pour cent. (auteur)

  16. First measurement of several $\\beta$-delayed neutron emitting isotopes beyond N=126

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Arcones, A; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Borzov, I N; Bowry, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Cortés, G; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García, A R; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marketin, T; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, Ch; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Taín, J L; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P; Yeremin, A

    2015-01-01

    The $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities of neutron rich Hg and Tl nuclei have been measured together with $\\beta$-decay half-lives for 20 isotopes of Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in the mass region N$\\gtrsim$126. These are the heaviest species where neutron emission has been observed so far. These measurements provide key information to evaluate the performance of nuclear microscopic and phenomenological models in reproducing the high-energy part of the $\\beta$-decay strength distribution. In doing so, it provides important constraints to global theoretical models currently used in $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  17. Momentum dependence of spin polarization for beta emitting nuclei produced through charge exchange reaction at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momota, S., E-mail: momota.sadao@kochi-tech.ac.jp [Kochi University of Tech. (Japan); Mihara, M. [Osaka University (Japan); Nishimura, D. [RIKEN (Japan); Fukuda, M.; Kamisho, Y.; Wakabayashi, M.; Matsuta, K. [Osaka University (Japan); Suzuki, S.; Nagashima, M. [Niigata University (Japan); Zhu, Shengyun; Yuan, Daqing; Zheng, Yongnan; Yi, Zuo; Fan, Ping [CIAE (China); Izumikawa, T. [Niigata University, RI Center (Japan); Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Torikoshi, M. [NIRS (Japan); Minamisono, T. [Osaka University (Japan); and others

    2013-05-15

    In order to investigate the polarization process in charge exchange reactions, we observed the momentum and angular distribution as well as the nuclear polarization of a proton-rich beta-emitting nucleus, {sup 28}P (I{sup {pi}} = 3{sup +}, T{sub 1/2} = 270 msec), produced through the reaction {sup 28}Si+ {sup 9}Be at E = 100 MeV/u, by selecting the momentum and the ejection angle. An analysis by using double Gaussian functions resolved the observed momentum distribution into two reaction components, nucleon knockout and pick-up abrasion reactions, as suggested in a previous study. The behavior of the observed angular distribution and nuclear polarization implies the influence of those two components. The momentum dependence of the observed nuclear polarization of {sup 28}P could be consistently reproduced by a simple model, in which two reaction components are considered. The present study also shows that the charge exchange reaction at intermediate energy is a useful method to produce polarized beta-emitting nuclei, especially for proton-rich nuclei.

  18. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in

  19. Calibration of the IRD/CNEN whole-body counter unity for gamma-ray emitting radio-nuclides with energies greater than 200 KeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to calibrate the IRD Whole Body Counter Unit for γ-ray emitting radionuclides with energies greater than 200 KeV a fiber glass mannequin, filled with polyehylene bags containing radioactive solutions of known activity, was used. Solutions of Cs-137, Mn-54, Co-60, K-40 and Ra-228 were prepared. Each phanton was counted by a NaI(Tl) 8''x4'' for 1000 minutes using a whole body geometry. Detection efficiency and full width at half maximum curves were plotted as function of the energy and minimum detectable activity evaluations were performed in the region of the mentioned radionuclides for a counting time of 30 minutes. (author)

  20. A comparison between the discrete point approximation and NOMOGRAM methods for estimation of dose resulting from gamma rays emitted by radionuclide in finite cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the nomogram method and discrete point approximation can be used for estimation of doses resulting from gamma rays emitted by radionuclides in finite cloud. The former can only be applied for evaluation of dose from nine noble gas finite clouds in case of constant weather conditions, but the later can be used for estimation of doses from some radionuclides finite clouds is case of changing weather condition during the transport times. Some calculations using the two methods have been made under the described situation. The comparison computations for absorbed dose rate in air show a very good agreement. Mostly, above 86% of the computed data are within a factor of 2, up to 96% of data are within a factor of 3. Naturally, it should be noticed that the remaining percentage have an error up to a factor of 6 at stable atmospheric condition. (2 tabs.)

  1. Measurement of activity of surfaces contaminated by beta-emitting nuclides and 55Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The responses of a variety of different types of surface contamination monitoring probes to both small area and distributed sources of the β-emitting nuclides, 90Sr/90Y, 204Tl, 147Pm, 14C and 63Ni, have been measured. The responses to the low-energy X-ray emitting electron-capture nuclide, 55Fe, have also been measured. A figure of merit for the comparison of different types of probe has been derived and applied to the measured responses. The responses of a beryllium-window sodium iodide scintillation probe to 55Fe with integral and differential bias is described in detail; calculated responses to the electron-capture nuclides, 109Cd and 125I, are also included in this report. (author)

  2. Positron excess in the center of the Milky Way from short-lived $\\beta^+$ emitting isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, Maxim S

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the INTEGRAL satellite revealed the presence of yet unexplained excess in the central region of the Galaxy at the energies around 511 keV. These gamma-rays are produced in the process of positron annihilation, the needed rate is around $10^{42}~\\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. In this short paper it is shown that \\pos -emitting isotopes that are formed in interactions of subrelativistic cosmic rays (CRs) with light nuclei (CNONe) can account for a considerable fraction -- up to several tens of percent -- of $e^{+}$ production rate in the central region.

  3. Analysis of gamma emitting radionuclides (terrestrial and anthropogenic) in soil samples from Kilis province in south Anatolia, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The study presents the activity of terrestrial and anthropogenic radionuclides in soil. • The activity concentrations of radionuclides are measured using gamma spectrometer. • Absorbed gamma dose rate from terrestrial radionuclides is estimated. • Annual effective dose due to external exposure is estimated. • In this study, the regional scale radioactivity map is produced. - Abstract: In recent years, there has been great concern about analysis of radionuclide content in environmental samples (soil, water, etc.) in many countries. The aim of the present study is to analyze the activity concentrations of terrestrial (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and anthropogenic (137Cs) radionuclides in surface soil samples collected from different locations in and around Kilis province using the high-resolution gamma spectrometer with HPGe detector and evaluate external ionizing radiation exposure in outdoor air. The mean values of the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in the soil samples were analyzed as 16.1, 15.0, 206.0 and 9.5 Bq kg−1, respectively. Evaluated values of absorbed gamma dose rate in outdoor air and the corresponding external annual effective dose varied from 5 to 75 nGy h−1 with a mean value of 25 nGy h−1 and 6–92 μSv with a mean value of 31 μSv, respectively. These mean values were found to be within acceptable limits

  4. Calibration System for Dosimetry and Radioactivity of Beta-Emitting Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Ye, Sungjoon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kwangjae; Park, Uljae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to develop a calibration system for radioactivity of beta sources using a calibration constant which derived from comparing measurement and simulation. It is hard to measure the activity of beta emitter isotope due to self absorption and scattering. So the activity involves high levels of uncertainty. The surface dose of Sr/Y-90 standard isotope was measured using extrapolation chamber and calculated using Monte Carlo. The activity (4.077 kBq) of source was measured by NIST measurement assurance program. And several correction factors were calculated Monte Carlo method. The measurement result was corrected by correction factors. The calibration constant was defined as the ratio of surface dose to activity. It was 4.5Χ10{sup -8} and 6.52Χ10{sup -8} for measurement and Monte Carlo, respectively. There was about 15.4% difference in the calibration constant determined by the two techniques. The depth uncertainty makes the difference because of high dose gradients. Some correction factors have error due to scattering by detector geometry. A test source will be produced by HANARO. The activity will be calculated using calibration constant. The activity will be performed cross-calibration with NIST. Finally, the system will provide accurate information of sources.

  5. Decontamination Experiments on Intact Pig Skin Contaminated with Beta-Gamma- Emitting Nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edvardsson, K.A.; Hagsgaard, S. [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Swensson, A. [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1966-11-15

    A number of decontamination experiments have been performed on intact pig skin. In most of the experiments NaI-131 in water solution has been utilized because this nuclide is widely used within the Studsvik research establishment, is easy to detect and relatively harmless, and is practical to use in these experiments. Among the {beta} {gamma}-nuclides studied 1-131 has furthermore proved to be the one most difficult to remove from the skin. The following conclusions and recommendations regarding the decontamination of skin are therefore valid primarily for iodine in the form of Nal, but are probably also applicable to many other {beta} {gamma}-nuclides. a) A prolonged interval between contamination and decontamination has a negative effect on the result of the decontamination. Therefore start decontamination as soon as possible after the contamination. b) Soap and water has proved to be the most suitable decontamination agent. A number of other agents have appeared to be harmful to the skin. Therefore, first of all use only soap and water in connection with gentle rubbing. c) No clear connection between the temperature of the water for washing and the result of the decontamination has been demonstrated. d) Skin not degreased before the contamination seems to be somewhat easier to decontaminate than degreased skin, particularly if the activity has been on the skin for a long time. Therefore do not remove the sebum of the skin when engaged on radioactive work involving contamination risks. e) Irrigation of the contaminated surface with a solution containing the corresponding inactive ions or ordinary water in large quantities may considerably decrease the skin contamination. f) In radioactive work of long duration involving high risks of contamination prophylactic measures in the form of a protective substance ('invisible glove'), type Kerodex, may make decontamination easier.

  6. The measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in beach sand cores of coastal regions of Ramsar, Iran using HPGe detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Marziyeh; Moussavi Zarandi, Sayyed Ali; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Zare, Mohammad Reza

    2013-09-15

    Radionuclides which present in different beach sands are sources of external exposure that contribute to the total radiation exposure of human. (226)Ra, (235)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs analysis has been carried out in sand samples collected at six depth levels, from eight locations of the northern coast of Iran, Ramsar, using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average Specific activities of natural radionuclides viz., (226)Ra, (235)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, in the 0-36 cm depth sand were found as: 19.2±0.04, 2.67±0.17, 17.9±0.06, 337.5±0.61 and 3.35±0.12 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The effects of organic matter content and pH value of sand samples on the natural radionuclide levels were also investigated. Finally, the measured radionuclide concentrations in the Ramsar beach were compared with the world average values, as reported by UNSCEAR (2000). None of the studied beaches were considered as a radiological risk. PMID:23850123

  7. The measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in beach sand cores of coastal regions of Ramsar, Iran using HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In this research, distribution of radionuclides in the sand profile has been assessed. • This research aims to establish baseline map of radioactivity in Ramsar beach sands. • 48 beach sand samples from 8 different coastal zones were collected for analyzes. • The line of 185.7 keV was used to calculate activity of 235U. • The activity contents are below limit values and there was no radiological risk. -- Abstract: Radionuclides which present in different beach sands are sources of external exposure that contribute to the total radiation exposure of human. 226Ra, 235U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs analysis has been carried out in sand samples collected at six depth levels, from eight locations of the northern coast of Iran, Ramsar, using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average Specific activities of natural radionuclides viz., 226Ra, 235U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs, in the 0–36 cm depth sand were found as: 19.2 ± 0.04, 2.67 ± 0.17, 17.9 ± 0.06, 337.5 ± 0.61 and 3.35 ± 0.12 Bq kg−1, respectively. The effects of organic matter content and pH value of sand samples on the natural radionuclide levels were also investigated. Finally, the measured radionuclide concentrations in the Ramsar beach were compared with the world average values, as reported by UNSCEAR (2000). None of the studied beaches were considered as a radiological risk

  8. Biological effects of inhaled radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on various types of radionuclides that may be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. One of the primary goals of this ICRP Task Group is to assess specifically the biological implications of inhaled plutonium. Because other transuranics are becoming more abundant, information on americium, curium and einsteinium is included. Data are also included from studies of polonium and of several beta-gamma emitting isotopes. The Task Group evaluated most of the data on the biological effects of inhaled radionuclides in experimental animals to identify the tissues at risk and to assess possible dose-response relationships. Few data from human cases of inhaled radionuclides are available for this assessment. The biological effects of nonradioactive air pollutants were also considered to provide the perspective that all air pollutants can have a deleterious effect on human life and to emphasize the possibility for combined or synergistic effects of nonradioactive and radioactive substances on the respiratory tract. (orig./HP)

  9. Distribution of artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclide activity concentration in the top soil in the vicinity of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant and other regions in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksiene, Benedikta, E-mail: bena@ar.fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Marciulioniene, Danute [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos str. 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Rozkov, Andrej [PLL ' LOKMIS' Radiometry Department, Visoriu 2, LT-08300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gudelis, Arunas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Holm, Elis [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden); Galvonaite, Audrone [Lithuanian Hydrometeorological Service under the Ministry of Environment, Rudnios str. 6, LT-09300 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2012-11-15

    The impact of the operating Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) on the contamination of top soil layer with artificial radionuclides has been studied. Results of the investigation of artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclide distribution in soil in the vicinity of the INPP and distant regions in Lithuania in 1996-2008 (INPP operational period) show that nowadays {sup 137}Cs remains the most important artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclide in the upper soil layer. Mean {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in the top soil layer in the vicinity of the INPP were found to be significantly lower compared to those in remote regions of Varena and Plunge ({approx} 300 km from INPP). In 1996 and 1998 mean {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations were in the range of 28-45 Bq/kg in the nearest vicinity to the INPP, 103 Bq/kg in Varena and 340 Bq/kg in Plunge region. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations were 5-20 times lower in meadow soil (4-14 Bq/kg) compared to swamp and forest soil. {sup 60}Co, the INPP origin radionuclide, was detected in samples only in 1996 and 2000, and the activity concentration of {sup 60}Co was found to be in the range from 0.4 to 7.0 Bq/kg at the sampling ground nearest to the INPP. Average annual activity concentrations of the INPP origin {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co in the air and depositions in the INPP region were modeled using Pasquill-Gifford equations. The modeling results of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co depositional load in the INPP vicinity agree with the experimentally obtained values. Our results provide the evidence that the operation of INPP did not cause any significant contamination in soil surface. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gamma-emitters in top soil were studied during the operational period of the Ignalina NPP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only {sup 137}Cs was detected in each sample of the top soil in studied regions every year. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean {sup 137}Cs activity in the top soil of the INPP

  10. Calibration of non-discriminating scintillating instruments for sensitivities to naturally occuring gamma radiation emitting radionuclides at environmental concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of calibrating non-discriminating gamma radiation detectors for environmental level measurements is described. It is based on a method used to calibrate field gamma spectrometers, and has several advantages over the more traditional point-source approach. Radiological measurements are taken on pads with known concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium, and the sensitivities to these naturally occurring terrestrial sources of gamma radiation are determined. Measurements can then be converted into radionuclide concentration or exposure rates. (author)

  11. Calibration of radionuclides with decay trough beta emission or electron capture by liquid scintillation technique; Calibracao de radionuclideos que decaem por emissao beta ou por captura eletronica pela tecnica de cintilacao liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Jamir dos Santos

    2000-02-01

    In this work is reported a methodology a methodology for pure beta and electron capture radionuclides standardization, suing liquid scintillation technique. In this sense the CIEMAT/NIST method, recently utilized by international laboratories, was implemented and the lack in the Laboratorio Nacional das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI, of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, for adequate methodology to standardize this kind if radionuclides was filled, fact that was not present with alpha and gamma radionuclides. The implementation procedure evaluation was provided by concentration activity determination of the following radionuclides: {sup 14} C and {sup 90} Sr, pure beta emitters; {sup 55} Fe, electron capture decay; {sup 204} Tl, electron capture and beta decay and {sup 60} Co, beta-gamma emitter. In this way, a careful analysis of the implementation procedure with these radionuclides types, ranging on a broad energy spectral, was possible. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. Besides this intercomparisons, one was provided with a {sup 204} Tl solution, utilized in the international comparison recently promoted by BIPM, and another one with a {sup 60} C solution calibrated in LNMRI/CNEN previously by a relative calibration system, with a well type pressurized ionization chamber, and an absolute beta-gamma coincidence system, with a pill-box type proportional counter 4 {pi} geometry, coupled with a scintillator system with a sodium iodide cristal of 4x4 inches. The comparisons among LNMRI/CNEN results and the reference values, showed a small deviation of 1,32% for {sup 14} C, 0,40% for {sup 60} Co, 1,12% for {sup 55} Fe, 0,10% for {sup 90} Sr and 0,73% for {sup

  12. Assessment of gamma emitting radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem of Kakrapar Atomic Power Station and evaluation of radiological doses to aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During operation and maintenance of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS), low level radioactive liquid waste is generated and released to the aquatic ecosystem (Moticher lake). The silt and aquatic weed (Hydrilla verticillata) samples collected from different locations in Moticher lake were analysed for 137Cs, 134Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn and 40K during 2007-2008. A wide variation in activity levels of 137Cs, 134Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn and 40K in silt and weed samples were observed in aquatic system of KAPS. The activity buildup in the silt is confined to a small area in the Moticher lake. The activity levels were found to be insignificant at 1 km away from discharge point (upstream and downstream). An attempt was made to evaluate the radiological dose to aquatic weed (Hydrilla verticillata), which was found to be well within the dose limit prescribed by US DOE. The total radiological dose due to the naturally occurring radionuclide (40K) is comparatively higher than that of other reactor released gamma emitting radionuclides. (author)

  13. Therapeutic radionuclides: production and decay property considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, W A; Goeckeler, W F; Ehrhardt, G J; Ketring, A R

    1991-01-01

    The development of effective therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals requires careful consideration in the selection of the radionuclide. The in vivo targeting and clearance properties of the carrier molecule must be balanced with the decay properties of the attached radionuclide. Radionuclides for therapeutic applications fall into three general categories: beta-particle emitters, alpha-particle emitters, and Auger and Coster-Kronig-electron emitters following electron capture. Alpha particles and Auger electrons deposit their energy over short distances with a high LET that limits the ability of cells to repair damage to DNA. Despite their high levels of cytotoxicity, the relatively short range of alpha particles requires binding of the carrier molecule to most cancer cells within a tumor in order to be effective. Because of the extremely short range of Auger electrons, the radionuclide must be carried directly into the nucleus to elicit high radiotoxicity, making it necessary to deliver the radionuclide to every cell within a tumor cell population. These characteristics impose rigid restrictions on the nature of the carrier molecules for these types of particle emitters but successful targeting of these types of radionuclides could result in high therapeutic ratios. Most beta-emitting radionuclides are produced in nuclear rectors via neutron capture reactions; however, a few are produced in charged-particle accelerators. For radionuclides produced by direct neutron activation, the quantities and specific activities that can be produced are determined in large part by the cross-section of the target isotope and the flux of the reactor. Many applications (e.g., therapeutic bone agents, radiolabeled microspheres, radiocolloids) do not require high-specific activities and can therefore utilize the wide range of radionuclides that can be produced in sufficient quantity by direct neutron activation. Other applications (e.g., MAb labeling) require high-specific activity

  14. Is the human nasal cavity at risk from inhaled radionuclides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of three life-span studies in which beagle dogs inhaled relatively soluble forms of beta-emitting radionuclides, a number of cancers of the nasal cavity have arisen at long times after the inhalation exposure. No such cancers were observed in the control dogs. Data obtained in other studies involving serial sacrifice of dogs that received these radionuclides in similar forms have shown that high local concentrations of the radionuclides can persist in nasal turbinates for long periods of time, depending on the physical half-life of the radionuclide inhaled. Several nasal carcinomas have also been observed in dogs injected with 137CsCl in which the relative concentrations of beta activity in the turbinate region were not as pronounced as in the above studies. Similar risks of sinonasal cancer were calculated for dogs in each of these studies regardless of differences in radionuclide, dosimetry, and route of administration. Since sinonasal cancers have occurred in people exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides, it is reasonable to assume this could occur with beta emitters as well. Radiation protection guidelines should account for the sinonasal region being at risk. 23 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  15. Rapid screening and analysis of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in liquids using a single sample preparation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Bahman; Henitz, James B; Carter, Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    A multifaceted radiochemical testing procedure has been developed to analyze a large number of liquid samples and measure a wide range of radionuclides in a short period of time. This method involves a single, unique and fast sample preparation procedure and allows sequential/concurrent determination of analytes with accuracy and precision. The same prepared sample can be selectively analyzed by gross alpha counting, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and alpha spectroscopy. This method is especially attractive in radiological emergency events where analytical data will be needed urgently as a basis for protective action. Given the simplicity and rapidity of the method, it may be suitable for field portable laboratories, which could save time and the cost associated with the transit of samples to a fixed laboratory. A 100 mL aliquot of sample was spiked with ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers and subjected to a chemical separation procedure using a combined BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 co-precipitation scheme. Then, the gross alpha-particle activity of the prepared sample was measured with a low-background gas-proportional counter, followed by the analysis of its photon-emitters using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with high-purity intrinsic Ge detectors. Gamma-ray determination of ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers was used to assess the chemical recoveries of BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 fractions, respectively. Selectivity of the radionuclides for co-precipitation with either BaSO4 or Fe(OH)3 components was also investigated. Alpha mass-efficiency curves were derived using ²³⁰Th and ²⁴¹Am standards as alpha-calibration sources. Various mixtures of radionuclides, including ⁵⁴Mn, ⁵⁷Co, ⁶⁰Co, ⁸⁵Sr, ⁸⁸Y, ¹⁰⁹Cd, ¹¹³Sn, ¹³⁷Cs, ¹³⁹Ce, ²⁰³Hg, ²⁰⁹Po, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²³⁰Th, ²⁴¹Am, and natural uranium were used in this study. Most were quantitatively assayed with high chemical recoveries. Alpha-isotope identification and assessment of the prepared

  16. The possibilities of autoradiographic imaging of the distribution of beta-emitting substances in dynamic processes by means of a gamma scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of imaging the distribution of beta-emitting substances by means of a gamma scintillation camera are described. The sensitivity and the resolving power of the gamma scintillation camera was tested by means of a 140 KeV-high resolution collimator and a newly developed lead collimator with smaller hole diameter and hole distance. As an example for tests of imaging dynamic processes the transportation of 32P-labelled defoliant in a tomato plant is examined. (author)

  17. Control of the risk of exposure to alpha emitting radionuclides in French nuclear power plants: example of Cattenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, B; Roupioz, A; Rabu, B; Bouvy, A; Labouglie, J F; Garcier, Y

    2003-01-01

    Control of the risk of internal exposure of EDF PWR plant maintenance workers by alpha-emitting radioactive elements is based on identification and quantification of the contamination of the systems. In 2001, an experiment carried out at Cattenom Power Plant during a unit outage in the presence of a leaking fuel cladding, based on measurement of alpha-emitting radioactive elements, made it possible to determine a realistic particle resuspension coefficient. A resuspension coefficient of 10(-6) m(-1) was adopted for operational radiological protection. An appropriate monitoring system for workers was set in place in collaboration with the occupational medicine and radiological protection department. It was based on prior estimation of the level of alpha contamination, and confirmed by swipe measurements, atmospheric surveillance by monitors, and collective analysis by nose blow samples from workers selected on the basis of their workstations, as well as supplementary individual measurements (monitoring of faeces). This surveillance made it possible to validate an appropriate work area monitoring system. PMID:14526975

  18. Characteristics, spatial distribution and vertical profile of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in the coastal environment of North Sinai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide concentrations of beach and dune sand from various sites in Al-Arish city and surrounding area, North Sinai, Egypt, were measured. The sampling sites included locations in the local harbor, Al-Arish valley and Zaranik protected area. The results indicate that the activities of the products of 232Th and 226Ra series in samples from the harbor and along the beach were higher than those from non-coastal sites. The activity concentrations of 232Th for beach sand ranged from 2.3 to 506.5 Bq/kg with an average of 83.4 Bq/kg, while that for dune sand ranged from 2.2 to 15.1 Bq/kg with an average of 6.4 Bq/kg. The average activity concentration of 226Ra for beach sand was 56.0 Bq/kg (2.9-261.5 Bq/kg), while that for dune sand was 6.5 Bq/kg (3.0-14.7 Bq/kg). The average activity concentrations of 40K for beach and dune sand were 88.1 Bq/kg and 178.4 Bq/kg, respectively. Six depth profiles in the harbor area were measured up to a depth of 1 m within more than two years. These sets of measurements allowed the determination of the migration rate of black sand to be 0.094 cm/day. Samples with the smallest grain size (<0.2 mm) were found to have the highest level of activities, which were attributed to their high content of black sand. No risk exists for public health based on the calculated effective dose equivalent and the recommended limit of 5 mSv/y. On the other hand, local children and adults may receive doses higher than this recommended limit in two locations in the Zaranik protected area according to a model developed in this study

  19. Dosimetry of bone metastases in targeted radionuclide therapy with alpha-emitting {sup 223}Ra-dichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacilio, Massimiliano [Azienda Ospealiera San Camillo Forlianini, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Medical Physics; Ventroni, Guido; Mango, Lucio [Azienda Ospealiera San Camillo Forlianini, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicin; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Frantellizzi, Viviana; Follacchio, Giulia Anna; Garkavaya, Tatiana [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo Pathological Sciences; Cassano, Bartolomeo; Lorenzon, Leda [Rome Univ. (Italy). Postgraduate School of Medical Physics; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Pani, Roberto [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Molecular Medicine; Ialongo, Pasquale [Azienda Ospealiera San Camillo Forlianini, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-01-15

    Ra-dichloride is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical used in the treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer. Image-based dosimetric studies remain challenging because the emitted photons are few. The aim of this study was to implement a methodology for in-vivo quantitative planar imaging, and to assess the absorbed dose to lesions using the MIRD approach. The study included nine Caucasian patients with 24 lesions (6 humeral head lesions, 4 iliac wing lesions, 2 scapular lesions, 5 trochanter lesions, 3 vertebral lesions, 3 glenoid lesions, 1 coxofemoral lesion). The treatment consisted of six injections (one every 4 weeks) of 50 kBq per kg body weight. Gamma-camera calibrations for {sup 223}Ra included measurements of sensitivity and transmission curves. Patients were statically imaged for 30 min, using an MEGP collimator, double-peak acquisition, and filtering to improve the image quality. Lesions were delineated on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP whole-body images, and the ROIs superimposed on the {sup 223}Ra images after image coregistration. The activity was quantified with background, attenuation, and scatter correction. Absorbed doses were assessed deriving the S values from the S factors for soft-tissue spheres of OLINDA/EXM, evaluating the lesion volumes by delineation on the CT images. In 12 lesions with a wash-in phase the biokinetics were assumed to be biexponential, and to be monoexponential in the remainder. The optimal timing for serial acquisitions was between 1 and 5 h, between 18 and 24 h, between 48 and 60 h, and between 7 and 15 days. The error in cumulated activity neglecting the wash-in phase was between 2 % and 12 %. The mean effective half-life (T{sub 1/2eff}) of {sup 223}Ra was 8.2 days (range 5.5-11.4 days). The absorbed dose (D) after the first injection was 0.7 Gy (range 0.2-1.9 Gy). Considering the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles (RBE = 5), D{sub RBE} = 899 mGy/MBq (range 340-2,450 mGy/MBq). The

  20. Controls of internal contamination from gamma-emitting radionuclides performed whole-body counter measures on children's population from Bjelorussia, Russia and Ucraina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results obtained in 9 measurement campaigns, performed at the ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) centres of Bologna and Roma-Casaccia from April 1991 to September 1992, for the assessment of internal contamination from gamma-emitting radionuclides. Homogeneous samples were selected for the controls, each one representing the children's population from given area. 15 areas were investigated and 24 examined; 20 of them were from Bjelorussia. 266 children, 124 male and 142 female subjects, were controlled. The instruments were intercalibrated according to the body size, from 20.25 kg to 81 kg. Body contamination only from 137Cs and 134Cs was detected. Evaluations were performed in order to test appropriate use of ICRP caesium biokynetic model for children aged 8 to 15 years. Statistical distribution of body activity data were carefully analyzed. It is demonstrated that the data are well fitted by lognormal distribution and a difference between sexes in terms of activity. A significant difference between sexes was found in terms of activity intake

  1. Report on the IAEA-CU-2006-03 world-wide open proficiency test on the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of analytical measurements play a vital role in our daily lives. Analytical data may be the basis upon which economic, legal or environmental management decisions are made, and they are essential in international trade, environmental protection, safe transportation, law enforcement, consumer safety and the preservation of human health. As an incorrect decision can be extremely costly and detrimental, it is essential that such measurements are accurate, reliable, cost effective and defensible. In addition, measurements performed by laboratories located worldwide should yield traceable and comparable results. Proficiency testing is a method for regularly assessing the accuracy of the analytical data produced by the laboratories of particular measurements. The IAEA-CU-2006-03 world-wide proficiency test (PT) on the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides in water grass and soil is conducted by the Chemistry Unit of the IAEA's Laboratories located in Seibersdorf (Austria), which is actively involved in the production and characterization of matrix reference materials of terrestrial origin, widely used for method validation and organization of proficiency tests and intercomparison studies. The Chemistry Unit is a part of the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory. This report describes the sample preparation methodology, data evaluation approach, summary evaluation of each nuclide and individual evaluation report for each laboratory

  2. Primary 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides by means of plastic scintillators; Sistema primario por coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} para a padronizacao de radionuclideos empregando cintiladores plasticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baccarelli, Aida Maria

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes a 4{pi}({alpha},{beta})-{gamma} coincidence system for absolute measurement of radionuclide activity using a plastic scintillator in 4{pi} geometry for charged particles detection and a Nal (Tl) crystal for gamma-ray detection. Several shapes and dimensions of the plastic scintillator have been tried in order to obtain the best system configuration. Radionuclides which decay by alpha emission, {beta}{sup -}, {beta}{sup +} and electron capture have been standardized. The results showed excellent agreement with other conventional primary system which makes use of a 4{pi} proportional counter for X-ray and charged particle detection. The system developed in the present work have some advantages when compared with the conventional systems, namely; it does not need metal coating on the films used as radioactive source holders. When compared to liquid scintillators, is showed the advantage of not needing to be kept in dark for more than 24 h to allow phosphorescence decay of ambient light. Therefore it can be set to count immediately after the sources are placed inside of it. (author)

  3. A study of gamma-emitting radionuclides present into the sediments and algae of the ''Baie de l'Orne'' (Central Normandy Coast) collecting during the years 1980 - 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of some environmental effects of existing sources of gamma-emitting radionuclides, along the Central part of the Normandy Coast (Calvados shores and river Orne mouth) was determined. A systematic study was made on the behaviour of the marine sediments and brown alga 'Laminaria digitata' with regard to their properties as indicators of radioactive contamination. Marine sediments were collected into the river Orne at fixed locations and into the sea in and around the estuary from 1977 to 1982. Algae samples were picked up along the coast from 1980 to 1982, mostly on the western part of the Orne estuary. Dosimetry techniques employed have produced accurate and reliable results, despite the very low levels of activity involved. Gamma-emitting radionuclides present in the environment (chiefly 106Ru, 137Cs, 95Zr) were identified and measured. Their behaviour into the marine sediments and into Laminaria Digitata were determined. This study provides evidence on the presence of numerous gamma-emitting radionuclides into the marine environment of the Central part of the Normandy coast, but, altogether with very low levels of radioactivity

  4. Blood flow measurements in the irradiated pig skin using {beta} emitters radionuclides; Mesure de la circulation sanguine cutanee chez le porc irradie a l`aide de radioisotopes emetteurs {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daburon, F.; Lefaix, J.L.; Leplat, J.J.; Fayart, G.; Delacroix, D.; Le Thanh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Non invasive methods of study of the skin blood flow are numerous, but generally do not give any indication on the cutaneous micro-circulatory flow, except for cutaneous laser Doppler. The isotopic exploration of the skin with injected {gamma} radionuclides, even of weak energy, doe snot allow to characterize the skin blood flow, because of the important contribution of the subcutaneous tissues. The use of {beta} emitters energy spectrum, analyzed by different quantitative methods, are proportional to the thickness of the screen localized between the radioactive source and detector. Using simple and complex phantoms composed of tissue equivalent screens, with {sup 32}P sources placed at different depths, it was possible to study the degradation of {beta} spectra, simulating respectively the sub-epidermis and sub-dermis vascular levels. A modelization and an experimental study in-vivo are proposed in this work, with {sup 32}P phosphate administered intravenously in pigs. (author).

  5. Long-lived radionuclides in the marine environment of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural and artificial radionuclides in the environment of the Gulf of Thailand were studied during 1989-1991. In the study, surface water, sediment at 5 locations between latitudes 90 28' N and 130 15' N longitudes 1000 35' E. and 5 species of marine biota were collected in 1989. In 1990 and 1991, 9 and 7 species of marine biota were collected from the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea respectively. These samples were prepared and analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides as well as some beta and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as C14, Sr90, Pu239,240, Po210 etc. The results indicate the present status of radioactivity level of the environment of the gulf and the sea

  6. Long-lived radionuclides in the marine environment of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural and artificial radionuclides in the environment of the Gulf of Thailand were studied during 1989-1991. In the study, surface water, sediment at 5 locations between latitudes 9 degree 28 minute N and 13 degree 15 minute N longitudes 100 degree 35 minute E. and 5 species of marine biota were collected in 1989. In 1990 and 1991, 9 and 7 species of marine biota were collected from the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea respectively. These samples were prepared and analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides as well as some beta and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as C-14, Sr-90, Pu-239,240, Po-210 etc. The results indicate the present status of radioactivity level of the environment of the gulf and the sea

  7. New analytical solution to calculate linear absorption coefficients of beta radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with an alternative model of beta radiation transmissions through attenuation layers and brings another analytical description of this phenomenon. The model is validated with a reliable data set and brings a possibility to calculate characteristic material parameters with low uncertainties. Using no correction factors, these calculations can be considered fundamental and inspiring for further research in the field. - Highlights: • New analytical model of beta radiation transmission curve in 2π geometry has been proposed. • Linear absorption coefficients in aluminum and Mylar were calculated for 19 radionuclides. • An empirical relationship between the calculated range parameter and average energy of beta radiation emitted by radionuclides was established

  8. Intraoperative beta probe: A device for detecting tissue labeled with positron or electron emitting isotopes during surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intraoperative beta probe was designed, built, and tested for detection of radio-labeled malignant tissues that has the advantage of being selectively sensitive to beta while insensitive to gamma radiation. Since beta radiation (electrons or positrons) has a short range in tissue, this probe is ideal for detecting tracers in tumors at the surface of the surgical field. This probe contains a plastic scintillation detector sensitive to beta rays and to a lesser degree some background gamma rays. A second detector counts spurious gamma rays and allows for their subtraction from the activity measured by the first detector. Sensitivity of the dual probe for I-131 and F-18 was measured to be 108 counts/s/kBq (4000 counts/s/μCi). The dual-detector probe faithfully measured the 10:1 ''tumor'' to background ratio of radioactivity concentrations in a simulated environment of a tumor in the presence of intense background 511 keV photons. In another phantom experiment, simulating abdominal tumor deposits with various realistic I-131 radioactive concentrations, the probe was able to accurately identify tumors of approximately 50 mg with a tumor/normal radioactivity concentration of 3/1 in 10 s

  9. Systematic trends in beta-delayed particle emitting nuclei: The case of βpα emission from 21Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Lund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have observed β+-delayed α and pα emission from the proton-rich nucleus 21Mg produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The assignments were cross-checked with a time distribution analysis. This is the third identified case of βpα emission. We discuss the systematic of beta-delayed particle emission decays, show that our observed decays fit naturally into the existing pattern, and argue that the patterns are to a large extent caused by odd–even effects.

  10. NBS (National Bureau of Standards) measurement services: calibration of beta-particle-emitting ophthalmic applicators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The service provides calibrations for (90)Sr + (90)Y beta-particle ophthalmic applicators. The calibration determines the average surface absorbed-dose rate to water over the active area of the applicator. The technique used is to measure current per unit mass of air at the active surface with an extrapolation ionization chamber, and to convert this into absorbed-dose rate with Bragg-Gray cavity ionization theory. The extrapolation chamber measurements are made in three parts. Data-book measurements and a calibration report are given for one particular applicator

  11. Attraction of Heterorhabditis sp. toward synthetic (E)-beta-cariophyllene, a plant SOS signal emitted by maize on feeding by larvae of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbesse, S; Ehlers, R U

    2010-01-01

    Most plants, when damaged by herbivore insects, synthesize and release various chemicals as indirect defence mechanism that attract parasitic or predatory insects that are natural enemies of the herbivores. When attacked by Western Corn Rootworms, the roots of many maize plant varieties emit (E)-beta-caryophyllene that attracts the neighbouring entomopathogenic nematodes to kill the feeding pest. Through plant genetics and biotechnology it was possible to manipulate this volatile compound in order to increase the effectiveness of entomopathogenic nematodes in reducing the damage of the pest. In order to further use this strategy to improve the effectiveness of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora by selective breeding, we invesa tigated the applicability of the strategy in different standard laboratory bioassays using three different sand and agar plate assays. The synthetic form of (E)-beta-caryophyllene and H. megidis (the strain, which in previous investigation, showed significant attraction to caryophyllene) were used in the study. In all bioassays no significant difference was observed in attraction of nematodes between the caryophyllene treatments and the controls. The results contradict results of previous investigations done by other investigators (Rasmann et al., 2005). Future investigations for the genetic improvement of the host finding ability of entomopathogenic nematodes can therefore not target attraction to caryophyllene. PMID:21539265

  12. Dynamic and static small-animal SPECT in rats for monitoring renal function after 177Lu-labeled Tyr3-octreotate radionuclide therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, M.; Swart, J.; Visser, M. de; Berndsen, S.C.; Koelewijn, S.; Valkema, R.; Boerman, O.C.; Krenning, E.P.; Jong, M. de

    2010-01-01

    High kidney radiation doses during clinical peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with beta-particle-emitting radiolabeled somatostatin analogs will lead to renal failure several months after treatment, urging the coinfusion of the cationic amino acids lysine and arginine to reduce the renal

  13. Combination of digital autoradiography and alpha track analysis to reveal the distribution of definite alpha- and beta-emitting nuclides in contaminated samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital autoradiography using Imaging Plate is commonly employed for searching 'hot' particles in the contaminated soil, sediment and aerosol probes. However digital radiography images combined with Alpha Track radiography data could provide much more information about micro-distribution of different alpha- and beta- nuclides. The discrimination method to estimate the distribution of radionuclides that are the main contributors to the total radioactivity (90Sr/90Y, 137Cs, 241Am) has been developed on the case of artificial reservoir V-17 (PA 'Mayak'). The bottom sediments and hydrobionts probes collected from V-17 along with the standards of 137Cs, 90Sr/90Y and 241Am have been exposed for a short time (15 min) using a stack of 3 Imaging Plates (Cyclone Plus Storage Phosphor System, Perkin Elmer). The attenuation of photostimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity from layer to layer of the Imaging Plates depends on the type and energy of radiation. Integrated approach using PSL attenuation in the samples and standards (digital radiography) along with Alpha Track radiography and gamma-spectroscopy of the preparation was used to estimate the contribution of the main nuclides in specific parts of contaminated samples. The observation of the 90Sr/90Y and 137Cs activity maxima could help to find the phases which are responsible for preferential sorption of the nuclides. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  14. Experimental experiences with intra-articular injections of the α-emitting radionuclide 224Ra(ThX) into the knee-joint of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    224Ra is used within the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of this radionuclide in the organism was investigated up to 7 days after incorporation in order to estimate a possible risk of late effects. In the autoradiographs we found strong blackenings at those bonesurfaces which faced the injected knee-joint hole. In addition the radionuclide was deposited in skeletal growth-zones similarly as after i.v. and i.p. injections. The dosimetric data (particularly of knee-joint and skeleton) were calculated and compared with those which occur after the therapy of ankylosing spondylitis using i.v. 224Ra injections. (orig.)

  15. Confirmation of selected milk and meat radionuclide-transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elements selected for study of their transfer coefficients to eggs, poultry meat, milk and beef were Mo, Tc, Te, and Ba. The radionuclides used in the study were the gamma-emitting radionuclides 99Mo, /sup 123m/Te and 133Ba. 133Ba was selected because 140Ba-140La is produced infrequently and availability was uncertain. 133Ba has a great advantage for our type of experiment because of its longer physical half-life. 99Tc is a pure beta-emitter and was used in the first three animal experiments because we could not obtain the gamma-emitting /sup 95m/Tc. A supply of this nuclide was recently obtained, however, for the second cow experiment

  16. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy-How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Robin M; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Denkova, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  17. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy—How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Robin M.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Denkova, Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  18. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy—How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin M. de Kruijff

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET. Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium, 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue.

  19. Biological effects of inhaled radionuclides: summary of ICRP report 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP Task Group charged with evaluating the hazards associated with inhalation of plutonium and other radionuclides, enumerated the biological responses to inhaled radionuclides, identified tissues and cells at risk, derived risk coefficients for inhaled radionuclides from animal experiments for comparison with human data, and determined an equal effectiveness ratio of alpha emitters relative to beta-gamma emitters. High lung burdens of inhaled radionuclides result in profound structural and functional changes in which the pulmonary capillary endothelial cells are the most prominent cells at risk. Linear and nonlinear models used to evaluate lung cancer data from animal experiments project to risk coefficients between 0.84 and 1600 cases/106 animals/rad. The report concludes that the animal data support the current ICRP lung cancer risk of 2 x 10-3 Sv-1 (400 x 10+H-+H6 rad-1). Comparison of risk coefficients for beta-gamma emitters with those for alpha emitters, obtained using the same models, gave an Equal Effectiveness Ratio of 30 for inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides. Thus, the experimental data support the ICRP decision to change the quality factor from 10 to 20 for alpha radiation. (H.K.)

  20. Application of Monte Carlo method in study of the padronization for radionuclides with complex disintegration scheme in 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence System; Aplicacao do metodo de Monte Carlo no estudo da padronizacao de radionuclideos com esquema de desintegracao complexos em sistema de coincidencias 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Mauro Noriaki

    2006-07-01

    The present work described a new methodology for modelling the behaviour of the activity in a 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system. The detection efficiency for electrons in the proportional counter and gamma radiation in the NaI(Tl) detector was calculated using the Monte Carlo program MCNP4C. Another Monte Carlo code was developed which follows the path in the disintegration scheme from the initial state of the precursor radionuclide, until the ground state of the daughter nucleus. Every step of the disintegration scheme is sorted by random numbers taking into account the probabilities of all {beta}{sup -} branches, electronic capture branches, transitions probabilities and internal conversion coefficients. Once the final state was reached beta, electronic capture events and gamma transitions are accounted for the three spectra: beta, gamma and coincidence variation in the beta efficiency was performed simulating energy cut off or use of absorbers (Collodion). The selected radionuclides for simulation were: {sup 134}Cs, {sup 72}Ga which disintegrate by {beta}{sup -} transition, {sup 133}Ba which disintegrates by electronic capture and {sup 35}S which is a beta pure emitter. For the latter, the Efficiency Tracing technique was simulated. The extrapolation curves obtained by Monte Carlo were filled by the Least Square Method with the experimental points and the results were compared to the Linear Extrapolation method. (author)

  1. Determination of radionuclides present in the relation of waste plant storage of El Cabril

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different waste streams of low and medium level radioactive are generated from the operation of Nuclear Power Plants with light water reactors. The most important waste streams are: spent ion exchange resin, used to purify the water of the reactor coolant and the evaporator concentrates produced in the evaporation of some liquid radioactive waste. In this paper are show the improvement and development of the analytical methods of all these radionuclides, performed in the CIEMAT project about Characterization of Radioactive Wastes and Materials. The alpha, beta and low energy gamma-emitting radionuclides are analyzed after the separation procedure by alpha-spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry. The high energy gamma-emitting radionuclides (>50 keV) are analyzed by gamma spectrometry without separation. This work has been developed within the framework of the CIEMAT-ENRESA Association Agreement. (Author) 12 refs

  2. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    oxygen retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  3. Systemic radioimmunotherapy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac directed toward the alpha subunit of the IL-2 receptor armed with the {alpha}-emitting radionuclides {sup 212}Bi or {sup 211}At

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley, Jon N.; McGee, Edwin C.; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Yordanov, Alexander T.; Wu Chuanchu; Gansow, Otto A.; Eckelman, William C.; Bacher, John D.; Flynn, Michael; Goldman, Carolyn K.; MacLin, Melvin; Schwartz, Uwe P.; Jackson-White, Terri; Phillip, Celeste M.; Decker, Jean; Waldmann, Thomas A. E-mail: tawald@helix.nih.gov

    2004-04-01

    To exploit the fact that IL-2 receptors are expressed by T-cells responding to foreign antigens but not by resting T-cells, humanized anti-Tac (HAT) armed with alpha-emitting radionuclides {sup 212}Bi and {sup 211}At was evaluated in a cynomolgus cardiac allograft model. Control graft survival was 8.2{+-} 0.5 days compared with 14.0{+-}1.3 days (p<0.01) survival for monkeys treated with {sup 212}Bi labeled HAT and 26.7{+-}2.4 days survival (p<0.001 versus controls) with {sup 211}At labeled HAT. Thus, {sup 211}At labeled HAT may have application in organ transplantation and in treatment of IL-2 receptor expressing T-cell leukemia.

  4. Standardization of radionuclides 45Ca, 137Cs, 204Tl by tracing method using 4πβ-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure followed for the standardization of 45Ca, 137Cs and 204Tl is described. The activity measurements was carried out in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system by the tracing method. The radionuclides chosen as the P-y emitting tracer nuclide were 60Co for the 45Ca and 134Cs for 137Cs and 204TL because their end-point beta-ray energy are close to the respective beta emitters. The radioactive sources were prepared using two different techniques: one was the drops technique and the other was the solution technique. In the drop technique the sources were prepared by dropping directly on the subtract both solutions (tracer and beta pure). In the other technique a solution of tracer plus beta pure was mixed previously before making the radioactive sources. The activities of the radionuclides obtained with these technique were compared and the values are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties. (author)

  5. Comparison between Three Promising ß-emitting Radionuclides, 67Cu, 47Sc and 161Tb, with Emphasis on Doses Delivered to Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Morgat, Clément; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Hindié, Elif

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radionuclide therapy is increasingly seen as a promising option to target minimal residual disease. Copper-67, scandium-47 and terbium-161 have a medium-energy β- emission which is similar to that of lutetium-177, but offer the advantage of having diagnostic partner isotopes suitable for pretreatment imaging. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 67Cu, 47Sc and 161Tb to irradiate small tumors. METHODS: The absorbed dose deriving from a homogeneous distribution of 67Cu, 47Sc or 161Tb in water-density spheres was calculated with the Monte Carlo code CELLDOSE. The diameters of the spheres ranged from 5 mm to 10 µm, thus simulating micrometastases or single tumor cells. All electron emissions, including β- spectra, Auger and conversion electrons were taken into account. Because these radionuclides differ in electron energy per decay, the simulations were run assuming that 1 MeV was released per µm3, which would result in a dose of 160 Gy if totally absorbed. RESULTS: The absorbed dose was similar for the three radionuclides in the 5-mm sphere (146-149 Gy), but decreased differently in smaller spheres. In particular, 161Tb delivered higher doses compared to the other radionuclides. For instance, in the 100-µm sphere, the absorbed dose was 24.1 Gy with 67Cu, 14.8 Gy with 47Sc and 44.5 Gy with 161Tb. Auger and conversion electrons accounted for 71% of 161Tb dose. The largest dose differences were found in cell-sized spheres. In the 10-µm sphere, the dose delivered by 161Tb was 4.1 times higher than that from 67Cu and 8.1 times that from 47Sc. CONCLUSION: 161Tb can effectively irradiate small tumors thanks to its decay spectrum that combines medium-energy β- emission and low-energy conversion and Auger electrons. Therefore 161Tb might be a better candidate than 67Cu and 47Sc for treating minimal residual disease in a clinical setting. PMID:27446495

  6. Skin dose estimation due to a contamination by a radionuclide {beta} emitter: are doses equivalent good estimator of protection quantities?; Estimation de la dose extremite due a une contamination par un radionucleide emetteur {beta}: l'equivalent de dose est-il un bon estimateur de la grandeur de protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgois, L. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France)

    2011-04-15

    When handling radioactive {beta} emitters, measurements in terms of personal dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) are used to estimate the equivalent dose limit to skin or extremities given by regulations. First of all, analytical expressions for individual dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) and equivalent doses to the extremities H{sub skin} are given for a point source and for contamination with a radionuclide {beta} emitter. Second of all, operational quantities and protection quantities are compared. It is shown that in this case the operational quantities significantly overstate the protection quantities. For a skin contamination the ratio between operational quantities and protection quantities is 2 for a maximum {beta} energy of 3 MeV and 90 for a maximum {beta} energy of 150 keV. (author)

  7. Natural radionuclides in drinking waters in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross alpha and beta activities, 3H, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activities were measured in bottled mineral water produced in Serbia in order to assess its radiological quality. In 11 samples of tap water and in 1 sample of spring waters gross alpha and beta activity were determined. The natural activity concentration of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are within the range recommended by World Health Organization. The tritium concentration in bottled mineral waters ranged from 0.023±0.012 to 0.046±0.006 Bq l−1. The activity of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were below the minimum detectable activity. In order to evaluate the annual effective dose for different classes of age, a conservative dosimetric calculation was carried out. - Highlights: ► The gross alpha and beta activities are within the range recommended by WHO. ► Tritium activity were lower than the value established for mineral waters. ► The activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40 K were below the MDC. ► Investigated water can be used as drinking water.

  8. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site, part II: man-made γ-ray emitting radionuclides in the ground and the resultant kerma rate in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2012-07-01

    Samples of soil and epigeic lichens were collected from the "Taiga" peaceful nuclear explosion site (61.30°N 56.60°E, the Perm region, Russia) in 2009 and analyzed using high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. For soil samples obtained at six different plots, two products of fission ((137)Cs and (155)Eu), five products of neutron activation ((60)Co, (94)Nb, (152)Eu, (154)Eu, (207)Bi) and (241)Am have been identified and quantified. The maximal activity concentrations of (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am for the soils samples were measured as 1650, 7100, and 6800 Bq kg(-1) (d.w.), respectively. The deposit of (137)Cs for the top 20 cm of soil on the tested plots at the "Taiga" site ranged from 30 to 1020 kBq m(-2); the maximal value greatly (by almost 3 orders of magnitude) exceeded the regional background (from global fallout) level of 1.4 kBq m(-2). (137)Cs contributes approximately 57% of the total ground inventory of the man-made γ-ray emitters for the six plots tested at the "Taiga" site. The other major radionuclides -(241)Am and (60)Co, constitute around 40%. Such radionuclides as (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am, and (207)Bi have also been determined for the epigeic lichens (genera Cladonia) that colonized certain areas at the ground lip produced by the "Taiga" explosion. Maximal activity concentrations (up to 80 Bq kg(-1) for (60)Co, 580 Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs, 200 Bq kg(-1) for (241)Am, and 5 Bq kg(-1) for (207)Bi; all are given in terms of d.w.) have been detected for the lower dead section of the organisms. The air kerma rates associated with the anthropogenic sources of gamma radiation have been calculated using the data obtained from the laboratory analysis. For the six plots tested, the kerma rates ranged from 50 to 1200 nGy h(-1); on average, 51% of the dose can be attributed to (137)Cs and 45% to (60)Co. These estimates agree reasonably well with the results of the in situ measurements made during our field survey of the "Taiga" site in August

  9. Insights into radionuclide-induced lung cancer in people from life-span studies in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In life-span studies, beagle dogs were exposed one time by inhalation to an aerosol containing a beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclide in a relatively soluble or insoluble chemical form. After exposure dogs were observed for late-occurring biological effects. Lung cancer has been a predominant observation for radionuclides inhaled in a relatively insoluble form because most of the absorbed dose was delivered to the lung and contiguous tissues. Approximately 130 lung cancers were observed in dogs exposed to inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides; tumors occurred with absorbed doses to lung ranging from 1100 to 68,000 rads. With inhaled alpha emitters lung tumors occurred at doses between 530 and 8400 rads. Dose rate pattern was shown to be an important factor in the induction of lung cancer by inhaled beta emitters. Doses of low-LET irradiation delivered in a matter of days can be as much as 8 times more effective per unit of dose than radiation doses delivered over a more protracted period of time. Tumors also have occurred in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of dogs that inhaled relatively insoluble forms of beta emitters. From these studies, the risk of lung cancer from inhaled beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides was compared to determine the importance of LET and other dose-effect modifying factors on resulting risks and on extrapolation to human inhalation exposure. Attention also was given to the risk of cancer in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, on the basis of the results of these studies and the current ICRP computational method in which lymph nodes are included with lung for purposes of dose and risk calculation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Research method for assay activity and activity distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides in the model waste drum by Tomography Gamma Scanning Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive waste is generated during a lifetime of nuclear facility or during decommissioning. They are collected, classified, treated, conditioned and packaged in the standard drums of 200 liter. The radioactive waste contained in drums can be highly heterogeneous in matrix distribution and may also exhibit a non-uniform and unrelated distribution of radionuclides. Under such circumstances, accurate quantitative results can be obtained by performing non-destructive assay of the waste using a Tomography Gamma Scanner (TGS). This theme researches to establish Tomography Gamma Scanning method for low to moderate density waste matrices contained in 200 liter drums. The Tomography Gamma Scanner combines gamma spectrometry with HpGe detector and low spatial resolution transmission and emission imaging techniques to accomplish assay goals. The transmission image is a voxel-by-voxel distribution of linear attenuation coefficients throughout the drum volume, and the emission image is a voxel-by-voxel distribution of the source activity. The transmission data is analyzed using a maximum likelihood algorithm, which results in a rectangular map in tow dimensions (2-D) of the distribution of density or gamma ray attenuation for each segment. The attenuation map information is then used in the analysis of the distribution of activity in the segment. As in the TGS transmission correction measurement, the TGS emission measurement generates a map or 2-D picture of the activity distribution in the segment. The TGS analysis, combining the data from the transmission and emission maps, results in a very accurate transmission correction for the determination of the activity distribution in the segment. (author)

  11. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-588: Optimization of Imaging Following 223Ra Administration in Targeted Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With a growing demand of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, especially Xofigo (223RaCl2) which is used in the treatment of metastatic bone disease, the optimization of dosimetry becomes necessary. Indeed, in Europe, as stated on the council directive 2013/59/euratom, exposures of target volumes for radiotherapeutic purposes shall be individually planned taking into account that doses to non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable. To that aim, the possibility of imaging 223Ra was first investigated. Methods: The experiments were conducted at the Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou with an Infinia Hawkeye 4 gamma camera, equipped with a medium-energy collimator. Imaging parameters, such as sensibility, spatial resolution and energy spectrum, were determined using several physical phantoms with a source of 6 MBq of 223Ra. Bone metastases were modeled with a NEMA Body Phantom to investigate image degradation based on the concentration of 223Ra. Results: The acquired energy spectrum allowed to visualize several photon peaks: at 85, 154 and 270 keV. Camera sensitivity measured from the phantom study was 102.3 cps/MBq for the 85 keV ± 20 %, 89.9 cps/MBq for the 154 ± 20 % window and 65.4 cps/MBq for the 270 ± 10 % window. The spatial resolution (full-width at half-maximum) was respectively 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 cm for the three energy windows. SPECT/CT images of NEMA Body Phantom without and with attenuation have permitted to determine the best reconstruction parameters. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clinically relevant information from images of 223Ra. All these results will be valuable to analyze biodistribution imaging of the radiopharmaceutical in the patient body and go further in the reconstruction of patient images in order to personalize the dosimetry

  13. SU-E-T-588: Optimization of Imaging Following 223Ra Administration in Targeted Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benabdallah, N; Bernardini, M [Hopital Europeen George Pompidou, Paris, Ile de France (France); Desbree, A [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-roses, Ile-de-France (France); Labriolle-Vaylet, C de [Hopital Trousseau, Paris, Ile de France (France); Franck, D [Institut de Radioprotection et de Suretu Nucleaire, Fontenay Aux Roses, Ile de France (France)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: With a growing demand of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, especially Xofigo ({sup 223}RaCl{sub 2}) which is used in the treatment of metastatic bone disease, the optimization of dosimetry becomes necessary. Indeed, in Europe, as stated on the council directive 2013/59/euratom, exposures of target volumes for radiotherapeutic purposes shall be individually planned taking into account that doses to non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable. To that aim, the possibility of imaging {sup 223}Ra was first investigated. Methods: The experiments were conducted at the Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou with an Infinia Hawkeye 4 gamma camera, equipped with a medium-energy collimator. Imaging parameters, such as sensibility, spatial resolution and energy spectrum, were determined using several physical phantoms with a source of 6 MBq of {sup 223}Ra. Bone metastases were modeled with a NEMA Body Phantom to investigate image degradation based on the concentration of {sup 223}Ra. Results: The acquired energy spectrum allowed to visualize several photon peaks: at 85, 154 and 270 keV. Camera sensitivity measured from the phantom study was 102.3 cps/MBq for the 85 keV ± 20 %, 89.9 cps/MBq for the 154 ± 20 % window and 65.4 cps/MBq for the 270 ± 10 % window. The spatial resolution (full-width at half-maximum) was respectively 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 cm for the three energy windows. SPECT/CT images of NEMA Body Phantom without and with attenuation have permitted to determine the best reconstruction parameters. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clinically relevant information from images of {sup 223}Ra. All these results will be valuable to analyze biodistribution imaging of the radiopharmaceutical in the patient body and go further in the reconstruction of patient images in order to personalize the dosimetry.

  14. Beta particle dose rates to micro-organisms in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were made to estimate the beta-particle dose rates to micro-organisms of various sizes in soil. The small insects and organisms living in soil are constantly exposed to beta-radiation arising from naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields them. The technique of measuring beta-particle dose rate consisted of using of a thin plastic scintillator to measure the pulse height distribution as the beta particle traverses the scintillator. The integrated response was determined by the number and size of the photomultiplier pulses. From the data of soil analyses it was estimated that typically about 29% of the beta particles emitted per gm. of soil were contributed by the U/Ra series, 21% by the Th series and about 50% by potassium. By combining the individual spectra of these three radionuclides in the proportion found in a typical soil, a resultant spectrum was computed representing the energy distribution of the beta particles. The dose rate received by micro-organisms of different shape and size in soil was derived from the equilibrium dose rates combined with a 'Geometrical Factor' of the organisms. For small organisms, the dose rates did not vary between the spherical and cylindrical types, but in the case of larger organisms, the dose rates were found to be greater for the spherical types of the same diameter. (auth.)

  15. Absorbed dose estimation and prediction irradiation effects in tumor-bearing mice under radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As the sizes of mouse organ are comparable with the range of the high-energy beta particles emitted by the radionuclides commonly used in radionuclide therapy a significant amount of beta radiation emitted could be imparted to the adjacent tissues. The often assumption that beta particles are fully-absorbed at the emission site is not satisfied and cross-irradiation should be included into the dose estimation formulas. Keeping in mind that the radiation effects are correlated with the absorbed dose in the target the inclusion of cross-irradiation in the dose estimation must be evaluated. The MIRD's formulation was used to perform absorbed dose calculation in mice using absorbed fractions previously reported for 131I, 90Y and 177Lu. Two approaches were considered: a) cross irradiation when a fraction of beta particles emitted can escape from the organ source and, b) full self- irradiation when the beta particles are considered fully absorbed at the emission site. The formulation of linear-quadratic model was readapted to be used in the radionuclide therapy. Treatment with a single administration in mice was simulated and radiation effects on tumor, bone marrow and kidneys under the assumption of cross-irradiation were predicted. A biphasic repair kinetics was considered in the calculation of irradiation effects on kidneys. Typical published biokinetic data for radiopharmaceutical assayed in mice and radiobiological parameters were used in the calculations. The influence of cross irradiation condition was diverse for the tissues analyzed here. The absorbed dose values in kidneys calculated for both methods were no significantly different for low energies, but variations around to 40-50% (over or under-estimation) in absorbed dose were obtained for high energies. Approximately a 30% of the beta radiation emitted from bone will cross irradiates the bone marrow. For injected activities values higher than 10MBq (300μCi), as a single injection, the

  16. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation (238U, 235U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40K) and radiocaesium (137Cs, 134Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium (210Pb, 210Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of 210Pb and 210Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to 137Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  17. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  18. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes. - Highlights: • Radioactivity-induced charge enhances electrostatic particle interactions. • Radioactivity-induced particle charging is important in radioactivity transport. • Ionization rate coefficients of beta-emitting radionuclides are reported

  19. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  20. A silicon array detector for high-energy betas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of significant levels of certain gamma and beta emitting isotopes could allow on-site Inspection teams working under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to localize probable vent and fissure locations. Thus, sophisticated drilling and radionuclide measurements could then be made more effectively allowing for a higher probability of correctly identifying a nuclear event. In order to address this need we have developed a silicon array coupled with a Nal for detecting gammas, high-energy betas, and beta-gamma coincidences. The pursuit of this detection method is now viable since large-area, high-purity silicon wafers are now commercially available making this layered, large-area technique technically and economically feasible. We have designed, constructed, and tested a prototype detector system and we will present out initial test data

  1. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations; Contribuicoes primaria e espalhada para dosimetria beta calculadas pelo dose point kernels empregando simulacoes pelo Metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Mauro [CONICET - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de La Republica Argentina (Conicet), Buenos Aires, AR (Brazil); Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics Department; Perez, Pedro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  2. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd and production of radionuclides relevant for double beta decay: Completing measurement in 5–35 MeV energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeda, O., E-mail: lebeda@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, v.v.i., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Lozza, V.; Petzoldt, J. [Institut für Kern und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Štursa, J.; Zdychová, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, v.v.i., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Zuber, K. [Institut für Kern und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Cross-sections for the proton-induced reactions on natural neodymium in energy regions 5–10 MeV and 30–35 MeV were measured using the cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Řež near Prague. This measurement completes the investigation previously done in the 10–30 MeV energy range. Results revealed practical production thresholds and secondary maxima and minima in the excitation functions. It allowed for more appropriate calculation of thick target yields and production rates of many longer-lived radionuclides potentially disturbing the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Measured cross-sections are consistent with our previously published data.

  3. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd and production of radionuclides relevant for double beta decay: Completing measurement in 5-35 MeV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Lebeda, O; Petzoldt, J; Stursa, J; Zdychova, V; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sections for the proton-induced reactions on natural neodymium in energy regions 5-10 MeV and 30-35 MeV were measured using the cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Rez near Prague. This measurement completes the investigation previously done in the 10-30 MeV energy range. Results revealed practical production thresholds and secondary maxima and minima in the excitation functions. It allowed for more appropriate calculation of thick target yields and production rates of many longer-lived radionuclides potentially disturbing the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Measured cross-sections are consistent with our previously published data.

  4. Radionuclides and the normal bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Eisenhut and co-workers have described development of iodine-131 labeled diphosphonates for palliative treatment of bone metastases. The compound labeled was alpha-amino (4-hydroxybenzylidene) diphosphonate (BDP3). Other beta-emitting radionuclides have been used for treatment of intractable pain secondary to bone metastases. These include strontium-89, which has some difficulties, particularly in terms of disposal of the excretions due to the long physical half-life of the life of the radionuclide. Yttrium-90 has also been used but has a relatively high hepatic uptake. Phosphorus-32 labeled compounds have also been used. Although palliation has been described, bone marrow depression has also occurred. Rhenium-186 also has been suggested, however, high renal uptake is a problem. At present, the iodine-131 labeled BDP3 appears to be the best of the available therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. One of the major disadvantages in use of this compound is the production of gamma photons. While undesirable from a dosimetry viewpoint, gamma photons do, however, permit imaging if desired

  5. Methods of Radioactivity Measurement for Beta Emitter Radionuclides of 14C, 36Cl and 90Sr in Area Geometric Using 2π Proportional Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactivity measurement of beta emitter of 14C, 36Cl and 90Sr in area geometric have been carried out by 2π proportional counter in Center for Technology of Safety and Metrology Radiation-BATAN. The measurement is needed to get standard methods for standardized of beta emitter in area geometric without destructing of the sample. The Measurement is carried out by 2π proportional counter using gas flow system of P10 in order that ionization process to be passed continuously. To prevent damage. the sources covered with very thin foil layer. Detection efficiencies are determined by variation of beta discriminator. The activities of sources are determined by extrapolation methods to 100 % of efficiencies. The results measurements are fairly good by (5954 ± 62) Bq for 14C ; (5175 ± 49) Bq for 36Cl and (1619 ± 23) Bq for 90Sr. (author)

  6. Radionuclides and ionizing radiation in water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 31 papers dealing with the impact of nuclear power plants on the hydrosphere (radionuclide composition of waste waters and their assessment, the effect of liquid radioactive wastes on surface water organisms, the occurrence of radionuclides in bottom sediments, the cost-effectiveness of risk reduction of liquid radioactive wastes, etc.); the methods of concentrating and separating radionuclides from high-volume liquid samples; the methods of radionuclide contamination measurement (semiconductor spectrometry, the use of silicon detectors, the measurement of gross alpha and beta activities, etc.); and radionuclide migration in ground waters. (E.S.). 25 figs., 30 tabs., 86 refs

  7. Development of Cyclotron Radionuclides for Medical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Qaim, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of radioactivity it was shown that radionuclides can be used both for diagnostic and therapeutic studies, depending on the characteristic radiations emitted by them. By 1960’s the radionuclide production technology using nuclear reactors was well established. In early 1970’s a renaissance of the cyclotrons occurred because many of the neutron deficient radionuclides could only be produced using irradiations with charged particles, like protons, deuterons, α-particles,...

  8. A mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I of the project: early effects of inhaled radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a mathematical model for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included

  9. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and on-line radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is presented for the relatively rapid measurement of actinide and beta-emitting radionuclides in waste streams and environmental samples. It uses ion chromatography for elemental selectivity and flow-through scintillation counting with dual parameter pulse-height and pulse-shape analysis for alpha/beta detection and discrimination. The system was tested for one surrogate sample (spiked groundwater from the southeastern U.S.) and two actual samples from the Savannah River Site (supernatant from a high activity drain tank and sludge from a high level waste tank). For the spiked groundwater, recoveries were quantitative for all of the analytes (americium, curium, plutonium, and strontium) except uranium. For the actual samples, which contained americium, curium, plutonium, strontium, and cesium, the results using the system were within 20% of those obtained independently. Based on these tests, it is concluded that the system is capable of analyzing alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in samples that are representative of those encountered at contaminated former weapons sites. (author)

  10. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  11. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  12. Radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of radionuclides to biota is discussed especially with reference to specific elements in local soils. Two annual plant species have received concentrated study. These are cheatgrass and tumbleweed, both important inhabitants of waste burial sites. Little is known concerning the radionuclide dynamics of perennial grasses, forbs, or shrub species. The potential for radionuclide transport by jackrabbits, waterfowl, small mammals, and biota inhabiting pond systems is discussed. Concentration ratios are tabulated

  13. Natural radionuclides content and radioactive series disequilibrium in drinking waters from Balkans region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radioactivity of drinking water with various geological origin in Balkans region has been studied. Collected water samples are analyzed for total alpha and total beta activities and specific alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides content using low-background proportional counting and alpha and gamma-spectrometry techniques. Obtained activity concentrations of 238U, 234U, 235U, 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in water samples and radioactive disequilibrium between members of the natural radioactive series, based on the isotopic ratios, has been discussed. (author)

  14. Cosmogenic radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Jürg; Von Steiger, R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. This book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any f

  15. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  16. 胰岛β细胞放射性核素分子显像研究进展%Research progress of radionuclide molecular imaging in pancreatic beta cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘帅; 张一帆

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a common disease that poses great threat to human health. At present, insulin replacement therapy remains the main treatment. In recent years, pancreatic beta cell transplantation has demonstrated potential prospect in treatment of type 1 diabetes, however, it is an important issue in clinical application on the non-invasive monitoring of in vivo pancreatic beta cell transplantation. Radionuclide molecular imaging technology, which has been developing rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity, has been widely applied in monitoring pancreatic beta cell transplantation, and has demonstrated favorable prospect in application.%糖尿病是严重威胁人类健康的常见病和多发病,胰岛素替代治疗是其主要的治疗手段.近年来,胰岛β细胞移植治疗1型糖尿病展示出潜在的应用前景,但如何在活体条件下无创地进行胰岛β细胞移植的监测,是目前临床应用所面临的重要问题.放射性核素分子显像技术近年来得到了快速发展,具有灵敏度高、特异性强等特点,在胰岛β细胞移植监测方面得到了广泛应用,展示了良好的应用前景.

  17. ASSESSMENTOF BETA PARTICLE FLUX FROM SURFACE CONTAMINATION AS A RELATIVE INDICATOR FOR RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION ON EXTERNAL SURFACES OF A MULTI-STORY BUILDING IN PRIPYAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-17

    How would we recover if a Radiological Dispersion Device (e.g., dirty bomb) or Improvised Nuclear Device were to detonate in a large city? In order to assess the feasibility of remediation following such an event, several issues would have to be considered, including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of the required resources to accomplish decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Presently little is known about the distribution, redistribution, and migration of radionuclides in an urban environment. However, Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to determine the radionuclide distribution on a Pripyat multi-story building, which had not been previously decontaminated and therefore could reflect the initial fallout and its further natural redistribution on external surfaces. The 7-story building selected was surveyed from the ground floor to the roof on horizontal and vertical surfaces along seven ground-to-roof transections. Some of the results from this study indicate that the upper floors of the building had higher contamination levels than the lower floors. The authors consequently recommend that existing decontamination procedures for tall structures be re-examined and modified accordingly.

  18. Assessment of beta particle flux from surface contamination as a relative indicator for radionuclide distribution on external surfaces of a multistory building in Pripyat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Gaschak, Sergii P; Maksymenko, Andriy M; Jannik, G Tim; Marra, James C; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Donnelly, Elizabeth H

    2011-02-01

    Several issues should be considered when assessing the feasibility of remediation following the detonation of a radiological dispersion device (e.g., dirty bomb) or improvised nuclear device in a large city. These issues include the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of resources required for decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Presently, little is known about the distribution, redistribution, and migration of radionuclides in an urban environment. However, Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in April 1986, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to determine the radionuclide distribution on a Pripyat multistory building that had not been decontaminated and, therefore, could reflect the initial fallout and its further natural redistribution on external surfaces over 23 y. The seven-story building selected was surveyed from the ground floor to the roof on horizontal and vertical surfaces along seven ground-to-roof transections. Some results from this study indicate that the upper floors of the building had higher contamination levels than the lower floors. Consequently, the authors recommend that thorough decontamination should be considered for all the floors of tall buildings (not just lower floors). PMID:21399438

  19. Neutrinoless double positron decay and positron emitting electron capture in the interacting boson model

    OpenAIRE

    Barea, J.; Kotila, J.; Iachello, F.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay is of fundamental importance for determining the neutrino mass. Although double electron ($\\beta^-\\beta^-$) decay is the most promising mode, in very recent years interest in double positron ($\\beta^+\\beta^+$) decay, positron emitting electron capture ($EC\\beta^+$), and double electron capture ($ECEC$) has been renewed. We present here results of a calculation of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-$\\beta^+$ decay and positron emitting electron ca...

  20. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  1. An analytical model to calculate absorbed fractions for internal dosimetry with alpha, beta and gamma emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Amato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a general model for the calculation of absorbed fractions in ellipsoidal volumes of soft tissue uniformly filled with alpha, beta and gamma emitting radionuclides. The approach exploited Monte Carlo simulations with the Geant4 code to determine absorbed fractions in ellipsoids characterized by a wide range of dimensions and ellipticities, for monoenergetic emissions of each radiation type. The so-obtained absorbed fractions were put in an analytical relationship with the 'generalized radius', calculated as 3V/S, where V is the ellipsoid volume and S its surface. Radiation-specific parametric functions were obtained in order to calculate the absorbed fraction of a given radiation in a generic ellipsoidal volume. The dose from a generic radionuclide can be calculated through a process of summation and integration over the whole radionuclide emission spectrum, profitably implemented in an electronic spreadsheet. We compared the results of our analytical calculation approach with those obtained from the OLINDA/EXM computer software, finding a good agreement in a wide range of sphere radii, for the high-energy pure beta emitter 90Y, the commonly employed beta-gamma emitter 131I, and the pure alpha emitter 213Po. The generality of our approach makes it useful an easy to implement in clinical dosimetry calculations as well as in radiation safety estimations when doses from internal radionuclide uptake are to be taken into account.

  2. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  3. History, biological effects, and dosimetry of beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a renewed interest in the dosimetry of beta radiation, particularly in the nuclear power industry. This interest is fueled by the current regulatory concern over exposure to hot particles. Hot particles are small, usually microscopic particles of fuel material or activated products produced as a result of neutron activation in a nuclear reactor. In addition, these particles are characterized as having very high specific activity and being composed primarily of beta-emitting radionuclides. Of primary interest in the dosimetry of hot particles is the absorbed dose and/or dose equivalent to the basal layer of the skin. Current federal regulations, as well as international and national radiation protection standards, do not address adequately the exposure of small areas of the skin from a single point source. In this paper, the history of beta dosimetry is reviewed with an emphasis on early beta-radiation exposures, such as those associated with fallout from nuclear weapons. Beta burns due to the black rain associated with the Japanese bombings and fallout studies at the Nevada test site and in the Pacific testing area provided much of the earliest data. Many survivors of the Japanese bombings were exposed to high-intensity beta radiation when they were caught in a rainout of material that had been sucked up into the fireball of the weapon

  4. Measurement of radionuclides in various environmental samples and in items of diet of the local population. Part of a coordinated programme on environmental monitoring for radiological protection in Asia and the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research covered identification of radionuclides and measurement of their concentration in various environmental media and items of diet of the local population. Biomedia and items of diet selected for study were air, surface water, precipitation, vegetables, meat, poultry and fish etc. Radioactive assays under-taken were gross gamma activity measurements and gamma spectrometric analyses for the determination of gamma emitting radionuclides. These were followed by radiochemical analyses for the separation of Sr 90 and Pu 239. Radiometric measurements for Sr 90 and Pu 239 were performed by low back-ground beta counting and alpha spectrometric analyses respectively

  5. Manual of bioassay procedures for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monitoring program is described by which atomic radiation workers ar monitored for internal contamination with radionuclides in the workplace. The program involves analytical procedures for measuring alpha, beta and gamma activity in biological specimens, usually urine. Radionuclides are identified by their characteristic radiation using liquid scintillation counting, and alpha, beta and gamma spectrometry. Examples of calculating the minimum detectable activity for specific radionuclides are given and used to derive call-in-criteria in accordance with which the different groups of workers are monitored each month

  6. Radionuclide cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on radionuclide cystography in infants and children for the detection of vesicoureteral reflux. Vesicoureteral reflux represents a common and potentially serious form of urinary tract pathology. Reflux accompanied by asymptomatic or inadequately treated urinary tract infections has been associated with significant sequelae, including renal scarring, hypertension, and end- stage renal disease. Although there are several advantages and disadvantages to both radionuclide and radiographic techniques for detection of reflux, radionuclide cystography has been found to be at least as sensitive as the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) for the detection of clinically significant reflux. The major advantage of radionuclide cystography is a significantly lower radiation dose as compared to VCUG. Both indirect and direct techniques for radionuclide cystography have been developed. In addition to detection of vesicoureteral reflux, indirect radionuclide cystography allows evaluation of differential renal function. Supplemental parameters that may be evaluated with direct radionuclide cystography include: quantitation of reflux, determination of bladder volume at which reflux occurs, evaluation of the dynamics of bladder emptying, and determination of residual bladder volume following voiding

  7. 16 alpha-[77Br]bromoestradiol-17 beta: a high specific-activity, gamma-emitting tracer with uptake in rat uterus and uterus and induced mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    16 alpha-[77Br]bromoestradiol-17 beta (Compound 1) has been synthesized by radiobromination of estrone enoldiacetate. Tissue uptake studies performed 1 h after administration of Compound 1 to immature or mature female rats showed uterus-to-blood ratios of 13, with nontarget issue-to-blood ratios ranging from 0.6 to 2. Co-administration of unlabelled estradiol caused a selective depression in the uterine uptake with no effect on nontarget tissue uptake. In adult animals bearing adenocarcinomas induced by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene), tumor-to-blood ratios of 6.3 were obtained, this uptake also being depressed in animals treated with unlabeled estradiol. The studies demonstrate that Compound 1 has suitable binding properties and sufficiently high specific activity so that its uptake in estrogen target tissues in vivo is mediated primarily by the estrogen receptor. Furthermore, they suggest that this compound may be suitable for imaging human breast tumors that contain estrogen receptors

  8. Cross section data for production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of nuclear reaction cross section data for production of medically interesting radionuclides is discussed. The needs for short- and long-term investigations are considered. Whereas short-term investigations refer to improvements in the utilization of known radionuclides, long-term studies pertain to the development of new radionuclides. The major interest is directed to longer-lived β+ emitters and low-range radiation emitting therapeutic radionuclides. Some challenges involved in the relevant nuclear data work are outlined. (author)

  9. Assessment of beta-emitter radionuclides in biological samples using liquid scintillation counting. Application to the study of internal doses in molecular and cellular biology techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotopic techniques used in Molecular and Cellular Biology involve external and internal irradiation risk. It is necessary to control the possible internal contamination associated to the development of these techniques. The internal contamination risk can be due to physical and chemical properties of the labelled compounds, aerosols generated during the performance technique. The aim of this work was to estimate the possible intake of specific beta emitters during the technique development and to propose the required criterions to perform Individual Monitoring. The most representative radioisotopic techniques were selected attending their potential risk of internal contamination. Techniques were analysed applying IAEA methodology according to the used activity in each technique. It was necessary to identify the worker groups that would require individual monitoring on the base of their specific risk. Different measurement procedures were applied to study the possible intake in group risk and more than 160 persons were measured by in vitro bioassay. (Author) 96 refs

  10. Biological effects of inhaled radionuclides. A report of a task group of Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Adopted by the Commission in May 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on various types of radionuclides that may be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. One of the primary goals of this ICRP Task Group is to assess specifically the biological implications of inhaled plutonium. Because other transuranics are becoming more abundant, information on americium, curium and einsteinium is included. Data are also included from studies of polonium and of several beta-gamma emitting isotopes. The Task Group evaluated most of the data on the biological effects of inhaled radionuclides in experimental animals to identify the tissues at risk and to assess possible dose-response relationships. Few data from human cases of inhaled radionuclides are available for this assessment. The biological effects of nonradioactive air pollutants were also considered to provide the perspective that all air pollutants can have a deleterious effect on human life and to emphasize the possibility for combined or synergistic effects of nonradioactive and radioactive substances on the respiratory tract. (author)

  11. Mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.; Roswell, R.L.; Stevens, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    A mathematical model was constructed for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included. 25 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results presented are from the nationwide programme to survey the fall-out levels of radionuclides in Finland. This programme includes results from the vicinities of the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Analysis of deposition samples for their 3H, 89Sr and 90Sr, as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclide contents was continued. The results are given as a follow-up to the previous results. The cumulative deposition of long-lived radionuclides retained in soil was measured near the Finnish nuclear power stations. The 90Sr and 137Cs levels in deposition in 1979 were lower than in the previous two years, and no 89Sr was detected. The trend to slightly increasing 3H concentrations of previous years was reversed in 1979. The mean annual deposition of tritium at different sampling stations varied from 85 nCi/m2 (3.1 kBq/m2) to 180 nCi/m2 (6.7 kBq/m2). The total annual deposits of various fission product radionuclides have decreased continuously since the maximum in 1977. No short-lived radionuclides originating from either nuclear explosions or nuclear power plants were observed in 1979. (author)

  13. Measurements of gamma (γ)-emitting radionuclides with a high-purity germanium detector: the methods and reliability of our environmental assessments on the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Tetsuro; Mimura, Mari; Komiyama, Chiyo; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The severe accident of Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant due to the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake in 11 March 2011 caused wide contamination and pollution by radionuclides in Fukushima and surrounding prefectures. In the current JPR symposium, a group of plant scientists attempted to examine the impact of the radioactive contamination on wild and cultivated plants. Measurements of gamma (γ) radiation from radionuclides in "Fukushima samples", which we called and collected from natural and agricultural areas in Fukushima prefecture were mostly done with a high-purity Ge detector in the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University. In this technical note, we describe the methods of sample preparation and measurements of radioactivity of the samples and discuss the reliability of our data in regards to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency test (IAEA proficiency test). PMID:24338059

  14. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  15. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements were carried out to determine the fall-out levels of radionuclides in Finland including those from the surroundings of the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Deposition samples were analysed for their 3H, 89Sr and 90Sr as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclide contents. 90Sr, 239,240Pu, as well as 137Cs and other gamma radionuclides deposited in soil were also measured. The 90Sr and 137Cs levels in deposition in 1978 remained at almost the same level as in 1977. The slightly increasing trend in 3H concentrations continued in 1978. The mean annual deposition of tritium at different sampling stations varied from 120 nCi/m2 (4.4 kBq/m2) to 200 nCi/m2 (7.4 kBq/m2). The total annual deposits of various fission product radionuclides during 1978 were smaller than during 1977. No increase in radioactivity originating from nuclear power plants could be observed. (author)

  16. Radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new carrier for radionuclide technetium 99m has been prepared for scintiscanning purposes. The new preparate consists of physiologically acceptable water-insoluble Tcsup(99m)-carrier containing from 0.2 to 0.8 weight percent of stannic ion as reductor, bound to an anionic starch derivative with about 1-20% of phosphate substituents. (EG)

  17. Radionuclide cisternogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems with the flow of spinal fluid. ... a lumbar puncture include pain at the injection site, bleeding, and ... used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  18. Maximum permissible activities of gamma-emitting radionuclides behind lead-shielding of small thickness (0,1 and 0,3 cm lead); Hoechste zulaessige Aktivitaeten von Gammastrahlern hinter Bleiabschirmungen geringer Wanddicke (0,1 und 0,3 cm Blei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, J. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Abt. Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel

    1998-12-31

    Maximum permissible activities of gamma-emitting radionuclides behind lead-shielding of 0,1 and 0,3 cm thickness for a dose rate of 2,5 {mu}Sv/h in 0,5 and 1 m distance are given. Values may for instance be useful in shielding containers for radioactive waste at working place. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer 28 ausgewaehlte Radionuklide werden die hoechstzulaessigen Aktivitaeten hinter Bleiabschirmungen von 0,1, 0,3 und 0,5 cm Wanddicke angegeben. Die Werte gelten fuer eine Dosisleistung von 25 {mu}Sv/h in 0,25 m, bzw. fuer 2,5 {mu}Sv/h in 0,5 und 1,0 m Abstand von der Strahlenquelle. Die Werte erheben keinen Anspruch auf strenge wissenschaftliche Genauigkeit, sollten jedoch zur Orientierung im praktischen Strahlenschutz - z.B. bei der Abschirmung von Sammelbehaeltern fuer radioaktiven Abfall - ausreichen. (orig.)

  19. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'renaissance' of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as 32P, 89Sr and 131I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as 153Sm, 166 Ho, 165Dy and 186-188Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of 153Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 153Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling techniques and quality control methods for the

  20. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  1. Low energy, photon emitting nuclides: reference spectra library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section presents a reference library consisting of the measured spectral response of the NaI(Tl)-CsI(Tl) detector to individual low energy photon-emitting nuclides in a point source geometry. The reference spectra collection will be limited to radionuclides which emit photons in the energy range below 20 keV

  2. Long-lived radionuclides in low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1982, the Low-Level Waste Licensing Branch of the NRC, anticipating the impact of the proposed Part 61 to 10 CFR, funded a two-year project by SAI to study the radionuclide contents of LWR generated in low-level waste. The objectives of the study are: (1) to analyze, using verified techniques, 150 archived samples for specified beta- and x-ray-emitting nuclides that had not previously been analyzed; (2) to analyze twenty new samples obtained from operating plants for all relevant nuclides and compare them to previous data to ascertain trends; (3) to develop empirical scaling factors through the use of which concentrations of hard-to-analyze nuclides can be estimated from analyses of the gamma-ray emitting nuclides. The new samples are analyzed and the results are summarized and interpreted. Over fifty archived samples have also been analyzed. We discuss scaling factor development. Factors are presented that relate 63Ni and 59Ni to 60Co for PWRs and to 58Co for BWRs, 90Sr to 137Cs for BWRs and 241Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm to 144Ce for all LWRs. 8 figures, 3 tables

  3. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium calculations of cross-sections of (, ) reactions on 89Y, 90Zr and 94Mo targets used for the production of 89Zr, 90Nb and 94Tc positron-emitting radionuclides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Baldik; H Aytekin; E Tel

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium calculations of cross-sections of 89Y(, ), 90Zr$(p, xn)$ and 94Mo(, ) reactions, which were used for the production of 89Zr, 90Nb and 94Tc positron-emitting radioisotopes, have been investigated. Pre-equilibrium calculations have been performed at different proton incident energies by using the hybrid, geometry-dependent-hybrid and full exciton models. The Weisskopf–Ewing model is used for calculating the equilibrium effects at the same incident energies. The calculated results have been discussed and compared with the experimental results.

  4. Summary report of consultants' meeting on high-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting on 'High-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes'. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g.. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g. (author)

  5. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  6. Radionuclide therapy for metastatic bone palliation; Nuklearmedizinische Therapie von Skelettmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtaran, A.; Preitfellner, J. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Havlik, E. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Technik und Physik

    2000-07-01

    In patients with advanced osteoblastic bone metastases from malignant tumours, {beta}-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are used. These radiopharmaceuticals are in elemental form such as {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr or bound on a bone-seeking carrier like HEDP, HMDTP. The radionuclide therapy of bone metastases causes no serious side effects and is well tolerated by the patients. According to recommended criteria this therapy is palliative and serves mainly for pain relief. The effect of the therapy lasts for several months and may be repeated if required. (orig.) [German] Bei Patienten mit fortgeschrittenen osteoblastischen ossaeren Metastasen werden {beta}-Strahlung-emittierende osteotrope Radiopharmaka verwendet. Diese sind entweder Radionuklide in elementarer Form ({sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr...) oder an einer knochenaffinen Traegersubstanz gebundene Radionuklide ({sup 153}Sm, {sup 186}Re...). Die Radionuklidterapie ist im Allgemeinen nebenwirkungsarm und belastet die Patienten wenig. Nach derzeit ueblichen Kriterien stellt diese Therapie eine palliative Massnahme dar und dient hauptsaechlich zur Schmerzlinderung. Die Wirkung haelt ueber mehrere Monate an und bei Bedarf kann die Therapie wiederholt werden. (orig.)

  7. Concentration and speciation of radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper will describe three examples dealing with the measure of some natural (U, Th, 210Pb, 40K) and artificial (137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu, 241Am) radionuclides in environmental samples such as mosses, sediments, soils. Extraction chromatography, liquid extraction, selective precipitation and electroplating were used to isolate the radionuclides, except for gamma emitters which were detected by gamma spectrometry. Alpha spectrometry were used to measure the alpha emitters and low background beta detector to measure the beta emitters

  8. Four observations of surgical treatment of wounds contaminated by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four cases of surgical treatment of wounds contaminated by radionuclides are presented and discussed. Conclusions are drawn and organization of facilities where radionuclides are manipulated is proposed. Measurements of beta and especially alpha activities in a wound are not sufficient, but must be followed by gamma- or X-radiation measurements to detect deep contamination. (B.G.)

  9. Natural and artificial (90Sr radionuclides in some carbonated mineral waters used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Marija M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A radiological characterization of 7 different carbonated mineral water samples collected in the local supermarkets in the area of Belgrade (produced in Serbia was carried out. Analysis included determination of gross alpha and gross beta activities. The obtained results showed that the natural activity concentrations of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in carbonated mineral water samples were within World Health Organization recommended levels, except for the Heba Strong and Kiseljak samples where the beta activity exceeds 1 Bq/L. For these two water samples gamma spectrometry analysis was performed as well as determination of 90Sr by oxalic method. The instrumentation used to count the gross alpha and gross beta activities, as well as for 90Sr, was a/b low level proportional counter Thermo Eberline FHT 770 T. Gamma spectrometric measurements were performed using a HPGe Canberra detector with a counting efficiency of 20%. The annual effective dose equivalent due to ingestion of investigated waters was calculated for age group >17, and obtained values are lower than 0.1 mSv recommended reference level. Finally, a comparison of the investigated waters with worldwide data was made. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009

  10. Deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements presented here were carried out for determination of the fallout levels of radionuclides throughout the country, including the areas surrounding the nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. The 90Sr, 137Cs and 3H contents of deposition were determined and the results are given as a follow-up to the previous results. 89Sr and other gammaradionuclides in addition to 137Cs were measured from wet and dry deposition. Also 89-90Sr, 239-240Pu, 137Cs and other gammaradionuclides deposited in soil were measured. The radiochemical separation technique was used to determine 89Sr, 90Sr, 137Cs and 239-240Pu. Tritium contents were determined by liquid scintillation counting after electrolytic enrichment. Gammaradionuclides were measured by Ge(Li) spectrometry. In 1977 the contents of the long-lived radionuclides 90Sr and 137Cs in deposition increased to almost the same level as in the early '70s. This is due to the high-yield atmospheric nuclear weapon tests carried out by China. A slight increase in 3H deposition can also be noticed in 1977. The results of soil sample measurements indicate that practically all the activity is found in the top 20 cm layer. (author)

  11. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  12. Tumor immunotargeting using innovative radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. PMID:25679452

  13. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  14. Transfer of radionuclides to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampling of Water Horsetail and Bracken Fern including upper soil layer (0-10 cm) and water was carried out in Torahult, Sweden, in Almindingen on Bornholm, in Asserbo and Arresoe on Zealand and in Sdr. Hostrup and Nydam mose in Jutland. Furthermore, sampling was carried out in 2004 for seawater, seaweed and shrimps at locations in Danish waters at Bornholm (Svenskehavn), at Zealand (Klint), at Lolland/Falster (Guldborgsund) and on the west coast of Jutland (Hirtshals, Agger, Hvide Sande and Roemoe). Concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides and uranium were determined in Bracken Fern, Water Horsetail and soil samples. The concentration ratios (CR) are highest for 40K in both plant species and show the lowest variability across locations. The CR's for 40K range from 1 to 2, while the CR's for the other radionuclides range one to three orders of magnitude lower. The CR's for 137Cs show particularly high variability across locations. The CR's were analysed in a two-way ANOVA on the log-transformed values to test differences between plant species and radionuclides. The difference between radionuclides was highly significant, p137Cs and 99Tc in marine samples. Concentration ratios calculated from the analysed samples are presented. The concentration ratios for 99Tc agree with those reported elsewhere in the Indofern Project. The concentration ratios for 137Cs in Fucus show a correlation to salinity with higher values in low salinity water at Bornholm than in high salinity water on the west coast of Jutland. (LN)

  15. Determination of radionuclides in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The air in certain work areas at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant is monitored for selected radionuclides to assure safety FR-om toxic effects to personnel in the area. Some of the radionuclides that are determined are shown with their Radiation Protection Standard (RPS) values by means of a table. The RPS is the maximum average airborne contamination to which personnel may be exposed for one week without respiratory protection and is expressed as disintegrations per minute (dpm) per cubic meter (m/sup 3/) of air. It is desirable to make reliable measurements at a level which is 10% of the RPS to ensure that the detection limits are well below the RPS. Thorium, neptunium, plutonium, and uranium all have alpha emitting isotopes and it is their alpha activity which is measured. Results are tabulated

  16. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods: 99mTc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, 186Re/188Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy/MBq (318.2 Gy/mCi) and 5.7 Gy/MBq (209.1 Gy/mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for 186Re/188Re liposomes, respectively, and 37-92 MBq (1-2.5 mCi)/g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating radionuclides with higher energy

  17. Natural radionuclides in volcanic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radionuclides of 222Ra, 210Pb and 212Pb present in the magma are emitted during the eruption of volcanoes. Depletion of 222Rn in pumices and in lava showed that significant amounts of 222Rn were released from erupting magmas. Atmospheric 210Pb originating from the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo was detected in Japan and in Korea as a temporal increase in the atmospheric concentration after the eruption. Atmospheric 212Pb originating from the 2000 eruption of Mt. Miyake-jima was also detected as an abrupt rise in atmospheric concentration after the event

  18. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin ... then there is a 25% chance with each pregnancy that their child will inherit two abnormal beta ...

  19. Beta-energy averaging and beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple yet highly accurate method for approximately calculating spectrum-averaged beta energies and beta spectra for radioactive nuclei is presented. This method should prove useful for users who wish to obtain accurate answers without complicated calculations of Fermi functions, complex gamma functions, and time-consuming numerical integrations as required by the more exact theoretical expressions. Therefore, this method should be a good time-saving alternative for investigators who need to make calculations involving large numbers of nuclei (e.g., fission products) as well as for occasional users interested in restricted number of nuclides. The average beta-energy values calculated by this method differ from those calculated by ''exact'' methods by no more than 1 percent for nuclides with atomic numbers in the 20 to 100 range and which emit betas of energies up to approximately 8 MeV. These include all fission products and the actinides. The beta-energy spectra calculated by the present method are also of the same quality

  20. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  1. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  2. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd in the 10-30 MeV energy range, and production of radionuclides relevant for double-beta decay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Lozza, V.; Schrock, P.; Štursa, Jan; Zuber, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 4 (2012), 049905/1-049905/12. ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA09013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : proton-induced reactions * radionuclides Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.715, year: 2012

  3. Determination of scaling factors to estimate the radionuclide inventory in waste with low and intermediate-level activity from the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations regarding transfer and final disposal of radioactive waste require that the inventory of radionuclides for each container enclosing such waste must be estimated and declared. The regulatory limits are established as a function of the annual radiation doses that members of the public could be exposed to from the radioactive waste repository, which mainly depend on the activity concentration of radionuclides, given in Bq/g, found in each waste container. Most of the radionuclides that emit gamma-rays can have their activity concentrations determined straightforwardly by measurements carried out externally to the containers. However, radionuclides that emit exclusively alpha or beta particles, as well as gamma-rays or X-rays with low energy and low absolute emission intensity, or whose activity is very low among the radioactive waste, are generically designated as Difficult to Measure Nuclides (DTMs). The activity concentrations of these DTMs are determined by means of complex radiochemical procedures that involve isolating the chemical species being studied from the interference in the waste matrix. Moreover, samples must be collected from each container in order to perform the analyses inherent to the radiochemical procedures, which exposes operators to high levels of radiation and is very costly because of the large number of radioactive waste containers that need to be characterized at a nuclear facility. An alternative methodology to approach this problem consists in obtaining empirical correlations between some radionuclides that can be measured directly – such as 60Co and 137Cs, therefore designated as Key Nuclides (KNs) – and the DTMs. This methodology, denominated Scaling Factor, was applied in the scope of the present work in order to obtain Scaling Factors or Correlation Functions for the most important radioactive wastes with low and intermediate-activity level from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. (author)

  4. Radiolabelled somatostatin analogs for radionuclide therapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    first peptide evaluated was somatostatin. To date five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst1-sst5) have been identified and cloned. The stabilized somatostatin analogue octreotide binds with high affinity to subtypes sst2 and sst5. The diagnostic accuracy of In-111-labeled octreotide to visualize tumour lesions after intravenous injection has been determined in large series of patients with sst2-positive, mostly neuroendocrine tumours. Most interesting is the recent application of somatostatin analogues in PET, after labelling with positron emitters. As soon as the success of peptide receptor scintigraphy for tumour visualization became clear, the next logical step was to try to label these peptides with therapeutic radionuclides and to treat receptor-positive tumours with peptide receptor radionuclides. So far, Y-90, emitting beta-particles with a high maximum energy (2.27 MeV), and Lu-177, emitting beta-particles with a lower maximum energy (0.5 MeV) and gamma radiation suitable for scintigraphy, are the most frequently used radionuclides in PRRT. The second generation somatostatin analogue DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide can form a stable complex with Y-90. In rats with subcutaneous CA20948 pancreatic tumours, Y-90-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide effectively controlled tumour growth. Studies to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Y-90-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide in cancer patients are ongoing at various institutions in Basel, Milan, Brussels and Rotterdam and show most promising rates of complete plus partial remissions. The new somatostatin analogue Tyr3-octreotate has an increased affinity for sst2 compared to octreotide and Tyr3-octreotide. Lu-177-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate has proved very successful in achieving tumour regression in animal models. Patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, known to be resistant to external beam radiation, were treated with 3?4 administrations of 200 mCi (7.4 GBq) Lu-177-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate in our hospital. Three months after the final

  5. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat; Turvesoiden ja polttoturpeen radionuklidit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtovaara, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K) and radiocaesium ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to {sup 137}Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 was determined to be about 500 mSv. (authors)

  7. Anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ottawa River has received nuclear reactor effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years, including releases from a NRX accident in 1952. Recent interest in the potential impact of these historical releases and the possible need for remediation of a small region immediately downstream from the release point has led to comprehensive studies to assess risk to people and wildlife. In this paper, the results of an extensive survey of gamma-emitting anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment in the vicinity of CRL are presented. Anthropogenic radionuclides detected in Ottawa River sediment include 60Co, 94Nb, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu and 241Am. Concentrations of all anthropogenic radionuclides decline rapidly with distance downstream of the process outfall, reaching stable concentrations about 2 km downstream. All of these radionuclides are found at some sites within 2 km upstream of the process outfall suggesting limited upstream transport and sedimentation. Comparison of anthropogenic radionuclides with several representative primordial radionuclides shows that with the exception of sites at the process outfall and within 2 km downstream of the process outfall, primordial radionuclide concentrations greatly exceed CRL derived anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations. Thus, over 60 years of radionuclide releases from operations at CRL have had little impact on radionuclide concentrations in Ottawa River sediment, except at a few sites immediately adjacent to the process outfall. (author)

  8. Calculation of the absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by beta radiation through the Varskin code modified for 122 isotopes of interest for nuclear medicine, nuclear plants and research; Calculo de dosis absorbida para contaminacion en piel impartida por radiacion beta mediante el codigo Varskin modificado para 122 isotopos de interes para medicina nuclear, plantas nucleares e investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1992-06-15

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the Varskin code for calculation of absorbed dose by contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by beta emitting is presented. The necessary data for the execution of the code are: isotope, dose depth, isotope activity, geometry type, source radio and time of integration of the isotope, being able to execute combinations of up to five radionuclides. This program it was implemented in Fortran 5 by means of the FFSKIN source program and the executable one in binary language BFFSKIN being the maximum execution time of 5 minutes. (Author)

  9. Alpha-emitting radioisotopes production for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institutet of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    This review discusses the production of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy labeled with alpha-particle is expected to be very useful for the treatment of monocellular cancer (e.g. leukemia) and micrometastasis at an early stage, residual tumor remained in tissues after chemotherapy and tumor resection, due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of alpha particle. Despite of the expected effectiveness of alpha-particle in radioimmunotherapy, its clinical research has not been activated by the several reasons, shortage of a suitable a-particle development and a reliable radionuclide production and supply system, appropriate antibody and chelator development. Among them, the establishment of radionuclide development and supply system is a key factor to make an alpha-immunotherapy more popular in clinical trial. Alpha-emitter can be produced by several methods, natural radionuclides, reactor irradiation, cyclotron irradiation, generator system and elution. Due to the sharply increasing demand of {sup 213}Bi, which is a most promising radionuclide in radioimmunotherapy and now has been produced with reactor, the cyclotron production system should be developed urgently to meet the demand.

  10. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-01-01

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for rad...

  11. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  12. Radionuclides in ground-level air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the air surveillance programme the concentrations of artificial radionuclides are monitored in the air close to the ground to obtain the necessary basic data for estimating the exposure of the Finnish population to fall-out radionuclides and also to detect atmospheric traces of radioactive materials caused by their use or production. Airborne dust is collected on filters with high-volume air samplers and the concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the air are evaluated. In the first quarter of 1986 only long-lived cesium, caused by earlier atmospheric nuclear explosions was detected. The concentrations of cesium were very low. In January and March a small amount of short-lived, fresh fission and activation products were also observed

  13. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237

  14. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  15. Assessment of radionuclides in the drone affected soils of North Waziristan Agency and Orakzai Agency (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the drone affected soils of North Waziristan and Orakzai Agency were exposed to high resolution gamma ray spectrometry technique to determine the activity concentration levels the results were quite alarming. The results revealed that the mean concentration for the activity of the natural radionuclides including /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 40/K were 42.37 +- 1.85, 47.18 +- 3.45 and 471.28 +- 23.77 Bq kg/sup -1/ respectively. On the other hand the anthropogenic activities were adding radioactive Cs 137 to soils of drone affected areas of North Waziristan and Orakzai Agency with the mean activity concentration of 5.95 +- 0.25 Bq kg/sup -1/. The maximum activity concentration of /sup 137/Cs was in North Waziristan affected soil with the value of 15.15 +- 0.39. /sup 137/Cs is an anthropogenic radionuclide produced as a fission product. However the presence of /sup 137/Cs in all the soil samples reveals the anthropogenic changes in the soils. The exact source of the introduction of /sup 137/Cs is assumed to be drone bombardment. /sup 137/Cs has radioactive half life of 30.17 years and it decays by emitting gamma and beta radiations. These gamma radiations can create havoc in our environment. (author)

  16. On Absolute Measurements of β-Emitting Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4 π GM detectors are described and some of their characteristics presented. The absence of spurious pulses is shown by the measurement of the rate of arrival of intervals between pulses. Some problems related to the foil absorption and source absorption are considered using Sr90 and Y90. Aiming at correcting the counting losses in the foil and in a certain extent also the source absorption an experimental method which uses paired sources is presented. The preparation of standards of Bi210 (RaE) is described. A note is presented on the problem of foil absorption losses in scintillation absolute counting. (author)

  17. Radiological hazards of waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process

  18. Lutetium-177 Labeled Bombesin Peptides for Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tamila Stott; Bandari, Rajendra P; Jiang, Zongrun; Smith, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    The rare-earth radionuclides that decay by beta particle (β-) emission are considered to be ideal in the context of targeted radiotherapy. The rare-earth isotopes exist primarily in the 3+ oxidation state and are considered to be hard metal centers, requiring multidentate, hard donor ligands such as the poly(aminocarboxylates) for in vivo kinetic inertness. 177Lu is a rare-earth radionuclide that is produced in moderate specific activity (740 GBq/mg) by direct neutron capture of enriched 176Lu via the 176Lu(n,γ)177Lu nuclear reaction. 177Lu has a half-life of 6.71 d, decays by beta emission (Ebmax = 0.497 MeV), and emits two imagable photons (113keV, 3% and 208kev, 11%). High specific activity, no-carrier-added 177Lu can also be prepared by an indirect neutron capture nuclear reaction on a 176Yb target. Herein, we report upon bombesin (BBN) peptides radiolabeled with 177Lu. The impetus driving many of the research studies that we have described in this review is that the high-affinity gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR, BBN receptor subtype 2, BB2) has been identified in tissue biopsy samples and immortalized cell lines of many human cancers and is an ideal biomarker for targeting early-stage disease. Early on, the ability of GRPR agonists to be rapidly internalized coupled with a high incidence of GRPR expression on various neoplasias was a driving force for the design and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents targeting GRP receptor-positive tumors. Recent reports, however, show compelling evidence that radiopharmaceutical design and development based upon antagonist-type ligand frameworks clearly bears reexamination. Last of all, the ability to target multiple biomarkers simultaneously via a heterodimeric targeting ligand has also provided a new avenue to investigate the dual targeting capacity of bivalent radioligands for improved in vivo molecular imaging and treatment of specific human cancers. In this report, we describe recent advances

  19. Calculation of the absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by beta radiation through the Varskin code modified for 122 isotopes of interest for nuclear medicine, nuclear plants and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the Varskin code for calculation of absorbed dose by contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by beta emitting is presented. The necessary data for the execution of the code are: isotope, dose depth, isotope activity, geometry type, source radio and time of integration of the isotope, being able to execute combinations of up to five radionuclides. This program it was implemented in Fortran 5 by means of the FFSKIN source program and the executable one in binary language BFFSKIN being the maximum execution time of 5 minutes. (Author)

  20. Research by beta and gamma spectrometry methods of presence admixings in the radionuclide Sr-89 obtained in the nuclear reactor from Y2O3 by reaction (n, p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The obtaining of Sr-89 in the nuclear reactor WWR-SM by means of irradiation of Y-89 according to (n, p) reaction had been investigated in this work. The calculations was made on formation of the basic product and admixtures. By application of the scintillation plastic beta detector and the germanium-lithium gamma detector there was detected the activity of strontium-89 and the contents of the admixtures in a main product

  1. Radionuclide Small Intestine Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jiri Dolezal; Marcela Kopacova

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this overview article is to present the current possibilities of radionuclide scintigraphic small intestine imaging. Nuclear medicine has a few methods—scintigraphy with red blood cells labelled by means of 99mTc for detection of the source of bleeding in the small intestine, Meckel's diverticulum scintigraphy for detection of the ectopic gastric mucosa, radionuclide somatostatin receptor imaging for carcinoid, and radionuclide inflammation imaging. Video capsule or deep enteroscop...

  2. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  3. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  4. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body

  5. Radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One source of radionuclide releases to the Columbia River was from production reactor operations. This report provides a quantitative estimate of the amount of radioactivity released each month (1944--1971) to the Columbia River from eleven radionuclides as well as from gross beta activity

  6. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  7. Beta particle monitor for surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beta radiation detector which is capable of reliably detecting beta radiation emitted from a surface. An electrically conductive signal collector is adjustably mounted inside an electrically conductive enclosure which may define a single large opening for placing against a surface. The adjustable mounting of the electrically conductive signal collector can be based on the distance from the surface or on the expected beta energy range. A voltage source is connected to the signal collector through an electrometer or other display means for creating an electric field between the signal collector and the enclosure. Air ions created by the beta radiation are collected and the current produced is indicated on the electrometer or other display means. 2 figs

  8. Age-dependent effective doses for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Tran Van [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-06-15

    Age-dependent effective doses for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air are reported. The calculations were performed for 160 radionuclides, which are important for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. The energies and intensities of photons emitted from radionuclides were taken from the decay data DECDC used for dose calculations. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m{sup -3}) for 6 age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years-old and adult. The effective doses for the adult are also compared to values given in the literature.

  9. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd in the 10-30 MeV energy range, and production of radionuclides relevant for double-{\\beta} decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lebeda, O; Schrock, P; Štursa, J; Zuber, K; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.014602

    2012-01-01

    A preferred candidate for neutrinoless double-{\\beta} decay, 150Nd, is present in natural neodymium at an abundance level of 5.64%. However, neodymium could be activated by cosmic rays during the period it spends on the Earth's surface. Its activation by protons is therefore of interest when it comes to estimating the possible disturbance effects and increased background during neutrinoless double-{\\beta}-decay experiments like Sudbury Neutrino Observatory plus liquid scintillator (SNO+). In most cases, we lack experimental data on proton-induced reactions on neodymium. Therefore, a measurement of cross sections has been performed for the formation of 141Pm, 143Pm, 144Pm, 146Pm, 148Pm, 148Pmm, 149Pm, 150Pm, 140Nd, 141Nd, 147Nd, 149Nd, 138Prm, 139Pr, 142Pr, and 139Ce by 10-30 MeV protons. Oxidation-protected metal foil targets of natural isotopic abundance were irradiated by the usual stacked-foil technique on the external proton beam of the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at \\v{R...

  10. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  11. Modifying radionuclide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism and effects of radionuclides may be influenced by a number of dietary, physiological, and environmental factors. Some factors are studied which have been identified as potentially important determinants of radionuclide behavior: the reproductive performance of female rats exposed to 239Pu during pregnancy or lactation, and the relative contribution of cross-placental and milk transfer to offspring

  12. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on beta dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appropriate monoclonal antibodies labeled with beta-emitting nuclides of high specific activity have been suggested for treatment of specific tumors. In a homogeneous medium the radiation dose rate distribution R due to a distributed activity distribution C can be calculated by convolution of the beta dose point kernel of the radionuclide in soft tissue with C. Prototype computer programs using Fast Fourier Transform techniques have been developed to evaluate the three dimensional spatial convolution efficiently. To study the effect of tissue inhomogeneity on R, the authors simulated a soft tissue-bone interface by a polystyrene (PST)-aluminum (A1) interface and considered the backscattering of beta rays from a point source and a plane source of 32P. LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. With the point source at the PST-A1 interface, R at 0-31, 125-156, and 283-314 mg/cm2 separations from the interface were increased by (12 +/- 3)%, (8 +/-2)%, and (3 +/- 2)%, respectively, compared with a PST-PST interface. With the plane source, the increases were (8 +/- 3)%, (6 +/- 3)%, and (5 +/- 5)% for separations of 23-58, 150-184, and 277-311 mg/cm2, respectively. With the point source at a PST-air interface to simulate soft tissue-air interface, R at 0-31, 139-170, and 283-314 mg/cm2 from the interface were decreased by (25 +/- 4)%, (11 +/- 7)%, and (5 +/-2)%, respectively. The changes in R have also been measured with degraded spectra of 32P. Comparison of the experimental data with Monte Carlo calculation and the Two-Group method of calculation will be discussed. 20 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  13. Recent technologic developments on high-resolution beta imaging systems for quantitative autoradiography and double labeling applications

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, N; Chatti, K; Coulon, P; Maitrejean, S; 10.1016/j.nima.2004.03.014

    2004-01-01

    Two novel beta imaging systems, particularly interesting in the field of radiopharmacology and molecular biology research, were developed these last years. (1) a beta imager was derived from research conducted by Pr Charpak at CERN. This parallel plate avalanche chamber is a direct detection system of beta radioactivity, which is particularly adapted for qualitative and quantitative autoradiography. With this detector, autoradiographic techniques can be performed with emitters such as /sup 99m/Tc because this radionuclide emits many low-energy electrons and the detector has a very low sensitivity to low-range gamma -rays. Its sensitivity (smallest activity detected: 0.007 cpm/mm/sup 2/ for /sup 3/H and 0.01 for /sup 14/C), linearity (over a dynamic range of 10/sup 4/) and spatial resolution (50 mu m for /sup 3/H or /sup 99m/Tc to 150 mu m for /sup 32/P or /sup 18/F ( beta /sup +/)) gives a real interest to this system as a new imaging device. Its principle of detection is based on the analysis of light emitte...

  14. High beta and electron dose from 192Ir: implications for 'gamma' intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Trains of multiple 192Ir seeds are used in many clinical trials for intravascular brachytherapy. 192Ir source is commonly considered as a gamma emitter, despite the understanding that this radionuclide also emits a wide range of electron and beta energies, with a similar range of energy. The high dose from betas and electrons in the submillimeter range due to unsealed ends of seed sources should be precisely quantified to fully understand the backdrop for complications associated with 192Ir coronary artery brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C code) were performed for a model 5-seed 192Ir train used in SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and the Washington Radiation for In-Stent Restenosis (WRIST) randomized clinical trials. A stack of radiochromic films was also used to measure the dose distributions for an actual 6-seed train. Results: In the submillimeter range very close to the source, Monte Carlo results show that betas and electrons deposit a higher dose than 192Ir photons (gamma and X-rays) over the interseed gap. A high luminal dose from the combined effects of betas, electrons, and photons emitted from 192Ir can be deposited, particularly between seeds. When prescribing 15 Gy at 2 mm, the combined dose can be as high as 160 Gy at 0.5 mm. Different peak doses near the interseed gaps were noted, which may be due to variability of seed-end surfaces and nonuniformity of seed activity within a real multiseed train. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of lumen surfaces were evaluated for an eccentric seed train. The DVH parameters indicating the extent of hot spots in the lumen wall, DV10, DV5, DV2, and DV1 (dose received by 10, 5, 2, 1% respectively of the total lumen surface), can be as high as 55, 76, 81, and 155 Gy for a lumen with 3-mm diameter, and 75, 80, 110, and 158 Gy for a narrow 2-mm lumen. Conclusion: 192Ir multiple seed trains used in the SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and WRIST trials can deposit a very high dose to the luminal wall. A particularly

  15. Optimization of measurements procedures for determination of beta emitters using a proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization of measurements procedures for beta emitters with proportional counter recently installed at the Hot Cells Facility (HCF) of the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) is described. Specific detection efficiencies for 40K, 90Sr, 90Y, 210Pb and 210Bi were determined that allows for more accurate determination of the particular radionuclides as a single 40K efficiency most frequently used. In addition, self-absorption curves for different surface densities for the same nuclides were derived. The detection efficiencies obtained ranged from 10 to 52 %, depending on the beta energy emitted and surface density used including the chemical composition of the salts used or precipitates obtained following radiochemical separation in the experiment. Two empirical equations were constructed allowing for accurate determination of detection efficiencies for 90Sr and 210Pb accounting for the surface densities of the sample and the time of measurement after the radiochemical separation of each nuclide concerned. The procedures and formulae developed and applied include calculation of minimal detectable activities for individual nuclides and uncertainty budgets for the determinations concerned. As an example, determination of total beta activities of mineral waters according to the relevant ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) standard is presented. The procedure applied is based on calibration using the 40K detection efficiency curve. The values obtained ranged from 0,06 to 1,4 Bq/L, with typical uncertainties of 10 % relative. (author)

  16. Overview of radionuclides transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been recognition of radioactivity levels and the fate of radionuclides that could have modified the biogeochemical cycles in the ecological environment. These modifications can disturb a variety of the ecosystems on which human life depends. It is essential to understand the pathways of radionuclides that are transported and deposited in the atmosphere and in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems related to their impacts on human life. This paper is mainly focused on the transport in the atmospheric part. Various physical processes that control the transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere are reviewed. The transport processes used in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as underground are briefly described. For the purpose of demonstration, dose calculations due to the exposures of radionuclides, and the numerical model simulations of transport of 210Pb particles and dust aerosols in the atmosphere are presented. Each transport process is complex. More sampling data are needed to refine the transport models for assessing and predicting the fate of radionuclides and their impacts on ecosystems. Long-lived radionuclides are remained in the atmosphere and can be transported in a long distance over wider areas. Although a numerical model can handle complex transport processes, a Gaussian model offers an attraction for ease and quickness of interpretation of exposures to radionuclides during emergency. Radionuclides entering the atmosphere go through the transfer process from air to soil, soil to plants, and plants to animals. The transfer is a long-term process. Therefore, a longer-term study of environmental sampling of radionuclides is required to accurately assess the transport processes and long-term impacts on health and ecosystems. Also, it should get involving in a study of modeling transport of radionuclides over urban area having various heights and sizes of buildings, i.e., skyscrapers with high population, in the case of an event occurring

  17. Radionuclides in waters of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of radionuclides in drinking water became increasingly important within the European Union since the implementation of the European Drinking Water Directive in 1998. The limit for the uptake of radionuclides via drinking water has been established in the form of a 'total indicative dose' of 0.1 mSv per year. Unfortunately, the total indicative dose cannot be measured directly but has to be calculated from the summed up contribution of each natural or artificial radionuclide, which is present in water - excluding 3H, 40K, radon and radon decay products. The parameters of choice are the gross-alpha and gross-beta activity concentration. If the gross-alpha activity in a tap water sample is lower than 0.1 Bq/dm3 and the gross-beta activity does not exceed 1.0 Bq/dm3, it can be assumed that the annual total indicative dose of adults is less than 0.1 mSv per year (authors)

  18. Distribution of radionuclides in Dardanelle Reservoir sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgy, J R; Epperson, C E; Swindle, D L

    1984-02-01

    Natural and reactor-discharged gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Dardanelle Reservoir surface sediments taken near the Arkansas Nuclear One Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths and particle sizes, at 33 locations, in a field survey conducted in early September 1980. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: natural radioactivity (40K as well as uranium and thorium decay products) 661-1210 Bq/kg; and reactor discharged radioactivity (137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co,, 58Co, 54Mn), no detectable activity to 237 Bq/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with decreasing sediment particle size. The average external whole-body and skin doses from all measurable reactor-discharged radionuclides were calculated according to the mathematical formula for determining external dose from sediment given by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Inside the discharge embayment near the reactor discharge canal, the doses were 1.7 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and 2.0 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the skin. Outside this area, the doses were 0.15 X 10(-3) and 0.18 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and skin, respectively. PMID:6693264

  19. RTP: Radionuclides inventories calculation using ORIGEN Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ORIGEN is a widely used computer code for calculating the buildup, decay, and processing of radioactive materials. The ORIGEN code was created by famous and reputable nuclear institution in United States, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). For a nuclear reactor, either it is a nuclear power reactor or nuclear research reactor, the radionuclide inventories data is important. This data is acquired by performing source term modelling. A fresh nuclear fuel could not cause any harm to human. However, used nuclear fuel could pose danger threat to human. The fission products particularly long-lived radionuclides for example H-3, Co-60, Cs-137 that are generated inside the fuel yield a significance amount of radioactivity. Therefore, there is no doubt that for a facility having a nuclear reactor, it is vital to anticipate the amount of fission products inside the fuel together with the radioactivity that it may emit. Sufficient information on the radionuclide inventories allows the facility to provide adequate shielding protection and ensure safe transportation of nuclear fuel, when it is needed. This paper briefly describes application of ORIGEN code to calculate the radionuclides inventories of TRIGA-PUSPATI REACTOR (RTP) fuel. (author)

  20. A semiconductor beta ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of energy spectra of beta particles emitted from nuclei in beta-decay processes provides information concerning the mass difference of these nuclei between initial and final state. Moreover, experimental beta spectra yield information on the feeding of the levels in the daughter nucleus. Such data are valuable in the construction and checking of the level schemes. This thesis describes the design, construction, testing and usage of a detector for the accurate measurement of the mentioned spectra. In ch. 2 the design and construction of the beta spectrometer, which uses a hyper-pure germanium crystal for energy determination, is described. A simple wire chamber is used to discriminate beta particles from gamma radiation. Disadvantages arise from the large amounts of scattered beta particles deforming the continua. A method is described to minimize the scattering. In ch. 3 some theoretical aspects of data analysis are described and the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of the summation of annihilation radiation are compared with experiments. Ch. 4 comprises the results of the measurements of the beta decay energies of 103-108In. 87 refs.; 34 figs.; 7 tabs

  1. Application of radionuclides in process research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides were used to study the transport, transformation and modification of materials in process systems. Their advantage lies in the contactless measurement of radioactively labeled flow of materials (gas, liquid or solid) by the radiation emitted even through thick walls of equipment, under production conditions. Even under rigorous process conditions (high pressure, high temperature, rapid velocity) the experiments can be carried out. The simultaneous determination of material flows can be obtained by manifold labeling with different radionuclides. A synopsis of results obtained in plants of the power industry, material industry and biological clarification plants is given. The special measuring technique is demonstrated by the example of the technical multistage process of caprolactam synthesis and gas concrete production by the Hebel and Calsilox processes and stressed concrete pipe production by the rotation technique. (author)

  2. The Assay of Alpha- and Beta-Emitters by Means of Scintillating Ion-Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of scintillating ion.exchange resins (SIER) has provided a unique system for the detection and counting of alpha- and beta-ray emitting nuclides. The property of ion exchange permits the concentration of ionic radionuclides from aqueous solutions of widely varying chemical conditions. The property of scintillation in response to the emitted particles allows for the detection of the adsorbed radionuclides. Both anionic and cationic SIER have been developed and possess the strongly basic, quaternary ammonium group and the strongly acidic, aryl sulphonic group respectively. Therefore, the voluminous literature on the uses of commercially available ion-exchange resins can be applied in many cases to SIER. The availability of both anionic and cationic resins presents the possibility of a method for the adsorption of almost all elements except the rare gases. The stability of SIER is such that it can be used in solution of strong sodium hydroxide, concentrated hydrochloric and sulphuric acids as well as 6N nitric acid at 25°C for short periods (3 - 4 h) of time. SIER is readily adapted for counting with the available scintillation counting apparatus. The activated resin can be counted in a plastic (or glass) cup coupled to a photomultiplier tube and an electronic pulse counter. It can also be transferred to a glass vial, immersed in aqueous alcohol or toluene, and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. SIER in the form of small spherical beads permits the use of counting vessels with many different geometric configurations. Both alpha- and beta-ray emitting nuclides have been efficiently adsorbed and counted using these methods. The low-energy beta-emitters, such as 63Ni and 14C, have been counted with 12 and 35%efficiencies respectively. The alpha-emitters of 239Pu and 237Np have been adsorbed and efficiently counted (70-90%) on both the anionic and cationic resins. 14C-tagged amino acids have also been counted at over 20% efficiency using a liquid

  3. WE-A-17A-01: Absorbed Dose Rate-To-Water at the Surface of a Beta-Emitting Planar Ophthalmic Applicator with a Planar, Windowless Extrapolation Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently there is no primary calibration standard for determining the absorbed dose rate-to-water at the surface of β-emitting concave ophthalmic applicators and plaques. Machining tolerances involved in the design of concave window extrapolation chambers are a limiting factor for development of such a standard. Use of a windowless extrapolation chamber avoids these window-machining tolerance issues. As a windowless extrapolation chamber has never been attempted, this work focuses on proof of principle measurements with a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber to verify the accuracy in comparison to initial calibration, which could be extended to the design of a hemispherical, windowless extrapolation chamber. Methods: The window of an extrapolation chamber defines the electrical field, aids in aligning the source parallel to the collector-guard assembly, and decreases the backscatter due to attenuation of lower electron energy. To create a uniform and parallel electric field in this research, the source was made common to the collector-guard assembly. A precise positioning protocol was designed to enhance the parallelism of the source and collector-guard assembly. Additionally, MCNP5 was used to determine a backscatter correction factor to apply to the calibration. With these issues addressed, the absorbed dose rate-to-water of a Tracerlab 90Sr planar ophthalmic applicator was determined using National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) calibration formalism, and the results of five trials with this source were compared to measurements at NIST with a traditional extrapolation chamber. Results: The absorbed dose rate-to-water of the planar applicator was determined to be 0.473 Gy/s ±0.6%. Comparing these results to NIST's determination of 0.474 Gy/s yields a −0.6% difference. Conclusion: The feasibility of a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber has been demonstrated. A similar principle will be applied to developing a

  4. WE-A-17A-01: Absorbed Dose Rate-To-Water at the Surface of a Beta-Emitting Planar Ophthalmic Applicator with a Planar, Windowless Extrapolation Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, A [of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Soares, C [NIST (Retired), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Micka, J; Culberson, W [University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); DeWerd, L [University of WIMadison/ ADCL, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently there is no primary calibration standard for determining the absorbed dose rate-to-water at the surface of β-emitting concave ophthalmic applicators and plaques. Machining tolerances involved in the design of concave window extrapolation chambers are a limiting factor for development of such a standard. Use of a windowless extrapolation chamber avoids these window-machining tolerance issues. As a windowless extrapolation chamber has never been attempted, this work focuses on proof of principle measurements with a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber to verify the accuracy in comparison to initial calibration, which could be extended to the design of a hemispherical, windowless extrapolation chamber. Methods: The window of an extrapolation chamber defines the electrical field, aids in aligning the source parallel to the collector-guard assembly, and decreases the backscatter due to attenuation of lower electron energy. To create a uniform and parallel electric field in this research, the source was made common to the collector-guard assembly. A precise positioning protocol was designed to enhance the parallelism of the source and collector-guard assembly. Additionally, MCNP5 was used to determine a backscatter correction factor to apply to the calibration. With these issues addressed, the absorbed dose rate-to-water of a Tracerlab 90Sr planar ophthalmic applicator was determined using National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) calibration formalism, and the results of five trials with this source were compared to measurements at NIST with a traditional extrapolation chamber. Results: The absorbed dose rate-to-water of the planar applicator was determined to be 0.473 Gy/s ±0.6%. Comparing these results to NIST's determination of 0.474 Gy/s yields a −0.6% difference. Conclusion: The feasibility of a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber has been demonstrated. A similar principle will be applied to developing a

  5. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 900C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 5000C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  6. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  7. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2010-06-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

  8. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form

  9. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form.

  10. Radionuclides in US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Neutrinoless double positron decay and positron emitting electron capture in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Barea, J; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay is of fundamental importance for determining the neutrino mass. Although double electron ($\\beta^-\\beta^-$) decay is the most promising mode, in very recent years interest in double positron ($\\beta^+\\beta^+$) decay, positron emitting electron capture ($EC\\beta^+$), and double electron capture ($ECEC$) has been renewed. We present here results of a calculation of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-$\\beta^+$ decay and positron emitting electron capture within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) for $^{58}$Ni, $^{64}$Zn, $^{78}$Kr, $^{96}$Ru, $^{106}$Cd, $^{124}$Xe, $^{130}$Ba, and $^{136}$Ce decay. By combining these with a calculation of phase space factors we calculate expected half-lives.

  12. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    valuable information about chemical processes occurring during inundation as the water disappeared. Important observations from water-chemistry analyses included: 1) total dissolved solids (TDS) and chloride ion (Cl-) concentrations were very low (TDS: < 200 mg/L and Cl-: < 3.0 mg/L, respectively) for all water samples regardless of time or areal extent; 2) all dissolved constituents were at concentrations well below what might be expected for evaporating shallow surface waters on a playa, even when 98 to 99 percent of the water had disappeared; 3) the amount of evaporation for the last water samples collected at the end of inundation, estimated with the stable isotopic ratios δ2H or δ18O, was approximately 60 percent; and 4) water samples analyzed by gamma spectroscopy did not show any man-made radioactivity; however, the short scanning time (24 hours) and relative chemical diluteness of the water samples (TDS ranged between 39 and 190 mg/L) may have contributed to none being detected. Additionally, any low-energy beta emitting radionuclides would not have been detected by gamma spectroscopy. From these observations, it was apparent that a significant portion of water on the playa did not evaporate, but rather infiltrated into the subsurface (approximately 40 percent). Consistent with this water chemistry-based conclusion is particle-size analysis of two archived Frenchman Flat playa soils samples, which showed low clay content in the near surface soil that also suggested infiltration. Infiltration of water from the playa during inundation into the subsurface does not necessarily imply that groundwater recharge is occurring, but it does provide a mechanism for moving residual radionuclides downward into the subsurface of Frenchman Flat playa. Water-mineral geochemical reactions were modeled so that changes in the water chemistry could be identified and the extent of reactions quantified. Geochemical modeling showed that evaporation; equilibrium with atmospheric carbon

  13. Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  14. Boundary Electron and Beta Dosimetry-Quantification of the Effects of Dissimilar Media on Absorbed Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Josane C.

    1991-02-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft -tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta -ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radioimmunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods has to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus -32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data also contribute to the relatively sparse set of published boundary dosimetry data. At the same time, they may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods, which were developed elsewhere, are compared

  15. Radionuclides in Bentic Algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentic micro-algae (mainly consisting of diatoms) were taken from 4 sites in the discharge area of the Forsmark Nuclear Power Station (Sweden) and from 1 site in the cooling water intake channel of the power station. Samples were taken every third week during 1984. The micro-algae were brushed of a 0.1-0.15 m2 area on stones collected from the hydrolittoral zone. Radionuclide concentration was measured as gamma radiation with a Ge-detector. Fission products from the power plant cooling water can easily be detected in the micro-algae. We show that benthic diatom assemblages are good indicators for radionuclides; good correlations were found between radionuclide concentration in the algae and the discharge from the power plant. The best correlations were obtained if the accumulated discharge for the 15 days before sampling was used in the calculations. Of the investigated radionuclides, Co-60 and Zn-65 show significant relationships between concentration in the algae and discharge for 2 site, Ag-110m for 3 sites and Mn-54 for 1 site. No correlations were found for the site in the intake channel. The results show differences which depend on whether calculations were done for total, particulate or dissolved fractions of the radionuclides. There are indications that there is considerable recirculation of the radionuclides within the algal assemblages, and the recirculation from the outlet of the Biotest basin to the intake channel is of about 10%. In this report we also present a budget for the total amount of radionuclides in the Biotest Basin for 1984. The highest amounts of radionuclides in diatoms were found during late winter and early spring, associated with the large diatom blooms at that time of the year in the basin. (authors)

  16. Micro-battery Development using beta radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear battery which use the beta radiation sources emitting the low penetration radiation energy from radioisotope can be applied as the long term (more than 10 years) micro power source in MEMS and nano components. This report describes the basic concept and principles of nuclear micro-battery and its fabrication in space and military field. In particular direct conversion method is described by investigating the electron-hole generation and recombination in p-n junction of silicon betavoltaics with beta radiation

  17. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  18. Possible applications of radionuclide techniques in criminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioindicator methods in dactyloscopy is described, in which is used the bond of suitable radioindicators to certain components of the sweat secretion with subsequent detection of the local distribution of these radionuclides using the autoradiographic method. The use of autoradiography and gamma spectrometry is given in ballistics, neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence analysis in the investigation of motor car accidents and in the verification of historical objects, in forensic medicine, the use of autoradiography in the expertise of photographs, beta radiography in graphology and the use of radioactive labelling for trapping criminals. (J.P.)

  19. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Ogata, Yoshimune; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  20. Project 8: Determining neutrino mass from tritium beta decay using a frequency-based method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, Peter J.; Kofron, Jared N.; MCBride, Lisa; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Doelman, S.; Rogers, Alan E.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel; Oblath, Noah S.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; Monreal, Ben; Bahr, Matthew; Asner, David M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Fernandes, Justin L.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Bradley, Rich; Thummler, Thomas

    2013-10-04

    A general description is given of Project 8, a new approach to measuring the neutrino mass scale via the beta decay of tritium. In Project 8, the energy of electrons emitted in beta decay is determined from the frequency of cyclotron radiation emitted as the electrons spiral in a uniform magnetic field

  1. Project 8: Determining neutrino mass from tritium beta decay using a frequency-based method

    CERN Document Server

    Doe, P J; McBride, E L; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Doelman, S; Rogers, A; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Oblath, N S; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; Monreal, B; Bahr, M; Asner, D M; Jones, A M; Fernandes, J; VanDevender, B A; Patterson, R; Bradley, R; Thuemmler, T

    2013-01-01

    A general description is given of Project 8, a new approach to measuring the neutrino mass scale via the beta decay of tritium. In Project 8, the energy of electrons emitted in beta decay is determined from the frequency of cyclotron radiation emitted as the electrons spiral in a uniform magnetic field.

  2. Radionuclides detected in lime samples that consumed with tobacco and betel nuts by people of Northeast India where head and neck squamous cells cancer (HNSCC) is prevalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is a very predominant type of cancer amongst the population of northeastern states of India than the rest of the world. Epidemiological and other data suggest consumption of betel nuts with/without tobacco and lime or tobacco alone with lime is a probable cause of high cancer incidence. The fundamental question arises that why this particular cancer is induced more in this region while people follow the similar habits elsewhere. Here we report the results on analysis of lime samples, collected from 12 different locations spectrophotometrically by high-purity germanium detector. The calculated activity of radionuclides showed to an average of 2.68, 0.10 and 0.83 Bq/gm for 238U, 235U and 232Th series respectively for ten samples which are about 8 times higher than the normal background level of 0.37, 0.02 and 0.02 Bq/gm for 238U, 235U and 232Th series found in control samples, collected from outside of northeast. The results conclusively showed for the first time that the lime samples almost throughout the northeastern India contain high proportion of radionuclides of uranium, thorium and actinides series. Further, annual effective dose of gamma radiation calculations from these results of earth's crust in northeast showed that gamma rays emitted at an average dose of up to 2.5 mSv/year/consumer approximately. This dose calculation in the oral cavity is underestimated as short range radiations by decay of alpha, beta and electron-capture etc are not considered in the present study. Continuous exposure of such low dose radiations emitting from different radionuclides to the sensitive squamous cells of the oral cavity for a long twenty years or more amounting to a total minimum dose of at least 50 mSv evidently contributes towards excessive HNSCC to the people of northeast than other parts of India.

  3. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99mTc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [18F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  4. Bilateral Comparison CIEMAT-CENTIS-DMR for radionuclide activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a bilateral comparison of radionuclide activity measurements between the Radionuclide Metrology Department of the Center of Isotopes of Cuba (CENTIS-DMR), and the Ionising Radiation Metrology Laboratory (LMRI) of the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT) of Spain. The aim of the comparison was to establish the comparability of the measurement instruments and methods used to obtain radioactive reference materials of some gamma-emitting nuclides at CENTIS-DMR. The results revealed that there are no statistically significant differences between the data reported by both laboratories. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Radionuclide distribution in a nuclear test cavity: the baseball event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1994 two holes were drilled into the cavity formed in 1981 by the underground nuclear test named Baseball. An extensive set of side wall samples were collected in these holes. We have analyzed the samples for tritium and for gamma-emitting radionuclides (both fission products and neutron activation products). It appears that the distribution pattern of these radioactive materials, established at the time of the detonation, have persisted even though the cavity has been under water for 13 years. These findings are discussed in the context of radionuclide migration and groundwater contamination at the Nevada Test Site. (orig.)

  6. Distribution of radionuclides in a marine sediment core off the waterspout of the nuclear power plants in Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sediment core was collected and dated using 210Pbex dating method off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides were analyzed using HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation and to study the past environment changes. It suggested that NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment based on the low specific activity of 137Cs. Two broad peaks of TOC, TC and LOI accorded well with the commercial operations of Daya Bay NPP (1994.2 and 1994.5) and LNPP Phase I (2002.5 and 2003.3), implying that the mass input of cooling water from NPP may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities. - Graphical abstract: A sediment core was collected and dated using 210Pbex dating method, off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides analyzed using the HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to study the past environment changes and assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation. NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment, but the mass input of cooling water from nuclear power plants may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities. - Highlights: • A sediment core collected from Daya Bay, South China Sea was dated using 210Pbex method. • The γ-emitting radionuclides, gross α and β, TOC, TIC, TC, LOI were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation. • The low activity of 137Cs in sediment suggested NPP provided no new radioactivity source. • Two peaks of TOC, TC and LOI implied that the mass input of NPP cooling water may result

  7. Determination of technogenic radionuclides prevalence and the most polluted zones in the ecosystem of lake Drukshiai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regular measurements of 1989 - 1993 indicate show that radioecological situation in lake Drukshiai is not stable. Ignalina NPP generated radionuclides together with the debalance water are thrown into the warm water throw-out zone where industrial - rain and domestic wastewater gets too. Getting off radionuclides into the lake partly depends on the wash-out of the radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere. In the cooler of Ignalina NPP - lake Drukshiai, secondary long-living source of radionuclide pollution, i.e. bottom sediments, forms. The system, accumulating radionuclides and other pollutants of anthropogenic origin, is conservative, as well as cleans hardly and Chernobyl radionuclides are already accumulated in lake's deep-parts. (author). 8 refs., 7 figs

  8. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides (14C and 60Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides (137Cs and 90Sr/90Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process

  9. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-08

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 60}Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process.

  10. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  11. Light emitting ceramic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  12. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  13. Experience on the neutron activation of natural/enriched Re, Sm, and Ho nuclides in a reactor for the production of radiotherapeutic radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, M M; Mushtaq, A; Jawaid, M

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been concentrated on the use of beta-emitting radionuclides for the treatment of various cancers. The reports suggested the application of 186Re and 153Sm as radiotherapeutic radionuclides for the treatment of palliative widespread skeletal metastases, whereas 166Ho was suggested as an agent for radiation synovectomy. Hence, a study on the production of 186Re, 153Sm, and 166Ho radionuclides was carried out by neutron activation of the appropriate target materials using a Pakistan Atomic Research Reactor (PARR-1) at a neutrons flux of 1 x 10(4) n/cm2 s. These radionuclides were then converted to appropriate radiopharmaceuticals for their use on animals and patients. The targets of natural Re (metal), natural Sm2O3, enriched Sm2O3 (99.06%), Sm(NO3)3 (solid), Sm(NO3)3 (liquid), and Ho2O3 were irradiated in the PARR-1. After irradiation, the purity of these radionuclides were checked by a multichannel analyzer, Canberra series 85 (MCA) coupled with HPGe detector and then measured in radioisotope calibrator Capintec ionization chamber model CRC-5RH. The effect of the irradiation time and amount of target material was investigated on the production yields of the radionuclides. The results showed an increase in the specific activity of Re with an increase in the irradiation time from 1 to 72 h, whereas a decrease in the specific activity was observed with increase in the amount of Re from 10 to 100 mg. Similar results were obtained for 153Sm and 166Ho radionuclides. The results further indicated that the specific activity of powder target was much less than the liquid targets for 153Sm. Their conversion to the appropriate radiotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals were also carried out by investigating the experimental conditions and acceptable quality of 186Re-HEDP and 153Sm-EDTMP complexes were prepared. These complexes were then used on animals and patients which showed good performance. PMID:10676528

  14. Differences among Monte Carlo codes in the calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy and analysis of their impact on absorbed dose evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ). For 90Y and 188Re, the differences among the various codes have a negligible impact (within few percents) on convolution calculations of the absorbed dose; thus either one of the MC programs is suitable to produce voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy dosimetry. However, if a low-energy beta-emitting radionuclide is considered, these differences can affect also dose depositions at small source-target voxel distances, leading to more conspicuous variations (about 9% for 131I) when calculating the absorbed dose in the volume of interest.

  15. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculations. Data for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tamura, Tsutomu

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear decay data used for dose calculations were compiled for 162 nuclides with half-lives greater than or equal to 10 min that are not listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and their 28 daughter nuclides. Additional 14 nuclides that are considered to be important in fusion reactor facilities were also included. The data were compiled using decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Investigations of the data sets were performed to check their consistency by referring to recent literature and NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides, and by using the utility programs of ENSDF. Possible revisions of the data sets were made for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The revised data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to calculate the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays including annihilation photons, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformations of the radionuclides. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were presented in two types of format; Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. This report provides the decay data in the Publ. 38 format along with decay scheme drawings. The data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection. (author)

  16. Relationships between ESR-evaluated doses estimated from enamel and activity of radionuclides in bone and teeth of reindeer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doses of radiation estimated from ESR analysis of tooth enamel were compared with activities of alpha- and beta-emitters in enamel and in bone tissue of mandibles of 77 reindeer from populations with different levels of radiation contamination. Contribution of the radionuclides incorporated into bone (or bone-seeking radionuclides in food) to ESR-evaluated doses was substantial and the contribution of the radionuclides incorporated into enamel itself proved to be relatively small

  17. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  18. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  19. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  20. An atlas of selected beta-ray spectra and depth-dose distributions in lithium fluoride and soft tissue generated by a fast Monte-Carlo-based sampling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Gillespie, Timothy J.; Chris Wang, C.-K.

    1996-12-01

    A method to generate depth-dose distributions due to beta radiation in LiF and soft tissue is proposed. In this method, the EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code is initially used to generate a library of monoenergetic electron depth-dose distributions in the material for electron energies in the range of 10 keV to 5 MeV in 10 keV increments. A polynomial least-squares fit is applied to each distribution. In addition, a theoretical model is developed to generate beta-ray energy spectra of selected radionuclides. A standard Monte Carlo random sampling technique is then employed to sample the spectra and generate the depth-dose distributions in LiF and soft tissue. The proposed method has an advantage over more traditional methods in that the actual radiation transport in the media is performed only once for a set of monoenergetic cases and the beta depth-dose distributions are easily generated by sampling this previously-acquired database in a matter of minutes. This method therefore reduces the demand on computer resources and time. The method can be used to calculate depth-dose distribution due to any beta-emitting nuclide or combination of nuclides with up to ten beta components.

  1. Orbital radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbital abnormalities can be evaluated by dynamic scintigraphy (radionuclide angiography) and static scintigraphy (radionuclide ''scanning''). The use of en face positioning improves the visualization of orbital details. Lesions can be detected and localized most accurately if multiple tracers are used for these studies. Abnormalities can be characterized by the recognition of various angiographic flow patterns, of distinct static distribution patterns, and of differences in the accumulation of multiple radiopharmaceuticals. The results of scintigraphic examination using technetium 99m sodium pertechnetate, mercury 197 chlormerodrin, and gallium 67 citrate in a series of 57 patients are reported. (U.S.)

  2. Long-term dose-response studies of inhaled or injected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the scientific progress in, and current status of, life-span studies of the long-term health risks in Beagle dogs of chronic irradiation from internally deposited radionuclides or from an external source. The reporting period for this document is the 2-year period from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1993. Studies that were initiated at three different laboratories (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, ITRI, University of Utah, and Argonne National Laboratory, ANL) are presented here because they are being completed at ITRI. All living dogs in the Utah-initiated studies were transferred to the ITRI facility for the remainder of their life-span observations and measurements in September 1987. This report is the fourth in a series of reports dealing with the current status and progress of both the Utah and ITRI studies. Other life-span studies involving dogs exposed to gamma radiation from an external source were initiated and conducted for many years at ANL. In 1991, the decision was made to discontinue the chronic irradiation of the remaining living dogs and to transfer all remaining dogs to ITRI for care, clinical observations, and pathological observations at death or euthanasia. This report provides the current status of these dogs. Status reports on the Utah and ITRI studies comprise most of this report. The ITRI-related section presents brief statements of project objectives, the general procedures used in these studies, and some study-specific features for each of the 19 studies being conducted with either beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides. Dose- and effect-modifying factors being addressed in these studies include total dose, dose rate, LET, solubility, nonuniformity of dose, species, age, sex, health status, and mode of exposure. Recent additions to experimental protocols for studies in which dogs are still alive involve the collection and analysis of tumor tissues using currently available molecular biology techniques

  3. Assessment of beta-emitter radionuclides in biological samples using liquid scintillation counting. Application to the study of internal doses in molecular and cellular biology techniques; Evaluacion en muestras biologicas de radionucleidos emisores beta mediante espectrometria de centelleo en fase liquida. Aplicaciones al estudio de dosis internas en tecnicas de investigacion de biologia molecular y celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, I.; Delgado, A.; Navarro, T.; Macias, M. T.

    2007-07-01

    The radioisotopic techniques used in Molecular and Cellular Biology involve external and internal irradiation risk. It is necessary to control the possible internal contamination associated to the development of these techniques. The internal contamination risk can be due to physical and chemical properties of the labelled compounds, aerosols generated during the performance technique. The aim of this work was to estimate the possible intake of specific beta emitters during the technique development and to propose the required criterions to perform Individual Monitoring. The most representative radioisotopic techniques were selected attending their potential risk of internal contamination. Techniques were analysed applying IAEA methodology according to the used activity in each technique. It was necessary to identify the worker groups that would require individual monitoring on the base of their specific risk. Different measurement procedures were applied to study the possible intake in group risk and more than 160 persons were measured by in vitro bioassay. (Author) 96 refs.

  4. An interspecies comparison of the biological effects of an inhaled, relatively insoluble beta emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice, rats, Syrian hamsters, and beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to graded levels of 144Ce in relatively insoluble forms to demonstrate species similarities and differences regarding patterns of deposition, fate, dosimetry, and dose-response relationships. All animals were serially evaluated to determine lung burdens, held for life-span observation, necropsied at death, and examined histopathologically to characterize the lesions present and to determine the cause of death. The primary malignant lung tumors observed in rodents were predominantly squamous-cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas, whereas those in dogs at earlier times were primarily hemangiosarcomas and those in dogs that died at later times were pulmonary carcinomas. The relationship between the incidence of lung cancer and absorbed beta dose to the lung differed among species. The results of modeling these data provide a better understanding of how the choice of species can influence the outcome of a life-span study. The data are used to estimate the risk of lung cancer in man from an inhaled beta-emitting radionuclide. 26 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Radionuclide transfer in Alpine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although alpine ecosystems are only of limited extent in Europe and the world, they serve as an important socio-economic basis for food production and tourism for the local population. The specific climate conditions and agricultural practice do have influence on radionuclide transfer in Alpine regions. The paper describes basic processes governing radionuclide behaviour in Alpine ecosystems and gives parameters for vertical migration of radionuclide in soil, for soil-plant transfer as well as transfer of radionuclide to cow milk. (author)

  6. Elaboration of supports for beta emitting sources (with vyns)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Radioactive patterns account with a 4 πβ-γ coincidence system of recent acquisition with which absolute measures of radioactive activity with uncertainties of the order of 0.1% can be made. Since the coincidence method for the activity measure consists on detecting to the particle and the photon corresponding to oneself nuclear disintegration, it is necessary to elaborate special radioactive sources on thin supports, in order to allowing the maximum possible fluence of β particles (∼ 100%). This work a technique for the elaboration of these sources and for the measure of the thickness of the walls of the support is presented. (Author)

  7. Radionuclides in house dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  8. Underground radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number 9 sub-report of the safety assesment studies of the disposal of radioactive waste in rock-salt formations concerns the calculation of radio-nuclide migration with groundwater. Calculations ar carried out in two phases. The first phase consists of calculation of the groundwater flow system under a great number of different hydrological boundary conditions, which possibly can be encountered in future. Variations in sea level and consequences of glaciations are included. Given a great number of possible groundwater flow systems, in the second phase radionuclide migration is calculated for a restricted number of representative situations. Transport of radionuclides with groundwater takes place, starting at a release point at the top (edge) of the rock salt formation until the landsurface, the bottom of a sea or an extraction-well for public water supply has been reached, at which places concentrations radionuclides have been computed as a function of time. Calculations continued till all concentrations had reached their maxima. Results form the input for biosphere dose-calculations, as reported in the number 10 sub-report. (author). 26 refs.; 43 figs.; 22 tabs

  9. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  10. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to 4K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials

  11. Computed Cerenkov luminescence yields for radionuclides used in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that takes advantage of the optical Cerenkov photons emitted following the decay of radionuclides in dielectric media such as tissue. Cerenkov radiation potentially allows many biomedically-relevant radionuclides, including all positron-emitting radionuclides, to be imaged in vivo using sensitive CCD cameras. Cerenkov luminescence may also provide a means to deliver light deep inside tissue over a sustained period of time using targeted radiotracers. This light could be used for photoactivation, including photorelease of therapeutics, photodynamic therapy and photochemical internalization. Essential to assessing the feasibility of these concepts, and the design of instrumentation designed for detecting Cerenkov radiation, is an understanding of the light yield of different radionuclides in tissue. This is complicated by the dependence of the light yield on refractive index and the volume of the sample being interrogated. Using Monte Carlo simulations, in conjunction with step-wise use of the Frank–Tamm equation, we studied forty-seven different radionuclides and show that Cerenkov light yields in tissue can be as high as a few tens of photons per nuclear decay for a wavelength range of 400–800 nm. The dependency on refractive index and source volume is explored, and an expression for the scaling factor necessary to compute the Cerenkov yield in any arbitrary spectral band is given. This data will be of broad utility in guiding the application of Cerenkov radiation emitted from biomedical radionuclides. (paper)

  12. Radiation-induced liver lesions in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk for liver disease from internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides is unknown because there are no human populations exposed to hepatotropic beta-emitting radionuclides available for study. In this report, we discuss the hepatic lesion in dogs exposed to a beta-emitting radionuclide, 144CeCl3, and held for their life spans

  13. Study of the transfer of the medically used radionuclides in sewage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    γ-emitting radionuclides were detected in sewage sludges from two sewage treatment plants at Nice, in South Eastern France, and Saint Laurent du Var, near Nice. The medically used radio-nuclides 99mTc, 201Tl, 131I, 67Ga and 111In were measured daily during a sampling period of two months. A comparison of the calculated activity concentrations with the doses injected to the patients allowed us to determine the transfer time and the effective half-life of these different radionuclides in the two sewage systems. (orig.)

  14. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  15. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  16. Radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of the presence of radionuclides in food are presented: natural radiation and artificial radiation. The transfer of radionuclides through food chains, intakes of radionuclides to the body with its partners effective doses and typical consumption of basic foods of a rural adult population are exposed as main topics. Also the radiation doses from natural sources and exposure to man by ingestion of contaminated food with radionuclides of artificial origin are shown. The contribution of the food ingestion to the man exposure depends on: characteristics of radionuclide, natural conditions, farming practices and eating habits of the population. The principal international organizations in charge of setting guide levels for radionuclides in food are mentioned: standards, rules and the monitoring. It establishes that a guide is necessary for the food monitoring; the alone CODEX ALIMENTARIUS is applicable to emergency situations and the generic action levels proposed by the CODEX not satisfy all needs (no guiding international levels for planned or existing situations such as NORM). There are handled mainly socio-economic and political aspects. Among the actions to be taken are: to assure a public comprehensive information over the risk evaluation in food; to reinforce the collaboration among the different international organizations (WHO, IAEA, ICRP, EC) in relation with the food of set; to give follow-up to the control of the drinkable water and NORM's presence in the food. In addition, it is possible to create the necessary mechanisms to reduce the number of irrelevant measures and bureaucratic useless steps (certificates); to promote the exchange between the different institutions involved in the topic of the food, with relation to the acquired experiences and learned lessons. Likewise, it might examine the possibility of a multidisciplinary approximation (radioactive and not radioactive pollutants); to elaborate a technical guide to assure the

  17. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed. PMID:18215644

  18. Radionuclide diagnosis of nephrolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide investigations were conducted in 322 patients with nephrolithiasis. Unilateral calculosis was established in 46.3% of the patients, bilateral calculosis in 50.6%. The nature of changes on renograms, scintigrams and in clearance values shown to depend on the localization of concrements, their size and the presence of concomitant infection. A conclusion has been made as to the usefulness of the methods with relation to operative treatment, especially in a bilateral localization of a pathological renal process

  19. Radionuclide fate and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies reported here deal with the full range of contaminant behavior and fate, from the initial physicochemical factors that govern radionuclide availability in terrestrial and aquatic environments to studies of contaminant transport by biological means. By design, we focus more on the biologically and chemically mediated transport processes and food-chain pathways than on the purely physical forms of contaminant transport, such as transport by wind and water

  20. Soil contamination by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil is the first link in the food chain. Soil contamination by individual radionuclides significantly affects the level of terrestrial radiation in the locality. The authors mapped situation of post-Chernobyl 137Cs soil contamination in Slovakia and European countries. Samples were collected in three layers of agriculturally cultivated area. Even a few years after the Chernobyl accident authors can say that elevated 137Cs values were recorded in the samples from Austria and Germany, in all layers of collection. (authors)

  1. Radionuclide co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the minor components of the spent fuel matrix has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two different situations have been studied: Part I, the near field scenario, where the release and migration of the minor components is dependent on the solubility behaviour of UO2(s); Part II, the far field, where the solubility and transport of the radionuclides is related to the major geochemical processes occurring. (orig.)

  2. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  3. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographical database has been developed to provide quick access to research and background literature in the field of radioecology. This is a development of an earlier database described by Nelson (Bocock 1981). ITE's particular fields of interest have led to a subject bias in the bibliography towards studies in Cumbria, especially those concerned with radionuclides originating from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and towards ecological research studies that are complementary to radionuclide studies. Other subjects covered, include the chemistry of radionuclides, budgets and transfers within ecosystems and techniques for the analysis of environmental samples. ITE's research objectives have led to the establishment of a specialized database which is intended to complement rather than compete with the large international databases made available by suppliers such as IRS-DIALTECH or DIALOG. Currently the database holds about 1900 references which are stored on a 2 1/2 megabyte hard disk on a Digital PDP11/34 computer operating under a time shared system. The references follow a standard format. (author)

  4. Laboratory model of radionuclide migration in the aeration zone of country between Uzh and Pripyat' rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special installation for modelling of the radionuclide migration in the aeration zone was presented to predict the ground water state in the Chernobyl' accident region. This installation was under operation in the Chernobyl' radiochemical laboratory from 1987, September. Results of the first stage of experiment have shown that the level of total beta-activity of recharge run-off samples is 10-9 Ci/l, while the total beta-activity of model 'ground water' is half an order less in average. Cs-137, Cs-134, Ce-144, Ru-106 radionuclides were found in run-off samples. 7 figs

  5. Exposure to radionuclides in smoke from vegetation fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium were determined in bushes and trees and in the smoke from summer forest fires. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in smoke particles were much enriched when compared to original vegetation. Polonium-210 (210Po) in smoke was measured in concentrations much higher than all other radionuclides, reaching 7255 ± 285 Bq kg−1, mostly associated with the smaller size smoke particles (210Po in surface air near forest fires displayed volume concentrations up to 70 mBq m−3, while in smoke-free air 210Po concentration was about 30 μBq m−3. The estimated absorbed radiation dose to an adult member of the public or a firefighter exposed for 24 h to inhalation of smoke near forest fires could exceed 5 μSv per day, i.e, more than 2000 times above the radiation dose from background radioactivity in surface air, and also higher than the radiation dose from 210Po inhalation in a chronic cigarette smoker. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to smoke allows for enhanced inhalation of radionuclides associated with smoke particles. Due to high radiotoxicity of alpha emitting radionuclides, and in particular of 210Po, the protection of respiratory tract of fire fighters is strongly recommended. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides in vegetation are in low concentrations. • Forest fires release natural radionuclides from vegetation and concentrate them in inhalable ash particles. • Prolonged inhalation of smoke from forest fires gives rise enhanced radiation exposure of lungs especially due to polonium. • Respiratory protection of fire fighters and members of public is highly recommended for radioprotection reasons

  6. Exposure to radionuclides in smoke from vegetation fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.pt; Oliveira, João M.; Malta, Margarida

    2014-02-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium were determined in bushes and trees and in the smoke from summer forest fires. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in smoke particles were much enriched when compared to original vegetation. Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) in smoke was measured in concentrations much higher than all other radionuclides, reaching 7255 ± 285 Bq kg{sup −1}, mostly associated with the smaller size smoke particles (< 1.0 μm). Depending on smoke particle concentration, {sup 210}Po in surface air near forest fires displayed volume concentrations up to 70 mBq m{sup −3}, while in smoke-free air {sup 210}Po concentration was about 30 μBq m{sup −3}. The estimated absorbed radiation dose to an adult member of the public or a firefighter exposed for 24 h to inhalation of smoke near forest fires could exceed 5 μSv per day, i.e, more than 2000 times above the radiation dose from background radioactivity in surface air, and also higher than the radiation dose from {sup 210}Po inhalation in a chronic cigarette smoker. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to smoke allows for enhanced inhalation of radionuclides associated with smoke particles. Due to high radiotoxicity of alpha emitting radionuclides, and in particular of {sup 210}Po, the protection of respiratory tract of fire fighters is strongly recommended. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides in vegetation are in low concentrations. • Forest fires release natural radionuclides from vegetation and concentrate them in inhalable ash particles. • Prolonged inhalation of smoke from forest fires gives rise enhanced radiation exposure of lungs especially due to polonium. • Respiratory protection of fire fighters and members of public is highly recommended for radioprotection reasons.

  7. Prospects for the methods of radionuclide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of radionuclide production for the nuclear-medicine purposes are described. In a budget approach, the application of low-energy accelerators is especially advantageous. Intense flux of bremsstrahlung at electron accelerators or high-current cyclotron beams of alpha particles must supply a great yield for many isotopes. The choice of a target material and of the projectile energy provides enough variation for concrete species formation. The innovating procedures are here proposed for optimizing of methods, for instance, application of the noble-gas target for production and transport of activities. The known and new variants of the 'generator' scheme are discussed. Many isotopes are listed as promising in the context of the therapeutic and theragnostic applications. Among them are isotopes/isomers emitting soft radiation for the selective and careful body treatment, also the positron emitters for PET, and the halogen and alkali-metal species convenient for chemical separation.

  8. Prospects for the methods of radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamian, S. A., E-mail: karamian@nrmail.jinr.ru; Dmitriev, S. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, FLNR, 141980, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-30

    In the present report, methods of radionuclide production for the nuclear-medicine purposes are described. In a budget approach, the application of low-energy accelerators is especially advantageous. Intense flux of bremsstrahlung at electron accelerators or high-current cyclotron beams of alpha particles must supply a great yield for many isotopes. The choice of a target material and of the projectile energy provides enough variation for concrete species formation. The innovating procedures are here proposed for optimizing of methods, for instance, application of the noble-gas target for production and transport of activities. The known and new variants of the “generator” scheme are discussed. Many isotopes are listed as promising in the context of the therapeutic and theragnostic applications. Among them are isotopes/isomers emitting soft radiation for the selective and careful body treatment, also the positron emitters for PET, and the halogen and alkali-metal species convenient for chemical separation.

  9. Natural radionuclides in industrial and rural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-226, lead-210, uranium and thorium are dispersed in the environment by fly ash emitted by coal-fuelled power stations. Concentrations of these nuclides have been determined in fly ash from three power stations and in soils collected in six industrial and twenty rural regions. In industrial areas, the concentrations of natural radionuclides in a 5 cm thick surface soil layer were found to be higher than in lower layers. With the exception of lead-210, this effect was not observed in rural soils, which contained less of radium-226, uranium and thorium. It was found that the type of coal or combustion technology influences the amount of radium-226 dispersed in the environment which is accessible to plants

  10. Artificial radionuclides in the atmosphere over Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    and precision of analysis were tested using NIST SRM No 4350B and 4357 as well as in intercomparison runs, organized by the Riso National Laboratory, Denmark. Precision of 137Cs measurements by gamma spectrometry was ≤ 7% at 2σ, Pu ≤ 8 %, Am ≤ 10 %. 240Pu/239Pu ratio was determined by ICP-MS. For determination of chemical association of radionuclides with aerosol particles the sequential extraction methods were used. Measurements performed in Vilnius and Preila indicated transfer of resuspention and combustion products after the forest and peat bog fires in the Ukraine and Belarus when activity concentrations of 137Cs in the atmosphere increased up to 200μBq/m3. The measurements carried out on aerosol samples collected in Vilnius in 1997-1999 indicated the presence of alpha emitting radionuclides. The activity concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am ranged from 0.4 to 18 and from 0.3 to 9.7 nBq/m3, respectively. The origin of contamination source was identified using meteorological data of backward trajectories, characteristic speciation, activity and atom ratio of radionuclides. For comparison measurements were performed on aerosol samples collected during the Chernobyl accident and the contaminated Chernobyl soil. In some samples the high activity ratio of 238Pu/239,240Pu up to 0.5 was observed. The presence of the Chernobyl derived plutonium was confirmed by ICPMS (atom ratio 240Pu/239Pu up to 0.40 was found). Thus, the Chernobyl accident resulted in contamination of large areas of the Earth's surface and forests by radioactive substances. The redistribution of radionuclides mainly of Cs, from these regions to less contaminated areas takes place during the forest fires, because the aerosol particles generated in a different phase of fire have predominantly a submicronic size and are enriched by the volatile Cs due to its evaporation and condensation on condensation nuclei in the atmosphere (the increase of Cs/Sr and Cs/Pu ratio determined in the forest fire

  11. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  12. Natural radionuclides in ground water in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nationwide survey of the natural radioactivity in drinking water was conducted in Finland throughout the 1970s and has continued in the 1980s with the emphasis on drinking water originating from drilled wells, which may be rich in natural radionuclides (mean 222Rn 1020 Bq.l-1, maximum 77,000 Bq.l-1). Between 1981 and 1987, 3000 ground water samples were analysed for 222Rn, some of them for gross alpha and beta, 226Ra, 210Pb, 210Po and U. In recent years the occurrence of 210Pb and 210Po in ground water has been studied. Preliminary results suggest that the contribution of 210Pb and 210Po to the total annual effective dose equivalent is higher than the contribution of 226Ra or U in that water. (author)

  13. Sherlock Holmes for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of 2001 ARC Seibersdorf research has taken the management of the first worldwide certified laboratory to control the realization of the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Altogether there will be 16 CTBT certified laboratories worldwide; therefore a global network of radionuclides measurements stations and test laboratories as well as seismic, radiation and hydroacustic measurements stations is necessary . In the future air samples will be taken from these stations and analyzed in one of these certified laboratories, when appears the suspicion that an atomic test was carried out. (nevyjel)

  14. Absorption of selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 1978, the Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung Heidelberg e.V. published a contribution to part 26 of the model study of radio-ecology at Biblis under the title 'Estimation of the absorption of radionuclides from the gastrointestinal tract in the blood'. Using the example of this contribution, a critical analysis is made to show how a selection of the information contained in various scientific publications and other items of literature can give uncritical readers the impression that all statements made are scientifically well founded. (orig./HP)

  15. Modifying radionuclide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project involves a study of the relationship of physiological and environmental factors to the metabolism and effects of radionuclides. We have studied placental transfer and suckling as pathways of americium entry into the newborn or juvenile rat. Rats were injected intravenously with 5 μCi of 241Am while nulliparous (30 days prior to mating), pregnant (day 19 of gestation), or lactating (1 day after parturition), and subsequent litters were killed to determine 241Am retention. A deficit in reproductive performance was observed in the group injected before mating, as evidenced by reduced number and weight of offspring

  16. Dosimetric comparison of radionuclides for therapy of somatostatin receptor-expressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Therapy of tumors expressing somatostatin receptors, sstr, has recently been clinically tested using somatostatin analogues labeled with 111In and 90Y. Several other radionuclides, i.e., 131I, 161Tb, 64Cu, 188Re, 177Lu, and 67Ga, have also been proposed for this type of therapy. The aim of this work was to investigate the usefulness of the above-mentioned radionuclides bound to somatostatin analogues for tumor therapy. Methods: Biokinetic data of 111In-labeled octreotide in mice and man were used, primarily from our studies but sometimes from the literature. Dosimetric calculations were performed with the assumption that biokinetics were similar for all radionuclides bound to somatostatin analogues. The cumulated tumor:normal-tissue activity concentration, TNC∼, was calculated for the various physical half-lives of the radionuclides. Using mathematical models, the tumor:normal-tissue mean absorbed dose rate ratio, TN D, and tumor:normal-tissue mean absorbed dose ratio, TND, were calculated for various tumor sizes in mice and humans. Results: TNC∼ of radionuclide-labeled octreotide increased with physical half-life for most organs, both in mice and in humans. TN D showed that radionuclides emitting electrons with too high energy are not suitable for therapy of small tumors. Furthermore, radionuclides with a higher frequency of photon emissions relative to electron emissions will yield lower TN D and are thus less suitable for therapy than radionuclides with a lower frequency of photon emissions. The TND was highest for 161Tb in both mice and humans. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that long-lived radionuclides, which emit electrons with rather low energy and which have low frequency of photon emissions, should be the preferred therapy for disseminated small sstr-expressing tumors

  17. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial

  18. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv. PMID:22042969

  19. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  20. Radionuclide imaging in morbid obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRogatis, A.J.

    1987-06-01

    Radionuclide studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract have been useful in many gastrointestinal disorders. However, the literature relating to radionuclide techniques in morbid obesity is limited and, at times, controversial. It is hoped that this brief review will stimulate interest in the use of tracer techniques in this complex disorder. 23 references.

  1. Radionuclide imaging in morbid obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract have been useful in many gastrointestinal disorders. However, the literature relating to radionuclide techniques in morbid obesity is limited and, at times, controversial. It is hoped that this brief review will stimulate interest in the use of tracer techniques in this complex disorder. 23 references

  2. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  3. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Mausner, L. F.; Garland, M. A.

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology, and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by β- emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for the production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  4. Medical-radionuclide production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable supply of radionuclides is critical for many areas of nuclear medicine. The recent shortages have highlighted the need for additional sources of medical radionuclides, especially molybdenum-99. The Workshop brought together specialists with knowledge in various methods of producing radionuclides for nuclear medicine to share their perspectives. Its outcome was the provision of sound technical information on the various alternatives. The Workshop comprised expert presentations on the different methods available for producing medical radionuclides, and featured speakers from ACSION Industries, AECL, McMaster University, MDS Nordion, TRIUMF, Canadian Society of Nuclear Medicine and others. There was extensive opportunities for discussions and exchange of ideas. This Workshop was of interest to persons with general knowledge of radioactivity, nuclear reactors, accelerators and related technologies who wish to become more knowledgeable about the available methods of producing medical radionuclides.

  5. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  6. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  7. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author)

  8. Pulmonary carcinogenesis and chronic beta irradiation of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light water nuclear power reactor fuel cycles at various stages contain substantial quantities of β-emitting radionuclides. Thus, in the event of an accident, there is potential for inhalation exposure of man to various types and forms of β-emitting radionuclides. In order to study the biological effects of such potential exposures, a series of life span studies have been initiated in which beagle dogs have been exposed to inhalation to achieve graded lung burdens of a relatively insoluble fused clay form of β-emitting radionuclides. The specific radionuclides, 90Y, 91Y, 144Ce, or 90Sr, were selected on the basis of physical half-life to produce a variety of radiation-dose patterns to the lung. Early effects have been the development of radiation pneumonitis and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. In general, dogs which receive high- and rapidly-declining dose-rate exposure from 90Y or 91Y die earlier and at lower cumulative doses than dogs exposed to 144Ce or 90Sr. By contrast, the incidence of later-occurring malignant lung tumors and the degree of inflammatory response is greater in dogs which received protracted low dose-rate exposure associated with 144Ce and 90Sr. Of particular note is the nature of the lung tumors thus far observed

  9. Impact of industries in the accumulation of radionuclides in the lower part of Ebro river (Catalonia, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebro River extends over almost 930 km and is the main Spanish river entering the Mediterranean Sea. There are several industries located along this river course including a di-calcium phosphate factory (DCP) and two nuclear power reactors. These installations, together with other factors such as the geology, can contribute to the radiological content of the river. Therefore, this study was performed to determine some natural and also some anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in the Ebro River ecosystem. We analysed water samples, solid samples (rice field sludge and surface marine sediment samples), and also biota samples (Cladophora glomerata and Cynodon dactylon). For water samples, gross alpha, gross beta, tritium, uranium, thorium and also a group of gamma-emitting isotopes' activities were determined. The main contribution to radioactivity for these samples was due to some isotopes from the uranium and thorium chain. For the solid samples, we quantified some natural and artificial gamma radioisotopes, which may be related to the geological and/or industrial activities located in this zone. In the case of biota, the results indicate that the presence of the DCP has a significant influence, since the highest activity was observed in the surroundings of this industry (Flix), where isotopes such as 214Bi and 214Pb presented activity values of 105 ± 43 Bq/kg and 100 ± 58 Bq/kg, respectively. (authors)

  10. Radionuclide transverse section imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope scanning apparatus for use in nuclear medicine is described in detail. The apparatus enables the quantification and spatial location of the radioactivity in a body section of a patient to be determined with high sensitivity. It consists of an array of highly focussed collimators arranged such that adjacent collimators move in the same circumferential but opposite radial directions. The explicit movements of the gantry are described in detail and may be controlled by a general purpose computer. The use of highly focussed collimators allows both a reasonable solid angle of acceptance and also high target to background images; additionally, dual radionuclide pharmaceutical studies can be performed simultaneously. It is claimed that the high sensitivity of the system permits the early diagnosis of pathological changes and the images obtained show accurately the location and shape of physiological abnormalities. (UK)

  11. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki; Kim, Jang Hye; Kim, Gi Sup [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the project, 12,077mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 5,717mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 2,096mCi of {sup 123}l, 482mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 2,738mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 387,253,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  12. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Sup; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Lee, Jong Doo; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In the project, 11,492mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 4,384mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 1,245mCi of {sup 123}l, 523mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 1,283mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 304,723,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  13. Radionuclide fate and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of these studies is to develop a basic understanding of radionuclide chemical behavior in soil systems and determine biological availability and transport through ecological pathways defining basic mechanisms at the chemical, cellular, and organism level, enables the incorporation of information into predictive models, which are subsequently validated in the field at reactor and waste management sites. Through investigations of critical geochemical, microbial, and plant phenomena, the precision with which human dose assessments are made is improved. The biologically and chemically mediated transport processes and food-chain pathways are studied rather than the purely physical forms of contaminant transport, such as transport by wind and water. Results can also be used to predict the behavior of non-nuclear pollutants such as heavy metals, and to provide a basis for new designs and remedial measures (chemical treatments, biobarriers) that will minimize hazards associated with extended waste disposal and isolation

  14. Radiochemical analyses for radionuclide estimation in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity is not only a residuary product of nuclear energy. It is also a normal constituent of the earth's crust. The stellar material from which the earth was formed about 4.5 billion years ago contained many unstable nuclides. The majority of these unstable nuclides have long time since decayed into stable elements. However, some of the original (primordial) nuclides, whose half-lives, are about as long as the earth's age, are still present. In recent decades the activity levels have been enhanced by the addition of man-made radionuclides, mainly from fallout due to the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950' s and 1960' s and from controlled and accidental discharges of radioactive effluents from nuclear installations. Variety of radiochemical techniques are employed in the determination of natural radionuclides, transuranes, and fission products present in water, soil, ores, tailings, vegetation, biological tissue, filters, resins, etc. at low levels. Sample breakdown and radionuclide solubilization is accomplished by wet-ashing or dry-ashing in a muffle furnace, depending on the volatility of the radionuclide(s ) of interest. Because of the low-level nature of these samples, subsequent radiochemical separators are generally done sequentially from a single sample. Radiochemical operations include coprecipitation, ion exchange, and solvent extraction. Each sample is spiked with the appropriate carriers and yield tracers prior to radiochemical analysis. Following separation, each radionuclide fraction is converted to a suitable form for counting using precipitation or electrodeposition. This source is counted for alpha, beta, or gamma using alpha spectrometry, gas proportional counting, liquid scintillation counting, or gamma spectroscopy. (authors)

  15. Comparative Measures of Radionuclide Containment in the Crystalline Geophere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A probabilistic model for assessing the capacity of a fractured crystalline rock volume to contain radionuclides is developed. The rock volume is viewed as a network of discrete fractures through which radionuclides are transported by flowing water. Diffusive mass transfer between the open fractures and the stagnant water in the pore space of the rock matrix allow radionuclides access to mineral grains where physical and chemical processes - collectively known as sorption - can retain radionuclides. A stochastic Lagrangian framework is adopted to compute the probability that a radionuclide particle will be retained by the rock, i.e., the probability that it will decay before being released from the rock volume. A dimensionless quantity referred to as the 'containment index' is related to this probability and proposed as a suitable measure for comparing different rock volumes; such a comparative measure may be needed, for example, in a site selection program for geological radioactive waste disposal. The probabilistic solution of the transport problem is based on the statistics of two Lagrangian variables: τ, the travel time of an imaginary tracer moving with the flowing water, and β, a suitably normalized surface area available for retention. Statistics of τ and β may be computed numerically using site-specific discrete fracture network simulations. Fracture data from the well-characterized Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory site in southern Sweden are used to illustrate the implementation of the proposed containment index for six radionuclides (126Sn, 129I, 135Cs, 237Np, 239Pu, and 79Se). It is found that fractures of small aperture imply prolonged travel times and hence long tails in both beta and tau. This, in turn, enhances retention and is favorable from a safety assessment perspective

  16. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M and O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''

  17. Diagnostic applications of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are now used routinely in two different types of medical diagnostic tests: in vivo measurements of the distribution of radioactivity in the body, and in vitro assays. Information gained from these procedures is expected to improve the physician's understanding of this patient's well-being by providing an objective evaluation of important physiologic functions. This information may be used to establish a correct diagnosis, determine the extent or severity of the patient's illness, or to evaluate a patient's response to therapy. Diagnostic tests thus increase the speed and accuracy of patient care decisions. As a result, treatment is more objective, recovery is more rapid, and the duration of patient suffering is reduced. These benefits may significantly reduce the overall costs of medical care. The numbers of test performed and the amount of radioactivity employed has increased dramatically. This growth has been facilitated by the development of new radiation detection instruments that are especially designed for clinical applications, and by the increased commercial availability of labeled materials that can be used for diagnostic tests. In addition, the use of isotopes in human subjects is limited by a variety of special problems. Some of these problems are rather technical, relating only to the development of method for storage and preparation of labeled materials in a form suitable for human use. Other more critical problems include the limited selection of radionuclides available for use in the investigation of human metabolism, the inefficiency of instruments used to detect radioactivity, and the growing concern for the potential hazards associated with the use of all forms of ionizing radiation

  18. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  19. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ljungberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions.

  20. Syringe calibration factors and volume correction factors for the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Tyler, D K

    2002-01-01

    The activity assay of a radiopharmaceutical administration to a patient is normally achieved via the use of a radionuclide calibrator. Because of the different geometries and elemental compositions between plastic syringes and glass vials, the calibration factors for syringes may well be significantly different from those for the glass containers. The magnitude of these differences depends on the energies of the emitted photons. For some radionuclides variations have been observed of 70 %, it is therefore important to recalibrate for syringes or use syringe calibration factors. Calibration factors and volume correction factors have been derived for the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator, for a variety of commonly used syringes and needles, for the most commonly used medical radionuclide.

  1. Positron emitting pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of physiology at the molecular level bridges the gap between laboratory science and clinical medicine by providing the most specific and sensitive means for imaging molecular pathways and interactions in tissues of man. PET-imaging requires the use Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals (PRPs), which are radioactively labeled 'true metabolites' i.e., sugars, amino acids, fatty acids etc., essentially made of H, C, N and O which the cells in the body can metabolize. The PET-isotopes: 11C, 15O, 13N and 18F (instead of H) are cyclotron produced and are short-lived, which places several constraints on the synthesis time for the PRPs, quality control and their clinical use as compared to the conventional 99mTc- and other SPECT-RPs widely used in nuclear medicine. There are large number of published reports showing the utility of several PRPs labeled with 18F (T1/2 = 110 min) and 11C (T1/2 = 20 min). A few PRPs have been labeled with 13N (T1/2 = 10 min). 15O (T1/2 = 2min) is used mostly as H215O, C15 or C15O2. 18F-radiopharmaceuticals can be made at a medical cyclotron facility and sent to PET -imaging centres, which can be reached in a couple of hours. The sensitivity of PET -imaging has encouraged R and D in several other PRPs, labeled with viz., 68Ga (generator produced, T1/2 68 min), 124I (cyclotron, T1/2 4.2 d), 82Rb (generator, T1/2 75s), 64Cu (cyclotron, T1/2 12h), and 94mTc (cyclotron, T1/2 52 min). Due to its relevance in several diseases, particularly cancer, PET-imaging has made major scientific contribution to drug development, particularly for neurological diseases and cancer treatment. (author)

  2. Experimental autoabsorption curve 90Sr in SrCO3. Efficiency calculation to detection of 90Sr, 90Y and 90Sr + 90Y in a beta gas proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium-90 has been determined by radiochemical separation techniques in environmental samples. These techniques, of course, cannot separate the two strontium radionuclides from each other of from stable strontium. Consequently the end product of the chemical separation contains all strontium isotopes in SrCO3. The beta particules emitted by 90Sr are absorbed by the SrCO3 precipitate. This is the main source of error in the activity measurement. It has been prepared sources of 90Sr in SrCO3 in order to determinate the counting efficiency and autoabsorption curve. Also detection efficiencies have been calibrated using known activities of 90Y and equilibrium mixture of 90Sr+90Y in the same geometry than our samples. The activity of 90Sr by ingrowth of 90Y has been calculated by our computer program. (author). 2 figs., 3 refs

  3. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 (137Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 (210Pb) and beryllium-7(7Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  4. Radionuclide source term and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in two types of experiment is reported. In the first the equilibrium and concentration of radionuclides in groundwater in contact with real radioactive wastes are measured. Container material, backfill material and rock are added to groundwater to investigate their effects. In the second experiment the retardation of radionuclides leached from wastes as groundwater flows over samples of container, backfill and geological material is measured. Outflow is analysed for radionuclides and experimental results for cesium 134, cesium 137 and cobalt 60 are presented. (U.K.)

  5. Radionuclide migration in water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicity degree and radiation effect of different radionuclides depend on multiple factors, whose interaction can strengthen or weaken the effects through the mechanism of nuclide accumulation by hydrobiontes. Stage of development of an aquatic organism, its age, mass and sex as well as lifetime and residence time of the organism in the given medium are of importance. The radionuclide build up depends on illumination, locale of the bioobject residence, on the residence nature. The concentration of radionuclides in aquatic organisms and bionts survival depend on a season, temperature of the residence medium, as well as salinity and mineral composition of water influence

  6. 6. Radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural transformation series are described and the characteristics given of natural radionuclides which do not form series and of certain cosmogenic radionuclides. The hazard is evaluated of internal and external irradiation from various artificial radioactivity sources, namely those which are linked with the operation of nuclear power installations and waste processing. Data are given on the occurrence of natural radionuclides in the environment and in the human organism. A brief description is presented of environmental monitoring methods and methods of dosimetry at nuclear power installations. (M.D.)

  7. Specific processes in solvent extractiotn of radionuclide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doctoral thesis discusses the consequences of the radioactive beta transformation in systems liquid-liquid and liquid-ion exchanger, and the effect of the chemical composition of liquid-liquid systems on the distribution of radionuclide traces. A model is derived of radiolysis in two-phase liquid-liquid systems used in nuclear chemical technology. The obtained results are used to suggest the processing of radioactive wastes using the Purex process. For solvent extraction the following radionuclides were used: 59Fe, 95Zr-95Nb, 99Mo, sup(99m)Tc, 99Tc, 103Pd, 137Cs, 141Ce, 144Ce-144Pr, 234Th, and 233Pa. Extraction was carried out at laboratory temperature. 60Co was used as the radiation source. Mainly scintillation spectrometry equipment was used for radiometric analysis. (E.S.)

  8. Intercomparison of radionuclides in environmental samples 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison exercise on radionuclides in environmental samples was carried out during 2000-2001 as part of a Nordic NKS project. The exercise included six sample types (aerosols, dry milk, soil, seawater, seaweed and lake water) and a range of man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides, mainly gamma-emitters but also beta- and alpha-emitters. A total of 25 Nordic and Baltic laboratories participated. The analytical quality across participants was generally good with about two thirds of the results in close agreement with estimated mean values. The exercise has demonstrated improved agreement between the results and more realistic analytical uncertainties submitted by the participants compared with a previous exercise carried out during 1998-1999 in the same NKS project. (au)

  9. Criteria for the selection of radionuclides for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of utilizing monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors (radioimmunotherapy, RIT) has stimulated much research activity. From dosimetric and other considerations, the choice of radiolabel is an important factor that needs to be optimized for maximum effectiveness of RIT. This paper reviews and assesses a number of present and future radionuclides that are particularly suitable for RIT based on the various physical, chemical, and biological considerations. Intermediate to high-energy beta emitters' (with and without gamma photons in their emission) are emphasized since they possess a number of advantages over alpha and Auger emitters. Factors relating to the production and availability of candidate radiometals as well as their stable chemical attachment to monoclonal antibodies are discussed. 34 refs., 4 tabs

  10. The behaviour of radionuclides in the Ribble Estuary, NW England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this project was to consider the geochemical behaviour of a suite of radionuclides (137Cs, 241Am, isotopes of Pu, Th and U and 234mPa) in the Ribble estuarine environment. Controls on the vertical distribution of radionuclides in sediment deposits were considered and the fluxes of sediment and radionuclides at sites close to the river channel were investigated. Vertical activity distributions were studied by taking cores from various intertidal sediment deposits. Sediment/activity fluxes were studied by installing sediment traps. All samples were analysed by gamma spectrometry. Selected samples were analysed for total organic carbon, mineralogy (XRD), major and trace-metals (XRF), grain-size distribution (laser granulometry) and alpha-emitting radionuclides (alpha spectrometry). The geochemical phase associations of radionuclides were investigated using sequential extraction experiments. Sellafield-derived radionuclides exhibited distinct subsurface maxima (up to 4 785 ± 42 Bq kg-1137Cs, 618 ± 14 Bq kg-1239,240Pu and 868 ± Bq kg-1241Am) in mature saltmarsh sediment deposits. Thorium-230 exhibited more complex depth profiles (maximum = 2383 ± 36 Bq kg-1). Variations in grain-size were low and therefore not important in controlling the specific activity variation with depth at these sites. The effects of early diagenesis on the specific activity profiles of 137Cs, 241Am, 239,240Pu and 230Th were small. The vertical distribution of Sellafield-derived radionuclides reflected the cumulative discharge pattern from Sellafield implicating a sediment transport mechanism that has involved the integration of contamination from previous discharge events. The vertical distribution of 230Th reflected the annual discharge pattern from BNFL Springfields implicating a transport pathway that involves little mixing of sediment. Levels of Springfields-derived 234mPa and 234Th were highly variable in time and space (-1 recorded at Penwortham over the course of the

  11. Reactor production of n.c.a grade 143Pr, 161Tb and 111Ag radionuclides for radionuclide therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale radioisotope production of no-carrier-added (n.c.a) radionuclides from bulk amounts of neutron irradiated targets were evaluated in view of their potential applications in nuclear medicine. Three different radionuclides viz 143Pr (T1/2 13.57 d and Eβmax 0.937 MeV), 161Tb (t1/2 6.91 d, Eβmax 593.1keV, Eγ 74.6 keV (9.8%)) and 111Ag (t1/2 7.45 d, Eβmax 1.09 MeV, Eγ 245.4 keV (1.24%), 342.1 KeV (6.68%)) were investigated for production in n.c.a form by (n,γ) followed by beta decay route. The radiochemical separation of the nuclide of interest was performed by precipitation in case of 143Pr and 161Tb and an ion exchange chromatography for 111Ag. The separated n.c.a grade products were of high radionuclidic purity (>99.9%) and did not contain any detectable impurities. Logistics of regular production of these radionuclides, their quality control and the scope for production of these radiochemicals with high specific activity are discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Emissive Ion Thruster -EMIT Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A propulsion system is proposed that is based on acceleration of ions emitted from a thin, solid-state electrochemical ceramic membrane. This technology would...

  13. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues in patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising treatment option for patients with inoperable or metastasised neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with all of the various 111In, 90Y, or 177Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used. Since tumour size reduction was seldom achieved with 111Indium labelled somatostatin analogues, radiolabelled somatostatin analogues with beta-emitting isotopes like 90Y and 177Lu were developed. Reported anti-tumour effects of [90Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide vary considerably between various studies: Tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 9 to 33% (mean 22%). With [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate treatments, tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 28% of patients and tumour regression of 25 to 50% in 19% of patients, stable disease was demonstrated in 35% and progressive disease in 18%. Predictive factors for tumour remission were high tumour uptake on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and limited amount of liver metastases. The side-effects of PRRT are few and mostly mild, certainly when using renal protective agents: Serious side-effects like myelodysplastic syndrome or renal failure are rare. The median duration of the therapy response for [90Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide and [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate is 30 months and more than 36 months respectively. Lastly, quality of life improves significantly after treatment with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate. These data compare favourably with the limited number of alternative treatment approaches, like chemotherapy. If more widespread use of PRRT is possible, such therapy might become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasised or inoperable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Also the role in somatostatin receptor expressing non-GEP tumours, like metastasised paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and non-radioiodine-avid differentiated thyroid carcinoma might become more important

  14. Radionuclide migration studies in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a brief description about retention and migration parameters of radionuclides in soil, including main methods to determine the distribution coefficient (K) are given. Some of several factors that can act on the migration are also mentioned. (author)

  15. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  16. Radionuclide diffusion in soils. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors are discussed affecting the rate of migration of radionuclides in the soil (properties of the radionuclide - the sign and magnitude of ion charge, soil properties - moisture, density, presence of salts and organic substances, composition of sorption complex and soil solution, climatic conditions -temperature). Fick's 2nd law cannot be used for the mathematical description of vertical migration of radionuclides in the soil and equations are therefore suggested for describing the movement of substances through an absorbing porous medium and for the calculation of the diffusion coefficient. In order to specify the mathematical description of migration it is necessary to obtain a great numbert of experimental data and to use multiparameter regression analysis for identifying the effect of the different properties of the soil on the diffusion of radionuclides. (J.C.)

  17. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  18. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  19. Radionuclide generators for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of this work is to provide a reference point for the investigator who is interested in the development of a particular generator system and the refinements which have been reported. Moreover, the incorporation of the particular daughter radionuclide into a suitable radiodiagnostic agent is presented

  20. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  1. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  2. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific

  3. Study on natural radionuclide activities in meat samples consumed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Taddei, Maria HelenaT. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Avegliano, Roseane P.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: mychelle@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of food is usually the most important route by which natural and artificial radionuclides can enter the human body. An assessment of radionuclide levels in different foods and diets is therefore important to estimate the intake of these radionuclides by man. The contamination by radionuclides can occur via the food chain (soil, root, plant and animal), with emphasis to the long half-life radionuclides, which can also have their transfer through the animal meat. The inclusion of meat in human nutrition is important because it is an excellent source of high quality protein, nutrient related to construction and cell regeneration. This work aims the determination of natural radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb) in meat samples. Five groups of samples were analyzed, such as cattle meat (beef), fish, pork, poultry, and processed meat, after radiochemical separation followed by alpha or alpha beta spectrophotometry, and total count quantification. The determination of these radionuclides is very important because they are products of the natural decay series of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, being easily found in meat samples. (author)

  4. Study on natural radionuclide activities in meat samples consumed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consumption of food is usually the most important route by which natural and artificial radionuclides can enter the human body. An assessment of radionuclide levels in different foods and diets is therefore important to estimate the intake of these radionuclides by man. The contamination by radionuclides can occur via the food chain (soil, root, plant and animal), with emphasis to the long half-life radionuclides, which can also have their transfer through the animal meat. The inclusion of meat in human nutrition is important because it is an excellent source of high quality protein, nutrient related to construction and cell regeneration. This work aims the determination of natural radionuclides (234U, 235U, 238U, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, and 210Pb) in meat samples. Five groups of samples were analyzed, such as cattle meat (beef), fish, pork, poultry, and processed meat, after radiochemical separation followed by alpha or alpha beta spectrophotometry, and total count quantification. The determination of these radionuclides is very important because they are products of the natural decay series of 238U and 232Th, being easily found in meat samples. (author)

  5. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  6. Identification of beta-lymphotoxin as the predominant molecular class of in vitro and in vivo Syrian hamster lymphotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular class of Golden Syrian hamster lymphotoxin produced in vitro and in vivo was determined by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography using silica-based protein separation columns eluted with a 0.1 M sodium phosphate, pH 7.4 buffer containing 0.1% Mr 4000 polyethylene glycol. Lymphotoxin cytolytic activity was quantitated in the column effluent by measuring the ability of the fractions to lyse alpha-L929 cells as indicated by [3H]TdR release. Lymphotoxin activity induced by an 8- or 24-hr or 5-day phytohemagglutinin stimulation of peritoneal leukocytes, by 24-hr phytohemagglutinin-coated alpha-L929-cell stimulation of peritoneal leukocytes, or by 24-hr phytohemagglutinin stimulation of spleen cells occurred in the Mr range of 20,000-56,000, with major components in the 35,000-50,000 beta-lymphotoxin region. No activity was present in the complex (greater than 200,000) region and only minimal activity was detectable in the alpha (70,000-160,000) and gamma (12,000-20,000) regions. In vivo-induced lymphotoxin, obtained by peritoneal lavage 48 hr after intraperitoneal administration of phytohemagglutinin, was entirely beta-lymphotoxin and was not detectable in the plasma. Lymphotoxin produced in vitro and injected simultaneously with the gamma-emitting radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc inhibited in vivo development of radiation-induced transplacental carcinogenesis. Thus, Syrian hamster lymphotoxin with antitumor activity consists of glycoproteins with isoelectric points of 4.8-5.2, Mr of 20,000-56,000, and major in vitro and in vivo forms in the beta-lymphotoxin range

  7. Distribution of radionuclides in L-Lake surface sediments phase 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-emitting radionuclides in L Lake were examined in situ with an underwater High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector and further studied by retrieving various sediment samples for analysis by HPGe gamma spectrometry. The predominant man-made radionuclide detected was cesium-137. These measurements constituted Phase 3 of a four phase strategy for characterizing L-Lake contaminants. The data provided by these studies will be utilized in the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement that evaluates the consequences of discontinuing river water pumping to the man-made cooling water reservoirs on the Savannah River Site. A site evaluation report will also be prepared for the L-Lake basin

  8. Biomedical research and application utilizing cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, January 1 1977--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on cyclotron production of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (18F, 15O, 11C, 13N, 52Fe, 38K, 206Bi, 73Se, and 48Cr) for use in the preparation labelled compounds for metabolic research in patients and animals. The chemical preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with cyclotron-produced radionuclides for pancreas and tumor scanning is discussed. The imaging capabilities of a total organ kinetic imaging monitor (TOKIM) gamma camera system operated in the positron coincidence mode were improved with the addition of computerized iterative correction procedures

  9. Hydrogeological interpretation of natural radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Gerhard; Berka, Rudolf; Hörhan, Thomas; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Philippitsch, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) stores comprehensive data sets of radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwater. There are several analyses concerning Rn-222, Ra-226, gross alpha and gross beta as well as selected analyses of Ra-228, Pb-210, Po-210, Uranium and U-234/U-238. In a current project financed by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management, AGES and the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) are evaluating these data sets with regard to the geological backgrounds. Several similar studies based on groundwater monitoring have been made in the USA (for instance by Focazio, M.J., Szabo, Z., Kraemer, T.F., Mullin, A.H., Barringer, T.H., De Paul, V.T. (2001): Occurrence of selected radionuclides in groundwater used for drinking water in the United States: a reconnaissance survey, 1998. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4273). The geological background for the radionuclide contents of groundwater will be derived from geological maps in combination with existing Thorium and Uranium analyses of the country rocks and stream-sediments and from airborne radiometric maps. Airborne radiometric data could contribute to identify potential radionuclide hot spot areas as only airborne radiometric mapping could provide countrywide Thorium and Uranium data coverage in high resolution. The project will also focus on the habit of the sampled wells and springs and the hydrological situation during the sampling as these factors can have an important influence on the Radon content of the sampled groundwater (Schubert, G., Alletsgruber, I., Finger, F., Gasser, V., Hobiger, G. and Lettner, H. (2010): Radon im Grundwasser des Mühlviertels (Oberösterreich) Grundwasser. - Springer (in print). Based on the project results an overview map (1:500,000) concerning the radionuclide potential should be produced. The first version should be available in February 2011.

  10. Radiation exposure from aerosol-borne radionuclides with half-life periods shorter than 8 days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological monitoring of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants with DWRs or PWRs during normal operation does not include in general analyses of the contribution of aerosol-borne radionuclides with a half-life period smaller than 8 days. In order to evaluate this contribution to radiation doses, the study investigates all airborne radionuclides emitted from nuclear power plants equipped with an LWR during normal operation. A conservative assessment of emission rates is based on diffusion-model calculations of radionuclide release from fuel elements, assuming non-delayed transport into the surroundings; the study covers rare gases, halogens, alkaline metals, and oxidizing fission products. It is shown that the short-lived aerosol-borne radionuclides mainly are decay products of rare gas isotopes with half-life periods shorter than 3 hrs. Only Rb-88, Rb-89, Rb-90, Cs-138 and Cs-139 account for radiation doses that are worth considering. Rb-88 is the prevailing radionuclide of this type in PWRs, and in BWRs it is Cs-138. The radiation doses of interest are determined by calculating transport factors for γ-submersion as a function of radionuclide half-life periods using a simple, new model, and by calculating the missing dose factors for the various exposure pathways. The radiation dose to the population induced by these aerosol-borne radionuclides is due only to γ- or β-submersion. Since the radioactivity thus released is lower than that of the rare gases, while the dose factors for calculating external radiation exposure are almost identical, the radiation dose contribution from these short-lived radionuclides is only a fraction of that of the rare gases, so that it is justifiable to include this type of exposure in the calculations for assessing radiation exposure emanating from rare gases. This all the more as a direct measurement of these aerosol-borne radionuclides that are completely decayed after 6 hours is very difficult. (orig./HP)

  11. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  12. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    .S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return of the...

  13. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward-...

  14. Properties of the H-alpha-emitting Circumstellar Regions of Be Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tycner, C; Hajian, A R; Armstrong, J T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hutter, D J; Pauls, T A; White, N M; Tycner, Christopher; Lester, John B.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-baseline interferometric observations obtained with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer of the H-alpha-emitting envelopes of the Be stars eta Tauri and beta Canis Minoris are presented. For compatibility with the previously published interferometric results in the literature of other Be stars, circularly symmetric and elliptical Gaussian models were fitted to the calibrated H-alpha observations. The models are sufficient in characterizing the angular distribution of the H-alpha-emitting circumstellar material associated with these Be stars. To study the correlations between the various model parameters and the stellar properties, the model parameters for eta Tau and beta CMi were combined with data for other Be stars from the literature. After accounting for the different distances to the sources and stellar continuum flux levels, it was possible to study the relationship between the net H-alpha emission and the physical extent of the H-alpha-emitting circumstellar region. A clear dependence of the...

  15. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  16. ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aririguzo Marvis Ijeaku

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED is a device composed of an organic layer that emits lights in response to an electrical current. Organic light emitting diodes have advanced tremendously over the past decades. The different manufacturing processes of the OLED itself to several advantages over flat panel displays made with LCD technology which includes its light weight and flexible plastic substrates, wider viewing angles, improved brightness, better power efficiency and quicker response time. However, its drawbacks include shorter life span, poor color balance, poor outdoor performance, susceptibility to water damage etc.The application of OLEDs in electronics is on the increase on daily basics from cameras to cell phones to OLED televisions, etc. Although OLEDs provides prospects for thinner, smarter, lighter and ultraflexible electronics displays, however, due to high cost of manufacturing, it is not yet widely used.

  17. Electromigration of carrier-free radionuclides. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a special type of on line electromigration measurements of γ-emitting radionuclides in homogeneous aqueous electrolytes free of supporting materials the electromigration behaviour of the carrier-free 241Am-Am(III) in inert electrolytes, μ = 0.1 (ClO4-), T = 298.1(1) K, was studied. Basing on experimental dependencies of the overall ion mobilities of 241Am-Am(III) on pH between pH 5.5 and 12.9 the stoichiometric hydrolysis constants pβ3 = 28.8(9) and pK1 = 6.9(2) were obtained. For K4 a limitation of pK4 > 13.9(3) was possible, because no formation of anionic hydrolysis products in solutions pH 241Am-Am(III) degrees in the range pH 5.5 - 3 from +6.85(15) up to +5.50(15) · 10-4 cm2s-1V-1. Dependencies of this effect on overall ionic strength, inert electrolyte anion, and temperature of the electrolytes were studied in detail both in acidic and neutral solutions. (author)

  18. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  19. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  20. Lixiviation as a tool for radionuclide fractionation in holm oak leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to distinguish among different ways of radionuclide retention, lixiviation by means of a sequential extraction scheme was studied and experimental conditions were optimized. Holm oak leaves were contaminated by a thermogenerated radioactive aerosol containing 134Cs, 85Sr and 110mAg. This aerosol was deposited on leaf surfaces in dry conditions. After contamination, holm oak leaves were kept at 4 deg C and individual samples of about 2 g were sequentially extracted. Gamma-emitting in each fraction were determined by high resolution gamma-spectrometry using an intrinsic Ge detector. From the results, two procedures which give different information about radionuclide retention may be used, one defined by single water extraction (Procedure A) and another two-step procedure which uses water and chloroform:hexane (Procedure B). Since the objective was to study simultaneously the retention of Cs, Sr, and Ag, the chosen experimental conditions are an agreement among individual optimal conditions for each radionuclide. Procedure A allows to define two fractions: the fraction removed by water is related to total radionuclide retained on leaf surfaces and the residual fraction to the incorporated into leaves. Procedure B permits to distinguish among the following fractions: the fraction removed by water is related to radionuclide fraction easily leached by rain, the fraction removed by organic solvent may be associated with the radionuclide fraction stronger retained on leaf surface and, finally, a residual fraction, that may represent the incorporated fraction. 1 tab., 1 fig

  1. A review of radionuclides determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental radiochemical analysis have several steps such as sample pre-treatment, sample pre-concentration, separation and determination. Many separation methods, using solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography are applied tote preconcentration and separation of radionuclides. These methods are time-consuming, use large amounts of strong acids and produce organic wastes. Recently, separation methods on the extraction chromatography have became increasingly popular in radiochemical analysis. In this presentation, we briefly summarize the published literature on principles and various applications of radioanalytical method that have been commonly used in radionuclide separations (authors)

  2. Long-term dose-response studies of inhaled or injected radionuclides. Biennial report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Miller, S.C.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the scientific progress in, and current status of, life-span studies of the long-term health risks in Beagle dogs of chronic irradiation from internally deposited radionuclides or from an external source. The reporting period for this document is the 2-year period from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1993. Studies that were initiated at three different laboratories (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, ITRI, University of Utah, and Argonne National Laboratory, ANL) are presented here because they are being completed at ITRI. All living dogs in the Utah-initiated studies were transferred to the ITRI facility for the remainder of their life-span observations and measurements in September 1987. This report is the fourth in a series of reports dealing with the current status and progress of both the Utah and ITRI studies. Other life-span studies involving dogs exposed to gamma radiation from an external source were initiated and conducted for many years at ANL. In 1991, the decision was made to discontinue the chronic irradiation of the remaining living dogs and to transfer all remaining dogs to ITRI for care, clinical observations, and pathological observations at death or euthanasia. This report provides the current status of these dogs. Status reports on the Utah and ITRI studies comprise most of this report. The ITRI-related section presents brief statements of project objectives, the general procedures used in these studies, and some study-specific features for each of the 19 studies being conducted with either beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides. Dose- and effect-modifying factors being addressed in these studies include total dose, dose rate, LET, solubility, nonuniformity of dose, species, age, sex, health status, and mode of exposure. Recent additions to experimental protocols for studies in which dogs are still alive involve the collection and analysis of tumor tissues using currently available molecular biology techniques.

  3. Estimation of the skeletal burden of bone-seeking radionuclides from in vivo scintillation measurements of their content in the skull: contribution from radionuclides in the thoracic skeleton to in vivo measurement of activity in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the initiation of NaI(Tl), spectrometric methods for detecting photon-emitting radionuclides in man, it became evident that the high background rates in the low energy regions precluded in vivo measurement of many bone-seeking nuclides. To meet these needs a dual crystal, low energy sensitive NaI(Tl)-CsI(Tl) detector system was developed. To date this system, in combination with more routine bioassays, remains the optimum methodology for the determination of internal exposure to low energy, photon-emitting radionuclides. Since most occupational exposures occur by inhalation, internal deposits must be quantitated with these detectors placed over the lung area. Since many of the alpha-emitting nuclides are bone-seekers, the contribution of material which has been transported from the lung and deposited in the skeleton must be accounted for

  4. Interference of spontaneously emitted photons

    CERN Document Server

    Beige, A; Pachos, J; Beige, Almut; Schoen, Christian; Pachos, Jiannis

    2002-01-01

    We discuss an experimental setup where two laser-driven atoms spontaneously emit photons and every photon causes a ``click'' at a point on a screen. By deriving the probability density for an emission into a certain direction from basic quantum mechanical principles we predict a spatial interference pattern. Similarities and differences with the classical double-slit experiment are discussed.

  5. Interference of spontaneously emitted photons

    OpenAIRE

    Beige, Almut; Schoen, Christian; Pachos, Jiannis

    2001-01-01

    We discuss an experimental setup where two laser-driven atoms spontaneously emit photons and every photon causes a ``click'' at a point on a screen. By deriving the probability density for an emission into a certain direction from basic quantum mechanical principles we predict a spatial interference pattern. Similarities and differences with the classical double-slit experiment are discussed.

  6. Ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system for positron radionuclides: potential applications and limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; WATABE, Tadashi; IKEDA, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cerenkov-light imaging provides inherently high resolution because the light is emitted near the positron radionuclide. However, the magnitude for the high spatial resolution of Cerenkov-light imaging is unclear. Its potential molecular imaging applications also remain unclear. We developed an ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system, measured its spatial resolution, and explored its applications to molecular imaging research. Methods Our Cerenkov-light imaging system cons...

  7. Occurence of natural and artificial radionuclides in the environment and methods of their detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss occurence of radionuclides in the environment and illustrate the circulation of natural and artificial radioactive substances in the air, water and soil. Methods are presented of detecting radioactive contamination, including the sampling and detection of radiation emitted by radioactive isotopes contained in the samples. Various conditions as well as the kind of ionizing radiation emitters are taken into consideration. 19 refs. (author)

  8. Determination of alpha radionuclides in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In atmospheric water, external water and undercurrent the occurrence of radionuclides is usual. It is an important factor of quality of the environment. Plants ingest radionuclides from water and with they everyone. And it arises radioactivity infest food-chain. Radiotoxicity of this radionuclides is very deer sometimes. The sensitive radiochemical procedures for their determination are necessarily important. The poster presents the combined procedure used at our laboratory for determination of alpha radionuclides in biological samples. (authors)

  9. Concentrations of radionuclides in reef and lagoon pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological survey was conducted from September through November of 1978 to assess the concentrations of persistent man-made radionuclides in the terrestrial and marine environments of 11 atolls and 2 islands of the Northern Marshall Islands. The atolls and islands include Rongelap, Utirik, Taka, Bikar, Rongerik, Ailinginae, Likiep, Jemo, Ailuk, Mejet, Wotho, Ujelang and Bikini. Over 4000 terrestrial and marine samples were collected for radionuclide analysis from 76 different islands. Soils, vegetation, indigenous animals, and cistern and groundwater were collected from the islands. Reef fish, pelagic species, clams, lagoon water, and sediments were obtained from the lagoons. A report is given of all available concentration data for 137Cs, 90Sr, /sup 239+240/Pu, 238Pu, 241Am as well as naturally occurring 40K and other gamma emitting radionuclides in tissues and organs of different species of fish collected from the atolls

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  11. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED ALPHA DECAY, BETA DECAY, ELECTRON CAPTURE DECAY, BETA BETA-DECAY, PROTON DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION DECAY NUCLIDES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, H.E.

    2003-08-08

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for the 2001 Atomic Weights Commission meeting in Brisbane. I provided a report, BNL-NCS-68377, to fulfill Roth's request. Peiser has now made a similar suggestion that I review these data for our next Commission meeting in Ottawa for their possible inclusion in our Tables. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay, proton decay and spontaneous fission decay. This data review (post Brisbane) provides an update to the recommendation of the 2001 review.

  12. Radionuclide transfer in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of radionuclides in forest ecosystems differs substantially from the other ecosystems. The contamination of various forest products is commonly quantified using the Aggregated Transfer Factor (Tag in m2 kg-1) which integrates various environmental parameters including soil and plant type, root distribution as well as nature and vertical distribution of the deposits. This review aims at compiling the most relevant quantitative information on radionuclide transfers to forest biota including trees, understorey vegetation, mushrooms, berries and game animals. For both radiocaesium and radiostrontium in trees, the order of magnitude of mean Tag values is 10-3 m2.kg-1 (dry weight). The transfer of radionuclides to mushrooms and berries is high, in comparison with foodstuffs grown in agricultural systems. Concerning caesium uptake by mushrooms, the transfer is characterized by a very large variability of Tag, from 10-3 to 101 m2.kg-1 (dry weight). For berries, typical values are around 0.01 to 0.1 m2.kg-1 (dry weight). Transfer of radioactive caesium to game animals and reindeer and the rate of activity reduction, quantified as an ecological half-life, reflect the soil and pasture conditions at individual locations. Even if, the importance of radioactive contamination of forests as a significant source of the population exposure is recognized, most of the data refer to caesium and to a lesser extent, strontium. Data for other radionuclides are rather limited. (author)

  13. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  14. Radionuclide investigation of nutritive absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the theoretical rationale, algorithm and results of verification of a new radionuclide method for the determination of nutritive absorption. The proposed method allows the determination of the amount of a labeled unabsorbed food ingredient without the collection and radiometry of feces, with a high degree of significance

  15. Radionuclide retention in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GEOTRAP is the OECD/NEA Project on Radionuclide Migration in Geologic, Heterogeneous Media carried out in the context of site evaluation and safety assessment of deep repository systems for long-lived radioactive waste. Retention of radionuclides within the geosphere for prolonged periods is an important safety function of deep geologic disposal concepts for radioactive waste. The extent to which retention processes can be relied upon in repository performance assessment depends upon the existence of well-established theoretical bases for the processes. It also depends on support for the operation of specific retention processes, and models for their quantitative evaluation, from a wide range of laboratory and field experiments and observations from nature. The fifth GEOTRAP workshop, 'Geological Evidence and Theoretical Bases for Radionuclide-retention Processes in Heterogeneous Media' held in May 2001, looked at radionuclide-retention processes and their consideration and representation in performance assessments. Current approaches to characterising and modelling retention processes, and suggestions for future improvements, were presented and discussed. In addition to the material presented during the workshop, this publication includes a technical synthesis reflecting the discussions that took place as well as the conclusions and recommendations made, notably during the working group sessions. (author)

  16. Radionuclides and ionizing radiation in water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the conference contain 22 texts of contributions presented, out of which 21 have been inputted in INIS. The topics treated include mainly contamination of surface waters by radionuclides, e.g from the operation of nuclear power plants, accumulation of radionuclides by the biosphere, and analytical problems of determination of radionuclides in the hydrosphere. (P.A.)

  17. An investigation of electrostatically deposited radionuclides on latex balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) education material for a community science education event to promote science awareness, science culture and literacy (Science Rendezvous 2011) lead to investigation of observed phenomena. Experiments are done on balloons that are electrostatically charged then left to collect particulate. Alpha spectroscopy was performed to identify alpha emitting radioisotopes present on the balloons. The time dependent behaviour of the activity was investigated. Additionally, the Alpha activity of the balloon was compared to Beta activity. The grounds for further investigations are proposed. (author)

  18. An investigation of electrostatically deposited radionuclides on latex balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, T.; Caly, A., E-mail: Terry.Price@gmail.com [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Use of Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) education material for a community science education event to promote science awareness, science culture and literacy (Science Rendezvous 2011) lead to investigation of observed phenomena. Experiments are done on balloons that are electrostatically charged then left to collect particulate. Alpha spectroscopy was performed to identify alpha emitting radioisotopes present on the balloons. The time dependent behaviour of the activity was investigated. Additionally, the Alpha activity of the balloon was compared to Beta activity. The grounds for further investigations are proposed. (author)

  19. Bio-inspired digital signal processing for fast radionuclide mixture identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin, M.; Bichler, O.; Thiam, C.; Bobin, C.; Lourenço, V.

    2015-05-01

    Countries are trying to equip their public transportation infrastructure with fixed radiation portals and detectors to detect radiological threat. Current works usually focus on neutron detection, which could be useless in the case of dirty bomb that would not use fissile material. Another approach, such as gamma dose rate variation monitoring is a good indication of the presence of radionuclide. However, some legitimate products emit large quantities of natural gamma rays; environment also emits gamma rays naturally. They can lead to false detections. Moreover, such radio-activity could be used to hide a threat such as material to make a dirty bomb. Consequently, radionuclide identification is a requirement and is traditionally performed by gamma spectrometry using unique spectral signature of each radionuclide. These approaches require high-resolution detectors, sufficient integration time to get enough statistics and large computing capacities for data analysis. High-resolution detectors are fragile and costly, making them bad candidates for large scale homeland security applications. Plastic scintillator and NaI detectors fit with such applications but their resolution makes identification difficult, especially radionuclides mixes. This paper proposes an original signal processing strategy based on artificial spiking neural networks to enable fast radionuclide identification at low count rate and for mixture. It presents results obtained for different challenging mixtures of radionuclides using a NaI scintillator. Results show that a correct identification is performed with less than hundred counts and no false identification is reported, enabling quick identification of a moving threat in a public transportation. Further work will focus on using plastic scintillators.

  20. Status report on radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the suggestion of the Federal Minstry of the Interior, in June 1978, a group of scientists from several institutions who are active in the field of radionuclide transfer or are interested in these problems got together. During the discussions of the work team, especially the transfer soil/plants was emphasized. Then the work team set up a status report on the transfer of the radionuclides relevant in the sense of the radiation protection act. The nuclides H3 and C14, the isotopes of the Sr, J, and Cs, Tc99, the so-called corrosion nuclides Mn54, Fe59, co-isotopes and Zn65, and isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm were regarded as important for a possible radiation exposition. Recent investigations revealed that also the natural radionuclides Ra226, Po210, and Pb210 should be covered by the investigations. The goal of this status report is to present the level of knowledge on the transfer of these radionuclides to man in a brief form, giving hints at the most important literature. It was requested by the Federal Ministry of the Interior, as fas as possible, to indicate transfer factors which are necessary for the radio-occology act to be decreed according to Para. 45 of the radiation protection act. Another goal of the report was to show the gap in the knowledge on the radio nuclide transfer. This was thought to help to create a basis for the decisions of the Federal Ministry concerning the support of other investigation projects in the field of transfer of radionuclides. (orig./MG)

  1. Interactions of radionuclides in water, particulates, and oysters in the discharge canal of a nuclear power plant. [Humboldt Bay reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, F.L.; Wong, K.M.; Heft, R.E.

    1976-08-19

    This study was designed to provide data for dynamic modeling of radioactive pollutants in marine ecosystems adjacent to nuclear power plants. The data are relevant to the dynamics of radionuclide transfer among seawater, suspended particulates, sediments, and biota. Gamma-emitting radionuclides (/sup 54/Mn, /sup 60/Co, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 137/Cs) were followed in the water and particulates, as well as in oysters introduced into the discharge canal of the boiling water reactor of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant near Eureka, California. The liquid waste was introduced into the canal at irregular intervals and contained radionuclides at extremely low but variable concentrations. Radionuclides were determined in the oysters, water, and particulates after single releases (over about 6 hr) and over a long series of releases (18 months).

  2. Targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy of functionally critically located gliomas with 213Bi-DOTA-[Thi8,Met(O2)11]-substance P: a pilot trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionally critically located gliomas represent a challenging subgroup of intrinsic brain neoplasms. Standard therapeutic recommendations often cannot be applied, because radical treatment and preservation of neurological function are contrary goals. The successful targeting of gliomas with locally injected beta radiation-emitting 90Y-DOTAGA-substance P has been shown previously. However, in critically located tumours, the mean tissue range of 5 mm of 90Y may seriously damage adjacent brain areas. In contrast, the alpha radiation-emitting radionuclide 213Bi with a mean tissue range of 81 μm may have a more favourable toxicity profile. Therefore, we evaluated locally injected 213Bi-DOTA-substance P in patients with critically located gliomas as the primary therapeutic modality. In a pilot study, we included five patients with critically located gliomas (WHO grades II-IV). After diagnosis by biopsy, 213Bi-DOTA-substance P was locally injected, followed by serial SPECT/CT and MR imaging and blood sampling. Besides feasibility and toxicity, the functional outcome was evaluated. Targeted radiopeptide therapy using 213Bi-DOTA-substance P was feasible and tolerated without additional neurological deficit. No local or systemic toxicity was observed. 213Bi-DOTA-substance P showed high retention at the target site. MR imaging was suggestive of radiation-induced necrosis and demarcation of the tumours, which was validated by subsequent resection. This study provides proof of concept that targeted local radiotherapy using 213Bi-DOTA-substance P is feasible and may represent an innovative and effective treatment for critically located gliomas. Primarily non-operable gliomas may become resectable with this treatment, thereby possibly improving the prognosis. (orig.)

  3. Determination of natural radionuclides in lichen samples of Carnoparmelia Texana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichen plays an important role in studies of environmental pollution. It can be used for the evaluation of air contaminants, including heavy metals and radionuclides. The main objective of this study is to verify the possibility of using the lichen species Canoparmelia Texana for the assessment of natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series in air in the vicinity of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) installations. IPEN has as major activity to perform research in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, and therefore deals with natural radionuclides of the U and Th series. The content of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 210Po and 232Th in lichen samples were determined by alpha spectrometry after a radiochemical separation. Ra isotopes and 210Pb were determined by gross alpha and beta counting after a radiochemical separation and measurement on a low background gas flow proportional detector. The results obtained for 238U varied from 2.4 ± 0.4 Bq kg-1 to 6.6 ± 0.1 Bq kg-1 and from 4.4 ± 0.3 Bq kg-1 to 12.1 ± 2.6 Bq kg-1, for 232Th. For 226Ra varied from 13 ± 1 Bq kg-1 to 38 ± 2 Bq kg-1 and from 200 ± 13 Bq kg-1 to 351 ± 12 Bqkg-1 for 228Ra. The results obtained were compared with data obtained for the same radionuclides in lichen samples in an area affected by TENORM industry and can be considered as background for this lichen species. It can be concluded that the control of atmospheric discharges of IPEN facilities has been effective along the years, giving no evidence of radiological environmental impact. (author)

  4. NEXT, a HPGXe TPC for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    CERN Document Server

    Granena, F; Nova, F; Rico, J; Sánchez, F; Nygren, D R; Barata, J A S; Borges, F I G M; Conde, C A N; Dias, T H V T; Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Lopes, J A M; Monteiro, C M B; Santos, J M F dos; Santos, F P; Tavora, L M N; Veloso, J F C A; Calvo, E; Gil-Botella, I; Novella, P; Palomares, C; Verdugo, A; Giomataris, Yu; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Hernando-Morata, J A; Martínez, D; Cid, X; Ball, M; Carcel, S; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Díaz, J; Gil, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Martín-Albo, J; Monrabal, F; Munoz-Vidal, J; Serra, L; Sorel, M; Yahlali, N; Bosch, R Esteve; Lerche, C W; Martinez, J D; Mora, F J; Sebastiá, A; Tarazona, A; Toledo, J F; Lazaro, M; Perez, J L; Ripoll, L; Carmona, J M; Cebrián, S; Dafni, T; Galan, J; Gomez, H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Luzón, G; Morales, J; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Tomas, A; Villar, J A

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel detection concept for neutrinoless double-beta decay searches. This concept is based on a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) filled with high-pressure gaseous xenon, and with separated-function capabilities for calorimetry and tracking. Thanks to its excellent energy resolution, together with its powerful background rejection provided by the distinct double-beta decay topological signature, the design discussed in this Letter Of Intent promises to be competitive and possibly out-perform existing proposals for next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We discuss the detection principles, design specifications, physics potential and R&D plans to construct a detector with 100 kg fiducial mass in the double-beta decay emitting isotope Xe(136), to be installed in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory.

  5. Koedam {beta} factors revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J.E. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doughty, D.A. [Perkin-Elmer Optoelectronics, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Lister, G.G. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., Beverly, MA (United States)

    2002-07-21

    A Koedam {beta} factor makes it possible to compute the total output power in line radiation from a positive column discharge using a single radiance measurement normal to an aperture in the wall. The results of analytic derivations of {beta} factors are presented for columns with uniform ({beta}=1.0) and parabolic ({beta}=0.75) excitation rates per unit volume and with negligible opacity. A Monte Carlo code for simulating radiation trapping with a spatially uniform density of absorbing atoms is then used to determine {beta} factors as a function of opacity. The code includes partial frequency redistribution and a Voigt line shape with radiative broadening, resonance collisional broadening, and Doppler broadening. The resulting {beta} factors are found to be nearly independent of opacity over a wide range of column radii for spectral line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening or by resonance collisional broadening. Additional Monte Carlo simulations are used to study {beta} factors as a function of a non-uniform density of absorbing atoms from radial cataphoresis with line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening, foreign gas broadening, and resonance collisional broadening. Radial cataphoresis is found to increase {beta} factors in all cases. Geometrical effects, refraction, and imperfect transmission at the glass wall are studied and found to decrease {beta} factors. (author)

  6. Radionuclide accumulation and dose burden in small mammals in Chernobyl zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By results of complex research in the Chernobyl zone, peculiarities of radionuclide accumulation in small mammal organisms have been studied and radiation doses have been assessed. It is shown, that radionuclide intake is defined by trophic specialization of the animals, and how that depends on season and local changes of the animals diet. A detailed description of 90Sr and 137Cs distribution in organism of bank vole has been presented. Radiation dose burden has been assessed for 4 small mammal species, and for conditions of the last 7 years. As a rule, the major contributor into total dose - external beta irradiation, some less - external gamma irradiation. Internal dose depends on species radionuclide accumulation and it is mainly determined by 90Sr, with the exception of the bank vole, for which an internal irradiation is more important than external, due to extremely high 137Cs accumulation. (author)

  7. Organic Light-Emitting Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Karg, Siegfried; Rost-Bietsch, Constance; Riess, Walter; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Murgia, Mauro; Muccini, Michele

    2005-01-01

    A light-emitting OFET with pronounced ambipolar current characteristic has been prepared by co-evaporation of α-quinquethiophene (α-5T) as hole-transport material and ditridecyl-perylene-tetracarboxylic diimide (P13) as electron-transport material. The light intensity is controlled by both the drain-source voltage VDS and the gate voltage VG. Here, we demonstrate the general concept of adjusting electron and hole mobilities by co-evaporation of two different organic semiconductors.

  8. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide 90Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca2+ thereby taking advantage of Ca2+ transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a 90Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, 90Sr uptake and accumulation of root and frond have been implemented

  9. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, Arne [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide {sup 90}Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca{sup 2+} thereby taking advantage of Ca{sup 2+} transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a {sup 90}Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation of root and

  10. A comparison of intravascular source designs based on the beta particle emitter 114mIn/114In Line source versus stepping source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) sources of the next generation will have to meet high demands in terms of miniaturization, flexibility, safety, reliability, costs and versatility. The radionuclide pair 114mIn/114In (half-life 49.51 days, maximum beta energy 2.0 MeV, average beta energy 0.78 MeV) is an attractive beta emitter for application in such a source. Methods: Since metallic indium is unfit for the manufacture of a brachytherapy source, the feasibility, safety and dosimetric properties of a design concept comprising a linear array of ceramic In2O3 spheres within a thin-walled, superelastic Ni/Ti capsule are investigated. Results: Neutron activation of enriched In2O3 spheres yields a specific activity sufficiently high for the manufacture of a stepping source, keeping treatment times limited to a few minutes. Although 114mIn/114In also emits some gamma radiation, the effective doses received by members of the medical staff are an order of magnitude lower than those received from fluoroscopy. The dose distributions about a 40-mm line source and a 5-mm stepping source (outer diameter 0.36 mm) are calculated using MCNP4C. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are calculated for the line source (centered and noncentered) and the stepping source (centered) using the geometry of a human coronary artery. Conclusion: The results show that a centered stepping source with optimized dwell times delivers the most homogenous dose within the target volume

  11. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Final progress report, 1994--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research focused on the following major tasks: improved dosimetric models of the head and brain; development of improved skeletal dosimetry models; development of dosimetric techniques for nonuniform activity distributions; pediatric dosimetry phantoms and radionuclide S values; microdosimetry of beta emitters in radioimmunotherapy; and mechanisms of molecular radiation damage.

  12. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Final progress report, 1994 -1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research focused on the following major tasks: improved dosimetric models of the head and brain; development of improved skeletal dosimetry models; development of dosimetric techniques for nonuniform activity distributions; pediatric dosimetry phantoms and radionuclide S values; microdosimetry of beta emitters in radioimmunotherapy; and mechanisms of molecular radiation damage

  13. Radionuclide techniques in criminology. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted aimed at testing the possible use of beta radiography for the study of the structures of normal types of paper, banknotes and hand-made paper for graphic art. A large-area 14C beta emitter in the form of radioactive polymethyl methacrylate was used. In paper, the structure could be studied up to 18 mg/cm2 in weight. Examples are shown of the radiograms of paper, a polyethylene film, banknotes and a coloured engraving. In banknotes, the watermark appeared clearly and the fine print lines could be seen. In graphics, beta radiography allows the determination of the dimensions of mesh sieve in the hand-made paper manufacture. Also shown were clusters of binders strongly absorbing beta radiation. In coloured graphics different absorption capacity of the individual pigments could be observed. Comparing the colouring of a graphic and the degree of absorption radiographically detected, the type of pigments used can be estimated. The results show that beta radiography may be used as an expertise method in criminology and graphic studies. (J.P.)

  14. Double beta decay experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Barabash, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  15. Negative Beta Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Kohda, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A new class of analog-digital (A/D), digital-analog (D/A) converters as an alternative to conventional ones, called $\\beta$-encoder, has been shown to have exponential accuracy in the bit rates while possessing self-correction property for fluctuations of amplifier factor $\\beta$ and quantizer threshold $\

  16. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for...

  17. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestr, Christopher J. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; E-mail: palestro@lij.edu; Love, Charito [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2007-09-15

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  18. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  19. Choice of radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innumerable questions need to be answered and obstacles overcome before radioimmunotherapy can be generally successful in cancer patients. Major developments have greatly enhanced the likelihood of success. The important development of appropriate radionuclides and radiochemistry for this therapy must be intimately linked with the biological and biochemical realities. All aspects must be considered, such as the specific nature of the antigenic target, the pharmacokinetics of the antibody fragment carrier, the capability of in vivo quantitation of tumor uptake and turnover time, as well as total body kinetics. With this knowledge, then, practical radiochemistry methods can be integrated with the suitable radionuclide choices, and production methods can be developed which will deliver effective and dependable products for patient therapy

  20. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  1. Mineralisation and biomineralisation of radionuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Brookshaw, Diana Roumenova

    2013-01-01

    Management of contamination from industrial activities and wastes from nuclear power generation and weapons development are arguably amongst the greatest challenges facing humanity currently and into the future. Understanding the mobility of toxic radioactive elements is essential for successful remediation strategies and safe management of our nuclear waste legacy (DEFRA, 2008). Interactions between minerals and radionuclides, such as sorption and precipitation, govern the mobility of the co...

  2. Radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instantaneous liberation of radionuclides in the atmosphere is studied in three dimensions, according to the formalism of the diffusion theory. The analytical solution, expose to gravitational and an atmospherical effects, is combined with the discretization of space and time in the calculation of levels of exposure. A typical inventory (for a PWR) was considered in the calculation of immersion doses, and the results permitted a comparative analysis among the different existing models. (Author)

  3. Accelerator-derived radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the research, development and commercialization of accelerator produced generator systems intended for life science applications is reviewed. The generator technology reported since 1983 is stressed with emphasis on loading the generator, the selection, and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter and the breakthrough of the radionuclidic parent. Quality control considerations and the automated delivery of the eluent for human use are mentioned. 121 references are cited. (orig.)

  4. Radionuclide 252Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of radionuclide neutron sourses of 252Cf base with the activity from 106 to 109 n/s have been investigated. Energetic distributions of neutrons and gamma-radiation have been presented. The results obtained have been compared with other data available. The hardness parameter of the neutron spectrum for the energy range from 3 to 15 MeV is 1.4 +- 0.02 MeV

  5. The separation of radionuclide migration by solution and particle transport in LLRW repository buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory-scale lysimeter experiments were performed with simulated waste forms placed in candidate buffer materials which have been chosen for a low-level radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide releases into the effluent water and radionuclide capture by the buffer material were determined. The results could not be explained by traditional solution transport mechanisms, and transport by particles released from the waste form and/or transport by buffer particles were suspected as the dominant mechanism for radionuclide release from the lysimeters. To elucidate the relative contribution of particle and solution transport, the waste forms were replaced by a wafer of neutron-activated buffer soaked with selected soluble isotopes. Particle transport was determined by the movement of gamma-emitting neutron-activation products through the lysimeter. Solution transport was quantified by comparing the migration of soluble radionuclides relative to the transport of neutron activation products. The new approach for monitoring radionuclide migration in soil is presented. It facilitates the determination of most of the fundamental coefficients required to model the transport process

  6. Empirical formula for two neutrino double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double beta (2β) decay is a rare nuclear weak process in which two neutrons in the nucleus are converted into two protons, and two electrons and two electron antineutrinos are emitted. The process can be thought as a sum of 2β decays. For the double beta decay to be possible, the final nucleus must have a larger binding energy than the original nucleus. The present work aims to develop an empirical formula for computing two neutrino 2β decay half-lives

  7. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs

  8. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  9. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored

  10. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  11. Time reversal in polarized neutron decay: the emiT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, G L; Anaya, J M; Bowles, T J; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dewey, M S; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; García, A; Greene, G L; Hwang, S R; Lising, L J; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Robertson, R G H; Steiger, T D; Teasdale, W A; Thompson, A K; Wasserman, E G; Wietfeldt, F E; Wilkerson, J F

    2000-01-01

    The standard electro-weak model predicts negligible violation of time-reversal invariance in light quark processes. We report on an experimental test of time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons as a search for physics beyond the standard model. The emiT collaboration has measured the time-reversal-violating triple-correlation in neutron beta decay between the neutron spin, electron momentum, and neutrino momentum often referred to as the D coefficient. The first run of the experiment produced 14 million events which are currently being analyzed. However, a second run with improved detectors should provide greater statistical precision and reduced systematic uncertainties.

  12. Time reversal in polarized neutron decay: the emiT experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard electro-weak model predicts negligible violation of time-reversal invariance in light quark processes. We report on an experimental test of time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons as a search for physics beyond the standard model. The emiT collaboration has measured the time-reversal-violating triple-correlation in neutron beta decay between the neutron spin, electron momentum, and neutrino momentum often referred to as the D coefficient. The first run of the experiment produced 14 million events which are currently being analyzed. However, a second run with improved detectors should provide greater statistical precision and reduced systematic uncertainties

  13. Environmental methodology. Sampling and preparing fresh water organisms. Measuring of emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides some initial responses to questions asked by users of radioecological documents. By using aquatic plants and fish drawn ''in situ'' the authors' results often reveal very low activity levels; they make a point of knowing how to deal with such levels, since the fundamental objective is to interpret transfer mechanisms. The establishment of the environmental level of radioactivity requires that the write-ups produced demonstrate the use of reproducible methods, and contain results for which the extent of reliability is clearly specified. Aquatic plants and fish are, among all fresh water organisms, the most interesting links in the study of artificial and natural radioactivity. By systematically using concrete examples, this work reaffirms the precautions that should be taken in a site study. Once the objective is clearly defined, the properties to give to the sampling can be specified

  14. In vivo measurement of radionuclides emitting low-energy gamma or X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical problems associated with the measurement of low-energy radiation in the human body are highlighted. Attention is mainly paid to the detectors and to the calibration with phantoms. The whole body counter in Prague, equipped with special detectors for low energy photons, is described. (P.A.)

  15. Pore-filled scintillating membranes for simultaneous alpha-emitting radionuclides preconcentration and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pore-filled membranes with scintillating properties have been synthesized by in-situ UV grafting of monomer Bis (2- (methacryloxy)ethyl) phosphate in pores of the microporous host membranes. The polymerization has been carried in presence of scintillating molecules, 2,5-diphenyloxazole, which are physically trapped in the polymer matrix. The membranes have been prepared with two host materials, poly (propylene) and poly (ethersulfone). Much higher scintillation efficiency has been obtained for PES based grafted membranes owing to its aromatic backbone. The scintillation response of PES based membranes have been found to be linear over the range of 241Am activity studied. The membranes have been found to be stable and reusable. (author)

  16. Radiotherapy Based On α Emitting Radionuclides: Geant4 For Dosimetry And Micro-/Nano-Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible physics approaches to evaluate the efficacy of TAT are dosimetry, microdosimetry and nanodosimetry. Dosimetry is adequate when mean absorbed dose to a macroscopic target volume is important to understand the biological effect of radiation. General purpose Monte Carlo (MC) codes, based on condensed history approach, are a very useful, cost effective tool to solve dosimetric problems. The condensed history approach is based on the use of multiple scattering theories to calculate the energy losses and angular changes in the direction of the particle. The short α particle range and high LET make the microdosimetric approach more suitable than dosimetry to study TAT from first physics principles, as this approach takes into account the stochastic nature of energy deposition at cellular level

  17. Radiochemical and radioecological studies of natural and artificial alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranium elements, including uranium and thorium, were analyzed in both marine and terrestrial samples. Vertical profiles of 239+240Pu, 241Am, 230Th, and 238U, in the Pacific, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic, measured by different investigators, were compared. Uptake of the fallout isotopes 241Pu, 240+239Pu, 238Pu, and 241Am in the lichen - reindeer food chain was studied. Americium and thorium exhibited similar biophysical behavior in the environment and in the water column, although the settling velocity for thorium was somewhat higher. Plutonium showed similar distribution in the water columns in different waters. The fraction of ingested plutonium which was retained in the body of reindeer was in good agreement with the value of 3 x 10-5 predicted for man. Uranium showed a constant concentration in the water column, with a low affinity to particles in the water. The high concentration of uranium in reindeer tissues depended on high intake from drinking water and foodstuffs other than lichens

  18. The use of the Cerenkov effect in the counting of β- and γ- emitting radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelsema, W.J.; Ligny, C.L. de; Luten, J.B.; Vossenberg, F.G.A.

    1975-01-01

    In a transparent medium, β-radiation and the electrons which are released, under certain conditions, by the interaction of γ-radiation with the medium cause Cerenkov-radiation. The intensity of this Cerenkov-radiation was measured in water, glycerol and saturated sodium iodide solution in water. The

  19. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecti

  20. Radiolabelling of n- and i-colchicines with positron emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothari, P.J.; Cai, S.; Finn, R.D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Colchicine, a naturally occurring alkaloid and a potent inhibitor of cellular mitosis, is a member of the multi-drug resistance family of drugs. As a potential indicator of multi-drug resistance, the C-10 methoxy group of n-colchicine and C-9 methoxy group of i-colchicine have been radiolabelled. The syntheses of {sup 11}C-labelled n- and i-colchicines have been achieved by allowing desmethyl colchicine to react with {sup 11}C-iodomethane. The isomeric colchicines were purified and isolated by reversed phase HPLC in greater than 90% radiochemical and chemical purity. Using {sup 13}C-iodomethane, {sup 13}C-labelled n- and i-colchicines have also been synthesized for their evaluation at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The restrictions imposed by short half-life of the carbon-11 compound prompted our investigation into the syntheses of fluorine-18 labelled colchicine analogues. The nucleophilic displacement of trifluoromthanesulfonate by {sup 18}F-anion yielded a mixture of {sup 18}F-labelled desmethoxy colchicines. The data suggest that the isolation of fluorine-18 analogue is possible and the compound potentially applicable to multi-drug resistance evaluations.

  1. Investigations into agents for improving cell labeling with positron- and gamma-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was possible to label leukocytes with Co-oxine, but a large proportion of the radioactivity was eluted from the cells upon washing. Ruthenium oxine labeled platelets efficiently in plasma while negligible proportion of radioactivity was eluted from the cells. Three factors influence the labeling efficiency of the cells: duration of the incubation periods; cell concentration; and ACD concentration

  2. Contactless measurement of phase and concentration distributions in bubble columns using positron emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established method for studying metabolic processes in humans and in use as a medical diagnostic procedure (metabolism, blood perfusion, metastasis detection). The present project was dedicated to a nonmedical application of this imaging method, namely to the development and use of a PET tomograph for studying the behaviour of foam in bubble columns on the ''SchaumPET'' test stand. This paper deals in particular with the technical realisation of the project and the image acquisition methods used. The capacity of positron emission tomography to detect the accumulation of a surfactant in a foam layer is demonstrated for the example of sodium capronate

  3. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  4. Radionuclide concentrations in wild waterfowl using the test reactor area radioactive leaching pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterfowl use the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Radioactive Leaching Pond on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site (INEL Site) as a resting area. Daily observations of waterfowl were made to determine species composition and numbers. Eight ducks and one coot were collected from the TRA pond during 1976 and 1977. Seven background samples were also collected. Each bird was dissected and tissue samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides. Duck tissues contained 25 radionuclides. Average and maximum radionuclide concentrations were highest in gut followed by feathers, liver, and muscle, Chromium-51 had the highest concentrations of all radionuclides identified 130,000 pCi/g (4800 Bq/g) in the gut and 37,500 pCi/g (1390 Bq/g) on the feathres). Neodymium-147 had the highest concentration on feathers of any radionuclide (104,000 pCi/g, 3850 Bq/g). Cesium-137 was the predominant radionuclide in muscle with a maximum concentration of 4,070 pCi/g (150 Bq/g). The ducks had lower radionuclide concentrations in the edible tissues than in the non-edible tissues. Potential whole-body and thyroid dose commitments to man consuming contaminated ducks were calculated using muscle concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137, and I-131. Although assumptions used for dose calculations maximized the dose commitment to man, results indicated that consumption of contaminated duck tissue is not a radiation hazard to humans. Even the highest dose commitments were below the limits recommended for individuals of the general population by the Internatioal Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The highest potential dose commitment to man would result from the consumption of an American coot known to have spent 20 days on the TRA pond. The average dose commitment to man would be 20 mrem

  5. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs

  6. Fractionation of radionuclide species in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment may be present in different physico-chemical forms (i.e., radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, degree of complexation, etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time-dependent transformation processes such as mobilisation of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews available fractionation techniques which can be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes

  7. Metabolism of radionuclides in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl has shown that shortly after the contamination of the environment radionuclides can be found in animal products. The main contamination pathways of domestic animas are: uptake of radionuclides by foodstuffs; uptake of radionuclides by contaminated drinking water; uptake of radionuclides by inhalation; uptake of radionuclides through skin; uptake of radionuclides by ingestion of soil particles. Generally the uptake of radionuclides by food is the dominant exposure pathway. In rare cases the inhalation of radionuclides or the uptake by drinking water may be of importance. The metabolism of incorporated radionuclides is comparable to the respective metabolism of essential mass or trace elements or heavy metals. Radioisotopes of essential elements are for instance iron 55, manganese 54, cobalt 58 and cobalt 60. Other elements are typical antagonists to essential elements, e.g. strontium 90 is an antagonist to calcium or cesium 137 to potassium. Lead 210 and plutonium 239 behave similarly as heavy metals. Generally the knowledge of the metabolism of trace and mass elements, of antagonistic and synergistic elements and heavy metals can be applied to these radionuclides

  8. Unusual radionuclide ratios in sediment cores off Sumba Island, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittauerova, Daniela; Fischer, Helmut W. [University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Steinke, Stephan [University of Bremen, MARUM, Leobener Str., D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A study of gamma emitting radionuclides has been performed at a set of sediment cores taken from a marine site in Lombok basin off Sumba Island, Indonesia, at 1290 m water depth. The samples involved core sections from two parallel multi-cores and the top part of the associated gravity core down to 50 cm depth. The mean recent sedimentation rates were estimated based on {sup 210}Pb depth profiles (supported by artificial radionuclides) to be 0.27 ± 0.02 cm.yr{sup -1}. They were found to be comparable to the past sedimentation rates calculated from of 39 AMS{sup 14}C dates of mixed planktonic foraminifera. These ages covering the last 6000 years provided sedimentation rates between 0.11 and 0.35 cm.yr{sup -1}. Very high {sup 210}Pbxs inventory of (28.7 ± 1.2).103 Bq.m{sup -2} together with high sedimentation rates suggest existence of focusing processes at the studied site. The inventories of both radionuclides were determined to be 148 ± 13 Bq.m{sup -2} {sup 241}Am and 55.7 ± 8.5 Bq.m{sup -2} {sup 137}Cs. The expected {sup 137}Cs inventory from global nuclear test fallout (decay corrected to year 2005) would be about 200 Bq.m{sup -2} {sup 137}Cs. The ratios of {sup 241}Am/ {sup 137}Cs were surprisingly high. It is expected that {sup 241}Am is present in the studied sediments as a decay product of its parent isotope {sup 241}Pu, rather than being deposited in-situ. Further investigation of the artificial radionuclides including Pu isotopes in the sediments will be conducted by means of AMS and alpha spectrometry. The results could contribute to understanding the meanwhile unclear radionuclides' sources (global fallout vs. regional contribution from Pacific proving grounds fallout as a result of transport through the Indonesian through-flow) and the processes leading to their accumulation. (authors)

  9. Natural radionuclides as dirt tracers in sugar cane consignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil is usually carried out to the mills, as an impurity in sugar cane, leading to economic drawbacks for the industry. The quantification of this dirt is important to identify its causes and for routine quality control. Several methods have been used for this purpose, however, no single one has been pointed out as an industrial standard. The use of a γ-ray emitting radionuclide of natural occurence was investigated and, after several soil and cane radioactivity analyses, 212Pb was chosen as the best tracer. Calibration curves developed with the addition of soil in clean cane, from 0 to 10% (dry mass), demonstrated the linearity of the method. Analyses of eleven samples taken from consignments showed that the procedure was consistent and reliable when compared to the traditional ash method. (author)

  10. Determination of scaling factors to estimate the radionuclide inventory of wastes from the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations for transfer and final disposal of radioactive waste require that the inventory of radionuclides for each package enclosing such waste must be estimated and declared. In this work, the scaling factor methodology was applied successfully to estimate the inventory of radionuclides in spent ion-exchange resins and spent activated charcoal, both with low and intermediate-activity level, from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. Scaling factors or correlation functions were obtained linking the activity concentrations of 15 difficult to measure nuclides with two gamma-rays emitting key nuclides, reducing exposure to ionizing radiation, contamination risks and operational costs. (author)

  11. Rapid determination of gross alpha/beta activity in milk using liquid scintilation counter technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sas Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid determination of gross alpha and beta emitters in milk by liquid scintillation counter is discussed. This method is based on direct addition of different types of milk into scintillation cocktail and therefore it is very promising for fast determination of alpha/beta activity due to direct alpha and beta separation, measurement in close 4p geometry and without sample treatment. The selected group of radionuclides was chosen with the respect to military significance, radio-toxicity, and possibility of potential misuse. As model radionuclides 241Am, 239Pu, and 90Sr were selected. The Liquid Scintilation Counter Hidex 300 SL equipped with triple-double-coincidence-ratio technique was used for sample measurement. The aim of the work was focused on comparison of different cocktails produced by Hidex and Perkin Elmer, choosing the best cocktail based on our measurement results and adjustment of its appropriate volume. Furthermore, the optimization of ratio between the volume of scintillation cocktail and the volume of urine was investigated with the respect to the model radionuclides. According to the obtained results, the efficiency for alpha emitters was greater than 85% and for beta, greater than 95%. The obtained results allowed this method to be used for rapid determination of gross alpha/beta activity in cases where time is an essence, such as first responders or mass-scale samples, where ordinary means suffer from lack of capacity or simply collapse under the onslaught.

  12. Radiolabelled somatostatin analogues for radionuclide therapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging and therapy are rapidly developing and will become important topics in medicine in the 21st century. Radiolabelled peptides that bind to receptors form an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The specific receptor binding property of the peptide can be exploited by labelling with radionuclide and using the radiolabelled peptide as a vehicle to guide the radioactivity to tumours expressing a particular receptor. The high affinity of the peptide for the peptide-receptor complex facilitates high uptake of the radiolabel in receptor expressing tumours, while its relatively small size facilitates rapid clearance from blood, resulting in low background radioactivity. The use of radiolabelled peptides is growing rapidly due to these favourable characteristics, their low antigenicity and ease of production. Receptor binding peptides labelled with gamma radiation emitters or positron emitters enable non-evasive, whole body visualization. This process is referred to as peptide receptor scintigraphy and is being used to detect, stage and plan the therapy of receptor expressing tumours and also to follow tumours after therapy. In addition, labelled with a therapeutic beta emitter these peptide molecules have the potential to destroy receptor expressing tumours, an approach referred to as peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To date, five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst1-sst5) have been identified and cloned. The diagnostic accuracy of 111In labelled octreotide to visualize tumour lesions after intravenous injection has been determined in a large series of patients with sst2 positive, mostly neuroendocrine tumours. Most interesting is the successful application of somatostatin analogues in PET, after labelling with positron emitters. The next logical step was to try to label these with therapeutic radionuclides and to treat receptor positive tumors with peptide receptor radionuclides. So far, 90Y and 177Lu are

  13. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  15. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  16. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  17. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  18. Radionuclides in the study of marine processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the radioactive properties of the naturally occurring radionuclides have been used to determine their distributions in the marine environment and, more generally, to gain an understanding of the dynamic processes which control their behaviour in attaining these distributions. More recently the inputs from human activities of both natural and artificial (i.e. man-made) radionuclides have provided additional opportunities for the study of marine processes on local, regional and global scales. The primary objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the insights concerning processes in the marine environment which can be gained from studies of radionuclide behaviour. Papers have been grouped within the following principal themes; the uses of radionuclides as tracers of water transport; scavenging and particulate transport processes in the oceans as deduced from radionuclide behaviour; processes in the seabed and radionuclides in biological systems. (Author)

  19. 10. Radionuclides in galenical pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are discussed of studying resorption of drugs (tablets, coated tablets, pills, suppositories, ointments) in the organism using radioactive tracers 24NaCl, Na131I. The resorption and penetration are discussed of salts dissolved in medicinal baths. Techniques are described using beta scattering for studying stability of heterogeneous systems (suspensions, emulsions, powders) used in the preparation of drugs. (H.S.)

  20. Production of radionuclides with generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The radionuclide generator provides a convenient means for researchers and clinicians to obtain a source of radionuclides without dependence on nuclear facilities (nuclear reactor or cyclotron). It should be noted that radionuclide generator technique yields products of very high purity and it offers moreover the only possible way of obtaining very short-lived radionuclides for practical applications. Therefore at present radionuclide generators have found important uses in nuclear medicine. This talk reviews the development of preparation methods for radionuclide generators of current interest: 99Mo-99mTc, 188W-188Re and 68Ge-68Ga. 99Mo-99mTc generator. 99mTc is presently the most widely used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The reason for such a preeminent position of 99mTc in clinical uses is its extremely favorable nuclear properties with γ-energy of 140 keV and short half-life of 6 hours. Chromatographic generator of 99Mo-99mTc based on aluminium oxide using as eluent of isotonic saline solution, containing nitrate-ions has been produced in INP AS RU. However, the main disadvantage of this generator is that the eluent-saline solution contains some amount of nitrate-ions. Nitrate-ions added to maximize and stabilize 99mTc yields would interfere with the chemical reactions which involve Sn(II) reduction of the pertechnetate ion and which are used subsequently in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore we proposed the new method for preliminary treatment of aluminium oxide by the external gamma (Co-60) irradiation. It is found that the aluminium oxide has got electron-acceptor properties after gamma-irradiation. Adsorption of 99Mo radionuclide as isopolymolybdate on gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide is very high and molybdenum is firmly retained. Adsorption capacity of gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide at pH 2-4 is 60-80 mg Mo per gram of Al2O3. The yields of 99mTc from experimental generators remained high (75-85%) independently